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Sample records for non-pneumococcal streptococcal pneumonia

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Community-Acquired Viridans Streptococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Ha; Choi, Keum-Ju; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Seo, Hyewon; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Viridans streptococci (VS) are a large group of streptococcal bacteria that are causative agents of community-acquired respiratory tract infection. However, data regarding their clinical characteristics are limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and radiologic features of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with or without parapneumonic effusion caused by VS. Methods Of 455 consecutive CAP patients with or without parapneumonic effusion, VS were isolated from the blood or pleural fluid in 27 (VS group, 5.9%) patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified as a single etiologic agent in 70 (control group) patients. We compared various clinical parameters between the VS group and the control group. Results In univariate analysis, the VS group was characterized by more frequent complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema and bed-ridden status, lower incidences of productive cough, elevated procalcitonin (>0.5 ng/mL), lower age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, and more frequent ground glass opacity (GGO) or consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scans. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema, productive cough, bed-ridden status, and GGO or consolidation on CT scans were independent predictors of community-acquired respiratory tract infection caused by VS. Conclusion CAP caused by VS commonly presents as complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema. It is characterized by less frequent productive cough, more frequent bed-ridden status, and less common CT pulmonary parenchymal lesions. However, its treatment outcome and clinical course are similar to those of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26175772

  2. Invasive streptococcal infections in the era before the acquired immune deficiency syndrome: a 10 years' compilation of patients with streptococcal bacteraemia in North Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Barnham, M

    1989-05-01

    Significant streptococcal (non-pneumococcal, non-enterococcal) bacteraemia was detected in 100 patients in two Health Districts of North Yorkshire in the decade 1978-1988. Patients with these infections accounted for 11% of the total 902 patients in the districts in whom bacteraemia was diagnosed during the period. Infection was most often seen with beta-haemolytic streptococci (52 patients) comprising Lancefield group A (Streptococcus pyogenes) (20 patients), group B (13), group C (5), group G (9), haemolytic Streptococcus milleri and non-groupable streptococci (5). The wide variety of serious infections included cellulitis, abscess, septicaemia, pneumonia, septic arthritis, necrotising fasciitis, acute endocarditis and mycotic aneurysm. Of these 52 patients, 21 (40%) died. alpha-Haemolytic streptococcal bacteraemia was diagnosed in 38 patients of whom 24 (63%) suffered from endocarditis and three (8%) died. Three of ten patients with non-haemolytic or anaerobic streptococcal bacteraemia died also. Six of the 100 patients with streptococcal bacteraemia had concomitant acute virus infections. Of the total 56 patients with infective endocarditis diagnosed in the districts during the period, streptococci were responsible in 30 (54%) of them. The predisposing factors, clinical features and outcome of the infections are described and discussed. PMID:2663996

  3. Influenza B/Streptococcal co-infection complicated by organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Wang C; Lam, Sonia H Y; Wong, Maria P; Ip, Mary S M; Lam, David C L

    2016-09-01

    Organizing pneumonia is a rare complication of influenza infection that has substantial morbidity. We report the first case of organizing pneumonia associated with influenza B and Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection that had significant improvement with corticosteroid treatment. The clinical and radiological features of organizing pneumonia associated with this coinfection are similar to those after influenza A infection. Timely use of systemic glucocorticosteroids would be of benefit in promoting resolution for influenza-associated organizing pneumonia. PMID:27516886

  4. Association of bacterial carbohydrate-specific cold agglutinin antibody production with immunization by group C, group B type III, and Streptococcus pneumoniae type XIV streptococcal vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Colling, R G; Pearson, T C; Brown, J C

    1983-01-01

    Rabbits immunized with group B type III, group C, and Streptococcus pneumoniae type XIV streptococcal vaccines developed autoantibodies reactive with autologous and isologous erythrocytes and human O-positive erythrocytes at reduced temperatures. The cold agglutinin antibodies were present in both the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG fractions of group C streptococcal antiserum and in the IgM fraction of group B type III and S. pneumoniae type XIV antisera. BALB/c, CF1, and local strains of mice immunized with group B type III and S. pneumoniae type XIV streptococcal vaccines also produced a cold agglutinin antibody reactive with rabbit and human erythrocytes. The cold agglutinin antibodies were reactive with saccharide compounds representative of the determinants present on the individual bacterial carbohydrate structures, individual vaccine preparations, and isolated polysaccharides. The group C antibodies in rabbits were reactive with sugar ligands in the following order: N-acetylgalactosamine greater than melibiose greater than lactose greater than galactose greater than glucose. Group B type III and S. pneumoniae type XIV cold agglutinin antibodies in rabbit antisera, however, displayed reactivities different from group C antibodies and from each other. Group B type III antibodies reacted with galactose greater than lactose greater than N-acetylgalactosamine greater than glucose greater than rhamnose; S. pneumoniae type XIV antibodies reacted with lactose greater than melibiose greater than galactose greater than glucose greater than N-acetylgalactosamine. The same relative ligand specificity was observed for the cold agglutinin antibodies in S. pneumoniae type XIV mouse antisera. The cold agglutinin antibodies in group B type III and S. pneumoniae type XIV antiserum reacted with erythrocytes at higher temperatures (up to 31 degrees C) than did group C antibodies (up to 14 degrees C). In addition, S. pneumoniae type XIV antibodies did not discriminate between I

  5. GENES, IN ADDITION TO TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 2, PLAY A ROLE IN ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streptococcus infection in human populations continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mic...

  6. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia Print A A A ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  7. Staphylococcal and Streptococcal Superantigen Exotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Adam R.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Kohler, Petra L.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Leung, Donald Y. M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This review begins with a discussion of the large family of Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococcal pyrogenic toxin T lymphocyte superantigens from structural and immunobiological perspectives. With this as background, the review then discusses the major known and possible human disease associations with superantigens, including associations with toxic shock syndromes, atopic dermatitis, pneumonia, infective endocarditis, and autoimmune sequelae to streptococcal illnesses. Finally, the review addresses current and possible novel strategies to prevent superantigen production and passive and active immunization strategies. PMID:23824366

  8. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Neumonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  9. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the flu Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you ...

  10. Restless legs syndrome: association with streptococcal or mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Muneaki; Tsuchiya, Katsunori; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Singer, Harvey S

    2004-08-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections have been reported to cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as chorea, tics, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, presumably through autoimmune damage to basal ganglia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have also been reported to cause damage to the basal ganglia. Restless legs syndrome is a movement disorder with focal restlessness, an irresistible desire to move, and exacerbation by long periods of sitting or lying. We present three children with transient restless legs syndrome-like symptoms possibly associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. One of three patients had persistently elevated enzyme-linked immunosorbent optical density values against human caudate and putamen. PMID:15301831

  11. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause typical pneumonia. These include Legionella pneumophila , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , and Chlamydophila pneumoniae . Atypical pneumonia also tends to have milder symptoms than typical pneumonia. Causes Mycoplasma pneumonia is a type of atypical pneumonia. It ...

  12. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  13. Streptococcal infections of skin and PANDAS.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Rosanna; Pallanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Group A streptococcal infections are associated with a variety of infections and a subset of obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or tic disorders. Screening of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics in patient with streptococcal infection of skin must be effective in identifying subjects who met published criteria for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). PMID:24502308

  14. Streptoccocus pyogenes: a forgotten cause of severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Birch, C; Gowardman, J

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (Lancefield Group A streptoccocus) that was complicated by a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Although this micro-organism is an uncommon cause of community-acquired pneumonia, previously well individuals may be infected and the clinical course may be fulminant. A household contact was the likely point of infection. Invasive group A streptococcal disease continues to remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the community and therefore will continue to be encountered by intensive care physicians. Treatment of Group A streptococcal infection remains penicillin; however, clindamycin should be added in severe infection. PMID:10701045

  15. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  16. Group G streptococcal lymphadenitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Corning, B F; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    1991-12-01

    Group G streptococci which have been isolated from the oral flora of rats are also normal inhabitants of the human skin, oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. This group of streptococci can cause a wide variety of clinical diseases in humans, including septicemia, pharyngitis, endocarditis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Ten days after oral gavage with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, 12 of 22 two-month-old, female, outbred, viral-antibody-free rats presented with red ocular and nasal discharges and marked swelling of the cervical region. Various degrees of firm, nonpitting edema in the region of the cervical lymph nodes and salivary glands as well as pale mucous membranes and dehydration were observed. Pure cultures of beta-hemolytic streptococci were obtained from the cervical lymph nodes of three rats that were necropsied. A rapid latex test system identified the isolates to have group G-specific antigen. These streptococcal isolates fermented trehalose and lactose but not sorbitol and inulin and did not hydrolize sodium hippurate or bile esculin. A Voges-Proskauer test was negative for all six isolates. Serologic tests to detect the presence of immunoglobulin G antibody to rat viral pathogens and Mycoplasma pulmonis were negative. Histopathologic changes included acute necrotizing inflammation of the cervical lymph nodes with multiple large colonies of coccoid bacteria at the perimeter of the necrotiz zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of naturally occurring disease attributed to group G streptococci in rats. PMID:1757539

  17. Streptococcal superantigens: categorization and clinical associations.

    PubMed

    Commons, Robert J; Smeesters, Pierre R; Proft, Thomas; Fraser, John D; Robins-Browne, Roy; Curtis, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Superantigens are key virulence factors in the immunopathogenesis of invasive disease caused by group A streptococcus. These protein exotoxins have also been associated with severe group C and group G streptococcal infections. A number of novel streptococcal superantigens have recently been described with some resulting confusion in their classification. In addition to clarifying the nomenclature of streptococcal superantigens and proposing guidelines for their categorization, this review summarizes the evidence supporting their involvement in various clinical diseases including acute rheumatic fever. PMID:24210845

  18. Streptococcal meningitis following myelogram procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew; Bergeron, Toni; Fox, Teresa; Gum, Greg; Pischke, Vera; Potts, David; Townes, John; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2007-05-01

    In September of 2004, we investigated 7 cases of post-myelography meningitis. Streptococcal species were recovered from blood or cerebrospinal fluid in all cases. Our findings suggest that droplet transmission of the oral flora of the clinician performing the procedure was the most likely source of these infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of face masks by those performing myelograms. PMID:17464927

  19. Antibody to streptococcal cysteine proteinase as a seromarker of group A Streptococcal (Streptococcus pyogenes) infections.

