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Sample records for non-linear feedback control

  1. Optimal feedback control of strongly non-linear systems excited by bounded noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. Q.; Huang, Z. L.; Ko, J. M.; Ni, Y. Q.

    2004-07-01

    A strategy for non-linear stochastic optimal control of strongly non-linear systems subject to external and/or parametric excitations of bounded noise is proposed. A stochastic averaging procedure for strongly non-linear systems under external and/or parametric excitations of bounded noise is first developed. Then, the dynamical programming equation for non-linear stochastic optimal control of the system is derived from the averaged Itô equations by using the stochastic dynamical programming principle and solved to yield the optimal control law. The Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation associated with the fully completed averaged Itô equations is solved to give the response of optimally controlled system. The application and effectiveness of the proposed control strategy are illustrated with the control of cable vibration in cable-stayed bridges and the feedback stabilization of the cable under parametric excitation of bounded noise.

  2. Non-linear feedback control of the p53 protein-mdm2 inhibitor system using the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2016-06-01

    It is proven that the model of the p53-mdm2 protein synthesis loop is a differentially flat one and using a diffeomorphism (change of state variables) that is proposed by differential flatness theory it is shown that the protein synthesis model can be transformed into the canonical (Brunovsky) form. This enables the design of a feedback control law that maintains the concentration of the p53 protein at the desirable levels. To estimate the non-measurable elements of the state vector describing the p53-mdm2 system dynamics, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is used. Moreover, to compensate for modelling uncertainties and external disturbances that affect the p53-mdm2 system, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is re-designed as a disturbance observer. The derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter consists of the Kalman filter recursion applied on the linearised equivalent of the protein synthesis model together with an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory that enables to retrieve estimates for the state variables of the initial non-linear model. The proposed non-linear feedback control and perturbations compensation method for the p53-mdm2 system can result in more efficient chemotherapy schemes where the infusion of medication will be better administered. PMID:27187988

  3. Overall non-linear correction of phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system based on displacement feedback control combined with fuzzy PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningfang; Luo, Xinkai; Li, Huipeng; Li, Jiao

    2015-10-01

    The non-linearity of the phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system can seriously affect the measuring accuracy of the system. In this paper, the correcting method is to combine the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology. Displacement feedback control mechanism and fuzzy PID controller are designed and then try to figure it out through Matlab simulation and experiment.. The result shows that combining the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology can fulfill decent overall non-linear correction in the white light interferometry measuring system. Meanwhile, the accuracy of the correction is high and the non-linearity drop from 2% to 0.1%.

  4. Output feedback non-linear decoupled control synthesis and observer design for manoeuvring aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. N.; Schy, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the applicability of nonlinear decoupling theory to the design of control systems using output feedback for maneuvering aircraft is presented. The response variables chosen for decoupled control were angular velocity components along roll, pitch, and yaw axes, angle of attack (p), and angle of sideslip, using aileron, rudder, and elevator controls. An observer design for a class of nonlinear systems was presented and this method was used to estimate angle of attack and sideslip; an approximate observer was obtained by neglecting derivatives of p and aileron deflection angles and it was used in a simulation study. A simulation study showed that precise rapid combined lateral and longitudinal maneuvers can be performed; it was also demonstrated that a bank-angle-command outer loop could be designed for precise bank angles changes and simultaneous large lift maneuvers.

  5. Passive dynamic controllers for non-linear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Wu, Shih-Chin; Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to develop active model-independent controllers for slewing and vibration control of nonlinear multibody flexible systems, including flexible robots. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: passive stabilization; work-energy rate principle; Liapunov theory; displacement feedback; dynamic controller; displacement and acceleration feedback; velocity feedback; displacement feedback; physical interaction; a 6-DOF robot; and simulation results.

  6. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  7. A non-linear UAV altitude PSO-PD control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Calogero

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a nonlinear model based approach is presented for the altitude stabilization of a hexarotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The mathematical model and control of the hexacopter airframe is presented. To stabilize the system along the vertical direction, a Proportional Derivative (PD) control is taken into account. A particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach is used in this paper to select the optimal parameters of the control algorithm taking into account different objective functions. Simulation sets are performed to carry out the results for the non-linear system to show how the PSO tuned PD controller leads to zero the error of the position along Z earth direction.

  8. The amazing evolutionary dynamics of non-linear optical systems with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavsky, Leonid

    2013-09-01

    Optical systems with feedback are, generally, non-linear dynamic systems. As such, they exhibit evolutionary behavior. In the paper we present results of experimental investigation of evolutionary dynamics of several models of such systems. The models are modifications of the famous mathematical "Game of Life". The modifications are two-fold: "Game of Life" rules are made stochastic and mutual influence of cells is made spatially non-uniform. A number of new phenomena in the evolutionary dynamics of the models are revealed: - "Ordering of chaos". Formation, from seed patterns, of stable maze-like patterns with chaotic "dislocations" that resemble natural patterns, such as skin patterns of some animals and fishes, see shell, fingerprints, magnetic domain patterns and alike, which one can frequently find in the nature. These patterns and their fragments exhibit a remarkable capability of unlimited growth. - "Self-controlled growth" of chaotic "live" formations into "communities" bounded, depending on the model, by a square, hexagon or octagon, until they reach a certain critical size, after which the growth stops. - "Eternal life in a bounded space" of "communities" after reaching a certain size and shape. - "Coherent shrinkage" of "mature", after reaching a certain size, "communities" into one of stable or oscillating patterns preserving in this process isomorphism of their bounding shapes until the very end.

  9. Limit cycle oscillation of missile control fin with structural non-linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, J. S.; Lee, I.

    2004-01-01

    Non-linear aeroelastic characteristics of a deployable missile control fin with structural non-linearity are investigated. A deployable missile control fin is modelled as a two-dimensional typical section model. Doublet-point method is used for the calculation of supersonic unsteady aerodynamic forces, and aerodynamic forces are approximated by using the minimum-state approximation. For non-linear flutter analysis structural non-linearity is represented by an asymmetric bilinear spring and is linearized by using the describing function method. The linear and non-linear flutter analyses indicate that the flutter characteristics are significantly dependent on the frequency ratio. From the non-linear flutter analysis, various types of limit cycle oscillations are observed in a wide range of air speeds below or above the linear divergent flutter boundary. The non-linear flutter characteristics and the non-linear aeroelastic responses are investigated.

  10. Adaptive iterative learning control for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with input saturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruikun; Hou, Zhongsheng; Ji, Honghai; Yin, Chenkun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive iterative learning control scheme is proposed for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with unknown time-varying parameters and input saturations. By incorporating a saturation function, a new iterative learning control mechanism is presented which includes a feedback term and a parameter updating term. Through the use of parameter separation technique, the non-linear parameters are separated from the non-linear function and then a saturated difference updating law is designed in iteration domain by combining the unknown parametric term of the local Lipschitz continuous function and the unknown time-varying gain into an unknown time-varying function. The analysis of convergence is based on a time-weighted Lyapunov-Krasovskii-like composite energy function which consists of time-weighted input, state and parameter estimation information. The proposed learning control mechanism warrants a L2[0, T] convergence of the tracking error sequence along the iteration axis. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the adaptive iterative learning control scheme.

  11. An accurate halo model for fitting non-linear cosmological power spectra and baryonic feedback models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Heymans, C.; Joudaki, S.; Heavens, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present an optimized variant of the halo model, designed to produce accurate matter power spectra well into the non-linear regime for a wide range of cosmological models. To do this, we introduce physically motivated free parameters into the halo-model formalism and fit these to data from high-resolution N-body simulations. For a variety of Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and wCDM models, the halo-model power is accurate to ≃ 5 per cent for k ≤ 10h Mpc-1 and z ≤ 2. An advantage of our new halo model is that it can be adapted to account for the effects of baryonic feedback on the power spectrum. We demonstrate this by fitting the halo model to power spectra from the OWLS (OverWhelmingly Large Simulations) hydrodynamical simulation suite via parameters that govern halo internal structure. We are able to fit all feedback models investigated at the 5 per cent level using only two free parameters, and we place limits on the range of these halo parameters for feedback models investigated by the OWLS simulations. Accurate predictions to high k are vital for weak-lensing surveys, and these halo parameters could be considered nuisance parameters to marginalize over in future analyses to mitigate uncertainty regarding the details of feedback. Finally, we investigate how lensing observables predicted by our model compare to those from simulations and from HALOFIT for a range of k-cuts and feedback models and quantify the angular scales at which these effects become important. Code to calculate power spectra from the model presented in this paper can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  12. Non-linear modelling and optimal control of a hydraulically actuated seismic isolator test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Stefano; Russo, Riccardo; Strano, Salvatore; Terzo, Mario

    2013-02-01

    This paper investigates the modelling, parameter identification and control of an unidirectional hydraulically actuated seismic isolator test rig. The plant is characterized by non-linearities such as the valve dead zone and frictions. A non-linear model is derived and then employed for parameter identification. The results concerning the model validation are illustrated and they fully confirm the effectiveness of the proposed model. The testing procedure of the isolation systems is based on the definition of a target displacement time history of the sliding table and, consequently, the precision of the table positioning is of primary importance. In order to minimize the test rig tracking error, a suitable control system has to be adopted. The system non-linearities highly limit the performances of the classical linear control and a non-linear one is therefore adopted. The test rig mathematical model is employed for a non-linear control design that minimizes the error between the target table position and the current one. The controller synthesis is made by taking no specimen into account. The proposed approach consists of a non-linear optimal control based on the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE). Numerical simulations have been performed in order to evaluate the soundness of the designed control with and without the specimen under test. The results confirm that the performances of the proposed non-linear controller are not invalidated because of the presence of the specimen.

  13. Non-Linear Dynamics and Chaos Control of a Physical Pendulum with Vibrating and Rotating Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GE, Z.-M.; YANG, C.-H.; CHEN, H.-H.; LEE, S.-C.

    2001-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of a physical pendulum system of which the support is subjected to both rotation and vertical vibration are studied in this paper. Both analytical and computational results are employed to obtain the characteristics of the system. By using Lyapunov's direct method the conditions of stability of the relative equilibrium position can be determined. Melnikov's method is applied to identify the existence of chaotic motion. The incremental harmonic balance method is used to find the stable and unstable periodic solutions for the strong non-linear system. By applying various numerical results such as phase portrait, Pioncaré map, time history and power spectrum analysis, a variety of the periodic solutions and the phenomena of the chaotic motion can be presented. The effects of the changes of parameters in the system could be found in the bifurcation and parametric diagrams. Further, chaotic motion can be verified by using Lyapunov exponent and Lyapunov dimension. The global analysis of basin boundary and fractal structure are observed by the modified interpolated cell mapping method. Besides, non-feedback control, delayed feedback control, adaptive control, and variable structure control are used to control the chaos effectively.

  14. Convergence behaviour and Control in Non-Linear Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Control of genetic regulatory networks is challenging to define and quantify. Previous control centrality metrics, which aim to capture the ability of individual nodes to control the system, have been found to suffer from plausibility and applicability problems. Here we present a new approach to control centrality based on network convergence behaviour, implemented as an extension of our genetic regulatory network simulation framework Jimena ( http://stefan-karl.de/jimena). We distinguish three types of network control, and show how these mathematical concepts correspond to experimentally verified node functions and signalling pathways in immunity and cell differentiation: Total control centrality quantifies the impact of node mutations and identifies potential pharmacological targets such as genes involved in oncogenesis (e.g. zinc finger protein GLI2 or bone morphogenetic proteins in chondrocytes). Dynamic control centrality describes relaying functions as observed in signalling cascades (e.g. src kinase or Jak/Stat pathways). Value control centrality measures the direct influence of the value of the node on the network (e.g. Indian hedgehog as an essential regulator of proliferation in chondrocytes). Surveying random scale-free networks and biological networks, we find that control of the network resides in few high degree driver nodes and networks can be controlled best if they are sparsely connected. PMID:26068060

  15. Non linear predictive control of a LEGO mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabti, H.; Bouchemal, B.; Belarbi, K.; Boucherma, D.; Amouri, A.

    2014-10-01

    Metaheuristics are general purpose heuristics which have shown a great potential for the solution of difficult optimization problems. In this work, we apply the meta heuristic, namely particle swarm optimization, PSO, for the solution of the optimization problem arising in NLMPC. This algorithm is easy to code and may be considered as alternatives for the more classical solution procedures. The PSO- NLMPC is applied to control a mobile robot for the tracking trajectory and obstacles avoidance. Experimental results show the strength of this approach.

  16. Synthesis of a non-linear feedback system with significant plant-ignorance for prescribed time-domain tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, K. R.; Horowitz, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    The problem considered is the design of a feedback system containing a linear, time invariant, minimum phase plant, whose parameters are known only within given bounds, such that the time response of the system remains within specified limits. A quasi-optimal design, for given design constraints, is one which minimizes the effect of white sensor noise on the input to the plant. An investigation was conducted on the use of the non linear device known as the Clegg integrator in the design of such a system. The describing function of the Clegg integrator has the same magnitude characteristic, apart from a scale factor, as the linear integrator, but has 52 deg less phase-lag, at all frequencies, than the linear integrator; thus, when used in a feedback system, it provides a larger stability margin than the linear integrator. This property allows the nonlinear feedback system to be designed so that the sensor noise is attenuated more than in the linear design.

  17. Non-Linear Fuzzy Logic Control for Forced Large Motions of Spinning Shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEI, SHULIANG; PALAZZOLO, ALAN; NA, UHNJOO; KASCAK, ALBERT

    2000-08-01

    A unique control approach is developed for prescribed large motion control using magnetic bearings in a proposed active stall control test rig. A finite element based, flexible shaft is modeled in a closed loop system with PD controllers that generate the control signals to support and to shake the rotor shaft. A linearized force model of the stall rig with 16 magnetic poles (4 opposing C-cores) yields stability and frequency responses. The non-linear model retains the non-linearities in Ampere's law, Faraday's law and the Maxwell stress tensor. A fuzzy logic control system is then designed to show the advantages over the conventional controllers with the fully non-linear model.

  18. A Signal Transmission Technique for Stability Analysis of Multivariable Non-Linear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark; Zimpfer, Doug; Adams, Neil; Lindsey, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the difficulties associated with multivariable, non-linear control systems is the problem of assessing closed-loop stability. Of particular interest is the class of non-linear systems controlled with on/off actuators, such as spacecraft thrusters or electrical relays. With such systems, standard describing function techniques are typically too conservative, and time-domain simulation analysis is prohibitively extensive, This paper presents an open-loop analysis technique for this class of non-linear systems. The technique is centered around an innovative use of multivariable signal transmission theory to quantify the plant response to worst case control commands. The technique has been applied to assess stability of thruster controlled flexible space structures. Examples are provided for Space Shuttle attitude control with attached flexible payloads.

  19. Stabilization and robustness of non-linear unity-feedback system - Factorization approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Kabuli, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    The paper is a self-contained discussion of a right factorization approach in the stability analysis of the nonlinear continuous-time or discrete-time, time-invariant or time-varying, well-posed unity-feedback system S1(P, C). It is shown that a well-posed stable feedback system S1(P, C) implies that P and C have right factorizations. In the case where C is stable, P has a normalized right-coprime factorization. The factorization approach is used in stabilization and simultaneous stabilization results.

  20. Solution algorithms for non-linear singularly perturbed optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability and usefulness of several classical and other methods for solving the two-point boundary-value problem which arises in non-linear singularly perturbed optimal control are assessed. Specific algorithms of the Picard, Newton and averaging types are formally developed for this class of problem. The computational requirements associated with each algorithm are analysed and compared with the computational requirement of the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Approximate solutions to a linear and a non-linear problem are obtained by each method and compared.

  1. Non-linear adaptive sliding mode switching control with average dwell-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Maoqing; Fei, Shumin

    2013-03-01

    In this article, an adaptive integral sliding mode control scheme is addressed for switched non-linear systems in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. The control law includes two parts: a slide mode controller for the reduced model of the plant and a compensation controller to deal with the non-linear systems with parameter uncertainties. The adaptive updated laws have been derived from the switched multiple Lyapunov function method, also an admissible switching signal with average dwell-time technique is given. The simplicity of the proposed control scheme facilitates its implementation and the overall control scheme guarantees the global asymptotic stability in the Lyapunov sense such that the sliding surface of the control system is well reached. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  2. Model predictive control of non-linear systems over networks with data quantization and packet loss.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jimin; Nan, Liangsheng; Tang, Xiaoming; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the approach of model predictive control (MPC) for the non-linear systems under networked environment where both data quantization and packet loss may occur. The non-linear controlled plant in the networked control system (NCS) is represented by a Tagaki-Sugeno (T-S) model. The sensed data and control signal are quantized in both links and described as sector bound uncertainties by applying sector bound approach. Then, the quantized data are transmitted in the communication networks and may suffer from the effect of packet losses, which are modeled as Bernoulli process. A fuzzy predictive controller which guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system is obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26341070

  3. Intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system based on the adaptive neurocontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Kobezhicov, V.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an adaptive neuro-controller for intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system. The formed as the fuzzy selective neural net the adaptive neuro-controller on the base of system's state, creates the effective control signal under random perturbations. The validity and advantages of the proposed adaptive neuro-controller are demonstrated by numerical simulations. The simulation results show that the proposed controller scheme achieves real-time control speed and the competitive performance, as compared to PID, fuzzy logic controllers.

  4. Non-linear controls influence functions in an aircraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Motter, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    In the development and testing of novel structural and controls concepts, such as morphing aircraft wings, appropriate models are needed for proper system characterization. In most instances, available system models do not provide the required additional degrees of freedom for morphing structures but may be modified to some extent to achieve a compatible system. The objective of this study is to apply wind tunnel data collected for an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), that implements trailing edge morphing, to create a non-linear dynamics simulator, using well defined rigid body equations of motion, where the aircraft stability derivatives change with control deflection. An analysis of this wind tunnel data, using data extraction algorithms, was performed to determine the reference aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the aircraft. Further, non-linear influence functions were obtained for each of the aircraft s control surfaces, including the sixteen trailing edge flap segments. These non-linear controls influence functions are applied to the aircraft dynamics to produce deflection-dependent aircraft stability derivatives in a non-linear dynamics simulator. Time domain analysis of the aircraft motion, trajectory, and state histories can be performed using these nonlinear dynamics and may be visualized using a 3-dimensional aircraft model. Linear system models can be extracted to facilitate frequency domain analysis of the system and for control law development. The results of this study are useful in similar projects where trailing edge morphing is employed and will be instrumental in the University of Maryland s continuing study of active wing load control.

  5. Iterated non-linear model predictive control based on tubes and contractive constraints.

    PubMed

    Murillo, M; Sánchez, G; Giovanini, L

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a predictive control algorithm for non-linear systems based on successive linearizations of the non-linear dynamic around a given trajectory. A linear time varying model is obtained and the non-convex constrained optimization problem is transformed into a sequence of locally convex ones. The robustness of the proposed algorithm is addressed adding a convex contractive constraint. To account for linearization errors and to obtain more accurate results an inner iteration loop is added to the algorithm. A simple methodology to obtain an outer bounding-tube for state trajectories is also presented. The convergence of the iterative process and the stability of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in controlling a quadcopter type unmanned aerial vehicle. PMID:26850752

  6. Physiographic controls on thresholds and non-linearity in rainfall-runoff transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    Thresholds are critical points in time or space that eventually express a rapid change in runoff behavior. They have gained increasing attention in recent years. Two types of thresholds are existing: storage and intensity controlled thresholds. Most threshold studies focused on individual catchments which lead to difficulties in identifying the combinations of hydro-climatic and physiographic factors that control catchment thresholds and non-linearities in rainfall-runoff transformations, as well as differences between catchments. The individual influence of the boundary conditions remains poorly understood. Here, we employ a data set from the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). While the climatic conditions are similar throughout the basin, the lithology of individual sub-catchments varies remarkably. We find clean and mixed combinations of distinct geologies: schists, marls, sandstone, dolomite, and limestone. We focus on the role of storage thresholds. The filling of catchment storage plays a critical role on the runoff response and stable isotopes signatures in stream water in the Alzette basin. On seasonal scale the geology leads to distinct non-linearity in the flow duration curve. These changes in the flow duration curve indicate a storage threshold exceedance within a distinct geology that changes streamwater stable isotope behavior. In the catchment with the lowest permeability (e.g. 100% schist), a storage threshold changes the runoff response from a single to a (delayed) double peak hydrograph. On event scale the different geologies control the relation between storage filling and threshold response and the shape of the non-linear relationship between rainfall and runoff. The use of various catchments within the same hydro-climatic region allows a better description of the influence of physiographic properties on thresholds in the rainfall-runoff response. Better understanding of individual influences will further improve our understanding of the

  7. Distributed control of cluster synchronisation in networks with randomly occurring non-linearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Aihua; Cao, Jinde; Hu, Manfeng; Guo, Liuxiao

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the issue of mean square cluster synchronisation in complex networks, which consist of non-identical nodes with randomly occurring non-linearities. In order to guarantee synchronisation, distributed controllers depending on the information from the neighbours in the same cluster are applied to each node, meanwhile, the control gains are supposed to be updated according to the given laws. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, the sufficient synchronisation conditions are derived and proved theoretically. Finally, a numerical example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the results.

  8. Non-linear control of the ''clam'' wave energy device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    A promising wave energy device being currently investigated is the ''clam'' device. The clam extracts energy by pumping air through a specially designed (Wells) turbine. Although operation of the Wells turbine does not require a rectified air flow, some additional control will be necessary to optimize the phase of the clam motion for good efficiencies. An examination of the equation of motion in the time domain suggests the possibility of non-linear phase control by mechanical, power take-off, or pneumatic latching. Latching can be shown to increase the efficiency of the device in the longer wavelengths of the wave spectrum, i.e. those of high incident wave power.

  9. Energy shaping non-linear acceleration control for a pendulum-type mobility and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kazuto; Takahashi, Masaki

    2015-02-01

    A dynamics-based non-linear controller with energy shaping to accelerate a pendulum-type mobility is proposed. The concept of this study is to control translational acceleration of the vehicle in a dynamically reasonable manner. The body angle is controlled to maintain a reference state where the vehicle is statically unstable but dynamically stable, which leads to a constant translational acceleration due to instability of the system. The accelerating motion is like a sprinter moving from crouch start and it fully exploits dynamics of the vehicle. To achieve it, the total energy of the system is shaped to have the minimum at a given reference state and the system is controlled to converge to it. The controller can achieve various properties through the energy shaping procedure. Especially, an energy function that will lead to safe operation of the vehicle is proposed. The effectiveness of the controller is verified in simulations and experiments.

