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Sample records for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase

  1. Novel indole-3-sulfonamides as potent HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhijian; Wolkenberg, Scott E.; Lu, Meiqing; Munshi, Vandna; Moyer, Gregory; Feng, Meizhen; Carella, Anthony V.; Ecto, Linda T.; Gabryelski, Lori J.; Lai, Ming-Tain; Prasad, Sridar G.; Yan, Youwei; McGaughey, Georgia B.; Miller, Michael D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hartman, George D.; Vacca, Joseph P.; Williams, Theresa M.

    2008-09-29

    This Letter describes the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 3-indole sulfonamides as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with balanced profiles against common HIV RT mutants K103N and Y181C.

  2. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Interactions with Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Ishii, Kentaro; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Uchiyama, Susumu; Hannongbua, Supa; Kato, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) have been developed for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1 RT binding to NNRTIs has been characterized by various biophysical techniques. However, these techniques are often hampered by the low water solubility of the inhibitors, such as the current promising diarylpyrimidine-based inhibitors rilpivirine and etravirine. Hence, a conventional and rapid method that requires small sample amounts is desirable for studying NNRTIs with low water solubility. Here we successfully applied a recently developed mass spectrometric technique under non-denaturing conditions to characterize the interactions between the heterodimeric HIV-1 RT enzyme and NNRTIs with different inhibitory activities. Our data demonstrate that mass spectrometry serves as a semi-quantitative indicator of NNRTI binding affinity for HIV-1 RT using low and small amounts of samples, offering a new high-throughput screening tool for identifying novel RT inhibitors as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26934936

  3. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Spallarossa, Andrea Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  4. Substituted indoles as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a patent evaluation (WO2015044928).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Gao, Ping; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-01

    The invention described in this patent (WO2015044928) is related to compounds based on the substituted indole scaffold, their synthetic process and application to inhibit HIV-1 replication as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the newly claimed compounds presented improved potency against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain in comparison to previously disclosed indole-based NNRTIs and were also shown to be effective against common resistant HIV-1 strains. In light of their novel structural characteristics, simple synthetic route and improved anti-HIV activity, these compounds deserve further study as promising NNRTIs. PMID:26742549

  5. NMR characterization of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase binding to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with different activities

    PubMed Central

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Boonsri, Pornthip; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Techasakul, Supanna; Kato, Koichi; Hannongbua, Supa

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is an important target for antiviral therapy against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the efficiency of available drugs is impaired most typically by drug-resistance mutations in this enzyme. In this study, we applied a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic technique to the characterization of the binding of HIV-1 RT to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with different activities, i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, dapivirine, etravirine, and rilpivirine. 1H-13C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectral data of HIV-1 RT, in which the methionine methyl groups of the p66 subunit were selectively labeled with 13C, were collected in the presence and absence of these NNRTIs. We found that the methyl 13C chemical shifts of the M230 resonance of HIV-1 RT bound to these drugs exhibited a high correlation with their anti-HIV-1 RT activities. This methionine residue is located in proximity to the NNRTI-binding pocket but not directly involved in drug interactions and serves as a conformational probe, indicating that the open conformation of HIV-1 RT was more populated with NNRTIs with higher inhibitory activities. Thus, the NMR approach offers a useful tool to screen for novel NNRTIs in developing anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26510386

  6. Discovery, characterization, and lead optimization of 7-azaindole non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Richard A; Lu, Xiao; Detorio, Mervi; Montero, Catherine; Hammond, Emily T; Ehteshami, Maryam; Domaoal, Robert A; Nettles, James H; Feraud, Michel; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2016-08-15

    A library of 585 compounds built off a 7-azaindole core was evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity, and ten hits emerged with submicromolar potency and therapeutic index >100. Of these, three were identified as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors and were assayed against relevant resistant mutants. Lead compound 8 inhibited RT with submicromolar potency (IC50=0.73μM) and also maintained some activity against the clinically important RT mutants K103N and Y181C (IC50=9.2, 3.5μM) in cell-free assays. Free energy perturbation guided lead optimization resulted in the development of a compound with a two-fold increase in potency against RT (IC50=0.36μM). These data highlight the discovery of a unique scaffold with the potential to move forward as next-generation anti-HIV-1 agents. PMID:27390064

  7. Complete inactivation of HIV-1 using photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rios, Adan; Quesada, Jorge; Anderson, Dallas; Goldstein, Allan; Fossum, Theresa; Colby-Germinario, Susan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that a photo-labeled derivative of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine termed DAPY, when used together with exposure to ultraviolet light, was able to completely and irreversibly inactivate both HIV-1 RT activity as well as infectiousness in each of a T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Control experiments using various concentrations of DAPY revealed that a combination of exposure to ultraviolet light together with use of the specific, high affinity photo-labeled compound was necessary for complete inactivation to occur. This method of HIV RT inactivation may have applicability toward preservation of an intact viral structure and warrants further investigation in regard to the potential of this approach to elicit a durable, broad protective immune response. PMID:20937333

  8. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a review on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Usach, Iris; Melis, Virginia; Peris, José-Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 non-nucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key drugs of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the clinical management of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)/HIV infection. Discussion First-generation NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP), delavirdine (DLV) and efavirenz (EFV) are drugs with a low genetic barrier and poor resistance profile, which has led to the development of new generations of NNRTIs. Second-generation NNRTIs, etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Union, and the next generation of drugs is currently being clinically developed. This review describes recent clinical data, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of commercialized NNRTIs, including the effects of sex, race and age differences on pharmacokinetics and safety. Moreover, it summarizes the characteristics of next-generation NNRTIs: lersivirine, GSK 2248761, RDEA806, BILR 355 BS, calanolide A, MK-4965, MK-1439 and MK-6186. Conclusions This review presents a wide description of NNRTIs, providing useful information for researchers interested in this field, both in clinical use and in research. PMID:24008177

  9. Searching for novel scaffold of triazole non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Frączek, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Kamiński, Rafał; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Azoles are a promising class of the new generation of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). From thousands of reported compounds, many possess the same basic structure of an aryl substituted azole ring linked by a thioglycolamide chain with another aromatic ring. In order to find novel extensions for this basic scaffold, we explored the 5-position substitution pattern of triazole NNRTIs using molecular docking followed by the synthesis of selected compounds. We found that heterocyclic substituents in the 5-position of the triazole ring are detrimental to the inhibitory activity of compounds with four-membered thioglycolamide linker and this substitution seems to be viable only for compounds with shorter two-membered linker. Promising compound, N-(4-carboxy-2-chlorophenyl)-2-((4-benzyl-5-methyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)sulfanyl)acetamide, with potent inhibitory activity and acceptable aqueous solubility has been identified in this study that could serve as lead scaffold for the development of novel water-soluble salts of triazole NNRTIs. PMID:25942362

  10. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz increases monolayer permeability of human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2010-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is often associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications. In this study, we determined whether HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) could increase endothelial permeability. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were treated with EFV (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) and endothelial permeability was determined by a transwell system with a fluorescence-labeled dextran tracer. HCAECs treated with EFV showed a significant increase of endothelial permeability in a concentration-dependent manner. With real time PCR analysis, EFV significantly reduced the mRNA levels of tight junction proteins claudin-1, occludin, zonula occluden-1 and junctional adhesion molecule-1 compared with controls (P<0.05). Protein levels of these tight junction molecules were also reduced substantially in the EFV-treated cells by western blot and flow cytometry analyses. In addition, EFV also increased superoxide anion production with dihydroethidium and cellular glutathione assays, while it decreased mitochondrial membrane potential with JC-staining. Antioxidants (ginkgolide B and MnTBAP) effectively blocked EFV-induced endothelial permeability and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, EFV increased the phosphorylation of MAPK JNK and IkappaBalpha, thereby increasing NFkappaB translocation to the nucleus. Chemical JNK inhibitor and dominant negative mutant JNK and IkappaBalpha adenoviruses effectively blocked the effects of EFV on HCAECs. Thus, EFV increases endothelial permeability which may be due to the decrease of tight junction proteins and the increase of superoxide anion. JNK and NFkappaB activation may be directly involved in the signal transduction pathway of EFV action in HCAECs. PMID:19674747

  11. Drug interaction profile for GSK2248761, a next generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Steve; Kim, Joseph; Gould, Elizabeth; Lou, Yu; White, Scott; de Serres, Mark; Johnson, Mark; Zhou, Xiao-Jian; Pietropaolo, Keith; Mayers, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    AIM To evaluate potential drug interactions with antiretroviral therapies or supportive therapies for use in conjunction with the once daily, next generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor GSK2248761 in patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS A series of phase I drug interaction studies was conducted. RESULTS GSK2248761 was shown to be a weak CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 inhibitor in a clinical study with a probe cocktail. Mean plasma concentration–time profiles for atazanavir, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC), darunavir (DRV, administered with ritonavir [RTV]), and drospirenone/ethinylestradiol were similar following co-administration of GSK2248761. Plasma raltegravir AUC(0,τ) and Cmax increased by 18% with no change in Cτ when raltegravir was co-administered with GSK2248761. Lopinavir (LPV) plasma AUC(0,τ), Cmax and Cτ decreased by 23%, 14% and 40%, respectively, following administration of lopinavir/ritonavir with GSK2248761. Atorvastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin AUC(0,∞) and Cmax increased following co-administration with GSK2248761, with the largest changes observed for simvastatin (3.7-fold and 4.3-fold). Changes in maximum and extent of GSK2248761 exposure were marginal after co-administration with atazanavir, TDF/FTC and raltegravir compared with GSK2248761 administered alone. Co-administration of GSK2248761 with DRV/RTV and LPV/RTV increased plasma GSK2248761 exposures by 1.25- to ≤2-fold compared with GSK2248761 administered alone, and increases in GSK2248761 exposure were higher following single dose co-administration of DRV/RTV or LPV/RTV compared with multiple doses. There were few drug-related AEs, and no treatment-related trends in blood chemistry, haematology, urinalysis, vital signs or ECG findings. CONCLUSIONS These studies indicate that GSK2248761 was safe and well tolerated in healthy adults treated in these studies at the doses and duration of therapy evaluated. PMID:22288567

  12. Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: molecular modeling and X-ray structure investigations.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, W; Friebe, W G; Leinert, H; Mertens, A; Poll, T; von der Saal, W; Zilch, H; Nuber, B; Ziegler, M L

    1993-03-19

    The structural features of a new class of non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (3) are presented. Comparison of the structural and electronic properties with those of TIBO (1) and Nevirapine (2) yields a common three-dimensional model. This model permits the improvement of the lead compound 3 by chemical modification (5,6). Additionally, two new types of inhibitors (4, 7) with similar biological activity can be derived from this model. The structure of the new compounds, including their absolute configuration, are determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:7681480

  13. Ligand similarity guided receptor selection enhances docking accuracy and recall for non-nucleoside HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Richard A; Nettles, James H; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) are allosteric inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), a viral polymerase essential to infection. Despite the availability of >150 NNRTI-bound RT crystal structures, rational design of new NNRTI remains challenging because of the variability of their induced fit, hydrophobic binding patterns. Docking NNRTI yields inconsistent results that vary markedly depending on the receptor structure used, as only 27% of the >20k cross-docking calculations we performed using known NNRTI were accurate. In order to determine if a hospitable receptor for docking could be selected a priori, we evaluated more than 40 chemical descriptors for their ability to pre-select a best receptor for NNRTI cross-docking. The receptor selection was based on similarity scores between the bound- and target-ligands generated by each descriptor. The top descriptors were able to double the probability of cross-docking accuracy over random receptor selection. Additionally, recall of known NNRTI from a large library of similar decoys was increased using the same approach. The results demonstrate the utility of pre-selecting receptors when docking into difficult targets. Graphical Abstract Cross-docking accuracy increases when using chemical descriptors to determine the NNRTI with maximum similarity to the new compound and then docking into its respective receptor. PMID:26450349

  14. Exploring isoxazole and carboxamide derivatives as potential non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Sudheer S; Joshi, Kaustubh A

    2016-04-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transciptase inhibitors (NNRTI) are a class of drug molecules with a specific target of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). In the present work, we evaluated a set of selected oxazole and carboxamide derivatives to identify potential pharmacophoric features using molecular docking approach. The docking approach employed has been validated by enrichment factor calculation at top 1% (EF1%). It shows a considerable improvement in EF1%value compared to earlier reported study carried out on specific dataset of ligands and decoys for RT, in the directory of useful decoys (DUD). The carboxamide derivatives show better activity as NNRT inhibitors than oxazole derivatives. From this study, four pharmacophoric groups including a triazine ring, an aniline substituent, a benzyl amide moiety and a trimethylphenoxy substituent have been recognized and used for designing new NNRT inhibitors. Newly designed molecules show significant enhancement in docking scores over the native ligand, parent and other training set molecules. In addition, some functional groups have also been identified to assist in improving the activity of these pharmacophores. Thus a nitrile group, an amide and fluoro substitution turn out to be an important requisite for NNRT potential inhibitors. PMID:26973048

  15. Pharmacophore Identification, Molecular Docking, Virtual Screening, and In Silico ADME Studies of Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2012-12-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have gained a definitive place due to their unique antiviral potency, high specificity and low toxicity in antiretroviral combination therapies used to treat HIV. In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of different classes of NNRT inhibitors of HIV-1 have been developed. The best HypoRefine pharmacophore model, Hypo 1, which has the best correlation coefficient (0.95) and the lowest RMS (0.97), contains two hydrogen bond acceptors, one hydrophobic and one ring aromatic feature, as well as four excluded volumes. Hypo 1 was further validated by test set and Fischer validation method. The best pharmacophore model was then utilized as a 3D search query to perform a virtual screening to retrieve potential inhibitors. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by Lipinski's rule of five and docking studies by Libdock and Gold methods to refine the retrieved hits. Finally, 7 top ranked compounds based on Gold score fitness function were subjected to in silico ADME studies to investigate for compliance with the standard ranges. PMID:27476739

  16. Systematic evaluation of methyl ester bioisosteres in the context of developing alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) for anti-HIV-1 chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Ayako; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Jun; Xuan, Meiyan; Okazaki, Mari; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Pannecouque, Christophe; Cushman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) are a class of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) targeting HIV-1. Four chemically and metabolically stabilized ADAMs incorporating N-methoxyimidoyl halide replacements of the methyl esters of the lead compound were previously reported. In this study, twenty-five new ADAMs were synthesized in order to investigate the biological consequences of installing nine different methyl ester bioisosteres at three different locations. Attempts to define a universal rank order of methyl ester bioisosteres and discover the 'best' one in terms of inhibitory activity versus HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) led to the realization that the potencies are critically dependent on the surrounding structure at each location, and therefore the definition of universal rank order is impossible. This investigation produced several new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in which all three of the three methyl esters of the lead compound were replaced by methyl ester bioisosteres, resulting in compounds that are more potent as HIV-1 RT inhibitors and antiviral agents than the lead compound itself and are expected to also be more metabolically stable than the lead compound. PMID:27234889

  17. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship and molecular docking of cyclohexenone based analogous as potent non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazar, Muhammad Faizan; Abdullah, Muhammad Imran; Badshah, Amir; Mahmood, Asif; Rana, Usman Ali; Khan, Salah Ud-Din

    2015-04-01

    The chalcones core in compounds is advantageously chosen effective synthons, which offer exciting perspectives in biological and pharmacological research. The present study reports the successful development of eight new cyclohexenone based anti-reverse transcriptase analogous using rational drug design synthesis principles. These new cyclohexenone derivatives (CDs) were synthesized by following a convenient route of Robinson annulation, and the molecular structure of these CDs were later confirmed by various analytical techniques such as 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. All the synthesized compounds were screened theoretically and experimentally against reverse transcriptase (RT) and found potentially active reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. Of the compounds studied, the compound 2FC4 showed high interaction with RT at non-nucleoside binding site, contributing high free binding energy (ΔG -8.01 Kcal) and IC50 (0.207 μg/ml), respectively. Further results revealed that the compounds bearing more halogen groups, with additional hydrophobic character, offered superior anti-reverse transcriptase activity as compared to rest of compounds. It is anticipate that the present study would be very useful for the selection of potential reverse transcriptase inhibitors featuring inclusive pharmacological profiles.

  18. Discovery of piperidin-4-yl-aminopyrimidine derivatives as potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zheng-Yong; Yao, Jin; Tao, Yuan; Mao, Tian-Qi; Wang, Xin-Long; Lu, Yi-Pei; Wang, Hai-Feng; Yin, Hong; Wu, Yan; Chen, Fen-Er; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    A novel series of piperidin-4-yl-aminopyrimidine derivatives were designed fusing the pharmacophore templates of etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids our group previously described and piperidine-linked aminopyrimidines. Most compounds displayed significantly improved activity against wild-type HIV-1 with EC50 values in single-digit nanomolar concentrations compared to etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids. Selected compounds were also evaluated for activity against reverse transcriptase, and had lower IC50 values than that of nevirapine. The improved potency observed in this in vitro model of HIV RNA replication partly validates the mechanism by which this class of allosteric pyrimidine derivatives inhibits reverse transcriptase, and represents a remarkable step forward in the development of AIDS therapeutics. PMID:25935383

  19. Discovery of the Aryl-phospho-indole IDX899, a Highly Potent Anti-HIV Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dousson, Cyril; Alexandre, François-René; Amador, Agnès; Bonaric, Séverine; Bot, Stéphanie; Caillet, Catherine; Convard, Thierry; da Costa, Daniel; Lioure, Marie-Pierre; Roland, Arlène; Rosinovsky, Elodie; Maldonado, Sébastien; Parsy, Christophe; Trochet, Christophe; Storer, Richard; Stewart, Alistair; Wang, Jingyang; Mayes, Benjamin A; Musiu, Chiara; Poddesu, Barbara; Vargiu, Luana; Liuzzi, Michel; Moussa, Adel; Jakubik, Jocelyn; Hubbard, Luke; Seifer, Maria; Standring, David

    2016-03-10

    Here, we describe the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and identification of a clinical candidate non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a novel aryl-phospho-indole (APhI) scaffold. NNRTIs are recommended components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV-1. Since a major problem associated with NNRTI treatment is the emergence of drug resistant virus, this work focused on optimization of the APhI against clinically relevant HIV-1 Y181C and K103N mutants and the Y181C/K103N double mutant. Optimization of the phosphinate aryl substituent led to the discovery of the 3-Me,5-acrylonitrile-phenyl analogue RP-13s (IDX899) having an EC50 of 11 nM against the Y181C/K103N double mutant. PMID:26804933

  20. Effect of template secondary structure on the inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by a pyridinone non-nucleoside inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, D B; Carroll, S S; Culberson, J C; Shafer, J A; Kuo, L C

    1994-01-01

    The importance of RNA secondary structure on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase catalyzed polymerization and on the potency of the pyridin-2-one inhibitor 3-(4,7-dichlorobenzoxazol-2-ylmethylamino)-5-ethyl-6-meth ylpyridin-2(1H)-one, L-697,661, were investigated by employing heteromeric primer-template systems. Our data revealed that a stem-loop hairpin secondary structure in the RNA template could lead to strong hindrance of reverse transcription in the reaction catalyzed by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase resulting in the build up of intermediate-length (pause) polymerization products. The presence of L-697,661 greatly enhanced the accumulation of the pause products suggesting that the rate of enzyme translocation from the pause product might be more potently inhibited than polymerization up to the pause site. Model experiments using a synthetic RNA template containing a stem-loop hairpin revealed that the inhibitory potency of L-697, 661 increased 2-fold upon polymerization to within four bases of the secondary structure. Inhibitor potency was enhanced over 6-fold when primer-extension proceeded through the duplex region of the stem-loop. Images PMID:7514786

  1. Complete and repeatable inactivation of HIV-1 viral particles in suspension using a photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marin-Muller, C; Rios, A; Anderson, D; Siwak, E; Yao, Q

    2013-04-01

    A method is described for achieving repeatable, complete inactivation of HIV, based on photo-inactivation of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) with a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), photoactive 4-[[4-[(4-azido-2,6-dimethylphenyl) amino]-2-pyrimidinyl]amino]benzonitrile (PA-DAPYa). These results show that PA-DAPYa inactivated completely a suspension of cell-free HIV-1 viral particles in a dose and time-dependent manner. Using an ELISA assay for p24, it is demonstrated that a 500nM concentration of PA-DAPYa is able to inactivate 500 TCID50 of HIV viral particles in suspension when irradiated with non-microbicidal wavelength UV light for 30min. No active p24 was detected on days 7, 14, and 21 days after culturing the inactivated HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Several batches of large quantities of HIV viral particles were demonstrated to be inactivated completely and repeatedly by this method. Therefore, a reliable method has been developed to inactivate HIV viral particles in a reproducible manner using an optimal concentration of PA-DAPYa and duration of UV exposure time of the treated particles. The inactivation of viral particles in suspension allows for large-scale production of an injectable formulation of inactivated HIV viral particles for vaccine development which should preserve the conformational and antigenic integrity of viral surface proteins. PMID:23384676

  2. Identification of a novel sulfonamide non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor by a phenotypic HIV-1 full replication assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Ko, Yoonae; Christophe, Thierry; Cechetto, Jonathan; Kim, Junwon; Kim, Kyoung-Ae; Boese, Annette S; Garcia, Jean-Michel; Fenistein, Denis; Ju, Moon Kyeong; Kim, Junghwan; Han, Sung-Jun; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Brondani, Vincent; Sommer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Classical target-based, high-throughput screening has been useful for the identification of inhibitors for known molecular mechanisms involved in the HIV life cycle. In this study, the development of a cell-based assay that uses a phenotypic drug discovery approach based on automated high-content screening is described. Using this screening approach, the antiviral activity of 26,500 small molecules from a relevant chemical scaffold library was evaluated. Among the selected hits, one sulfonamide compound showed strong anti-HIV activity against wild-type and clinically relevant multidrug resistant HIV strains. The biochemical inhibition, point resistance mutations and the activity of structural analogs allowed us to understand the mode of action and propose a binding model for this compound with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. PMID:23874756

  3. Structure-based virtual screening efforts against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase to introduce the new potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Yaser; Mollica, Adriano; Mirzaie, Sako

    2016-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which is strictly related to the development of AIDS, is treated by a cocktail of drugs, but due its high propensity gain drug resistance, the rational development of new medicine is highly desired. Among the different mechanism of action we selected the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition, for our studies. With the aim to identify new chemical entities to be used for further rational drug design, a set of 3000 molecules from the Zinc Database have been screened by docking experiments using AutoDock Vina software. The best ranked compounds with respect of the crystallographic inhibitor MK-4965 resulted to be five compounds, and the best among them was further tested by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our results indicate that comp1 has a stronger interaction with the subsite p66 of RT than MK-4965 and that both are able to stabilize specific conformational changes of the RT 3D structure, which may explain their activity as inhibitors. Therefore comp1 could be a good candidate for biological tests and further development.

  4. Arylthiopyrrole (AThP) derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and docking studies (part 2).

    PubMed

    Lavecchia, Antonio; Costi, Roberta; Artico, Marino; Miele, Gaetano; Novellino, Ettore; Bergamini, Alberto; Crespan, Emmanuele; Maga, Giovanni; Di Santo, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    Arylthio isopropyl pyridinylmethylpyrrolemethanols (AThPs) have been recently reported as a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors acting at the non-nucleoside binding site (NNBS) of this enzyme. Docking experiments of the potent inhibitors 4k (IC(50) = 0.24 microM, SI = 167) and 5e (IC(50) = 0.11 microM, SI > 1667) of wild-type RT prompted the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel AThP derivatives featuring a number of polar groups in position 3 of the pyrrole ring and larger and more hydrophobic alicyclic substituents in place of the isopropyl group at position 4. Among the compounds synthesized and tested in cell-based assays against HIV-1 infected cells, 19b was the most active, with EC(50) = 0.007 microM, CC(50) = 114.5 microm, and SI = 16357. This compound and its precursor 18b retained interesting activities against clinically relevant drug-resistant RT forms carrying K103N, Y181I, and L100I mutations. Docking calculations of 10, 14, 18b, and 19b were also performed to investigate their binding mode into the RT NNBS and to rationalize both structure-activity relationship and resistance data. PMID:17089434

  5. Development and Characterization of a Vaginal Film Containing Dapivirine, a Non- nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI), for prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

    PubMed

    Akil, Ayman; Parniak, Michael A; Dezzuitti, Charlene S; Moncla, Bernard J; Cost, Marilyn R; Li, Mingguang; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2011-06-01

    Dapivirine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is a potent and promising anti-HIV molecule. It is currently being investigated for use as a vaginal microbicide in two dosage forms, a semi-solid gel and a silicone elastomer ring. Quick-dissolving films are promising and attractive dosage forms that may provide an alternative platform for the vaginal delivery of microbicide drug candidates. Vaginal films may provide advantages such as discreet use, no product leakage during use, lack of requirement for an applicator for insertion, rapid drug release and minimal packaging and reduced wastage. Within this study the in vitro bioactivity of dapivirine as compared to the NNRTI UC781 was further established and a quick dissolve film was developed for vaginal application of dapivirine for prevention of HIV infection. The developed film was characterized with respect to its physical and chemical attributes including water content, mechanical strength, drug release profile, permeability, compatibility with lactobacilli and bioactivity. The anti-HIV activity of the formulated dapivirine film was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo models. Importantly the physical and chemical properties of the film as well as its bioactivity were maintained for a period of 18 months. In conclusion, a vaginal film containing dapivirine was developed and characterized. The film was shown to prevent HIV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo and have acceptable characteristics which make this film a promising candidate for testing as vaginal microbicide. PMID:22708075

  6. Development and Characterization of a Vaginal Film Containing Dapivirine, a Non- nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI), for prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Ayman; Parniak, Michael A.; Dezzuitti, Charlene S.; Moncla, Bernard J.; Cost, Marilyn R.; Li, Mingguang; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2012-01-01

    Dapivirine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is a potent and promising anti-HIV molecule. It is currently being investigated for use as a vaginal microbicide in two dosage forms, a semi-solid gel and a silicone elastomer ring. Quick-dissolving films are promising and attractive dosage forms that may provide an alternative platform for the vaginal delivery of microbicide drug candidates. Vaginal films may provide advantages such as discreet use, no product leakage during use, lack of requirement for an applicator for insertion, rapid drug release and minimal packaging and reduced wastage. Within this study the in vitro bioactivity of dapivirine as compared to the NNRTI UC781 was further established and a quick dissolve film was developed for vaginal application of dapivirine for prevention of HIV infection. The developed film was characterized with respect to its physical and chemical attributes including water content, mechanical strength, drug release profile, permeability, compatibility with lactobacilli and bioactivity. The anti-HIV activity of the formulated dapivirine film was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo models. Importantly the physical and chemical properties of the film as well as its bioactivity were maintained for a period of 18 months. In conclusion, a vaginal film containing dapivirine was developed and characterized. The film was shown to prevent HIV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo and have acceptable characteristics which make this film a promising candidate for testing as vaginal microbicide. PMID:22708075

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  8. Effects of the protonation state in the interaction of an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) amino acid, Lys101, and a non nucleoside RT inhibitor, GW420867X.

    PubMed

    Galembeck, Sérgio E; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between an inhibitor and amino acids from a binding pocket could help not only to understand the nature of these interactions, but also to support the design of new inhibitors. In this paper, we explore the key interaction between a second generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), GW420867X, and HIV-1 RT amino acid Lys101 (K101), by quantum mechanical methods. The neutral, protonated, and zwitterionic complexes of GW420867X-K101 were studied. The interaction energies were determined by SCS-MP2/def2-cc-pVQZ, and the electron density was analyzed by natural bond orbital (NBO), atoms in molecules (AIM) and reduced gradient analysis. A large increase in the interaction was observed with the tautomerization of neutral or neutral protonated species. The monomers interact by two medium-strength hydrogen bonds, one partially covalent and another noncovalent. There are some van der Waals intramolecular interactions that are topologically unstable. The nature of the intermolecular interactions was also analyzed using quantitative molecular orbital (MO) theory in combination with an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) at BLYP-D/TZ2P. PMID:24965933

  9. Arylthiopyrrole (AThP) derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and docking studies (part 1).

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Artico, Marino; Miele, Gaetano; Lavecchia, Antonio; Novellino, Ettore; Bergamini, Alberto; Cancio, Reynel; Maga, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    Novel arylthio isopropyl pyridinylmethylpyrrolemethanol (AThP) derivatives 3-5, which are related to capravirine (S-1153), were synthesized and tested for their ability to block the replication cycle of HIV-1 in infected cells. The newly synthesized AThPs are active in the concentration range of 0.008-53 microM. Even if compounds 3-5 are generally less potent than S-1153, their SI values are in some cases similar to that of the reference drug. In fact, the cytotoxicities of AThPs are generally lower than that of S-1153. Compound 4e was the most active derivative of this series in cell-based assays; its potency is similar to that of S-1153 (EC(50)=8 and 3 nM, respectively), as is its selectivity index (SI=6250 and 7000, respectively). AThP derivatives were proven to target HIV-1 RT. In fact, compounds 3-5 generally inhibited the viral enzyme at concentrations similar to those observed in cell-based assays. A selected number of AThPs (4k and 5a,e) were tested against clinically relevant drug-resistant forms of recombinant reverse transcriptase (rRT) carrying the K103N and Y181I mutations. Carbamate 5e showed an approximate 240-fold decrease in activity against Y181I, but only a 10-fold loss in potency against the K103N rRT form. Docking calculations were also performed to investigate the binding mode of compounds 2, 4e, 4j, 4k and 5e into the non-nucleoside binding site of HIV-1 RT and to rationalize some structure-activity relationships and resistance data. PMID:17089433

  10. Valproic Acid Inhibits the Release of Soluble CD40L Induced by Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Donna C.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART), a majority of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV) infected individuals continually develop HIV – Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistent with this notion, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) are elevated in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV infected, cognitively impaired individuals, and that excess sCD40L can contribute to blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability in vivo, thereby signifying the importance of this inflammatory mediator in the pathogenesis of HAND. Here we demonstrate that the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (EFV) induces the release of circulating sCD40L in both HIV infected individuals and in an in vitro suspension of washed human platelets, which are the main source of circulating sCD40L. Additionally, EFV was found to activate glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) in platelets, and we now show that valproic acid (VPA), a known GSK3β inhibitor, was able to attenuate the release of sCD40L in HIV infected individuals receiving EFV, and in isolated human platelets. Collectively these results have important implications in determining the pro-inflammatory role that some antiretroviral regimens may have. The use of antiretrovirals remains the best strategy to prevent HIV-associated illnesses, including HAND, however these drugs have clear limitations to this end, and thus, these results underscore the need to develop adjunctive therapies for HAND that can also minimize the undesired negative effects of the antiretrovirals. PMID:23555843

  11. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) cross-resistance: implications for preclinical evaluation of novel NNRTIs and clinical genotypic resistance testing

    PubMed Central

    Melikian, George L.; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Varghese, Vici; Porter, Danielle; White, Kirsten; Taylor, Jonathan; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Burack, Jeffrey; DeJesus, Edwin; Robbins, Gregory K.; Razzeca, Kristin; Kagan, Ron; Liu, Tommy F.; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Israelski, Dennis; Shafer, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The introduction of two new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in the past 5 years and the identification of novel NNRTI-associated mutations have made it necessary to reassess the extent of phenotypic NNRTI cross-resistance. Methods We analysed a dataset containing 1975, 1967, 519 and 187 genotype–phenotype correlations for nevirapine, efavirenz, etravirine and rilpivirine, respectively. We used linear regression to estimate the effects of RT mutations on susceptibility to each of these NNRTIs. Results Sixteen mutations at 10 positions were significantly associated with the greatest contribution to reduced phenotypic susceptibility (≥10-fold) to one or more NNRTIs, including: 14 mutations at six positions for nevirapine (K101P, K103N/S, V106A/M, Y181C/I/V, Y188C/L and G190A/E/Q/S); 10 mutations at six positions for efavirenz (L100I, K101P, K103N, V106M, Y188C/L and G190A/E/Q/S); 5 mutations at four positions for etravirine (K101P, Y181I/V, G190E and F227C); and 6 mutations at five positions for rilpivirine (L100I, K101P, Y181I/V, G190E and F227C). G190E, a mutation that causes high-level nevirapine and efavirenz resistance, also markedly reduced susceptibility to etravirine and rilpivirine. K101H, E138G, V179F and M230L mutations, associated with reduced susceptibility to etravirine and rilpivirine, were also associated with reduced susceptibility to nevirapine and/or efavirenz. Conclusions The identification of novel cross-resistance patterns among approved NNRTIs illustrates the need for a systematic approach for testing novel NNRTIs against clinical virus isolates with major NNRTI-resistance mutations and for testing older NNRTIs against virus isolates with mutations identified during the evaluation of a novel NNRTI. PMID:23934770

  12. Second-line protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based regimens in Asian HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Fahey, Paul; Kariminia, Azar; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin Nik; Khanh, Truong Huu; Sohn, Annette H.; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Razali, Kamarul; Kurniati, Nia; Huy, Bui Vu; Sudjaritruk, Tavitiya; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Fong, Siew Moy; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Background The WHO recommends boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) treatment. We examined outcomes of this regimen in Asian HIV-infected children. Methods Children from five Asian countries in the TREAT Asia Pediatric HIV Observational Database (TApHOD) with ≥24 weeks of NNRTI-based HAART followed by ≥24 weeks of bPI-based HAART were eligible. Primary outcomes were the proportions with virologic suppression (HIV-RNA <400 copies/ml) and immune recovery (CD4% ≥25% if age <5 years and CD4 count ≥500 cells/mm3 if age ≥5 years) at 48 and 96 weeks. Results Of 3422 children, 153 were eligible; 52% were female. At switch, median age was 10 years, 26% were in WHO stage 4. Median weight-for-age z-score (WAZ) was −1.9 (n=121), CD4% was 12.5% (n=106), CD4 count was 237 (n=112) cells/mm3, and HIV-RNA was 4.6 log10copies/ml (n=61). The most common PI was lopinavir/ritonavir (83%). At 48 weeks, 61% (79/129) had immune recovery, 60% (26/43) had undetectable HIV-RNA and 73% (58/79) had fasting triglycerides ≥130mg/dl. By 96 weeks, 70% (57/82) achieved immune recovery, 65% (17/26) virologic suppression, and hypertriglyceridemia occurred in 66% (33/50). Predictors for virologic suppression at week 48 were longer duration of NNRTI-based HAART (p=0.006), younger age (p=0.007), higher WAZ (p=0.020), and HIV-RNA at switch <10,000 copies/ml (p=0.049). Conclusion In this regional cohort of Asian children on bPI-based second-line HAART, 60% of children tested had immune recovery by one year, and two-thirds had hyperlipidemia, highlighting difficulties in optimizing second-line HAART with limited drug options. PMID:23296119

  13. Steady state kinetics and inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by a non-nucleoside dipyridodiazepinone, BI-RG-587, using a heteropolymeric template.