    PubMed

    Batsford, Stephen; Brundiers, Mechtild; Schweier, Oliver; Horbach, Elmar; Mönting, Jürgen Schulte

    2002-01-01

    Serological tests are commonly employed to aid the diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes infections, particularly when non-suppurative sequelae are suspected. Conventional laboratory practice is to measure antibody levels to various combinations of the extracellular group A Streptococcus (GAS) antigens streptolysin O (SLO), DNase B, streptokinase and hyaluronidase. Antibody to the extracellular cysteine proteinase streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) and its precursor zymogen is also produced in response to GAS infections. An indirect hemagglutination test for antibody to zymogen/SPE B was established and evaluated in serum samples from 168 patients with proven (n = 27) or suspected GAS (n = 141) infections, which were also screened for antibodies using the 4 conventional tests. For comparison, sera from 56 patients infected with a variety of other pathogens, as well as sera from 16 patients infected with either S. agalactiae or S. pneumoniae and 34 sera from healthy subjects, were tested. Statistical analysis confirmed that antibody to zymogen/SPE B is a serological marker that can discriminate GAS infections. It can be ranked with the anti-SLO titer, currently the most widely used test, as a marker of an antecedent GAS infection. PMID:12160165

  20. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunocompromised host." Related conditions include: Hospital-acquired pneumonia Pneumocystis jirovecii (previously called Pneumocystis carinii) pneumonia Pneumonia - cytomegalovirus Pneumonia ...

  1. [Chest radiograph of atypical pneumonia: comparison among Chlamydia pneumoniae. Pneumonia, ornithosis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Itoh, I; Ishida, T; Hashimoto, T; Arita, M; Osawa, M; Tachibana, H; Nishiyama, H; Takakura, S; Bando, K; Nishizawa, Y; Amitani, R; Onishi, H; Taguchi, Y

    2000-11-01

    No report has been found comparing Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) pneumonia radiographically with other atypical pneumonias, Chlamydia psittaci (C. psittaci) pneumonia and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) pneumonia. We described the chest radiographs of three kinds of pneumonia cases: 46 cases of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, 39 cases of C. psittaci pneumonia, and 131 cases of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Radiographic shadows were categorized into main shadows and sub-shadows. The main shadows are classified from the viewpoint of the characteristics; air space consolidation(AS), ground-glass opacity(GG), reticular shadow(RS), bronchopneumonia(BP), and small nodular shadows (SN). The size, the site, and the number of the main shadows were also analyzed. In comparison among the three pneumonias, BP was the most frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.40/case). AS predominated in C. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.67/case), and GG in C. psittaci pneumonia (0.62/case). The number of main shadows was equal, about 1.4/case in three pneumonias. Large shadows were less frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02) and C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01). Main shadows were more frequent in the outer zone in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01), and in the middle zone in C. psittaci pneumonia than in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02). Cases with bilateral main shadows were less common in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (9%) than C. pneumoniae pneumonia(33%, p = 0.001) and C. psittaci pneumonia(30%, p = 0.005). Thickening of bronchovascular bundles as a sub-shadow was most frequently noted in M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Some differences among the three atypical pneumonias were seen in the chest radiograph. However, no specific findings of C. pneumoniae pneumonia were shown radiographically in this study. PMID:11140079

  2. Human pathogenic streptococcal proteomics and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jason N; Henningham, Anna; Gillen, Christine M; Ramachandran, Vidiya; Walker, Mark J

    2008-03-01

    Gram-positive streptococci are non-motile, chain-forming bacteria commonly found in the normal oral and bowel flora of warm-blooded animals. Over the past decade, a proteomic approach combining 2-DE and MS has been used to systematically map the cellular, surface-associated and secreted proteins of human pathogenic streptococcal species. The public availability of complete streptococcal genomic sequences and the amalgamation of proteomic, genomic and bioinformatic technologies have recently facilitated the identification of novel streptococcal vaccine candidate antigens and therapeutic agents. The objective of this review is to examine the constituents of the streptococcal cell wall and secreted proteome, the mechanisms of transport of surface and secreted proteins, and describe the current methodologies employed for the identification of novel surface-displayed proteins and potential vaccine antigens. PMID:21136841

  3. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia in a patient with sickle cell anemia on penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, W.; Salah, H.; Khakoo, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Serious invasive bacterial infections, particularly those due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Hemophilus influenzae, are a well-known complication in patients with sickle cell disease. Early penicillin prophylaxis has been shown to prevent these infections and also to improve survival. This article describes a child with sickle cell anemia who, while on penicillin prophylaxis, developed a group A streptococcal bacteremia, a pathogen not commonly associated with bacteremia in sickle cell disease. PMID:7783241

  4. The Impact of Prior Antibiotic Therapy on Outcomes in Children Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Eran; Breuer, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review current available literature regarding the effect of prior antibiotic treatment on outcomes of children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). To date, no prospective trial has reported information regarding morbidity or mortality in this group of patients. Retrospective studies have provided evidence for the advantage of treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics in children who failed prior antibiotic therapy. We discuss the changing epidemiology of CAP in the post PCV13 and Hib vaccines era and its relevance to the outcome of pediatric patients hospitalized for CAP. Current studies still report Streptococcus pneumoniae as the most common typical bacterial causative agent in pediatric CAP. However, in children who fail to respond to guideline directed antibiotic therapy, a non-pneumococcal, possibly one of several β-lactam resistant causative bacterial agents should be considered thus clarifying the advantage for broad-spectrum empirical antibiotic treatment in this group of patients. PMID:26715113

  5. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  6. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000082.htm Mycoplasma pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mycoplasma pneumonia is an infection of the lungs by the ...

  7. Pulmonary Renal Syndrome After Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Mara-Koosham, Gopi; Stoltze, Karl; Aday, Jeffrey; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary renal syndrome is a class of small vessel vasculitides that are characterized by the dual presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and glomerulonephritis. Pulmonary renal syndrome has multiple etiologies, but its development has been rarely reported following infection with group A streptococcus. We present the case of a 36-year-old Native American male who was transferred to our facility due to refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis 2 weeks prior to admission. Given the presence of hemoptysis, bronchoscopy was performed and was consistent with DAH. Urinalysis demonstrated hematuria and proteinuria, in the setting of elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Additionally, antistreptolysin O titer was positive. Given the constellation of laboratory findings and history of streptococcal pharyngitis, the patient was diagnosed with PRS secondary to streptococcal infection. High-dose methylprednisolone was initiated with concomitant plasmapheresis. He was extubated successfully after his respiratory status improved and was eventually discharged home after making a full recovery within 2 weeks after admission. This case illustrates the importance of clinically relevant sequelae of streptococcal infection as well as the appropriate treatment of PRS secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis with plasmapheresis and intravenous corticosteroids. PMID:27231692

  8. Bacteriology of viridans streptococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Luh, K T; Deng, L J; Hsieh, W C

    1987-11-01

    In order to assess the species distribution and the antibiotic susceptibility of viridans streptococci in various human infections, we reviewed 164 cases of viridans streptococcal bacteremia seen at the National Taiwan University Hospital between May 1981 and April 1987. The organisms were isolated from 83 patients with endocarditis. Among 81 nonendocarditis patients, only 54 had clinically recognizable foci of suppurative inflammation. Mainly based on API 20 STREP system of species identification, S. sanguis II accounted for 24.4%; S. mitis, 20.7%; S. sanguis I, 20.1%; and S. milleri 2, 11.6% of the 164 cases studied. Of 83 endocarditis patients, 27.7% were S. sanguis I; 21.7%, S. sanguis II; and 16.9%, S. mitis. In nonendocarditis bacteremia with known suppurative lesions, 3 most often isolated organisms were S. sanguis II (24.0%), S. mitis (24.0%), and S. milleri 2 (24.0%). In nonendocarditis bacteremia without suppurative infection, the most frequent isolates were S. sanguis II (33.3%) and S. mitis (25.9%). In terms of relative frequency between endocarditis and nonendocarditis cases, S. mutan, S. sanguis I, and S. bovis had the highest frequency ratio of 7:1, 3.5:1, and 1.5:1, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G, ampicillin, and cephalothin. Tetracycline resistance, however, were observed in 35.4% of the isolates; oxacillin resistance, 11.0%; and erythromycin resistance, 9.1%. PMID:3449320

  9. Common Questions About Streptococcal Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Monica G; Higgins, Kim E; Perez, Evan D

    2016-07-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection causes 15% to 30% of sore throats in children and 5% to 15% in adults, and is more common in the late winter and early spring. The strongest independent predictors of GABHS pharyngitis are patient age of five to 15 years, absence of cough, tender anterior cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudates, and fever. To diagnose GABHS pharyngitis, a rapid antigen detection test should be ordered in patients with a modified Centor or FeverPAIN score of 2 or 3. First-line treatment for GABHS pharyngitis includes a 10-day course of penicillin or amoxicillin. Patients allergic to penicillin can be treated with firstgeneration cephalosporins, clindamycin, or macrolide antibiotics. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are more effective than acetaminophen and placebo for treatment of fever and pain associated with GABHS pharyngitis; medicated throat lozenges used every two hours are also effective. Corticosteroids provide only a small reduction in the duration of symptoms and should not be used routinely. PMID:27386721

  10. Management of streptococcal pharyngitis reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Gerber, M A; Markowitz, M

    1985-01-01

    Adequate treatment of GABHS pharyngitis with penicillin shortens the course of illness, reduces the spread of streptococci and prevents suppurative complications. It has also been a major factor in the markedly accelerated decline in the incidence of acute rheumatic fever in this country. Difficulties in the clinical diagnosis of GABHS pharyngitis make bacteriologic confirmation highly desirable. Currently a properly performed throat culture is the best way to obtain this bacteriologic confirmation. However, it is possible that rapid antigen detection tests will replace the throat culture in the future. These diagnostic tools should be used more selectively and only in conjunction with clinical and epidemiologic data. Greater selectivity will help control costs and will increase the chances of identifying patients who are truly infected and are not merely streptococcal carriers. Penicillin is still the drug of choice and an oral preparation given twice daily is as effective as more frequent doses. Patients at risk for noncompliance should be treated with a single injection of benzathine penicillin combined with procaine penicillin to lessen the local discomfort. Routine follow-up cultures of asymptomatic patients should be abandoned. Persistence of GABHS following a course of treatment may no longer be an important risk factor for the development of rheumatic fever. However, there are exceptional cases, as noted in the text, in which eradication of GABHS carriage with a short course of rifampicin may be desirable. PMID:3931060

  11. Adult Zebrafish model of streptococcal infection

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Hilary A.; Runft, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcal pathogens cause a wide array of clinical syndromes in humans, including invasive systemic infections resulting in high mortality rates. Many of these pathogens are human specific, and therefore difficult to analyze in vivo using typical animal models, as these models rarely replicate what is observed in human infections. This unit describes the use of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an animal model for streptococcal infection to analyze multiple disease states. This model closely mimics the necrotizing fasciitis/myositis pathology observed in humans from a Streptococcus pyogenes infection. The use of a zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus iniae, which replicates systemic infections caused by many streptococcal pathogens, including dissemination to the brain, is also described. Included protocols describe both intraperitoneal and intramuscular infections, as well as methods for histological and quantitative measurements of infection. PMID:19412913

  12. Prospects for a group A streptococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    McMillan, David J; Chhatwal, Gursharan S