  10. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Trajectory Control in the Vicinity of a Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. This paper discusses the development of a non-linear, station-keeping, control algorithm for trajectories in the vicinity of a libration point. The control law guarantees exponential convergence, based on a Lyaponov analysis. Controller performance is evaluated using FreeFlyer(R) and MATLAB(R) for a spacecraft stationed near the L2 libration point in the Earth-Moon system, tracking a pre-defined reference trajectory. Evaluation metrics are fuel usage and tracking accuracy. Simulation results are compared with a linear-based controller for a spacecraft tracking the same reference trajectory. Although the analysis is framed in the context of station-keeping, the control algorithm is equally applicable to a formation flying problem with an appropriate definition of the reference trajectory.

  11. Linear and non-linear control techniques applied to actively lubricated journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoletti, R.; Santos, I. F.

    2003-03-01

    The main objectives of actively lubricated bearings are the simultaneous reduction of wear and vibration between rotating and stationary machinery parts. For reducing wear and dissipating vibration energy until certain limits, one can use the conventional hydrodynamic lubrication. For further reduction of shaft vibrations one can use the active lubrication action, which is based on injecting pressurized oil into the bearing gap through orifices machined in the bearing sliding surface. The design and efficiency of some linear (PD, PI and PID) and a non-linear controller, applied to a tilting-pad journal bearing, are analysed and discussed. Important conclusions about the application of integral controllers, responsible for changing the rotor-bearing equilibrium position and consequently the "passive" oil film damping coefficients, are achieved. Numerical results show an effective vibration reduction of unbalance response of a rigid rotor, where the PD and the non-linear P controllers show better performance for the frequency range of study (0-80 Hz). The feasibility of eliminating rotor-bearing instabilities (phenomena of whirl) by using active lubrication is also investigated, illustrating clearly one of its most promising applications.

  12. Very large space structures: Non-linear control and robustness to structural uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarri, Paolo; Monti, Riccardo; Sabatini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Very Large Space Structures (VLSS) are challenging systems to be controlled, due to their high flexibility. In particular, rapid attitude maneuvers can determine great oscillations on the flexible elements of a spacecraft (solar wings, antennas, booms). On account of this, in the last decades many researchers have developed different strategies to effectively damp the elastic vibrations by means of active vibration devices (such as piezo-electric patches) or by means of robust control algorithms. The approach suggested in this paper is different, since neither additional devices nor complex control laws are introduced. In fact, the complete model of the system (including rigid, elastic and orbital dynamics, coupled with control actions) is controlled by the non-linear attitude controller named state dependent Riccati equation, which will be based on a simplified version of the spacecraft model. The task to reduce the mutual interaction between rigid attitude and flexible dynamics is entirely transferred to a modification of the desired trajectory that must be tracked. This command shaping technique is based on the knowledge of the parameters (inertial and elastics) of the VLSS. Unfortunately these parameters are not always exactly known and, however, they may change over the time. On account of this a Monte Carlo analysis has been also performed, showing the robustness of the proposed control strategy to the structural uncertainties. The numerical simulations prove that this strategy, based on the joint application of two well-known yet simple techniques, produces accurate and robust results.

  13. A non-linear model predictive controller with obstacle avoidance for a space robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingming; Luo, Jianjun; Walter, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the use of the non-linear model predictive control (NMPC) strategy for a kinematically redundant space robot to approach an un-cooperative target in complex space environment. Collision avoidance, traditionally treated as a high level planning problem, can be effectively translated into control constraints as part of the NMPC. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of the predictive controller in a constrained workspace and to investigate the feasibility of imposing additional constraints into the NMPC. In this paper, we reformulated the issue of the space robot motion control by using NMPC with predefined objectives under input, output and obstacle constraints over a receding horizon. An on-line quadratic programming (QP) procedure is employed to obtain the constrained optimal control decisions in real-time. This study has been implemented for a 7 degree-of-freedom (DOF) kinematically redundant manipulator mounted on a 6 DOF free-floating spacecraft via simulation studies. Real-time trajectory tracking and collision avoidance particularly demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of the proposed NMPC strategy for the space robot.

  14. Non-linear stochastic optimal control of acceleration parametrically excited systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Jin, Xiaoling; Huang, Zhilong

    2016-02-01

    Acceleration parametrical excitations have not been taken into account due to the lack of physical significance in macroscopic structures. The explosive development of microtechnology and nanotechnology, however, motivates the investigation of the acceleration parametrically excited systems. The adsorption and desorption effects dramatically change the mass of nano-sized structures, which significantly reduces the precision of nanoscale sensors or can be reasonably utilised to detect molecular mass. This manuscript proposes a non-linear stochastic optimal control strategy for stochastic systems with acceleration parametric excitation based on stochastic averaging of energy envelope and stochastic dynamic programming principle. System acceleration is approximately expressed as a function of system displacement in a short time range under the conditions of light damping and weak excitations, and the acceleration parametrically excited system is shown to be equivalent to a constructed system with an additional displacement parametric excitation term. Then, the controlled system is converted into a partially averaged Itô equation with respect to the total system energy through stochastic averaging of energy envelope, and the optimal control strategy for the averaged system is derived from solving the associated dynamic programming equation. Numerical results for a controlled Duffing oscillator indicate the efficacy of the proposed control strategy.

  15. Non-linear generalised minimum variance control state space design for a second-order Volterra series model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maboodi, Mohsen; Camacho, Eduardo F.; Khaki-Sedigh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a non-linear generalised minimum variance (NGMV) controller for a second-order Volterra series model with a general linear additive disturbance. The Volterra series models provide a natural extension of a linear convolution model with the nonlinearity considered in an additive term. The design procedure is entirely carried out in the state space framework, which facilitates the application of other analysis and design methods in this framework. First, the non-linear minimum variance (NMV) controller is introduced and then by changing the cost function, NGMV controller is defined as an extended version of the linear cases. The cost function is used in the simplest form and can be easily extended to the general case. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed non-linear method.

  16. Quantum Process Tomography of an Optically-Controlled Kerr Non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Jordaan, Bertus; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-01-01

    Any optical quantum information processing machine would be comprised of fully-characterized constituent devices for both single state manipulations and tasks involving the interaction between multiple quantum optical states. Ideally for the latter, would be an apparatus capable of deterministic optical phase shifts that operate on input quantum states with the action mediated solely by auxiliary signal fields. Here we present the complete experimental characterization of a system designed for optically controlled phase shifts acting on single-photon level probe coherent states. Our setup is based on a warm vapor of rubidium atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency with its dispersion properties modified through the use of an optically triggered N-type Kerr non-linearity. We fully characterize the performance of our device by sending in a set of input probe states and measuring the corresponding output via time-domain homodyne tomography and subsequently performing the technique of coherent state quantum process tomography. This method provides us with the precise knowledge of how our optical phase shift will modify any arbitrary input quantum state engineered in the mode of the reconstruction. PMID:26585904

  17. Quantum Process Tomography of an Optically-Controlled Kerr Non-linearity

    PubMed Central

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Jordaan, Bertus; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-01-01

    Any optical quantum information processing machine would be comprised of fully-characterized constituent devices for both single state manipulations and tasks involving the interaction between multiple quantum optical states. Ideally for the latter, would be an apparatus capable of deterministic optical phase shifts that operate on input quantum states with the action mediated solely by auxiliary signal fields. Here we present the complete experimental characterization of a system designed for optically controlled phase shifts acting on single-photon level probe coherent states. Our setup is based on a warm vapor of rubidium atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency with its dispersion properties modified through the use of an optically triggered N-type Kerr non-linearity. We fully characterize the performance of our device by sending in a set of input probe states and measuring the corresponding output via time-domain homodyne tomography and subsequently performing the technique of coherent state quantum process tomography. This method provides us with the precise knowledge of how our optical phase shift will modify any arbitrary input quantum state engineered in the mode of the reconstruction. PMID:26585904

  18. Quantum Process Tomography of an Optically-Controlled Kerr Non-linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Jordaan, Bertus; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-11-01

    Any optical quantum information processing machine would be comprised of fully-characterized constituent devices for both single state manipulations and tasks involving the interaction between multiple quantum optical states. Ideally for the latter, would be an apparatus capable of deterministic optical phase shifts that operate on input quantum states with the action mediated solely by auxiliary signal fields. Here we present the complete experimental characterization of a system designed for optically controlled phase shifts acting on single-photon level probe coherent states. Our setup is based on a warm vapor of rubidium atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency with its dispersion properties modified through the use of an optically triggered N-type Kerr non-linearity. We fully characterize the performance of our device by sending in a set of input probe states and measuring the corresponding output via time-domain homodyne tomography and subsequently performing the technique of coherent state quantum process tomography. This method provides us with the precise knowledge of how our optical phase shift will modify any arbitrary input quantum state engineered in the mode of the reconstruction.

  19. Stable myoelectric control of a hand prosthesis using non-linear incremental learning

    PubMed Central

    Gijsberts, Arjan; Bohra, Rashida; Sierra González, David; Werner, Alexander; Nowak, Markus; Caputo, Barbara; Roa, Maximo A.; Castellini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Stable myoelectric control of hand prostheses remains an open problem. The only successful human–machine interface is surface electromyography, typically allowing control of a few degrees of freedom. Machine learning techniques may have the potential to remove these limitations, but their performance is thus far inadequate: myoelectric signals change over time under the influence of various factors, deteriorating control performance. It is therefore necessary, in the standard approach, to regularly retrain a new model from scratch. We hereby propose a non-linear incremental learning method in which occasional updates with a modest amount of novel training data allow continual adaptation to the changes in the signals. In particular, Incremental Ridge Regression and an approximation of the Gaussian Kernel known as Random Fourier Features are combined to predict finger forces from myoelectric signals, both finger-by-finger and grouped in grasping patterns. We show that the approach is effective and practically applicable to this problem by first analyzing its performance while predicting single-finger forces. Surface electromyography and finger forces were collected from 10 intact subjects during four sessions spread over two different days; the results of the analysis show that small incremental updates are indeed effective to maintain a stable level of performance. Subsequently, we employed the same method on-line to teleoperate a humanoid robotic arm equipped with a state-of-the-art commercial prosthetic hand. The subject could reliably grasp, carry and release everyday-life objects, enforcing stable grasping irrespective of the signal changes, hand/arm movements and wrist pronation and supination. PMID:24616697

  20. Soil Organic Matter Content: A Non-linear Control on Microbial Respiration in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, J.; Grandy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and the amount of CO2 respired from soil largely depends on the amount of substrate available to microbes. Soils with high SOM concentrations will have higher respiration rates than soils with low SOM concentrations given similar environmental conditions. It is widely assumed that microbial activity and respiration rates respond linearly to substrate concentrations. This assumption remains however largely untested. In a lab incubation experiment, we amended a mixture of agricultural soil and sand with increasing amounts of one of three plant residues differing in their C/N ratio (clover 14; rye 23 and wheat straw 110). We used 9 levels of organic carbon (OC) content ranging from 0.25% to 5.7%. The mixtures were then incubated at constant temperature and water contents for 63 days. Our results show that across substrates CO2 production increased with increasing OC content following a quadratic function instead of the expected linear one up to 2.2% OC. Above that point CO2 production leveled off and increased linearly. We hypothesize that the probability that a microbe meets a substrate also increases with increasing amounts of plant residues. At all substrate concentrations, samples amended with clover had the highest carbon losses, followed by rye and straw. Differences between the three kinds of plant residue might have been caused by their C/N ratios and thus the amount of available N. High amounts of N might have led to an increase in microbial biomass, which could occupy more space and is thus more likely to meet new substrate. Additional analysis of microbial biomass, enzyme activities and N pools will help to understand the mechanism leading to the observed CO2 patterns. A non-linear relation of CO2 production and OC content indicates that spatial separation as an inherent property of SOM content is an important control on decomposition at low OC contents. Knowledge of this controlling effect could be used to enhance

  1. Non-linear control logics for vibrations suppression: a comparison between model-based and non-model-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Orsini, Lorenzo; Resta, Ferruccio

    2015-04-01

    Non-linear behavior is present in many mechanical system operating conditions. In these cases, a common engineering practice is to linearize the equation of motion around a particular operating point, and to design a linear controller. The main disadvantage is that the stability properties and validity of the controller are local. In order to improve the controller performance, non-linear control techniques represent a very attractive solution for many smart structures. The aim of this paper is to compare non-linear model-based and non-model-based control techniques. In particular the model-based sliding-mode-control (SMC) technique is considered because of its easy implementation and the strong robustness of the controller even under heavy model uncertainties. Among the non-model-based control techniques, the fuzzy control (FC), allowing designing the controller according to if-then rules, has been considered. It defines the controller without a system reference model, offering many advantages such as an intrinsic robustness. These techniques have been tested on the pendulum nonlinear system.

  2. Non-Linear Dynamics and Control of Chaos for a Tachometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GE, Z.-M.; SHIUE, J.-S.

    2002-06-01

    The dynamic behaviors of a rotational tachometer with vibrating support are studied in the paper. Both analytical and computational results are used to obtain the characteristics of the system. The Lyapunov direct method is applied to obtain the conditions of stability of the equilibrium position of the system. The center manifold theorem determines the conditions of stability for the system in a critical case. By applying various numerical analyses such as phase plane, Poincaré map and power spectrum analysis, a variety of periodic solutions and phenomena of the chaotic motion are observed. The effects of the changes of parameters in the system can be found in the bifurcation diagrams and parametric diagrams. By using Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimensions, the periodic and chaotic behaviors are verified. Finally, various methods, such as the addition of a constant torque, the addition of a periodic torque, delayed feedback control, adaptive control, Bang-Bang control, optimal control and the addition of a periodic impulse are used to control chaos effectively.

  3. Non-linear dynamic characteristics and optimal control of giant magnetostrictive film subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z. W.; Zhang, W. D. Xu, J.

    2014-03-15

    The non-linear dynamic characteristics and optimal control of a giant magnetostrictive film (GMF) subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation were studied. Non-linear differential items were introduced to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of the GMF, and the non-linear dynamic model of the GMF subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation was developed. The stochastic stability was analysed, and the probability density function was obtained. The condition of stochastic Hopf bifurcation and noise-induced chaotic response were determined, and the fractal boundary of the system's safe basin was provided. The reliability function was solved from the backward Kolmogorov equation, and an optimal control strategy was proposed in the stochastic dynamic programming method. Numerical simulation shows that the system stability varies with the parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation and chaos appear in the process; the area of the safe basin decreases when the noise intensifies, and the boundary of the safe basin becomes fractal; the system reliability improved through stochastic optimal control. Finally, the theoretical and numerical results were proved by experiments. The results are helpful in the engineering applications of GMF.

  4. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Commer, Michael

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria. The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.

  5. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.« less

  6. Non-linear joint dynamics and controls of jointed flexible structures with active and viscoelastic joint actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.

    1990-12-01

    Studies on joint dominated flexible space structures have attracted much interest recently due to the rapid developments in large deployable space systems. This paper describes a study of the non-linear structural dynamics of jointed flexible structures with initial joint clearance and subjected to external excitations. Methods of using viscoelastic and active vibration control technologies, joint actuators, to reduce dynamic contact force and to stabilize the systems are proposed and evaluated. System dynamic equations of a discretized multi-degrees-of-freedom flexible system with initial joint clearances and joint actuators (active and viscoelastic passive) are derived. Dynamic contacts in an elastic joint are simulated by a non-linear joint model comprised of a non-linear spring and damper. A pseudo-force approximation method is used in numerical time-domain integration. Dynamic responses of a jointed flexible structure with and without viscoelastic and active joint actuators are presented and compared. Effectiveness of active/passive joint actuators is demonstrated.

  7. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions, demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. Linear control strategies have been developed for station-keeping. However, their region of stability is bounded by the assumptions required for linearizing the governing equations of motion. For example, reference [I] discusses the development of a linear control design for maintaining a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 libration point. Trial runs indicated the trajectory was unstable for starting points exceeding 45,000 km from the L2 point. Also, there was significant growth in the control effort required to maintain the orbit as the nominal radius increased. This result is a consequence of the increased influence of the system non-linearities, as the trajectory deviated from the linearization point, L2. As an alternative, this paper presents the development of a non-linear control strategy, based on a Hamiltonian formulation of the equations of motion. The control strategy is applied to the problem of formation maintenance, rather than simple station

  8. Non-linear feedbacks between climate change, hydrologic partitioning, plant available water, and carbon cycling in montane forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, P. D.; Litvak, M. E.; Harpold, A. A.; Molotch, N. P.; McIntosh, J. C.; Troch, P. A.; Zapata, X.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in both temperature and the amount and timing of precipitation have the potential to profoundly impact water balance in mountain ecosystems. Although changes in the amount of precipitation and potential evapotranspiration are widely considered in climate change scenarios, less attention has been given to how changes in climate or land cover may affect hydrologic partitioning and plant available water. The focus of this presentation is on how spatial transitions in ecosystem structure and temporal transitions in climate affect the fraction of precipitation potentially available to vegetation. In most temperate mountain environments winter snows are a significant fraction of annual precipitation and understanding the partitioning of snow and snow melt is critical for predicting both ecosystem water availability and stream flow under future climate scenarios. Spatial variability in net snow water input is a function of the interaction of snowfall, wind, and solar radiation with topography and vegetation structure. Integrated over larger scales these interactions may result in between 0% and 40% sublimation of winter snowfall before melt, effectively excluding this water from growing season water balance. Once melt begins, variability in the partitioning of snowmelt is driven by the rate of melt, and somewhat less intuitively, by the timing of snow accumulation the previous fall. Early accumulating snowpacks insulate soils and minimize soil frost increasing infiltration of melt the following spring. In contrast, later snowfall results in colder soils, more soil frost, reduced infiltration, increased runoff during melt, and reduced plant available water during the following growing season. This change in hydrologic partitioning, mediated by the timing of snowpack accumulation, results in lower evapotranspiration (ET) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) the following spring. These findings suggest that abiotic controls on the partitioning of precipitation may

  9. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. This paper discusses the development of a non-linear, formation maintenance, control algorithm for trajectories in the vicinity of a libration point. However, the formulation holds for any trajectory governed by the equations of motion for the restricted three body problem. The control law guarantees exponential convergence, based on a Lyaponov analysis. FreeFlyer and MATLAB provide the simulation environment for controller performance evaluation. The simulation, modeled after the MAXIM Pathfinder mission, maintains the relative position of a "follower" spacecraft with respect to a "leader" spacecraft, stationed near the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Evaluation metrics are fuel usage and tracking accuracy.

  10. Multi input single output model predictive control of non-linear bio-polymerization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugasamy, Senthil Kumar; Ahmad, Z.

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on Multi Input Single Output (MISO) Model Predictive Control of bio-polymerization process in which mechanistic model is developed and linked with the feedforward neural network model to obtain a hybrid model (Mechanistic-FANN) of lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone (ɛ-CL) for Poly (ɛ-caprolactone) production. In this research, state space model was used, in which the input to the model were the reactor temperatures and reactor impeller speeds and the output were the molecular weight of polymer (Mn) and polymer polydispersity index. State space model for MISO created using System identification tool box of Matlab™. This state space model is used in MISO MPC. Model predictive control (MPC) has been applied to predict the molecular weight of the biopolymer and consequently control the molecular weight of biopolymer. The result shows that MPC is able to track reference trajectory and give optimum movement of manipulated variable.

  11. Multi input single output model predictive control of non-linear bio-polymerization process

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugasamy, Senthil Kumar; Ahmad, Z.

    2015-05-15

    This paper focuses on Multi Input Single Output (MISO) Model Predictive Control of bio-polymerization process in which mechanistic model is developed and linked with the feedforward neural network model to obtain a hybrid model (Mechanistic-FANN) of lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) for Poly (ε-caprolactone) production. In this research, state space model was used, in which the input to the model were the reactor temperatures and reactor impeller speeds and the output were the molecular weight of polymer (M{sub n}) and polymer polydispersity index. State space model for MISO created using System identification tool box of Matlab™. This state space model is used in MISO MPC. Model predictive control (MPC) has been applied to predict the molecular weight of the biopolymer and consequently control the molecular weight of biopolymer. The result shows that MPC is able to track reference trajectory and give optimum movement of manipulated variable.

  12. Chaos in Balance: Non-Linear Measures of Postural Control Predict Individual Variations in Visual Illusions of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Apthorp, Deborah; Nagle, Fintan; Palmisano, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Visually-induced illusions of self-motion (vection) can be compelling for some people, but they are subject to large individual variations in strength. Do these variations depend, at least in part, on the extent to which people rely on vision to maintain their postural stability? We investigated by comparing physical posture measures to subjective vection ratings. Using a Bertec balance plate in a brightly-lit room, we measured 13 participants' excursions of the centre of foot pressure (CoP) over a 60-second period with eyes open and with eyes closed during quiet stance. Subsequently, we collected vection strength ratings for large optic flow displays while seated, using both verbal ratings and online throttle measures. We also collected measures of postural sway (changes in anterior-posterior CoP) in response to the same visual motion stimuli while standing on the plate. The magnitude of standing sway in response to expanding optic flow (in comparison to blank fixation periods) was predictive of both verbal and throttle measures for seated vection. In addition, the ratio between eyes-open and eyes-closed CoP excursions during quiet stance (using the area of postural sway) significantly predicted seated vection for both measures. Interestingly, these relationships were weaker for contracting optic flow displays, though these produced both stronger vection and more sway. Next we used a non-linear analysis (recurrence quantification analysis, RQA) of the fluctuations in anterior-posterior position during quiet stance (both with eyes closed and eyes open); this was a much stronger predictor of seated vection for both expanding and contracting stimuli. Given the complex multisensory integration involved in postural control, our study adds to the growing evidence that non-linear measures drawn from complexity theory may provide a more informative measure of postural sway than the conventional linear measures. PMID:25462216

  13. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  14. Feedback control of canards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Joseph; Moehlis, Jeff

    2008-03-01

    We present a control mechanism for tuning a fast-slow dynamical system undergoing a supercritical Hopf bifurcation to be in the canard regime, the tiny parameter window between small and large periodic behavior. Our control strategy uses continuous feedback control via a slow control variable to cause the system to drift on average toward canard orbits. We apply this to tune the FitzHugh-Nagumo model to produce maximal canard orbits. When the controller is improperly configured, periodic or chaotic mixed-mode oscillations are found. We also investigate the effects of noise on this control mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate that a sensor tuned in this way to operate near the canard regime can detect tiny changes in system parameters.