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, E B; Miglietta, J J; Shrutkowski, A G; Shih, C K; Grob, P M; Skoog, M T

    1991-01-01

    Steady state kinetics and inhibition by a dipyridodiazepinone of the reverse transcriptase from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) were studied using a heteropolymeric RNA template with a sequence from the authentic initiation site on the HIV genome. For addition of the first deoxynucleotide to primer, kcat/KM is 0.05 (nM-min)-1 and KM is 10 nM. When all 4 deoxynucleotide triphosphates are present and processive synthesis occurs, catalysis is less efficient; kcat/KM = .0077 (nM-min)-1 and KM = 100 nM for dATP. These results are consistent with a rate determining conformation change involved in translocation of the enzyme along the template. Inhibition by the dipyridodiazepinone BI-RG-587 is noncompetitive with respect to both nucleotide and template-primer; this compound decreases Vmax but does not affect KM. Thus, this inhibitor binds to a site distinct from the substrate binding sites with Ki of 220 nM. Inhibition by BI-RG-587 results in a uniform decrease in amount of products of all lengths rather than a shift from longer to shorter products, suggesting the inhibitor does not affect processivity of reverse transcriptase. Images PMID:1711678

  14. Anti-HIV cytotoxicity enzyme inhibition and molecular docking studies of quinoline based chalcones as potential non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRT).

    PubMed

    Hameed, Asima; Abdullah, Muhammad Imran; Ahmed, Ejaz; Sharif, Ahsan; Irfan, Ahmad; Masood, Sara

    2016-04-01

    A series of fourteen (A1 - A14) qunioline based chalcones were screened for reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RT) and found potentially active against RT. Bioassay, theoretical and dockings studies with RT (the enzyme required for reverse transcription of viral RNA) results showed that the type and positions of the substituents seemed to be critical for their inhibition against RT. The bromo and chloro substituted chalcone displayed high degree of inhibition against RT. The A4 andA6 showed high interaction with RT, contributing high free binding energy (ΔG -9.30 and -9.13kcal) and RT inhibition value (IC50 0.10μg/ml and 0.11μg/ml). PMID:26964017

  15. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 2-Thioxopyrimidin-4(1H)-one Derivatives as Potential Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Nagy M.; Al-Omar, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    A series of new 5-allyl-6-benzylpyrimidin-4(3H)-ones bearing different substituents at the C-2 position of the pyrimidine core have been synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the human T-lymphotropic type (MT-4 cell cultures). The majority of the title compounds showed moderate to good activities against HIV-1. Amongst them, 5-allyl-6-benzyl-2-(3-hydroxypropylthio)pyrimidin-4(3H)-one analogue 11c exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (IC50 0.32 µM). The biological testing results clearly indicated that the substitution at C-2 position of the pyrimidine ring could increase the anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. PMID:25397597

  16. Design, discovery, modelling, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel and small, low toxicity s-triazine derivatives as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Viira, Birgit; Selyutina, Anastasia; García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Karonen, Maarit; Sinkkonen, Jari; Merits, Andres; Maran, Uko

    2016-06-01

    A set of top-ranked compounds from a multi-objective in silico screen was experimentally tested for toxicity and the ability to inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in cell-free assay and in cell-based assay using HIV-1 based virus-like particles. Detailed analysis of a commercial sample that indicated specific inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription revealed that a minor component that was structurally similar to that of the main compound was responsible for the strongest inhibition. As a result, novel s-triazine derivatives were proposed, modelled, discovered, and synthesised, and their antiviral activity and cellular toxicity were tested. Compounds 18a and 18b were found to be efficient HIV-1 RT inhibitors, with an IC50 of 5.6±1.1μM and 0.16±0.05μM in a cell-based assay using infectious HIV-1, respectively. Compound 18b also had no detectable toxicity for different human cell lines. Their binding mode and interactions with the RT suggest that there was strong and adaptable binding in a tight (NNRTI) hydrophobic pocket. In summary, this iterative study produced structural clues and led to a group of non-toxic, novel compounds to inhibit HIV-RT with up to nanomolar potency. PMID:27108399

  17. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 5-Alkyl-6-Adamantylmethylpyrimidin-4(3H)-ones as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxin; Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    A series of novel 5-alkyl-6-Adamantylmethylpyrimidin-4(3H)-ones bearing various substituents at the C-2 position of the pyrimidinone ring were synthesized using a facile route and evaluated for their anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cells. The biological results demonstrated that the majority of the newly designed compounds possessed moderate efficiency in inhibiting the replication of the wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain (IIIB ) with EC50 values in the range from 0.10 to 5.39 μm. Among them, 5b1 and 5b3 proved to be the two most active inhibitors against WT HIV-1 with EC50 values of 0.10 and 0.12 μm, respectively, which were more active than nevirapine (NVP) in the same assay. In addition, HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase (RT) inhibition assay indicated that the representative compound 5b1 showed affinity to WT HIV-1 RT, and inhibited the activity of RT with an IC50 value superior to the reference drug NVP. Moreover, the preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) and the molecular modeling analysis of these new derivatives are also discussed. PMID:27062197

  18. Development and validation of a high performance liquid chromatography method for determination of 6-benzyl-1-benzyloxymethyl-5-iodouracil (W-1), a novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and its application to a pharmacokinetic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Yuan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Jun-Yi; Li, Pu; Ren, Hong; Lou, Ya-Qing; Lu, Chuang; Zhang, Guo-Liang

    2015-10-01

    A sensitive and selective high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for determination of 6-benzyl-1-benzyloxymethyl-5-iodouracil (W-1), a novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in rat plasma, was developed and validated. Chromatographic separation of W-1 and megestrol acetate (internal standard) was achieved on a reversed-phase C18 column at 25°C. The mobile phase was consisted of acetonitrile-water (60:40, v/v) and pumped at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The ultraviolet (UV) detector was set at the absorption wavelength of 284 nm. The calibration curve for W-1 was linear over the concentration range of 0.01-8 µg/mL and the lower limit of quantification was 10 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were <8.9 and 5.3%, respectively. The extraction recoveries ranged from 97.9 to 101.6%. The validated HPLC method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of W-1 in rats. PMID:25808138

  19. Novel HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Agents: Optimization of Diarylanilines with High Potency against Wild-Type and Rilpivirine-Resistant E138K Mutant Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Wei, Lei; Huang, Li; Yu, Fei; Zheng, Weifan; Qin, Bingjie; Zhu, Dong-Qin; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2016-04-28

    Three series (6, 13, and 14) of new diarylaniline (DAAN) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for anti-HIV potency, especially against the E138K viral strain with a major mutation conferring resistance to the new-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug rilpivirine (1b). Promising new compounds were then assessed for physicochemical and associated pharmaceutical properties, including aqueous solubility, log P value, and metabolic stability, as well as predicted lipophilic parameters of ligand efficiency, ligand lipophilic efficiency, and ligand efficiency-dependent lipophilicity indices, which are associated with ADME property profiles. Compounds 6a, 14c, and 14d showed high potency against the 1b-resistant E138K mutated viral strain as well as good balance between anti-HIV-1 activity and desirable druglike properties. From the perspective of optimizing future NNRTI compounds as clinical trial candidates, computational modeling results provided valuable information about how the R(1) group might provide greater efficacy against the E138K mutant. PMID:27070547

  20. A Phase III Comparative Study of the Efficacy and Tolerability of Three Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Sparing Antiretroviral Regimens for Treatment-Naïve HIV-1-Infected Volunteers: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha; Na, Lumine H.; Godfrey, Catherine; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Sagar, Manish; Brown, Todd T.; Cohn, Susan E.; McComsey, Grace A.; Aweeka, Francesca; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Presti, Rachel M.; Koletar, Susan L.; Haas, David W.; Patterson, Kristine B.; Benson, Constance A.; Baugh, Bryan P.; Leavitt, Randi Y.; Rooney, James F.; Seekins, Daniel; Currier, Judith S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NNRTI) inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy is not suitable for all treatment-naïve HIV-infected persons. Objective Perform a rigorous evaluation of three NNRTI-sparing initial antiretroviral regimens to demonstrate equivalence for virologic efficacy and tolerability. Design Phase-III, 1:1:1 randomized, open label, >96 week study. Setting Fifty-seven sites in United States and Puerto Rico. Patients Treatment naïve, ≥18 years, HIV-1 RNA >1000 copies/mL, no nucleoside reverse transcriptase or protease inhibitor resistance. Intervention Atazanavir 300 mg with ritonavir 100 mg, daily; or raltegravir 400 mg twice daily; or darunavir 800 mg with ritonavir 100 mg, daily; plus emtricitabine 200 mg + tenofovir disoproxil fumarate 300 mg daily. Measurements Virologic failure defined as confirmed HIV-1 RNA >1000 copies/mL between 16 and 24 weeks, or >200 copies/mL at or after 24 weeks; tolerability failure defined as discontinuation of atazanavir, raltegravir or darunavir for toxicity. A secondary endpoint was a combination of virologic efficacy and tolerability. Results Among 1,809 participants all pairwise comparisons of incidence of virologic failure over 96-weeks demonstrated equivalence within ±10%. Raltegravir and ritonavir-boosted darunavir were equivalent for tolerability, whereas ritonavir-boosted atazanavir resulted in a 12.7% and a 9.2% higher incidence of tolerability discontinuation than raltegravir and ritonavir-boosted darunavir respectively, primarily due to hyperbilirubinemia. For combined virologic efficacy and tolerability ritonavir-boosted darunavir was superior to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir, and raltegravir was superior to both protease inhibitors. Antiretroviral resistance at time of virologic failure was rare but more likely with raltegravir. Limitations Open label; ritonavir not provided Conclusions Over 2 years all three regimens attain high and equivalent rates of virologic control. Regimens

  1. A controlled Phase II trial assessing three doses of enfuvirtide (T-20) in combination with abacavir, amprenavir, ritonavir and efavirenz in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-naive HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Lalezari, Jacob P; DeJesus, Edwin; Northfelt, Donald W; Richmond, Gary; Wolfe, Peter; Haubrich, Richard; Henry, David; Powderly, William; Becker, Stephen; Thompson, Melanie; Valentine, Fred; Wright, David; Carlson, Margrit; Riddler, Sharon; Haas, Frances F; DeMasi, Ralph; Sista, Prokash R; Salgo, Miklos; Delehanty, John

    2003-08-01

    Enfuvirtide is a novel antiretroviral that blocks HIV-1 cell fusion and viral entry. This Phase II, controlled, open-label, randomized, multicentre dose-ranging trial explored the safety, antiviral activity and pharmacokinetics of enfuvirtide, administered by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection, in 71 HIV-1-infected, protease inhibitor-experienced, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-naive adults for 48 weeks. Study participants were randomized to receive enfuvirtide at a deliverable dose of 45, 67.5 or 90 mg twice daily; the 45 mg twice daily dose required 2 injections/day, while the higher doses required 4 injections/day. A background oral antiretroviral (ARV) regimen of abacavir (300 mg twice daily), amprenavir (1200 mg twice daily), ritonavir (200 mg twice daily) and efavirenz (600 mg once daily) was provided with enfuvirtide. A control group received the background ARV regimen alone. All potential participants underwent an HIV genotype at screen to ensure a homogenous population and to exclude patients with evidence of genotypic resistance to NNRTIs. Overall, the tolerability of the combination of abacavir, amprenavir, ritonavir, efavirenz and enfuvirtide was generally comparable to control through 48 weeks. No enfuvirtide dose-dependent adverse events (AEs) were observed across treatment groups. Injection site reactions (ISRs) occurred at least once in 68.5% of the enfuvirtide-treated population, and most ISRs were mild to moderate in severity, with no apparent dose relationship. Excluding ISRs, the most common treatment-emergent AEs were nausea, diarrhoea, dizziness and fatigue; with no clinically significant differences in the incidence of AEs observed between the control and enfuvirtide groups. Each treatment group benefited from ARV therapy, with a trend of increasing antiviral and immunological activity associated with increasing enfuvirtide dose. At 48 weeks, the median HIV-1 RNA change from baseline for the ITT population was -2.24 log10

  2. Long-term effectiveness of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor- versus ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy: implications for first-line therapy choice in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D; Hull, Mark; McVea, David; Chau, William; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio SG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In many resource-limited settings, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) failure is diagnosed clinically or immunologically. As such, there is a high likelihood that patients may stay on a virologically failing regimen for a substantial period of time. Here, we compared the long-term impact of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)- versus boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based cART in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We followed prospectively 3925 ART-naïve patients who started NNRTIs (N=1963, 50%) or bPIs (N=1962; 50%) from 1 January 2000 until 30 June 2013 in BC. At six months, we assessed whether patients virologically failed therapy (a plasma viral load (pVL) >50 copies/mL), and we stratified them based on the pVL at the time of failure ≤500 versus >500 copies/mL. We then followed these patients for another six months and calculated their probability of achieving subsequent viral suppression (pVL <50 copies/mL twice consecutively) and of developing drug resistance. These probabilities were adjusted for fixed and time-varying factors, including cART adherence. Results At six months, virologic failure rates were 9.5 and 14.3 cases per 100 person-months for NNRTI and bPI initiators, respectively. NNRTI initiators who failed with a pVL ≤500 copies/mL had a 16% higher probability of achieving subsequent suppression at 12 months than bPI initiators (0.81 (25th–75th percentile 0.75–0.83) vs. 0.72 (0.61–0.75)). However, if failing NNRTI initiators had a pVL >500 copies/mL, they had a 20% lower probability of suppressing at 12 months than pVL-matched bPI initiators (0.37 (0.29–0.45) vs. 0.46 (0.38–0.54)). In terms of evolving HIV drug resistance, those who failed on NNRTI performed worse than bPI in all scenarios, especially if they failed with a viral load >500 copies/mL. Conclusions Our results show that patients who virologically failed at six months on NNRTI and continued on the same regimen had a

  3. Discovery of 3-{5-[(6-Amino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl)methoxy]-2-chlorophenoxy}-5-chlorobenzonitrile (MK-4965): A Potent, Orally Bioavailable HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor with Improved Potency against Key Mutant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Thomas J.; Sisko, John T.; Tynebor, Robert M.; Williams, Theresa M.; Felock, Peter J.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Lai, Ming-Tain; Liang, Yuexia; McGaughey, Georgia; Liu, Meiquing; Miller, Mike; Moyer, Gregory; Munshi, Vandna; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Prasad, Sridhar; Reid, John C.; Sanchez, Rosa; Torrent, Maricel; Vacca, Joseph P.; Wan, Bang-Lin; Yan, Youwei

    2009-07-10

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have been shown to be a key component of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The use of NNRTIs has become part of standard combination antiviral therapies producing clinical outcomes with efficacy comparable to other antiviral regimens. There is, however, a critical issue with the emergence of clinical resistance, and a need has arisen for novel NNRTIs with a broad spectrum of activity against key HIV-1 RT mutations. Using a combination of traditional medicinal chemistry/SAR analyses, crystallography, and molecular modeling, we have designed and synthesized a series of novel, highly potent NNRTIs that possess broad spectrum antiviral activity and good pharmacokinetic profiles. Further refinement of key compounds in this series to optimize physical properties and pharmacokinetics has resulted in the identification of 8e (MK-4965), which has high levels of potency against wild-type and key mutant viruses, excellent oral bioavailability and overall pharmacokinetics, and a clean ancillary profile.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4-[[4-[[4-[(E)-2-cyanoethenyl]-2,6-dimethylphenyl]amino]-2-pyrimidinyl]amino]benzonitrile (TMC278/rilpivirine) aggregates: correlation between amphiphilic properties of the drug and oral bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Yulia Volovik; Gallicchio, Emilio; Das, Kalyan; Levy, Ronald M.; Arnold, Eddy

    2009-01-01

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) TMC278/rilpivirine is an anti-AIDS therapeutic agent with high oral bioavailability despite its high hydrophobicity. Previous studies established a correlation between ability of the drug molecule to form stable, homogeneous populations of spherical nanoparticles (~100–120 nm in diameter) at low pH in surfactant-independent fashion, and good oral bioavailability. Here, we hypothesize that the drug is able to assume surfactant-like properties under physiologically relevant conditions, thus facilitating formation of nanostructuresin the absence of other surfactants. The results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations indeed show that protonated drug molecules behave as surfactants at the water/aggregate interface while neutral drug molecules assist aggregate packing via conformational variability. Our simulation results suggest that amphiphilic behavior at low pH and intrinsic flexibility influence drug aggregation and are believed to play critical roles in the favorable oral bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:19739675

  5. Development and in Vitro Evaluation of a Microbicide Gel Formulation for a Novel Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Belonging to the N-Dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidines (N-DABOs) Family.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Brai, Annalaura; Dasso Lang, Maria Chiara; Deodato, Davide; Greco, Antonia Michela; Bizzarri, Bruno Mattia; Cascone, Lorena; Casian, Alexandru; Zamperini, Claudio; Dreassi, Elena; Crespan, Emmanuele; Maga, Giovanni; Vanham, Guido; Ceresola, Elisa; Canducci, Filippo; Ariën, Kevin K; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-03-24

    Preventing HIV transmission by the use of a vaginal microbicide is a topic of considerable interest in the fight against AIDS. Both a potent anti-HIV agent and an efficient formulation are required to develop a successful microbicide. In this regard, molecules able to inhibit the HIV replication before the integration of the viral DNA into the genetic material of the host cells, such as entry inhibitors or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs), are ideal candidates for prevention purpose. Among RTIs, S- and N-dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidines (S-DABOs and N-DABOs) are interesting compounds active at nanomolar concentration against wild type of RT and with a very interesting activity against RT mutations. Herein, novel N-DABOs were synthesized and tested as anti-HIV agents. Furthermore, their mode of binding was studied by molecular modeling. At the same time, a vaginal microbicide gel formulation was developed and tested for one of the most promising candidates. PMID:26898379

  6. Selective non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. New 2,3-dihydrothiazolo[2,3-a]isoindol-5(9bH)-ones and related compounds with anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Mertens, A; Zilch, H; König, B; Schäfer, W; Poll, T; Kampe, W; Seidel, H; Leser, U; Leinert, H

    1993-08-20

    A series of substituted 2,3-dihydrothiazolo[2,3-a]isoindol-5(9bH)-ones and related compounds 1-73 were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit reverse transcriptase (RT) of the human immune deficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and replication of HIV-1 in MT2 cells. The antiviral activity of these compounds depends on the stereoselective configuration of the substituent in position 9b. Structure-activity studies were done within these series of compounds to determine the optimum substituents for antiviral activity. The most potent inhibitors were found in the class of 2,3-dihydrothiazolo[2,3-a]isoindol-5(9bH)-ones bearing a phenyl ring system in position 9b optionally substituted with one or two methyl groups or a chlorine atom in position 8. The most active analogues (R)-(+)-1, (R)-(+)-6, (R)-(+)-13, (R)-(+)-26, and (R)-(+)-53 inhibit the HIV-1 RT with an IC50 between 16 and 300 nM and an IC50 between 10 and 392 nM in MT2 cells, respectively. PMID:7689109

  7. Structural requirements for potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sperm-immobilizing activities of cyclohexenyl thiourea and urea non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Venkatachalam, Taracad K; Mao, Chen; Qazi, Sanjive; Uckun, Fatih M

    2002-12-01

    The current pandemic of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has created an urgent need for a new type of microbicide, one that is both a spermicide and a virucide. In a systematic effort to identify a non-detergent-type antiviral spermicide, we have rationally designed and synthesized a series of cyclohexenyl thiourea (CHET) nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with sperm-immobilizing activity (SIA). To gain further insight into the structural requirements for the optimal activity of these dual-function NNIs, we compared the effects of thiazolyl, benzothiazolyl, and pyridyl ring substitutions and functionalization with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups as well as the importance of thiourea and urea moieties of 15 heterocyclic ring-substituted NNIs. RT activity and p24 antigen production in HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used as markers of viral replication. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used for evaluating SIA of CHET compounds. The rabbit model was used for evaluation of in vivo mucosal toxicity and contraceptive activity of the lead NNIs. Three CHET-NNIs with a bromo, chloro, or methyl substitution at the 5 position of the pyridyl ring exhibited potent anti-HIV activity at nanomolar concentrations (IC(50) = 3-5 nM) and SIA at micromolar concentrations (EC(50) = 45-96 micro M). The dual-function CHET-NNIs were potent inhibitors of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains with genotypic and phenotypic NNI resistance. Upon substitution of the sulfur atom of the thiourea moiety with an oxygen atom, the most striking difference noted was a 38-fold reduction in time required for 50% sperm immobilization (T(1/2)). A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was used in deriving regression equations between 20 physicochemical properties and SIA of NNIs. QSAR analysis showed that the T(1/2) values positively correlated with

  8. Investigational reverse transcriptase inhibitors for the treatment of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cory, Theodore J; Midde, Narasimha M; Rao, PSS; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While considerable advances have been made in the development of antiretroviral agents, there is still work to be done. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors are important drugs for the treatment of HIV, and considerable research is currently ongoing to develop new agents and to modify currently existing agents. Areas covered Herein, the authors discuss both investigational nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), including agents that are in various stages of development. They also discuss novel formulations that are being investigated for currently available drugs, and discuss the advantages that these new formulations may provide. Expert opinion New formulations and co-formulations of currently existing antiretrovirals will represent an important area of development, as a means to improve adherence for HIV-positive individuals. New formulations will continue to be developed, with a focus on allowing for less-frequent administration, as well increasing drug concentrations at local sites such as vaginal tissue, rectal tissue and sites in the immune system. PMID:26088266

  9. Design of Annulated Pyrazoles As Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Z.K.; Harris, S.F.; Arora, N.; Javanbakht, H.; Li, Y.; Fretland, J.; Davidson, J.P.; Billedeau, J.R.; Gleason, S.; Hirschfeld, D.; Kennedy-Smith, J.J.; Mirzadegan, T.; Roetz, R.; Smith, M.; Sperry, S.; Suh, J.M.; Wu, J.; Tsing, S.; Villasenor, A.G.; Paul, A.; Su, G.

    2009-05-26

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are recommended components of preferred combination antiretroviral therapies used for the treatment of HIV. These regimens are extremely effective in suppressing virus replication. Structure-based optimization of diaryl ether inhibitors led to the discovery of a new series of pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridazine NNRTIs that bind the reverse transcriptase enzyme of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-RT) in an expanded volume relative to most other inhibitors in this class. The binding mode maintains the {beta}13 and {beta}14 strands bearing Pro236 in a position similar to that in the unliganded reverse transcriptase structure, and the distribution of interactions creates the opportunity for substantial resilience to single point mutations. Several pyrazolopyridazine NNRTIs were found to be highly effective against wild-type and NNRTI-resistant viral strains in cell culture.

  10. Mechanism of human telomerase inhibition by BIBR1532, a synthetic, non-nucleosidic drug candidate.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Emanuelle; Wenz, Christian; Lingner, Joachim; Hauel, Norbert; Priepke, Henning; Kauffmann, Iris; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Rettig, Wolfgang J; Damm, Klaus; Schnapp, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein acting as a reverse transcriptase, has been identified as a target for cancer drug discovery. The synthetic, non-nucleosidic compound, BIBR1532, is a potent and selective telomerase inhibitor capable of inducing senescence in human cancer cells (). In the present study, the mode of drug action was characterized. BIBR1532 inhibits the native and recombinant human telomerase, comprising the human telomerase reverse transcriptase and human telomerase RNA components, with similar potency primarily by interfering with the processivity of the enzyme. Enzyme-kinetic experiments show that BIBR1532 is a mixed-type non-competitive inhibitor and suggest a drug binding site distinct from the sites for deoxyribonucleotides and the DNA primer, respectively. Thus, BIBR1532 defines a novel class of telomerase inhibitor with mechanistic similarities to non-nucleosidic inhibitors of HIV1 reverse transcriptase. PMID:11854300

  11. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors as microbicides.

    PubMed

    Lewi, Paul; Heeres, Jan; Ariën, Kevin; Venkatraj, Muthusamy; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Vanham, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The CAPRISA 004 study in South Africa has accelerated the development of vaginal and rectal microbicides containing antiretrovirals that target specific enzymes in the reproduction cycle of HIV, especially reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). In this review we discuss the potential relevance of HIV-1 RTIs as microbicides, focusing in the nucleotide RTI tenofovir and six classes of nonnucleoside RTIs (including dapivirine, UC781, urea and thiourea PETTs, DABOs and a pyrimidinedione). Although tenofovir and dapivirine appear to be most advanced in clinical trials as potential microbicides, several issues remain unresolved, e.g., the importance of nonhuman primates as a "gatekeeper" for clinical trials, the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants, the combination of microbicides that target different phases of viral reproduction and the accessibility to microbicides in low-income countries. Thus, here we discuss the latest research on RTI as microbicides in the light of the continuing spread of the HIV pandemic from the point of view of medicinal chemistry, virological, and pharmaceutical studies. PMID:22264043

  12. Discovery and crystallography of bicyclic arylaminoazines as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Gil; Frey, Kathleen M; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Spasov, Krasimir A; Chan, Albert H; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) are reported that incorporate a 7-indolizinylamino or 2-naphthylamino substituent on a pyrimidine or 1,3,5-triazine core. The most potent compounds show below 10 nanomolar activity towards wild-type HIV-1 and variants bearing Tyr181Cys and Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys resistance mutations. The compounds also feature good aqueous solubility. Crystal structures for two complexes enhance the analysis of the structure-activity data. PMID:26166629

  13. Pyrazolo-Piperidines Exhibit Dual Inhibition of CCR5/CXCR4 HIV Entry and Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Cox, Bryan D; Prosser, Anthony R; Sun, Yongnian; Li, Zhufang; Lee, Sangil; Huang, Ming B; Bond, Vincent C; Snyder, James P; Krystal, Mark; Wilson, Lawrence J; Liotta, Dennis C

    2015-07-01

    We report novel anti-HIV-1 agents with combined dual host-pathogen pharmacology. Lead compound 3, composed of a pyrazole-piperidine core, exhibits three concurrent mechanisms of action: (1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibition, (2) CCR5-mediated M-tropic viral entry inhibition, and (3) CXCR4-based T-tropic viral entry inhibition that maintains native chemokine ligand binding. This discovery identifies important tool compounds for studying viral infectivity and prototype agents that block HIV-1 entry through dual chemokine receptor ligation. PMID:26191361

  14. Substituted tetrahydroquinolines as potent allosteric inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and its key mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dai-Shi; Lim, John J.; Tinney, Elizabeth; Wan, Bang-Lin; Young, Mary Beth; Anderson, Kenneth D.; Rudd, Deanne; Munshi, Vandna; Bahnck, Carolyn; Felock, Peter J.; Lu, Meiqing; Lai, Ming-Tain; Touch, Sinoeun; Moyer, Gregory; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Liang, Yuexia; Sanchez, Rosa; Prasad, Sridhar; Yan, Youwei; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Torrent, Maricel; Miller, Mike; Vacca, Joe P.; Williams, Theresa M.; Anthony, Neville J.; Merck

    2010-09-27

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key elements of multidrug regimens, called HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy), that are used to treat HIV-1 infections. Elucidation of the structure-activity relationships of the thiocarbamate moiety of the previous published lead compound 2 provided a series of novel tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 RT with nanomolar intrinsic activity on the WT and key mutant enzymes and potent antiviral activity in infected cells. The SAR optimization, mutation profiles, preparation of compounds, and pharmacokinetic profile of compounds are described.

  15. Discovery of potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors from arylthioacetanilide structural motif.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxin; Li, Xiao; De Clercq, Erik; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-09-18

    The poor pharmacokinetics, side effects and particularly the rapid emergence of drug resistance compromise the efficiency of the clinically used anti-HIV drugs. Therefore, the discovery of novel and effective NNRTIs is still an extremely primary mission. Arylthioacetanilide family is one of the highly active HIV-1 NNRTIs against wide-type (WT) HIV-1 and a wide range of drug-resistant mutant strains. Especially, VRX-480773 and RDEA806 have been chosen as candidates for further clinical studies. In this article, we review the discovery and development of the arylthioacetanilides, and, especially, pay much attention to the structural modifications, SARs conclusions and molecular modeling. Moreover, several medicinal chemistry strategies to overcome drug resistance involved in the optimization process of arylthioacetanilides are highlighted, providing valuable clues for further investigations. PMID:26276432

  16. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth HIV Reverse Transcriptase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    HIV Reverse Transcriptase crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission using Commercial Refrigerator/Incubator Module (CR/IM) at 4 degrees C and the Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA). Reverse transcriptase is an enzyme responsible for copying the nucleic acid genome of the AIDS virus from RNA to DNA. Studies indicated that the space-grown crystals were larger and better ordered (beyond 4 angstroms) than were comparable Earth-grown crystals. Principal Investigators were Charles Bugg and Larry DeLucas.

  17. Molecular modeling, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-heteroaryl compounds as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anuradha; Yadav, Dipti; Yadav, Madhu; Dhamanage, Ashwini; Kulkarni, Smita; Singh, Ramendra K

    2015-03-01

    Different N-heteroaryl compounds bearing pyrimidine and benzimidazole moieties have been designed in silico using Discovery studio 2.5 software, synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1 replication using laboratory adapted strains HIV-1IIIB (X4, subtype B) and HIV-1Ada5 (R5, subtype B), and the primary isolates HIV-1UG070 (X4, subtype D) and HIV-1VB59 (R5, subtype C). Cell-based assay showed that compounds were active at 1.394 μm concentrations (Selectivity Index: 1.29-38.39). The studies on structure-activity relationship clearly suggested anti-HIV activity of pyrimidine and benzimidazole derivatives and these findings were consistent with the in vitro cell-based experimental data. The results of molecular modeling and docking confirmed that all compounds assumed a butterfly-like conformation and showed H-bond, 'π-π' and 'π-+' and hydrophobic interactions within flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, similar to known non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as nevirapine. In view of the results obtained, it can be said that the chemical skeletons of N, N'-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)-succinamide (14 and 15) and 1, 4-bis-benzoimidazol-1-yl-butane-1, 4-dione (16 and 17) may be used for developing potent inhibitors of HIV-1 replication, with suitable structure/pharmacophore modifications. PMID:25055732

  18. Triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy in children.

    PubMed

    Handforth, Jennifer; Sharland, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Much of the success attributed to HIV therapy in the last few years has resulted from improved ways of using existing drugs in combination therapy regimens. The availability of new, more potent drugs such as protease inhibitors and more accurate viral load tests to aid decisions to start or change treatment has also contributed to the success. Published recommendations for pediatric HIV therapy, generated by a panel of experts and specialists, are readily available and regularly updated. Preferred regimens of 'potent' therapy (referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy, or HAART) currently consist of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) combined with either a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a protease inhibitor. More intense four-drug regimens using an NNRTI or a second protease inhibitor as a fourth drug are being evaluated. Problems with HAART include: unpalatable drug formulations and adverse effects, coupled with lack of data on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of various drug combinations. Adherence is a major factor influencing the efficacy and outcome of antiretroviral therapy. Many children cannot adhere to complex multidrug regimens, which cause virologic failure, despite excellent CD4+ cell count responses. This means a rapid progression through the limited number of treatment regimens available. Simpler regimens such as those containing three NRTIs have been proposed as a method of treatment that will allow suppression of the virus, yet circumvent many of the problems previously mentioned. An additional benefit would be the preservation of antiretroviral drugs from other classes for future treatment options if required. The major advantages of triple NRTI regimens are the simplicity of the regimen, good tolerability, few drug-drug interactions, and infrequent adverse effects coupled with a low pill burden. However, abacavir hypersensitivity remains a major problem. Up to 3% of patients may

  19. Coumarins as Potential Inhibitors of DNA Polymerases and Reverse Transcriptases. Searching New Antiretroviral and Antitumoral Drugs.