    2005-02-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections are associated with a number of human diseases, including pharyngitis, impetigo, necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and rheumatic heart disease. An increase in the incidence of severe GAS infections in Western countries, and the awareness of the burden of GAS-associated diseases in developing nations, which remains high in spite of the availability of antibiotics, has provided the impetus for development of a safe and efficacious GAS vaccine. This has focused on the M protein, a major GAS virulence factor, however, with the publication of several GAS genomes, a number of non-M vaccine candidates are now under investigation. PMID:15732524

  13. Production of Capsular Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae Type 14 and Its Purification by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Norma; Fraguas, Laura Franco; Texeira, Esther; Massaldi, Hugo; Batista-Viera, Francisco; Ferreira, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient method for producing the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae by fermentation on tryptic soy broth and purification of this compound by using immobilized soybean lectin as an affinity adsorbent. In principle, the same strategy can be used to produce purified capsular polysaccharides from other streptococcal serotypes by selecting the appropriate lectin adsorbents. PMID:11157270

  14. Production of capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 and its purification by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N; Fraguas, L F; Texeira, E; Massaldi, H; Batista-Viera, F; Ferreira, F

    2001-02-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient method for producing the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae by fermentation on tryptic soy broth and purification of this compound by using immobilized soybean lectin as an affinity adsorbent. In principle, the same strategy can be used to produce purified capsular polysaccharides from other streptococcal serotypes by selecting the appropriate lectin adsorbents. PMID:11157270

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Norbert; Riedel, Michael; Blendinger, Christa; Oberle, Karin; Jacobs, Enno; Abele-Horn, Marianne

    2004-12-15

    An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS. PMID:15590039

  16. Transfer of plasmids by conjugation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.; Shoemaker, N.B.; Burdett, V.; Guild, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Transfer of resistance plasmids occurred by conjugation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) similiarly to the process in other streptococcal groups. The 20-megadalton plasmid pIP501 mediated its own DNase-resistant transfer by filter mating and mobilized the 3.6-megadalton non-self-transmissible pMV158. Pneumococcal strains acted as donors or as recipients for intraspecies transfers and for interspecific transfers with Streptococcus faecalis. Transfer-deficient mutants of pIP501 have been found.

  17. Streptococcal Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Streptococcal Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Korean (한국어) Spanish (español) Arabic (العربية) Strep ...

  18. Vertebral osteomyelitis combined streptococcal viridans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Chen; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2003-01-01

    Endocarditis may be difficult to diagnose in patients with osteomyelitis in an early stage because they usually are treated for fever, bone pain and stiffness in the outpatient department. Herein we report an uncommon patient who developed severe lower back pain sustained for 2 months, and streptococcal viridans infected vertebral osteomyelitis combined endocarditis were diagnosed and cured. PMID:12493523

  19. Streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis: multiple faces of the same disease.

    PubMed

    Murillo, O; Roset, A; Sobrino, B; Lora-Tamayo, J; Verdaguer, R; Jiménez-Mejias, E; Nolla, J M; Colmenero, J de D; Ariza, J

    2014-01-01

    The role of Streptococcus species as an aetiological microorganism of vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) is considered to be of little relevance. We aimed to describe a large number of cases of streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis (SVO), to analyze the clinical features associated with different Streptococcus species, and to compare them with a cohort of patients with VO caused by Staphylococcus aureus. An incidence study and a retrospective, multicenter, observational clinical study of cases of SVO (1991-2011) were performed. Statistical comparison of SVO by different species and between them and staphylococcal VO was carried out. Over the whole period there was an increasing incidence in the number of VOs and SVOs per year (p <0.05). Among 58 cases of SVO, those caused by non-viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes; n = 26) mimicked VO by S. aureus, and presented with more fever, neurological symptoms and paravertebral abscesses in comparison with those caused by the viridans group (remaining species). In contrast, the latter have a sub-acute clinical picture and were associated with the presence of endocarditis (p <0.05). Among non-viridans SVOs, concomitant infection was specifically related to S. pneumoniae (p <0.05). In conclusion, SVO presents a wide range of clinical patterns. The relationship between VO and diagnosis of endocarditis was established with SVO caused by the viridans group. Whereas non-viridans SVO mimics acute characteristics of VO caused by S. aureus, cases of viridans SVO are significantly more likely to have a sub-acute clinical presentation. The increased incidence of SVO during the last decades could support a new epidemiological scenario. PMID:23889700

  20. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  1. No Resistance to Penicillin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, or Vancomycin in Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yayan, Josef; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Rasche, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Group B Streptococcus is a primary source of pneumonia, which is a leading cause of death worldwide. During the last few decades, there has been news of growing antibiotic resistance in group B streptococci to penicillin and different antibiotic agents. This clinical study retrospectively analyzes antimicrobial resistance in inpatients who were diagnosed with group B streptococcal pneumonia. Methods: All of the required information from inpatients who were identified to have group B streptococcal pneumonia was sourced from the database at the Department of Internal Medicine of HELIOS Clinic Wuppertal, Witten/Herdecke University, in Germany, from 2004-2014. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for the different antimicrobial agents that were regularly administered to these inpatients. Results: Sixty-six inpatients with a mean age of 63.3 ± 16.1 years (45 males [68.2%, 95% CI 60.0%-79.4%] and 21 females [31.8%, 95% CI 20.6%-43.0%]) were detected to have group B streptococcal pneumonia within the study period from January 1, 2004, to August 12, 2014. Group B Streptococcus had a high resistance rate to gentamicin (12.1%), erythromycin (12.1%), clindamycin (9.1%), and co-trimoxazole (3.0%), but it was not resistant to penicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, or vancomycin (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: No resistance to penicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, or vancomycin was detected among inpatients with pneumonia caused by group B streptococci. PMID:26664260

  2. Medical treatment of multiple streptococcal liver abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlow, A.; Vellend, H.

    1983-04-01

    We describe four cases of multiple, cryptogenic, and streptococcal liver abscesses which were cured with antibiotic therapy. Two of the patients were referred for medical management as a last resort after open surgical drainage failed to eradicate the suppurative process. The other two patients were treated from the time of diagnosis with antimicrobial agents alone. Blood cultures or needle aspirates of the abscesses yielded a pure growth of streptococci in all instances. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G. Cryptogenic streptococcal abscesses may represent a subset of multiple hepatic abscesses particularly amenable to successful medical therapy consisting of a minimum of 6 weeks parenteral antibiotic therapy followed by a period of oral antibiotics until clinical, biochemical, and radiological resolution of the abscesses has occurred.

  3. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  4. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  5. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    More serious infections can result in respiratory failure, liver failure, and heart failure. Sometimes, bacterial infections occur during or just after viral pneumonia, which may lead to more serious forms ...

  6. Incidence and clinical variables associated with streptococcal throat infections: a prospective diagnostic cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Little, Paul; Hobbs, FD Richard; Mant, David; McNulty, Cliodna AM; Mullee, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of pharyngitis is commonly based on features which are thought to be associated with Lancefield group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GABHS) but it is debatable which features best predict GABHS. Non-group A strains share major virulence factors with group A, but it is unclear how commonly they present and whether their presentation differs. Aim To assess the incidence and clinical variables associated with streptococcal infections. Design and setting Prospective diagnostic cohort study in UK primary care. Method The presence of pathogenic streptococci from throat swabs was assessed among patients aged ≥5 years presenting with acute sore throat. Results Pathogenic streptococci were found in 204/597 patients (34%, 95% CI = 31 to 38%): 33% (68/204) were non-group A streptococci, mostly C (n = 29), G (n = 18) and B (n = 17); rarely D (n = 3) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 1). Patients presented with similar features whether the streptococci were group A or non-group A. The features best predicting A, C or G beta-haemolytic streptococci were patient’s assessment of severity (odds ratio [OR] for a bad sore throat 3.31, 95% CI = 1.24 to 8.83); doctors’ assessment of severity (severely inflamed tonsils OR 2.28, 95% CI = 1.39 to 3.74); absence of a bad cough (OR 2.73, 95% CI = 1.56 to 4.76), absence of a coryza (OR 1.54, 95% CI = 0.99 to 2.41); and moderately bad or worse muscle aches (OR 2.20, 95% CI = 1.41 to 3.42). Conclusion Non-group A strains commonly cause streptococcal sore throats, and present with similar symptomatic clinical features to group A streptococci. The best features to predict streptococcal sore throat presenting in primary care deserve revisiting. PMID:23211183

  7. A chimeolysin with extended-spectrum streptococcal host range found by an induced lysis-based rapid screening method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Linden, Sara B.; Wang, Jing; Yu, Junping; Nelson, Daniel C.; Wei, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    The increasing emergence of multi-drug resistant streptococci poses a serious threat to public health worldwide. Bacteriophage lysins are promising alternatives to antibiotics; however, their narrow lytic spectrum restricted to closely related species is a central shortcoming to their translational development. Here, we describe an efficient method for rapid screening of engineered chimeric lysins and report a unique “chimeolysin”, ClyR, with robust activity and an extended-spectrum streptococcal host range against most streptococcal species, including S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, S. equi, S. mutans, S. pneumoniae, S. suis and S. uberis, as well as representative enterococcal and staphylococcal species (including MRSA and VISA). ClyR is the first lysin that demonstrates activity against the dominant dental caries-causing pathogen as well as the first lysin that kills all four of the bovine mastitis-causing pathogens. This study demonstrates the success of the screening method resulting in a powerful lysin with potential for treating most streptococcal associated infections. PMID:26607832

  8. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Treated? Treatment for pneumonia depends on the type ... can go back to their normal routines. Bacterial Pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ...

  9. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  10. Identification and structural basis of binding to host lung glycogen by streptococcal virulence factors.