  15. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  16. Feedback control of waiting times.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions. PMID:27176250

  17. Control system design to cope with non-linearities of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel for satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Myeong-Ryong; Hashimoto, Tatsuaki; Ninomiya, Keiken

    1994-12-31

    Attitude control system for a satellite using a magnetic bearing momentum wheel (MBMW) with gimballing capability involves double control loops: the inner loop to control the wheel`s gimballing to be stable while it is exchanging the angular momentum with the spacecraft main body, and the outer loop for controlling satellite`s attitude. To cope with the magnetic bearing`s nonlinearity in the inner control loop, a sliding-mode controller is proposed. which is usually known to have simple control structure as well as anti-disturbance robustness. In this case, moreover, the sliding mode controller particularly provides the merit to feedback the wheel`s rotational velocity automatically into the gim-balling control. The designed controller`s performance is validated by numerical simulation. Additionally, a simple analytical form of the closed servo loop transfer function of the inner loop, which is necessary for the outer loop design, is proposed based upon numerical simulations on the system response.

  18. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  19. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  20. Feedback control indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-08-01

    A general framework is introduced for modeling pharmacodynamic processes that are subject to autoregulation, which combines the indirect response (IDR) model approach with methods from classical feedback control of engineered systems. The canonical IDR models are modified to incorporate linear combinations of feedback control terms related to the time course of the difference (the error signal) between the pharmacodynamic response and its basal value. Following the well-established approach of traditional engineering control theory, the proposed feedback control indirect response models incorporate terms proportional to the error signal itself, the integral of the error signal, the derivative of the error signal or combinations thereof. Simulations are presented to illustrate the types of responses produced by the proposed feedback control indirect response model framework, and to illustrate comparisons with other PK/PD modeling approaches incorporating feedback. In addition, four examples from literature are used to illustrate the implementation and applicability of the proposed feedback control framework. The examples reflect each of the four mechanisms of drug action as modeled by each of the four canonical IDR models and include: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and extracellular serotonin; histamine H2-receptor antagonists and gastric acid; growth hormone secretagogues and circulating growth hormone; β2-selective adrenergic agonists and potassium. The proposed feedback control indirect response approach may serve as an exploratory modeling tool and may provide a bridge for development of more mechanistic systems pharmacology models. PMID:27394724

  1. ASDTIC - A feedback control innovation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (analog signal to discrete time interval converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  2. ASDTIC: A feedback control innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (Analog Signal to Discrete Time Interval Converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  3. Non-linear inversion of controlled source multi-receiver electromagnetic induction data for unexploded ordnance using a continuation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, A.; Everett, M. E.

    2007-03-01

    This work adopts a continuation approach, based on path tracking in model space, to solve the non-linear least-squares problem for discrimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO) using multi-receiver electromagnetic induction (EMI) data. The forward model corresponds to a stretched-exponential decay of eddy currents induced in a magnetic spheroid. We formulate an over-determined, or under-parameterized, inverse problem. An example using synthetic multi-receiver EMI responses illustrates the efficiency of the method. The fast inversion of actual field multi-receiver EMI responses of inert, buried ordnances is also shown. Software based on the continuation method could be installed within a multi-receiver EMI sensor and used for near-real-time UXO decision-making purposes without the need for a highly-trained operator.

  4. Storage Dynamics and Non-Linear Connectivity between Landscape Units Control Runoff Generation and Stream Water Age Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulsby, C.; Birkel, C.; Geris, J.; Tetzlaff, D.

    2015-12-01

    We assess the influence of storage dynamics and non-linearities in hydrological connectivity on runoff generation and stream water ages, using a long-term record of daily isotopes in precipitation and stream flow. These were used to test a parsimonious tracer-aided runoff model for a Scottish catchment. The model tracks tracers and the ages of water fluxes through and between conceptual stores representing steeper hillslopes, dynamically saturated riparian peatlands and deeper groundwater (i.e. the main landscape units involved in runoff generation). Storage is largest in groundwater and on the steep hillslopes, though most dynamic mixing occurs in smaller stores in the riparian peat. The model also couples the ecohydrological effects of different vegetation communities in contrasting landscape units, by estimating evaporation, resulting moisture deficits and the ages of evaporated waters, which also affect the generation and age of runoff. Both stream flow and isotope variations are well-captured by the model, and the simulated storage and tracer dynamics in the main landscape units are consistent with independent measurements. The model predicts the mean age of runoff as ~1.8 years. On a daily basis, this varies from ~1 month in storm events, when younger waters draining the riparian peatland dominate, to around 4 years in dry periods, when groundwater sustains flow. Hydrological connectivity between the units varies non-linearly with storage which depends upon antecedent conditions and event characteristics. This, in turn, determines the spatial distribution of flow paths and the integration of their contrasting non-stationary ages. Improving the representation of storage dynamics and quantifying the ages of water fluxes in such models gives a more complete conceptualisation of the importance of the soil water fluxes in critical zone processes and a framework for tracking diffuse pollutants in water quality assessment.

  5. Infrared reduction, an efficient method to control the non-linear optical property of graphene oxide in femtosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Maiti, R.; Saha, S.; Das, A. C.; Mondal, S.; Ray, S. K.; Bhaktha, S. B. N.; Datta, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been prepared by modified Hummers method and it has been reduced using an IR bulb (800-2000 nm). Both as grown GO and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman spectra shows well documented Dband and G-band for both the samples while blue shift of G-band confirms chemical functionalization of graphene with different oxygen functional group. The XPS result shows that the as-prepared GO contains 52% of sp2 hybridized carbon due to the C=C bonds and 33% of carbon atoms due to the C-O bonds. As for RGO, increment of the atomic % of the sp2 hybridized carbon atom to 83% and rapid decrease in atomic % of C=O bonds confirm an efficient reduction with infrared radiation. UV-Visible absorption spectrum also confirms increment of conjugation with increased reduction. Non-linear optical properties of both GO and RGO are measured using single beam open aperture Z-Scan technique in femtosecond regime. Intensity dependent nonlinear phenomena are observed. Depending upon the intensity, both saturable absorption and two photon absorption contribute to the non-linearity of both the samples. Saturation dominates at low intensity (~ 127 GW/cm2) while two photon absorption become prominent at higher intensities (from 217 GW/cm2 to 302 GW/cm2). We have calculated the two-photon absorption co-efficient and saturation intensity for both the samples. The value of two photon absorption co-efficient (for GO~ 0.0022-0.0037 cm/GW and for RGO~ 0.0128-0.0143 cm/GW) and the saturation intensity (for GO~57 GW/cm2 and for RGO~ 194GW/cm2) is increased with reduction. Increase in two photon absorption coefficient with increasing intensity can also suggest that there may be multi-photon absorption is taking place.

  6. Non Linear Conjugate Gradient

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-11-17

    Software that simulates and inverts electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a time harmonic source field excitation arising from the following antenna geometery: loops and grounded bipoles, as well as point electric and magnetic dioples. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code NLCGCS_MP ver 1.0. The upgrade includes the following components: Incorporation of new 1 D field sourcing routines to more accurately simulate the 3D electromagnetic field for arbitrary geologic& media, treatment for generalized finite length transmitting antenna geometry (antennas with vertical and horizontal component directions). In addition, the software has been upgraded to treat transverse anisotropy in electrical conductivity.« less

  7. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  8. Insula Demonstrates a Non-Linear Response to Varying Demand for Cognitive Control and Weaker Resting Connectivity With the Executive Control Network in Smokers.

    PubMed

    Fedota, John R; Matous, Allison L; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Gu, Hong; Ross, Thomas J; Stein, Elliot A

    2016-09-01

    Deficits in cognitive control processes are a primary characteristic of nicotine addiction. However, while network-based connectivity measures of dysfunction have frequently been observed, empirical evidence of task-based dysfunction in these processes has been inconsistent. Here, in a sample of smokers (n=35) and non-smokers (n=21), a previously validated parametric flanker task is employed to characterize addiction-related alterations in responses to varying (ie, high, intermediate, and low) demands for cognitive control. This approach yields a demand-response curve that aims to characterize potential non-linear responses to increased demand for control, including insensitivities or lags in fully activating the cognitive control network. We further used task-based differences in activation between groups as seeds for resting-state analysis of network dysfunction in an effort to more closely link prior inconsistencies in task-related activation with evidence of impaired network connectivity in smokers. For both smokers and non-smokers, neuroimaging results showed similar increases in activation in brain areas associated with cognitive control. However, reduced activation in right insula was seen only in smokers and only when processing intermediate demand for cognitive control. Further, in smokers, this task-modulated right insula showed weaker functional connectivity with the superior frontal gyrus, a component of the task-positive executive control network. These results demonstrate that the neural instantiation of salience attribution in smokers is both more effortful to fully activate and has more difficulty communicating with the exogenous, task-positive, executive control network. Together, these findings further articulate the cognitive control dysfunction associated with smoking and illustrate a specific brain circuit potentially responsible. PMID:27112116

  9. Iterative learning control applied to a non-linear vortex panel model for improved aerodynamic load performance of wind turbines with smart rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Mark W.; Tutty, Owen R.; Rogers, Eric; Sandberg, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of smart devices in wind turbine rotor blades could, in conjunction with collective and individual pitch control, improve the aerodynamic performance of the rotors. This is currently an active area of research with the primary objective of reducing the fatigue loads but mitigating the effects of extreme loads is also of interest. The aerodynamic loads on a wind turbine blade contain periodic and non-periodic components and one approach is to consider the application of iterative learning control algorithms. In this paper, the control design is based on a simple, in relative terms, computational fluid dynamics model that uses non-linear wake effects to represent flow past an airfoil. A representation for the actuator dynamics is included to undertake a detailed investigation into the level of control possible and on how performance can be effectively measured.

  10. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    In designing fixed order compensators, an output feedback formulation has been adopted by suitably augmenting the system description to include the compensator states. However, the minimization of the performance index over the range of possible compensator descriptions was impeded due to the nonuniqueness of the compensator transfer function. A controller canonical form of the compensator was chosen to reduce the number of free parameters to its minimal number in the optimization. In the MIMO case, the controller form requires a prespecified set of ascending controllability indices. This constraint on the compensator structure is rather innocuous in relation to the increase in convergence rate of the optimization. Moreover, the controller form is easily relatable to a unique controller transfer function description. This structure of the compensator does not require penalizing the compensator states for a nonzero or coupled solution, a problem that occurs when following a standard output feedback synthesis formulation.

  11. Non-linear control of variable-speed wind turbines with permanent magnet synchronous generators: a robust backstepping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şeker, Murat; Zergeroğlu, Erkan; Tatlicioğlu, Enver

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a robust backstepping approach for the control problem of the variable-speed wind turbine with a permanent magnet synchronous generator is presented. Specifically, to overcome the negative effects of parametric uncertainties in both mechanical and electrical subsystems, a robust controller with a differentiable compensation term is proposed. The proposed methodology ensures the generator velocity tracking error to uniformly approach a small bound where practical tracking is achieved. Stability of the overall system is ensured by Lyapunov-based arguments. Comparative simulation studies with a standard proportional-integral-type controller are performed to illustrate the effectiveness, feasibility and efficiency of the proposed controller.

  12. Feedback control of resistive instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

    1985-12-01

    Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  13. A direct application of the non-linear inverse transformation flight control system design on a STOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. W.; Mcneill, W. E.; Stortz, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear inverse transformation flight control system design method is applied to the Lockheed Ft. Worth Company's E-7D short takeoff and vertical land (STOVL) supersonic fighter/attack aircraft design with a modified General Electric F110 engine which has augmented propulsive lift capability. The system is fully augmented to provide flight path control and velocity control, and rate command attitude hold for angular axes during the transition and hover operations. In cruise mode, the flight control system is configured to provide direct thrust command, rate command attitude hold for pitch and roll axes, and sideslip command with turn coordination. A control selector based on the nonlinear inverse transformation method is designed specifically to be compatible with the propulsion system's physical configuration which has a two dimensional convergent-divergent aft nozzle, a vectorable ventral nozzle, and a thrust augmented ejector. The nonlinear inverse transformation is used to determine the propulsive forces and nozzle deflections, which in combination with the aerodynamic forces and moments (including propulsive induced contributions), and gravitational force, are required to achieve the longitudinal and vertical acceleration commands. The longitudinal control axes are fully decoupled within the propulsion system's performance envelope. A piloted motion-base flight simulation was conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames Research Center to examine the handling qualities of this design. Based on results of the simulation, refinements to the control system have been made and will also be covered in the report.

  14. Non-linear Feedbacks Between Forest Mortality and Climate Change: Implications for Snow Cover, Water Resources, and Ecosystem Recovery in Western North America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, P. D.; Harpold, A. A.; Biederman, J. A.; Gochis, D. J.; Litvak, M. E.; Ewers, B. E.; Broxton, P. D.; Reed, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Unprecedented levels of tree mortality from insect infestation and wildfire are dramatically altering forest structure and composition in Western North America. Warming temperatures and increased drought stress have been implicated as major factors in the increasing spatial extent and frequency of these forest disturbances, but it is unclear how these changes in forest structure will interact with ongoing climate change to affect snowmelt water resources either for society or for ecosystem recovery following mortality. Because surface discharge, groundwater recharge, and ecosystem productivity all depend on seasonal snowmelt, a critical knowledge gap exists not only in predicting discharge, but in quantifying spatial and temporal variability in the partitioning of snowfall into abiotic vapor loss, plant available water, recharge, and streamflow within the complex mosaic of forest disturbance and topography that characterizes western mountain catchments. This presentation will address this knowledge gap by synthesizing recent work on snowpack dynamics and ecosystem productivity from seasonally snow-covered forests along a climate gradient from Arizona to Wyoming; including undisturbed sites, recently burned forests, and areas of extensive insect-induced forest mortality. Both before-after and control-impacted studies of forest disturbance on snow accumulation and ablation suggest that the spatial scale of snow distribution increases following disturbance, but net snow water input in a warming climate will increase only in topographically sheltered areas. While forest disturbance changes spatial scale of snowpack partitioning, the amount and especially the timing of snow cover accumulation and ablation are strongly related to interannual variability in ecosystem productivity with both earlier snowmelt and later snow accumulation associated with decreased carbon uptake. Empirical analyses and modeling are being developed to identify landscapes most sensitive to

  15. Extension of the stability of motions in a combustion chamber by non- linear active control based on hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Knoop, P.; Culick, F.E.C.; Zukoski, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report presents the first quantitative data establishing the details of hysteresis whose existence in dynamical behavior was reported by Sterling and Zukoski. The new idea was demonstrated that the presence of dynamical hysteresis provides opportunity for a novel strategy of active nonlinear control of unsteady motions in combustors. A figure shows the hysteresis exhibited for the amplitude of pressure oscillations as a function of equivalence ratio in a combustor having a recirculation zone, in this case a dump combustor.

  16. Non-linear oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, P.

    The mathematical pendulum is used to provide a survey of free and forced oscillations in damped and undamped systems. This simple model is employed to present illustrations for and comparisons between the various approximation schemes. A summary of the Liapunov stability theory is provided. The first and the second method of Liapunov are explained for autonomous as well as for nonautonomous systems. Here, a basic familiarity with the theory of linear oscillations is assumed. La Salle's theorem about the stability of invariant domains is explained in terms of illustrative examples. Self-excited oscillations are examined, taking into account such oscillations in mechanical and electrical systems, analytical approximation methods for the computation of self-excited oscillations, analytical criteria for the existence of limit cycles, forced oscillations in self-excited systems, and self-excited oscillations in systems with several degrees of freedom. Attention is given to Hamiltonian systems and an introduction to the theory of optimal control is provided.

  17. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  18. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  19. Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Controller Systematic Design Methodology: A Comparison of Non-Linear and Linear Model-Based Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    1999-07-30

    Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. Traditional controller design generally consists of linearizing a model about an operating point. This step was taken for two different operating points, and the systematic design approach was used. A comparison of the optimal regions selected using the n on-linear model and the two linear models shows similarities. The linearization point selection does, however, affect the turbine performance slightly. Exploitation of the simplicity of the model allows surfaces consisting of operation under a wide range of gain values to be created. This methodology provides a means of visually observing turbine performance based upon the two metrics chosen for this study. Design of a PID controller is simplified, and it is possible to ascertain the best possible combination of controller parameters. The wide, flat surfaces indicate that a PID controller is very robust in this variable-speed wind turbine application.

  20. Modal insensitivity with optimality. [in feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Raman, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a constant gain, feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. Both full state and output feedback control are considered. A constraint is established for the feedback gain matrix that results in modal insensitivity, and necessary conditions for optimality subject to this constraint are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  1. Feedback control of pulsed laser deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, S. J. P.; Stark, E. F.

    1993-10-01

    Implementation of closed loop feedback on PLD (pulsed laser deposition) requires actuators and sensors. Improvements in quality and reproducibility of material depositions are achieved by actuating the process towards desired operating regions. Empirical relationships are experimentally determined for describing the complex dynamical interactions of laser parameters. Feedback control based on this description can then be implemented to reduce process disorder.

  2. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For ExB rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for ExB rotationally driven flute modes. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For E×B rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for E×B rotationally driven flute modes.

  4. Non-linear interaction of elastic waves in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, B. N.; Smit, T. J. H.; Campman, X. H.

    2013-09-01

    We study theoretically the interaction of elastic waves caused by non-linearities of rock elastic moduli, and assess the possibility to use this phenomenon in hydrocarbon exploration and in the analysis of rock samples. In our calculations we use the five-constant model by Gol'dberg. It is shown that the interaction of plane waves in isotropic solids is completely described by five coupling coefficients, which have the same order of magnitude. By considering scattering of compressional waves generated by controlled sources at the Earth surface from a non-linear layer at the subsurface, we conclude that non-linear signals from deep formations are unlikely to be measured with the current level of technology. Our analysis of field tests where non-linear signals were measured, suggests that these signals are generated either in the shallow subsurface or in the vicinity of sources. Non-linear wave interaction might be observable in lab tests with focused ultrasonic beams. In this case, the non-linear response is generated in the secondary parametric array formed by linear beams scattered from inclusions. Although the strength of this response is controlled by non-linearity of the surrounding medium rather than by non-linearity of inclusions, its measurement can help to obtain better images of rock samples.

  5. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  6. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-time, linear quadratic methods were used to design feedback controllers for reducing tones generated by flow over a cavity. The dynamics of a synthetic jet actuator mounted at the leading edge of the cavity as observed by two microphones in the cavity were modeled over a broad frequency range using state space models computed from experimental data. Variations in closed loop performance as a function of model order, control order, control bandwidth, and state estimator design were studied using a cavity in the Probe Calibration Tunnel at NASA Langley. The controller successfully reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at the tested flow speeds of Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. In some cases, the closed loop results were limited by excitation of sidebands of the cavity tones, or the creation of new tones at frequencies away from the cavity tones. Nonetheless, the results validate the combination of optimal control and experimentally-generated state space models, and suggest this approach may be useful for other flow control problems. The models were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  7. Dynamic output feedback control of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle via T-S fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoxiang; Wu, Ligang; Hu, Changhua; Wang, Zhaoqiang; Gao, Huijun

    2014-08-01

    By utilising Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy set approach, this paper addresses the robust H∞ dynamic output feedback control for the non-linear longitudinal model of flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicles (FAHVs). The flight control of FAHVs is highly challenging due to the unique dynamic characteristics, and the intricate couplings between the engine and fight dynamics and external disturbance. Because of the dynamics' enormous complexity, currently, only the longitudinal dynamics models of FAHVs have been used for controller design. In this work, T-S fuzzy modelling technique is utilised to approach the non-linear dynamics of FAHVs, then a fuzzy model is developed for the output tracking problem of FAHVs. The fuzzy model contains parameter uncertainties and disturbance, which can approach the non-linear dynamics of FAHVs more exactly. The flexible models of FAHVs are difficult to measure because of the complex dynamics and the strong couplings, thus a full-order dynamic output feedback controller is designed for the fuzzy model. A robust H∞ controller is designed for the obtained closed-loop system. By utilising the Lyapunov functional approach, sufficient solvability conditions for such controllers are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed T-S fuzzy dynamic output feedback control method is demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  8. Possibility of controlled ejection of ferrofluid grains from a magnetically ordered ferrofluid using high frequency non-linear acoustic pulses - a particle dynamical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Manciu, Marian; Sen, Surajit

    2000-10-01

    We consider a model dilute ferrofluid that is subjected to a strong, homogeneous magnetic field directed perpendicular to the surface of the ferrofluid, such that there is a chain formation in the direction perpendicular to the surface of the liquid. We study the propagation of impulses generated at high-frequency across finite times through the ferrofluid chains. Our numerical analysis shows that a very high-frequency sequence of non-linear acoustic pulses of appropriate magnitudes, initiated at the base of the container, can lead to the ejection of desired number of ferrofluid grains through the liquid-air interface. The proposed mechanism, if successfully realized in the laboratory, could help design a nozzle-free, ultrafast, ink-jet printer of unparalleled resolution.