    PubMed

    Garro, Hugo A; Pungitore, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the viral agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and at present, there is no effective vaccine against HIV. Reverse Transcriptase (RT) is an essential enzyme for retroviral replication, such as HIV as well as for other RNA infectious viruses like Human T lymphocyte virus. Polymerases act in DNA metabolism, modulating different processes like mitosis, damage repair, transcription and replication. It has been widely documented that DNA Polymerases and Reverse Transcriptases serve as molecular targets for antiviral and antitumoral chemotherapy. Coumarins are oxygen heterocycles that are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Natural coumarins have attraction due to their bioactive properties such as tumor promotion inhibitory effects, and anti-HIV activity. Coumarins and derivates exhibit potent inhibitory effects on HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes and compounds isolated from Calophyllum inophyllum or DCK derivates showed inhibitory activity against human RT. Furthermore, natural isocoumarins isolated from cultures of fungi or hydroxycoumarins were able to inhibit human DNA polymerase. In view of their importance as drugs and biologically active natural products, and their medicinally useful properties, extensive studies have been carried out on the synthesis of coumarin compounds in recent years. Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs), a class of antiretroviral chemotherapeutic agents, act by binding to an allosteric pocket showing, generally, low toxicity. This work tries to summarize the investigation about natural and synthetic coumarins with the ability to inhibit key enzymes that play a crucial role in DNA metabolism and their possible application as antiretroviral and antitumoral agents. PMID:26179474

  20. The human LINE-1 reverse transcriptase:effect of deletions outside the common reverse transcriptase domain.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, A P; Singer, M F

    1998-01-01

    Heterologous expression of human LINE-1 ORF2 in yeast yielded a single polypeptide (Mr145 000) which reacted with specific antibodies and co-purified with a reverse transcriptase activity not present in the host cells. Various deletion derivatives of the ORF2 polypeptide were also synthesized. Reverse transcriptase assays using synthetic polynucleotides as template and primer revealed that ORF2 protein missing a significant portion of the N-terminal endonuclease domain still retains some activity. Deletion of the C-terminal cysteine-rich motif reduces activity only a small amount. Three non-overlapping deletions spanning 144 amino acids just N-terminal to the common polymerase domain of the ORF2 protein were analyzed for their effect on reverse transcriptase activity; this region contains the previously-noted conserved Z motif. The two deletions most proximal to the polymerase domain eliminate activity while the third, most-distal deletion had no effect. An inactive enzyme was also produced by substitution of two different amino acids in a highly-conserved octapeptide sequence, Z8, located within the region removed to make the deletion most proximal to the polymerase domain; substitution of a third had no effect. We conclude that the octapeptide sequence and neighboring amino acids in the Z region are essential for reverse transcriptase activity, while the endonuclease and cysteine-rich domains are not absolutely required. PMID:9671814

  1. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs) in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center) platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity) per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L), and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology. PMID:25423096

  2. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacterial Reverse Transcriptases

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Nicolás; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs) in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center) platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity) per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L), and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology. PMID:25423096

  3. Reverse transcriptase: mediator of genomic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Brosius, J; Tiedge, H

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription has been an important mediator of genomic change. This influence dates back more than three billion years, when the RNA genome was converted into the DNA genome. While the current cellular role(s) of reverse transcriptase are not yet completely understood, it has become clear over the last few years that this enzyme is still responsible for generating significant genomic change and that its activities are one of the driving forces of evolution. Reverse transcriptase generates, for example, extra gene copies (retrogenes), using as a template mature messenger RNAs. Such retrogenes do not always end up as nonfunctional pseudogenes but form, after reinsertion into the genome, new unions with resident promoter elements that may alter the gene's temporal and/or spatial expression levels. More frequently, reverse transcriptase produces copies of nonmessenger RNAs, such as small nuclear or cytoplasmic RNAs. Extremely high copy numbers can be generated by this process. The resulting reinserted DNA copies are therefore referred to as short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs). SINEs have long been considered selfish DNA, littering the genome via exponential propagation but not contributing to the host's fitness. Many SINEs, however, can give rise to novel genes encoding small RNAs, and are the migrant carriers of numerous control elements and sequence motifs that can equip resident genes with novel regulatory elements [Brosius J. and Gould S.J., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89, 10706-10710, 1992]. Retrosequences, such as SINEs and portions of retroelements (e.g., long terminal repeats, LTRs), are capable of donating sequence motifs for nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, transcriptional enhancers and silencers, poly(A) addition sequences, determinants of RNA stability or transport, splice sites, and even amino acid codons for incorporation into open reading frames as novel protein domains. Retroposition can therefore be considered as a major

  4. Hepatotoxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Harris, Marianne; Montaner, Julio S G

    2003-05-01

    Hepatotoxicity is an adverse effect of all available classes of antiretrovirals, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). A syndrome of hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis has been recognized as a rare, potentially fatal complication since the advent of NRTI monotherapy in the early 1990s. Today, NRTI remain the backbone of antiretroviral combination regimens, and, with the success of current treatment strategies, exposure to two or more of these agents may occur over a number of years. Hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis are accordingly being observed more frequently, along with a more recently recognized syndrome of chronic hyperlactatemia. These as well as other adverse effects of NRTI are mediated by inhibition of human DNA polymerase gamma, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and other tissues. Early recognition and intervention are essential to avert serious outcomes. PMID:12800069

  5. Telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit expression is associated with chondrosarcoma malignancy.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; DeYoung, Barry R; Gitelis, Steven; Weydert, Jamie A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Kurriger, Gail; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2004-09-01

    Expression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase gene is associated with most human malignancies. Because telomerase reverse transcriptase is rarely expressed in normal tissue, its presence in pathologic specimens is considered a marker of transformed cells. Moreover, high levels of expression have been correlated with poor prognosis in many cancers. Although telomerase activity has been found in chondrosarcomas, its prognostic significance in these malignant cartilage tumors is unknown. Malignancy in cartilage-derived tumors is assessed routinely by histomorphologic grading, but even well differentiated, low-grade lesions can metastasize. This unpredictable behavior greatly complicates the clinical treatment of cartilage tumors, making better prognostic indicators desirable. To address this issue we used immunohistochemistry to compare telomerase reverse transcriptase expression in a collection of 61 tumors consisting of malignant chondrosarcomas of varying grade and benign enchondromas. Associated case histories were reviewed to test the hypothesis that telomerase reverse transcriptase expression levels correlated with subsequent tumor recurrence. We found that the relative abundance of telomerase reverse transcriptase-expressing cells correlated significantly with grade and recurrence. These findings indicate that telomerase reverse transcriptase immunostaining may be a useful adjunct to the conventional three-level grading system. PMID:15346061

  6. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta; La Colla, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Some novel MC-1220 analogs were synthesized by condensation of 4,6-dichloro-N-methylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives (1a,b and 15) and/or 4-chloro-6-methoxy-N,N,5-trimethylpyrimidin-2-amine (2a) with the sodium salt of 2,6-difluorophenylacetonitrile followed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure between compound 7 and MC-1220 is a fluoro atom instead of a CH3 group. PMID:26996241

  7. Quantitation of avian RNA tumor virus reverse transcriptase by radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Panet, A; Baltimore, D; Hanafusa, T

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed that can detect and quantitate 3 ng or more of the avian RNA tumor virus reverse transcriptase. The assay detected no antigenic sites in Rous sarcoma virus alpha virions or in virions of a murine RNA tumor virus. About 70 molecules of reverse transcriptase were found per virion of avian myleloblastosis virus with this assay or with an assay based on antibody inhibition of enzymatic activity. The assay detected about 270 ng of enzyme per mg of cell protein in virus-producing cells; uninfected cells had much less antigenic material but contained some determinants able to displace radioactive antigen. No additional antigenic determinants on reverse transcriptase could be detected that were not found on the separated alpha subunit of the enzyme. Although sevenfold less sensitive than enzymatic activity as a measure of reverse transcriptase, the radioimmunoassay can detect antigen using small amounts of protein and in the presence of inhibtors. Images PMID:48558

  8. Reverse transcriptase and intron number evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Introns are universal in eukaryotic genomes and play important roles in transcriptional regulation, mRNA export to the cytoplasm, nonsense-mediated decay as both a regulatory and a splicing quality control mechanism, R-loop avoidance, alternative splicing, chromatin structure, and evolution by exon-shuffling. Methods Sixteen complete fungal genomes were used 13 of which were sequenced and annotated by JGI. Ustilago maydis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Coprinus cinereus (also named Coprinopsis cinerea) were from the Broad Institute. Gene models from JGI-annotated genomes were taken from the GeneCatalog track that contained the best representative gene models. Varying fractions of the GeneCatalog were manually curated by external users. For clarity, we used the JGI unique database identifier. Results The last common ancestor of eukaryotes (LECA) has an estimated 6.4 coding exons per gene (EPG) and evolved into the diverse eukaryotic life forms, which is recapitulated by the development of a stem cell. We found a parallel between the simulated reverse transcriptase (RT)-mediated intron loss and the comparative analysis of 16 fungal genomes that spanned a wide range of intron density. Although footprints of RT (RTF) were dynamic, relative intron location (RIL) to the 5'-end of mRNA faithfully traced RT-mediated intron loss and revealed 7.7 EPG for LECA. The mode of exon length distribution was conserved in simulated intron loss, which was exemplified by the shared mode of 75 nt between fungal and Chlamydomonas genomes. The dominant ancient exon length was corroborated by the average exon length of the most intron-rich genes in fungal genomes and consistent with ancient protein modules being ~25 aa. Combined with the conservation of a protein length of 400 aa, the earliest ancestor of eukaryotes could have 16 EPG. During earlier evolution, Ascomycota’s ancestor had significantly more 3'-biased RT-mediated intron loss that was followed by dramatic RTF loss

  9. Bifunctional Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase: Mechanism and Proof-of-Concept as a Novel Therapeutic Design Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christopher M.; Sullivan, Todd J.; Iyidogan, Pinar; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Chung, Raymond; Ruiz-Caro, Juliana; Mohamed, Ebrahim; Jorgensen, William; Hunter, Roger; Anderson, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is a major target for currently approved anti-HIV drugs. These drugs are divided into two classes: nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs). This study illustrates the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a novel bifunctional RT inhibitor utilizing d4T (NRTI) and a TMC-derivative (a diarylpyrimidine NNRTI) linked via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. HIV-1 RT successfully incorporates the triphosphate of d4T-4PEG-TMC bifunctional inhibitor in a base-specific manner. Moreover, this inhibitor demonstrates low nanomolar potency that has 4.3-fold and 4300-fold enhancement of polymerization inhibition in vitro relative to the parent TMC-derivative and d4T, respectively. This study serves as a proof-of-concept for the development and optimization of bifunctional RT inhibitors as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 viral replication. PMID:23659183

  10. The Genetic Basis of HIV-1 Resistance to Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.; Kantor, Rami; Gonzales, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance is caused by mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease enzymes, the molecular targets of antiretroviral therapy. At the beginning of the year 2000, two expert panels recommended that HIV-1 RT and protease susceptibility testing be used to help select antiretroviral drugs for HIV-1-infected patients. Genotypic assays have been developed to detect HIV-1 mutations known to confer antiretroviral drug resistance. Genotypic assays using dideoxynucleoside sequencing provide extensive insight into the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population of viruses within an individual. However, the interpretation of these assays in clinical settings is formidable because of the large numbers of drug resistance mutations and because these mutations interact with one another and emerge in complex patterns. In addition, cross-resistance between antiretroviral drugs is greater than that anticipated from initial in vitro studies. This review summarises the published data linking HIV-1 RT and protease mutations to in vitro and clinical resistance to the currently available nucleoside RT inhibitors, non-nucleoside RT inhibitors, and protease inhibitors. PMID:19096725

  11. The Reverse Transcriptase Encoded by LINE-1 Retrotransposons in the Genesis, Progression, and Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; De Luca, Chiara; Spadafora, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotic genomes, Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons represent a large family of repeated genomic elements. They transpose using a reverse transcriptase (RT), which they encode as part of the ORF2p product. RT inhibition in cancer cells, either via RNA interference-dependent silencing of active LINE-1 elements, or using RT inhibitory drugs, reduces cancer cell proliferation, promotes their differentiation and antagonizes tumor progression in animal models. Indeed, the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor efavirenz has recently been tested in a phase II clinical trial with metastatic prostate cancer patients. An in-depth analysis of ORF2p in a mouse model of breast cancer showed ORF2p to be precociously expressed in precancerous lesions and highly abundant in advanced cancer stages, while being barely detectable in normal breast tissue, providing a rationale for the finding that RT-expressing tumors are therapeutically sensitive to RT inhibitors. We summarize mechanistic and gene profiling studies indicating that abundant LINE-1-derived RT can “sequester” RNA substrates for reverse transcription in tumor cells, entailing the formation of RNA:DNA hybrid molecules and impairing the overall production of regulatory miRNAs, with a global impact on the cell transcriptome. Based on these data, LINE-1-ORF2 encoded RT has a tumor-promoting potential that is exerted at an epigenetic level. We propose a model whereby LINE1-RT drives a previously unrecognized global regulatory process, the deregulation of which drives cell transformation and tumorigenesis with possible implications for cancer cell heterogeneity. PMID:26904537

  12. Structure based activity prediction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Marc R; Koymans, Lucien M H; Vinkers, H Maarten; Daeyaert, Frits F D; Heeres, Jan; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-03-24

    We have developed a fast and robust computational method for prediction of antiviral activity in automated de novo design of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. This is a structure-based approach that uses a linear relation between activity and interaction energy with discrete orientation sampling and with localized interaction energy terms. The localization allows for the analysis of mutations of the protein target and for the separation of inhibition and a specific binding to the enzyme. We apply the method to the prediction of pIC(50) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The model predicts the activity of an arbitrary compound with a q(2) of 0.681 and an average absolute error of 0.66 log value, and it is fast enough to be used in high-throughput computational applications. PMID:15771460

  13. Homodimerization of the p51 Subunit of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Mueller, G; Cuneo, M; DeRose, E; London, R

    2010-01-01

    The dimerization of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT), required to obtain the active form of the enzyme, is influenced by mutations, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), nucleotide substrates, Mg ions, temperature, and specifically designed dimerization inhibitors. In this study, we have utilized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the [methyl-{sup 13}C]methionine-labeled enzyme and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate how several of these factors influence the dimerization behavior of the p51 subunit. The {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C HSQC spectrum of p51 obtained at micromolar concentrations indicates that a significant fraction of the p51 adopts a 'p66-like' conformation. SAXS data obtained for p51 samples were used to determine the fractions of monomer and dimer in the sample and to evaluate the conformation of the fingers/thumb subdomain. All of the p51 monomer observed was found to adopt the compact, 'p51C' conformation observed for the p51 subunit in the RT heterodimer. The NMR and SAXS data indicate that the p51 homodimer adopts a structure that is similar to the p66/p51 heterodimer, with one p51C subunit and a second p51 subunit in an extended, 'p51E' conformation that resembles the p66 subunit of the heterodimer. The fractional dimer concentration and the fingers/thumb orientation are found to depend strongly on the experimental conditions and exhibit a qualitative dependence on nevirapine and ionic strength (KCl) that is similar to the behavior reported for the heterodimer and the p66 homodimer. The L289K mutation interferes with p51 homodimer formation as it does with formation of the heterodimer, despite its location far from the dimer interface. This effect is readily interpreted in terms of a conformational selection model, in which p51{sub L289K} has a much greater preference for the compact, p51C conformation. A reduced level of dimer formation then results from the reduced ratio of the p51E{sub L289K} to p51C

  14. Synthetic evolutionary origin of a proofreading reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ellefson, Jared W; Gollihar, Jimmy; Shroff, Raghav; Shivram, Haridha; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Ellington, Andrew D

    2016-06-24

    Most reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes belong to a single protein family of ancient evolutionary origin. These polymerases are inherently error prone, owing to their lack of a proofreading (3'- 5' exonuclease) domain. To determine if the lack of proofreading is a historical coincidence or a functional limitation of reverse transcription, we attempted to evolve a high-fidelity, thermostable DNA polymerase to use RNA templates efficiently. The evolutionarily distinct reverse transcription xenopolymerase (RTX) actively proofreads on DNA and RNA templates, which greatly improves RT fidelity. In addition, RTX enables applications such as single-enzyme reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and direct RNA sequencing without complementary DNA isolation. The creation of RTX confirms that proofreading is compatible with reverse transcription. PMID:27339990

  15. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein. PMID:27163463

  16. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Structure with RNase H Inhibitor dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl Hydrazone Bound at a Novel Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel,D.; Sarafianos, S.; Dharmasena, S.; Hossain, M.; McCoy-Simandle, K.; Ilina, T.; Clark, A.; Knight, J.; Julias, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), has limited the efficacy of anti-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatments, and new lead compounds that target novel binding sites are needed. We have determined the 3.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) complexed with dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone (DHBNH), an HIV-1 RT RNase H (RNH) inhibitor (RNHI). DHBNH is effective against a variety of drug-resistant HIV-1 RT mutants. While DHBNH has little effect on most aspects of RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis, at relatively high concentrations it does inhibit the initiation of RNA-primed DNA synthesis. Although primarily an RNHI, DHBNH binds >50 {angstrom} away from the RNH active site, at a novel site near both the polymerase active site and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) binding pocket. When DHBNH binds, both Tyr181 and Tyr188 remain in the conformations seen in unliganded HIV-1 RT. DHBNH interacts with conserved residues (Asp186, Trp229) and has substantial interactions with the backbones of several less well-conserved residues. On the basis of this structure, we designed substituted DHBNH derivatives that interact with the NNRTI-binding pocket. These compounds inhibit both the polymerase and RNH activities of RT.

  17. Analysis of transmitted drug resistance in Spain in the years 2007-2010 documents a decline in mutations to the non-nucleoside drug class.

    PubMed

    Monge, S; Guillot, V; Alvarez, M; Peña, A; Viciana, P; García-Bujalance, S; Pérez Elias, M J; Iribarren, J A; Gutiérrez, F; Itziar Casado, M; Garcia, F

    2012-11-01

    We have studied transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in 1.864 antiretroviral-naïve patients entering CoRIS (Spain) during 2007-2010. An overall 8.58% TDR was observed (3.92%, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs); 3.86%, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs); 2.31%, protease inhibitors), with a significant decreasing trend over time for NNRTIs (5.53%, 2007; 2.45%, 2010; p for trend = 0.044). Non-B subtype prevalence was 15.93%, with a significant increase (11.95%, 2007; 18.14%, 2010; p for trend = 0.018), mainly related to immigration. Having no formal education increased the risk of TDR to NNRTIs (OR, 7.26), and carrying a non-B subtype reduced the risk of TDR to NRTIs (OR, 0.27). These findings may have important implications for treatment guidelines and laboratory testing recommendations. PMID:23016666

  18. ATP-dependent removal of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Naeger, Lisa K; Margot, Nicolas A; Miller, Michael D

    2002-07-01

    Removal of nucleoside chain terminator inhibitors mediated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) using ATP as an acceptor molecule has been proposed as a novel mechanism of HIV resistance. Recombinant wild-type and mutant HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RT enzymes with thymidine analog resistance mutations D67N, K70R, and T215Y were analyzed for their ability to remove eight nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP. The order for the rate of removal of the eight inhibitors by the mutant RT enzyme was zidovudine (AZT) > stavudine (d4T) > zalcitabine (ddC) > abacavir > amdoxovir (DAPD) > lamivudine (3TC) > didanosine (ddI) > tenofovir. Thymidine analogs AZT and d4T were the most significantly removed by the mutant enzyme, suggesting that removal of these inhibitors by the ATP-dependent removal mechanism contributes to the AZT and d4T resistance observed in patients with HIV expressing thymidine analog resistance mutations. ATP-dependent removal of tenofovir was 22- to 35-fold less efficient than removal of d4T and AZT, respectively. The addition of ATP and the next complementary deoxynucleoside triphosphate caused a reduction of ATP-mediated removal of d4T, ddC, and DAPD, while AZT and abacavir removal was unaffected. The reduction of d4T, ddC, and DAPD removal in the presence of the deoxynucleoside triphosphate could explain the minor changes in susceptibility to these drugs observed in conventional in vitro phenotypic assays using cells that have higher deoxynucleoside triphosphate pools. The minimal removal of abacavir, ddC, DAPD, 3TC, ddI, and tenofovir is consistent with the minor changes in susceptibility to these drugs observed for HIV mutants with thymidine analog resistance mutations. PMID:12069972

  19. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor from Phyllanthus niruri.

    PubMed

    Ogata, T; Higuchi, H; Mochida, S; Matsumoto, H; Kato, A; Endo, T; Kaji, A; Kaji, H

    1992-11-01

    An aqueous extract of Phyllanthus niruri (Euphorbiaceae) inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1-RT). The inhibitor against HIV-1-RT in this plant was purified by combination of three column chromatographies, Sephadex LH-20, cellulose, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The inhibitor was then identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra as repandusinic acid A monosodium salt (RA) which was originally isolated from Mallotus repandus. The 50% inhibitory doses (ID50) of RA on HIV-1-RT and DNA polymerase alpha (from HeLa cells) were 0.05 microM and 0.6 microM, respectively, representing approximately a 10-fold more sensitivity of HIV-1-RT compared with DNA polymerase alpha. RA was shown to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to the template-primer while it was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate. RA as low as 10.1 microM inhibited HIV-1-induced cytopathogenicity in MT-4 cells. In addition, 4.5 microM of RA inhibited HIV-1-induced giant cell formation of SUP-T1 approximately 50%. RA (2.5 microM) inhibited up to 90% of HIV-1 specific p24 antigen production in a Clone H9 cell system. PMID:1283310

  20. Application of the Huisgen cycloaddition and 'click' reaction toward various 1,2,3-triazoles as HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pribut, Nicole; Veale, Clinton G L; Basson, Adriaan E; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Pelly, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    The development of novel anti-HIV agents remains an important medicinal chemistry challenge given that no cure for the disease is imminent, and the continued use of current NNRTIs inevitably leads to problems associated with resistance. Inspired by the pyrazole-containing NNRTI lersivirine (LSV), we embarked upon a study to establish whether 1,2,3-triazole heterocycles could be used as a new scaffold for the creation of novel NNRTIs. An especially attractive feature of triazoles used for this purpose is the versatility in accessing variously functionalised systems using either the thermally regulated Huisgen cycloaddition, or the related 'click' reaction. Employing three alternative forms of these reactions, we were able to synthesise a range of triazole compounds and evaluate their efficacy in a phenotypic HIV assay. To our astonishment, even compounds closely mimicking LSV were only moderately effective against HIV. PMID:27287366

  1. Novel (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanones with restricted conformation as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Šimon, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Šaman, David; Stepan, George; Hu, Eric; Lansdon, Eric B; Jansa, Petr; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-10-21

    To elucidate the structure-geometry-activity relationship in diarylpyrimidine family (DAPYs) containing carbonyl linker between the central pyrimidine core and phenyl type B-arm, a series of (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanones was designed, prepared and tested for their anti-HIV-1 activity. The carbonyl linker bearing B phenyl arm was successfully attached at both C-2 and C-4 positions of the central pyrimidine ring using a new synthetic approach. Further modifications of target compounds are present at C-5 position of the pyrimidine ring. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity study performed on a series of 22 compounds confirmed the crucial importance of both conformational rigidity between phenyl B arm and the pyrimidine core linked through the carbonyl bridge, as well as presence of fluoro substituents in ortho-positions of phenyl B moiety. The most potent derivative of the series, compound 17, having almost perpendicular angle within the two planes made from the B aromatic arm and the pyrimidine ring, exhibited low nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 4 nM) with no significant toxicity (CC50 > 57.1 μM). PMID:27371922

  2. Molecular Modeling, Synthesis, and Anti-HIV Activity of Novel Isoindolinedione Analogues as Potent Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Garima; Singh, Ramendra K

    2016-02-01

    Different isoindolinedione derivatives bearing imine, amide, thioamide, and sulfonamide linkages have been designed in silico using discovery studio software (BIOVIA, San Diego, CA, USA), synthesized, and evaluated for their anti-HIV activity. SAR studies revealed that the linkages in these molecules did affect their anti-HIV activity and the molecules having sulfonamide linkages were the most potent HIV-RT inhibitors as the S=O bonds of the sulfonamide moiety interacted with Lys103 (NH or carbonyl or both) and Pro236; the NH part of the sulfonamide linkage formed bond with carbonyl of Lys101. blood-brain barrier (BBB) plots were also studied, and it was found that all the designed molecules have potential to cross BBB, a very vital criteria for anti-HIV drugs. In vitro screening was performed using HIV-1 strain IIIB in MT-4 cells using the MTT assay, and it was seen that some of these molecules were effective inhibitors of HIV-1 replication at nanomolar concentration with selectivity indices ranging from 33.75 to 73.33 under in vitro conditions. Some of these molecules have shown good anti-HIV activity at 3-4 nm concentrations. These derivatives have potential to be developed as lead molecules effective against HIV-1. Novel isoindolinedione derivatives as probable NNRTIs have been synthesized and characterized. Some of these molecules have shown good anti-HIV activity at 3-4 nm concentrations. PMID:26212217

  3. Hybrid chemistry. Part 4: Discovery of etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids as potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zheng-Yong; Tao, Yuan; Wang, Ya-Feng; Mao, Tian-Qi; Yin, Hong; Chen, Fen-Er; Piao, Hu-Ri; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    A novel series of etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids were designed using structure-guided molecular hybridization strategy and fusing the pharmacophore templates of etravirine and VRX-480773. The anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity was evaluated in MT-4 cell cultures. The most active hybrid compound in this series, N-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-((4-(4-cyano-2,6-dimethylphenoxy)pyrimidin-2-yl)thio)acetamide 3d (EC50=0.24 , SI>1225), was more potent than delavirdine (EC50=0.66 μM, SI>67) in the anti-HIV-1 in vitro cellular assay. Studies of structure-activity relationships established a correlation between anti-HIV activity and the substitution pattern of the acetanilide group. PMID:26162497

  4. Detection of Treponema pallidum by a sensitive reverse transcriptase PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Centurion-Lara, A; Castro, C; Shaffer, J M; Van Voorhis, W C; Marra, C M; Lukehart, S A

    1997-01-01

    Syphilis is diagnosed by serologic testing or by identification of the causative agent, Treponema pallidum. The bacterium has historically been detected in clinical specimens by dark-field microscopy, immunostaining with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies, or the rabbit inoculation test (RIT). RIT is considered to be very sensitive and specific, although it is available only in research settings and is not clinically useful due to the length of time required to obtain a result. In recent years, several PCR methods have been developed for the detection of T. pallidum, but none of these has shown a clear advantage in sensitivity over RIT. We have developed a specific and highly sensitive reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) that targets a 366 bp region of the 16S rRNA of T. pallidum. This RT-PCR can detect a single organism by Southern analysis when whole organisms are diluted and 10(-2) to 10(-3) T. pallidum organisms when RNA equivalents are used to make cDNA. The test was demonstrated to detect 10(-2) T. pallidum RNA equivalents in cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty different strains of T. pallidum, isolated from cerebrospinal fluids, aqueous humor, blood, and chancres, were shown to be detectable by this test. This efficient and sensitive technique could be more useful than existing methods for detecting very low numbers of organisms in clinical samples. PMID:9163442

  5. The p66 Immature Precursor of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf, Naima G.; Poliner, Eric; Slack, Ryan L.; Christen, Martin T.; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Parniak, Michael A.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the wealth of structural data available for the mature p66/p51 heterodimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT), the structure of the homodimeric p66 precursor remains unknown. In all X-ray structures of mature RT, free or complexed, the processing site in the p66 subunit, for generating the p51 subunit, is sequestered into a β-strand within the folded ribonuclease H (RNH) domain and is not readily accessible to proteolysis, rendering it difficult to propose a simple and straightforward mechanism of the maturation step. Here, we investigated, by solution NMR, the conformation of the RT p66 homodimer. Our data demonstrate that the RNH and Thumb domains in the p66 homodimer are folded and possess conformations very similar to those in mature RT. This finding suggests that maturation models which invoke a complete or predominantly unfolded RNH domain are unlikely. The present study lays the foundation for further in-depth mechanistic investigations at the atomic level. PMID:24771554

  6. Human Specific Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Cheng, De; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase, regulated primarily by the transcription of its catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), is critical for controlling cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis by maintaining telomere length. Although there is a high conservation between human and mouse TERT genes, the regulation of their transcription is significantly different in these two species. Whereas mTERT expression is widely detected in adult mice, hTERT is expressed at extremely low levels in most adult human tissues and cells. As a result, mice do not exhibit telomere-mediated replicative aging, but telomere shortening is a critical factor of human aging and its stabilization is essential for cancer development in humans. The chromatin environment and epigenetic modifications of the hTERT locus, the binding of transcriptional factors to its promoter, and recruitment of nucleosome modifying complexes all play essential roles in restricting its transcription in different cell types. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of TERT regulation in human and mouse tissues and cells, and during cancer development. PMID:27367732

  7. Reverse transcriptase activity of an intron encoded polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Fassbender, S; Brühl, K H; Ciriacy, M; Kück, U

    1994-01-01

    A number of group II introns from eukaryotic organelles and prokaryotes contain open reading frames for polypeptides with homology to retroviral reverse transcriptases (RTs). We have used the yeast transposon (Ty) system to express ORFs for RTs from eukaryotic organelles. This includes the mitochondrial coxI intron i1 from the fungus Podospora anserina, the plastid petD intron from the alga Scenedesmus obliquus and the mitochondrial RTL gene from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The ORFs were fused with the TYA ORF from the yeast retrotransposon Ty to produce virus-like particles in the recipient strains with detectable amounts of the RT-like polypeptides. Analysis of the heterologous gene products revealed biochemical evidence that the P. anserina intron encodes an RNA-directed DNA polymerase with properties typically found for RTs of viral or retrotransposable origin. In vitro assays showed that the intron encoded RT is sensitive to RT inhibitors such as N-ethylmaleimide and dideoxythymidine triphosphate but is insensitive against the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. The direct biochemical evidence provided here supports the idea that intron encoded RTs are involved in intron transposition events. Images PMID:7514530

  8. Asymmetric conformational maturation of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xunhai; Perera, Lalith; Mueller, Geoffrey A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase utilizes a metamorphic polymerase domain that is able to adopt two alternate structures that fulfill catalytic and structural roles, thereby minimizing its coding requirements. This ambiguity introduces folding challenges that are met by a complex maturation process. We have investigated this conformational maturation using NMR studies of methyl-labeled RT for the slower processes in combination with molecular dynamics simulations for rapid processes. Starting from an inactive conformation, the p66 precursor undergoes a unimolecular isomerization to a structure similar to its active form, exposing a large hydrophobic surface that facilitates initial homodimer formation. The resulting p66/p66' homodimer exists as a conformational heterodimer, after which a series of conformational adjustments on different time scales can be observed. Formation of the inter-subunit RH:thumb' interface occurs at an early stage, while maturation of the connection' and unfolding of the RH' domains are linked and occur on a much slower time scale. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06359.001 PMID:26037594

  9. Human Specific Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Cheng, De; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase, regulated primarily by the transcription of its catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), is critical for controlling cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis by maintaining telomere length. Although there is a high conservation between human and mouse TERT genes, the regulation of their transcription is significantly different in these two species. Whereas mTERT expression is widely detected in adult mice, hTERT is expressed at extremely low levels in most adult human tissues and cells. As a result, mice do not exhibit telomere-mediated replicative aging, but telomere shortening is a critical factor of human aging and its stabilization is essential for cancer development in humans. The chromatin environment and epigenetic modifications of the hTERT locus, the binding of transcriptional factors to its promoter, and recruitment of nucleosome modifying complexes all play essential roles in restricting its transcription in different cell types. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of TERT regulation in human and mouse tissues and cells, and during cancer development. PMID:27367732

  10. The p66 immature precursor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Poliner, Eric; Slack, Ryan L; Christen, Martin T; Byeon, In-Ja L; Parniak, Michael A; Gronenborn, Angela M; Ishima, Rieko

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to the wealth of structural data available for the mature p66/p51 heterodimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT), the structure of the homodimeric p66 precursor remains unknown. In all X-ray structures of mature RT, free or complexed, the processing site in the p66 subunit, for generating the p51 subunit, is sequestered into a β-strand within the folded ribonuclease H (RNH) domain and is not readily accessible to proteolysis, rendering it difficult to propose a simple and straightforward mechanism of the maturation step. Here, we investigated, by solution NMR, the conformation of the RT p66 homodimer. Our data demonstrate that the RNH and Thumb domains in the p66 homodimer are folded and possess conformations very similar to those in mature RT. This finding suggests that maturation models which invoke a complete or predominantly unfolded RNH domain are unlikely. The present study lays the foundation for further in-depth mechanistic investigations at the atomic level. PMID:24771554

  11. Computational development of rubromycin-based lead compounds for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Carlos E P; Silva, Pedro J

    2014-01-01

    The binding of several rubromycin-based ligands to HIV1-reverse transcriptase was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. MM-PBSA analysis and examination of the trajectories allowed the identification of several promising compounds with predicted high affinity towards reverse transcriptase mutants which have proven resistant to current drugs. Important insights on the complex interplay of factors determining the ability of ligands to selectively target each mutant have been obtained. PMID:25071993

  12. Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Subunit through Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kayla A.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome-shortening is characteristic of normal cells, and is known as the end replication problem. Telomerase is the enzyme responsible for extending the ends of the chromosomes in de novo synthesis, and occurs in germ cells as well as most malignant cancers. There are three subunits of telomerase: human telomerase RNA (hTERC), human telomerase associated protein (hTEP1), or dyskerin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). hTERC and hTEP1 are constitutively expressed, so the enzymatic activity of telomerase is dependent on the transcription of hTERT. DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation are basic epigenetic regulations involved in the expression of hTERT. Non-coding RNA can also serve as a form of epigenetic control of hTERT. This epigenetic-based regulation of hTERT is important in providing a mechanism for reversibility of hTERT control in various biological states. These include embryonic down-regulation of hTERT contributing to aging and the upregulation of hTERT playing a critical role in over 90% of cancers. Normal human somatic cells have a non-methylated/hypomethylated CpG island within the hTERT promoter region, while telomerase-positive cells paradoxically have at least a partially methylated promoter region that is opposite to the normal roles of DNA methylation. Histone acetylation of H3K9 within the promoter region is associated with an open chromatin state such that transcription machinery has the space to form. Histone methylation of hTERT has varied control of the gene, however. Mono- and dimethylation of H3K9 within the promoter region indicate silent euchromatin, while a trimethylated H3K9 enhances gene transcription. Non-coding RNAs can target epigenetic-modifying enzymes, as well as transcription factors involved in the control of hTERT. An epigenetics diet that can affect the epigenome of cancer cells is a recent fascination that has received much attention. By combining portions of this diet with

  13. Vaginal microbicide film combinations of two reverse transcriptase inhibitors, EFdA and CSIC, for the prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Minlu; Shi, Yuan; Gong, Tiantian; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Moncla, Bernard; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Parniak, Michael A.; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EFdA is a potent nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) with activity against a wide spectrum of wild-type and drug resistant HIV-1 variants. CSIC is a tight-binding non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with demonstrated anti-HIV properties important for use in topical prevention of HIV transmission. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize film-formulated EFdA and CSIC for use as a female-controlled vaginal microbicide to prevent sexual transmission of HIV. Methods Assessments of EFdA- and CSIC-loaded films included physicochemical characteristics, in vitro cytotoxicity, epithelia integrity studies, compatibility with the normal vaginal Lactobacillus flora and anti-HIV bioactivity evaluations. Results No significant change in physicochemical properties or biological activity of the combination films were noted during 3 months storage. In vitro cytotoxicity and bioactivity testing showed that 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of either EFdA or CSIC was several orders of magnitude higher than the 50% effective concentration (EC50) values. Film-formulated EFdA and CSIC combination showed additive inhibitory activity against wild type and drug-resistant variants of HIV. Epithelial integrity studies demonstrated that the combination vaginal film had a much lower toxicity to HEC-1A monolayers compared to that of VCF®, a commercial vaginal film product containing nonoxynol-9. Polarized ectocervical explants showed films with drug alone or in combination were effective at preventing HIV infection. Conclusions Our data suggest that vaginal microbicide films containing a combination of the NRTI EFdA and the NNRTI CSIC have potential to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. PMID:25794967

  14. Interaction between Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Is Required for Reverse Transcription during HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tekeste, Shewit S.; Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Weiner, Ethan M.; Xu, Xiaowen; Miller, Jennifer T.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication requires reverse transcription of its RNA genome into a double-stranded cDNA copy, which is then integrated into the host cell chromosome. The essential steps of reverse transcription and integration are catalyzed by the viral enzymes reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN), respectively. In vitro, HIV-1 RT can bind with IN, and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of IN is necessary and sufficient for this binding. To better define the RT-IN interaction, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments to map a binding surface on the IN CTD in the presence of RT prebound to a duplex DNA construct that mimics the primer-binding site in the HIV-1 genome. To determine the biological significance of the RT-IN interaction during viral replication, we used the NMR chemical shift mapping information as a guide to introduce single amino acid substitutions of nine different residues on the putative RT-binding surface in the IN CTD. We found that six viral clones bearing such IN substitutions (R231E, W243E, G247E, A248E, V250E, and I251E) were noninfectious. Further analyses of the replication-defective IN mutants indicated that the block in replication took place specifically during early reverse transcription. The recombinant INs purified from these mutants, though retaining enzymatic activities, had diminished ability to bind RT in a cosedimentation assay. The results indicate that the RT-IN interaction is functionally relevant during the reverse transcription step of the HIV-1 life cycle. IMPORTANCE To establish a productive infection, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) needs to reverse transcribe its RNA genome to create a double-stranded DNA copy and then integrate this viral DNA genome into the chromosome of the host cell. These two essential steps are catalyzed by the HIV-1 enzymes reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN), respectively. We have shown previously that IN

  15. Two proteins with reverse transcriptase activities associated with hepatitis B virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bavand, M.R.; Laub, O. )

    1988-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that hepatitis B virus (HBV), despite being a DNA virus, replicates via an RNA intermediate. The HBV life cycle is therefore a permuted version of the RNA retroviral life cycle. Sequence homology between retroviral reverse transcriptase and the putative HBV polymerase gene product suggests the presence of an HBV reverse transcriptase. As yet, there has been no direct evidence that reverse transcriptase activity is present in the viral particle. The authors used activity gel analysis to detect the in situ catalytic activities of DNA polymerases after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophorsis. These studies demonstrated that HBV-like particles secreted by a differentiated human hepatoma cell line tranfected with genomic HBV DNA contain two major polymerase activities which migrate as {approximately}90- and {approximately}70-kilodalton (kDa) proteins. This demonstrated, for the first time, that HBV-like particles contain a novel DNA polymerase-reverse transcriptase activity. Furthermore, they propose that the 70-kDa reverse transcriptase may be produced by proteolytic self-cleavage of the 90-kDa precursor protein.