    PubMed

    van Bueren, Alicia Lammerts; Higgins, Melanie; Wang, Diana; Burke, Robert D; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal alpha-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors. PMID:17187076

  11. Meningococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Matthias; Mitteregger, Dieter; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-08-17

    Neisseria meningitidis remains the most important cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide, particularly in children and young adults. The second most common and a potentially severe end-organ manifestation of invasive meningococcal disease (excluding systemic sepsis) is meningococcal pneumonia. It occurs in between 5% and 15% of all patients with invasive meningococcal disease and is thus the second most common non-systemic end-organ manifestation. To establish the diagnosis requires a high level of clinical awareness - the incidence is therefore very likely underreported and underestimated. This review of 344 meningococcal pneumonia cases reported in the Americas, Europe, Australia, and Asia between 1906 and 2015 presents risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic approaches, treatment, and prognosis of meningococcal pneumonia. PMID:27443594

  12. Pathogenesis of Group A Streptococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococci are model extracellular gram-positive pathogens responsible for pharyngitis, impetigo, rheumatic fever, and acute glomerulonephritis. A resurgence of invasive streptococcal diseases and rheumatic fever has appeared in outbreaks over the past 10 years, with a predominant M1 serotype as well as others identified with the outbreaks. emm (M protein) gene sequencing has changed serotyping, and new virulence genes and new virulence regulatory networks have been defined. The emm gene superfamily has expanded to include antiphagocytic molecules and immunoglobulin-binding proteins with common structural features. At least nine superantigens have been characterized, all of which may contribute to toxic streptococcal syndrome. An emerging theme is the dichotomy between skin and throat strains in their epidemiology and genetic makeup. Eleven adhesins have been reported, and surface plasmin-binding proteins have been defined. The strong resistance of the group A streptococcus to phagocytosis is related to factor H and fibrinogen binding by M protein and to disarming complement component C5a by the C5a peptidase. Molecular mimicry appears to play a role in autoimmune mechanisms involved in rheumatic fever, while nephritis strain-associated proteins may lead to immune-mediated acute glomerulonephritis. Vaccine strategies have focused on recombinant M protein and C5a peptidase vaccines, and mucosal vaccine delivery systems are under investigation. PMID:10885988

  13. Platelet depletion and severity of streptococcal endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Lawrence; Miller, Todd; Herndon, Betty; Diez, Ireneo; Dew, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of thrombocytopenia in streptococcal endocarditis using an animal model. DESIGN: A model of human septic endocarditis was established in rats (polyethylene catheters across the aortic valve and administration of Streptococcus sanguis, 5×107 colony forming units [cfu] intravenous). Thrombocytopenia at four levels was produced by antiplatelet serum. Secondary methods of producing thrombocytopenia were also evaluated. At sacrifice (96 h after platelet depletion and 72 h after infection), vegetations were removed, weighed, diluted, plated and counted. Potential mechanisms of the dose-response relationship between vegetation density and platelet count were evaluated. SETTING: Controlled research laboratory experiments. POPULATION STUDIED: Animal models of streptococcal endocarditis. MAIN RESULTS: The bacterial density of the aortic valve vegetations significantly increased as the platelet count decreased (P=0.0007). In severely thrombocytopenic animals (two-dose antiplatelet serum), data suggest increased vegetation embolism. Platelet depletion, which was minimal with chemical methods, was produced most effectively by antithrombocyte serum. Platelet surfaces in endocarditis were found to express elevated CD62p proteins (72.7% endocarditis, 34.7% control). Platelet protein fractions were evaluated in vitro by both streptocidal (P=0.19) and phagocytosis-stimulating assays. Platelet presence in mature aortic valve vegetations averaged only about 2%. CONCLUSIONS: In platelet depletion experiments using a rat model, a dose-response relationship of peripheral circulating platelet depletion to aortic valve vegetation density was found. The mechanism relating thrombocytopenia to endocarditis severity remains unresolved. PMID:22346555

  14. [Aspiration pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Cabré, Mateu; Clavé, Pere

    2007-09-29

    The incidence and the prevalence of aspiration pneumonia (AP) in the community is poorly defined. It increases in direct relation with age and underlying diseases. The pathogenesis of AP presumes the contribution of risk factors that alter swallowing funtion and predispose the orofaringe and gastric region to bacterial colonization. The microbial etiology of AP involves Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae for community-acquired aspiration pneumonia and Gram-negative aerobic bacilli in nosocomial pneumonia. It is worth bearing in mind the relative unimportance of anaerobic bacterias in AP. When we choose the empirical antibiotic treatmentant we have to consider some pathogens identified in orofaríngea flora. Empirical treatment with antianaerobics should only be used in certain patients. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies should be used to determine the nature and extent of any swallow disorder and to rule out silent aspiration. Assessment of swallowing disorders is cost-effective and results in a significant reduction in overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:17927938

  15. CMV pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... help prevent CMV pneumonia in certain people: Using organ transplant donors who don't have CMV Using CMV-negative blood products for transfusion Using CMV-immune globulin in certain ... that can occur in people who have a weakened immune system.

  16. Streptococcal cysteine proteinase releases biologically active fragments of streptococcal surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Berge, A; Björck, L

    1995-04-28

    Streptococcus pyogenes are important pathogenic bacteria which produce an extracellular cysteine proteinase contributing to their virulence and pathogenicity. S. pyogenes also express surface molecules, M proteins, that are major virulence determinants due to their antiphagocytic property. In the present work live S. pyogenes bacteria of the M1 serotype were incubated with purified cysteine proteinase. Several peptides were solubilized, and analysis of their protein-binding properties and amino acid sequences revealed two internal fibrinogen-binding fragments of M1 protein (17 and 21 kDa, respectively), and a 36-kDa IgG-binding NH2-terminal fragment of protein H, an IgGFc-binding surface molecule. M protein also plays a role in streptococcal adherence, and removal of this and other surface proteins could promote bacterial dissemination, whereas the generation of soluble complexes between immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin-binding streptococcal surface proteins could be an etiological factor in the development of glomerulonephritis and rheumatic fever. Thus, in these serious complications to S. pyogenes infections immune complexes are found in affected organs. The cysteine proteinase also solubilized a 116-kDa internal fragment of C5a peptidase, another streptococcal surface protein. Activation of the complement system generates C5a, a peptide stimulating leukocyte chemotaxis. C5a-mediated granulocyte migration was blocked by the 116-kDa fragment. This mechanism, by which phagocytes could be prevented from reaching the site of infection, may also contribute to the pathogenicity and virulence of S. pyogenes. PMID:7730368

  17. Streptococcal Infections, Rheumatic Fever and School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Milton

    1979-01-01

    Because rheumatic fever is a potentially serious complication of a streptococcal sore throat which can lead to permanent heart disease, this article advocates the expansion of school health services in medically underserved areas. (JMF)

  18. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  19. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  20. A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gayford, Kylie; McCarthy, Ana; Hague, William M

    2011-01-01

    A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis, a rare complication of an invasive infection by a common maternal commensal bacterium, which demonstrates the need to develop rapid and accurate antepartum and intrapartum screening methods for this organism.

  1. Functional Characterization of Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin J, a Novel Superantigen

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, John K.; Pragman, Alexa A.; Stolpa, John C.; Leung, Donald Y. M.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a highly lethal, acute-onset illness that is a subset of invasive streptococcal disease. The majority of clinical STSS cases have been associated with the pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAgs) streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A or C (SPE A or C), although cases have been reported that are not associated with either of these exotoxins. Recent genome sequencing projects have revealed a number of open reading frames that potentially encode proteins with similarity to SPEs A and C and to other PTSAgs. Here, we describe the cloning, expression, purification, and functional characterization of a novel exotoxin termed streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin J (SPE J). Purified recombinant SPE J (rSPE J) expressed from Escherichia coli stimulated the expansion of both rabbit splenocytes and human peripheral blood lymphocytes, preferentially expanded human T cells displaying Vβ2, -3, -12, -14, and -17 on their T-cell receptors, and was active at concentrations as low as 5 × 10−6 μg/ml. Furthermore, rSPE J induced fevers in rabbits and was lethal in two models of STSS. Biochemically, SPE J had a predicted molecular weight of 24,444 and an isoelectric point of 7.7 and lacked the ability to form the cystine loop structure characteristic of many PTSAgs. SPE J shared 19.6, 47.1, 38.8, 18.1, 19.6, and 24.4% identity with SPEs A, C, G, and H, streptococcal superantigen, and streptococcal mitogenic exotoxin Z-2, respectively, and was immunologically cross-reactive with SPE C. The characterization of a seventh functional streptococcal PTSAg raises important questions relating to the evolution of the streptococcal superantigens. PMID:11179302

  2. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections. PMID:23827827

  3. Pathogenesis of group A streptococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Barnett, Timothy C; Maamary, Peter G; Walker, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) is a human pathogen which causes significant morbidity and mortality globally. GAS typically infects the throat and skin of the host, causing mild infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo, in addition to life threatening conditions including necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), and bacteremia. Repeated infection with GAS may result in the non-suppurative sequelae, acute rheumatic fever, and acute glomerulonephritis. GAS remains sensitive to the antibiotic penicillin which can be administered as a means to treat infection or as prophylaxis. However, issues with patient compliance and a growing concern over the possible emergence of resistant GAS strains may limit the usefulness of antibiotics in the future. A vaccine capable of preventing GAS infection may be the only effective way to control and eliminate GAS infection and disease. PMID:22642914

  4. AN INACTIVE PRECURSOR OF STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Stuart D.; Dole, Vincent P.

    1947-01-01

    1. Streptococcal proteinase is derived from an inactive precursor found in culture filtrates of proteinase-producing streptococci. 2. The precursor can be converted into the proteinase by low concentrations of trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. 3. In cultures grown in suitable media the conversion of precursor to proteinase is effected autocatalytically. This reaction occurs under reducing conditions and is initiated by active proteinase present in low concentrations with the precursor. 4. The autocatalytic reaction is suppressed or retarded by conditions which decrease the activity of the proteinase, e.g. by growing cultures at 22°C. instead of at 37°C. or by growing them under markedly aerobic conditions. It is also retarded in the presence of casein. PMID:19871616

  5. Auranofin-loaded nanoparticles as a new therapeutic tool to fight streptococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Martínez, Roberto; García-Fernández, Esther; Manzano, Miguel; Martínez, Ángel; Domenech, Mirian; Vallet-Regí, María; García, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) can improve infection treatment by ensuring drug concentration at the right place within the therapeutic window. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs are able to enhance drug localization in target site and to sustainably release the entrapped molecule, reducing the secondary effects caused by systemic antibiotic administration. We have loaded auranofin, a gold compound traditionally used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, into PLGA NPs and their efficiency as antibacterial agent against two Gram-positive pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes was evaluated. Auranofin-PLGA NPs showed a strong bactericidal effect as cultures of multiresistant pneumococcal strains were practically sterilized after 6 h of treatment with such auranofin-NPs at 0.25 μM. Moreover, this potent bactericidal effect was also observed in S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes biofilms, where the same concentration of auranofin-NPs was capable of decreasing the bacterial population about 4 logs more than free auranofin. These results were validated using a zebrafish embryo model demonstrating that treatment with auranofin loaded into NPs achieved a noticeable survival against pneumococcal infections. All these approaches displayed a clear superiority of loaded auranofin PLGA nanocarriers compared to free administration of the drug, which supports their potential application for the treatment of streptococcal infections. PMID:26776881

  6. Auranofin-loaded nanoparticles as a new therapeutic tool to fight streptococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Díez-Martínez, Roberto; García-Fernández, Esther; Manzano, Miguel; Martínez, Ángel; Domenech, Mirian; Vallet-Regí, María; García, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) can improve infection treatment by ensuring drug concentration at the right place within the therapeutic window. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs are able to enhance drug localization in target site and to sustainably release the entrapped molecule, reducing the secondary effects caused by systemic antibiotic administration. We have loaded auranofin, a gold compound traditionally used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, into PLGA NPs and their efficiency as antibacterial agent against two Gram-positive pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes was evaluated. Auranofin-PLGA NPs showed a strong bactericidal effect as cultures of multiresistant pneumococcal strains were practically sterilized after 6 h of treatment with such auranofin-NPs at 0.25 μM. Moreover, this potent bactericidal effect was also observed in S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes biofilms, where the same concentration of auranofin-NPs was capable of decreasing the bacterial population about 4 logs more than free auranofin. These results were validated using a zebrafish embryo model demonstrating that treatment with auranofin loaded into NPs achieved a noticeable survival against pneumococcal infections. All these approaches displayed a clear superiority of loaded auranofin PLGA nanocarriers compared to free administration of the drug, which supports their potential application for the treatment of streptococcal infections. PMID:26776881

  7. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  8. What Is Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (nu-MO-ne-ah) is an infection in ... such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi—can cause pneumonia. The infection inflames your lungs' air sacs, which ...