  9. Non-linear Flood Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, A.

    The genesis of floodings is very complex depending on hydrologic, meteorological and evapo-transpirative factors that are linked among themselves in a non linear way with numerous feedback processes. The Cantor dust and the rank-ordering statistics supply a proper framework for identifying a kind of a non linear order in the time succession of the floodings and so provide a basis for their prediction. When a catalogue is analysed, it is necessary to test its completeness with respect to the size of the recorded events and results obtained from analysis of catalogues that do not take into account such a test are suspect and possibly wrong, or, at least, unreliable. Floodings have no instrumentally determined magnitude scale, like that conventionally used for earthquakes, and this is why they are generally described in qualitative terms. For this reason, a semi-quantitative index, called ASI (Alluvial Strength Index) has been here developed that combines attributes of alluvial triggering mechanisms and effects on the territorial and hydraulic system.The historical succession of alluvial events occurred at high valley of Po river (Northern Italy), mean valley of Calore river (Southern Italy) and at Sarno, near Naples, have been accurately reconstructed on the basis of old documents and classified according to their ASI. The catalogues have been verified to be complete only for events classified at least as moderate and this probably because many of the lowest energetic events, especially in the past, escaped the detection. The identification of scale-invariances in the time clustering of alluvial events, both on short and long time scales, even if indicative of the complexity of their genesis, might be very helpful for the assessment and reduction of the hazard of future disasters. For example, on the basis of the results of the rank-ordering statistics, the most probable occurrence of an alluvial event at Sarno, classified at least as strong, is predicted to occur

  10. Feedback controlled electrostatic and electromagnetic sample positioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Elleman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Four different sample positioners are discussed. The four systems share a common operating principle in that the sample positioning is achieved by feedback controlled forces which can be electrostatic, dielectrophoretic, or electromagnetic. The first system is the electrostatic liquid drop positioner which operates at the near ambient position. The second system is the tetrahedral electrostatic positioner which is being developed for the high temperature materials processing in vacuum. The third system is essentially the the same tetrahedral system above except that the position control is achieved by dielectrophoretic forces in the pressurized gas environment. Finally, the feasibility of a feedback controlled electromagnetic positioner is discussed.

  11. Feedback linearization application for LLRF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1999-06-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of the LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose a control law which is based on exact feedback linearization coupled with gain scheduling which reduces the effect of the deterministic klystron cathode voltage ripple that is due to harmonics of the high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points. Also, they propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and the estimates based feedback linearization controller.

  12. Feedback linearization application for LLRF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of the LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose a control law which is based on exact feedback linearization coupled with gain scheduling which reduces the effect of the deterministic klystron cathode voltage ripple that is due to harmonics of the high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points. Also, they propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and the estimates based feedback linearization controller.

  13. Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer actuators have shown significant potential in articulating micro instruments, manipulation devices, and robotics. However, implementing a feedback control strategy to enhance their positioning ability and accuracy in any application requires a feedback sensor, which is extremely large in size compared to the size of the actuators. Therefore, this paper proposes a new sensorless control scheme without the use of a position feedback sensor. With the help of the system identification technique and particle swarm optimization, the control scheme, which we call the simulated feedback control system, showed a satisfactory command tracking performance for the conducting polymer actuator’s step and dynamic displacement responses, especially under a disturbance, without needing a physical feedback loop, but using a simulated feedback loop. The primary contribution of this study is to propose and experimentally evaluate the simulated feedback control scheme for a class of the conducting polymer actuators known as tri-layer polymer actuators, which can operate both in dry and wet media. This control approach can also be extended to other smart actuators or systems, for which the feedback control based on external sensing is impractical.

  14. Nonsmooth feedback controls of nonlocal dispersal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaguti, Luisa; Rubbioni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with a nonlocal diffusion equation which is a model for biological invasion and disease spread. A nonsmooth feedback control term is included and the existence of controlled dynamics is proved, satisfying different kinds of nonlocal condition. Jump discontinuities appear in the process. The existence of optimal control strategies is also shown, under suitably regular control functionals. The investigation makes use of techniques of multivalued analysis and is based on the degree theory for condensing operators in Hilbert spaces.

  15. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a study of the application of H infinity and mu synthesis techniques to the design of feedback control laws for the longitudinal dynamics of the High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are presented. The objective of this study is to develop methods for the design of feedback control laws which cause the closed loop longitudinal dynamics of the HARV to meet handling quality specifications over the entire flight envelope. Control law designs are based on models of the HARV linearized at various flight conditions. The control laws are evaluated by both linear and nonlinear simulations of typical maneuvers. The fixed gain control laws resulting from both the H infinity and mu synthesis techniques result in excellent performance even when the aircraft performs maneuvers in which the system states vary significantly from their equilibrium design values. Both the H infinity and mu synthesis control laws result in performance which compares favorably with an existing baseline longitudinal control law.

  16. Balanced-Bridge Feedback Control Of Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity to variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics reduced. Proposed control system for motor-driven rotary actuator includes three nested feedback loops which, when properly designed, decoupled from each other. Intended to increase accuracy of control by mitigating such degrading effects as vibrations and variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics of structure rotated. Lends itself to optimization of performance via independent optimization of each of three loops. Includes outer, actuator, and driver feedback loops, configured so that actuator is subsystem, and driver is subsystem of actuator.

  17. Applying vision feedback to crane controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lun-Hui; Huang, Pei-Hsiang; Pan, Shing-Tai; Wijaya Lie, Handra; Chiang, Tung-Chien; Chang, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Encoders are generally used to track the motion of industrial mechanisms. However, the information obtained by encoders may have errors due to encoder aging or mechanism-design problem. Therefore, information by visual feedback is a better way to track the movement of industrial mechanisms. However, image information costs lots of computing effort so it is not easy to be used in real-time control applications. This manuscript derives a simple but effective visual feedback method to follow the target and the image information is obtained only by a general handy camcorder. Besides, the proposed method can track multi-locations in a meantime. Fast image pattern recognition and localisation of the colour histogram by using a moving tracking block is applied to increase the calculation speed. Finally, the obtained locations information by the proposed visual feedback method is applied in an industrial crane control system to verify the effectiveness.

  18. Structural learning in feedforward and feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    For smooth and efficient motor control, the brain needs to make fast corrections during the movement to resist possible perturbations. It also needs to adapt subsequent movements to improve future performance. It is important that both feedback corrections and feedforward adaptation need to be made based on noisy and often ambiguous sensory data. Therefore, the initial response of the motor system, both for online corrections and adaptive responses, is guided by prior assumptions about the likely structure of perturbations. In the context of correcting and adapting movements perturbed by a force field, we asked whether these priors are hard wired or whether they can be modified through repeated exposure to differently shaped force fields. We found that both feedback corrections to unexpected perturbations and feedforward adaptation to a new force field changed, such that they were appropriate to counteract the type of force field that participants had experienced previously. We then investigated whether these changes were driven by a common mechanism or by two separate mechanisms. Participants experienced force fields that were either temporally consistent, causing sustained adaptation, or temporally inconsistent, causing little overall adaptation. We found that the consistent force fields modified both feedback and feedforward responses. In contrast, the inconsistent force field modified the temporal shape of feedback corrections but not of the feedforward adaptive response. These results indicate that responses to force perturbations can be modified in a structural manner and that these modifications are at least partly dissociable for feedback and feedforward control. PMID:22896725

  19. Sensory Feedback Control of Mammalian Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Smotherman, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Somatosensory and auditory feedback mechanisms are dynamic components of the vocal motor pattern generator in mammals. This review explores how sensory cues arising from central auditory and somatosensory pathways actively guide the production of both simple sounds and complex phrases in mammals. While human speech is a uniquely sophisticated example of mammalian vocal behavior, other mammals can serve as examples of how sensory feedback guides complex vocal patterns. Echolocating bats in particular are unique in their absolute dependence on voice control for survival: these animals must constantly adjust the acoustic and temporal patterns of their orientation sounds to efficiently navigate and forage for insects at high speeds under the cover of darkness. Many species of bats also utter a broad repertoire of communication sounds. The functional neuroanatomy of the bat vocal motor pathway is basically identical to other mammals, but the acute significance of sensory feedback in echolocation has made this a profitable model system for studying general principles of sensorimotor integration with regard to vocalizing. Bats and humans are similar in that they both maintain precise control of many different voice parameters, both exhibit a similar suite of responses to altered auditory feedback, and for both the efficacy of sensory feedback depends upon behavioral context. By comparing similarities and differences in the ways sensory feedback influences voice in humans and bats, we may shed light on the basic architecture of the mammalian vocal motor system and perhaps be able to better distinguish those features of human vocal control that evolved uniquely in support of speech and language. PMID:17449116

  20. Bihemispheric network dynamics coordinating vocal feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kort, Naomi S; Cuesta, Pablo; Houde, John F; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of vocal pitch is a key speech feature that conveys important linguistic and affective information. Auditory feedback is used to monitor and maintain pitch. We examined induced neural high gamma power (HGP) (65-150 Hz) using magnetoencephalography during pitch feedback control. Participants phonated into a microphone while hearing their auditory feedback through headphones. During each phonation, a single real-time 400 ms pitch shift was applied to the auditory feedback. Participants compensated by rapidly changing their pitch to oppose the pitch shifts. This behavioral change required coordination of the neural speech motor control network, including integration of auditory and somatosensory feedback to initiate change in motor plans. We found increases in HGP across both hemispheres within 200 ms of pitch shifts, covering left sensory and right premotor, parietal, temporal, and frontal regions, involved in sensory detection and processing of the pitch shift. Later responses to pitch shifts (200-300 ms) were right dominant, in parietal, frontal, and temporal regions. Timing of activity in these regions indicates their role in coordinating motor change and detecting and processing of the sensory consequences of this change. Subtracting out cortical responses during passive listening to recordings of the phonations isolated HGP increases specific to speech production, highlighting right parietal and premotor cortex, and left posterior temporal cortex involvement in the motor response. Correlation of HGP with behavioral compensation demonstrated right frontal region involvement in modulating participant's compensatory response. This study highlights the bihemispheric sensorimotor cortical network involvement in auditory feedback-based control of vocal pitch. PMID:26917046

  1. Sensory feedback control of mammalian vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Smotherman, Michael S

    2007-09-01

    Somatosensory and auditory feedback mechanisms are dynamic components of the vocal motor pattern generator in mammals. This review explores how sensory cues arising from central auditory and somatosensory pathways actively guide the production of both simple sounds and complex phrases in mammals. While human speech is a uniquely sophisticated example of mammalian vocal behavior, other mammals can serve as examples of how sensory feedback guides complex vocal patterns. Echolocating bats in particular are unique in their absolute dependence on voice control for survival: these animals must constantly adjust the acoustic and temporal patterns of their orientation sounds to efficiently navigate and forage for insects at high speeds under the cover of darkness. Many species of bats also utter a broad repertoire of communication sounds. The functional neuroanatomy of the bat vocal motor pathway is basically identical to other mammals, but the acute significance of sensory feedback in echolocation has made this a profitable model system for studying general principles of sensorimotor integration with regard to vocalizing. Bats and humans are similar in that they both maintain precise control of many different voice parameters, both exhibit a similar suite of responses to altered auditory feedback, and for both the efficacy of sensory feedback depends upon behavioral context. By comparing similarities and differences in the ways sensory feedback influences voice in humans and bats, we may shed light on the basic architecture of the mammalian vocal motor system and perhaps be able to better distinguish those features of human vocal control that evolved uniquely in support of speech and language. PMID:17449116

  2. Exponential stability and robust H∞ control of a class of discrete-time switched non-linear systems with time-varying delays via T-S fuzzy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yanbing; Zhang, Hongbin

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with stability and robust H∞ control of discrete-time switched non-linear systems with time-varying delays. The T-S fuzzy models are utilised to represent each sub-non-linear system. Thus, with two level functions, namely, crisp switching functions and local fuzzy weighting functions, we introduce a discrete-time switched fuzzy systems, which inherently contain the features of the switched hybrid systems and T-S fuzzy systems. Piecewise fuzzy weighting-dependent Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals (PFLKFs) and average dwell-time approach are utilised in this paper for the exponentially stability analysis and controller design, and with free fuzzy weighting matrix scheme, switching control laws are obtained such that H∞ performance is satisfied. The conditions of stability and the control laws are given in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that are numerically feasible. The state decay estimate is explicitly given. A numerical example and the control of delayed single link robot arm with uncertain part are given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  3. Impedance feedback control for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alpuche-Aviles, M A; Wipf, D O

    2001-10-15

    A new constant-distance imaging method based on the relationship between tip impedance and tip-substrate separation has been developed for the scanning electrochemical microscope. The tip impedance is monitored by application of a high-frequency ac voltage bias between the tip and auxiliary electrode. The high-frequency ac current is easily separated from the dc-level faradaic electrochemistry with a simple RC filter, which allows impedance measurements during feedback or generation/collection experiments. By employing a piezo-based feedback controller, we are able to maintain the impedance at a constant value and, thus, maintain a constant tip-substrate separation. Application of the method to feedback and generation/collection experiments with tip electrodes as small as 2 microm is presented. PMID:11681463

  4. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsmo, Arne L.

    2015-08-01

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays.

  5. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Arne L

    2015-08-01

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays. PMID:26296104

  6. Nonholonomic feedback control among moving obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Stephen Gregory

    A feedback controller is developed for navigating a nonholonomic vehicle in an area with multiple stationary and possibly moving obstacles. Among other applications the developed algorithms can be used for automatic parking of a passenger car in a parking lot with complex configuration or a ground robot in cluttered environment. Several approaches are explored which combine nonholonomic systems control based on sliding modes and potential field methods.

  7. Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2003-01-01

    An improved approach to the mathematical modeling of feedback control of thermal networks has been devised. Heretofore software for feedback control of thermal networks has been developed by time-consuming trial-and-error methods that depend on engineers expertise. In contrast, the present approach is a systematic means of developing algorithms for feedback control that is optimal in the sense that it combines performance with low cost of implementation. An additional advantage of the present approach is that a thermal engineer need not be expert in control theory. Thermal networks are lumped-parameter approximations used to represent complex thermal systems. Thermal networks are closely related to electrical networks commonly represented by lumped-parameter circuit diagrams. Like such electrical circuits, thermal networks are mathematically modeled by systems of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) that is, ordinary differential equations subject to a set of algebraic constraints. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on applications in which thermal networks are subject to constant disturbances and, therefore, integral control action is necessary to obtain steady-state responses. The mathematical development of the present approach begins with the derivation of optimal integral-control laws via minimization of an appropriate cost functional that involves augmented state vectors. Subsequently, classical variational arguments provide optimality conditions in the form of the Hamiltonian equations for the standard linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) problem. These equations are reduced to an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) with respect to the augmented state vector. The solution of the ARE leads to the direct computation of the optimal proportional- and integral-feedback control gains. In cases of very complex networks, large numbers of state variables make it difficult to implement optimal controllers in the manner described in the preceding paragraph.

  8. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N.; Iglesias, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin–actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  9. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2015-08-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin-actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  10. Local feedback control of light honeycomb panels.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chinsuk; Elliott, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes theoretical and experimental work on the feedback control of sound radiation from honeycomb panels using piezoceramic actuators. It is motivated by the problem of sound transmission in aircraft, specifically the active control of trim panels. Trim panels are generally honeycomb structures designed to meet the design requirement of low weight and high stiffness. They are resiliently mounted to the fuselage for the passive reduction of noise transmission. Local coupling of the closely spaced sensor and actuator was observed experimentally and modeled using a single degree of freedom system. The effect of the local coupling was to roll off the response between the actuator and sensor at high frequencies, so that a feedback control system can have high gain margins. Unfortunately, only relatively poor global performance is then achieved because of localization of reduction around the actuator. This localization prompts the investigation of a multichannel active control system. Globalized reduction was predicted using a model of 12-channel direct velocity feedback control. The multichannel system, however, does not appear to yield a significant improvement in the performance because of decreased gain margin. PMID:17297778

  11. Feedback control during voluntary motor actions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stephen H; Cluff, Tyler; Lowrey, Catherine R; Takei, Tomohiko

    2015-08-01

    Humans possess an impressive ability to generate goal-oriented motor actions to move and interact with the environment. The planning and initiation of these body movements is supported by highly distributed cortical and subcortical circuits. Recent studies, inspired by advanced control theory, highlight similar sophistication when we make online corrections to counter small disturbances of the limb or altered visual feedback. Such goal-directed feedback is likely generated by the same neural circuits associated with motor planning and initiation. These common neural substrates afford a highly responsive system to maintain goal-directed control and rapidly select new motor actions as required to deftly move and interact in a complex world. PMID:25827274

  12. Thermodynamics of Nonequilibrium Systems with Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    In modern nonequilibrium physics, ``Maxwell's demon'' has attracted renewed attentions in both terms of theory and experiment. The demon plays a key role to unify thermodynamics and information theory, which can extract the useful work from a heat bath by using the obtained information via feedback control. In this talk, I will talk about the recent development of thermodynamics of information. In particular, I will focus on the generalizations of the second law of thermodynamics and the Jarzynski equality in the presence of feedback control, where information contents and thermodynamic quantities are treated on an equal footing. I will also discuss recent experimental results that realized Maxwell's demon by colloidal particles and single electrons.

  13. Non-linearity in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Petros, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The whole spectrum of medicine consists of complex non-linear systems that are balanced and interact with each other. How non-linearity confers stability on a system and explains variation and uncertainty in clinical medicine is discussed. A major theme is that a small alteration in initial conditions may have a major effect on the end result. In the context of non-linearity, it is argued that 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM) as it exists today can only ever be relevant to a small fraction of the domain of medicine, that the 'art of medicine' consists of an intuitive 'tuning in' to these complex systems and as such is not so much an art as an expression of non-linear science. The main cause of iatrogenic disease is interpreted as a failure to understand the complexity of the systems being treated. Case study examples are given and analysed in non-linear terms. It is concluded that good medicine concerns individualized treatment of an individual patient whose body functions are governed by non-linear processes. EBM as it exists today paints with a broad and limited brush, but it does promise a fresh new direction. In this context, we need to expand the spectrum of scientific medicine to include non-linearity, and to look upon the 'art of medicine' as a historical (but unstated) legacy in this domain. PMID:12787180

  14. Channel Capacity of Non-Linear Transmission Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Andrew D.; Zhao, Jian

    Since their introduction in the late 1970s, the capacity of optical communication links has grown exponentially, fuelled by a series of key innovations including movement between the three telecommunication windows of 850 nm, 1,310 nm and 1,550 nm, distributed feedback laser, erbium-doped fibre amplifiers (EDFAs), dispersion-shifted and dispersion-managed fibre links, external modulation, wavelength division multiplexing, optical switching, forward error correction (FEC), Raman amplification, and most recently, coherent detection, electronic signal processing and optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). Throughout this evolution, one constant factor has been the use of single-mode optical fibre, whose fundamental principles dated back to the 1800s, when Irish scientist, John Tyndall demonstrated in a lecture to the Royal Society in London that light could be guided through a curved stream of water [1]. Following many developments, including the proposal for waveguides by J.J. Thompson [2], the presentation of detailed calculations for dielectric waveguides by Snitzer [3], the proposal [4] and fabrication [5] of ultra low loss fibres, single-mode fibres were first adopted for non-experimental use in Dorset, UK in 1975, and are still in use today, despite the evolving designs to control chromatic dispersion and non-linearity.

  15. Adaptive output feedback control of flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun

    Neural network-based adaptive output feedback approaches that augment a linear control design are described in this thesis, and emphasis is placed on their real-time implementation with flexible systems. Two different control architectures that are robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics are presented. The unmodelled effects can consist of minimum phase internal dynamics of the system together with external disturbance process. Within this context, adaptive compensation for external disturbances is addressed. In the first approach, internal model-following control, adaptive elements are designed using feedback inversion. The effect of an actuator limit is treated using control hedging, and the effect of other actuation nonlinearities, such as dead zone and backlash, is mitigated by a disturbance observer-based control design. The effectiveness of the approach is illustrated through simulation and experimental testing with a three-disk torsional system, which is subjected to control voltage limit and stiction. While the internal model-following control is limited to minimum phase systems, the second approach, external model-following control, does not involve feedback linearization and can be applied to non-minimum phase systems. The unstable zero dynamics are assumed to have been modelled in the design of the existing linear controller. The laboratory tests for this method include a three-disk torsional pendulum, an inverted pendulum, and a flexible-base robot manipulator. The external model-following control architecture is further extended in three ways. The first extension is an approach for control of multivariable nonlinear systems. The second extension is a decentralized adaptive control approach for large-scale interconnected systems. The third extension is to make use of an adaptive observer to augment a linear observer-based controller. In this extension, augmenting terms for the adaptive observer can be used to achieve adaptation in

  16. Control of parallel manipulators using force feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanua, Prabjot

    1994-01-01

    Two control schemes are compared for parallel robotic mechanisms actuated by hydraulic cylinders. One scheme, the 'rate based scheme', uses the position and rate information only for feedback. The second scheme, the 'force based scheme' feeds back the force information also. The force control scheme is shown to improve the response over the rate control one. It is a simple constant gain control scheme better suited to parallel mechanisms. The force control scheme can be easily modified for the dynamic forces on the end effector. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of both the rate and force control schemes. The gains in the force based scheme can be individually adjusted in all three directions, whereas the adjustment in just one direction of the rate based scheme directly affects the other two directions.

  17. Implicit Flux Feedback Control for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Frederick Joseph

    Design and implementation of a dynamic system that includes magnetic bearings is dependent on knowledge of the relationship between the command input to the magnetic actuator and the force that the bearing actually applies to the rotor (or other structure) being controlled. Traditional designs relate the bearing coil current to the developed bearing force; unfortunately, the current-to-force relationship is not invariant to magnetic hysteresis, magnetic saturation, eddy current effects, or changes in the bearing air gap length. To overcome these limitations, an approach known as implicit flux feedback is explored. Since the gap force in a magnetic circuit is directly related to the flux in that gap, measuring the gap flux and employing it as a feedback state results in a bearing with an improved command -to-force relation which is less subject to the error sources mentioned above. Confirmation of the flux-to-force relationship is accomplished via experiments on a test apparatus specifically designed to allow simultaneous force and flux measurements on a single-axis magnetic bearing (using both laminated and solid magnetic components). Successful implementation of the flux feedback algorithm simplifies the control system design of magnetic bearing systems by providing a more accurate, well characterized actuator model, and, by overcoming such effects as hysteresis, saturation, eddy currents and gap dependence, this approach provides magnetic bearings which exhibit significantly improved dynamic performance.

  18. Wide power range microwave feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, L. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A substantially constant power level is derived over a predetermined frequency band, in each of a plurality of relatively widely spaced power ranges, from a microwave load having a predetermined amplitude versus frequency response, such as an antenna. A microwave source of substantially constant amplitude drives a forward path connected between the source and the load. A feedback path responsive to the microwave power level in the forward path derives a control voltage for the PIN attenuator. The equalizer attenuator drives a linear, crystal amplitude detector. Attenuating means included in the forward and feedback paths are selectively connected in circuit to maintain the power level of the microwave input to the amplitude detector substantially constant, even though different power ranges are supplied to the load by the forward path.