  16. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  17. Discovery and Structure-Based Optimization of 2-Ureidothiophene-3-carboxylic Acids as Dual Bacterial RNA Polymerase and Viral Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Elgaher, Walid A M; Sharma, Kamal K; Haupenthal, Jörg; Saladini, Francesco; Pires, Manuel; Real, Eleonore; Mély, Yves; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2016-08-11

    We are concerned with the development of novel anti-infectives with dual antibacterial and antiretroviral activities for MRSA/HIV-1 co-infection. To achieve this goal, we exploited for the first time the mechanistic function similarity between the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) "switch region" and the viral non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) binding site. Starting from our previously discovered RNAP inhibitors, we managed to develop potent RT inhibitors effective against several resistant HIV-1 strains with maintained or enhanced RNAP inhibitory properties following a structure-based design approach. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis revealed distinct molecular features necessary for RT inhibition. Furthermore, mode of action (MoA) studies revealed that these compounds inhibit RT noncompetitively, through a new mechanism via closing of the RT clamp. In addition, the novel RNAP/RT inhibitors are characterized by a potent antibacterial activity against S. aureus and in cellulo antiretroviral activity against NNRTI-resistant strains. In HeLa and HEK 293 cells, the compounds showed only marginal cytotoxicity. PMID:27339173

  18. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  19. Virtual screening of Indonesian herbal database as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi; Mun'im, Abdul; Suhartanto, Heru; Yanuar, Arry

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1) is a member of retrovirus family that could infect human and causing AIDS disease. AIDS epidemic is one of most destructive diseases in modern era. There were more than 33 million people infected by HIV until 2010. Various studies have been widely employed to design drugs that target the essential enzymes of HIV-1 that is, reverse transcriptase, protease and integrase. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach is used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database using AutoDock4 performed on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds were mulberrin, plucheoside A, vitexilactone, brucine N-oxide, cyanidin 3-arabinoside, alpha-mangostin, guaijaverin, erycristagallin, morusin and sanggenol N. PMID:23275721

  20. Effect of pentosan polysulfate (SP 54) on the reverse transcriptase activity of several retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sydow, G; Klöcking, H P

    1987-01-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (SP 54), a low molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide, was studied in vitro for its effect on the reverse transcriptase activity of seven retroviruses. Six of them possess an enzyme with high sensitivity against SP 54, while the enzyme of one virus (bovine leucosis virus) proved to be insensitive within the concentration range tested. In comparison with other polyanionic compounds so far tested, SP 54 seems to be one of the most active in vitro inhibitors of retrovirus-specific reverse transcriptase. PMID:2445339

  1. Action of uracil analogs on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and its reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Piras, G; Dutschman, G E; Im, G J; Pan, B C; Chu, S H; Cheng, Y C

    1995-01-01

    Three structural analogs of 5-ethyl-1-benzyloxymethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil (E-BPU) inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication without cytotoxicity in vitro and were more potent than azidothymidine and were as potent as E-BPU. The target of these compounds is HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Reverse transcriptases resistant to nevirapine (tyrosine at position 181 to cysteine) and TIBO R82150 (leucine at position 100 to isoleucine) are cross resistant to E-BPU analogs. Nevirapine- or TIBO R82150-resistant HIV-1 were cross resistant to E-BPU analogs but were inhibited at concentrations 11- to 135-fold lower than the cytotoxic doses. PMID:7537030

  2. Telomerase inhibition by non-nucleosidic compound BIBR1532 causes rapid cell death in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bashash, Davood; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Mirzaee, Rooholah; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-03-01

    Since unlimited proliferative potential has been identified as a major and, to date, therapeutically unexploited phenotypic hallmark of cancer, telomere maintenance mechanisms have been proposed as potential targets for new anticancer interventions. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of BIBR1532, the lead compound of non-nucleosidic inhibition of telomerase, on pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. BIBR1532 caused rapid cell death in Nalm-6 cells probably through transcriptional suppression of survivin-mediated c-Myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, our results also suggest that induced p73, up-regulated Bax/Bcl-2 molecular ratio and subsequent activation of caspase-3 may contribute to a direct short-term cytotoxic effect of high doses of BIBR1532, independent of long-term substantial telomere erosion-mediated cell cycle arrest. PMID:22957790

  3. Soft shell clams Mya arenaria with disseminated neoplasia demonstrate reverse transcriptase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, M.L.; Kim, C.H.; Reno, P.W.

    1998-01-01

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN), a proliferative cell disorder of the circulatory system of bivalves, was first reported in oysters in 1969. Since that time, the disease has been determined to be transmissible through water-borne exposure, but the etiological agent has not been unequivocally identified. In order to determine if a viral agent, possibly a retrovirus, could be the causative agent of DN, transmission experiments were performed, using both a cell-free filtrate and a sucrose gradient-purified preparation of a cell-free filtrate of DN positive materials. Additionally, a PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay was used to determine if reverse transcriptase was present in tissues or hemolymph from DN positive soft shell clams Mya arenaria. DN was transmitted to healthy clams by injection with whole DN cells, but not with cell-free flitrates prepared from either tissues from DN positive clams, or DN cells. The cell-free preparations from DN-positive tissues and hemolymph having high levels of DN cells in circulation exhibited positive reactions in the PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay. Cell-free preparations of hemolymph from clams having low levels of DN (<0.1% of cells abnormal), hemocytes from normal soft shell clams, and normal soft shell clam tissues did not produce a positive reaction in the PCR enhanced reverse transcriptase assay.

  4. Encapsidated hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase is poised on an ordered RNA lattice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Nickens, David G.; Lentz, Thomas B.; Loeb, Daniel D.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of a hepatitis B virus (HBV) virion begins with the formation of an RNA-filled core composed of a symmetrical capsid (built of core protein), viral pregenomic RNA, and viral reverse transcriptase. To generate the circular dsDNA genome of HBV, reverse transcription requires multiple template switches within the confines of the capsid. To date, most anti-HBV therapeutics target this reverse transcription process. The detailed molecular mechanisms of this crucial process are poorly understood because of the lack of structural information. We hypothesized that capsid, RNA, and viral reverse transcriptase would need a precise geometric organization to accomplish reverse transcription. Here we present the asymmetric structure of authentic RNA-filled cores, determined to 14.5-Å resolution from cryo-EM data. Capsid and RNA are concentric. On the interior of the RNA, we see a distinct donut-like density, assigned to viral reverse transcriptase, which pins the viral pregenomic RNA to the capsid inner surface. The observation of a unique ordered structure inside the core suggests that assembly and the first steps of reverse transcription follow a single, determinate pathway and strongly suggests that all subsequent steps in DNA synthesis do as well. PMID:25034253

  5. Functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Hameed, Abdul; Ackermann, Lisa-Maria; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Wagner, Manfred; Berisha, Filip; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of novel functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, which can be easily modified with thiol containing biomolecules such as tumour targeting structures. The linkage between inhibitor and biomolecule contains cleavable bonds to enable efficient intracellular delivery in the reductive milieu of the cytosol as well as in the acidic environment within endosomes and lysosomes. The suitability of this synthetic approach was shown by the successful bioconjugation of a poor cell-permeable inhibitor with a cell-penetrating peptide. Additionally, we have demonstrated the excellent inhibitory effect of the compounds presented here in a live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer-based assay in human embryonic kidney cells. PMID:25319071

  6. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase activity increases stability of the HIV-1 core.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5α(rh)). Collectively, this work implies that the surface of the HIV-1 core is dynamic and changes upon the ongoing processes within the core. PMID:23077298

  7. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chaves Valadão, Ana Luiza; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Dias, Juliana Zanatta; Arantes, Pablo; Verli, Hugo; Tanuri, Amilcar; de Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2015-01-01

    Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine's potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT) to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V). Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine. PMID:26111177

  8. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  9. Deep sequencing analysis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase at baseline and time of failure in patients receiving rilpivirine in the phase III studies ECHO and THRIVE.

    PubMed

    Van Eygen, Veerle; Thys, Kim; Van Hove, Carl; Rimsky, Laurence T; De Meyer, Sandra; Aerssens, Jeroen; Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Minority variants (1.0-25.0%) were evaluated by deep sequencing (DS) at baseline and virological failure (VF) in a selection of antiretroviral treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected patients from the rilpivirine ECHO/THRIVE phase III studies. Linkage between frequently emerging resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) was determined. DS (llIumina®) and population sequencing (PS) results were available at baseline for 47 VFs and time of failure for 48 VFs; and at baseline for 49 responders matched for baseline characteristics. Minority mutations were accurately detected at frequencies down to 1.2% of the HIV-1 quasispecies. No baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs were detected in VFs; one responder carried 1.9% F227C. Baseline minority mutations associated with resistance to other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were detected in 8/47 VFs (17.0%) and 7/49 responders (14.3%). Baseline minority nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) RAMs M184V and L210W were each detected in one VF (none in responders). At failure, two patients without NNRTI RAMs by PS carried minority rilpivirine RAMs K101E and/or E138K; and five additional patients carried other minority NNRTI RAMs V90I, V106I, V179I, V189I, and Y188H. Overall at failure, minority NNRTI RAMs and NRTI RAMs were found in 29/48 (60.4%) and 16/48 VFs (33.3%), respectively. Linkage analysis showed that E138K and K101E were usually not observed on the same viral genome. In conclusion, baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs and other NNRTI/NRTI RAMs were uncommon in the rilpivirine arm of the ECHO and THRIVE studies. DS at failure showed emerging NNRTI resistant minority variants in seven rilpivirine VFs who had no detectable NNRTI RAMs by PS. J. Med. Virol. 88:798-806, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26412111

  10. Functional analysis of the C-terminal extension of telomerase reverse transcriptase. A putative "thumb" domain.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Shabbir; Singh, Sunitha; Lue, Neal F

    2002-09-27

    Telomerase is an RNA-protein complex responsible for the extension of one strand of telomere terminal repeats. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase, known generically as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), exhibits significant homology to reverse transcriptases (RTs) encoded by retroviruses and retroelements. The mechanisms of telomerase may therefore be similar to those of the conventional reverse transcriptases. In this report, we explore potential similarity between these two classes of proteins in a region with no evident sequence similarity. Previous analysis has implicated a C-terminal domain of retroviral RTs (known as the "thumb" domain) in template-primer binding and in processivity control. The equivalent region of TERTs, although similar to one another, does not exhibit significant sequence homology to retroviral RTs. However, we found that removal of this region of yeast TERT similarly resulted in a decrease in the stability of telomerase-DNA complex and in the processivity of telomerase-mediated nucleotide addition. Moreover, the C-terminal domain of TERT exhibits a nucleic acid binding activity when recombinantly expressed and purified. Finally, amino acid substitutions of conserved residues in this region of TERT were found to impair telomerase activity and processivity. We suggest that mechanistic similarity between telomerase and retroviral RTs may extend beyond the regions with apparent sequence similarity. PMID:12151386

  11. Action of anti-HIV drugs and resistance: reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2004-01-01

    Currently, 20 drugs have been approved for Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) clinical therapy. These drugs inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, or virus entry. Introduction of a combination therapy with reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors has resulted in a drastic decrease in HIV-1 related mortality. Although the combination therapy can suppress viral replication below detection levels in current available assays, low levels of on-going viral replication still persist in some patients. Long-term administration of the combination therapy may increase selective pressure against viruses, and subsequently induce emergence of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. Attempts have been made to design novel antiretroviral drugs that would be able to suppress replication of the resistant variants. At present, several investigational drugs are being tested in clinical trials. These drugs target not only the resistant variants, but also improvement in oral bioavilability or other viral proteins such as HIV-1 integrase, ribonuclease H, and HIV-1 entry (CD4 attachment inhibitors, chemokine receptors antagonists, and fusion inhibitors). Understanding mechanism(s) of action of the drugs and mechanisms of drug resistance is necessary for successful designs in the next generation of anti-HIV-1 drugs. In this review, the mechanisms of action of reverse transcriptase- and protease-inhibitors, and the mechanism of resistance to these inhibitors, are described. PMID:15579086

  12. Elevated Human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene expression in blood cells associated with chronic and arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Arsenic exposure is associated with human cancer. Telomerase containing the catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of chromosomes, delay senescence and promoting cell proliferation leading to tumorigenesis. OBJECTIVE:...

  13. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted. PMID:26560977

  14. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted. PMID:26560977

  15. Antiviral Activity of MK-4965, a Novel Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor▿

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Touch, Sinoeun; Tynebor, Robert M.; Tucker, Thomas J.; McKenna, Philip M.; Williams, Theresa M.; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Miller, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are the mainstays of therapy for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections. However, the effectiveness of NNRTIs can be hampered by the development of resistance mutations which confer cross-resistance to drugs in the same class. Extensive efforts have been made to identify new NNRTIs that can suppress the replication of the prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses. MK-4965 is a novel NNRTI that possesses both diaryl ether and indazole moieties. The compound displays potency at subnanomolar concentrations against wild-type (WT), K103N, and Y181C reverse transcriptase (RT) in biochemical assays. MK-4965 is also highly potent against the WT virus and two most prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses (viruses that harbor the K103N or the Y181C mutation), against which it had 95% effective concentrations (EC95s) of <30 nM in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. The antiviral EC95 of MK-4965 was reduced approximately four- to sixfold when it was tested in 50% human serum. Moreover, MK-4965 was evaluated with a panel of 15 viruses with NNRTI resistance-associated mutations and showed a superior mutant profile to that of efavirenz but not to that of etravirine. MK-4965 was similarly effective against various HIV-1 subtypes and viruses containing nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or protease inhibitor resistance-conferring mutations. A two-drug combination study showed that the antiviral activity of MK-4965 was nonantagonistic with each of the 18 FDA-licensed drugs tested vice versa in the present study. Taken together, these in vitro data show that MK-4965 possesses the desired properties for further development as a new NNRTI for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:19289522

  16. Variable selection based QSAR modeling on Bisphenylbenzimidazole as Inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Surendra; Tiwari, Meena

    2013-11-01

    The emergence of mutant virus in drug therapy for HIV-1 infection has steadily risen in the last decade. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase enzyme has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of HIV infection. The aim to decipher the structural features that interact with receptor, we report a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) study on a dataset of thirty seven compounds belonging to bisphenylbenzimidazoles (BPBIs) as reverse transcriptase inhibitors using enhanced replacement method (ERM), stepwise multiple linear regression (Stepwise-MLR) and genetic function approximation (GFA) method for selecting a subset of relevant descriptors, developing the best multiple linear regression model and defining the QSAR model applicability domain boundaries. The enhanced replacement method was found to give better results r²=0.8542, Q²(loo) = 0.7917, r²pred = 0.7812) at five variables as compared to stepwise MLR and GFA method, evidenced by internal and external validation parameters. The modified r² (r²m) of the training set, test set and whole data set were calculated and are in agreement with the enhanced replacement method. The results of QSAR study rationalize the structural requirement for optimum binding of ligands. The developed QSAR model shows that hydrophobicity, flexibility, three dimensional surface area, volume and shape of molecule are important parameters to be considered for designing new compounds and to decipher reverse transcriptase enzyme inhibition activity of these compounds at molecular level. The applicability domain was defined to find the similar analogs with better prediction power. PMID:23106285

  17. Direct CRISPR spacer acquisition from RNA by a natural reverse transcriptase-Cas1 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Silas, Sukrit; Mohr, Georg; Sidote, David J; Markham, Laura M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Bhaya, Devaki; Lambowitz, Alan M; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-02-26

    CRISPR systems mediate adaptive immunity in diverse prokaryotes. CRISPR-associated Cas1 and Cas2 proteins have been shown to enable adaptation to new threats in type I and II CRISPR systems by the acquisition of short segments of DNA (spacers) from invasive elements. In several type III CRISPR systems, Cas1 is naturally fused to a reverse transcriptase (RT). In the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea (MMB-1), we showed that a RT-Cas1 fusion protein enables the acquisition of RNA spacers in vivo in a RT-dependent manner. In vitro, the MMB-1 RT-Cas1 and Cas2 proteins catalyze the ligation of RNA segments into the CRISPR array, which is followed by reverse transcription. These observations outline a host-mediated mechanism for reverse information flow from RNA to DNA. PMID:26917774

  18. Design, Synthesis, Biochemical, and Antiviral Evaluations of C6 Benzyl and C6 Biarylmethyl Substituted 2-Hydroxylisoquinoline-1,3-diones: Dual Inhibition against HIV Reverse Transcriptase-Associated RNase H and Polymerase with Antiviral Activities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not targeted by current chemotherapy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although numerous chemotypes have been reported to inhibit HIV RNase H biochemically, few show significant antiviral activity against HIV. We report herein the design, synthesis, and biological evaluations of a novel variant of 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) scaffold featuring a crucial C-6 benzyl or biarylmethyl moiety. The synthesis involved a recently reported metal-free direct benzylation between tosylhydrazone and boronic acid, which allowed the generation of structural diversity for the hydrophobic aromatic region. Biochemical studies showed that the C-6 benzyl and biarylmethyl HID analogues, previously unknown chemotypes, consistently inhibited HIV RT-associated RNase H and polymerase with IC50s in low to submicromolar range. The observed dual inhibitory activity remained uncompromised against RT mutants resistant to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), suggesting the involvement of binding site(s) other than the NNRTI binding pocket. Intriguingly, these same compounds inhibited the polymerase, but not the RNase H function of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMLV) RT and also inhibited Escherichia coli RNase H. Additional biochemical testing revealed a substantially reduced level of inhibition against HIV integrase. Molecular docking corroborates favorable binding of these analogues to the active site of HIV RNase H. Finally, a number of these analogues also demonstrated antiviral activity at low micromolar concentrations. PMID:25522204

  19. Parameterization of AZT-A widely used nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Seven nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors are currently used in the clinical treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These substrate analogues block DNA synthesis by the viral enzyme RT. However, the emergence of resistant variants of RT allied to their long-term toxicity requires the design of new and better RT inhibitors, with long-term in vivo efficacy. In this work we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to develop a set of molecular mechanics (MM) parameters committed to the AMBER force field for one of the most used in the clinic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs): zidovudine (AZT). These parameters were tested by comparing the optimized geometries of AZT at both the DFT and MM levels of theory. The ability of the new parameters to reproduce the torsional energy of the azide group was also verified by scanning the surface in MM with the new parameters and comparing the results with the same potential energy surface (PES) at the DFT level. Finally, the parameters were validated through classical MD simulations of AZT in aqueous environment.

  20. Functional analysis of conserved residues in the putative "finger" domain of telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Bosoy, D; Lue, N F

    2001-12-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase (RT) responsible for the maintenance of one strand of telomere terminal repeats. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase, known generically as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), exhibits significant homology to RTs encoded by retroviruses and retroelements. The polymerization mechanisms of telomerase may therefore be similar to those of the "conventional" RTs. In this study, we explored the extent of mechanistic conservation by analyzing mutations of conserved residues within the putative "finger" domain of TERT. Previous analysis has implicated this domain of retroviral RTs in nucleotide and RNA binding and in processivity control. Our results demonstrate that residues conserved between TERT and human immunodeficiency virus-1 RT are more likely than TERT-specific residues to be required for enzyme activity. In addition, residues presumed to make direct contact with either the RNA or nucleotide substrate appear to be functionally more important. Furthermore, distinct biochemical defects can be observed for alterations in the putative RNA- and nucleotide-binding TERT residues in a manner that can be rationalized by their postulated mechanisms of action. This study thus supports a high degree of mechanistic conservation between telomerase and retroviral RTs and underscores the roles of distinct aspects of telomerase biochemistry in telomere length maintenance. PMID:11581271

  1. Transcription Regulation of the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Wang, Jing; Toh, Wei Xun; Li, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to maintain their telomere length via expression of an enzymatic complex called telomerase. Similarly, more than 85%–90% of cancer cells are found to upregulate the expression of telomerase, conferring them with the potential to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, is the rate-limiting factor in reconstituting telomerase activity in vivo. To date, the expression and function of the human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) gene are known to be regulated at various molecular levels (including genetic, mRNA, protein and subcellular localization) by a number of diverse factors. Among these means of regulation, transcription modulation is the most important, as evident in its tight regulation in cancer cell survival as well as pluripotent stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we discuss how hTERT gene transcription is regulated, mainly focusing on the contribution of trans-acting factors such as transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers, as well as genetic alterations in hTERT proximal promoter. PMID:27548225

  2. Immortalization of pig fibroblast cells by transposon-mediated ectopic expression of porcine telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Li, Yangyang; Chen, Yang; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2016-08-01

    Pigs are the most economically important livestock, but pig cell lines useful for physiological studies and/or vaccine development are limited. Although several pig cell lines have been generated by oncogene transformation or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) immortalization, these cell lines contain viral sequences and/or antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we established a new method for generating pig cell lines using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated ectopic expression of porcine telomerase reverse transcriptase (pTERT). The performance of the new method was confirmed by generating a pig fibroblast cell (PFC) line. After transfection of primary PFCs with the SB transposon system, one cell clone containing the pTERT expression cassette was selected by dilution cloning and passed for different generations. After passage for more than 40 generations, the cell line retained stable expression of ectopic pTERT and continuous growth potential. Further characterization showed that the cell line kept the fibroblast morphology, growth curve, population doubling time, cloning efficiency, marker gene expression pattern, cell cycle distribution and anchorage-dependent growth property of the primary cells. These data suggest that the new method established is useful for generating pig cell lines without viral sequence and antibiotic resistant gene. PMID:26341227

  3. Prediction of Mutational Tolerance in HIV-1 Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Using Flexible Backbone Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Rocco; Ó Conchúir, Shane; Kortemme, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Predicting which mutations proteins tolerate while maintaining their structure and function has important applications for modeling fundamental properties of proteins and their evolution; it also drives progress in protein design. Here we develop a computational model to predict the tolerated sequence space of HIV-1 protease reachable by single mutations. We assess the model by comparison to the observed variability in more than 50,000 HIV-1 protease sequences, one of the most comprehensive datasets on tolerated sequence space. We then extend the model to a second protein, reverse transcriptase. The model integrates multiple structural and functional constraints acting on a protein and uses ensembles of protein conformations. We find the model correctly captures a considerable fraction of protease and reverse-transcriptase mutational tolerance and shows comparable accuracy using either experimentally determined or computationally generated structural ensembles. Predictions of tolerated sequence space afforded by the model provide insights into stability-function tradeoffs in the emergence of resistance mutations and into strengths and limitations of the computational model. PMID:22927804

  4. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    Heterocyclic compounds execute a very important role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the basic milestones of the research for pyrroloaryl and pyrroloheteroaryl based components targeting HIV viral replication cycle. Anti-HIV activity is elaborated for several classes of pyrrolo-compounds as pyrrolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridazines, pyrrolobenzodiazepinones, pyrrolobenzothiazepines, pyrrolobenzoxazepinones, pyrrolophenanthridines, pyrroloquinoxalines, pyrrolotriazines, pyrroloquinolines, pyrrolopyrazinones, pyrrolothiatriazines, arylthiopyrroles and pyrrolopyrazolones targeting two essential HIV enzymes, reverse transcriptase and integrase as well as attachment/fusion of HIV virons to the host CD-4 cell. Such attempts were resulted in a discovery of highly potent anti-HIV agents suitable for clinical trials, for example, BMS-378806, BMS-585248, BMS-626529, BMS-663068, BMS-488043 and BMS-663749, etc. as anti-HIV attachment agents, triciribine, QX432, BI-1 and BI-2 as HIV RT inhibitors which are in preclinical or clinical development. Mechanism of action of compounds presented in this article towards the suppression of HIV attachment/fusion as well as against the activities of HIV enzymes reverse transcriptase and integrase has been discussed. Relationships of new compounds' molecular framework and HIV viral target has been overviewed in order to facilitate further construction of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process. PMID:26116177

  5. [Research progress of dual inhibitors targeting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and integrase].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Both reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) play crucial roles in the life cycle of HIV-1, which are also key targets in the area of anti-HIV drug research. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors are involved in the most employed drugs used to treat AIDS patients and HIV-infected people, while one of the integrase inhibitors has already been approved by US FDA to appear on the market. Great achievement has been made in the research on both, separately. Recently, much more attention of medicinal chemistry researchers has been attracted to the strategies of multi-target drugs. Compounds with excellent potency against both HIV RT and IN, evidently defined as dual inhibitors targeting both enzymes, have been obtained through considerable significant exploration, which can be classified into two categories according to different strategies. Combinatorial chemistry approach together with high throughput screening methods and multi-target-based virtual screening strategy have been useful tools for identifying selective anti-HIV compounds for long times; Rational drug design based on pharmacophore combination has also led to remarkable results. In this paper, latest progress of both categories in the discovery and structural modification will be covered, with a view to contribute to the career of anti-HIV research. PMID:23833931

  6. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and retain potency against drug-resistance mutations. Our discovery that water molecules play an essential role in the drug binding is reported. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The two nitrile substituents (-CN), one on each arm of the drug, have vibrational spectra consistent with their protein environments being similar in crystals and in solutions. Two-dimensional vibrational-echo spectroscopy reveals a dry environment for one nitrile while unexpectedly the other is hydrogen-bonded to a mobile water molecule, not identified in earlier X-ray structures. Ultrafast nitrile-water dynamics are confirmed by simulations. A higher (1.51 Å) resolution X-ray structure indeed reveals a water-drug interaction network. Maintenance of a crucial anchoring hydrogen bond, despite the enlargement and structural variation of the binding pocket, may help retain the potency of rilpivirine against the pocket mutations. PMID:23422558

  7. Transcription Regulation of the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene.

    PubMed

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Wang, Jing; Toh, Wei Xun; Li, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to maintain their telomere length via expression of an enzymatic complex called telomerase. Similarly, more than 85%-90% of cancer cells are found to upregulate the expression of telomerase, conferring them with the potential to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, is the rate-limiting factor in reconstituting telomerase activity in vivo. To date, the expression and function of the human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) gene are known to be regulated at various molecular levels (including genetic, mRNA, protein and subcellular localization) by a number of diverse factors. Among these means of regulation, transcription modulation is the most important, as evident in its tight regulation in cancer cell survival as well as pluripotent stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we discuss how hTERT gene transcription is regulated, mainly focusing on the contribution of trans-acting factors such as transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers, as well as genetic alterations in hTERT proximal promoter. PMID:27548225

  8. Properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase recombination upon infection.

    PubMed

    Sakuragi, Sayuri; Shioda, Tatsuo; Sakuragi, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcription (RT) is one of the hallmark features of retroviruses. During RT, virus encoded reverse transcriptase (RTase) must transfer from one end to the other end of the viral genome on two separate occasions to complete RT and move on to the production of proviral DNA. In addition, multiple strand-transfer events between homologous regions of the dimerized viral genome by RTase are also observed, and such recombination events serve as one of the driving forces behind human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome sequence diversity. Although retroviral recombination is widely considered to be important, several features of its mechanism are still unclear. We constructed an HIV-1 vector system to examine the target sequences required for virus recombination, and elucidated other necessary prerequisites to harbor recombination, such as the length, homology and the stability of neighbouring structures around the target sequences. PMID:26282329

  9. Effects of the W153L Substitution in HIV Reverse Transcriptase on Viral Replication and Drug Resistance to Multiple Categories of Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P.; Oliveira, Maureen; Rajotte, Daniel; Bethell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A W153L substitution in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was recently identified by selection with a novel nucleotide-competing RT inhibitor (NcRTI) termed compound A that is a member of the benzo[4,5]furo[3,2,d]pyrimidin-2-one NcRTI family of drugs. To investigate the impact of W153L, alone or in combination with the clinically relevant RT resistance substitutions K65R (change of Lys to Arg at position 65), M184I, K101E, K103N, E138K, and Y181C, on HIV-1 phenotypic susceptibility, viral replication, and RT enzymatic function, we generated recombinant RT enzymes and viruses containing each of these substitutions or various combinations of them. We found that W153L-containing viruses were impaired in viral replicative capacity and were hypersusceptible to tenofovir (TFV) while retaining susceptibility to most nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. The nucleoside 3TC retained potency against W153L-containing viruses but not when the M184I substitution was also present. W153L was also able to reverse the effects of the K65R substitution on resistance to TFV, and K65R conferred hypersusceptibility to compound A. Biochemical assays demonstrated that W153L alone or in combination with K65R, M184I, K101E, K103N, E138K, and Y181C impaired enzyme processivity and polymerization efficiency but did not diminish RNase H activity, providing mechanistic insights into the low replicative fitness associated with these substitutions. We show that the mechanism of the TFV hypersusceptibility conferred by W153L is mainly due to increased efficiency of TFV-diphosphate incorporation. These results demonstrate that compound A and/or derivatives thereof have the potential to be important antiretroviral agents that may be combined with tenofovir to achieve synergistic results. PMID:24867966

  10. RNA-seq of human reference RNA samples using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Ryan M; Wu, Douglas C; Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized our ability to analyze transcriptomes. Current RNA-seq methods are highly reproducible, but each has biases resulting from different modes of RNA sample preparation, reverse transcription, and adapter addition, leading to variability between methods. Moreover, the transcriptome cannot be profiled comprehensively because highly structured RNAs, such as tRNAs and snoRNAs, are refractory to conventional RNA-seq methods. Recently, we developed a new method for strand-specific RNA-seq using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs). TGIRT enzymes have higher processivity and fidelity than conventional retroviral reverse transcriptases plus a novel template-switching activity that enables RNA-seq adapter addition during cDNA synthesis without using RNA ligase. Here, we obtained TGIRT-seq data sets for well-characterized human RNA reference samples and compared them to previous data sets obtained for these RNAs by the Illumina TruSeq v2 and v3 methods. We find that TGIRT-seq recapitulates the relative abundance of human transcripts and RNA spike-ins in ribo-depleted, fragmented RNA samples comparably to non-strand-specific TruSeq v2 and better than strand-specific TruSeq v3. Moreover, TGIRT-seq is more strand specific than TruSeq v3 and eliminates sampling biases from random hexamer priming, which are inherent to TruSeq. The TGIRT-seq data sets also show more uniform 5' to 3' gene coverage and identify more splice junctions, particularly near the 5' ends of mRNAs, than do the TruSeq data sets. Finally, TGIRT-seq enables the simultaneous profiling of mRNAs and lncRNAs in the same RNA-seq experiment as structured small ncRNAs, including tRNAs, which are essentially absent with TruSeq. PMID:26826130

  11. Rapid and Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in Reverse Transcriptase Gene for HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and Subtype B in China Using Sequenom MassARRAY® System.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ka-Wai; Peng, Qiaoli; He, Liufen; Cai, Kanru; Jiang, Qiang; Zhou, Boping; To, Sabrina Wai-Chi; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The development of a rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV-DR) testing system is a challenge for areas consisting different HIV-1 strains. In this study, we established a broadly reactive multiplex assay that could simultaneously detect major drug resistance mutations at 8 loci, which are associated with resistance to commonly used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), in specimens of HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and subtype B, the three major circulating strains in China, using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provided by Sequenom MassARRAY® system. To establish the assay, pol gene fragments were prepared from the plasma viral RNA of 159 patients by nested PCR and the presence of wild type and mutant alleles at the 8 loci were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. In terms of loci, the detection rate of the alleles was greater than 97% for M41L, K65R, M184V and G190A, 91.2% for K101E/Q/P, 91.2% for T215F/Y, 89.9% for K103N/S and 80.5% for L210W. In terms of individuals, 80% of the alleles were detected in 95.4% CRF01_AE patients, 100% CRF07_BC patients and 83.3% subtype B patients. Importantly, the MALDI-TOF MS results were concordant to the drug resistance profiles of patients obtained from conventional sequencing analysis after excluded the failed detections. Using plasmid templates, the assay was estimated to be sensitive to detect drug resistant variants at level about 20% of the circulating viral population. The capability of this assay to detect mixed viral populations was further verified by two different patient specimens. In conclusion, this study evaluated the use of Sequenom MassARRAY® system for high-throughput detection of HIV-DR mutations towards the commonly used reverse transcriptase inhibitors in China. PMID:27092551

  12. Rapid and Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in Reverse Transcriptase Gene for HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and Subtype B in China Using Sequenom MassARRAY® System

    PubMed Central

    He, Liufen; Cai, Kanru; Jiang, Qiang; Zhou, Boping; To, Sabrina Wai-Chi; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The development of a rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV-DR) testing system is a challenge for areas consisting different HIV-1 strains. In this study, we established a broadly reactive multiplex assay that could simultaneously detect major drug resistance mutations at 8 loci, which are associated with resistance to commonly used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), in specimens of HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and subtype B, the three major circulating strains in China, using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provided by Sequenom MassARRAY® system. To establish the assay, pol gene fragments were prepared from the plasma viral RNA of 159 patients by nested PCR and the presence of wild type and mutant alleles at the 8 loci were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. In terms of loci, the detection rate of the alleles was greater than 97% for M41L, K65R, M184V and G190A, 91.2% for K101E/Q/P, 91.2% for T215F/Y, 89.9% for K103N/S and 80.5% for L210W. In terms of individuals, 80% of the alleles were detected in 95.4% CRF01_AE patients, 100% CRF07_BC patients and 83.3% subtype B patients. Importantly, the MALDI-TOF MS results were concordant to the drug resistance profiles of patients obtained from conventional sequencing analysis after excluded the failed detections. Using plasmid templates, the assay was estimated to be sensitive to detect drug resistant variants at level about 20% of the circulating viral population. The capability of this assay to detect mixed viral populations was further verified by two different patient specimens. In conclusion, this study evaluated the use of Sequenom MassARRAY® system for high-throughput detection of HIV-DR mutations towards the commonly used reverse transcriptase inhibitors in China. PMID:27092551

  13. The diversity of retrotransposons and the properties of their reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Eickbush, Thomas H; Jamburuthugoda, Varuni K

    2008-06-01

    A number of abundant mobile genetic elements called retrotransposons reverse transcribe RNA to generate DNA for insertion into eukaryotic genomes. Four major classes of retrotransposons are described here. First, the long-terminal-repeat (LTR) retrotransposons have similar structures and mechanisms to those of the vertebrate retroviruses. Genes that may enable these retrotransposons to leave a cell have been acquired by these elements in a number of animal and plant lineages. Second, the tyrosine recombinase retrotransposons are similar to the LTR retrotransposons except that they have substituted a recombinase for the integrase and recombine into the host chromosomes. Third, the non-LTR retrotransposons use a cleaved chromosomal target site generated by an encoded endonuclease to prime reverse transcription. Finally, the Penelope-like retrotransposons are not well understood but appear to also use cleaved DNA or the ends of chromosomes as primer for reverse transcription. Described in the second part of this review are the enzymatic properties of the reverse transcriptases (RTs) encoded by retrotransposons. The RTs of the LTR retrotransposons are highly divergent in sequence but have similar enzymatic activities to those of retroviruses. The RTs of the non-LTR retrotransposons have several unique properties reflecting their adaptation to a different mechanism of retrotransposition. PMID:18261821

  14. The Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Subunit from the Dimorphic Fungus Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Horta-Valerdi, Guillermo; Celestino-Montes, Antonio; Kojic, Milorad; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo; Reyes-Cervantes, Hortensia; Vázquez-Cruz, Candelario; Guzmán, Plinio; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase in the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis. This protein (Trt1) contains 1371 amino acids and all of the characteristic TERT motifs. Mutants created by disrupting trt1 had senescent traits, such as delayed growth, low replicative potential, and reduced survival, that were reminiscent of the traits observed in est2 budding yeast mutants. Telomerase activity was observed in wild-type fungus sporidia but not those of the disruption mutant. The introduction of a self-replicating plasmid expressing Trt1 into the mutant strain restored growth proficiency and replicative potential. Analyses of trt1 crosses in planta suggested that Trt1 is necessary for teliospore formation in homozygous disrupted diploids and that telomerase is haploinsufficient in heterozygous diploids. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment analysis in the progeny hinted at alternative survival mechanisms similar to those of budding yeast. PMID:25299159

  15. Data on synthesis of methylene bisphosphonates and screening of their inhibitory activity towards HIV reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-09-01

    Inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) mimetics designed on a basis of methylenediphosphonic acid backbone are promising inhibitors of two key HIV replication enzymes, IN [1] and RT [2]. Herein, we present chemical synthesis of eleven methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) with their NMR and HRMS analysis synthesized via five different ways. Also, we present data on inhibition of HIV RT catalyzed phosphorolysis and polymerization by synthesized BPs using two methods based on denaturing urea PAGE. Tests were also performed for thymidine analogue mutations reverse transcriptase (TAM RT), which was expressed and purified for that. Structure-activity relationships and inhibitory activity data of synthesized BPs are presented in "Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity" [2]. PMID:27547792

  16. A novel dipyridodiazepinone inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase acts through a nonsubstrate binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.C.; Warren, T.C.; Adams, J.; Proudfoot, J.; Skiles, J.; Raghavan, P.; Perry, C.; Potocki, I.; Farina, P.R.; Grob, P.M. )

    1991-02-26

    A novel dipyridodiazepinone, 6,11-dihydro-11-cyclopropyl-4-methyldipyrido(2,3-b:2{prime},3{prime}-e)-(1,4)diazepin-6-one (BI-RG-587), is a selective noncompetitive inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT-1). An azido photoaffinity analogue of BI-RG-587 was synthesized and found to irreversibly inhibit the enzyme upon UV irradiation. BI-RG-587 and close structural analogues competitively protected RT-1 from inactivation by the photoaffinity label. A thiobenzimidazolone (TIBO) derivative, a nonnucleoside inhibitor of RT-1, also protected the enzyme from photoinactivation, which suggests a common binding site for these compounds. Substrates dGTP, template-primer, and tRNA afforded no protection from enzyme inactivation. A tritiated photoaffinity probe was found to stoichiometrically and selectively label p66 such that 1 mol of probe inactivates 1 mol of RT-1.