  9. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids under 6 years old. Take your child's temperature at least once each morning and each evening, ... Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza (Flu) Walking Pneumonia Word! Pneumonia Pneumonia Hib ...

  10. Healthcare-associated Pneumonia and Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Kosaku; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia proposed by the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2005. This category is located between community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia with respect to the characteristics of the causative pathogens and mortality, and primarily targets elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Aspiration among such patients is recognized to be a primary mechanism for the development of pneumonia, particularly since the HCAP guidelines were published. However, it is difficult to manage patients with aspiration pneumonia because the definition of the condition is unclear, and the treatment is associated with ethical aspects. This review focused on the definition, prevalence and role of aspiration pneumonia as a prognostic factor in published studies of HCAP and attempted to identify problems associated with the concept of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:25657850

  11. Pulmonary Renal Syndrome After Streptococcal Pharyngitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mara-Koosham, Gopi; Stoltze, Karl; Aday, Jeffrey; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary renal syndrome is a class of small vessel vasculitides that are characterized by the dual presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and glomerulonephritis. Pulmonary renal syndrome has multiple etiologies, but its development has been rarely reported following infection with group A streptococcus. We present the case of a 36-year-old Native American male who was transferred to our facility due to refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis 2 weeks prior to admission. Given the presence of hemoptysis, bronchoscopy was performed and was consistent with DAH. Urinalysis demonstrated hematuria and proteinuria, in the setting of elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Additionally, antistreptolysin O titer was positive. Given the constellation of laboratory findings and history of streptococcal pharyngitis, the patient was diagnosed with PRS secondary to streptococcal infection. High-dose methylprednisolone was initiated with concomitant plasmapheresis. He was extubated successfully after his respiratory status improved and was eventually discharged home after making a full recovery within 2 weeks after admission. This case illustrates the importance of clinically relevant sequelae of streptococcal infection as well as the appropriate treatment of PRS secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis with plasmapheresis and intravenous corticosteroids. PMID:27231692

  12. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  13. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  14. Synergistic inhibition of Streptococcal biofilm by ribose and xylitol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heon-Jin; Kim, Se Chul; Kim, Jinkyung; Do, Aejin; Han, Se Yeong; Lee, Bhumgey David; Lee, Hyun Ho; Lee, Min Chan; Lee, So Hui; Oh, Taejun; Park, Sangbin; Hong, Su-Hyung

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are the major causative agents of human dental caries. Therefore, the removal or inhibition of these streptococcal biofilms is essential for dental caries prevention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of ribose treatment alone or in combination with xylitol on streptococcal biofilm formation for both species. Furthermore, we examined the expression of genes responsible for dextran-dependent aggregation (DDAG). In addition, we investigated whether ribose affects the biofilm formation of xylitol-insensitive streptococci, which results from long-term exposure to xylitol. The viability of streptococci biofilms formed in a 24-well polystyrene plate was quantified by fluorescent staining with the LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability and counting kit, which was followed by fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. The effects of ribose and/or xylitol on the mRNA expression of DDAG-responsible genes, gbpC and dblB, was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Our data showed that ribose and other pentose molecules significantly inhibited streptococcal biofilm formation and the expression of DDAG-responsible genes. In addition, co-treatment with ribose and xylitol decreased streptococcal biofilm formation to a further extent than ribose or xylitol treatment alone in both streptococcal species. Furthermore, ribose attenuated the increase of xylitol-insensitive streptococcal biofilm, which results in the reduced difference of biofilm formation between S. mutans that are sensitive and insensitive to xylitol. These data suggest that pentose may be used as an additive for teeth-protective materials or in sweets. Furthermore, ribose co-treatment with xylitol might help to increase the anti-cariogenic efficacy of xylitol. PMID:25463908

  15. Group A streptococcal meningitis in a patient with palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Otsuka, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with a 10-year history of palmoplantar pustulosis, a recent history of cranial surgery and a persistent upper airway infection presented with a high fever and deep coma. The patient was diagnosed with Group A Streptococcal meningitis and promptly treated with antibiotics. Although his general condition recovered well, sensorineural hearing loss and facial palsy remained. Group A Streptococcal meningitis is a rare condition, and its typical clinical picture and epidemiological features remain poorly understood. Physicians need to be more aware of this infection, which is extremely rare but frequently causes various complications and yields a high mortality. PMID:24292762

  16. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  17. A Comprehensive Genetic Study of Streptococcal Immunoglobulin A1 Proteases: Evidence for Recombination within and between Species

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Knud; Reinholdt, Jesper; Jespersgaard, Christina; Boye, Kit; Brown, Thomas A.; Hauge, Majbritt; Kilian, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of 13 immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease genes (iga) of strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus sanguis was carried out to obtain information on the structure, polymorphism, and phylogeny of this specific protease, which enables bacteria to evade functions of the predominant Ig isotype on mucosal surfaces. The analysis included cloning and sequencing of iga genes from S. oralis and S. mitis biovar 1, sequencing of an additional seven iga genes from S. sanguis biovars 1 through 4, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of iga genes of another 10 strains of S. mitis biovar 1 and 6 strains of S. oralis. All 13 genes sequenced had the potential of encoding proteins with molecular masses of approximately 200 kDa containing the sequence motif HEMTH and an E residue 20 amino acids downstream, which are characteristic of Zn metalloproteinases. In addition, all had a typical gram-positive cell wall anchor motif, LPNTG, which, in contrast to such motifs in other known streptococcal and staphylococcal proteins, was located in their N-terminal parts. Repeat structures showing variation in number and sequence were present in all strains and may be of relevance to the immunogenicities of the enzymes. Protease activities in cultures of the streptococcal strains were associated with species of different molecular masses ranging from 130 to 200 kDa, suggesting posttranslational processing possibly as a result of autoproteolysis at post-proline peptide bonds in the N-terminal parts of the molecules. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences revealed a 94% similarity between S. oralis and S. mitis IgA1 proteases and a 75 to 79% similarity between IgA1 proteases of these species and those of S. pneumoniae and S. sanguis, respectively. Combined with the results of RFLP analyses using different iga gene fragments as probes, the results of nucleotide sequence comparisons provide evidence of

  18. Streptococcal toxins: role in pathogenesis and disease.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Timothy C; Cole, Jason N; Rivera-Hernandez, Tania; Henningham, Anna; Paton, James C; Nizet, Victor; Walker, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes), group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are host-adapted bacterial pathogens among the leading infectious causes of human morbidity and mortality. These microbes and related members of the genus Streptococcus produce an array of toxins that act against human cells or tissues, resulting in impaired immune responses and subversion of host physiological processes to benefit the invading microorganism. This toxin repertoire includes haemolysins, proteases, superantigens and other agents that ultimately enhance colonization and survival within the host and promote dissemination of the pathogen. PMID:26433203

  19. Post-streptococcal autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C

    2005-11-01

    Group A Streptococcus can induce autoimmune disease in humans with particular involvement of the heart, joints, and brain. The spectrum of post-streptococcal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) has been widened recently and includes movement disorders (chorea, tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism), psychiatric disorders (particularly emotional disorders), and associated sleep disorders. Neuroimaging and pathological studies indicate that the most vulnerable brain region is the basal ganglia. The immunopathogenesis of the disease is incompletely defined, and although there is some support for autoantibody-mediated disease, several conflicting studies cast doubt on the autoantibody hypothesis. It has been speculated that post-streptococcal autoimmunity has a role in common neuropsychiatric disease but the evidence is conflicting and routine screening of patients with Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder for post-streptococcal autoimmune abnormalities is not be recommended at present. However, post-streptococcal disorders of the CNS remain a useful model of neuropsychiatric disease, which may improve our understanding of abnormal movements and behaviours in children. PMID:16225745

  20. Atypical streptococcal infection of gingiva associated with chronic mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Haytac, M Cenk; Oz, I Attila

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcal infections of oral tissues are mainly seen in young children who experience a variety of upper respiratory tract infections. The disease is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, and ulcers on the gingiva, lips, and tonsils. This case report presents an atypical streptococcal infection of the gingiva in an 18-year-old man. The patient was referred to the periodontology department complaining of a 2-month history of gingival enlargement. He had persistent fever (39.5 degrees C) and general malaise for 2 weeks. Intraoral examination revealed extremely inflamed and enlarged gingiva with spontaneous bleeding and suppuration. Based on the otolaryngologic consultation and the hematologic, immunologic, and microbiologic tests, the final diagnosis was an atypical streptococcal gingivitis with chronic adenoid-related mouth breathing and oral hygiene neglect as contributing factors. Treatment consisted of a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen, supragingival and subgingival debridement, adenoidectomy, and scaling and root planing. A good response to nonsurgical therapy was achieved despite poor patient compliance, and no recurrence of gingival enlargement was observed after 1 year. Streptococcal gingivitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of suppurative gingival enlargements. Furthermore, chronic mouth breathing may initiate and/or contribute to this disease. PMID:18197316

  1. Pathogenic mechanism of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Nordstrand, A; Norgren, M; Holm, S E

    1999-01-01

    Considerable knowledge has been accumulated regarding the characteristics of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), and many attempts have been made to identify a streptococcal factor or factors responsible for triggering this disease. However, the pathogenic mechanism behind APSGN remains largely unknown. As glomerular deposition of C3 is generally demonstrated before that of IgG in the disease process, it is likely that the inflammatory response is initiated by renal deposition of a streptococcal product, rather than by deposition of antibodies or pre-formed immune complexes. During recent years, a number of streptococcal products have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenic process. In this review, possible roles of these factors are discussed in the context of the clinical and renal findings most often demonstrated in patients with APSGN. Streptokinase was observed to be required in order to induce signs of APSGN in mice, and a number of findings suggest that the initiation of the disease may occur as a result of renal binding by certain nephritis-associated variants of this protein. However, additional factors may be required for the development of the disease. PMID:10680980

  2. Rheumatic fever, autoimmunity, and molecular mimicry: the streptococcal connection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2014-01-01

    The group A streptococcus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and its link to autoimmune sequelae, has acquired a new level of understanding. Studies support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry between the group A streptococcus and heart or brain are important in directing immune responses in rheumatic fever. Rheumatic carditis, Sydenham chorea and a new group of behavioral disorders called pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections are reviewed with consideration of autoantibody and T cell responses and the role of molecular mimicry between the heart, brain and group A streptococcus as well as how immune responses contribute to pathogenic mechanisms in disease. In rheumatic carditis, studies have investigated human monoclonal autoantibodies and T cell clones for their crossreactivity and their mechanisms leading to valve damage in rheumatic heart disease. Although studies of human and animal sera from group A streptococcal diseases or immunization models have been crucial in providing clues to molecular mimicry and its role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever, study of human monoclonal autoantibodies have provided important insights into how antibodies against the valve may activate the valve endothelium and lead to T cell infiltration. Passive transfer of anti-streptococcal T cell lines in a rat model of rheumatic carditis illustrates effects of CD4+ T cells on the valve. Although Sydenham chorea has been known as the neurological manifestation of rheumatic fever for decades, the combination of autoimmunity and behavior is a relatively new concept linking brain, behavior and neuropsychiatric disorders with streptococcal infections. In Sydenham chorea, human mAbs and their expression in transgenic mice have linked autoimmunity to central dopamine pathways as well as dopamine receptors and dopaminergic neurons in basal ganglia. Taken together, the studies reviewed provide a basis for understanding streptococcal sequelae and

  3. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumocystis pneumonia can be life threatening, causing respiratory failure that can lead to death. People with this condition need early and effective treatment. For moderate to severe pneumocystis pneumonia in people with ...