  19. Smart building temperature control using occupant feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.

    This work was motivated by the problem of computing optimal commonly-agreeable thermal settings in spaces with multiple occupants. In this work we propose algorithms that take into account each occupant's preferences along with the thermal correlations between different zones in a building, to arrive at optimal thermal settings for all zones of the building in a coordinated manner. In the first part of this work we incorporate active occupant feedback to minimize aggregate user discomfort and total energy cost. User feedback is used to estimate the users comfort range, taking into account possible inaccuracies in the feedback. The control algorithm takes the energy cost into account, trading it off optimally with the aggregate user discomfort. A lumped heat transfer model based on thermal resistance and capacitance is used to model a multi-zone building. We provide a stability analysis and establish convergence of the proposed solution to a desired temperature that minimizes the sum of energy cost and aggregate user discomfort. However, for convergence to the optimal, sufficient separation between the user feedback frequency and the dynamics of the system is necessary; otherwise, the user feedback provided do not correctly reflect the effect of current control input value on user discomfort. The algorithm is further extended using singular perturbation theory to determine the minimum time between successive user feedback solicitations. Under sufficient time scale separation, we establish convergence of the proposed solution. Simulation study and experimental runs on the Watervliet based test facility demonstrates performance of the algorithm. In the second part we develop a consensus algorithm for attaining a common temperature set-point that is agreeable to all occupants of a zone in a typical multi-occupant space. The information on the comfort range functions is indeed held privately by each occupant. Using occupant differentiated dynamically adjusted prices as

  20. Smart building temperature control using occupant feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.

    This work was motivated by the problem of computing optimal commonly-agreeable thermal settings in spaces with multiple occupants. In this work we propose algorithms that take into account each occupant's preferences along with the thermal correlations between different zones in a building, to arrive at optimal thermal settings for all zones of the building in a coordinated manner. In the first part of this work we incorporate active occupant feedback to minimize aggregate user discomfort and total energy cost. User feedback is used to estimate the users comfort range, taking into account possible inaccuracies in the feedback. The control algorithm takes the energy cost into account, trading it off optimally with the aggregate user discomfort. A lumped heat transfer model based on thermal resistance and capacitance is used to model a multi-zone building. We provide a stability analysis and establish convergence of the proposed solution to a desired temperature that minimizes the sum of energy cost and aggregate user discomfort. However, for convergence to the optimal, sufficient separation between the user feedback frequency and the dynamics of the system is necessary; otherwise, the user feedback provided do not correctly reflect the effect of current control input value on user discomfort. The algorithm is further extended using singular perturbation theory to determine the minimum time between successive user feedback solicitations. Under sufficient time scale separation, we establish convergence of the proposed solution. Simulation study and experimental runs on the Watervliet based test facility demonstrates performance of the algorithm. In the second part we develop a consensus algorithm for attaining a common temperature set-point that is agreeable to all occupants of a zone in a typical multi-occupant space. The information on the comfort range functions is indeed held privately by each occupant. Using occupant differentiated dynamically adjusted prices as

  1. Non-Linear Electrohydrodynamics in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Since the inception of microfluidics, the electric force has been exploited as one of the leading mechanisms for driving and controlling the movement of the operating fluid and the charged suspensions. Electric force has an intrinsic advantage in miniaturized devices. Because the electrodes are placed over a small distance, from sub-millimeter to a few microns, a very high electric field is easy to obtain. The electric force can be highly localized as its strength rapidly decays away from the peak. This makes the electric force an ideal candidate for precise spatial control. The geometry and placement of the electrodes can be used to design electric fields of varying distributions, which can be readily realized by Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication methods. In this paper, we examine several electrically driven liquid handling operations. The emphasis is given to non-linear electrohydrodynamic effects. We discuss the theoretical treatment and related numerical methods. Modeling and simulations are used to unveil the associated electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The modeling based investigation is interwoven with examples of microfluidic devices to illustrate the applications. PMID:21673912

  2. Non-linear electrohydrodynamics in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Since the inception of microfluidics, the electric force has been exploited as one of the leading mechanisms for driving and controlling the movement of the operating fluid and the charged suspensions. Electric force has an intrinsic advantage in miniaturized devices. Because the electrodes are placed over a small distance, from sub-millimeter to a few microns, a very high electric field is easy to obtain. The electric force can be highly localized as its strength rapidly decays away from the peak. This makes the electric force an ideal candidate for precise spatial control. The geometry and placement of the electrodes can be used to design electric fields of varying distributions, which can be readily realized by Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication methods. In this paper, we examine several electrically driven liquid handling operations. The emphasis is given to non-linear electrohydrodynamic effects. We discuss the theoretical treatment and related numerical methods. Modeling and simulations are used to unveil the associated electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The modeling based investigation is interwoven with examples of microfluidic devices to illustrate the applications. PMID:21673912

  3. Proceedings of the Non-Linear Aero Prediction Requirements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Non-Linear Aero Prediction Requirements Workshop, held at NASA Langley Research Center on 8-9 Dec. 1993, was to identify and articulate requirements for non-linear aero prediction capabilities during conceptual/preliminary design. The attendees included engineers from industry, government, and academia in a variety of aerospace disciplines, such as advanced design, aerodynamic performance analysis, aero methods development, flight controls, and experimental and theoretical aerodynamics. Presentations by industry and government organizations were followed by panel discussions. This report contains copies of the presentations and the results of the panel discussions.

  4. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  5. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  6. Efficient Modeling Method of Vehicle Dynamics Operating at a Low Speed and Its Application to Non-Linear Optimal Controller Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Woo; Matsuzaki, Sinya; Narikiyo, Tatsuo

    In this paper, we propose a non-analytical but effective self-organizing modeling method, where system dynamics of interest are constructed in a polynomial affine formation with high granularity. The conventional data mining technique has the assessment scheme for representativeness of the developed model. However, if the model is applied to extract the desired values without considering the structural peculiarities such as input pattern used for constructing the dynamics, hardware specification used for data acquisition, and so on, it possibly shows substantial margin of modeling error. In order to correspond this type of control paradigm, we define the permissible set of state and input variables in order to characterize the data used for developing the model. The developed model is then applied to the programming based optimal control scheme where the optimal inputs are selected among the permissible set of the input variable, considering all the limitations specified by linear inequalities.

  7. Speech Production as State Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Houde, John F.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Spoken language exists because of a remarkable neural process. Inside a speaker's brain, an intended message gives rise to neural signals activating the muscles of the vocal tract. The process is remarkable because these muscles are activated in just the right way that the vocal tract produces sounds a listener understands as the intended message. What is the best approach to understanding the neural substrate of this crucial motor control process? One of the key recent modeling developments in neuroscience has been the use of state feedback control (SFC) theory to explain the role of the CNS in motor control. SFC postulates that the CNS controls motor output by (1) estimating the current dynamic state of the thing (e.g., arm) being controlled, and (2) generating controls based on this estimated state. SFC has successfully predicted a great range of non-speech motor phenomena, but as yet has not received attention in the speech motor control community. Here, we review some of the key characteristics of speech motor control and what they say about the role of the CNS in the process. We then discuss prior efforts to model the role of CNS in speech motor control, and argue that these models have inherent limitations – limitations that are overcome by an SFC model of speech motor control which we describe. We conclude by discussing a plausible neural substrate of our model. PMID:22046152

  8. Feedback Error Learning in neuromotor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Abraham K.

    This thesis is concerned with adaptive human motor control. Adaptation is a highly desirable characteristic of any biological system. Failure is an undesirable, yet very real, characteristic of the human motor control systems. Variability is a ubiquitous observation in human movements that has no direct analogue in the design and analysis of robotic control algorithms. This thesis attempts to link these three aspects of motor control under the constraints of a biologically inspired control framework termed Feedback Error Learning (FEL). Utilizing nonlinear and adaptive control methods we prove conditions for which the FEL framework is stable and successful learning can occur. Utilizing singular perturbation methods, we derive conditions for which the system is guaranteed to fail. Variability is analyzed using Ito Calculus and stochastic Lyapunov functionals where signal dependent noise, a commonly observed phenomenon, enters in the learning algorithm. We also show how signal dependent noise might benefit biological control systems despite the inherent variability introduced into the motor control loops. Lastly, we investigate a force tracking control task, where subjects are asked to track a time-varying plant. Using basic control and system identification techniques, we probe the human motor learning system and extract learning rates with respect to the FEL model.

  9. Learner Control of Feedback in a Computer Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pridemore, Doris R.; Klein, James D.

    This study assessed whether learner control of feedback has a beneficial effect in student performance and attitude, focusing on whether the degree of elaboration feedback needed for high performance could be determined. Program and learner control were used at three levels of feedback, verification, correct answer, and elaboration. Subjects were…

  10. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  11. Neural network modelling of non-linear hydrological relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahart, R. J.; See, L. M.

    2007-09-01

    Two recent studies have suggested that neural network modelling offers no worthwhile improvements in comparison to the application of weighted linear transfer functions for capturing the non-linear nature of hydrological relationships. The potential of an artificial neural network to perform simple non-linear hydrological transformations under controlled conditions is examined in this paper. Eight neural network models were developed: four full or partial emulations of a recognised non-linear hydrological rainfall-runoff model; four solutions developed on an identical set of inputs and a calculated runoff coefficient output. The use of different input combinations enabled the competencies of solutions developed on a reduced number of parameters to be assessed. The selected hydrological model had a limited number of inputs and contained no temporal component. The modelling process was based on a set of random inputs that had a uniform distribution and spanned a modest range of possibilities. The initial cloning operations permitted a direct comparison to be performed with the equation-based relationship. It also provided more general information about the power of a neural network to replicate mathematical equations and model modest non-linear relationships. The second group of experiments explored a different relationship that is of hydrological interest; the target surface contained a stronger set of non-linear properties and was more challenging. Linear modelling comparisons were performed against traditional least squares multiple linear regression solutions developed on identical datasets. The reported results demonstrate that neural networks are capable of modelling non-linear hydrological processes and are therefore appropriate tools for hydrological modelling.

  12. Optimal haptic feedback control of artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Besier, Thor; Anderson, Iain; McKay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    As our population ages, and trends in obesity continue to grow, joint degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are becoming increasingly prevalent. With no cure currently in sight, the only effective treatments for OA are orthopaedic surgery and prolonged rehabilitation, neither of which is guaranteed to succeed. Gait retraining has tremendous potential to alter the contact forces in the joints due to walking, reducing the risk of one developing hip and knee OA. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are being explored as a potential way of applying intuitive haptic feedback to alter a patient's walking gait. The main challenge with the use of DEAs in this application is producing large enough forces and strains to induce sensation when coupled to a patient's skin. A novel controller has been proposed to solve this issue. The controller uses simultaneous capacitive self-sensing and actuation which will optimally apply a haptic sensation to the patient's skin independent of variability in DEAs and patient geometries.

  13. Non-linear Post Processing Image Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shawn; Lopez, Alex; Torres, Angel

    1997-01-01

    A non-linear filter for image post processing based on the feedforward Neural Network topology is presented. This study was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of "smart" filters in image post processing. The filter has shown to be useful in recovering high frequencies, such as those lost during the JPEG compression-decompression process. The filtered images have a higher signal to noise ratio, and a higher perceived image quality. Simulation studies comparing the proposed filter with the optimum mean square non-linear filter, showing examples of the high frequency recovery, and the statistical properties of the filter are given,

  14. Stability of non-linear integrable accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Batalov, I.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The stability of non-linear Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) model developed in [1] was tested. The area of the stable region in transverse coordinates and the maximum attainable tune spread were found as a function of non-linear lens strength. Particle loss as a function of turn number was analyzed to determine whether a dynamic aperture limitation present in the system. The system was also tested with sextupoles included in the machine for chromaticity compensation. A method of evaluation of the beam size in the linear part of the accelerator was proposed.

  15. Design of turbofan engine controls using output feedback regulator theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on output feedback regulator (OFR) theory is applied to the F100 turbofan engine. Results for the OFR design are compared to a design based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. The OFR feedback control is designed in the full order state space and thus eliminates any need for model reduction techniques. Using the performance measure and control structure of the LQR design, an equivalent OFR feedback control is obtained. The flexibility of the OFR as a control design procedure is demonstrated, and differing feedback control structures are evaluated.

  16. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  17. The non-linear MSW equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Mark J.; McKellar, Bruce H. J.

    1991-04-01

    A simple, non-linear generalization of the MSW equation is presented and its analytic solution is outlined. The orbits of the polarization vector are shown to be periodic, and to lie on a sphere. Their non-trivial flow patterns fall into two topological categories, the more complex of which can become chaotic if perturbed.

  18. Non-linear cord-rubber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the stress-strain relations in a multi-layer composite made up of materials whose individual stress-strain characteristics are non-linear and possibly different. The method is applied to the case of asymmetric tubes in tension, and comparisons with experimentally measured data are given.

  19. DTRC electromagnetic launcher with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad, F. P.; Borraccini, J. P.; Waltman, D. J.; Fikse, T. H.; Ruby, W. R.; Superczynski, M. J.; Whitestone, R. C.; Thomas, E. V.

    1993-01-01

    Emad et al. (1989) described the development of an analytical model used to simulate, and aid in the design and construction, of a coaxial launcher. Attention is here given to a more powerful launcher, improved design methods, and the use of feedback to control the forces as the launch is taking place. The model is based on a variable set of differential equations that represent the electromagnetics of the system coupled with the mechanical equations of motion. This approach in modeling results in excellent accuracy, numerical stability, and efficiency. The simulation can be performed on a desktop computer. The resulting design was used to build a full scale model, which was then instrumented and tested. Both simulation and actual test results of the new launcher are presented.

  20. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  1. Feedback control of an ensemble of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-chun; Chen, Qun; Wang, Rang; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-06-01

    Rectified transport of self-propelled particles in an asymmetric period potential is numerically investigated by employing a feedback control protocol. The feedback control is switched on and off depending on the direction of the self-propelled speed. It is found that the direction of the transport is determined by the asymmetry of the potential and the feedback control strength. In the presence of feedback control, the directed transport can be improved significantly by increasing the feedback control strength under appropriate conditions. For large ensembles of particles, however, the feedback control will not obviously affect the transport of self-propelled particles. The present studies may be relevant to some applications in biology and nanotechnology, and provide the predicting results in experiments of active particles.

  2. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  3. Optimal Feedback Controlled Assembly of Perfect Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xun; Rupp, Bradley; Yang, Yuguang; Edwards, Tara D; Grover, Martha A; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-07-26

    Perfectly ordered states are targets in diverse molecular to microscale systems involving, for example, atomic clusters, protein folding, protein crystallization, nanoparticle superlattices, and colloidal crystals. However, there is no obvious approach to control the assembly of perfectly ordered global free energy minimum structures; near-equilibrium assembly is impractically slow, and faster out-of-equilibrium processes generally terminate in defective states. Here, we demonstrate the rapid and robust assembly of perfect crystals by navigating kinetic bottlenecks using closed-loop control of electric field mediated crystallization of colloidal particles. An optimal policy is computed with dynamic programming using a reaction coordinate based dynamic model. By tracking real-time stochastic particle configurations and adjusting applied fields via feedback, the evolution of unassembled particles is guided through polycrystalline states into single domain crystals. This approach to controlling the assembly of a target structure is based on general principles that make it applicable to a broad range of processes from nano- to microscales (where tuning a global thermodynamic variable yields temporal control over thermal sampling of different states via their relative free energies). PMID:27387146

  4. BISMAC control using SMA resistance feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Alex; Priya, Shashank

    2010-04-01

    Recently, bio-inspired shape memory alloy composite (BISMAC) actuators have been shown to be promising for the design of medusae rowing propulsion. BISMAC actuators were able to recreate bell deformation of Aurelia aurita by controlling shape memory alloy (SMA) deformation that allowed matching the contraction-relaxation deformation profile. In this study, we improve upon the control system and demonstrate feedback control using SMA wire resistance to decrease contraction time and power consumption. The controller requires the knowledge of threshold resistance and safe current inputs which were determined experimentally. The overheating effect of SMA wires was analyzed for BioMetal Fiber (BMF) and Flexinol 100 μm diameter wires revealing an increase in resistance as the wires overheated. The controller was first characterized on a SMA wire with bias spring system for a BMF 100 using Ihi = 0.5 A and Ilow = 0.2 A, where hi corresponds to peak current for fast actuation and low corresponds to the safe current which prevents overheating and maintains desired deformation. A contraction of 4.59% was achieved in 0.06 s using the controller and the deformation was maintained for 2 s at low current. The BISMAC actuator was operated using the controller with Ihi = 1.1 A and Ilow = 0.65 A achieving a 67% decrease in contraction time compared to using a constant driving current of Ilow = 0.2 A and a 60% decrease in energy consumption compared to using constant Ihi = 0.5 A while still exceeding the contraction requirements of the Aurelia aurita.

  5. Autonomous benthic algal cultivator under feedback control of ecosystem metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An autonomous and internally-controlled techno-ecological hybrid was developed that controls primary production of algae in a laboratory-scale cultivator. The technoecosystem is based on an algal turf scrubber (ATS) system that combines engineered feedback control programming with internal feedback...

  6. Design of turbofan engine controls using output feedback regulator theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on output feedback regulator (OFR) theory is applied to the F100 turbofan engine. Results for the OFR design are compared to a design based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. This LQR design was obtained as part of the F100 Multivariable Control Synthesis (MVCS) program. In the MVCS program the LQR feedback control was designed in a reduced dimension state space and then applied to the original system. However, the OFR feedback control is designed in the full order state space and thus eliminates any need for model reduction techniques. Using the performance measure and control structure of the MVCS program LQR design, an equivalent OFR feedback control is obtained. The flexibility of the OFR as a control design procedure is demonstrated and differing feedback control structures are evaluated.

  7. Disrupting vagal feedback affects birdsong motor control

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Jorge M.; Dall'Asén, Analía G.; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Coordination of different motor systems for sound production involves the use of feedback mechanisms. Song production in oscines is a well-established animal model for studying learned vocal behavior. Whereas the online use of auditory feedback has been studied in the songbird model, very little is known about the role of other feedback mechanisms. Auditory feedback is required for the maintenance of stereotyped adult song. In addition, the use of somatosensory feedback to maintain pressure during song has been demonstrated with experimentally induced fluctuations in air sac pressure. Feedback information mediating this response is thought to be routed to the central nervous system via afferent fibers of the vagus nerve. Here, we tested the effects of unilateral vagotomy on the peripheral motor patterns of song production and the acoustic features. Unilateral vagotomy caused a variety of disruptions and alterations to the respiratory pattern of song, some of which affected the acoustic structure of vocalizations. These changes were most pronounced a few days after nerve resection and varied between individuals. In the most extreme cases, the motor gestures of respiration were so severely disrupted that individual song syllables or the song motif were atypically terminated. Acoustic changes also suggest altered use of the two sound generators and upper vocal tract filtering, indicating that the disruption of vagal feedback caused changes to the motor program of all motor systems involved in song production and modification. This evidence for the use of vagal feedback by the song system with disruption of song during the first days after nerve cut provides a contrast to the longer-term effects of auditory feedback disruption. It suggests a significant role for somatosensory feedback that differs from that of auditory feedback. PMID:21113000

  8. Self-Controlled Feedback in 10-Year-Old Children: Higher Feedback Frequencies Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; de Medeiros, Franklin Laroque; Kaefer, Angelica; Wally, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether learning in 10-year-old children--that is, the age group for which the Chiviacowsky et al. (2006) study found benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR)--would differ depending on the frequency of feedback they chose. The authors surmised that a relatively high feedback frequency…

  9. Sensory-Feedback Exoskeletal Arm Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Bin; Massie, Thomas H.; Vayner, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    An electromechanical exoskeletal arm apparatus has been designed for use in controlling a remote robotic manipulator arm. The apparatus, called a force-feedback exoskeleton arm master (F-EAM) is comfortable to wear and easy to don and doff. It provides control signals from the wearer s arm to a robot arm or a computer simulator (e.g., a virtual-reality system); it also provides force and torque feedback from sensors on the robot arm or from the computer simulator to the wearer s arm. The F-EAM enables the wearer to make the robot arm gently touch objects and finely manipulate them without exerting excessive forces. The F-EAM features a lightweight design in which the motors and gear heads that generate force and torque feedback are made smaller than they ordinarily would be: this is achieved by driving the motors to power levels greater than would ordinarily be used in order to obtain higher torques, and by providing active liquid cooling of the motors to prevent overheating at the high drive levels. The F-EAM (see figure) includes an assembly that resembles a backpack and is worn like a backpack, plus an exoskeletal arm mechanism. The FEAM has five degrees of freedom (DOFs) that correspond to those of the human arm: 1. The first DOF is that of the side-to-side rotation of the upper arm about the shoulder (rotation about axis 1). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 1 via drum 1 and a planar four-bar linkage. 2. The second DOF is that of the up-and-down rotation of the arm about the shoulder. The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 2 via drum 2. 3. The third DOF is that of twisting of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis. This DOF is implemented in a cable remote-center mechanism (CRCM). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 3, which drives the upper-arm cuff and the mechanism below it. A bladder inflatable by gas or liquid is placed between the cuff and the wearer s upper arm to compensate for misalignment

  10. Feedback linearization for control of air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Stephen; Mattern, Duane

    1991-01-01

    The method of feedback linearization for control of the nonlinear nozzle and compressor components of an air breathing engine is presented. This method overcomes the need for a large number of scheduling variables and operating points to accurately model highly nonlinear plants. Feedback linearization also results in linear closed loop system performance simplifying subsequent control design. Feedback linearization is used for the nonlinear partial engine model and performance is verified through simulation.

  11. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, J.; Hövel, P.; Flunkert, V.; Guzenko, P. Yu.; Fradkov, A. L.; Schöll, E.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions.