  17. Two-year carcinogenicity study in rats with a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Prashant R; Morton, Daniel; Dochterman, Leland Wayne; Houle, Christopher; Thomford, Peter J; Fate, Gwendolyn; Bailey, Steven A; Finch, Gregory L

    2015-04-01

    Administration of lersivirine, a nonnucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor, daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley rats for up to 2 yr was associated with decreased survival, decreased body weights, and an increase in neoplasms and related proliferative lesions in the liver, thyroid, kidney, and urinary bladder. Thyroid follicular adenoma and carcinoma, the associated thyroid follicular hypertrophy/hyperplasia, hepatocellular adenoma/adenocarcinoma, altered cell foci, and hepatocellular hypertrophy were consistent with lersivirine-related induction of hepatic microsomal enzymes. Renal tubular adenoma and renal tubular hyperplasia were attributed to the lersivirine-related exacerbation of chronic progressive nephropathy (CPN), while urinary bladder hyperplasia and transitional cell carcinoma in the renal pelvis and urinary bladder were attributed to urinary calculi. Renal tubular neoplasms associated with increased incidence and severity of CPN, neoplasms of transitional epithelium attributed to crystalluria, and thyroid follicular and hepatocellular neoplasms related to hepatic enzyme induction have low relevance for human risk assessment. PMID:25122632

  18. Differential Regulation of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Promoter Activation and Protein Degradation by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qing, Hua; Aono, Jun; Findeisen, Hannes M; Jones, Karrie L; Heywood, Elizabeth B; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) maintains telomeres and is rate limiting for replicative life span. While most somatic tissues silence TERT transcription resulting in telomere shortening, cells derived from cancer or cardiovascular diseases express TERT and activate telomerase. In the present study, we demonstrate that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition induces TERT transcription and promoter activation. At the protein level in contrast, HDAC inhibition decreases TERT protein abundance through enhanced degradation, which decreases telomerase activity and induces senescence. Finally, we demonstrate that HDAC inhibition decreases TERT expression during vascular remodeling in vivo. These data illustrate a differential regulation of TERT transcription and protein stability by HDAC inhibition and suggest that TERT may constitute an important target for the anti-proliferative efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26505494

  19. Cancer-Specific Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) Promoter Mutations: Biological and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiantian; Yuan, Xiaotian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    The accumulated evidence has pointed to a key role of telomerase in carcinogenesis. As a RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA at the end of linear chromosomes, and attenuates or prevents telomere erosion associated with cell divisions. By lengthening telomeres, telomerase extends cellular life-span or even induces immortalization. Consistent with its functional activity, telomerase is silent in most human normal somatic cells while active only in germ-line, stem and other highly proliferative cells. In contrast, telomerase activation widely occurs in human cancer and the enzymatic activity is detectable in up to 90% of malignancies. Recently, hotspot point mutations in the regulatory region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, encoding the core catalytic component of telomerase, was identified as a novel mechanism to activate telomerase in cancer. This review discusses the cancer-specific TERT promoter mutations and potential biological and clinical significances. PMID:27438857

  20. Pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Valadan, Reza; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Tehrani, Mohsen; Rafiei, Alireza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) provides a powerful tool for precise gene expression analysis. The accuracy of the results highly depends on careful selection of a reference gene for data normalization. HPRT1 (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1) is a frequently used housekeeping gene for normalizing relative expression values. However, the existence of processed pseudogenes for HPRT1 might interfere with reliable results obtained in qRT-PCR due to amplification of unintended products. Here, we designed a primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR. We demonstrate that this primer pair specifically amplified HPRT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence while avoiding coamplification of the pseudogenes. PMID:26050630

  1. Cancer-Specific Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) Promoter Mutations: Biological and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiantian; Yuan, Xiaotian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    The accumulated evidence has pointed to a key role of telomerase in carcinogenesis. As a RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA at the end of linear chromosomes, and attenuates or prevents telomere erosion associated with cell divisions. By lengthening telomeres, telomerase extends cellular life-span or even induces immortalization. Consistent with its functional activity, telomerase is silent in most human normal somatic cells while active only in germ-line, stem and other highly proliferative cells. In contrast, telomerase activation widely occurs in human cancer and the enzymatic activity is detectable in up to 90% of malignancies. Recently, hotspot point mutations in the regulatory region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, encoding the core catalytic component of telomerase, was identified as a novel mechanism to activate telomerase in cancer. This review discusses the cancer-specific TERT promoter mutations and potential biological and clinical significances. PMID:27438857

  2. Bifunctional Inhibition of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A First Step in Designing a Bifunctional Triphosphate‡

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Dongyuan; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Iyidogan, Pinar; Dai, Guangxiu; Hinz, Wolfgang; Ray, Adrian S.; Murakami, Eisuke; Feng, Joy Y.; You, Fei; Dutschman, Ginger E.; Austin, David J.; Parker, Kathlyn A.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    The onset of resistance to approved anti-AIDS drugs by HIV necessitates the search for novel inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Developing single molecular agents concurrently occupying the nucleoside and nonnucleoside binding sites in RT is an intriguing idea but the proof-of-concept has so far been elusive. As a first step, we describe molecular modeling to guide focused chemical syntheses of conjugates having nucleoside (d4T) and nonnucleoside (TIBO) moieties tethered by a flexible polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. A triphosphate of d4T-6PEG-TIBO conjugate was successfully synthesized that is recognized as a substrate by HIV-1 RT and incorporated into a double-stranded DNA. PMID:23380374

  3. In Vitro Characterization of MK-1439, a Novel HIV-1 Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Meizhen; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Tawa, Paul; Witmer, Marc; DiStefano, Daniel; Li, Yuan; Burch, Jason; Sachs, Nancy; Lu, Meiqing; Cauchon, Elizabeth; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Grobler, Jay; Yan, Youwei; Ducharme, Yves; Côté, Bernard; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; Hazuda, Daria J.; Miller, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are a mainstay of therapy for treating human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1)-infected patients. MK-1439 is a novel NNRTI with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 12, 9.7, and 9.7 nM against the wild type (WT) and K103N and Y181C reverse transcriptase (RT) mutants, respectively, in a biochemical assay. Selectivity and cytotoxicity studies confirmed that MK-1439 is a highly specific NNRTI with minimum off-target activities. In the presence of 50% normal human serum (NHS), MK-1439 showed excellent potency in suppressing the replication of WT virus, with a 95% effective concentration (EC95) of 20 nM, as well as K103N, Y181C, and K103N/Y181C mutant viruses with EC95 of 43, 27, and 55 nM, respectively. MK-1439 exhibited similar antiviral activities against 10 different HIV-1 subtype viruses (a total of 93 viruses). In addition, the susceptibility of a broader array of clinical NNRTI-associated mutant viruses (a total of 96 viruses) to MK-1439 and other benchmark NNRTIs was investigated. The results showed that the mutant profile of MK-1439 was superior overall to that of efavirenz (EFV) and comparable to that of etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV). Furthermore, E138K, Y181C, and K101E mutant viruses that are associated with ETR and RPV were susceptible to MK-1439 with a fold change (FC) of <3. A two-drug in vitro combination study indicated that MK-1439 acts nonantagonistically in the antiviral activity with each of 18 FDA-licensed drugs for HIV infection. Taken together, these in vitro data suggest that MK-1439 possesses the desired properties for further development as a new antiviral agent. PMID:24379202

  4. SAMHD1 Specifically Affects the Antiviral Potency of Thymidine Analog HIV Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ballana, Ester; Badia, Roger; Terradas, Gerard; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Ruiz, Alba; Pauls, Eduardo; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Clotet, Bonaventura; Martí, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Sterile alpha motif and histidine-aspartic domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase recently recognized as an antiviral factor that acts by depleting dNTP availability for viral reverse transcriptase (RT). SAMHD1 restriction is counteracted by the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) accessory protein Vpx, which targets SAMHD1 for proteosomal degradation, resulting in an increased availability of dNTPs and consequently enhanced viral replication. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), one of the most common agents used in antiretroviral therapy, compete with intracellular dNTPs as the substrate for viral RT. Consequently, SAMHD1 activity may be influencing NRTI efficacy in inhibiting viral replication. Here, a panel of different RT inhibitors was analyzed for their different antiviral efficacy depending on SAMHD1. Antiviral potency was measured for all the inhibitors in transformed cell lines and primary monocyte-derived macrophages and CD4+ T cells infected with HIV-1 with or without Vpx. No changes in sensitivity to non-NRTI or the integrase inhibitor raltegravir were observed, but for NRTI, sensitivity significantly changed only in the case of the thymidine analogs (AZT and d4T). The addition of exogenous thymidine mimicked the change in viral sensitivity observed after Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation, pointing toward a differential effect of SAMHD1 activity on thymidine. Accordingly, sensitivity to AZT was also reduced in CD4+ T cells infected with HIV-2 compared to infection with the HIV-2ΔVpx strain. In conclusion, reduction of SAMHD1 levels significantly decreases HIV sensitivity to thymidine but not other nucleotide RT analog inhibitors in both macrophages and lymphocytes. PMID:24913159

  5. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (<300 Da) screened using primarily biophysical assays. FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs. PMID:26324045

  6. Identifying and Characterizing a Functional HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase-binding Site on Integrase*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Januszyk, Kurt; Phillips, Martin L.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Zhang, Min; Miller, Jennifer T.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Clubb, Robert T.; Chow, Samson A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrase (IN) from human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) exerts pleiotropic effects in the viral replication cycle. Besides integration, IN mutations can impact nuclear import, viral maturation, and reverse transcription. IN and reverse transcriptase (RT) interact in vitro, and the IN C-terminal domain (CTD) is both necessary and sufficient for binding RT. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify a putative RT-binding surface on the IN CTD, and surface plasmon resonance to obtain kinetic parameters and the binding affinity for the IN-RT interaction. An IN K258A substitution that disrupts reverse transcription in infected cells is located at the putative RT-binding surface, and we found that this substitution substantially weakens IN CTD-RT interactions. We also identified two additional IN amino acid substitutions located at the putative RT-binding surface (W243E and V250E) that significantly impair viral replication in tissue culture. These results strengthen the notion that IN-RT interactions are biologically relevant during HIV-1 replication and also provide insights into this interaction at the molecular level. PMID:19150986

  7. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance. PMID:24278679

  8. Use of propidium monoazide in reverse transcriptase PCR to distinguish between infectious and noninfectious enteric viruses in water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human enteric viruses can be present in untreated and inadequately treated drinking water. Molecular methods, such as the reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), can detect viral genomes in a few hours, but they cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses. Since o...

  9. Preclinical evaluation of HBY 097, a new nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Kleim, J P; Bender, R; Kirsch, R; Meichsner, C; Paessens, A; Rösner, M; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H; Kaiser, R; Wichers, M; Schneweis, K E

    1995-01-01

    HBY 097 [(S)-4-isopropoxycarbonyl-6-methoxy-3-(methylthiomethyl)-3, 4-dihydroquinoxaline-2(1H)-thione] was selected from a series of quinoxalines as a nonnucleoside inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (NNRTI). HBY 097 was shown to be a highly potent inhibitor of HIV-1 induced cell killing and HIV-1 replication in a variety of human cell lines as well as in fresh human peripheral blood lymphocytes and macrophages. The compound was also active against a variety of clinical isolates of HIV-1 including different HIV-1 subtypes and viruses resistant to 3'-deoxy-3'-azidothymidine. Mutant reverse transcriptases which arise as a consequence of treatment with other nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase were still inhibited by HBY 097 at relatively low concentrations. An HIV-1MN variant resistant to inhibition by HBY 097 displayed in the reverse transcriptase gene a mutation causing a substitution at position 190 of a glutamic acid for a glycine residue (G190 --> E), which is characteristic for quinoxaline derivatives. The drug was demonstrated to possess a favorable toxicity profile and to show good oral bioavailability in both mice and dogs. As a consequence of its outstanding properties, HBY 097 was selected for further development and is at present undergoing clinical trials. PMID:8619578

  10. Validation of a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for the detection of H7 avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A subtype specific H7 real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay developed by the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) for the detection of H7 in North and South American wild aquatic birds and poultry was validated as a collaborative effort by the SEPRL and Na...

  11. Indolyl aryl sulfones as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: role of two halogen atoms at the indole ring in developing new analogues with improved antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Regina, Giuseppe La; Coluccia, Antonio; Piscitelli, Francesco; Bergamini, Alberto; Sinistro, Anna; Cavazza, Antonella; Maga, Giovanni; Samuele, Alberta; Zanoli, Samantha; Novellino, Ettore; Artico, Marino; Silvestri, Romano

    2007-10-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfones bearing the 4,5-difluoro (10) or 5-chloro-4-fluoro (16) substitution pattern at the indole ring were potent inhibitors of HIV-1 WT and the NNRTI-resistant strains Y181C and K103N-Y181C. These compounds were highly effective against the 112 and the AB1 strains in lymphocytes and inhibited at nanomolar concentration the multiplication of the IIIBBa-L strain in macrophages. Compound 16 was exceptionally potent against RT WT and RTs carrying the K103N, Y181I, and L100I mutations. PMID:17803291

  12. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Danielle P.; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D.; White, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study. PMID:26690199

  13. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study.

    PubMed

    Porter, Danielle P; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D; White, Kirsten L

    2015-12-01

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study. PMID:26690199

  14. In vivo toxicity, pharmacokinetic features and tissue distribution of N-[2-(2,5-dimethoxyphenylethyl)]-N'-[2-(5-bromopyridyl)]-thiourea (HI-236), a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Venkatachalam, T K; Waurzyniak, B; Chelstrom, L; Uckun, F M

    2001-01-01

    N-[2-(2,5-Dimethoxyphenylethyl)]-N'-[2-(5-bromopyridyl)]-thiourea (HI-236, CAS 233271-65-3) possesses potent anti-viral activity against zidovudine-sensitive as well as multidrug-resistant HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus) strains. The purpose of the present study was to examine in vivo toxicity, pharmacokinetic features and tissue distribution of HI-236 in mice. HI-236 had an elimination half-life of 85.8 min after i.v. administration and 86.6 min after i.p. administration. The systemic clearance of HI-236 was 4337 ml/h/kg after i.v. administration and 10,130 ml/h/kg after i.p. administration. Following i.v. injection, HI-236 rapidly distributed to and accumulated in multiple tissues with particularly high accumulation in lung, adipose tissue, skin, urinary bladder, adrenal gland and uterus + ovary. The concentration of HI-236 in brain tissue was comparable to that in the plasma, indicating that HI-236 easily crosses the blood-brain barrier. Following i.p. injection, HI-236 was rapidly absorbed with a tmax values of 5.6 min and showed linear pharmacokinetics within the dose range of 10-80 mg/kg. Following oral administration, HI-236 was absorbed with a tmax of 5.8 min. The intraperitoneal bioavailability was estimated at 42.9%, while the oral bioavailability was only 2.2%. The pharmacokinetic study described herein provides the basis for advanced pharmacodynamic study of HI-236. PMID:11505789

  15. Frequent Emergence of N348I in HIV-1 Subtype C Reverse Transcriptase with Failure of Initial Therapy Reduces Susceptibility to Reverse-Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Jessica H.; Koontz, Dianna L.; Wallis, Carole L.; Shutt, Kathleen A.; Sanne, Ian; Wood, Robin; McIntyre, James A.; Stevens, Wendy S.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Mellors, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. It is not known how often mutations in the connection and ribonuclease H domains of reverse transcriptase (RT) emerge with failure of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in subtype C human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and how these mutations affect susceptibility to other antiretrovirals. Methods. We compared full-length RT sequences in plasma obtained before therapy and at virologic failure of initial ART among 63 participants with subtype C HIV-1 infection enrolled in the Comprehensive International Program of Research on AIDS in South Africa (CIPRA-SA) study. Recombinant viruses containing full-length plasma-derived RT sequences from participants with N348I at virologic failure were assayed for drug susceptibility. Results. Y181C and M184V mutations in the RT polymerase domain were associated with failure of stavudine-lamivudine-nevirapine (d4T/3TC/NVP; P < .01), and K103N, V106M, and M184V with failure of d4T/3TC/efavirenz (EFV; P < .01). N348I in the RT connection domain emerged in 45% (P = .002) and 12% (P = .06) of participants receiving failing regimens containing NVP or EFV, respectively. Longitudinal analyses revealed that nonnucleoside RT inhibitor resistance mutations in the polymerase domain generally appeared first. N348I emerged at the same time, or after, M184V. N348I in the context of polymerase domain mutations reduced susceptibility to NVP (8.9–13-fold), EFV (4–56-fold), etravirine (ETV; 1.9–4.7-fold) and decreased hypersusceptibility to zidovudine (AZT; 1.4–2.2-fold). Conclusions. N348I emerges frequently with virologic failure of first-line ART in subtype C HIV-1 infection and reduces susceptibility to NVP, EFV, ETV, and AZT. Additional studies are warranted to characterize the effects of N348I on virologic response to second- and third-line regimens in resource-limited settings where subtype C predominates. PMID:22618567

  16. Mechanistic and Kinetic Differences between Reverse Transcriptases of Vpx Coding and Non-coding Lentiviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Gina M.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Kim, Baek

    2015-01-01

    Among lentiviruses, HIV Type 2 (HIV-2) and many simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains replicate rapidly in non-dividing macrophages, whereas HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) replication in this cell type is kinetically delayed. The efficient replication capability of HIV-2/SIV in non-dividing cells is induced by a unique, virally encoded accessory protein, Vpx, which proteasomally degrades the host antiviral restriction factor, SAM domain- and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). SAMHD1 is a dNTPase and kinetically suppresses the reverse transcription step of HIV-1 in macrophages by hydrolyzing and depleting cellular dNTPs. In contrast, Vpx, which is encoded by HIV-2/SIV, kinetically accelerates reverse transcription by counteracting SAMHD1 and then elevating cellular dNTP concentration in non-dividing cells. Here, we conducted the pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from two Vpx non-coding and two Vpx coding lentiviruses. At all three sites of the template tested, the two RTs of the Vpx non-coding viruses (HIV-1) displayed higher kpol values than the RTs of the Vpx coding HIV-2/SIV, whereas there was no significant difference in the Kd values of these two groups of RTs. When we employed viral RNA templates that induce RT pausing by their secondary structures, the HIV-1 RTs showed more efficient DNA synthesis through pause sites than the HIV-2/SIV RTs, particularly at low dNTP concentrations found in macrophages. This kinetic study suggests that RTs of the Vpx non-coding HIV-1 may have evolved to execute a faster kpol step, which includes the conformational changes and incorporation chemistry, to counteract the limited dNTP concentration found in non-dividing cells and still promote efficient viral reverse transcription. PMID:26483545

  17. Mechanistic and Kinetic Differences between Reverse Transcriptases of Vpx Coding and Non-coding Lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Gina M; Domaoal, Robert A; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek

    2015-12-11

    Among lentiviruses, HIV Type 2 (HIV-2) and many simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains replicate rapidly in non-dividing macrophages, whereas HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) replication in this cell type is kinetically delayed. The efficient replication capability of HIV-2/SIV in non-dividing cells is induced by a unique, virally encoded accessory protein, Vpx, which proteasomally degrades the host antiviral restriction factor, SAM domain- and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). SAMHD1 is a dNTPase and kinetically suppresses the reverse transcription step of HIV-1 in macrophages by hydrolyzing and depleting cellular dNTPs. In contrast, Vpx, which is encoded by HIV-2/SIV, kinetically accelerates reverse transcription by counteracting SAMHD1 and then elevating cellular dNTP concentration in non-dividing cells. Here, we conducted the pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from two Vpx non-coding and two Vpx coding lentiviruses. At all three sites of the template tested, the two RTs of the Vpx non-coding viruses (HIV-1) displayed higher kpol values than the RTs of the Vpx coding HIV-2/SIV, whereas there was no significant difference in the Kd values of these two groups of RTs. When we employed viral RNA templates that induce RT pausing by their secondary structures, the HIV-1 RTs showed more efficient DNA synthesis through pause sites than the HIV-2/SIV RTs, particularly at low dNTP concentrations found in macrophages. This kinetic study suggests that RTs of the Vpx non-coding HIV-1 may have evolved to execute a faster kpol step, which includes the conformational changes and incorporation chemistry, to counteract the limited dNTP concentration found in non-dividing cells and still promote efficient viral reverse transcription. PMID:26483545

  18. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development. PMID:18197976

  19. RNase H activity associated with reverse transcriptase from feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Cronn, R C; Whitmer, J D; North, T W

    1992-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes requires the action of an RNase H for template switching and primer generation. In this report, we compare enzymatic properties of the RNase H associated with the reverse transcriptase (RT) from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and that from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both enzymes displayed substrate preference for poly[3H](rG) . poly(dC) hybird over poly[3H](rA) . poly(dT) and cation preference for Mg2+ over Mn2+. Activity of the FIV RNase H upon poly(rG) . poly(dC) produced hydrolysis products from 1 to 6 nucleotides in length, similar to that reported for HIV. Dextran sulfates were effective inhibitors of both the FIV and HIV RNase H and RT activities. Nearly identical inhibition constants (0.12 nM) were obtained for all enzyme activities with dextran sulfate 500,000, while different inhibition constants were observed with dextran sulfate 8,000. Our results suggest that FIV and HIV RTs contain a conserved region that is sensitive to the larger dextran sulfate and that dextran sulfate 8,000 may interact at a different site or by a different mechanism. Images PMID:1370549

  20. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications.

    PubMed

    Adebiyi, Oluwafeyisetan O; Adebiyi, Olubunmi A; Owira, Peter M O

    2015-12-01

    Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin's effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7) were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT) (groups I, II III), 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T) (groups IV, V, VI) and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII). Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy. PMID:26690471

  1. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Adebiyi, Oluwafeyisetan O.; Adebiyi, Olubunmi A.; Owira, Peter M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin’s effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7) were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT) (groups I, II III), 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T) (groups IV, V, VI) and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII). Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy. PMID:26690471

  2. Highly efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase by aptamers functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiang, Yen-Chun; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chen, Shih-Ju; Ou, Ting-Yu; Lin, Han-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-03-01

    We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45-Au NPs shows inhibitory efficiency in the retroviral replication cycle with a decreasing infectivity (40.2%).We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45

  3. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; de Souza, William Marciel; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; de Araujo, Jansen; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; da Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  4. Feedback regulation of telomerase reverse transcriptase: new insight into the evolving field of telomerase in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Huang, Cheng; He, Xu; Tian, Yuan-Yao; Zhou, De-Xi; He, Yong; Liu, Xin-Hua; Li, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the catalytic component of telomerase, especially the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase activity. So far, TERT has been reported to be over-expressed in more than 90% of cancers, thereby playing a critical role in sustained proliferation and survival potentials of various cancer cells. Over the past decade, a comprehensive network of transcription factors has been shown to be involved in the regulation of TERT. Furthermore, accumulating evidence has suggested that TERT could modulate the expression of numerous genes involved in diverse group of cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation and cellular signaling. Therefore, it indicates that TERT is both an effector and a regulator in carcinoma. However, the mechanisms of the interaction between TERT and its target genes are still not fully understood. Thus, it is necessary to consolidate and summarize recent developments of the cross-talk between TERT and related genes in cancer cells or other cells with cancer cell characteristics, and elucidate these relevant mechanisms. In this review, we focus on various signaling pathways and genes that participate in the feedback regulation of TERT and the underlying feedback loop mechanism of TERT, further providing new insights into non-telomeric functions of telomerase and potentially to be used as a novel therapeutic target for cancer. PMID:23993966

  5. Development and Evaluation of an Enterovirus D68 Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd N.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Buller, Richard S.; Cannella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in clinical specimens. This assay was developed in response to the unprecedented 2014 nationwide EV-D68 outbreak in the United States associated with severe respiratory illness. As part of our evaluation of the outbreak, we sequenced and published the genome sequence of the EV-D68 virus circulating in St. Louis, MO. This sequence, along with other GenBank sequences from past EV-D68 occurrences, was used to computationally select a region of EV-D68 appropriate for targeting in a strain-specific RT-PCR assay. The RT-PCR assay amplifies a segment of the VP1 gene, with an analytic limit of detection of 4 copies per reaction, and it was more sensitive than commercially available assays that detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses without distinguishing between the two, including three multiplex respiratory panels approved for clinical use by the FDA. The assay did not detect any other enteroviruses or rhinoviruses tested and did detect divergent strains of EV-D68, including the first EV-D68 strain (Fermon) identified in California in 1962. This assay should be useful for identifying and studying current and future outbreaks of EV-D68 viruses. PMID:26063859

  6. Efavirenz a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of first-generation: Approaches based on its medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Mônica M; Costa, Carolina C P; Bezerra, Talitha C; da Silva, Fernando de C; Boechat, Núbia

    2016-01-27

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that affects individuals on all continents. In 1987, the antiretroviral therapy began increasing survival rates and improving the quality of life for patients. Efavirenz (EFV) is a drug widely used in the treatment of HIV-AIDS since 1998. Belonging to a class of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), it directly blocks the action of the enzyme and consequently the multiplication of the virus. Although EFV has provided excellent results in reducing viral load, cases of resistance associated with adverse effects have led to the search to find new analogs of this drug. Although many researchers are involved in this quest, curiously there is still no clinical substitute for EFV. To develop a second-generation version of EFV, it is essential understand the structure-activity relationships of the derivative compounds. Thus, the aims of the present review are to compare EFV and its derivatives using medicinal chemistry and to describe the main synthetic routes. PMID:26708112

  7. Telomerase regulates MYC-driven oncogenesis independent of its reverse transcriptase activity.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cheryl M; Khattar, Ekta; Leow, Shi Chi; Liu, Chia Yi; Muller, Julius; Ang, Wei Xia; Li, Yinghui; Franzoso, Guido; Li, Shang; Guccione, Ernesto; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-05-01

    Constitutively active MYC and reactivated telomerase often coexist in cancers. While reactivation of telomerase is thought to be essential for replicative immortality, MYC, in conjunction with cofactors, confers several growth advantages to cancer cells. It is known that the reactivation of TERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase, is limiting for reconstituting telomerase activity in tumors. However, while reactivation of TERT has been functionally linked to the acquisition of several "hallmarks of cancer" in tumors, the molecular mechanisms by which this occurs and whether these mechanisms are distinct from the role of telomerase on telomeres is not clear. Here, we demonstrated that first-generation TERT-null mice, unlike Terc-null mice, show delayed onset of MYC-induced lymphomagenesis. We further determined that TERT is a regulator of MYC stability in cancer. TERT stabilized MYC levels on chromatin, contributing to either activation or repression of its target genes. TERT regulated MYC ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, and this effect of TERT was independent of its reverse transcriptase activity and role in telomere elongation. Based on these data, we conclude that reactivation of TERT, a direct transcriptional MYC target in tumors, provides a feed-forward mechanism to potentiate MYC-dependent oncogenesis. PMID:25893605

  8. Development and Evaluation of an Enterovirus D68 Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Todd N; Wylie, Kristine M; Buller, Richard S; Cannella, Maria; Storch, Gregory A

    2015-08-01

    We have developed and evaluated a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in clinical specimens. This assay was developed in response to the unprecedented 2014 nationwide EV-D68 outbreak in the United States associated with severe respiratory illness. As part of our evaluation of the outbreak, we sequenced and published the genome sequence of the EV-D68 virus circulating in St. Louis, MO. This sequence, along with other GenBank sequences from past EV-D68 occurrences, was used to computationally select a region of EV-D68 appropriate for targeting in a strain-specific RT-PCR assay. The RT-PCR assay amplifies a segment of the VP1 gene, with an analytic limit of detection of 4 copies per reaction, and it was more sensitive than commercially available assays that detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses without distinguishing between the two, including three multiplex respiratory panels approved for clinical use by the FDA. The assay did not detect any other enteroviruses or rhinoviruses tested and did detect divergent strains of EV-D68, including the first EV-D68 strain (Fermon) identified in California in 1962. This assay should be useful for identifying and studying current and future outbreaks of EV-D68 viruses. PMID:26063859

  9. Pharmacogenetics of nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-associated peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Hulgan, Todd

    2009-04-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is an important complication of antiretroviral therapy. Nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and nutritional factors are implicated in its pathogenesis. Pharmacogenetic and genomic studies investigating NRTI neurotoxicity have only recently become possible via the linkage of HIV clinical studies to large DNA repositories. Preliminary case-control studies using these resources suggest that host mitochondrial DNA haplogroup polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis gene and proinflammatory cytokine genes may influence the risk of peripheral neuropathy during antiretroviral therapy. These putative risk factors await confirmation in other HIV-infected populations but they have strong biological plausibility. Work to identify underlying mechanisms for these associations is ongoing. Large-scale studies incorporating clearly defined and validated methods of neuropathy assessment and the use of novel laboratory models of NRTI-associated neuropathy to clarify its pathophysiology are now needed. Such investigations may facilitate the development of more effective strategies to predict, prevent and ameliorate this debilitating treatment toxicity in diverse clinical settings. PMID:19374518

  10. Alternatively Spliced Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Variants Lacking Telomerase Activity Stimulate Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hrdličková, Radmila; Nehyba, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Eight human and six chicken novel alternatively spliced (AS) variants of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) were identified, including a human variant (Δ4-13) containing an in-frame deletion which removed exons 4 through 13, encoding the catalytic domain of telomerase. This variant was expressed in telomerase-negative normal cells and tissues as well as in transformed telomerase-positive cell lines and cells which employ an alternative method to maintain telomere length. The overexpression of the Δ4-13 variant significantly elevated the proliferation rates of several cell types without enhancing telomerase activity, while decreasing the endogenous expression of this variant by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology reduced cell proliferation. The expression of the Δ4-13 variant stimulated Wnt signaling. In chicken cells, AS TERT variants containing internal deletions or insertions that eliminated or reduced telomerase activity also enhanced cell proliferation. This is the first report that naturally occurring AS TERT variants which lack telomerase activity stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:22907755

  11. Origin and evolution of retroelements based upon their reverse transcriptase sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Y; Eickbush, T H

    1990-01-01

    To study the evolutionary relationship of reverse transcriptase (RT) containing genetic elements, a phylogenetic tree of 82 retroelements from animals, plants, protozoans and bacteria was constructed. The tree was based on seven amino acid domains totalling 178 residues identified in all RTs. We have also identified these seven domains in the RNA-directed RNA polymerases from various plus-strand RNA viruses. The sequence similarity of these RNA polymerases to RT suggests that these two enzymes evolved from a common ancestor, and thus RNA polymerase can be used as an outgroup to root the RT tree. A comparison of the genetic organization of the various RT containing elements and their position on the tree allows several inferences concerning the origin and evolution of these elements. The most probable ancestor of current retroelements was a retrotransposable element with both gag-like and pol-like genes. On one major branch of the tree, organelle and bacterial sequences (e.g. group II introns and bacterial msDNA) appear to have captured the RT sequences from retrotransposons which lack long terminal repeats (LTRs). On the other major branch, acquisition of LTRs gave rise to two distinct groups of LTR retrotransposons and three groups of viruses: retroviruses, hepadnaviruses and caulimoviruses. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1698615

  12. Crystal Engineering of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase for structure-Based Drug Design

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman,J.; Das, K.; Ho, W.; Baweja, M.; Himmel, D.; Clark, A.; Oren, D.; Shatkin, A.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a primary target for anti-AIDS drugs. Structures of HIV-1 RT, usually determined at {approx}2.5-3.0 Angstroms resolution, are important for understanding enzyme function and mechanisms of drug resistance in addition to being helpful in the design of RT inhibitors. Despite hundreds of attempts, it was not possible to obtain the structure of a complex of HIV-1 RT with TMC278, a nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) in advanced clinical trials. A systematic and iterative protein crystal engineering approach was developed to optimize RT for obtaining crystals in complexes with TMC278 and other NNRTIs that diffract X-rays to 1.8 Angstroms resolution. Another form of engineered RT was optimized to produce a high-resolution apo-RT crystal form, reported here at 1.85 Angstroms resolution, with a distinct RT conformation. Engineered RTs were mutagenized using a new, flexible and cost effective method called methylated overlap-extension ligation independent cloning. Our analysis suggests that reducing the solvent content, increasing lattice contacts, and stabilizing the internal low-energy conformations of RT are critical for the growth of crystals that diffract to high resolution. The new RTs enable rapid crystallization and yield high-resolution structures that are useful in designing/developing new anti-AIDS drugs.