  4. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  5. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  6. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In the hospital, your doctors and nurses helped you breathe better. ... body get rid of the germs that cause pneumonia. They also made sure you got enough liquids ...

  7. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  8. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  9. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  10. A Novel Metallo-β-Lactamase Involved in the Ampicillin Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49136 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Hui-Jen; Li, Yaw-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, a penicillin-sensitive bacterium, is recognized as a major cause of pneumonia and is treated clinically with penicillin-based antibiotics. The rapid increase in resistance to penicillin and other antibiotics affects 450 million people globally and results in 4 million deaths every year. To unveil the mechanism of resistance of S. pneumoniae is thus an important issue to treat streptococcal disease that might consequently save millions of lives around the world. In this work, we isolated a streptococci-conserved L-ascorbate 6-phosphate lactonase, from S. pneumoniae ATCC 49136. This protein reveals a metallo-β-lactamase activity in vitro, which is able to deactivate an ampicillin-based antibiotic by hydrolyzing the amide bond of the β-lactam ring. The Michaelis parameter (Km) = 25 μM and turnover number (kcat) = 2 s-1 were obtained when nitrocefin was utilized as an optically measurable substrate. Through confocal images and western blot analyses with a specific antibody, the indigenous protein was recognized in S. pneumoniae ATCC 49136. The protein-overexpressed S. pneumonia exhibits a high ampicillin-tolerance ability in vivo. In contrast, the protein-knockout S. pneumonia reveals the ampicillin-sensitive feature relative to the wild type strain. Based on these results, we propose that this protein is a membrane-associated metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) involved in the antibiotic-resistant property of S. pneumoniae. PMID:27214294

  11. PANDAS (Paediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection).

    PubMed

    Lynch, N E; Deiratany, S; Webb, D W; McMenamin, J B

    2006-05-01

    PANDAS (Paediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection) is a rare condition first described in 1998. It describes the presence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or tics with an episodic course, and a temporal relationship to Group A beta haemolytic streptococcal infection (GABHS). Recurrent episodes can be disruptive and upsetting for a child, but the best way to treat the condition has yet to be established. Penicillin prophylaxis has not proved effective, and other therapies are experimental. There is some evidence in the literature to support the role of tonsillectomy in improving the condition. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with tic and hemi-chorea associated with GABHS throat infection. He had a recurrence of his symptoms associated with a further GABHS infection, but has had no further symptoms following tonsillectomy. This case report lends further evidence to the role of tonsillectomy in the management of PANDAS. PMID:16892924

  12. GENETIC BASIS OF MURINE ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL LUNG INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mice (A/J, DBA/2J, CAST/Ei, FVB/NJ, BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, 129/SvImJ, and C3H/HeJ) and tlr2-deficient mice (C57BL/6

  13. The Group A Streptococcal Carrier State Reviewed: Still an Enigma.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory P; Wald, Ellen R

    2014-12-01

    Despite the common nature of group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, the carrier state of this organism is not well understood. In this article, we review the historical and recent research on the definition, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of the GAS carrier state. In addition, we outline trials of antimicrobial agents in the eradication of the carrier state and discuss indications for providing treatment to patients in the clinical setting. PMID:26625454

  14. Functional brain imaging in Sydenham's chorea and streptococcal tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Citak, Elvan Caglar; Gücüyener, Kivilcim; Karabacak, Nese Ilgin; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe; Okuyaz, Cetin; Aydin, Kurşad

    2004-05-01

    Group A streptococcal infections cause a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Sydenham's chorea, tics, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Structural (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) and functional (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies in patients with Sydenham's chorea have suggested reversible striatal abnormalities. The objective of this study was to investigate the cerebral perfusion patterns of the subcortical structures by using hexamethylpropylenamine oxime single-photon emission computed tomography (HMPAO-SPECT) in seven cases of Sydenham's chorea and two cases of streptococcal tic disorder. HMPAO-SPECT studies revealed a hyperperfusion pattern in two and a hypoperfusion pattern in five of the chorea patients and in two patients with tic disorder. The results are discussed in relation to the duration and severity of the symptoms and the response to therapy. Functional imaging findings can be variable in Sydenham's chorea, and hyperperfusion of the striatum and thalamus could be an indicator of the response to therapy and the severity of symptoms. However, the number of cases so far investigated by either SPECT or positron emission tomography is still too limited to draw any firm conclusions. PMID:15224712

  15. Molecular markers for the study of streptococcal epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McMillan, David J; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L; Smeesters, Pierre Robert; Sriprakash, Kadaba S

    2013-01-01

    Diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus, GAS) range from superficial infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo to potentially fatal rheumatic heart disease and invasive disease. Studies spanning emm-typing surveillance to population genomics are providing new insights into the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and biology of this organism. Such studies have demonstrated the differences that exist in the epidemiology of streptococcal disease between developing and developed nations. In developing nations, where streptococcal disease is endemic, the diversity of GAS emm-types circulating is much greater than that found in developed nations. An association between emm-type and disease, as observed in developed countries is also lacking. Intriguingly, comparative genetic studies suggest that emm-type is not always a good predictor of the evolutionary relatedness of geographically distant isolates. A view of GAS as a highly dynamic organism, in possession of a core set of virulence genes that contribute to host niche specialization and common pathogenic processes, augmented by accessory genes that change the relative virulence of specific lineages is emerging. Our inability to definitively identify genetic factors that contribute to specific disease outcome underscores the complex nature of streptococcal diseases. PMID:23179674

  16. Heterogeneity of group A streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin type B.

    PubMed Central

    Barsumian, E L; Cunningham, C M; Schlievert, P M; Watson, D W

    1978-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin type B purified from culture filtrates of either the NY-5 or T-19 strain of group A streptococcus was found to be heterogeneous in charge. Three protein fractions with isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.4, and 9.0 were isolated by differential solubility in ethanol and acetate-buffered saline followed by isoelectric focusing and shown to be antigenically identical to streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin type B. The molecular weights of all three fractions were approximately 17,500, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with aggregates forming in the presence of hyaluronic acid. Only the pI 8.4 fraction showed the characteristic activities of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin in rabbits: pyrogenicity and ability to enhance susceptibility to lethal endotoxin shock. The pI 8.0 and pI 9.0 fractions were not pyrogenic, but could be used to immunize against pyrogenicity. These two fractions failed either to enhance lethal endotoxin shock or to immunize against enhancement activity. When the isolated fractions were electrofocused again they appeared heterogeneous, suggesting an instability of the B toxin molecular forms. Images PMID:352946

  17. Integrated Translatomics with Proteomics to Identify Novel Iron–Transporting Proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; He, Ke; Du, Gaofei; Wu, Xiaohui; Yu, Guangchuang; Pan, Yunlong; Zhang, Gong; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (S.pneumoniae) is a major human pathogen causing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Efficiently acquiring iron from the environment is critical for S. pneumoniae to sustain growth and cause infection. There are only three known iron-uptake systems in Streptococcal species responsible for iron acquisition from the host, including ABC transporters PiaABC, PiuABC, and PitABC. Besides, no other iron-transporting system has been suggested. In this work, we employed our newly established translating mRNA analysis integrated with proteomics to evaluate the possible existence of novel iron transporters in the bacterium. We simultaneously deleted the iron-binding protein genes of the three iron-uptake systems to construct a piaA/piuA/pitA triple mutant (Tri-Mut) of S. pneumoniae D39, in which genes and proteins related to iron transport should be regulated in response to the deletion. With ribosome associated mRNA sequencing-based translatomics focusing on translating mRNA and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics based on the covalent labeling of peptides with tags of varying mass, we indeed observed a large number of genes and proteins representing various coordinated biological pathways with significantly altered expression levels in the Tri-Mut mutant. Highlighted in this observation is the identification of several new potential iron-uptake ABC transporters participating in iron metabolism of Streptococcus. In particular, putative protein SPD_1609 in operon 804 was verified to be a novel iron-binding protein with similar function to PitA in S. pneumoniae. These data derived from the integrative translatomics and proteomics analyses provided rich information and insightful clues for further investigations on iron-transporting mechanism in bacteria and the interplay between Streptococcal iron availability and the biological metabolic pathways. PMID:26870030

  18. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected “primary atypical pneumonia.” For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton’s group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the

  19. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected "primary atypical pneumonia." For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton's group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the Pinehurst

  20. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented? Pneumonia can be very serious and ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal Pneumonia Vaccine A vaccine is available to prevent pneumococcal ...

  1. Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infection: A Case-Control Study among Privately Insured Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Douglas L.; Kozma, Laura; Martin, Andres; Landeros, Angeli; Katsovich, Liliya; King, Robert A.; Leckman, James F.