  12. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, J; Hövel, P; Flunkert, V; Guzenko, P Yu; Fradkov, A L; Schöll, E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions. PMID:22225348

  13. Non-linear dark energy clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Ballesteros, Guillermo; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: ballesteros@pd.infn.it

    2011-11-01

    We consider a dark energy fluid with arbitrary sound speed and equation of state and discuss the effect of its clustering on the cold dark matter distribution at the non-linear level. We write the continuity, Euler and Poisson equations for the system in the Newtonian approximation. Then, using the time renormalization group method to resum perturbative corrections at all orders, we compute the total clustering power spectrum and matter power spectrum. At the linear level, a sound speed of dark energy different from that of light modifies the power spectrum on observationally interesting scales, such as those relevant for baryonic acoustic oscillations. We show that the effect of varying the sound speed of dark energy on the non-linear corrections to the matter power spectrum is below the per cent level, and therefore these corrections can be well modelled by their counterpart in cosmological scenarios with smooth dark energy. We also show that the non-linear effects on the matter growth index can be as large as 10–15 per cent for small scales.

  14. Phototube non-linearity correction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riboldi, S.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.

    2015-06-01

    Scintillation light is often detected by photo-multiplier tube (PMT) technology. PMTs are however intrinsically non linear devices, especially when operated with high light yield scintillators and high input photon flux. Many physical effects (e.g. inter-dynode field variation, photocathode resistivity, etc.) can spoil the ideal PMT behavior in terms of gain, ending up in what are addressed as the under-linearity and over-linearity effects. Established techniques implemented in the PMT base (e.g. increasing bleeding current, active voltage divider, etc.) can mitigate these effects, but given the unavoidable spread in manufacturing and materials, it turns out that, with respect to linearity at the percent level, every PMT sample is a story of its own. The residual non linearity is usually accounted for with polynomial correction of the spectrum energy scale, starting from the position of a few known energy peaks of calibration sources, but uncertainly remains in between of calibration peaks. We propose to retrieve the calibration information from the entire energy spectrum and not only the position of full energy peaks (FEP), by means of an automatic procedure that also takes into account the quality (signal/noise ratio) of the information about the non-linearity extracted from the various regions of the spectrum.

  15. Sparse feedback structures for wireless control of civil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoljak, Reuben D.; Linderman, Lauren E.

    2015-03-01

    Although originally popularized for structural health monitoring, wireless smart sensors are an attractive alternative to traditional tethered systems for structural control. Their onboard sensing, processing, and wireless communication offer all the components of a feedback control system. However, wireless smart sensors pose unique challenges for the application of centralized control, which is common in most modern control systems. Decentralized control offers several advantages to wireless structural control, including limiting the wireless communication required and the associated slow sampling rate and time delays in the control system. Previous decentralized structural control algorithms, both Ad-Hoc and Heuristic, enforce a spatial sparsity pattern during the design, which is assumed a priori. Therefore, the optimal feedback structure is not considered in the design. This work explores a decentralized optimal LQR design algorithm where the sparsity of the feedback gain is incorporated into the objective function. The control approach is compared to previous decentralized control techniques on the 20-Story control benchmark structure. Sparsity and control requirements are compared to centralized designs. The optimal sparse feedback design offers the best balance of performance, measurement feedback, and control effort. Additionally, the feedback structure identified is not easily identifiable a priori; thus, highlighting the significance of particular measurements in this feedback framework.

  16. A non-linear programming approach to the computer-aided design of regulators using a linear-quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1985-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a non-linear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer-aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer.

  17. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, E; Camunas-Soler, J; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Seifert, U; Ritort, F

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force. PMID:27575077

  18. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  19. Lyapunov optimal feedback control of a nonlinear inverted pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. J.; Anderson, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Liapunov optimal feedback control is applied to a nonlinear inverted pendulum in which the control torque was constrained to be less than the nonlinear gravity torque in the model. This necessitates a control algorithm which 'rocks' the pendulum out of its potential wells, in order to stabilize it at a unique vertical position. Simulation results indicate that a preliminary Liapunov feedback controller can successfully overcome the nonlinearity and bring almost all trajectories to the target.

  20. An improved output feedback control of flexible large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lin, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A special output feedback control design technique for flexible large space structures is proposed. It is shown that the technique will increase both the damping and frequency of selected modes for more effective control. It is also able to effect integrated control of elastic and rigid-body modes and, in particular, closed-loop system stability and robustness to modal truncation and parameter variation. The technique is seen as marking an improvement over previous work concerning large space structures output feedback control.

  1. Spin waves cause non-linear friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magiera, M. P.; Brendel, L.; Wolf, D. E.; Nowak, U.

    2011-07-01

    Energy dissipation is studied for a hard magnetic tip that scans a soft magnetic substrate. The dynamics of the atomic moments are simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation numerically. The local energy currents are analysed for the case of a Heisenberg spin chain taken as substrate. This leads to an explanation for the velocity dependence of the friction force: The non-linear contribution for high velocities can be attributed to a spin wave front pushed by the tip along the substrate.

  2. Non-linear Models for Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    Serroyen, Jan; Molenberghs, Geert; Verbeke, Geert; Davidian, Marie

    2009-01-01

    While marginal models, random-effects models, and conditional models are routinely considered to be the three main modeling families for continuous and discrete repeated measures with linear and generalized linear mean structures, respectively, it is less common to consider non-linear models, let alone frame them within the above taxonomy. In the latter situation, indeed, when considered at all, the focus is often exclusively on random-effects models. In this paper, we consider all three families, exemplify their great flexibility and relative ease of use, and apply them to a simple but illustrative set of data on tree circumference growth of orange trees. PMID:20160890

  3. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. We find that stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, pushing the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible. Results of driven N-body systems by Stuart Robbins: Even unforced rings show large variations; Forcing triggers aggregation; Some limit cycles and phase lags seen, but not always as predicted by predator-prey model. Summary of Halo Results: A predatorprey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw'. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon

  4. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2015-04-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. We find that stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, pushing the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible Results of driven N-body systems by Stuart Robbins: Even unforced rings show large variations; Forcing triggers aggregation; Some limit cycles and phase lags seen, but not always as predicted by predator-prey model. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw'. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon

  5. Non-linear aeroelastic prediction for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Henshaw, M. J.; Badcock, K. J.; Vio, G. A.; Allen, C. B.; Chamberlain, J.; Kaynes, I.; Dimitriadis, G.; Cooper, J. E.; Woodgate, M. A.; Rampurawala, A. M.; Jones, D.; Fenwick, C.; Gaitonde, A. L.; Taylor, N. V.; Amor, D. S.; Eccles, T. A.; Denley, C. J.

    2007-05-01

    in this domain. This is set within the context of a generic industrial process and the requirements of UK and US aeroelastic qualification. A range of test cases, from simple small DOF cases to full aircraft, have been used to evaluate and validate the non-linear methods developed and to make comparison with the linear methods in everyday use. These have focused mainly on aerodynamic non-linearity, although some results for structural non-linearity are also presented. The challenges associated with time domain (coupled computational fluid dynamics-computational structural model (CFD-CSM)) methods have been addressed through the development of grid movement, fluid-structure coupling, and control surface movement technologies. Conclusions regarding the accuracy and computational cost of these are presented. The computational cost of time-domain methods, despite substantial improvements in efficiency, remains high. However, significant advances have been made in reduced order methods, that allow non-linear behaviour to be modelled, but at a cost comparable with that of the regular linear methods. Of particular note is a method based on Hopf bifurcation that has reached an appropriate maturity for deployment on real aircraft configurations, though only limited results are presented herein. Results are also presented for dynamically linearised CFD approaches that hold out the possibility of non-linear results at a fraction of the cost of time coupled CFD-CSM methods. Local linearisation approaches (higher order harmonic balance and continuation method) are also presented; these have the advantage that no prior assumption of the nature of the aeroelastic instability is required, but currently these methods are limited to low DOF problems and it is thought that these will not reach a level of maturity appropriate to real aircraft problems for some years to come. Nevertheless, guidance on the most likely approaches has been derived and this forms the basis for ongoing

  6. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Loveday, P W; Rogers, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing operations, used to adjust the resonant frequency, by displacement feedback and for determining the velocity feedback required to produce a particular bandwidth. Experiments were performed on a cylindrical resonator with discrete piezoelectric actuation and sensing elements to demonstrate the principles. Good agreement between analysis and experiment was obtained, and it was shown that this type of resonator could be balanced by displacement feedback. The analysis method presented also is applicable to micromachined piezoelectric gyroscopes. PMID:18244281

  7. Heating power feedback control for CO2 laser fusion splicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenxin; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Toshirou; Klimowych, William

    2013-02-01

    A novel feedback control method has been developed for an automated splicer using a CO2 laser as the heating element. The feedback method employs a sensor for laser beam power and CMOS cameras as sensors for fiber luminescence which is directly related to glass temperature. The CO2 laser splicer with this type of feedback system provides a consistent platform for the fiber laser and bio-medical industry for fabrication of fused glass components such as tapers, couplers, combiners, mode-field adaptors, and fusion splices. With such a closed loop feedback system, both splice loss and peak-to-peak taper ripple are greatly reduced.

  8. Direct laser additive fabrication system with image feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Michelle L.; Hofmeister, William H.; Knorovsky, Gerald A.; MacCallum, Danny O.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Smugeresky, John E.

    2002-01-01

    A closed-loop, feedback-controlled direct laser fabrication system is disclosed. The feedback refers to the actual growth conditions obtained by real-time analysis of thermal radiation images. The resulting system can fabricate components with severalfold improvement in dimensional tolerances and surface finish.

  9. Coherent controllers for optical-feedback cooling of quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    We study the cooling performance of optical-feedback controllers for open optical and mechanical resonators in the linear quadratic Gaussian setting of stochastic control theory. We utilize analysis and numerical optimization of closed-loop models based on quantum stochastic differential equations to show that coherent control schemes, where we embed the resonator in an interferometer to achieve all-optical feedback, can outperform optimal measurement-based feedback control schemes in the quantum regime of low steady-state excitation number. These performance gains are attributed to the coherent controller's ability to simultaneously process both quadratures of an optical probe field without measurement or loss of fidelity, and may guide the design of coherent feedback schemes for more general problems of robust nonlinear and robust control.

  10. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla

  11. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech, and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 135 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech. PMID:18035557

  13. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw', as observed ny Cassini cameras. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon-triggered clumping at perturbed regions in Saturn's rings creates both high velocity dispersion and large aggregates at these distances, explaining both small and large particles observed there. This confirms the triple architecture of ring particles: a broad size distribution of particles; these aggregate into temporary rubble piles; coated by a regolith of dust. We calculate the stationary size distribution using a cell-to-cell mapping procedure that converts the phase-plane trajectories to a Markov chain. Approximating the Markov chain as an asymmetric random walk with reflecting boundaries allows us to determine the power law index from

  14. Cortical feedback control of olfactory bulb circuits.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alison M; Sturgill, James F; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2012-12-20

    Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  15. Quantum effects improve the energy efficiency of feedback control.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M; Jacobs, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    The laws of thermodynamics apply equally well to quantum systems as to classical systems, and because of this, quantum effects do not change the fundamental thermodynamic efficiency of isothermal refrigerators or engines. We show that, despite this fact, quantum mechanics permits measurement-based feedback control protocols that are more thermodynamically efficient than their classical counterparts. As part of our analysis, we perform a detailed accounting of the thermodynamics of unitary feedback control and elucidate the sources of inefficiency in measurement-based and coherent feedback. PMID:24827219

  16. Identification and feedback control in structures with piezoceramic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Ito, K.; Wang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    In this lecture we give fundamental well-posedness results for a variational formulation of a class of damped second order partial differential equations with unbounded input or control coefficients. Included as special cases in this class are structures with piezoceramic actuators. We consider approximation techniques leading to computational methods in the context of both parameter estimation and feedback control problems for these systems. Rigorous convergence results for parameter estimates and feedback gains are discussed.

  17. Adaptive method with intercessory feedback control for an intelligent agent

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2004-06-22

    An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for an intelligent agent provides for adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for multiple intelligent agents provides for coordinating and adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. Re-programming of the adaptive architecture is through a nexus which coordinates reflexive and deliberator components.

  18. A variable-gain output feedback control design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Moerder, Daniel D.; Broussard, John R.; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1989-01-01

    A digital control system design technique is developed in which the control system gain matrix varies with the plant operating point parameters. The design technique is obtained by formulating the problem as an optimal stochastic output feedback control law with variable gains. This approach provides a control theory framework within which the operating range of a control law can be significantly extended. Furthermore, the approach avoids the major shortcomings of the conventional gain-scheduling techniques. The optimal variable gain output feedback control problem is solved by embedding the Multi-Configuration Control (MCC) problem, previously solved at ICS. An algorithm to compute the optimal variable gain output feedback control gain matrices is developed. The algorithm is a modified version of the MCC algorithm improved so as to handle the large dimensionality which arises particularly in variable-gain control problems. The design methodology developed is applied to a reconfigurable aircraft control problem. A variable-gain output feedback control problem was formulated to design a flight control law for an AFTI F-16 aircraft which can automatically reconfigure its control strategy to accommodate failures in the horizontal tail control surface. Simulations of the closed-loop reconfigurable system show that the approach produces a control design which can accommodate such failures with relative ease. The technique can be applied to many other problems including sensor failure accommodation, mode switching control laws and super agility.

  19. Orbit stability and feedback control in synchrotron radiation rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is essential for the utilization of a low emittance storage ring as a high brightness radiation source. We discuss the development of the measurement and feedback control of the closed orbit, with emphasis on the activities as the National Synchrotron Light Source of BNL. We discuss the performance of the beam position detectors in use and under development: the PUE rf detector, split ion chamber detector, photo-emission detector, solid state detector, and the graphite detector. Depending on the specific experiments, different beamlines require different tolerances on the orbit motion. Corresponding to these different requirements, we discuss two approaches to closed orbit feedback: the global and local feedback systems. Then we describe a new scheme for the real time global feedback by implementing a feedback system based upon a harmonic analysis of both the orbit movements and the correction magnetic fields. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Control, Transport Reduction and Diagnostic use of Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.

    1999-11-01

    In the past we have reported on feedback suppression of a variety of micro-instabilities in the Columbia Linear Machine via an electron/ion beam suppressor. These include a curvature driven trapped particle mode, an E×B flute mode and an ITG mode; sometimes two of them simultaneously. We now report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. The anomalous particle transport due to an E×B centrifugally driven mode has been measured via cross-correlation of density and potential fluctuations. The transport is found to be reduced by up to a factor of three under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, we find the scaling of diffusion coefficient to be linear with RMS fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. Recently, we have performed a numerical experiment on feedback control of dissipative drift wave instability in collaboration with ETP, University of Marseille. The preliminary result is that even a highly chaotic state of the instability can be suppressed, if the feedback delay is less than the correlation time of fluctuations. We will explore the implication of these results for the remote prospect of reduction of micro-turbulence and associated transport. We are also persuing a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, we use time series analysis method for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For E×B rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a model of three coupled modes may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Secondly, we have

  1. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible, highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible Space Station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control (IPFC), feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system's characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model; hence, closed-loop system's poles will not move - they will be invariant (provided bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system's characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and, solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model's characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  2. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible space station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control, feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model. Hence closed-loop system poles will not move; they will be invariant (provided that bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  3. Control of resistance plug welding using quantitative feedback theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, A.E.; Horowitz, I. ||; Chait, Y.; Rodrigues, J.

    1996-12-01

    Resistance welding is used extensively throughout the manufacturing industry. Variations in weld quality often result in costly post-weld inspections. Applications of feed-back control to such processes have been limited by the lack of accurate models describing the nonlinear dynamics of this process. A new system based on electrode displacement feedback is developed that greatly improves quality control of the resistance plug welding process. The system is capable of producing repeatable welds of consistent displacement (and thus consistent quality), with wide variations in weld parameters. This paper describes the feedback design of a robust controller using Quantitative Feedback Theory for this highly complex process, and the experimental results of the applied system.

  4. Virtual Grasping: Closed-Loop Force Control Using Electrotactile Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Jorgovanovic, Nikola; Dosen, Strahinja; Djozic, Damir J.; Krajoski, Goran; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Closing the control loop by providing somatosensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is a well-known, long standing challenge in the field of prosthetics. Various approaches have been investigated for feedback restoration, ranging from direct neural stimulation to noninvasive sensory substitution methods. Although there are many studies presenting closed-loop systems, only a few of them objectively evaluated the closed-loop performance, mostly using vibrotactile stimulation. Importantly, the conclusions about the utility of the feedback were partly contradictory. The goal of the current study was to systematically investigate the capability of human subjects to control grasping force in closed loop using electrotactile feedback. We have developed a realistic experimental setup for virtual grasping, which operated in real time, included a set of real life objects, as well as a graphical and dynamical model of the prosthesis. We have used the setup to test 10 healthy, able bodied subjects to investigate the role of training, feedback and feedforward control, robustness of the closed loop, and the ability of the human subjects to generalize the control to previously “unseen” objects. Overall, the outcomes of this study are very optimistic with regard to the benefits of feedback and reveal various, practically relevant, aspects of closed-loop control. PMID:24516504

  5. Optical measurement of the weak non-linearity in the eardrum vibration response to auditory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Johan

    The mammalian hearing organ consists of the external ear (auricle and ear canal) followed by the middle ear (eardrum and ossicles) and the inner ear (cochlea). Its function is to convert the incoming sound waves and convert them into nerve pulses which are processed in the final stage by the brain. The main task of the external and middle ear is to concentrate the incoming sound waves on a smaller surface to reduce the loss that would normally occur in transmission from air to inner ear fluid. In the past it has been shown that this is a linear process, thus without serious distortions, for sound waves going up to pressures of 130 dB SPL (˜90 Pa). However, at large pressure changes up to several kPa, the middle ear movement clearly shows non-linear behaviour. Thus, it is possible that some small non-linear distortions are also present in the middle ear vibration at lower sound pressures. In this thesis a sensitive measurement set-up is presented to detect this weak non-linear behaviour. Essentially, this set-up consists of a loud-speaker which excites the middle ear, and the resulting vibration is measured with an heterodyne vibrometer. The use of specially designed acoustic excitation signals (odd random phase multisines) enables the separation of the linear and non-linear response. The application of this technique on the middle ear demonstrates that there are already non-linear distortions present in the vibration of the middle ear at a sound pressure of 93 dB SPL. This non-linear component also grows strongly with increasing sound pressure. Knowledge of this non-linear component can contribute to the improvement of modern hearing aids, which operate at higher sound pressures where the non-linearities could distort the signal considerably. It is also important to know the contribution of middle ear non-linearity to otoacoustic emissions. This are non-linearities caused by the active feedback amplifier in the inner ear, and can be detected in the external and

  6. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  7. A force-feedback control system for micro-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe; Chen, Peter C. Y.; Ganapathy, Anand; Zhao, Guoyong; Nam, Joohoo; Yang, Guilin; Burdet, Etienne; Teo, Cheeleong; Meng, Qingnian; Lin, Wei

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we report the development of an explicit force-feedback control system for micro-assembly, focusing on the key issues of force transmission and control. The force-feedback system is incorporated with a compound flexure stage, which is driven by a voice-coil actuator and designed to provide frictionless translation motion along one axis. A force sensor measures the interaction force between the micromanipulator and its environment, while an explicit force controller controls the interaction force to follow a desired force trajectory. The effectiveness of this prototype force-control system has been demonstrated in an experimental application, where parts (with dimensions in microns) were picked up and assembled under explicit force-feedback control.

  8. Sampled-Data State Feedback Stabilization of Boolean Control Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Jinde; Sun, Liangjie; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we investigate the sampled-data state feedback control (SDSFC) problem of Boolean control networks (BCNs). Some necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the global stabilization of BCNs by SDSFC. Different from conventional state feedback controls, new phenomena observed the study of SDSFC. Based on the controllability matrix, we derive some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the trajectories of BCNs can be stabilized to a fixed point by piecewise constant control (PCC). It is proved that the global stabilization of BCNs under SDSFC is equivalent to that by PCC. Moreover, algorithms are given to construct the sampled-data state feedback controllers. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results. PMID:26890349

  9. Delayed feedback control of self-mobile cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, A.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Gurevich, S. V.; Panajotov, K.; Huyet, G.; Tlidi, M.

    2013-11-01

    Control of the motion of cavity solitons is one the central problems in nonlinear optical pattern formation. We report on the impact of the phase of the time-delayed optical feedback and carrier lifetime on the self-mobility of localized structures of light in broad-area semiconductor cavities. We show both analytically and numerically that the feedback phase strongly affects the drift instability threshold as well as the velocity of cavity soliton motion above this threshold. In addition we demonstrate that the noninstantaneous carrier response of the semiconductor medium is responsible for the increase of the critical feedback rate corresponding to the drift instability.

  10. Control of Cardiac Arrhythmia by Nonlinear Spatiotemporal Delayed Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroujeni, Forough Rezaei; Vasegh, Nastaran; Sedigh, Ali Khaki

    The dynamic feedback control of the cardiac pacing interval has been widely used to suppress alternans. In this paper, temporally and spatially suppressing the alternans for cardiac tissue consisting of a one-dimensional chain of cardiac units is investigated. The model employed is a nonlinear partial difference equation. The model's fixed points and their stability conditions are determined, and bifurcations and chaos phenomenon have been studied by numerical simulations. The main objective of this paper is to stabilize the unstable fixed point of the model. The proposed approach is nonlinear spatiotemporal delayed feedback, and the appropriate interval for controller feedback gain is calculated using the linear stability analysis. It is proven that the proposed approach is robust with respect to all bifurcation parameter variations. Also, set point tracking is achieved by employing delayed feedback with an integrator. Finally, simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  11. A speed feedback control strategy for car-following model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Xing; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2014-11-01

    A speed feedback control mechanism was introduced into the system to improve the dynamical performance of the traffic flow. The modern control theory was used to analyze the stability of the system. It is found that the stability region varies with the feedback coefficient proportionally. In addition, the unit step responses in time domain and phase-frequency curves in frequency domain were given with different feedback coefficients in step response diagram and Bode diagram respectively. The overshoot and phase margins are inversely proportional to the speed feedback coefficients in an underdamped condition. The simulations were conducted to verify the validity of the improvement. The conclusion can be drawn that the analytical result and the simulation result are in good agreement with each other.