  13. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-03-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), which is an essential enzyme for the replication of HIV. These changes allow it to retain potency against mutations that otherwise would render the enzyme resistant. Here we report that water molecules play an essential role in this binding process. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose the molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 RT. Two nitrile substituents, one on each arm of the drug, are used as vibrational probes of the structural dynamics within the binding pocket. Two-dimensional vibrational echo spectroscopy reveals that one nitrile group is unexpectedly hydrogen-bonded to a mobile water molecule, not identified in previous X-ray structures. Ultrafast nitrile-water dynamics are confirmed by simulations. A higher (1.51 Å) resolution X-ray structure also reveals a water-drug interaction network. Maintenance of a crucial anchoring hydrogen bond may help retain the potency of rilpivirine against pocket mutations despite the structural variations they cause.

  14. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  15. Reverse transcriptase directs viral evolution in a deep ocean methane seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. G.; Bagby, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep ocean methane seeps are sites of intense microbial activity, with complex communities fueled by aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophy. Methane consumption in these communities has a substantial impact on the global carbon cycle, yet little is known about their evolutionary history or their likely evolutionary trajectories in a warming ocean. As in other marine systems, viral predation and virally mediated horizontal gene transfer are expected to be major drivers of evolutionary change in these communities; however, the host cells' resistance to cultivation has impeded direct study of the viral population. We conducted a metagenomic study of viruses in the anoxic sediments of a deep methane seep in the Santa Monica Basin in the Southern California Bight. We retrieved 1660 partial viral genomes, tentatively assigning 1232 to bacterial hosts and 428 to archaea. One abundant viral genome, likely hosted by Clostridia species present in the sediment, was found to encode a diversity-generating retroelement (DGR), a module for reverse transcriptase-mediated directed mutagenesis of a distal tail fiber protein. While DGRs have previously been described in the viruses of human pathogens, where diversification of viral tail fibers permits infection of a range of host cell types, to our knowledge this is the first description of such an element in a marine virus. By providing a mechanism for massively broadening potential host range, the presence of DGRs in these systems may have a major impact on the prevalence of virally mediated horizontal gene transfer, and even on the phylogenetic distances across which genes are moved.

  16. The Drosophila micropia retrotransposon encodes a testis-specific antisense RNA complementary to reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, S; Corces, V G; Lankenau, D H

    1994-01-01

    The micropia transposable element of Drosophila hydei is a long terminal repeat-containing retrotransposon present in both the autosomes and the Y chromosome. micropia expression gives rise to a complex set of sense and antisense RNAs transcribed primarily during spermatogenesis. The most abundant sense RNAs constitute an assortment of heterogeneous high-molecular-weight transcripts expressed as constituents of the Y-chromosomal lampbrush loops of primary spermatocytes. In addition, micropia encodes a full-length RNA that extends between the two long terminal repeats of the element. The major 1.0-kb antisense RNA characterized is complementary to the reverse transcriptase and RNase H coding regions of micropia. It is expressed from a testis-specific promoter during the primary spermatocyte stages and is detectable until spermatid elongation stages. Sequence comparison of this promoter with the 5' region of other testis-specific genes allows the conception of a conserved sequence that is responsible for this pattern of expression. A 284-bp fragment containing this sequence is able to drive testis-specific expression of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene in Drosophila melanogaster. This sequence is conserved in the micropia elements present in other Drosophila species that also encode an antisense RNA. The evolutionary conservation of micropia antisense RNA expression and the sequences responsible for its testis-specific transcription suggests a role for this antisense RNA in the control of germ line expression of the full-length transcript or transposon-encoded proteins. Images PMID:7509447

  17. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xunjun; Guo, Xiuchan; Chen, Yao; Chen, Guorong; Ma, Yin; Huang, Kate; Zhang, Yuning; Zhao, Qiongya; Winkler, Cheryl A; An, Ping; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-05-10

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations are among the most frequent noncoding somatic mutations in multiple cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological implications of TERT promoter mutations in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC have not been resolved. To investigate TERT promoter mutations, protein expression, and their clinical-pathological implications, we sequenced the TERT promoter region for hotspot mutations in HCC tissues and performed immunostaining for TERT protein expression from HBV-associated HCC in Chinese patients. Of 276 HCC tumor DNA samples sequenced, 85 (31%) carried TERT promoter mutations. TERT promoter mutations were more frequent in those with low α-fetoprotein (AFP) serum levels (p = 0.03), advanced age (p = 0.04), and in those lacking HCC family history (p = 0.02), but were not correlated with HCC stages and grades. TERT protein levels were higher in HCC (n = 28) compared to normal liver tissues (n = 8) (p =0.001), but did not differ between mutated and non-mutated tumor tissues. In conclusion, TERT promoter mutations are common somatic mutations in HCC of Han Chinese with HBV infection. Detection of TERT promoter mutations in those with low levels of AFP may aid diagnosis of HCC with atypical presentation. PMID:27056898

  18. A novel ribonuclease with potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from cultured mushroom Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Chang; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Wang, He-Xiang

    2011-10-01

    A 20-kDa ribonuclease (RNase) was purified from fresh fruiting bodies of cultured Schizophyllum commune mushrooms. The RNase was not adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel but adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose. It exhibited maximal RNase activity at pH 6.0 and 70°C. It demonstrated the highest ribonucleolytic activity toward poly (U) (379.5 μ/mg), the second highest activity toward poly (C) (244.7 μ/mg), less activity toward poly (A) (167.4 μ/mg), and much weaker activity toward poly (G) (114.5 μ/mg). The RNase inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 65 μM. No effect on [(3)H-methyl]-thymidine uptake by lymphoma MBL2 cells and leukemia L1210 cells was observed at 100 μM concentration of the RNase. A comparison of RNases from S. commune and Volvariella volvacea revealed that they demonstrated some similarities in N-terminal amino acid sequence, optimum pH and polyhomoribonucleotide specificity. However, some differences in chromatographic behavior and molecular mass were observed. PMID:22068498

  19. Design of a ribozyme targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase and cloning of it’s gene

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhi-Ming; Luo, Jin-Yan; Cheng, Jin; Wang, Quan-Yin; Yang, Guang-Xiao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To design a hammerhead ribozyme targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and clone it’s gene for future use in the study of tumor gene therapy. METHODS: Using the software RNAstructure, the secondary structure of hTERT mRNA was predicted and the cleavage site of ribozyme was selected. A hammerhead ribozyme targeting this site was designed and bimolecular fold between the ribozyme and hTERT was predicted. The DNA encoding the ribozyme was synthesized and cloned into pGEMEX-1 and the sequence of the ribozyme gene was confirmed by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: Triplet GUC at 1742 of hTERT mRNA was chosen as the cleavage site of the ribozyme. The designed ribozyme was comprised of 22 nt catalytic core and 17 nt flanking sequence. Computer-aided prediction suggested that the ribozyme and hTERT mRNA could cofold into a proper conformation. Endonuclease restriction and DNA sequencing confirmed the correct insertion of the ribozyme gene into the vector pGEMEX-1. CONCLUSION: This fundamental work of successful designing and cloning of an anti-hTERT hammerhead ribozyme has paved the way for further study of inhibiting tumor cell growth by cleaving hTERT mRNA with ribozyme. PMID:12508361

  20. Brain regions associated with telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in primary glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yinyan; Liu, Yong; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Chuanbao; Wang, Lei; Li, Shaowu; Ma, Jun; Jiang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations are important genetic alterations in many kinds of human malignancies, including glioma. The current study aimed to investigate the anatomical specificity of TERT promoter mutations in glioblastomas (GBMs). Clinical information and preoperative magnetic resonance images of 203 patients with GBMs were reviewed. TERT promoter mutation status was assessed by Sanger sequencing in all cases. Tumor lesions were manually segmented and then registered to a standard brain atlas. Then the specific brain regions associated with TERT promoter mutation status were subsequently identified by voxel-based regression analysis. TERT promoter mutations were detected in 94 (46.3 %) of the 203 patients. Voxel-based statistical analysis demonstrated that GBMs with TERT promoter mutations were much more likely to locate in the right temporal lobe, while those with wild-type TERT promoters were more likely to occur in the anterior region of the right lateral ventricle. No significant difference was found in the lesion volumes of the T2-identified tumor or in the contrast enhancement areas between the two groups. The current study demonstrated the anatomic specificity of TERT promoter mutation status in GBM. These findings may provide new insight into the molecular classification of GBM and further our understanding of the associations between tumor-specific molecular alterations and tumor location. PMID:27230769

  1. Conditional Knockout of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase in Mesenchymal Cells Impairs Mouse Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianju; Yu, Hongfeng; Ding, Lin; Wu, Zhe; Gonzalez De Los Santos, Francina; Liu, Jianhua; Ullenbruch, Matthew; Hu, Biao; Martins, Vanessa; Phan, Sem H.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is typically expressed in cellular populations capable of extended replication, such as germ cells, tumor cells, and stem cells, but is also induced in tissue injury, repair and fibrosis. Its catalytic component, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is induced in lung fibroblasts from patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease and in rodents with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. To evaluate the fibroblast specific role of TERT in pulmonary fibrosis, transgenic mice bearing a floxed TERT allele were generated, and then crossed with an inducible collagen α2(I)-Cre mouse line to generate fibroblast specific TERT conditional knockout mice. TERT-specific deficiency in mesenchymal cells caused attenuation of pulmonary fibrosis as manifested by reduced lung hydroxyproline content, type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels. The TERT-deficient mouse lung fibroblasts displayed decreased cell proliferative capacity and higher susceptibility to induced apoptosis compared with control cells. Additionally TERT deficiency was associated with heightened α-smooth muscle actin expression indicative of myofibroblast differentiation. However the impairment of cell proliferation and increased susceptibility to apoptosis would cause a reduction in the myofibroblast progenitor population necessary to mount a successful myofibroblast-dependent fibrotic response. These findings identified a key role for TERT in fibroblast proliferation and survival essential for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26555817

  2. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus.

    PubMed

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; Souza, William Marciel de; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; Araujo, Jansen de; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes da; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-06-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  3. Novel bimodular DNA aptamers with guanosine quadruplexes inhibit phylogenetically diverse HIV-1 reverse transcriptases

    PubMed Central

    Michalowski, Daniel; Chitima-Matsiga, Rebecca; Held, Daniel M.; Burke, Donald H.

    2008-01-01

    DNA aptamers RT5, RT6 and RT47 form a group of related sequences that inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The essential inhibitory structure is identified here as bimodular, with a 5′ stem–loop module physically connected to a 3′-guanosine quadruplex module. The stem–loop tolerates considerable sequence plasticity. Connections between the guanosine triplets in the quadruplex could be simplified to a single nucleotide or a nonnucleic acid linker, such as hexaethylene glycol. All 12 quadruplex guanosines are required in an aptamer retaining most of the original loop sequence from RT6; only 11 are required for aptamer R1T (single T residue in intra-quadruplex loops). Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy gave ellipticity minima and maxima at 240 nm and 264 nm, indicating a parallel arrangement of the quadruplex strands. The simplified aptamers displayed increased overall stability. An aptamer carrying the original intra-quadruplex loops from RT6 inhibited RT in K+ buffers but not in Na+ buffers and displayed significant CD spectral broadening in Na+ buffers, while R1T inhibited RT in both buffers and displayed less broadening in Na+ buffers. The bimodular ssDNA aptamers inhibited RT from diverse primate lentiviruses with low nM IC50 values. These data provide insight into the requirements for broad-spectrum RT inhibition by nucleic acid aptamers. PMID:18996899

  4. Robust Suppression of HIV Replication by Intracellularly Expressed Reverse Transcriptase Aptamers Is Independent of Ribozyme Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Margaret J; Sharma, Tarun K; Whatley, Angela S; Landon, Linda A; Tempesta, Michael A; Johnson, Marc C; Burke, Donald H

    2012-01-01

    RNA aptamers that bind human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) also inhibit viral replication, making them attractive as therapeutic candidates and potential tools for dissecting viral pathogenesis. However, it is not well understood how aptamer-expression context and cellular RNA pathways govern aptamer accumulation and net antiviral bioactivity. Using a previously-described expression cassette in which aptamers were flanked by two “minimal core” hammerhead ribozymes, we observed only weak suppression of pseudotyped HIV. To evaluate the importance of the minimal ribozymes, we replaced them with extended, tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozymes with enhanced self-cleavage activity, in addition to noncleaving ribozymes with active site mutations. Both the active and inactive versions of the extended hammerhead ribozymes increased inhibition of pseudotyped virus, indicating that processing is not necessary for bioactivity. Clonal stable cell lines expressing aptamers from these modified constructs strongly suppressed infectious virus, and were more effective than minimal ribozymes at high viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Tertiary stabilization greatly increased aptamer accumulation in viral and subcellular compartments, again regardless of self-cleavage capability. We therefore propose that the increased accumulation is responsible for increased suppression, that the bioactive form of the aptamer is one of the uncleaved or partially cleaved transcripts, and that tertiary stabilization increases transcript stability by reducing exonuclease degradation. PMID:22948672

  5. Reverse transcriptase genes are highly abundant and transcriptionally active in marine plankton assemblages.

    PubMed

    Lescot, Magali; Hingamp, Pascal; Kojima, Kenji K; Villar, Emilie; Romac, Sarah; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Boccara, Martine; Jaillon, Olivier; Iudicone, Daniele; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Genes encoding reverse transcriptases (RTs) are found in most eukaryotes, often as a component of retrotransposons, as well as in retroviruses and in prokaryotic retroelements. We investigated the abundance, classification and transcriptional status of RTs based on Tara Oceans marine metagenomes and metatranscriptomes encompassing a wide organism size range. Our analyses revealed that RTs predominate large-size fraction metagenomes (>5 μm), where they reached a maximum of 13.5% of the total gene abundance. Metagenomic RTs were widely distributed across the phylogeny of known RTs, but many belonged to previously uncharacterized clades. Metatranscriptomic RTs showed distinct abundance patterns across samples compared with metagenomic RTs. The relative abundances of viral and bacterial RTs among identified RT sequences were higher in metatranscriptomes than in metagenomes and these sequences were detected in all metatranscriptome size fractions. Overall, these observations suggest an active proliferation of various RT-assisted elements, which could be involved in genome evolution or adaptive processes of plankton assemblage. PMID:26613339

  6. Amphiphilic cationic nanogels as brain-targeted carriers for activated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Warren, G; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Senanayake, T; Rivera, K; Gorantla, S; Poluektova, LY; Vinogradov, SV

    2015-01-01

    Progress in AIDS treatment shifted emphasis towards limiting adverse effects of antiviral drugs while improving the treatment of hard-to-reach viral reservoirs. Many therapeutic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have a limited access to the central nervous system (CNS). Increased NRTI levels induced various complications during the therapy, including neurotoxicity, due to the NRTI toxicity to mitochondria. Here, we describe an innovative design of biodegradable cationic cholesterol-ε-polylysine nanogel carriers for delivery of triphosphorylated NRTIs that demonstrated high anti-HIV activity along with low neurotoxicity, warranting minimal side effects following systemic administration. Efficient CNS targeting was achieved by nanogel modification with brain-specific peptide vectors. Novel dual and triple-drug nanoformulations, analogous to therapeutic NRTI cocktails, displayed equal or higher antiviral activity in HIV-infected macrophages compared to free drugs. Our results suggest potential alternative approach to HIV-1 treatment focused on the effective nanodrug delivery to viral reservoirs in the CNS and reduced neurotoxicity. PMID:25559020

  7. Nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for the detection of group A rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Elschner, M; Prudlo, J; Hotzel, H; Otto, P; Sachse, K

    2002-03-01

    Rotaviruses are important pathogens associated with diarrhoeal diseases in almost all species of mammals. In the present study, a nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of group A rotaviruses was developed, which is based on a target region in gene segment 6. Rotavirus strains of human, bovine, porcine, canine, feline, equine, and ovine origin were examined. Furthermore several faecal specimens, in which rotavirus had already been detected using other methods than PCR, were included in the study. A nested RT-PCR product was formed with all strains and faecal samples tested. The detection limit for virus-containing cell culture supernatant was 3 x 10(-2) [50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50)] by RT-PCR and 3 x 10(-3) TCID50) by nested amplification. In order to examine the influence of the sample matrix on sensitivity, a rotavirus-negative faecal specimen was spiked with virus-containing cell culture suspension of the porcine rotavirus OSU. The detection limit of the present PCR procedure was approximately 1.6 x 10(2) TCID50 per g faeces and could be increased by one order of magnitude using nested PCR. The present method for detection and identification of group A rotaviruses represents a powerful diagnostic tool and was shown to be applicable to rotaviruses of different origin, including human sources. PMID:12002423

  8. Compounds from rose (Rosa rugosa) flowers with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, M; Ng, T B; Jiang, Y; Pi, Z F; Liu, Z K; Li, L; Liu, F

    2006-09-01

    The aqueous extracts and ethanol precipitates of aqueous extracts of 18 medicinal herbs traditionally used in China were screened for their ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) in-vitro. Among the samples screened at a concentration of 500 microg mL-1, dried rose (Rosa rugosa) flowers showed the strongest inhibition. The ethanol precipitate of the aqueous extract of R. rugosa was processed and two components (P1 and P2) were obtained after ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Then, P1-a (Mr 150 kDa) and P1-b (Mr 8 kDa) were isolated from P1 by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. They inhibited the activity of HIV-1 RT with an IC50 of 158 nM and 148.16 microg mL-1 (18.5 microM), respectively. Further structural analyses revealed that P1-a was a polysaccharide-peptide complex, and P1-b was a polymer consisting of acteoside and acteoside derivatives identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, assays of carbohydrate and protein contents and high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. PMID:16945187

  9. Enhanced HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory and Antibacterial Properties in Callus of Catha edulis Forsk.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Aloka; Baskaran, Ponnusamy; Van Staden, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    Developing tissue culture systems for medicinal plants is important in that they may offer an alternative to protect wild populations. However, analysis of bioactivity for tissue culture developed plant tissues is required to offer support and allow acceptance in traditional medicine. The use of propagated callus could provide potential material for therapeutic purposes. This study was aimed at evaluating the anti-HIV and antibacterial properties of a three-month-old tissue culture-derived calli and leaves of cultivated mother plants of Catha edulis Forsk. The calli were derived from leaf explants using different plant growth regulators. The calli obtained from callus cultured on 9.8 μM indole-3-butyric acid plus 2.7 μM naphthalene acetic acid exhibited the highest HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory effects when compared with other treatments and the mother plants. Different extracts of callus exhibited high antibacterial activity (<1 mg/mL: minimum inhibitory concentration from 0.098 to 0.78 mg/mL) against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Leaf acetone extracts showed moderate activity (minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.78 mg/mL) against Staphylococcus aureus. The present study indicated that tissue culture-derived calli could be used as therapeutic agents for traditional medicine. The choice of treatment used in the tissue culture system and the age of the callus for production of biomass may significantly influence its therapeutic potential. PMID:25753483

  10. Growth inhibition of BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells by expression of mutant telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rugang; Wang, Xingwang; Guo, Lixia; Xie, Hong

    2002-01-10

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies in Asia and Africa. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is expressed in HCC but absent in normal human liver cells, which is consistent with the expression pattern of telomerase. In the present study, expression of a dominant-negative form of hTERT (DN-hTERT) resulted in inhibition of telomerase activity and decreased mean telomeric length of BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells, whereas expression of wild-type hTERT (WT-hTERT) and control vector had no such effects. Cell growth was inhibited by this mutant (DN-hTERT), which was consistent with the changes in telomerase level. Flattened large cells were found in late generations with the DN-hTERT treatment. When mean telomeric length of DN-hTERT-transfected cells reached a critical length (about 1.7 kb), apoptosis was induced. Tumorigenicity of DN-hTERT-expressing cells was eliminated in vivo. These data indicated that hTERT was essential for the growth of hepatoma cells. hTERT can also be used as an important target for anti-HCC drug screening. PMID:11774261

  11. Genomic and Genetic Analysis of Bordetella Bacteriophages Encoding Reverse Transcriptase-Mediated Tropism-Switching Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minghsun; Gingery, Mari; Doulatov, Sergei R.; Liu, Yichin; Hodes, Asher; Baker, Stephen; Davis, Paul; Simmonds, Mark; Churcher, Carol; Mungall, Karen; Quail, Michael A.; Preston, Andrew; Harvill, Eric T.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Eiserling, Frederick A.; Parkhill, Julian; Miller, Jeff F.

    2004-01-01

    Liu et al. recently described a group of related temperate bacteriophages that infect Bordetella subspecies and undergo a unique template-dependent, reverse transcriptase-mediated tropism switching phenomenon (Liu et al., Science 295: 2091-2094, 2002). Tropism switching results from the introduction of single nucleotide substitutions at defined locations in the VR1 (variable region 1) segment of the mtd (major tropism determinant) gene, which determines specificity for receptors on host bacteria. In this report, we describe the complete nucleotide sequences of the 42.5- to 42.7-kb double-stranded DNA genomes of three related phage isolates and characterize two additional regions of variability. Forty-nine coding sequences were identified. Of these coding sequences, bbp36 contained VR2 (variable region 2), which is highly dynamic and consists of a variable number of identical 19-bp repeats separated by one of three 5-bp spacers, and bpm encodes a DNA adenine methylase with unusual site specificity and a homopolymer tract that functions as a hotspot for frameshift mutations. Morphological and sequence analysis suggests that these Bordetella phage are genetic hybrids of P22 and T7 family genomes, lending further support to the idea that regions encoding protein domains, single genes, or blocks of genes are readily exchanged between bacterial and phage genomes. Bordetella bacteriophages are capable of transducing genetic markers in vitro, and by using animal models, we demonstrated that lysogenic conversion can take place in the mouse respiratory tract during infection. PMID:14973019

  12. Susceptibility of the Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus to Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qari, Shoukat H.; Magre, Saema; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Hussain, Althaf I.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Patience, Clive; Weiss, Robin A.; Heneine, Walid

    2001-01-01

    Porcine xenografts may offer a solution to the shortage of human donor allografts. However, all pigs contain the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), raising concerns regarding the transmission of PERV and the possible development of disease in xenotransplant recipients. We evaluated 11 antiretroviral drugs licensed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy for their activities against PERV to assess their potential for clinical use. Fifty and 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s and IC90s, respectively) of five nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) were determined enzymatically for PERV and for wild-type (WT) and RTI-resistant HIV-1 reference isolates. In a comparison of IC50s, the susceptibilities of PERV RT to lamivudine, stavudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, and zidovudine were reduced >20-fold, 26-fold, 6-fold, 4-fold, and 3-fold, respectively, compared to those of WT HIV-1. PERV was also resistant to nevirapine. Tissue culture-based, single-round infection assays using replication-competent virus confirmed the relative sensitivity of PERV to zidovudine and its resistance to all other RTIs. A Gag polyprotein-processing inhibition assay was developed and used to assess the activities of protease inhibitors against PERV. No inhibition of PERV protease was seen with saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, or amprenavir at concentrations >200-fold the IC50s for WT HIV-1. Thus, following screening of many antiretroviral agents, our findings support only the potential clinical use of zidovudine. PMID:11134319

  13. Analysis of nonnucleoside drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, P L; Currens, M J; McMahon, J B; Boyd, M R; Hughes, S H

    1993-01-01

    A number of chemically distinct nonnucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have been reported. Several lines of evidence, including the isolation of RT mutants that show cross resistance, suggest that, despite their structural diversity, many of these inhibitors bind to a common site on HIV-1 RT. We have recently reported that, on the basis of analyses of HIV-1/HIV-2 chimeras, the natural product calanolide A may interact with a different site or sites in HIV-1 RT. We have used BspMI cassette mutagenesis to prepare a collection of HIV-1 RT mutants that show resistance to the known members of the general class of nonnucleoside inhibitors. This collection of mutants can be used to determine whether a new drug will show cross resistance with known inhibitors and to define amino acid positions critical for the action of the drugs. The mutants were used to analyze calanolide A, 1H,3H-thiazolo[3,4-a]benzimidazole(4i), and the acyclic nucleoside analog 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine. These analyses suggest that all three drugs interact with HIV-1 RT within the previously defined common binding site for nonnucleoside inhibitors. However, the drugs respond differently to the panel of drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs, indicating that while the binding sites of the drugs overlap they are not identical. PMID:7680393

  14. The role of telomeres and telomerase reverse transcriptase isoforms in pluripotency induction and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Kim, Joohwan; Betts, Dean H

    2016-08-01

    Telomeres are linear guanine-rich DNA structures at the ends of chromosomes. The length of telomeric DNA is actively regulated by a number of mechanisms in highly proliferative cells such as germ cells, cancer cells, and pluripotent stem cells. Telomeric DNA is synthesized by way of the ribonucleoprotein called telomerase containing a reverse transcriptase (TERT) subunit and RNA component (TERC). TERT is highly conserved across species and ubiquitously present in their respective pluripotent cells. Recent studies have uncovered intricate associations between telomeres and the self-renewal and differentiation properties of pluripotent stem cells. Interestingly, the past decade's work indicates that the TERT subunit also has the capacity to modulate mitochondrial function, to remodel chromatin structure, and to participate in key signaling pathways such as the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Many of these non-canonical functions do not require TERT's catalytic activity, which hints at possible functions for the extensive number of alternatively spliced TERT isoforms that are highly expressed in pluripotent stem cells. In this review, some of the established and potential routes of pluripotency induction and maintenance are highlighted from the perspectives of telomere maintenance, known TERT isoform functions and their complex regulation. PMID:26786236

  15. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors that potently and specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, D L; Busso, M; Tan, C K; Reusser, F; Palmer, J R; Poppe, S M; Aristoff, P A; Downey, K M; So, A G; Resnick, L

    1991-01-01

    Certain bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) at concentrations lower by 2-4 orders of magnitude than that which inhibits normal cellular DNA polymerase activity. Combination of a BHAP with nucleoside analog HIV-1 RT inhibitors suggested that together these compounds inhibited RT synergistically. In three human lymphocytic cell systems using several laboratory and clinical HIV-1 isolates, the BHAPs blocked HIV-1 replication with potencies nearly identical to those of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine or 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine; in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, concentrations of these antiviral agents were lower by at least 3-4 orders of magnitude than cytotoxic levels. The BHAPs do not inhibit replication of HIV-2, the simian or feline immunodeficiency virus, or Rauscher murine leukemia virus in culture. Evaluation of a BHAP in HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice (severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with human fetal lymph node) showed that the compound could block HIV-1 replication in vivo. The BHAPs are readily obtained synthetically and have been extensively characterized in preclinical evaluations. These compounds hold promise for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:1717988

  16. NFAT5 regulates transcription of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kotake, Yojiro; Yamashita, Makiko; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2010-12-10

    We aimed to clarify the transcription-regulation mechanisms of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (mTERT). First, we searched for the promoter region required for transcriptional activation of mTERT and identified an enhancer cis-element (named mTERT-EE) located between - 200 and - 179 bp of the mouse TERT gene (mTERT). EMSA results suggested that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) member proteins bind to mTERT-EE. We then identified NFAT5 as the factor binding to mTERT-EE and found that it activates the transcription of the mTERT core promoter. The results that siRNA directed against NFAT5 significantly reduced mTERT expression and mTERT core promoter activity and that the expressions of NFAT5 and mTERT were well correlated in various mouse tissues except liver suggest that NFAT5 dominantly and directly regulates mTERT expression. To clarify their functionality further, we investigated the effect of hypertonic stress, a known stimulus affecting the expression and transcriptional activity of NFAT5, on mTERT expression. The result indicated that hypertonic stress activates mTERT transcription via the activation and recruitment of NFAT5 to the mTERT promoter. These results provide useful information about the transcription-regulation mechanisms of mTERT.

  17. Universal reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Thompson, Rachel L.; Garver, Kyle A.; Hawley, Laura M.; Batts, William N.; Sprague, Laura; Sampson, Corie; Winton, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an acute pathogen of salmonid fishes in North America, Europe and Asia and is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 major virus genogroups of IHNV worldwide, designated U, M, L, E and J; multiple subtypes also exist within those genogroups. Here, we report the development and validation of a universal IHNV reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-rPCR) assay targeting the IHNV nucleocapsid (N) gene. Properties of diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp) were defined using laboratory-challenged steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and the new assay was compared to the OIE-accepted conventional PCR test and virus isolation in cell culture. The IHNV N gene RT-rPCR had 100% DSp and DSe and a higher estimated diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) than virus culture or conventional PCR. The RT-rPCR assay was highly repeatable within a laboratory and highly reproducible between laboratories. Field testing of the assay was conducted on a random sample of juvenile steelhead collected from a hatchery raceway experiencing an IHN epizootic. The RT-rPCR detected a greater number of positive samples than cell culture and there was 40% agreement between the 2 tests. Overall, the RT-rPCR assay was highly sensitive, specific, repeatable and reproducible and is suitable for use in a diagnostic setting.

  18. Mechanistic evaluation of new plant-derived compounds that inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Pengsuparp, T; Cai, L; Constant, H; Fong, H H; Lin, L Z; Kinghorn, A D; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Ingolfsdóttir, K; Wagner, H

    1995-07-01

    Swertifrancheside [1], a new flavonone-xanthone glucoside isolated from Swertia franchetiana, 1 beta-hydroxyaleuritolic acid 3-p-hydroxybenzoate [2], a triterpene isolated from the roots of Maprounea africana, and protolichesterinic acid [3], an aliphatic alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone isolated from the lichen Cetraria islandica, were found to be potent inhibitors of the DNA polymerase activity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT), with 50% inhibitory doses (IC50 values) of 43, 3.7, and 24 microM, respectively. They were not cytotoxic with cultured mammalian cells. The kinetic mechanisms by which compounds 1-3 inhibited HIV-1 RT were studied as was their potential to inhibit other nucleic acid polymerases. Swertifrancheside [1] bound to DNA and was shown to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to template-primer, but a mixed-type competitive inhibitor with respect to TTP. On the other hand, 1 beta-hydroxyaleuritolic acid 3-p-hydroxybenzoate [2] and protolichesterinic acid [3] were mixed-type competitive inhibitors with respect to template-primer and noncompetitive inhibitors with respect to TTP. Therefore, the mechanism of action of 1 beta-hydroxyaleuritolic acid 3-p-hydroxybenzoate [2] and protolichesterinic acid [3] as HIV-1 RT inhibitors involves nonspecific binding to the enzyme at nonsubstrate binding sites, whereas swertifrancheside [1] inhibits enzyme activity by binding to the template-primer. PMID:7561895

  19. A Ty1 Reverse Transcriptase Active-Site Aspartate Mutation Blocks Transposition but Not Polymerization†

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Ozcan; Gabriel, Abram

    2001-01-01

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) are found in a wide variety of mobile genetic elements including viruses, retrotransposons, and infectious organellar introns. An invariant triad of aspartates is thought to be required for the catalytic function of RTs. We generated RT mutants in the yeast retrotransposon Ty1, changing each of these active-site aspartates to asparagine or glutamate. All but one of the mutants lacked detectable polymerase activity. The novel exception, D211N, retained near wild-type in vitro polymerase activity within virus-like particles but failed to carry out in vivo transposition. For this mutant, minus-strand synthesis is impaired and formation of the plus-strand strong-stop intermediate is eliminated. Intragenic second-site suppressor mutations of the transposition defect map to the RNase H domain of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate that one of the three active-site aspartates in a retrotransposon RT is not catalytically critical. This implies a basic difference in the polymerase active-site geometry of Ty1 and human immunodeficiency virus RT and shows that subtle mutations in one domain can cause dramatic functional effects on a distant domain of the same enzyme. PMID:11413300

  20. Telomerase Activation in Atherosclerosis and Induction of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression by Inflammatory Stimuli in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gizard, Florence; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Zhao, Yue; Jones, Karrie L.; Cudejko, Cèline; Post, Ginell R.; Staels, Bart; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Objective Telomerase serves as a critical regulator of tissue renewal. Although telomerase activity is inducible in response to various environmental cues, it remains unknown whether telomerase is activated during the inflammatory remodeling underlying atherosclerosis formation. To address this question, we investigated in the present study the regulation of telomerase in macrophages and during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Methods and Results We demonstrate that inflammatory stimuli activate telomerase in macrophages by inducing the expression of the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a previously unrecognized NF-κB response element in the TERT promoter, to which NF-κB is recruited during inflammation. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling completely abolished the induction of TERT expression, characterizing TERT as a bona fide NF-κB target gene. Furthermore, functional experiments revealed that TERT-deficiency results in a senescent cell phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate high levels of TERT expression in macrophages of human atherosclerotic lesions and establish that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Conclusion These results characterize TERT as a previously unrecognized NF-κB target gene in macrophages and demonstrate that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis. This induction of TERT expression prevents macrophage senescence and may have important implications for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21106948

  1. Pyridinone derivatives: Specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors with antiviral activity

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.E.; Nunberg, J.H.; O'Brien, J.A.; Quintero, J.C.; Schleif, W.A.; Freund, K.F.; Gaul, S.L.; Saari, W.S.; Wai, J.S.; Hoffman, J.M.; Anderson, P.S.; Emini, E.A.; Stern, A.M. ); Hupe, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Derivatives of pyridinones were found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and prevent the spread of HIV-1 infection in cell culture without an appreciable effect on other retroviral or cellular polymerases. 3-{l brace}((4,7-Dimethyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl)methyl)amino{r brace}-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one(L-679,639) and 3-{l brace}((4,7-dichloro-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl)methyl)amino{r brace}-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one (L-697,661), two compounds within this series, had HIV-1 RT IC{sub 50} values in the range of 20-800 nM, depending upon the template-primer used. The most potent inhibition was obtained with rC{center dot}dG, reversible slow-binding noncompetitive inhibition was observed. ({sup 3}H)L-697,639 bound preferentially to enzyme-template-primer complexes. This binding was magnesium-dependent and saturable with a stoichiometry of 1 mol of ({sup 3}H)L-697,639 per mol of RT heterodimer. Synergism between 3{prime}-azido-3{prime}-deoxythymidine or dideoxyinosine and either of these compounds was also demonstrated in cell culture. Based upon their specificity for HIV-1 RT activity, template-primer dependence on potency and ability to displace ({sup 3}H)L-697,639; a tetrahydroimidazo(4,5,1-jk)(1,4)-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione derivative R82150 and the dipyridodiazepinone BI-RG-587 appear to inhibit RT activity by the same mechanism as the pyridinones.