    2008-01-01

    The link between streptococcal infections and the onset of a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders is studied using a national sample of privately insured children. Findings suggest that patients with new-onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome or tic orders were more likely to have been diagnosed with streptococcal infections in…

  2. HIV Associated Opportunistic Pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Ismail, T; Lee, C

    2011-03-01

    Opportunistic pneumonias are major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected individuals. The majority of new HIV infections in Malaysia are adults aged 20 to 39 years old and many are unaware of their HIV status until they present with an opportunistic infection. HIV associated opportunistic pneumonias can progress rapidly without appropriate therapy. Therefore a proper diagnostic evaluation is vital and prompt empiric treatment of the suspected diagnosis should be commenced while waiting for the results of the diagnostic studies. Tuberculosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and recurrent bacterial pneumonias are common causes of AIDS-defining diseases and are discussed in this article. PMID:23765154

  3. Regulatory RNAs in the Less Studied Streptococcal Species: From Nomenclature to Identification.

    PubMed

    Zorgani, Mohamed A; Quentin, Roland; Lartigue, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal species are Gram-positive bacteria involved in severe and invasive diseases in humans and animals. Although, this group includes different pathogenic species involved in life-threatening infections for humans, it also includes beneficial species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, which is used in yogurt production. In bacteria virulence factors are controlled by various regulatory networks including regulatory RNAs. For clearness and to develop logical thinking, we start this review with a revision of regulatory RNAs nomenclature. Previous reviews are mostly dealing with Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae regulatory RNAs. We especially focused our analysis on regulatory RNAs in Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus thermophilus and other less studied Streptococcus species. Although, S. agalactiae RNome remains largely unknown, sRNAs (small RNAs) are supposed to mediate regulation during environmental adaptation and host infection. In the case of S. mutans, sRNAs are suggested to be involved in competence regulation, carbohydrate metabolism, and Toxin-Antitoxin systems. A new category of miRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) was also identified for the first time in this species. The analysis of S. thermophilus sRNome shows that many sRNAs are associated to the bacterial immune system known as CRISPR-Cas system. Only few of the other different Streptococcus species have been the subject of studies pointed toward the characterization of regulatory RNAs. Finally, understanding bacterial sRNome can constitute one step forward to the elaboration of new strategies in therapy such as substitution of antibiotics in the management of S. agalactiae neonatal infections, prevention of S. mutans dental caries or use of S. thermophilus CRISPR-Cas system in genome editing applications. PMID:27507970

  4. Regulatory RNAs in the Less Studied Streptococcal Species: From Nomenclature to Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zorgani, Mohamed A.; Quentin, Roland; Lartigue, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal species are Gram-positive bacteria involved in severe and invasive diseases in humans and animals. Although, this group includes different pathogenic species involved in life-threatening infections for humans, it also includes beneficial species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, which is used in yogurt production. In bacteria virulence factors are controlled by various regulatory networks including regulatory RNAs. For clearness and to develop logical thinking, we start this review with a revision of regulatory RNAs nomenclature. Previous reviews are mostly dealing with Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae regulatory RNAs. We especially focused our analysis on regulatory RNAs in Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus thermophilus and other less studied Streptococcus species. Although, S. agalactiae RNome remains largely unknown, sRNAs (small RNAs) are supposed to mediate regulation during environmental adaptation and host infection. In the case of S. mutans, sRNAs are suggested to be involved in competence regulation, carbohydrate metabolism, and Toxin–Antitoxin systems. A new category of miRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) was also identified for the first time in this species. The analysis of S. thermophilus sRNome shows that many sRNAs are associated to the bacterial immune system known as CRISPR-Cas system. Only few of the other different Streptococcus species have been the subject of studies pointed toward the characterization of regulatory RNAs. Finally, understanding bacterial sRNome can constitute one step forward to the elaboration of new strategies in therapy such as substitution of antibiotics in the management of S. agalactiae neonatal infections, prevention of S. mutans dental caries or use of S. thermophilus CRISPR-Cas system in genome editing applications. PMID:27507970

  5. Type-Specific Opsonic Antibodies in Streptococcal Pyoderma

    PubMed Central

    Bisno, Alan L.; Nelson, Kenrad E.

    1974-01-01

    Prospective studies of streptococcal pyoderma were carried out among black children enrolled in Project Headstart centers in Holmes County, Miss. Sera collected from 28 of these children in early October were tested for opsonic antibodies to one of two prevalent skin strains of group A streptococci isolated from them on one or more occasions over the preceding 3 months. The two streptococcal strains (A and B) belong to M-types previously unrecognized. Ten subjects (36%) had antibody to their homologous serotypes detectable by the indirect bactericidal test: this included 6 of 10 subjects infected with strain B but only 4 of 18 infected with strain A (P < 0.05). Of 17 children who had strains A or B isolated from skin lesions only, 12% developed type-specific antibodies (TSA) against the infecting serotype. In contrast, 11 subjects had these strains isolated from throat cultures (either with or without associated pyoderma), and 72% had detectable TSA (P < 0.01). There was no demonstrable relationship between the development of antibodies to streptococcal extracellular products or to non-type-specific cellular antigens and the development of TSA. These results demonstrate that type-specific immune responses do occur following infection with pyoderma streptococci. The frequency with which such antibodies develop is variable and appears related to a number of factors, including the immunologic properties of the infecting strain and the site of bacterial colonization. Pharyngeal carriage may represent an important mechanism for development of acquired immunity to skin strains of group A streptococci. PMID:4435959

  6. M protein mediates streptococcal adhesion to HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J R; Stinson, M W

    1994-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes adheres to human epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. To identify adhesins, cell wall components were extracted from S. pyogenes M6 with alkali or by treatment with mutanolysin and lysozyme. HEp-2 cells were incubated with extracts of S. pyogenes M6 and then analyzed by Western blot (immunoblot) assays, using antibodies to S. pyogenes. Only one streptococcal component (62 kDa) was bound to HEp-2 cells and was identified serologically as M6 protein. Experiments with pepsin-cleaved fragments of M protein indicated that the binding site was located at the N-terminal half of the molecule. M protein was bound selectively to two trypsin-sensitive surface components, 97 and 205 kDa, of HEp-2 cells on nitrocellulose blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Tritium-labeled lipoteichoic acid bound to different HEp-2 cell components, 34 and 35 kDa, in a parallel experiment, indicating that lipoteichoic acid was not complexed with M protein and does not mediate M-protein binding. The four HEp-2 components were unrelated to fibronectin since they did not react with specific antibodies. An M-protein-deficient (M-) strain of streptococcus (JRS75), grown in chemically defined medium, showed 73% less adhesion activity to HEp-2 monolayers than an M+ strain (JRS4). Streptococcal adhesion was insensitive to competitive inhibition by selected monosaccharides. These results indicate that M protein binds directly to certain HEp-2 cell membrane components and mediates streptococcal adhesion. PMID:8300205

  7. Chlorhexidine susceptibilities of mutans streptococcal serotypes and ribotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Grönroos, L; Mättö, J; Saarela, M; Luoma, A R; Luoma, H; Jousimies-Somer, H; Pyhälä, L; Asikainen, S; Alaluusua, S

    1995-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 379 clinical mutans streptococcal isolates to chlorhexidine (CHX) were tested by agar dilution according to the standards of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Isolates were obtained from saliva samples of 34 young mothers who had high or moderate salivary levels of mutans streptococci at baseline. Samples were collected on three occasions, before childbirth, when each child was 6 months old, and 1 year later. Of these isolates, 50% were inhibited at 1 microgram of CHX per ml, 90% were inhibited at 2.0 micrograms/ml, and all were inhibited at 4.0 micrograms/ml. The MICs for Streptococcus mutans isolates (serotypes c, e, and f) were lower than those for Streptococcus sobrinus isolates (serotypes d and g). In some subjects, the MICs for isolates of the same serotype were different. This phenomenon was studied by ribotyping isolates (n = 45) from selected subjects (n = 7). It was found that if there were intraindividual differences in the MICs for isolates of the same serotype, then the ribotypes of these isolates were different. In order to decrease the mutans streptococcal infection risk for children, 24 mothers (test group) brushed their teeth periodically with a gel that contained 0.3% CHX digluconate and 0.2% NaF, pH 5.8, between the second and third sampling occasions. The gel was used twice a day for the first 10 days of each month. Development of resistant strains during CHX-NaF gel use was not detected. The serotype distribution of isolates from the test group after 1 year of periodic CHX-NaF gel use did not differ from that at baseline. Periodic CHX-NaF gel brushing did not lead to lower salivary mutans streptococcal counts. PMID:7785991

  8. Post-streptococcal vasculopathy with evolution to Degos' disease.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sandipan; Muley, Suraj A; Grill, Marie F; Coons, Stephen; Walker, Russell

    2011-01-15

    Degos' disease or malignant atrophic papulosis is a rare disseminated occlusive vasculopathy affecting the skin, gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system, and less often other organ systems. The exact etiology of this vasculopathy has not been established. Infections, autoimmune disease and coagulation defects have been proposed as underlying pathogenic mechanisms, but none have been confirmed. Here, we report the clinical, radiological and histopathologic features of Degos' disease in a 41-year-old man following streptococcal throat infection. Prior postulated hypothesis as post-infectious immunologic mechanism may be further supported by this case. PMID:21035145

  9. Diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, D M

    1988-06-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia occurs in 0.6% of hospitalized patients. The usual causative agents are gram-negative bacilli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and anaerobic bacteria. In immunocompromised hosts, the differential diagnosis also includes fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, Nocardia, and Pneumocystis carinii. Important risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia include prolonged mechanical ventilation, thoracic or upper abdominal surgery, altered mental status, underlying immunosuppression, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the use of antacids or histamine type 2 blockers. Colonization of the oropharynx and tracheal secretions with gram-negative aerobic bacteria is common in hospitalized patients with or without pneumonia. The diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia is usually based on the clinical features of dyspnea, cough, fever, purulent sputum production, new pulmonary infiltrates, hypoxemia, and leukocytosis. However, the clinician must recognize that the presence of these features is neither sensitive nor specific in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia. Microbiologic diagnosis is also difficult because blood cultures are usually negative, and cultures of tracheal secretions, although usually sensitive, are not specific. Invasive procedures may prove useful, but most have yet to be studied in large groups of patients with nosocomial pneumonia. PMID:3041515

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  11. A link between perianal strep and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Toufexis, Megan; Deoleo, Caroline; Elia, Josephine; Murphy, Tanya K

    2014-04-01

    Perianal streptococcal dermatitis is an infection caused by group A streptococcus (GAS). Children with a pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) phenotype may have tics or obsessive compulsive symptoms secondary to a systemic immune activation by GAS infecting perianal areas. In this retrospective case series, the authors describe three children with symptoms consistent with PANDAS and a confirmed perianal streptococcal dermatitis as the likely infectious trigger. Concomitant perianal dermatitis and new-onset obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics are strong indications for perianal culture and rapid antigen detection test in young children. PMID:24763762

  12. [Group a streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis of the genital area (Fournier's gangrene): a case report].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Atsuhiko; Naoi, Makito; Enatsu, Noritoshi; Fujisaki, Akira; Funada, Satoshi; Suzuki, Koichiro; Shiga, Naoki; Ota, Tomonori; Kuji, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Naoto; Iwata, Kentaro