  12. Dissipative preparation of multibody entanglement via quantum feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Xia, Yan; Sun, Xiu-Dong; Song, He-Shan

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the generation of a multibody Dicke state in a coupled cavity system subject to environmental noise. Based on quantum feedback control, cavity decay may play a constructive role in obtaining the intended state. The required interaction time need not be accurately controlled. In addition, the feedback operations are only applied to a single atom in one cavity during the whole evolution process, and it is not necessary to change the control strategy as the number of atoms increases. Thus, our proposal can exploit the core advantage of coupled cavities to implement a scalable control scheme for preparing multibody entanglement.

  13. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1995-01-01

    During this year, we concentrated our efforts on the design of controllers for lateral/directional control using mu synthesis. This proved to be a more difficult task than we anticipated and we are still working on the designs. In the lateral-directional control problem, the inputs are pilot lateral stick and pedal commands and the outputs are roll rate about the velocity vector and side slip angle. The control effectors are ailerons, rudder deflection, and directional thrust vectoring vane deflection which produces a yawing moment about the body axis. Our math model does not contain any provision for thrust vectoring of rolling moment. This has resulted in limitations of performance at high angles of attack. During 1994-95, the following tasks for the lateral-directional controllers were accomplished: (1) Designed both inner and outer loop dynamic inversion controllers. These controllers are implemented using accelerometer outputs rather than an a priori model of the vehicle aerodynamics; (2) Used classical techniques to design controllers for the system linearized by dynamics inversion. These controllers acted to control roll rate and Dutch roll response; (3) Implemented the inner loop dynamic inversion and classical controllers on the six DOF simulation; (4) Developed a lateral-directional control allocation scheme based on minimizing required control effort among the ailerons, rudder, and directional thrust vectoring; and (5) Developed mu outer loop controllers combined with classical inner loop controllers.

  14. Predictive Feedback and Feedforward Control for Systems with Unknown Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Eure, Kenneth W.

    1998-01-01

    Predictive feedback control has been successfully used in the regulation of plate vibrations when no reference signal is available for feedforward control. However, if a reference signal is available it may be used to enhance regulation by incorporating a feedforward path in the feedback controller. Such a controller is known as a hybrid controller. This paper presents the theory and implementation of the hybrid controller for general linear systems, in particular for structural vibration induced by acoustic noise. The generalized predictive control is extended to include a feedforward path in the multi-input multi-output case and implemented on a single-input single-output test plant to achieve plate vibration regulation. There are cases in acoustic-induce vibration where the disturbance signal is not available to be used by the hybrid controller, but a disturbance model is available. In this case the disturbance model may be used in the feedback controller to enhance performance. In practice, however, neither the disturbance signal nor the disturbance model is available. This paper presents the theory of identifying and incorporating the noise model into the feedback controller. Implementations are performed on a test plant and regulation improvements over the case where no noise model is used are demonstrated.

  15. Human hip-ankle coordination emerging from multisensory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Hettich, Georg; Assländer, Lorenz; Gollhofer, Albert; Mergner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Human sensorimotor control involves inter-segmental coordination to cope with the complexity of a multi-segment system. The combined activation of hip and ankle muscles during upright stance represents the hip-ankle coordination. This study postulates that the coordination emerges from interactions on the sensory levels in the feedback control. The hypothesis was tested in a model-based approach that compared human experimental data with model simulations. Seven subjects were standing with eyes closed on an anterior-posterior tilting motion platform. Postural responses in terms of angular excursions of trunk and legs with respect to vertical were measured and characterized using spectral analysis. The presented control model consists of separate feedback modules for the hip and ankle joints, which exchange sensory information with each other. The feedback modules utilize sensor-derived disturbance estimates rather than 'raw' sensory signals. The comparison of the human data with the simulation data revealed close correspondence, suggesting that the model captures important aspects of the human sensory feedback control. For verification, the model was re-embodied in a humanoid robot that was tested in the human laboratory. The findings show that the hip-ankle coordination can be explained by interactions between the feedback control modules of the hip and ankle joints. PMID:25150802

  16. Event-triggered output feedback control for distributed networked systems.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Magdi S; Sabih, Muhammad; Elshafei, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of output-feedback communication and control with event-triggered framework in the context of distributed networked control systems. The design problem of the event-triggered output-feedback control is proposed as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) feasibility problem. The scheme is developed for the distributed system where only partial states are available. In this scheme, a subsystem uses local observers and share its information to its neighbors only when the subsystem's local error exceeds a specified threshold. The developed method is illustrated by using a coupled cart example from the literature. PMID:26708304

  17. Dynamical singularities in adaptive delayed-feedback control.

    PubMed

    Saito, Asaki; Konishi, Keiji

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the dynamical characteristics of adaptive delayed-feedback control systems, exploiting a discrete-time adaptive control method derived for carrying out detailed analysis. In particular, the systems exhibit singularities such as power-law decay of the distribution of transient times and almost zero finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We can explain these results by characterizing such systems as having (1) a Jacobian matrix with unity eigenvalue in the whole phase space, and (2) parameters approaching a stability boundary proven to be identical with that of (nonadaptive) delayed-feedback control. PMID:22060398

  18. Dynamic output feedback H ∞ control for affine fuzzy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huimin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-01

    This article investigates the problem of designing H ∞ dynamic output feedback controllers for nonlinear systems, which are described by affine fuzzy models. The system outputs have been chosen as premise variables, which can guarantee that the plant and the controller always switch to the same region. By using a piecewise Lyapunov function and adding slack matrix variables, a piecewise-affine dynamic output feedback controller design method is obtained in the formulation of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be efficiently solved numerically. In contrast to the existing work, the proposed approach needs less LMI constraints and leads to less conservatism. Finally, numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the new result.

  19. Hybrid Feedforward-Feedback Noise Control Using Virtual Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Jacob; Fuller, Chris; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches to active noise control using virtual sensors are evaluated for eventual use in an active headrest. Specifically, adaptive feedforward, feedback, and hybrid control structures are compared. Each controller incorporates the traditional filtered-x least mean squares algorithm. The feedback controller is arranged in an internal model configuration to draw comparisons with standard feedforward control theory results. Simulation and experimental results are presented that illustrate each controllers ability to minimize the pressure at both physical and virtual microphone locations. The remote microphone technique is used to obtain pressure estimates at the virtual locations. It is shown that a hybrid controller offers performance benefits over the traditional feedforward and feedback controllers. Stability issues associated with feedback and hybrid controllers are also addressed. Experimental results show that 15-20 dB reduction in broadband disturbances can be achieved by minimizing the measured pressure, whereas 10-15 dB reduction is obtained when minimizing the estimated pressure at a virtual location.

  20. Effect of motor dynamics on nonlinear feedback robot arm control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Li, Zuofeng; Bejczy, Antal K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear feedback robot controller that incorporates the robot manipulator dynamics and the robot joint motor dynamics is proposed. The manipulator dynamics and the motor dynamics are coupled to obtain a third-order-dynamic model, and differential geometric control theory is applied to produce a linearized and decoupled robot controller. The derived robot controller operates in the robot task space, thus eliminating the need for decomposition of motion commands into robot joint space commands. Computer simulations are performed to verify the feasibility of the proposed robot controller. The controller is further experimentally evaluated on the PUMA 560 robot arm. The experiments show that the proposed controller produces good trajectory tracking performances and is robust in the presence of model inaccuracies. Compared with a nonlinear feedback robot controller based on the manipulator dynamics only, the proposed robot controller yields conspicuously improved performance.

  1. Nonlinear feedback control of highly manoeuvrable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Enns, Dale F.; Snell, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of nonlinear quadratic regulator (NLQR) theory to the design of control laws for a typical high-performance aircraft. The NLQR controller design is performed using truncated solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation of optimal control theory. The performance of the NLQR controller is compared with the performance of a conventional P + I gain scheduled controller designed by applying standard frequency response techniques to the equations of motion of the aircraft linearized at various angles of attack. Both techniques result in control laws which are very similar in structure to one another and which yield similar performance. The results of applying both control laws to a high-g vertical turn are illustrated by nonlinear simulation.

  2. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1994-01-01

    During the first half of the year, the investigators concentrated their efforts on completing the design of control laws for the longitudinal axis of the HARV. During the second half of the year they concentrated on the synthesis of control laws for the lateral-directional axes. The longitudinal control law design efforts can be briefly summarized as follows. Longitudinal control laws were developed for the HARV using mu synthesis design techniques coupled with dynamic inversion. An inner loop dynamic inversion controller was used to simplify the system dynamics by eliminating the aerodynamic nonlinearities and inertial cross coupling. Models of the errors resulting from uncertainties in the principal longitudinal aerodynamic terms were developed and included in the model of the HARV with the inner loop dynamic inversion controller. This resulted in an inner loop transfer function model which was an integrator with the modeling errors characterized as uncertainties in gain and phase. Outer loop controllers were then designed using mu synthesis to provide robustness to these modeling errors and give desired response to pilot inputs. Both pitch rate and angle of attack command following systems were designed. The following tasks have been accomplished for the lateral-directional controllers: inner and outer loop dynamic inversion controllers have been designed; an error model based on a linearized perturbation model of the inner loop system was derived; controllers for the inner loop system have been designed, using classical techniques, that control roll rate and Dutch roll response; the inner loop dynamic inversion and classical controllers have been implemented on the six degree of freedom simulation; and lateral-directional control allocation scheme has been developed based on minimizing required control effort.

  3. A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1989-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback is described and test results for a laboratory model magnetic bearing actuator are presented. Test results were obtained using a magnetic bearing test fixture, which is also described. The magnetic bearing actuator consists of elements similar to those used in a laboratory test model Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD).

  4. Stabilising falling liquid film flows using feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alice B.; Gomes, Susana N.; Pavliotis, Grigorios A.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    2016-01-01

    Falling liquid films become unstable due to inertial effects when the fluid layer is sufficiently thick or the slope sufficiently steep. This free surface flow of a single fluid layer has industrial applications including coating and heat transfer, which benefit from smooth and wavy interfaces, respectively. Here, we discuss how the dynamics of the system are altered by feedback controls based on observations of the interface height, and supplied to the system via the perpendicular injection and suction of fluid through the wall. In this study, we model the system using both Benney and weighted-residual models that account for the fluid injection through the wall. We find that feedback using injection and suction is a remarkably effective control mechanism: the controls can be used to drive the system towards arbitrary steady states and travelling waves, and the qualitative effects are independent of the details of the flow modelling. Furthermore, we show that the system can still be successfully controlled when the feedback is applied via a set of localised actuators and only a small number of system observations are available, and that this is possible using both static (where the controls are based on only the most recent set of observations) and dynamic (where the controls are based on an approximation of the system which evolves over time) control schemes. This study thus provides a solid theoretical foundation for future experimental realisations of the active feedback control of falling liquid films.

  5. Control design for a wind turbine-generator using output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javid, S. H.; Murdoch, A.; Winkelman, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The modeling and approach to control design for a large horizontal axis wind turbine (WT) generator are presented. The control design is based on a suboptimal output regulator which allows coordinated control of WT blade pitch angle and field voltage for the purposes of regulating electrical power and terminal voltage. Results of detailed non-linear simulation tests of this controller are shown.

  6. Feedback controlled optics with wavefront compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, William G. (Inventor); Redding, David C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity model of a complex optical system obtained by linear ray tracing is used to compute a control gain matrix by imposing the mathematical condition for minimizing the total wavefront error at the optical system's exit pupil. The most recent deformations or error states of the controlled segments or optical surfaces of the system are then assembled as an error vector, and the error vector is transformed by the control gain matrix to produce the exact control variables which will minimize the total wavefront error at the exit pupil of the optical system. These exact control variables are then applied to the actuators controlling the various optical surfaces in the system causing the immediate reduction in total wavefront error observed at the exit pupil of the optical system.

  7. High-fidelity simulation and reduced-order modelling of integrally-actuated membrane wings with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoso, Stefano; Palacios, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a numerical framework for the simulation and design of integrally actuated membrane wings with feedback control. The performance of the aeroelastic system are evaluated using a high-fidelity model. It consists in a fluid solver based on the direct numerical integration of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations implicitly coupled with a geometrically non-linear dynamic structural model which has been calibrated using experimental data. The rate-dependent constitutive law for the dielectric elastomer considered for the integral wing actuation is based on a non-linear formulation. The framework also includes a methodology for the model reduction of the fully-coupled system. The resulting low-order description showed to retain the main system dynamics, and can therefore be used for the design of the control scheme for the wing. Results highlights the potential to achieve on-demand aerodynamics using the actuation concept proposed. In particular, it is shown that the wing aerodynamic performance is noticeably enhanced through the actuation and the disturbances on the lift in case of gusts can be reduced up to 60%.

  8. Effects on non-linearities on aircraft poststall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Rohacs, J.; Thomasson, P.; Mosehilde, E.

    1994-12-31

    The poststall maneuverability controlled by thrust vectoring has become one of the important aspects of new fighter development projects. In simplified case, the motion of aircraft can be described by 6DOF nonlinear system. The lecture deals with the longitudinal motion of poststall maneuverable aircraft. The investigation made about the effects of non-linearities in aerodynamic coefficients having considerable non-linearities and hysteresisis an the poststall motions. There were used some different models of aerodynamic coefficients. The results of investigation have shown that the poststall domain of vectored aircraft can be divided into five different pHs in field of thrust - pitch vector angle, and the chaotic motions of aircraft can be found at the different frequencies of thrust deflection. There were defined an unstable right domain with an unstable oscillation and a field of overpulling at poststall motion. The certain frequency chaotic attractors were got at frequencies of Oxitation between the 0.15 and 0.65 rad/sec. The pitching moment derivatives had the big influence on the chaotic motions, while the lift coefficient derivatives bad the reasonable effects, only.

  9. Optimal feedback control of a bioreactor with a remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjan, S. C.; San, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors used to monitor bioreactor conditions directly often perform poorly in the face of adverse nonphysiological conditions. One way to circumvent this is to use a remote sensor block. However, such a configuration usually causes a significant time lag between measurements and the actual state values. Here, the problem of implementing feedback control strategies for such systems, described by nonlinear equations, is addressed. The problem is posed as an optimal control problem with a linear quadratic performance index. The linear control law so obtained is used to implement feedback. A global linearization technique as well as an expansion using Taylor series is used to linearize the nonlinear system, and the feedback is subsequently implemented.

  10. Second law of thermodynamics with discrete quantum feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2008-02-29

    A new thermodynamic inequality is derived which leads to the maximum work that can be extracted from multi-heat-baths with the assistance of discrete quantum feedback control. The maximum work is determined by the free-energy difference and a generalized mutual information content between the thermodynamic system and the feedback controller. This maximum work can exceed that in conventional thermodynamics and, in the case of a heat cycle with two heat baths, the heat efficiency can be greater than that of the Carnot cycle. The consistency of our results with the second law of thermodynamics is ensured by the fact that work is needed for information processing of the feedback controller. PMID:18352605

  11. A multi-time scale, non-linear approach to understanding soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, N. R.; Phillips, C.; Risk, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    To understand the processes that drive soil respiration and to make accurate predictions about global carbon cycling and potential climate feedbacks, it is critical that we develop accurate models that are useful on a range of timescales. There is, however, little agreement on the functional form and parameters that should be associated with modeling total soil respiration. Field data provides the most realistic platform for this assessment, but the environmental controls on soil respiration have been difficult to estimate in the field with good accuracy due to a combination of factors, including: (1) physical and biological uncertainties that are present in the field (ie. heat and gas diffusion, nutrient and substrate limitation); (2) the absence of a standardized and theoretically sound method for calculating model parameters using field data, and; (3) the absence of suitable long term, high temporal resolution respiration data from field studies, which is now becoming more available. This research focuses on multi-time scale non-linear analysis techniques, and their role in guiding the development of new soil respiration models that accurately predict respiration on a range of timescales. Using a physical model as a proxy of real world conditions, we focus on the confounding effect of physical factors, such as heat and gas diffusion and CO2 production depth, which have been found to be the cause of a considerable amount of error in past studies. Preliminary results show that for estimating temperature sensitivity, the non-linear approach is the best (compared to the typical log transform linear approach) in all circumstances, although caution should be exercised when analyzing short time series (i.e. diel) data because the lag and damping cause by gas diffusion may affect estimates. This work also examines moisture sensitivity parameters and the confounding effects of moisture on temperature sensitivity estimates. Finally we provide an evaluation of temporal

  12. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  13. Feedback Implementation of Zermelo's Optimal Control by Sugeno Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, C.; Homaifax, A.; Bikdash, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to implement optimal control laws of nonlinear systems in real time. Our methodology does not require solving two-point boundary value problems online and may not require it off-line either. The optimal control law is learned using the original Sugeno controller (OSC) from a family of optimal trajectories. We compare the trajectories generated by the OSC and the trajectories yielded by the optimal feedback control law when applied to Zermelo's ship steering problem.

  14. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  15. Stabilization and feedback control of weak measurement monitored quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Du Toit, Pieter; Burd, Shaun; Konrad, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We study feedback control of quantum oscillators, monitored through periodic weak measurement. By implementing reversals of measurement perturbations based on a Bayesian estimate of the state dynamics, we demonstrate suppressed measurement noise leading to greater oscillator stability and improved quantum feedback control. The work in this paper was supported in part by the National Research Foundation of South Africa through Grant No. 93602 as well as an award by the United States Airforce Office of Scientific Research, Award No. FA9550-14-1-0151.

  16. Output feedback regulator design for jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on the output feedback regulator formulation is described and applied to turbofan engine model. Full order model dynamics, were incorporated in the example design. The effect of actuator dynamics on closed loop performance was investigaged. Also, the importance of turbine inlet temperature as an element of the dynamic feedback was studied. Step responses were given to indicate the improvement in system performance with this control. Calculation times for all experiments are given in CPU seconds for comparison purposes.

  17. Output feedback regulator design for jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on the output feedback regulator formulation is described and applied to an F100 turbofan engine model. Full order model dynamics, are incorporated in the example design. The effect of actuator dynamics on closed loop performance is investigated. Also, the importance of turbine inlet temperature as an element of the dynamic feedback is studied. Step responses are given to indicate the improvement in system performance with this control. Calculation times for all experiments are given in CPU seconds for comparison purposes.

  18. Mode control of semiconductor laser with diffraction and dispersion feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsuji, R.; Fujii, K.; Nakayama, S.; Amano, M.; Kiyono, H.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tokita, Y.; Hanasawa, Y.; Mirov, S.B.; McCutcheon, M.J.; Whinnery, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    We have constructed two kinds of external cavity semiconductor laser. The first one is a diffraction feedback system consisting of a collimating lens, a diffraction grating and a mirror controlled by a PZT element. The second one is a dispersion feedback system in which the diffraction grating is replaced with a prism. Changing the angle of the external mirror by controlling the voltage to be supplied to the PZT, we have succeeded to tune the longitudinal mode of semiconductor laser continuously in the range of about 1 GHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy A.; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilizes negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioral and environmental context. PMID:24616685

  20. Linearizing feedforward/feedback attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to attitude control theory is introduced in which a linear form is postulated for the closed-loop rotation error dynamics, then the exact control law required to realize it is derived. The nonminimal (four-component) quaternion form is used to attitude because it is globally nonsingular, but the minimal (three-component) quaternion form is used for attitude error because it has no nonlinear constraints to prevent the rotational error dynamics from being linearized, and the definition of the attitude error is based on quaternion algebra. This approach produces an attitude control law that linearizes the closed-loop rotational error dynamics exactly, without any attitude singularities, even if the control errors become large.

  1. Feedback controllers for broadband active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Benoit; Legrain, Isabelle

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate the efficiency of an LQG-based controller for the active control of the acoustic field radiated by a rectangular panel. This topic has been of interest for numerous researchers in the past 10 or 15 years, but very little attention has been paid to broadband disturbances occurring in a relatively high frequency range. These are unfortunately common features of noise perturbations in realistic structures such as airplanes or helicopters. The few articles that deal with this problem provide very scarce experimental results and are related to frequency bands where the structure dynamics is rather poor. From the outset, the problem at hand involves numerous difficulties, such as the modeling of the active structure itself and the possible large size of the controller. In the following, the experimental setup is described, then the controller design procedure is developed and finally some experimental results are shown that prove the efficiency of the method.

  2. Is feedback control effective for ecosystem-based fisheries management?

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Abrams, Peter A

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of species interactions on the robustness of feedback control of the harvesting of prey species. We consider the consequences of feedback control of fishing effort. If a prey species is exploited, increasing fishing effort decreases predator abundance more than it does the prey abundance. Feedback control of fishing effort may cause the extinction of the predator, even if the prey population is well controlled. Even when fishing effort is controlled by predator density, it is difficult for the fishery and the predator to coexist, and, if they do so, the system exhibits complex dynamic behaviors. If the predator and fishery coexist, feedback control of fishing effort converges to a stable equilibrium, a synchronous cycle, or an asynchronous cycle. In the last case, the system undergoes more complex cycling with a longer period than that when the fishing effort is kept constant. These analyses suggest that there is no effective strategy that is robust against measurement errors, process errors and complex interactions in ecosystem dynamics. PMID:23792332

  3. Feedback control as a framework for understanding tradeoffs in biology.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Noah J; Ankarali, Mert M; Dyhr, Jonathan P; Madhav, Manu S; Roth, Eatai; Sefati, Shahin; Sponberg, Simon; Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Daniel, Thomas L

    2014-07-01

    Control theory arose from a need to control synthetic systems. From regulating steam engines to tuning radios to devices capable of autonomous movement, it provided a formal mathematical basis for understanding the role of feedback in the stability (or change) of dynamical systems. It provides a framework for understanding any system with regulation via feedback, including biological ones such as regulatory gene networks, cellular metabolic systems, sensorimotor dynamics of moving animals, and even ecological or evolutionary dynamics of organisms and populations. Here, we focus on four case studies of the sensorimotor dynamics of animals, each of which involves the application of principles from control theory to probe stability and feedback in an organism's response to perturbations. We use examples from aquatic (two behaviors performed by electric fish), terrestrial (following of walls by cockroaches), and aerial environments (flight control by moths) to highlight how one can use control theory to understand the way feedback mechanisms interact with the physical dynamics of animals to determine their stability and response to sensory inputs and perturbations. Each case study is cast as a control problem with sensory input, neural processing, and motor dynamics, the output of which feeds back to the sensory inputs. Collectively, the interaction of these systems in a closed loop determines the behavior of the entire system. PMID:24893678

  4. A stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback control methodology for superagility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Direskeneli, Haldun; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1992-01-01

    A new control design methodology is developed: Stochastic Optimal Feedforward and Feedback Technology (SOFFT). Traditional design techniques optimize a single cost function (which expresses the design objectives) to obtain both the feedforward and feedback control laws. This approach places conflicting demands on the control law such as fast tracking versus noise atttenuation/disturbance rejection. In the SOFFT approach, two cost functions are defined. The feedforward control law is designed to optimize one cost function, the feedback optimizes the other. By separating the design objectives and decoupling the feedforward and feedback design processes, both objectives can be achieved fully. A new measure of command tracking performance, Z-plots, is also developed. By analyzing these plots at off-nominal conditions, the sensitivity or robustness of the system in tracking commands can be predicted. Z-plots provide an important tool for designing robust control systems. The Variable-Gain SOFFT methodology was used to design a flight control system for the F/A-18 aircraft. It is shown that SOFFT can be used to expand the operating regime and provide greater performance (flying/handling qualities) throughout the extended flight regime. This work was performed under the NASA SBIR program. ICS plans to market the software developed as a new module in its commercial CACSD software package: ACET.