  2. Poly(A) polymerase modification and reverse transcriptase PCR amplification of environmental RNA.

    PubMed

    Botero, Lina M; D'Imperio, Seth; Burr, Mark; McDermott, Timothy R; Young, Mark; Hassett, Daniel J

    2005-03-01

    We describe a combination of two established techniques for a novel application for constructing full-length cDNA clone libraries from environmental RNA. The cDNA was cloned without the use of prescribed primers that target specific genes, and the procedure did not involve random priming. Purified RNA was first modified by addition of a poly(A) tail and then was amplified by using a commercially available reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) cDNA synthesis kit. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a cDNA clone library was constructed from size-fractionated RNA (targeting 16S rRNA) purified from a geothermally heated soil in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The resulting cDNA library contained clones representing Bacteria and Eukarya taxa and several mRNAs. There was no exact clone match between this library and a separate cDNA library generated from an RT-PCR performed with unmodified rRNA and Bacteria-specific forward and universal reverse primers that were designed from cultivated organisms; however, both libraries contained representatives of the Firmicutes and the alpha-Proteobacteria. Unexpectedly, there were no Archaea clones in the library generated from poly(A)-modified RNA. Additional RT-PCRs performed with universal and Archaea-biased primers and unmodified RNA demonstrated the presence of novel Archaea in the soil. Experiments with pure cultures of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Halobacterium halobium revealed that some Archaea rRNA may not be a suitable substrate for the poly(A) tail modification step. The protocol described here demonstrates the feasibility of directly accessing prokaryote RNA (rRNA and/or mRNA) in environmental samples, but the results also illustrate potentially important problems. PMID:15746328

  3. The reverse transcriptase encoded by LINE-1 retrotransposons in the genesis, progression and therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; De Luca, Chiara; Spadafora, Corrado

    2016-02-01

    In higher eukaryotic genomes, Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons represent a large family of repeated genomic elements. They transpose using a reverse transcriptase (RT), which they encode as part of the ORF2p product. RT inhibition in cancer cells, either via RNA interference-dependent silencing of active LINE-1 elements, or using RT inhibitory drugs, reduces cancer cell proliferation, promotes their differentiation and antagonizes tumor progression in animal models. Indeed, the nonnucleoside RT inhibitor efavirenz has recently been tested in a phase II clinical trial with metastatic prostate cancer patients. An in-depth analysis of ORF2p in a mouse model of breast cancer showed ORF2p to be precociously expressed in precancerous lesions and highly abundant in advanced cancer stages, while being barely detectable in normal breast tissue, providing a rationale for the finding that RT-expressing tumours are therapeutically sensitive to RT inhibitors. We summarise mechanistic and gene profiling studies indicating that highly abundant LINE-1-derived RT can “sequester” RNA substrates for reverse transcription in tumor cells, entailing the formation of RNA:DNA hybrid molecules and impairing the overall production of regulatory miRNAs, with a global impact on the cell transcriptome. Based on these data, LINE-1-ORF2 encoded RT has a tumor-promoting potential that is exerted at an epigenetic level. We propose a model whereby LINE1-RT drives a previously unrecognized global regulatory process, the deregulation of which drives cell transformation and tumorigenesis and possibly implicated in cancer cell heterogeneity.

  4. Chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1/type 2 reverse transcriptases display reversed sensitivity to nonnucleoside analog inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Shih, C K; Rose, J M; Hansen, G L; Wu, J C; Bacolla, A; Griffin, J A

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), an important therapeutic target in the treatment of AIDS, is effectively inhibited by a class of nonnucleoside analog compounds that includes nevirapine (BI-RG-587) and tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk]-[1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione. We show that both tyrosine residues at positions 181 and 188 flanking the putative catalytic site of HIV-1 RT are required for sensitivity of the enzyme to these compounds. HIV-2 RT, which does not have tyrosines at these positions, is resistant to these nonnucleoside analog inhibitors. Substitution of the HIV-2 RT amino acid residues at position 181 or 188 into HIV-1 RT results in an enzyme that is resistant to these compounds while retaining sensitivity to 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine triphosphate. HIV-2 RT substituted with amino acids 176-190 from HIV-1 RT acquires sensitivity to these nonnucleoside analog inhibitors. Images PMID:1719542

  5. Heterologous induction of Ty1 retrotransposition: Reverse transcriptase plays a key role in initiation of the retrotransposition cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Reznik, N.L.; Kidgotko, O.V.; Zolotova, L.I.

    1995-12-01

    A new method was developed to study the mechanism of initiation of the retrotransposition cycle: retrotransposons of Drosophila melanogaster, gypsy, copia, and 17.6 were expressed in yeast under the control of strong yeast promoters. Expression of retrotransposons induced formation of viruslike particles (VLPs) associated with full-length Ty1 RNA and DNA sequences. This phenomenon was termed heterologous induction. When the gene for reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was expressed in yeast, the same results were obtained. These data allowed us to assume that the excess of active reverse transcriptase plays the key role in induction of transposition. Possible mechanisms of induction of Ty1 transposition by homologous and heterologous elements are discussed. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Structure of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole with different substituents in position 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-01-01

    The constant development of new drugs against HIV-1 is necessary due to global expansion of AIDS and HIV-1 drug resistance. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic drugs in AIDS therapy. The crystal structures of six nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole are reported here. The investigated compounds belong to the group of so called "butterfly like" inhibitors with characteristic two π-electron moieties with an angled orientation. The structural data show the influence of the substituents of the benzimidazole ring on the geometry of the molecule and correlation between the structure of the inhibitor and its biological activity.

  7. Similarity between the Myxococcus xanthus and Stigmatella aurantiaca reverse transcriptase genes associated with multicopy, single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, M Y; Xu, C; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1992-01-01

    To determine the evolutional relationship of bacterial retroelements of Myxococcus xanthus and Stigmatella aurantiaca, the nucleotide sequence of 3,060 bases encompassing msr, msd, and the upstream region of msd (downstream of msr) of S. aurantiaca DW4 was determined and compared with the same region from M. xanthus. An open reading frame was found 92 bases upstream of msd which encoded a polypeptide of 480 amino acid residues having 73% identity with the reverse transcriptase of M. xanthus. Together with high homologies in msr (86%) and msd (81%) regions, the present data indicate that the reverse transcriptase genes as well as the retrons of M. xanthus (retron-Mx162) and S. aurantiaca (retron-Sa163) were derived from a common progenitor retron which possibly before the two myxobacterial species diverged. PMID:1372604

  8. Detection of BCR-ABL Fusion mRNA Using Reverse Transcriptase Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L C; Hall, S; Kohlgruber, A; Urbin, S; Torres, C; Wilson, P

    2011-12-08

    RT-PCR is commonly used for the detection of Bcr-Abl fusion transcripts in patients diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia, CML. Two fusion transcripts predominate in CML, Br-Abl e13a2 and e14a2. They have developed reverse transcriptase isothermal loop-mediated amplification (RT-LAMP) assays to detect these two fusion transcripts along with the normal Bcr transcript.

  9. Interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four nucleic acid binding proteins DNase I, RNase A, reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Utpal; Giri, Kalyan; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.

    2009-12-01

    In the investigation of interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four biologically important proteins we observed inhibition of enzymatic activity of DNase I, RNase A, M-MLV reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase by ATA in vitro assay. As the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the main catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, we also monitored effect of ATA on telomerase activity in vivo and observed dose-dependent inhibition of telomerase activity in Chinese hamster V79 cells treated with ATA. Direct association of ATA with DNase I ( Kd = 9.019 μM)), RNase A ( Kd = 2.33 μM) reverse transcriptase ( Kd = 0.255 μM) and Taq polymerase ( Kd = 81.97 μM) was further shown by tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies. Such association altered the three-dimensional conformation of DNase I, RNase A and Taq polymerase as detected by circular dichroism. We propose ATA inhibits enzymatic activity of the four proteins through interfering with DNA or RNA binding to the respective proteins either competitively or allosterically, i.e. by perturbing three-dimensional structure of enzymes.

  10. Retroviral reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity in Thai herbs and spices: screening with Moloney murine leukemia viral enzyme.

    PubMed

    Suthienkul, O; Miyazaki, O; Chulasiri, M; Kositanont, U; Oishi, K

    1993-12-01

    Fifty-seven Thai herbs and spices were examined for their retroviral reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity. All herbs and spices were extracted with hot-water and methanol. Reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity of the extracts was determined by using Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus reverse transcriptase (M-MuLV-RT) reacted with 3H-dTTP and radioactivity measured with a scintillation counter. Eighty-one per cent (46/57) of hot-water extracts and 54% (31/57) of methanol extracts showed inhibitory activities. At a concentration of 125 micrograms/ml, 13% (6/46) of hot-water extracts, namely Eugenia caryophyllus Bullock et Harrison, Phyllanthus urinaria Linn., Terminalia belerica Roxb., Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn., Psidium guajava Linn. and Lawsonia inermis Linn., had a relative inhibitory ratio (IR) over 50%. They showed ratios of 100%, 91%, 75%, 74%, 61% and 60%, respectively. For methanol extracts, only 10% (3/31) had IR values over 50%. They were T. belerica, E. caryophyllus and N. nucifera which exhibited IR values of 83%, 54% and 54%, respectively. PMID:7524165

  11. Sublimation characterization and vapor pressure estimation of an HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minli; Ziemba, Theresa M; Maurin, Michael B

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the sublimation process of DPC 963, a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV-1 retrovirus, and to better understand the effect of sublimation during active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) manufacture and formulation development, especially the drying processes. Sublimation of DPC 963 at 150 degrees C and above was determined by thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared (TGA-FTIR). The rates of sublimation at different temperatures were measured using isothermal TGA. Condensed material was collected and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and infrared (IR) spectrometry. Benzoic acid was used as a reference standard to derive a linear logarithmic relationship between sublimation/evaporation rate and vapor pressure specific to the TGA system used in this study. Sublimation and evaporation of DPC 963 were found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics. Using the Eyring equation, the enthalpy and entropy of the sublimation and evaporation processes were obtained. The enthalpies of sublimation and evaporation were found to be 29 and 22 kcal/mol, respectively. The condensed material from the vapor phase was found to exist in 2 physical forms, amorphous and crystalline. Using benzoic acid as a reference standard, vapor pressure of DPC 963 at different temperatures was calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained. DPC 963 undergoes sublimation at appreciable rates at 150 degrees C and above but this is not likely to pose a serious issue during the manufacturing process. Vapor pressure estimation using thermogravimetric analysis provided sufficient accuracy to be used as a fast, simple, and safe alternative to the traditional methods of vapor pressure determination. PMID:12916905

  12. Cloning and molecular characterization of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomere length analysis of Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Alaks, Glen; Desierto, Marie J; Townsley, Danielle M; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Chen, Jichun; Lacy, Robert C; Young, Neal S

    2015-08-15

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the catalytic subunit of telomerase complex that regulates telomerase activity to maintain telomere length for all animals with linear chromosomes. As the Mus musculus (MM) laboratory mouse has very long telomeres compared to humans, a potential alternative animal model for telomere research is the Peromyscus leucopus (PL) mouse that has telomere lengths close to the human range and has the wild counterparts for comparison. We report the full TERT coding sequence (pTERT) from PL mice to use in the telomere research. Comparative analysis with eight other mammalian TERTs revealed a pTERT protein considerably homologous to other TERTs and preserved all TERT specific-sequence signatures, yet with some distinctive features. pTERT displayed the highest nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with hamster TERT. Unlike human but similar to MM mice, pTERT expression was detected in various adult somatic tissues of PL mice, with the highest expression in testes. Four different captive stocks of PL mice and wild-captured PL mice each displayed group-specific average telomere lengths, with the longest and shortest telomeres in inbred and outbred stock mice, respectively. pTERT showed considerable numbers of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations. A pTERT proximal promoter region cloned was homologous among PL and MM mice and rat, but with species-specific features. From PL mice, we further cloned and characterized ribosomal protein, large, P0 (pRPLP0) to use as an internal control for various assays. Peromyscus mice have been extensively used for various studies, including human diseases, for which pTERT and pRPLP0 would be useful tools. PMID:25962353

  13. Conformational States of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase for Nucleotide Incorporation vs Pyrophosphorolysis-Binding of Foscarnet.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalyan; Balzarini, Jan; Miller, Matthew T; Maguire, Anita R; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-08-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) catalytically incorporates individual nucleotides into a viral DNA strand complementing an RNA or DNA template strand; the polymerase active site of RT adopts multiple conformational and structural states while performing this task. The states associated are dNTP binding at the N site, catalytic incorporation of a nucleotide, release of a pyrophosphate, and translocation of the primer 3'-end to the P site. Structural characterization of each of these states may help in understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug activity and resistance and in developing new RT inhibitors. Using a 38-mer DNA template-primer aptamer as the substrate mimic, we crystallized an RT/dsDNA complex that is catalytically active, yet translocation-incompetent in crystals. The ability of RT to perform dNTP binding and incorporation in crystals permitted obtaining a series of structures: (I) RT/DNA (P-site), (II) RT/DNA/AZTTP ternary, (III) RT/AZT-terminated DNA (N-site), and (IV) RT/AZT-terminated DNA (N-site)/foscarnet complexes. The stable N-site complex permitted the binding of foscarnet as a pyrophosphate mimic. The Mg(2+) ions dissociated after catalytic addition of AZTMP in the pretranslocated structure III, whereas ions A and B had re-entered the active site to bind foscarnet in structure IV. The binding of foscarnet involves chelation with the Mg(2+) (B) ion and interactions with K65 and R72. The analysis of interactions of foscarnet and the recently discovered nucleotide-competing RT inhibitor (NcRTI) α-T-CNP in two different conformational states of the enzyme provides insights for developing new classes of polymerase active site RT inhibitors. PMID:27192549

  14. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening.

    PubMed

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F; Tinetti, Ricky N; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S; Headey, Stephen J; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-06-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  15. Doravirine Suppresses Common Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Associated Mutants at Clinically Relevant Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Feng, Meizhen; Sachs, Nancy A; Xu, Min; Grobler, Jay; Blair, Wade; Hazuda, Daria J; Miller, Michael D; Lai, Ming-Tain

    2016-04-01

    Doravirine (DOR), which is currently in a phase 3 clinical trial, is a novel human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). DOR exhibits potent antiviral activity against wild-type virus and K103N, Y181C, and K103N/Y181C mutant viruses, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 12, 21, 31, and 33 nM, respectively, when measured in 100% normal human serum (NHS). To assess the potential for DOR to suppress NNRTI-associated and rilpivirine (RPV)-specific mutants at concentrations achieved in the clinic setting, inhibitory quotients (IQs) were calculated by determining the ratio of the clinical trough concentration over the antiviral IC50for each virus with DOR and RPV and efavirenz (EFV). DOR displayed IQs of 39, 27, and 25 against the K103N, Y181C, and K103N/Y181C mutants, respectively. In contrast, RPV exhibited IQs of 4.6, 1.4, and 0.8, and EFV showed IQs of 2.5, 60, and 1.9 against these viruses, respectively. DOR also displayed higher IQs than those of RPV and EFV against other prevalent NNRTI-associated mutants, with the exception of Y188L. Both DOR and EFV exhibited higher IQs than RPV when analyzed with RPV-associated mutants. Resistance selections were conducted with K103N, Y181C, G190A, and K103N/Y181C mutants at clinically relevant concentrations of DOR, RPV, and EFV. No viral breakthrough was observed with DOR, whereas breakthrough viruses were readily detected with RPV and EFV against Y181C and K103N viruses, respectively. These data suggest that DOR should impose a higher barrier to the development of resistance than RPV and EFV at the concentrations achieved in the clinic setting. PMID:26833152

  16. Positive Feedback-Loop of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and 15-Lipoxygenase-2 Promotes Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tingting; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Xiufeng; Liu, Mengmeng; Hou, Yunlong; Wang, Yanyan; Ma, Cui; Li, Shuzhen; Zhu, Daling

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized with pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling mediated by 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO)/15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) according to our previous studies. Meanwhile, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity is highly correlated with vascular injury and remodeling, suggesting that TERT may be an essential determinant in the development of PH. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution and molecular mechanisms of TERT in the pathogenesis of PH. Approach and Results We measured the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and ventricular weight, analyzed morphometric change of the pulmonary vessels in the hypoxia or monocrotaline treated rats. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, transwell assay and flow cytometry in pulmonary smooth muscle cells were performed to investigate the roles and relationship of TERT and 15-LO/15-HETE in PH. We revealed that the expression of TERT was increased in pulmonary vasculature of patients with PH and in the monocrotaline or hypoxia rat model of PH. The up-regulation of TERT was associated with experimental elevated RVSP and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments identified TERT as a novel interacting partner of 15-LO-2. TERT and 15-LO-2 augmented protein expression of each other. In addition, the proliferation, migration and cell-cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase induced by hypoxia were inhibited by TERT knockdown, which were rescued by 15-HETE addition. Conclusions These results demonstrate that TERT regulates pulmonary vascular remodeling. TERT and 15-LO-2 form a positive feedback loop and together promote proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, creating a self-amplifying circuit which propels pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24376652

  17. Antimycobacterial and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Activity of Julianaceae and Clusiaceae Plant Species from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cansino, Rocio; Espitia-Pinzón, Clara Inés; Campos-Lara, María Guadalupe; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Silvia Laura; Segura-Salinas, Erika; Echeverría-Valencia, Gabriela; Torras-Claveria, Laura; Cuevas-Figueroa, Xochitl Marisol; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The extracts of 14 Julianaceae and 5 Clusiaceae species growing in Mexico were tested in vitro (50 µg/mL) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and HIV reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT). The Julianaceae bark and leaf extracts inhibited M. tuberculosis (>84.67%) and HIV-RT (<49.89%). The Clusiaceae leaves extracts also inhibited both targets (>58.3% and >67.6%), respectively. The IC50 values for six selected extracts and their cytotoxicity (50 µg/mL) to human macrophages were then determined. Amphipterygium glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium fairly inhibited M. tuberculosis with IC50 of 1.87–2.35 µg/mL; but their IC50 against HIV-RT was 59.25–97.83 µg/mL. Calophyllum brasiliense, Vismia baccifera, and Vismia mexicana effect on M. tuberculosis was noteworthy (IC50 3.02–3.64 µg/mL) and also inhibited RT-HIV (IC50 26.24–35.17 µg/mL). These 6 extracts (50 µg/mL) presented low toxicity to macrophages (<23.8%). The HPLC profiles of A. glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium indicated that their antimycobacterial activity cannot be related to masticadienonic, 3α, or 3β-hydromasticadienonic acids, suggesting that other compounds may be responsible for the observed activity or this might be a synergy result. The anti-HIV-RT and antimycobacterial activities induced by C. brasiliense can be attributed to the content of calanolides A, B, as well as soulatrolide. PMID:25983849

  18. Association of genetic polymorphisms in the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dapeng; Yu, Hongjie; Sun, Jielin; Qi, Jun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Ruipeng; Zheng, Siqun Lily; Xu, Jianfeng; Kang, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), encoded by the TERT gene, is an essential component of telomerase, essential for the maintenance of telomere DNA length, chromosomal stability and cellular immortality. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between common genetic variations across the TERT gene region and prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness in a Chinese population. A total of 12 TERT tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped on the Sequenom Mass-ARRAY iPLEX® platform in a case-case study with 1,210 Chinese patients with PCa. Unconditional logistic regression was used to investigate the association of genotypes with PCa aggressiveness, Gleason grade and risk of developing early-onset PCa. It was observed that the C allele of the TERT intron 2 SNP (rs2736100) was significantly associated with reduced risk of PCa aggressiveness [odds ratio (OR)=0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-0.99; P=0.037]. This allele was also significantly correlated with a reduced risk of developing a tumor with a high Gleason score (>7; OR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.70-0.99; P=0.039). The T allele of the intron 4 SNP (rs10069690) was found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk for an aggressive form of PCa (OR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.59-0.97; P=0.030). In addition, the A allele of rs10078761 located at the 3' end of the TERT gene exhibited a statistically significant association with the reduced risk of developing a higher grade disease (OR=0.48; 95% CI: 0.28-0.81; P=0.006). However, no association between TERT polymorphisms and age at diagnosis was observed in the present study. The present findings demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that genetic variations across the TERT gene are associated with PCa aggressiveness in a Chinese Han population. PMID:25738283

  19. QSAR Modeling Using Large-Scale Databases: Case Study for HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, Olga A; Urusova, Aleksandra F; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Nicklaus, Marc C; Zakharov, Alexey V; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2015-07-27

    Large-scale databases are important sources of training sets for various QSAR modeling approaches. Generally, these databases contain information extracted from different sources. This variety of sources can produce inconsistency in the data, defined as sometimes widely diverging activity results for the same compound against the same target. Because such inconsistency can reduce the accuracy of predictive models built from these data, we are addressing the question of how best to use data from publicly and commercially accessible databases to create accurate and predictive QSAR models. We investigate the suitability of commercially and publicly available databases to QSAR modeling of antiviral activity (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition). We present several methods for the creation of modeling (i.e., training and test) sets from two, either commercially or freely available, databases: Thomson Reuters Integrity and ChEMBL. We found that the typical predictivities of QSAR models obtained using these different modeling set compilation methods differ significantly from each other. The best results were obtained using training sets compiled for compounds tested using only one method and material (i.e., a specific type of biological assay). Compound sets aggregated by target only typically yielded poorly predictive models. We discuss the possibility of "mix-and-matching" assay data across aggregating databases such as ChEMBL and Integrity and their current severe limitations for this purpose. One of them is the general lack of complete and semantic/computer-parsable descriptions of assay methodology carried by these databases that would allow one to determine mix-and-matchability of result sets at the assay level. PMID:26046311

  20. Use of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Only Regimens in HIV-infected Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Michael; Rutstein, Richard; Del Bianco, Gabriela; Heresi, Gloria; Barton, Theresa; Wiznia, Andrew; Wiegand, Ryan; Wheeling, Travis; Bohannon, Beverly; Dominguez, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    In adults, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-only antiretroviral regimens (NOARs) with ≥ three NRTIs are less potent than highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However published pediatric experience with NOARs is limited. Methods We analyzed data from NOAR-treated participants in LEGACY, a multicenter observational cohort study of HIV-infected children and adolescents. NOAR-treated case-participantswere matched to participantswithout prior NOAR who initiated HAART during the same year for comparison. Results Of 575 participants with data from time of HIV diagnosis through 2006, 67 (12%) received NOARs for at least 24 weeks; most (46%) received the fixed dose combination of zidovudine/lamivudine/abacavir. NOAR use peaked in 2001-2002. NOAR-treated participants were significantly older and more treatment-experienced than HAART-treated participants. Virologic outcomes, including the percentage of participants with a plasma HIV RNA viral load <400 copies/mL at week 24 (47% vs. 34%) and the mean 24-week change in log10 plasma HIV RNA viral load from baseline (−0.63 vs. −1.02) were similar between NOAR- and HAART-treated participants, but virologic rebound was more likely in NOAR-treated participants (77% vs. 54%, P = 0.02). Increase in CD4 percentage points from baseline to 24 weeks was negligible in NOAR-treated participants compared with HAART-treated participants (0.95% vs. 10.1%, P <0.001). Anemia and leukopenia were more commonly reported with NOARs than HAART. Discussion Week 24 virologic outcomes were similar between NOAR- and HAART-treated participants, but NOAR durability was poorer and their use was associated with less immunologic reconstitution. NOARs should play a limited role in pediatric and adolescent ART. PMID:24008749

  1. Diagnostic Value of Methylated Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase in Human Cancers: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Shi, Yuan; Liu, Wei; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wu, Josh Chia-Ching; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai; Wong, Thian-Sze

    2015-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of human malignancies. Overexpression of hTERT is essential in controlling the propagation of cancer cells. The CpG island located at hTERT promoter region is subjected to methylation modification in human cancer. In this perspective article, we discussed the diagnostic value of methylated hTERT in human cancers. The definitive diagnosis of most solid tumors is based on histological and immunohistochemical features. Under certain circumstances, however, the use of methylated hTERT might be useful in overcoming the limitation of the conventional methods. Methylated hTERT showed a good diagnostic power in discriminating cancer from benign or normal tissues. Nevertheless, differences in detection method, methylation site, cancer type, and histological subtype of cancer make it difficult to evaluate the actual diagnostic accuracy of methylated hTERT. Therefore, we performed subgroup analysis to assess the effects of these factors on the diagnostic efficiency of methylated hTERT. We demonstrated that quantitative MSP (qMSP) assay offers the highest discriminative power between normal and cancer in comparison with different detection methods. In addition, the methylated sites selected by different studies had an impact on the detection performance. Moreover, the diagnostic power of methylated hTERT was affected by cancer type and histological subtype. In conclusion, the existing evidence demonstrated that methylated hTERT is effective in cancer detection. Detailed profiling of the methylation sites to local the common methylation hotspot across human cancers is warranted to maximize the diagnostic value of methylated hTERT in cancer detection. PMID:26734575

  2. Derivation and characterization of goat fetal fibroblast cells induced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ying; Zhao, Xiaoe; Jia, Hongxiang; Ma, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Fetal fibroblast cells (FFCs) are often used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) because they are easy to culture and suitable for genetic manipulation. However, through genetic modification process, which required FFCs to be cultured in vitro for several passages, cells tended to age very rapidly and became inappropriate for SCNT. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) possessed the activity of human telomerase and maintains telomere in dividing cells; therefore, hTERT can be transfected into somatic cells to extend their lifespan. In this study, we transfected a Xinong Saanen Dairy Goat FFC line with hTERT. Then, we tested several characteristics of transfected cells, including growth curve, expression and activity of hTERT, tumorigenicity, and expression of oct4 and nanog. The result showed that hTERT could significantly extend the lifespan of transfected cells in vitro. hTERT mRNA was expressed in hTERT-transfected cells. Moreover, hTERT-transfected cells presented enhanced telomerase activity and longer telomere than untransfected cells at the same passage. On the other hand, hTERT-transfected cells can maintain normal karyotype even after several times of subculture in vitro. After inoculation of hTERT-transfected cells in nude mouse, none of them developed tumors on the vaccination site. Interestingly, transfection of hTERT can improve expression of nanog and oct4 in Xinong Saanen Dairy Goat FFCs, especially in low generation after transfection, but with increasing subculture, this effect gradually weakened. PMID:23271363

  3. Selection and characterization of HIV-1 with a novel S68 deletion in reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Schinazi, Raymond F; Massud, Ivana; Rapp, Kimberly L; Cristiano, Meta; Detorio, Mervi A; Stanton, Richard A; Bennett, Matthew A; Kierlin-Duncan, Monique; Lennerstrand, Johan; Nettles, James H

    2011-05-01

    Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) represents a significant problem in the design of novel therapeutics and the management of treatment regimens in infected persons. Resistance profiles can be elucidated by defining modifications to the viral genome conferred upon exposure to novel nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTI). In vitro testing of HIV-1LAI-infected primary human lymphocytes treated with β-D-2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydro-5-fluorocytidine (DFC; Dexelvucitabine; Reverset) produced a novel deletion of AGT at codon 68 (S68Δ) alone and in combination with K65R that differentially affects drug response. Dual-approach clone techniques utilizing TOPO cloning and pyrosequencing confirmed the novel S68Δ in the HIV-1 genome. The S68Δ HIV-1 RT was phenotyped against various antiviral agents in a heteropolymeric DNA polymerase assay and in human lymphocytes. Drug susceptibility results indicate that the S68Δ displayed a 10- to 30-fold increase in resistance to DFC, lamivudine, emtricitabine, tenofovir, abacavir, and amdoxovir and modest resistance to stavudine, β-d-2',3'-oxa-5-fluorocytidine, or 9-(β-D-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)guanine and remained susceptible to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), 1-(β-D-dioxolane)thymine (DOT) and lopinavir. Modeling revealed a central role for S68 in affecting conformation of the β3-β4 finger region and provides a rational for the selective resistance. These data indicate that the novel S68Δ is a previously unrecognized deletion that may represent an important factor in NRTI multidrug resistance treatment strategies. PMID:21357304

  4. Integrated centrifugal reverse transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification microdevice for influenza A virus detection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Hwan; Park, Byung Hyun; Oh, Seung Jun; Choi, Goro; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-06-15

    An integrated reverse transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) microdevice which consists of microbead-assisted RNA purification and RT-LAMP with real-time monitoring by a miniaturized optical detector was demonstrated. The integrated RT-LAMP microdevice includes four reservoirs for a viral RNA sample (purified influenza A viral RNA or lysates), a washing solution (70% ethanol), an elution solution (RNase-free water), and an RT-LAMP cocktail, and two chambers (a waste chamber and an RT-LAMP reaction chamber). The separate reservoirs for a washing solution, an elution solution, and an RT-LAMP cocktail were designed with capillary valves for stable storage. Three influenza A virus strains (A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and A/H5N1) were used for RNA templates, and RT-LAMP primer sets were designed to detect hemagglutinin (HA) and conserved M gene. Sequential sample flow to the microbeads for RNA purification was achieved by centrifugal force with optimization of capillary valves and a siphon channel. Furthermore, the purified RNA solution was successfully isolated from the waste solution by changing the rotational direction, and combined with the RT-LAMP cocktail in the RT-LAMP reaction chamber for target gene amplification. Total process from the sample injection to the result was completed in 47 min. Influenza A H1N1 virus was confirmed on the integrated RT-LAMP microdevice even with 10 copies of viral RNAs, which revealed 10-fold higher sensitivity than that of a conventional RT-PCR. Subtyping and specificity test of influenza A H1N1 viral lysates were also performed and clinical samples were successfully genotyped to confirm influenza A virus on our proposed integrated microdevice. PMID:25569879

  5. Highly optimized DNA vaccine targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase stimulates potent antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Thomas H.; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Morrow, Matthew P.; Walters, Jewell N.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) are detected in over 85% of human cancers. Immunological analysis supports hTERT is a widely applicable target recognized by T cells and can be potentially studied as a broad cancer immune therapeutic, or a unique line of defense against tumor recurrence. There remains an urgent need to develop more potent hTERT vaccines. Here, a synthetic highly optimized full-length hTERT DNA vaccine (phTERT) was designed and the induced immunity was examined in mice and non-human primates. When delivered by electroporation, phTERT elicited strong, broad hTERT-specific CD8 responses including induction of T-cells expressing CD107a, IFN-γ and TNF-α in mice. The ability of phTERT to overcome tolerance was evaluated in a NHP model, whose TERT is 96% homologous to that of hTERT. Immunized monkeys exhibited robust (average 1834 SFU/106 PBMCs), diverse (multiple immunodominant epitopes) IFN-γ responses and antigen-specific perforin release (average 332 SFU/106 PBMCs), suggesting phTERT breaks tolerance and induces potent cytotoxic responses in this human relevant model. Moreover, in an HPV16-associated tumor model, vaccination of phTERT slows tumor growth and improves survival rate in both prophylactic and therapeutic studies. Lastly, in vivo cytotoxicity assay confirmed that phTERT-induced CD8 T cells exhibited specific CTL activity, capable of eliminating hTERT-pulsed target cells. These findings support that this synthetic EP-delivered DNA phTERT may have a role as a broad therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:24777680

  6. Cloning and molecular characterization of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomere length analysis of Peromyscus leucopus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Alaks, Glen; Desierto, Marie J; Townsley, Danielle M.; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Chen, Jichun; Lacy, Robert C.; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the catalytic subunit of telomerase complex that regulates telomerase activity to maintain telomere length for all animals with linear chromosomes. As the Mus musculus (MM) laboratory mouse has very long telomeres compared to humans, a potential alternative animal model for telomere research is the Peromyscus leucopus (PL) mouse that has telomere lengths close to the human range and has the wild counterparts for comparison. We report the full TERT coding sequence (pTERT) from PL mice to use in the telomere research. Comparative analysis with eight other mammalian TERTs revealed a pTERT protein considerably homologous to other TERTs and preserved all TERT specific-sequence signatures, yet with some distinctive features. pTERT displayed the highest nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with hamster TERT. Unlike human but similar to MM mice, pTERT expression was detected in various adult somatic tissues of PL mice, with the highest expression in testes. Four different captive stocks of PL mice and wild-captured PL mice each displayed group-specific average telomere lengths, with the longest and shortest telomeres in inbred and outbred stock mice, respectively. pTERT showed considerable numbers of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations. A pTERT proximal promoter region cloned was homologous among PL and MM mice and rat, but with species-specific features. From PL mice, we further cloned and characterized ribosomal protein, large, P0 (pRPLP0) to use as an internal control for various assays. Peromyscus mice have been extensively used for various studies, including human diseases, for which pTERT and pRPLP0 would be useful tools. PMID:25962353

  7. Immunoaffinity concentration and purification of waterborne enteric viruses for detection by reverse transcriptase PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, K J; De Leon, R; Sobsey, M D

    1996-01-01

    To assess the risks from viral contamination of drinking-water supplies, there is a clear need for methods to directly detect viral pathogens. In this study, we developed a broad-spectrum immunocapture method for concentration and purification of enteric viruses. The method involved indirect antibody capture (AbCap) of intact viruses followed by release of virion genomic RNA and reverse transcriptase PCR for amplification and oligoprobe hybridization for detection. The procedure involved concentrating enteric viruses from large volumes of water by standard filtration-elution techniques with IMDS filters and 1 liter of 1% beef extract-0.05 M glycine (BE/G) as an eluate. The BE/G eluate was concentrated and purified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, Pro-Cipitate (a commercially available protein precipitating reagent) precipitation, and a second PEG precipitation to a volume of approximately 500 mu l. Aliquots of the second PEG precipitate were further processed by RNA extraction, AbCap, or cell culture analysis for infectious viruses. The AbCap method was applied to 11 field samples of fecally contaminated surface water. Of the 11 samples, 9 were positive for enteric viruses by AbCap method 4 of 11 samples were positive for enteric viruses by direct RNA extraction of a small aliquot of the second PEG concentrate; and 4 of 11 samples were positive for enteric viruses by measurement of cell culture infectivity. The results of enteric viruses were compared with those for standard bacterial and coliphage indicators of fecal contamination. PMID:8787407

  8. Directed evolution of DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activity in a single polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer L; Loakes, David; Jaroslawski, Szymon; Too, Kathleen; Holliger, Philipp

    2006-08-18

    DNA polymerases enable key technologies in modern biology but for many applications, native polymerases are limited by their stringent substrate recognition. Here we describe short-patch compartmentalized self-replication (spCSR), a novel strategy to expand the substrate spectrum of polymerases in a targeted way. spCSR is based on the previously described CSR, but unlike CSR only a short region (a "patch") of the gene under investigation is diversified and replicated. This allows the selection of polymerases under conditions where catalytic activity and processivity are compromised to the extent that full self-replication is inefficient. We targeted two specific motifs involved in substrate recognition in the active site of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and selected for incorporation of both ribonucleotide- (NTP) and deoxyribonucleotide-triphosphates (dNTPs) using spCSR. This allowed the isolation of multiple variants of Taq with apparent dual substrate specificity. They were able to synthesize RNA, while still retaining essentially wild-type (wt) DNA polymerase activity as judged by PCR. One such mutant (AA40: E602V, A608V, I614M, E615G) was able to incorporate both NTPs and dNTPs with the same catalytic efficiency as the wt enzyme incorporates dNTPs. AA40 allowed the generation of mixed RNA-DNA amplification products in PCR demonstrating DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase as well as reverse transcriptase activity within the same polypeptide. Furthermore, AA40 displayed an expanded substrate spectrum towards other 2'-substituted nucleotides and was able to synthesize nucleic acid polymers in which each base bore a different 2'-substituent. Our results suggest that spCSR will be a powerful strategy for the generation of polymerases with altered substrate specificity for applications in nano- and biotechnology and in the enzymatic synthesis of antisense and RNAi probes. PMID:16859707

  9. Cytotoxic T cell responses to human telomerase reverse transcriptase in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Marukawa, Yohei; Arai, Kuniaki; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2006-06-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase, hTERT, has been identified as the catalytic enzyme required for telomere elongation. hTERT is expressed in most tumor cells but seldom expressed in most human adult cells. It has been reported that 80% to 90% of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) express hTERT, making the enzyme a potential target in immunotherapy for HCC. In the current study, we identified hTERT-derived, HLA-A*2402-restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes and analyzed hTERT-specific CTL responses in patients with HCC. Peptides containing the epitopes showed high affinity to bind HLA-A*2402 in a major histocompatibility complex binding assay and were able to induce hTERT-specific CTLs in both hTERT cDNA-immunized HLA-A*2402/Kb transgenic mice and patients with HCC. The CTLs were able to kill hepatoma cell lines depending on hTERT expression levels in an HLA-A*2402-restricted manner and induced irrespective of hepatitis viral infection. The number of single hTERT epitope-specific T cells detected by ELISPOT assay was 10 to 100 specific cells per 3 x 10(5) PBMCs, and positive T cell responses were observed in 6.9% to 12.5% of HCC patients. hTERT-specific T cell responses were observed even in the patients with early stages of HCC. The frequency of hTERT/tetramer+ CD8+ T cells in the tumor tissue of patients with HCC was quite high, and they were functional. In conclusion, these results suggest that hTERT is an attractive target for T-cell-based immunotherapy for HCC, and the identified hTERT epitopes may be valuable both for immunotherapy and for analyzing host immune responses to HCC. PMID:16729333

  10. Preparation and characterization of the RNase H domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kosaku; Yokokawa, Kanta; Hisayoshi, Tetsuro; Fukatsu, Kosuke; Kuze, Ikumi; Konishi, Atsushi; Mikami, Bunzo; Kojima, Kenji; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV RT) contains fingers, palm, thumb, and connection subdomains as well as an RNase H domain. The DNA polymerase active site resides in the palm subdomain, and the RNase H active site is located in the RNase H domain. The RNase H domain contains a positively charged α-helix called the C helix (H(594)GEIYRRR(601)), that is thought to be involved in substrate recognition. In this study, we expressed three versions of the RNase H domain in Escherichia coli, the wild-type domain (WT) (residues Ile498-Leu671) and two variants that lack the regions containing the C helix (Ile593-Leu603 and Gly595-Thr605, which we called ΔC1 and ΔC2, respectively) with a strep-tag at the N-terminus and a deca-histidine tag at the C-terminus. These peptides were purified from the cells by anion-exchange, Ni(2+) affinity, and Strep-Tactin affinity column chromatography, and then the tags were removed by proteolysis. In an RNase H assay using a 25-bp RNA-DNA heteroduplex, WT, ΔC1, and ΔC2 produced RNA fragments ranging from 7 to 16 nucleotides (nt) whereas the full-length MMLV RT (Thr24-Leu671) produced 14-20-nt RNA fragments, suggesting that elimination of the fingers, palm, thumb, and connection subdomains affects the binding of the RNase H domain to the RNA-DNA heteroduplex. The activity levels of WT, ΔC1, and ΔC2 were estimated to be 1%, 0.01%, and 0.01% of full-length MMLV RT activity, indicating that the C helix is important, but not critical, for the activity of the isolated RNase H domain. PMID:25959458

  11. Establishment and characterization of buffalo fetal fibroblasts induced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shun; Guan, Xiaomei; Lu, Fenghua; Jiang, Jianrong; Deng, Yanfei; Luo, Chan; Shi, Deshun

    2016-10-01

    Fetal fibroblasts are often used as donor cells for SCNT, but their short lifespan greatly limits this application. To provide stable and long-lifespan cells, buffalo fetal fibroblasts (BFFs) transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The hTERT-transfected BFFs (hTERT-BFFs) were evaluated by qRT-PCR, Western blot, karyotype analysis, telomerase activity assay, growth curve assay, flow cytometry, and soft agar assay. The development of SCNT embryos derived from hTERT-BFFs was also assessed in vitro. The morphology of hTERT-BFFs was similar to the nontransfected BFFs, and the karyotype of hTERT-BFFs was normal at passage 30. The hTERT-BFFs at passage 4 and 30 had higher telomerase activity and extended proliferative lifespan with an increase in cell population at S phase when compared with nontransfected BFFs at passage 5 and 30. The mRNA expression of p53 in hTERT-BFFs at passage 5 and 30 remained unchanged when compared with nontransfected BFFs at passage 5, whereas the mRNA expression of p53 in the nontransfected BFFs at passage 30 was increased. Soft agar assay showed that hTERT-BFFs at passage 30 were not a malignant phenotype. Significantly, more SCNT embryos derived from hTERT-BFFs at passage 5 and 30 developed to blastocysts in comparison with BFFs at passage 30. The Caudal type homeobox 2 and Connexin 43 genes were indicated to involve in the development of cloned embryos. These results indicate that transfection of BFFs with hTERT can extend their lifespan and retain their basic and key biological characteristics in the status of primary BFFs. PMID:27388808

  12. Oxidative stress and the subcellular localization of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Muzza, Marina; Colombo, Carla; Cirello, Valentina; Perrino, Michela; Vicentini, Leonardo; Fugazzola, Laura

    2016-08-15

    During hormonogenesis, thyrocytes are physiologically exposed to high levels of oxidative stress (OS) which could either be involved in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer or exert a cytotoxic effect. We analyzed the oxidative status of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) both directly, by measuring H2O2 generation by NADPH oxidases (NOXs), and indirectly, by evaluating the antioxidant activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), which neutralizes H2O2 excess, and the lipid peroxidation (LP). Moreover, we investigated the subcellular localization of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and the H2O2 levels in the mitochondria of tumor and normal tissues. The calcium-dependent and independent H2O2 generation activity was significantly higher in tumors than in normal tissues. The GPX activity was higher in PTCs than in normal tissues, and, consistently, no differences were found in LP levels. Moreover, while TERT nuclear expression was similar in tumor and normal tissues, the mitochondrial localization was significantly higher in tumors. At the mitochondrial level, no differences were found in H2O2 generation between tumor and normal tissues. In conclusion, present data demonstrate that the intracellular H2O2 generation by NOXs is significantly higher in PTCs than in normal thyroid tissues. The increased GPX activity found in tumors counteracts the potential cytotoxic effects of high OS exposure. The significantly higher mitochondrial localization of TERT in tumors is consistent with its shuttling from the nucleus upon exposure to high OS. Finally, mitochondrial OS was not significantly different in tumors and normal tissues, supporting the postulated role of mitochondrial TERT in the control of local H2O2 production. PMID:27164443

  13. Mutagenicity and pausing of HIV reverse transcriptase during HIV plus-strand DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J; Hoffmann, J S; Loeb, L

    1994-01-01

    The unusually high frequency of misincorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV RT) is likely to be the major factor in the rapid accumulation of viral mutations in AIDS, especially in the env gene. To investigate the ability of HIV RT to copy the env gene, we subcloned an HIV env gene fragment into a single-stranded DNA vector and measured the progression of synthesis by HIV RT. We observed that HIV RT, but not RT from avian myeloblastosis virus, DNA polymerase-alpha or T7 DNA polymerase, pauses specifically at poly-deoxyadenosine stretches within the env gene. The frequency of bypassing the polyadenosine stretches by HIV RT is enhanced by increasing the ratio of enzyme to template. We measured the fidelity of DNA synthesis within a segment of the hypervariable region 1 of the env gene (V-1) containing a poly-deoxyadenosine sequence by repetitively copying the DNA by HIV RT, and then cloning and sequencing the copied fragments. We found that 27% of the errors identified in V-1 sequence were frameshift mutations opposite the poly-adenosine tract, a site where strong pausing was observed. Pausing of HIV RT at the polyadenosine tract could be enhanced by either distamycin A or netropsin, (A-T)-rich minor groove binding peptides. Moreover, netropsin increases the frequency of frameshift mutations in experiments in which HIV RT catalyzes gap filling synthesis within the lacZ gene in double-stranded circular M13mp2 DNA. These combined results suggest that the enhanced mutation frequency may be due to increased pausing at netropsin-modified polyadenosine tracts. Therefore, netropsin and related A-T binding chemicals may selectively enhance frameshift mutagenesis induced by HIV RT and yield predominantly non-viable virus. Images PMID:7510388

  14. Effects of ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase on immortalization of feather keratinocyte stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yulin; Yu, Minli; Wu, Fabai; Sun, Jianguo; Wood, Chris; Hattori, Masa-Aki; Wang, Jinfu; Xi, Yongmei

    2009-12-15

    Normal somatic cells possess a finite life span owing to replicative senescence. Telomerase functions as a potential regulator of senescence in various cells. Expression level of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is correlated with telomerase activity and cellular immortalization. In this study, we investigated the effects of ectopic expression of hTERT on proliferation potential of chicken feather keratinocyte stem cells (FKSCs). We established FKSCs transduced with hTERT catalytic subunit fused with EGFP marker gene (hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs). hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs had the great potential of proliferation in vitro and expressed kerainocyte stem cell markers integrin beta1 and CD49c. Keratin 15 and keratin 19, as native FKSCs, were also detected in hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs. By the analysis of fluorescent RT-PCR, western blotting and TRAP assay, hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were positive for telomerase activity, in comparison with native FKSCs showing no telomerase activity. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of hTERT could result in immortalization of FKSCs. Tumorigenecity of hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were examined by soft agar assay and transplantation into NOD-SCID mice. Results showed that hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs sustained the cellular characteristics of native FKSCs and had no transforming activity. In vivo differentiation multipotentials of hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were confirmed by transplantation into developing chicken embryos and in situ hybridization analysis. These data provide a novel framework for understanding human telomerase activity in different species and suggest a new insight for manipulating hTERT for therapeutic purposes in treating tissue injury and aging. PMID:19551764

  15. Transgenic rat model of childhood-onset dermatitis by overexpressing telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Sato, Atsuko; Hamada, Shun; Yagi, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Childhood-onset dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children. Although various mouse models that mirror aspects of dermatitis have become available, there is still a need for an animal model that develops dermatitis in childhood and is more suitable for performing tissue transplantation experiments. There is emerging evidence that peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with dermatitis have significantly increased telomerase activity. Here, we developed telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-expressing transgenic (Tg) rats that spontaneously developed eczematous skin inflammation in childhood. Newborn TERT-Tg rats developed visible dermatitis in 56 % of cases, and the skin lesions microscopically showed spongiosis and acanthosis with infiltration of lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis exhibited increased CD4 (2.5-fold) and CD8 (fivefold) T cell numbers compared with dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. Stronger TERT activity was observed in the peripheral lymphocytes of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats than those of dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that IL-4 was markedly elevated in the spleen of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats, and that interferon-gamma was increased in the dermatitis lesions. Moreover, skin grafting of TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis onto T cell-deficient nude rats demonstrated that the inflamed skin lesions could not be maintained. Taken together, the results suggest that TERT activation in T lymphocytes is one of the potential predisposing factors for dermatitis. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the TERT-Tg rats mirror aspects of human childhood-onset dermatitis and that these animals represent a potential animal model system for studying childhood-onset dermatitis. PMID:26885830

  16. The structure of unliganded reverse transcriptase from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, D W; Gamblin, S J; Harris, B A; Ray, S; Culp, J S; Hellmig, B; Woolf, D J; Debouck, C; Harrison, S C

    1995-02-14

    The crystal structure of the reverse transcriptase (RT) from the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus has been determined at 3.2-A resolution. Comparison with complexes between RT and the polymerase inhibitor Nevirapine [Kohlstaedt, L.A., Wang, J., Friedman, J.M., Rice, P.A. & Steitz, T.A. (1992) Science 256, 1783-1790] and between RT and an oligonucleotide [Jacobo-Molina, A., Ding, J., Nanni, R., Clark, A. D., Lu, X., Tantillo, C., Williams, R. L., Kamer, G., Ferris, A. L., Clark, P., Hizi, A., Hughes, S. H. & Arnold, E. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90, 6320-6324] reveals changes associated with ligand binding. The enzyme is a heterodimer (p66/p51), with domains labeled "fingers," "thumb," "palm," and "connection" in both subunits, and a ribonuclease H domain in the larger subunit only. The most striking difference between RT and both complex structures is the change in orientation of the p66 thumb (approximately 33 degrees rotation). Smaller shifts relative to the core of the molecule were also found in other domains, including the p66 fingers and palm, which contain the polymerase active site. Within the polymerase catalytic region itself, there are no rearrangements between RT and the RT/DNA complex. In RT/Nevirapine, the drug binds in the p66 palm near the polymerase active site, a region that is well-packed hydrophobic core in the unliganded enzyme. Room for the drug is provided by movement of a small beta-sheet within the palm domain of the Nevirapine complex. The rearrangement within the palm and thumb, as well as domain shifts relative to the enzyme core, may prevent correct placement of the oligonucleotide substrate when the drug is bound. PMID:7532306

  17. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F.; Tinetti, Ricky N.; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S.; Headey, Stephen J.; Chalmers, David K.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  18. Replication fitness of multiple nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase-resistant HIV-1 variants in the presence of etravirine measured by 454 deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Brumme, Chanson J; Huber, Kelly D; Dong, Winnie; Poon, Art F Y; Harrigan, P Richard; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    We applied an efficient method to characterize the relative fitness levels of multiple nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (NNRTI)-resistant HIV-1 variants by simultaneous competitive culture and 454 deep sequencing. Using this method, we show that the Y181V mutation in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in particular confers a clear selective advantage to the virus over 14 other NNRTI resistance mutations in the presence of etravirine in vitro. PMID:23720723

  19. Pyridinone derivatives: specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors with antiviral activity.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M E; Nunberg, J H; O'Brien, J A; Quintero, J C; Schleif, W A; Freund, K F; Gaul, S L; Saari, W S; Wai, J S; Hoffman, J M

    1991-01-01

    Derivatives of pyridinones were found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and prevent the spread of HIV-1 infection in cell culture without an appreciable effect on other retroviral or cellular polymerases. 3-[( (4,7-Dimethyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl) methyl]amino ]-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one (L-697,639) and 3-[[ (4,7-dichloro-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl) methyl]amino]-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one (L-697,661), two compounds within this series, had HIV-1 RT IC50 values in the range of 20-800 nM, depending upon the template-primer used. The most potent inhibition was obtained with rC.dG and dA.dT as template--primers. With rC.dG, reversible slow-binding non-competitive inhibition was observed. [3H]L-697,639 bound preferentially to enzyme-template-primer complexes. This binding was magnesium-dependent and saturable with a stoichiometry of 1 mol of [3H]L-697,639 per mol of RT heterodimer. Displacement of [3H]L-697,639 was seen with phosphonoformate. In human T-lymphoid-cell culture, L-697,639 and L-697,661 inhibited the spread of HIV-1 infection by at least 95% at concentrations of 12-200 nM. Synergism between 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine or dideoxyinosine and either of these compounds was also demonstrated in cell culture. Based upon their specificity for HIV-1 RT activity, template-primer dependence on potency and ability to displace [3H]L-697,639; a tetrahydroimidazo [4,5,1-jk] [1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione derivative R82150 and the dipyridodiazepinone BI-RG-587 appear to inhibit RT activity by the same mechanism as the pyridinones. PMID:1713693

  20. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors of human herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Lora; Zhi, Yun; Cheng, Hoyee; Ghosh, Ayantika; Piazza, Paolo; Yee, Michael B.; Kumar, Santosh; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bloom, David C.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Kinchington, Paul R.; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; D’Aiuto, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality through lifelong recurrent cycles of lytic and latent infection in several tissues, including the human nervous system. Acyclovir (ACV) and its prodrug, the current antivirals of choice for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and, to some extent, varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are nucleoside analogues that inhibit viral DNA replication. Rising viral resistance and the need for more effective second-line drugs have motivated searches for additional antiviral agents, particularly non-nucleoside based agents. We evaluated the antiviral activity of five compounds with predicted lysosomotropic activity using conventional and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal (iPSC-neurons) cultures. Their potency and toxicity were compared with ACV and the lysosomotropic agents chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Out of five compounds tested, micromolar concentrations of 30N12, 16F19, and 4F17 showed antiviral activity comparable to ACV (50μM) during lytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections, reduced viral DNA copy number, and reduced selected HSV-1 protein levels. These compounds also inhibited the reactivation of ‘quiescent’ HSV-1 infection established in iPSC-neurons, but did not inhibit viral entry into host cells. The same compounds had greater potency than ACV against lytic VZV infection; they also inhibited replication of human cytomegalovirus. The anti-herpetic effects of these non-nucleoside agents merit further evaluation in vivo. PMID:26079681

  1. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors of human herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    McClain, Lora; Zhi, Yun; Cheng, Hoyee; Ghosh, Ayantika; Piazza, Paolo; Yee, Michael B; Kumar, Santosh; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bloom, David C; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Kinchington, Paul R; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; D'Aiuto, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality through lifelong recurrent cycles of lytic and latent infection in several tissues, including the human nervous system. Acyclovir (ACV) and its prodrug, the current antivirals of choice for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and, to some extent, varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are nucleoside analogues that inhibit viral DNA replication. Rising viral resistance and the need for more effective second-line drugs have motivated searches for additional antiviral agents, particularly non-nucleoside based agents. We evaluated the antiviral activity of five compounds with predicted lysosomotropic activity using conventional and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal (iPSC-neurons) cultures. Their potency and toxicity were compared with ACV and the lysosomotropic agents chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Out of five compounds tested, micromolar concentrations of 30N12, 16F19, and 4F17 showed antiviral activity comparable to ACV (50μM) during lytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections, reduced viral DNA copy number, and reduced selected HSV-1 protein levels. These compounds also inhibited the reactivation of 'quiescent' HSV-1 infection established in iPSC-neurons, but did not inhibit viral entry into host cells. The same compounds had greater potency than ACV against lytic VZV infection; they also inhibited replication of human cytomegalovirus. The anti-herpetic effects of these non-nucleoside agents merit further evaluation in vivo. PMID:26079681

  2. Subunit-specific mutational analysis of residue N348 in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N348I in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) confers resistance to zidovudine (AZT) and nevirapine. Biochemical studies demonstrated that N348I indirectly increases AZT resistance by decreasing the frequency of secondary ribonuclease H (RNase H) cleavages that reduce the RNA/DNA duplex length of the template/primer (T/P) and diminish the efficiency of AZT-monophosphate (MP) excision. By contrast, there is some discrepancy in the literature in regard to the mechanisms associated with nevirapine resistance: one study suggested that it is due to decreased inhibitor binding while others suggest that it may be related to the decreased RNase H cleavage phenotype. From a structural perspective, N348 in both subunits of RT resides distal to the enzyme's active sites, to the T/P binding tract and to the nevirapine-binding pocket. As such, the structural mechanisms associated with the resistance phenotypes are not known. Results Using a novel modelled structure of RT in complex with an RNA/DNA T/P, we identified a putative interaction between the β14-β15 loop in the p51 subunit of RT and the RNA template. Substitution of the asparagine at codon 348 in the p51 subunit with either isoleucine or leucine abrogated the observed protein-RNA interaction, thus, providing a possible explanation for the decreased RNase H phenotype. By contrast, alanine or glutamine substitutions exerted no effect. To validate this model, we introduced the N348I, N348L, N348A and N348Q mutations into RT and purified enzymes that contained subunit-specific mutations. N348I and N348L significantly decreased the frequency of secondary RNase H cleavages and increased the enzyme's ability to excise AZT-MP. As predicted by the modelling, this phenotype was due to the mutation in the p51 subunit of RT. By contrast, the N348A and N348Q RTs exhibited RNase H cleavage profiles and AZT-MP excision activities similar to the wild-type enzyme. All N348 mutant RTs exhibited decreased nevirapine

  3. Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors Suppress Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Takeshi; Fowler, Benjamin J.; Kim, Younghee; Yasuma, Reo; Krueger, Laura A.; Gelfand, Bradley D.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the laser-induced mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods We evaluated the NRTIs lamivudine (3TC), zidovudine (AZT), and abacavir (ABC) and the P2X7 antagonist A438079. Choroidal neovascularization was induced by laser injury in C57BL/6J wild-type, Nlrp3−/−, and P2rx7−/− mice, and CNV volume was measured after 7 days by confocal microscopy. Drugs were administered by intravitreous injection immediately after the laser injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A in RPE-choroid lysates was measured 3 days after laser injury by ELISA. HEK293 cells expressing human and mouse P2X7 were exposed to the selective P2X7 receptor agonist 2′, 3′-(benzoyl-4-benzoyl)-ATP (Bz-ATP) with or without 3TC, and VEGF-A levels in media were measured by ELISA. Results Intravitreous injection of 3TC, AZT, and ABC significantly suppressed laser-induced CNV in C57BL/6J wild-type and Nlrp3−/− mice (P < 0.05) but not in P2rx7−/− mice. Intravitreous injection of A438079 also suppressed the laser-induced CNV (P < 0.05). The NRTIs 3TC, AZT, and ABC blocked VEGF-A levels in the RPE/choroid after laser injury in wild-type (P < 0.05) but not P2rx7−/− mice. Moreover, there was no additive effect of 3TC on CNV inhibition when coadministered with a neutralizing VEGF-A antibody. Stimulation of human and mouse P2X7-expressing HEK293 cells with Bz-ATP increased VEGF secretion (P < 0.001), which was abrogated by 3TC (P < 0.001). Stimulation of primary human RPE cells with Bz-ATP increased VEGFA and IL6 mRNA levels, which were abrogated by 3TC. Conclusions Multiple clinically relevant NRTIs suppressed laser-induced CNV and downregulated VEGF-A, via P2X7. PMID:26529046

  4. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide against human telomerase reverse transcriptase inhibits the proliferation of Eca-109 esophageal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    FAN, XIANG-KUI; YAN, RUI-HUA; LI, BAO-JIANG; CHEN, XIANG-MING; WEI, LIN; WANG, ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the growth of tumor cells may be inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides (ASODNs) targeted against human telomerase (hTR) or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), resulting in antitumor activity in a wide variety of tumors. However, few studies have investigated the effect of hTERT gene-targeted ASODNs on telomerase activity and cell proliferation in human esophageal cancer. In the present study, an MTT assay was used to determine the growth inhibition rate of Eca-109 cells treated with a hTERT-targeted phosphorothioate-ASODN (PS-ASODN). An inverted microscope was used to observe the morphologic changes of the cells following treatment with 5 μM PS-ASODN for 10 days. Telomerase activity was detected using the silver staining semi-quantitative telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Following treatment with the PS-ASODN (1–5 μmol/l), the proliferation of the Eca-109 cells was inhibited. The differences in inhibition rate between the PS-ASODN and blank control groups were statistically significant (P<0.05) when the concentration of the PS-ASODN was ≥2 μmol/l, whereas no statistically significant difference was identified between the non-specific-ASODN and blank control groups. The inhibition rate increased gradually as the concentration of the PS-ASODN increased and with time, suggesting that the PS-ASODN inhibited the growth of Eca-109 cells in a concentration-dependent, time-dependent and sequence-specific manner. The growth rate of the cells incubated with the PS-ASODN was reduced compared with that of the control cells. Cells treated with the PS-ASODN became round, suspended and reduced in size. The PS-ASODN was also found to inhibit telomerase activity. The ability of the PS-ASODN to inhibit the telomerase activity and cell proliferation of the Eca-109 cell line suggests that ASODNs have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:25187833

  5. Viral resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific pyridinone reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Nunberg, J H; Schleif, W A; Boots, E J; O'Brien, J A; Quintero, J C; Hoffman, J M; Emini, E A; Goldman, M E

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific pyridinone reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors prevent HIV-1 replication in cell culture (M. E. Goldman, J. H. Nunberg, J. A. O'Brien, J.C. Quintero, W. A. Schleif, K. F. Freund, S. L. Gaul, W. S. Saari, J. S. Wai, J. M. Hoffman, P. S. Anderson, D. J. Hupe, E. A. Emini, and A. M. Stern, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:6863-6867, 1991). In contrast to nucleoside analog inhibitors, such as AZT, which need to be converted to triphosphates by host cells, these compounds act directly to inhibit RT via a mechanism which is noncompetitive with respect to deoxynucleoside triphosphates. As one approach to define the mechanism of action of pyridinone inhibitors, we isolated resistant mutants of HIV-1 in cell culture. Serial passage in the presence of inhibitor yielded virus which was 1,000-fold resistant to compounds of this class. Bacterially expressed RTs molecularly cloned from resistant viruses were also resistant. The resistant RT genes encoded two amino acid changes, K-103 to N and Y-181 to C, each of which contributed partial resistance. The mutation at amino acid 181 lies adjacent to the conserved YG/MDD motif found in most DNA and RNA polymerases. The mutation at amino acid 103 lies within a region of RT which may be involved in PPi binding. The resistant viruses, although sensitive to nucleoside analogs, were cross-resistant to the structurally unrelated RT inhibitors TIBO R82150 (R. Pauwels, K. Andries, J. Desmyter, D. Schols, M. J. Kukla, H. J. Breslin, A. Raeymaeckers, J. Van Gelder, R. Woestenborghs, J. Heykanti, K. Schellekens, M. A. C. Janssen, E. De Clercq, and P. A. J. Janssen, Nature [London] 343:470-474, 1990) and BI-RG-587 (V. J. Merluzzi, K. D. Hargrave, M. Labadia, K. Grozinger, M. Skoog, J. C. Wu, C.-K. Shih, K. Eckner, S. Hattox, J. Adams, A. S. Rosenthal, R. Faanes, R. J. Eckner, R. A. Koup, and J. L. Sullivan, Science 250:1411-1413, 1990). Thus, these nonnucleoside analog inhibitors may share a

  6. Prevalence of Primary HIV Drug Resistance in Thailand Detected by Short Reverse Transcriptase Genotypic Resistance Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Pinsai, Subencha; Chantratita, Wasun; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Leechawengwongs, Manoon; Thipmontree, Wilawan; Siriyakorn, Nirada; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) is the major cause of treatment failure after scaling up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIVDR testing prior to ART initiation is not routinely performed in resource-limited settings. We aimed to assess the prevalence of primary HIVDR by short reverse transcriptase (RT) genotypic resistance assay and evaluate of the impact of the mutations on the treatment outcomes. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. Fourteen major mutations of codon 99–191 on the RT gene were selected (K103N, V106A/M, V108I, Q151M, Y181C/I, M184V/I, Y188C/L/H, and G190S/A) at a cost of testing of 35 USD. The association between the presence of primary HIVDR and undetectable HIV RNA (<50 copies/mL) after 6 months of ART was determined. Results A total of 265 HIV-infected patients were included, with a median age of 35.2 (range, 16.8–75.2) years; 62.6% were males. The median (interquartile range) CD4 cell count at ART initiation was 216 (77–381) cells/mm3. The overall prevalence of primary HIVDR was 7.9%. The prevalence of each HIVDR mutation were K103N 6.0%, V106I 1.1%, V108I 0.4%, Y181C 2.3%, Y181I 0.7%, Y181V 0.4%, M184V 3.0%, M184I 1.5%, and G190A 2.3%. No associated factor of having primary HIVDR was determined. By multiple stepwise logistic regression, factors associated with undetectable HIV RNA after 6 months of ART were: having M184V/I (odds ratio [OR] 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–0.62, p = 0.013), condom use (OR 2.38; 95% CI 1.12–5.06, p = 0.024), and adherence per 5% increase (OR 1.16; 95% CI 1.00–1.35, p = 0.044). Conclusions The prevalence of primary HIVDR is approximately 8%; it is associated with detectable HIV RNA at 6 months after ART initiation. Routine “short RT” genotypic resistance assay should be considered in resource-limited settings to maximize treatment outcome. PMID:26828876

  7. Treatment-limiting toxicities associated withnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy: A prospective, observational study**

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Rosario; Santos, Jesús; Camino, Xavier; Arazo, Piedad; Torres Perea, Rafael; Echevarrfa, Santiago; Ribera, Esteban; Sánchez de la Rosa, Rainel; Moreno Guillen, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Recover Study is an ongoing, prospective study designed 10 to assess toxicity associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (stavudine, zidovudine, lamivudine, didanosine, abacavir) in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in routine clinical practice. This project is being conducted at 120 HIV units at teaching hospitals across Spain. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the most common treatment-limiting 10 moderate to severe clinical and laboratory adverse effects (AEs), and the individual NRTIs involved in the development of these effects, in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART who discontinued use of an NRTI in the Recover Study. Methods: Patients eligible for participation in the Recover Study are aged10 ≥18 years; have virologically documented HIV-1 infection; have sustained viral suppression (viral load <200 cells/mL or stable, heavily experienced [ie, have received ≥3 antiretroviral regimens] patients with viral load <5000 cells/mL) for ≥6 months; are receiving HAART; are undergoing active follow-up; and have developed 2:1 NRTI-associated AE that, in the opinion of a study investigator and under the conditions of routine clinical practice, justified discontinuation of treatment with the offending drug (principal AE/offending NRTI). The present study included patients recruited for the Recover Study between September 2002 and May 2003. Results: A total of 1391 patients were enrolled (966 men, 425 women; mean 1 age, 42 years [range, 18–67 years]). Five hundred six patients (36.4%) had been diagnosed with AIDS. The mean duration of treatment with the offending NRTI was 74 months (range, 6–156 months). Seven hundred nine patients (51.0%) were receiving fourth-line (or more) therapy. Eight hundred twenty-one patients (59.0%) were receiving nonnucleoside analogues, and 552 patients (39.7%), protease inhibitors, as components of their HAART

  8. Reverse transcriptase domain sequences from tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) long terminal repeat retrotransposons: sequence characterization and phylogenetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Da-Long; Hou, Xiao-Gai; Jia, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Tree peony is an important horticultural plant worldwide of great ornamental and medicinal value. Long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-retrotransposons) are the major components of most plant genomes and can substantially impact the genome in many ways. It is therefore crucial to understand their sequence characteristics, genetic distribution and transcriptional activity; however, no information about them is available in tree peony. Ty1-copia-like reverse transcriptase sequences were amplified from tree peony genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with degenerate oligonucleotide primers corresponding to highly conserved domains of the Ty1-copia-like retrotransposons in this study. PCR fragments of roughly 270 bp were isolated and cloned, and 33 sequences were obtained. According to alignment and phylogenetic analysis, all sequences were divided into six families. The observed difference in the degree of nucleotide sequence similarity is an indication for high level of sequence heterogeneity among these clones. Most of these sequences have a frame shift, a stop codon, or both. Dot-blot analysis revealed distribution of these sequences in all the studied tree peony species. However, different hybridization signals were detected among them, which is in agreement with previous systematics studies. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) indicated that Ty1-copia retrotransposons in tree peony were transcriptionally inactive. The results provide basic genetic and evolutionary information of tree peony genome, and will provide valuable information for the further utilization of retrotransposons in tree peony. PMID:26019529

  9. APOBEC3DE Inhibits LINE-1 Retrotransposition by Interacting with ORF1p and Influencing LINE Reverse Transcriptase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Weizi; Xu, Jiwei; Yuan, Wensu; Song, Xuan; Zhang, Jianyong; Wei, Wei; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Human long interspersed elements 1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only autonomous non-LTR retroelement in humans and has been associated with genome instability, inherited genetic diseases, and the development of cancer. Certain human APOBEC3 family proteins are known to have LINE-1 restriction activity. The mechanisms by which APOBEC3 affects LINE-1 retrotransposition are not all well characterized; here, we confirm that both A3B and A3DE have a strong ability to inhibit LINE-1 retrotransposition. A3DE interacts with LINE-1 ORF1p to target LINE-1 ribonucleoprotein particles in an RNA-dependent manner. Moreover, A3DE binds to LINE-1 RNA and ORF1 protein in cell culture system. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that A3DE co-localizes with ORF1p in cytoplasm. Furthermore, A3DE inhibits LINE-1 reverse transcriptase activity in LINE-1 ribonucleoprotein particles in a cytidine deaminase-independent manner. In contrast, A3B has less inhibitory effects on LINE-1 reverse transcriptase activity despite its strong inhibition of LINE-1 retrotransposition. This study demonstrates that different A3 proteins have been evolved to inhibit LINE-1 activity through distinct mechanisms. PMID:27428332

  10. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase binds to a pre-organized hTR in vivo exposing its template.

    PubMed

    Zemora, Georgeta; Handl, Stefan; Waldsich, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized reverse transcriptase that is responsible for telomere length maintenance. As in other organisms, the minimal components required for an active human telomerase are the template-providing telomerase RNA (hTR) and the enzymatic entity telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Here, we explored the structure of hTR and the hTERT-induced conformational changes within hTR in living cells. By employing an in vivo DMS chemical probing technique, we showed that the pseudoknot and associated triple helical scaffold form stably in vivo independently of hTERT. In fact, the dimethyl-sulfate (DMS) modification pattern suggests that hTR alone is capable of adopting a conformation that is suited to interact with hTERT. However, in the absence of hTERT the template region of hTR is only weakly accessible to DMS-modifications. The predominant change after binding of hTERT to hTR is the exposure of the template region. PMID:26481359