  5. Tollmien-Schlichting wave cancellation by feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Hari; Morrison, Jonathan; Kerrigan, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves are primary instabilities in the boundary layer and, by actively interfering with their growth, the transition process can be delayed. In this study the experimental results of both open-loop and real-time feedback control will be shown for 3D TS waves excited within a flat-plate boundary layer. They are excited at a 0.75mm pin-hole source driven by a speaker. A 0.75 mm thin, dual slot geometry is used for actuation by another speaker and a wall hot-wire sensor manufactured in-house is used as the sensor for feedback control. The spatial transfer function models between the source and sensor (Gs) and the actuator and sensor (Ga) obtained by classic frequency sweep techniques are used to synthesize various types of robust, stabilizing controllers (K). The transfer function Gs determines the unstable range of frequencies whereas Ga together with K determines the stability of the closed-loop. A second traversing hot-wire is used to record the performance of the controller downstream. It is shown that the experimental transfer functions agree remarkably well with numerical calculations as do the predicted results from feedback control. Preliminary experimental feedback control results for various other actuator configurations will also be presented. This work is supported by EADS (support agreement number IW203591) and LFC-UK.

  6. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  7. Non linear processes modulated by low doses of radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Alloni, Daniele; Babini, Gabriele; Morini, Jacopo; Baiocco, Giorgio

    The perturbation induced by radiation impinging on biological targets can stimulate the activation of several different pathways, spanning from the DNA damage processing to intra/extra -cellular signalling. In the mechanistic investigation of radiobiological damage this complex “system” response (e.g. omics, signalling networks, micro-environmental modifications, etc.) has to be taken into account, shifting from a focus on the DNA molecule solely to a systemic/collective view. An additional complication comes from the finding that the individual response of each of the involved processes is often not linear as a function of the dose. In this context, a systems biology approach to investigate the effects of low dose irradiations on intra/extra-cellular signalling will be presented, where low doses of radiation act as a mild perturbation of a robustly interconnected network. Results obtained through a multi-level investigation of both DNA damage repair processes (e.g. gamma-H2AX response) and of the activation kinetics for intra/extra cellular signalling pathways (e.g. NFkB activation) show that the overall cell response is dominated by non-linear processes - such as negative feedbacks - leading to possible non equilibrium steady states and to a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Together with experimental data of radiation perturbed pathways, different modelling approaches will be also discussed.

  8. The non-linear initiation of diapirs and plume heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Kelly, Amanda

    1997-04-01

    A simple theory is devised to describe the non-linear feedback mechanisms involved in the initial growth of a single diapir or plume head from a low viscosity channel overlain by a much more viscous layer. Such feedbacks arise primarily from the relation between the growth of a proto-diapir (i.e. an undulation on the upper boundary of the low viscosity channel) and the draining of the low viscosity channel. In the period of time between its initial exponential growth (characterized by linear stability analysis) and its separation from the low viscosity channel as a fully formed diapir, the proto-diapir can undergo a significant cessation in its development due to deflation of the low viscosity channel; i.e. the proto-diapir's growth can essentially stall for a long period of time before it separates and begins its ascent through the overlying medium. The theory is used to determine a criterion for separation of the diapir from the low viscosity channel that is in terms of the geometrical and mechanical properties of the channel, instead of the ad hoc volume flux widely used in many models of mantle plumes and plume heads (e.g. Whitehead and Luther, 1975; Richards et al., 1989; Olson, 1990; Sleep, 1990; Bercovici and Mahoney, 1994). From this separation criterion, self-consistent scaling laws can be formulated to relate the size of the fully developed diapir and its trailing conduit to the properties of the initial channel, instead of to the ad hoc volume flux. Basic laboratory experiments involving highly viscous fluids are presented and demonstrate that the so-called 'stalling' period between initial growth and separation does indeed occur. These results suggest that nascent mantle plume heads may stall for extended periods at the base of the mantle and thereby contribute to variations in thickness of the D″ layer.

  9. Discrete-time infinity control problem with measurement feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoorvogel, A. A.; Saberi, A.; Chen, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the discrete-time H(sub infinity) control problem with measurement feedback. The authors extend previous results by having weaker assumptions on the system parameters. The authors also show explicitly the structure of H(sub infinity) controllers. Finally, they show that it is in certain cases possible, without loss of performance, to reduce the dynamical order of the controllers.

  10. Multiple feedback control apparatus for power conditioning equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biess, John (Inventor); Yu, Yuan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved feedback control system to govern the cyclic operation of the power switch of a non-dissipative power conditioning equipment. The apparatus includes two or three control loops working in unison. The first causes the output DC level to be compared with a reference, and the error amplified for control purposes. The second utilizes the AC component of the voltage across the output filter inductor or the current through the output filter capacitor, and the third loop senses the output transients.

  11. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  12. Time optimal feedback control of discrete systems with bounded inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xin; Longman, Richard W.; Klein, George

    1990-01-01

    Deadbeat control theory gives a feedback solution to the time optimal control of discrete time systems. Experience has shown the results to be impractical because they ignore bounds on the actuator strength. This paper develops two algorithms for generating time optimal control in feedback form for discrete systems with bounded controls. The results are also applicable for generating recovery regions and the set of reachable states. For multiple control problems a method of generating sublayers is developed which decreases off-line and on-line computational effort. Two algorithms are presented with somewhat different computational and storage requirements. The algorithms are practical within certain dimension constraints, and are natural for implementation with parallel processing.

  13. Microgravity vibration isolation: Optimal preview and feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Knospe, C. R.; Grodsinsky, C. M.; Allaire, P. E.; Lewis, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to achieve adequate low-frequency vibration isolation for certain space experiments an active control is needed, due to inherent passive-isolator limitations. Proposed here are five possible state-space models for a one-dimensional vibration isolation system with a quadratic performance index. The five models are subsets of a general set of nonhomogeneous state space equations which includes disturbance terms. An optimal control is determined, using a differential equations approach, for this class of problems. This control is expressed in terms of constant, Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) feedback gains and constant feedforward (preview) gains. The gains can be easily determined numerically. They result in a robust controller and offers substantial improvements over a control that uses standard LQR feedback alone.

  14. Kinematic feedback control laws for generating natural arm movements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Jang, Cheongjae; Park, Frank C

    2014-03-01

    We propose a stochastic optimal feedback control law for generating natural robot arm motions. Our approach, inspired by the minimum variance principle of Harris and Wolpert (1998 Nature 394 780-4) and the optimal feedback control principles put forth by Todorov and Jordan (2002 Nature Neurosci. 5 1226-35) for explaining human movements, differs in two crucial respects: (i) the endpoint variance is minimized in joint space rather than Cartesian hand space, and (ii) we ignore the dynamics and instead consider only the second-order differential kinematics. The feedback control law generating the motions can be straightforwardly obtained by backward integration of a set of ordinary differential equations; these equations are obtained exactly, without any linear-quadratic approximations. The only parameters to be determined a priori are the variance scale factors, and for both the two-DOF planar arm and the seven-DOF spatial arm, a table of values is constructed based on the given initial and final arm configurations; these values are determined via an optimal fitting procedure, and consistent with existing findings about neuromuscular motor noise levels of human arm muscles. Experiments conducted with a two-link planar arm and a seven-DOF spatial arm verify that the trajectories generated by our feedback control law closely resemble human arm motions, in the sense of producing nearly straight-line hand trajectories, having bell-shaped velocity profiles, and satisfying Fitts Law. PMID:24343165

  15. Design of multivariable feedback control systems via spectral assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, R. R.; Tung, L. J.; Marefat, M.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of spectral assignment techniques to the design of multivariable feedback control systems was investigated. A fractional representation design procedure for unstable plants is presented and illustrated with an example. A computer aided design software package implementing eigenvalue/eigenvector design procedures is described. A design example which illustrates the use of the program is explained.

  16. Note: Pneumatically modulated liquid delivery with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, C. R.; Terray, A. V.; Lubrano, A. L.; Rogers, D. A.; Hart, S. J.; Rose-Pehrsson, S. L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the design and characterization of a pneumatically driven liquid delivery system using an embedded microcontroller with feedback control capable of maintaining a stable, constant flow rate over several hours of operation. Flow rates with relative standard deviations less than 1% were achieved and compared to a typical laboratory syringe pump.

  17. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  18. Discriminative analysis of non-linear brain connectivity in schizophrenia: an fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Longfei; Wang, Lubin; Shen, Hui; Feng, Guiyu; Hu, Dewen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysfunctional integration of distributed brain networks is believed to be the cause of schizophrenia, and resting-state functional connectivity analyses of schizophrenia have attracted considerable attention in recent years. Unfortunately, existing functional connectivity analyses of schizophrenia have been mostly limited to linear associations. Objective: The objective of the present study is to evaluate the discriminative power of non-linear functional connectivity and identify its changes in schizophrenia. Method: A novel measure utilizing the extended maximal information coefficient was introduced to construct non-linear functional connectivity. In conjunction with multivariate pattern analysis, the new functional connectivity successfully discriminated schizophrenic patients from healthy controls with relative higher accuracy rate than the linear measure. Result: We found that the strength of the identified non-linear functional connections involved in the classification increased in patients with schizophrenia, which was opposed to its linear counterpart. Further functional network analysis revealed that the changes of the non-linear and linear connectivity have similar but not completely the same spatial distribution in human brain. Conclusion: The classification results suggest that the non-linear functional connectivity provided useful discriminative power in diagnosis of schizophrenia, and the inverse but similar spatial distributed changes between the non-linear and linear measure may indicate the underlying compensatory mechanism and the complex neuronal synchronization underlying the symptom of schizophrenia. PMID:24155713

  19. Detecting non-linearities in neuro-electrical signals: A study of synchronous local field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Gerking, Johannes; Martinerie, Jacques; Neuenschwander, Sergio; Pezard, Laurent; Renault, Bernard; Varela, Francisco J.

    The question of the presence and detection of non-linear dynamics and possibly low-dimensional chaos in the brain is still an open question, with recent results indicating that initial claims for low dimensionality were faulted by incomplete statistical testing. To make some progress on this question, our approach was to use stringent data analysis of precisely controlled and behaviorally significant neuroelectric data. There are strong indications that functional brain activity is correlated with synchronous local field potentials. We examine here such synchronous episodes in data recorded from the visual system of behaving cats and pigeons. Our purpose was to examine under these ideal conditions whether the time series showed any evidence of non-linearity concommitantly with the arising of synchrony. To test for non-linearity we have used surrogate sets for non-linear forecasting, the false nearest strands method, and an examination of deterministic vs stochastic modeling. Our results indicate that the time series under examination do show evidence for traces of non-linear dynamics but weakly, since they are not robust under changes of parameters. We conclude that low-dimensional chaos is unlikely to be found in the brain, and that a robust detection and characterization of higher-dimensional non-linear dynamics is beyond the reach of current analytical tools.

  20. Nonlinear feedback control for high alpha flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalford, Harold

    1990-01-01

    Analytical aerodynamic models are derived from a high alpha 6 DOF wind tunnel model. One detail model requires some interpolation between nonlinear functions of alpha. One analytical model requires no interpolation and as such is a completely continuous model. Flight path optimization is conducted on the basic maneuvers: half-loop, 90 degree pitch-up, and level turn. The optimal control analysis uses the derived analytical model in the equations of motion and is based on both moment and force equations. The maximum principle solution for the half-loop is poststall trajectory performing the half-loop in 13.6 seconds. The agility induced by thrust vectoring capability provided a minimum effect on reducing the maneuver time. By means of thrust vectoring control the 90 degrees pitch-up maneuver can be executed in a small place over a short time interval. The agility capability of thrust vectoring is quite beneficial for pitch-up maneuvers. The level turn results are based currently on only outer layer solutions of singular perturbation. Poststall solutions provide high turn rates but generate higher losses of energy than that of classical sustained solutions.

  1. Feedback and Modularity in Cell Cycle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotheim, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Underlying the wonderful diversity of natural forms is the ability of an organism to grow into its appropriate shape. Regulation ensures that cells grow, divide and differentiate so that the organism and its constitutive parts are properly proportioned and of suitable size. Although the size-control mechanism active in an individual cell is of fundamental importance to this process, it is difficult to isolate and study in complex multi-cellular systems and remains poorly understood. This motivates our use of the budding yeast model organism, whose Start checkpoint integrates multiple internal (e.g. cell size) and external signals into an irreversible decision to enter the cell cycle. We have endeavored to address the following two questions: What makes the Start transition irreversible? How does a cell compute its own size? I will report on the progress we have made. Our work is part of an emerging framework for understanding biological control circuits, which will allow us to discern the function of natural systems and aid us in engineering synthetic systems.

  2. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  3. L1 adaptive output-feedback control architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharisov, Evgeny

    This research focuses on development of L 1 adaptive output-feedback control. The objective is to extend the L1 adaptive control framework to a wider class of systems, as well as obtain architectures that afford more straightforward tuning. We start by considering an existing L1 adaptive output-feedback controller for non-strictly positive real systems based on piecewise constant adaptation law. It is shown that L 1 adaptive control architectures achieve decoupling of adaptation from control, which leads to bounded away from zero time-delay and gain margins in the presence of arbitrarily fast adaptation. Computed performance bounds provide quantifiable performance guarantees both for system output and control signal in transient and steady state. A noticeable feature of the L1 adaptive controller is that its output behavior can be made close to the behavior of a linear time-invariant system. In particular, proper design of the lowpass filter can achieve output response, which almost scales for different step reference commands. This property is relevant to applications with human operator in the loop (for example: control augmentation systems of piloted aircraft), since predictability of the system response is necessary for adequate performance of the operator. Next we present applications of the L1 adaptive output-feedback controller in two different fields of engineering: feedback control of human anesthesia, and ascent control of a NASA crew launch vehicle (CLV). The purpose of the feedback controller for anesthesia is to ensure that the patient's level of sedation during surgery follows a prespecified profile. The L1 controller is enabled by anesthesiologist after he/she achieves sufficient patient sedation level by introducing sedatives manually. This problem formulation requires safe switching mechanism, which avoids controller initialization transients. For this purpose, we used an L1 adaptive controller with special output predictor initialization routine

  4. Feedback control of major disruptions in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2011-08-15

    It is argued that major disruptions in ITER can be avoided by the feedback control of the causative MHD precursors. The sensors will be 2D-arrays of ECE detectors and the suppressors will be modulated ECH beams injected radially to produce non-thermal radial pressures to counter the radial dynamics of MHD modes. The appropriate amplitude and phase of this signal can stabilize the relevant MHD modes and prevent their evolution to a major disruption. For multimode MHD precursors, an optimal feedback scheme with a Kalman filter is discussed.

  5. Ferrite core non-linearity in coils for magnetic neurostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    The need to correctly predict the voltage across terminals of mm-sized coils, with ferrite core, to be employed for magnetic stimulation of the peripheral neural system is the motivation for this work. In such applications, which rely on a capacitive discharge on the coil to realise a transient voltage curve of duration and strength suitable for neural stimulation, the correct modelling of the non-linearity of the ferrite core is critical. A demonstration of how a finite-difference model of the considered coils, which include a model of the current-controlled inductance in the coil, can be used to correctly predict the time-domain voltage waveforms across the terminals of a test coil is presented. Five coils of different dimensions, loaded with ferrite cores, have been fabricated and tested: the measured magnitude and width of the induced pulse are within 10% of simulated values. PMID:26609390

  6. Influence of Vibrotactile Feedback on Controlling Tilt Motion After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Rupert, A. H.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the vestibular system are integrated with other sensory information leads to perceptual disturbances and impaired manual control following transitions between gravity environments. The primary goals of this ongoing post-flight investigation are to quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion following short-duration spaceflight and to evaluate vibrotactile feedback of tilt as a sensorimotor countermeasure. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on 9 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s, <20 cm radius) in a darkened room is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant canal or visual cues. A Tilt-Translation Sled (TTS) is capable of synchronizing pitch tilt with fore-aft translation to align the resultant gravitoinertial vector with the longitudinal body axis, thereby eliciting canal reflexes without concordant otolith or visual cues. A simple 4 tactor system was implemented to provide feedback when tilt position exceeded predetermined levels in either device. Closed-loop nulling tasks are performed during random tilt steps or sum-of-sines (TTS only) with and without vibrotactile feedback of chair position. RESULTS. On landing day the manual control performance without vibrotactile feedback was reduced by >30% based on the gain or the amount of tilt disturbance successfully nulled. Manual control performance tended to return to baseline levels within 1-2 days following landing. Root-mean-square position error and tilt velocity were significantly reduced with vibrotactile feedback. CONCLUSIONS. These preliminary results are consistent with our hypothesis that adaptive changes in vestibular processing corresponds to reduced manual control performance following G-transitions. A simple vibrotactile prosthesis improves the ability to null out tilt motion within a

  7. Feedback Control of Two-Component Regulatory Systems.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-09-01

    Two-component systems are a dominant form of bacterial signal transduction. The prototypical two-component system consists of a sensor that responds to a specific input(s) by modifying the output of a cognate regulator. Because the output of a two-component system is the amount of phosphorylated regulator, feedback mechanisms may alter the amount of regulator, and/or modify the ability of a sensor or other proteins to alter the phosphorylation state of the regulator. Two-component systems may display intrinsic feedback whereby the amount of phosphorylated regulator changes under constant inducing conditions and without the participation of additional proteins. Feedback control allows a two-component system to achieve particular steady-state levels, to reach a given steady state with distinct dynamics, to express coregulated genes in a given order, and to activate a regulator to different extents, depending on the signal acting on the sensor. PMID:27607549

  8. Feedback control of solid oxide fuel cell spatial temperature variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardadi, Mahshid; Mueller, Fabian; Jabbari, Faryar

    A high performance feedback controller has been developed to minimize SOFC spatial temperature variation following significant load perturbations. For thermal management, spatial temperature variation along SOFC cannot be avoided. However, results indicate that feedback control can be used to manipulate the fuel cell air flow and inlet fuel cell air temperature to maintain a nearly constant SOFC electrode electrolyte assembly temperature profile. For example temperature variations of less than 5 K are obtained for load perturbations of ±25% from nominal. These results are obtained using a centralized control strategy to regulate a distributed temperature profile and manage actuator interactions. The controller is based on H-infinity synthesis using a physical based dynamic model of a single co-flow SOFC repeat cell. The model of the fuel cell spatial temperature response needed for control synthesis was linearized and reduced from nonlinear model of the fuel cell assembly. A single 11 state feedback linear system tested in the full nonlinear model was found to be effective and stable over a wide fuel cell operating envelope (0.82-0.6 V). Overall, simulation of the advanced controller resulted in small and smooth monotonic temperature response to rapid and large load perturbations. This indicates that future SOFC systems can be designed and controlled to have superb load following characteristic with less than previously expected thermal stresses.

  9. Output feedback control of a quadrotor UAV using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Travis; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new nonlinear controller for a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is proposed using neural networks (NNs) and output feedback. The assumption on the availability of UAV dynamics is not always practical, especially in an outdoor environment. Therefore, in this work, an NN is introduced to learn the complete dynamics of the UAV online, including uncertain nonlinear terms like aerodynamic friction and blade flapping. Although a quadrotor UAV is underactuated, a novel NN virtual control input scheme is proposed which allows all six degrees of freedom (DOF) of the UAV to be controlled using only four control inputs. Furthermore, an NN observer is introduced to estimate the translational and angular velocities of the UAV, and an output feedback control law is developed in which only the position and the attitude of the UAV are considered measurable. It is shown using Lyapunov theory that the position, orientation, and velocity tracking errors, the virtual control and observer estimation errors, and the NN weight estimation errors for each NN are all semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB) in the presence of bounded disturbances and NN functional reconstruction errors while simultaneously relaxing the separation principle. The effectiveness of proposed output feedback control scheme is then demonstrated in the presence of unknown nonlinear dynamics and disturbances, and simulation results are included to demonstrate the theoretical conjecture. PMID:19963698

  10. Acceleration and torque feedback for robotic control - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclnroy, John E.; Saridis, George N.

    1990-01-01

    Gross motion control of robotic manipulators typically requires significant on-line computations to compensate for nonlinear dynamics due to gravity, Coriolis, centripetal, and friction nonlinearities. One controller proposed by Luo and Saridis avoids these computations by feeding back joint acceleration and torque. This study implements the controller on a Puma 600 robotic manipulator. Joint acceleration measurement is obtained by measuring linear accelerations of each joint, and deriving a computationally efficient transformation from the linear measurements to the angular accelerations. Torque feedback is obtained by using the previous torque sent to the joints. The implementation has stability problems on the Puma 600 due to the extremely high gains inherent in the feedback structure. Since these high gains excite frequency modes in the Puma 600, the algorithm is modified to decrease the gain inherent in the feedback structure. The resulting compensator is stable and insensitive to high frequency unmodeled dynamics. Moreover, a second compensator is proposed which uses acceleration and torque feedback, but still allows nonlinear terms to be fed forward. Thus, by feeding the increment in the easily calculated gravity terms forward, improved responses are obtained. Both proposed compensators are implemented, and the real time results are compared to those obtained with the computed torque algorithm.