    2011-07-01

    A necrotizing fasciitis especially caused by group A streptococcal infection is a life-threatening disease. This infection cause death due to septic shock and multiple organ failure in a short time without the immediate and adequate treatment. Currently a rapid test kit for streptococcal pharyngitis (strep A) is useful for prediction of group A streptococcal infection. We here demonstrate a 61 years old man's case of life-saved necrotizing fasciitis in genital area (Fournier's gangrene) by group A streptococcus infection, and usefulness of this kit for rapid diagnosis, aggressive debridement, and selection of adequate antibiotics. PMID:21961278

  13. Streptococcal Infection-related Nephritis (SIRN) Manifesting Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Type I.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ken; Iyoda, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Oda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 18-year-old boy who developed nephrotic syndrome and hypertension after upper airway inflammation. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis was diagnosed on the basis of a high antistreptolysin O titer, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, and microscopic hematuria. A renal biopsy was performed due to persistent proteinuria, and the pathological diagnosis was membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type I. Glomeruli showed positive staining for nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr), a nephritogenic group A streptococcal antigen, and plasmin activity was found in a similar distribution as NAPlr deposition. This rare case of streptococcal infection-related nephritis (SIRN) manifesting MPGN type I supports the histological diversity of SIRN. PMID:26984084

  14. Anti-brain antibodies in PANDAS versus uncomplicated streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Bianchini, Rio; Parano, Enrico; Incorpora, Gemma; Rizzo, Renata; Mazzone, Luigi; Trifiletti, Rosario R

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess brain involvement through the presence of antineuronal antibodies in Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) and in uncomplicated active Group A streptococcal infection. We compared serum antibrain antibody to human basal ganglia sections assessed by indirect tissue immunofluorescence in two groups: a PANDAS group, comprised of 22 patients (mean age 10.1 years; 20 male, 2 female) who met strict National Institutes of Mental Health diagnostic criteria for PANDAS and had clinically active tics or obsessive-compulsive disorder, or both; and a GABHS control group consisting of 22 patients (mean age 9.1 years; 15 mol/L, 7 female) with clinical evidence of active Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection confirmed by throat culture and elevated antistreptolysin O titers but without history or clinical evidence of tics or obsessive-compulsive disorder. We observed positive anti-basal ganglia staining (defined as detectable staining at 1:10 serum dilution) in 14/22 patients in the PANDAS group (64%) but only 2/22 (9%) in the GABHS control group (P < 0.001, Fisher's exact test). These results suggest that antibrain antibodies are present in children with PANDAS that cannot be explained merely by a history of GABHS infection. PMID:14984902

  15. Streptococcal C5a peptidase is a highly specific endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, P P; Prahbu, U; Dale, J B; Wexler, D E; Handley, J

    1992-01-01

    Compositional analysis of streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA) cleavage products from a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 20 C-terminal residues of C5a demonstrated that the target cleavage site is His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp, as previously suggested. A C5a peptide analog with Lys replaced by Gln was also subject to cleavage by SCPA. This confirmed that His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp is the scissile bond. Cleavage at histidine is unusual but is the same as that suggested for a peptidase produced by group B streptococci. Native C5 protein was also resistant to SCPA, suggesting that the His-Lys bond is inaccessible prior to proteolytic cleavage by C5 convertase. These experiments showed that the streptococcal C5a peptidase is highly specific for C5a and suggest that its function is not merely to process protein for metabolic consumption but to act primarily to eliminate this chemotactic signal from inflammatory foci. Images PMID:1452354

  16. Group A Streptococcal Infection in Pregnancy and the Puerperium.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Mary Ellen Burke

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increasing incidence worldwide of invasive group A streptococcal disease in pregnancy and the puerperal period over the past 30 years. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) was identified as the major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality from sepsis before the identification that hand washing techniques could prevent the transmission of the bacteria. Hand washing remains the cornerstone of prevention as transmission can occur directly from an asymptomatic colonized healthcare provider, other patients, or a community-acquired source. Pregnancy and the puerperal period are associated with significant maternal physiologic changes that must be identified and clarified to identify signs and symptoms of GAS so that treatment can be initiated at the earliest moment. Treatment of group A streptococcal sepsis follows the guidelines developed under the Surviving Sepsis Campaign model. Maternal outcomes are improved by identifying risk factors and working with the perinatal team to implement rapid intervention. Even with prompt treatment of invasive group A Streptococcus, it remains the most common cause of infection that results in severe maternal morbidity and death in the world. PMID:27104603

  17. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    Ellison RT, Donowitz GR. Acute pneumonia. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  18. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  19. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fever , which may be mild or high Shaking chills Shortness of breath (may only occur when you ... or unexplained weight loss Shortness of breath, shaking chills, or persistent fevers Signs of pneumonia and a ...

  20. Chronic Klebsiella pneumonia: a rare manifestation of Klebsiella pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Thungtitigul, Poungrat; Suwatanapongched, Thitiporn

    2015-01-01

    K. pneumoniae can present as two forms of community-acquired pneumonia, acute and chronic. Although acute pneumonia may turn into necrotizing pneumonia, which results in a prolonged clinical course, it often has a rapidly progressive clinical course. In contrast, chronic Klebsiella pneumonia runs a protracted indolent course that mimics other chronic pulmonary infections and malignancies. Herein, we present two cases of chronic Klebsiella pneumonia. The diagnosis was made by microorganism identification, as well as absence of other potential causes. Clinical and radiographic findings improved after a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:26543615

  1. Post-streptococcal 'complex' movement disorders: unusual concurrence of psychogenic and organic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Squintani, Giovanna; Tinazzi, Michele; Gambarin, Mattia; Bravi, Elena; Moretto, Giuseppe; Buttiglione, Maura; Defazio, Giovanni; Martino, Davide

    2010-01-15

    Post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders encompass a broad spectrum of movement disorders, including tics, stereotypies, dystonia and tremor. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a relapsing-remitting combination of psychogenic and organic movement disorders. Both relapses occurred after an episode of streptococcal pharyngitis and consisted in motor and phonic tics, an atypical gait disorder, and severe worsening of a pre-existing psychogenic tremor of the right hand. After each relapse, both psychogenic and 'organic' symptoms concomitantly remitted after the administration of an association of oral steroids and antibiotics. The peculiarity of this case consists in the coexistence of psychogenic and organic symptoms subsequent to streptococcal infection, and broadens the clinical spectrum of post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19896680

  2. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS): an indication for tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Alan A Z; Patel, Nitin J; Southammakosane, Cathy A; Mortensen, Melissa M

    2011-06-01

    Children with obsessive compulsive disorder or tic disorders that are associated with streptococcal infections (Group A beta-hemolytic) in the oro-pharyngeal region are given the diagnosis of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Tonsillectomy has been reported to resolve the neuro-psychiatric symptoms in these children. We have a case of a 9-year-old boy who was seen in our clinic with multiple recurrent streptococcal infections of the oro-pharyngeal cavity. He also exhibited neuro-psychiatric symptoms including agitation, hyperactivity, and tics. These symptoms followed his recurrent infections. Tonsillectomy was performed and in one year follow-up the patient did not have any recurrent streptococcal infections, and his neuro-psychiatric symptoms resolved completely. Guidelines for medical and surgical management of recurrent strep infections in the face of PANDAS are reviewed. PMID:21466900

  3. Granulomatous uveitis and reactive arthritis as manifestations of post-streptococcal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Kais; Chebil, Ahmed; Falfoul, Yosra; Bouladi, Mejda; El Matri, Leila

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of bilateral granulomatous post-streptococcal syndrome uveitis in association with reactive arthritis as manifestation of post-streptococcal syndrome. To our knowledge, this could represent the first reported case in the literature. A 9-year-old girl, with no past ocular history, presented with a 5-day history of bilateral blurred vision, red eyes, photophobia and walking difficulties because of a right ankle pain. Ophthalmic examination disclosed a visual acuity limited to hand motion, mutton-fat keratic precipitates, anterior chamber cells and posterior synechiae in both eyes. Ocular pressure was normal. Physical examination showed a fever (38 °C), inflammatory ankle arthritis and scarlet fever (streptococcal lesion). Anti-streptococcal lysine O titer was 419 μ/ml. The patient was treated with topical steroids, cycloplegics, high-dose oral steroids and preventive course of penicillin with total improvement and no recurrence. Post-streptococcal syndrome should be considered in the etiology of acute bilateral granulomatous uveitis in children, and anti-streptococcal lysine O titer should be considered in serodiagnostic testing. PMID:22986580

  4. The molecular basis of glycogen breakdown and transport in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Higgins, Melanie A.; Hyrnuik, Susanne; Pluvinage, Benjamin; van Bueren, Alicia Lammerts; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains, as typified by the TIGR4 strain, contains several genes encoding proteins putatively involved in α-glucan degradation, modification and synthesis. The extracellular components comprise an ABC-transporter with its solute-binding protein, MalX, and the hydrolytic enzyme SpuA. We show that of the commonly occurring exogenous α-glucans, S. pneumoniae TIGR4 is only able to grow on glycogen in a MalX and SpuA-dependent manner. SpuA is able to degrade glycogen into a ladder of α-1,4-glucooligosaccharides while the high affinity interaction (Ka ~ 106 M−1) of MalX with maltooligosaccharides plays a key role in promoting the selective uptake of the glycogen degradation products that are produced by SpuA. The X-ray crystallographic analyses of apo- and complexed MalX illuminate the protein’s specificity for the degradation products of glycogen and its striking ability to recognize the helical structure of the ligand. Overall, the results of this work provide new structural and functional insight into streptococcal α-glucan metabolism while supplying biochemical support for the hypothesis that the substrate of the S. pneumoniae α-glucan metabolizing machinery is glycogen, which in a human host is abundant lung epithelial cells, a common target for invasive S. pneumoniae. PMID:20497336

  5. Streptococcal M1 protein constructs a pathological host fibrinogen network

    PubMed Central

    Macheboeuf, Pauline; Buffalo, Cosmo; Fu, Chi-yu; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Cole, Jason N.; Johnson, John E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-01-01

    M1 protein, a major virulence factor of the leading invasive strain of group A Streptococcus, is sufficient to induce toxic shock-like vascular leakage and tissue injury. These events are triggered by the formation of a complex between M1 and fibrinogen (Fg) that, unlike M1 or Fg alone, leads to neutrophil activation. Here we provide a structural explanation for the pathological properties of the M1-Fg complex. A conformationally dynamic coiled-coil dimer of M1 was found to organize four Fg molecules into a specific cross-like pattern. This pattern supported the construction of a supramolecular network that was required for neutrophil activation but was distinct from a fibrin clot. Disruption of this network into other supramolecular assemblies was not tolerated. These results have bearing on the pathophysiology of streptococcal toxic shock. PMID:21475196

  6. Group G streptococcal myositis in a patient with myeloproliferative neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Midha, Monica; Rosenthal, Marnie E

    2016-01-01

    While many cases of streptococcal infection are due to Lancefield groups A and B, there has been a rise in reported cases of infections due to group G streptococcus. We present a case of an individual with a hematologic malignancy who developed myositis secondary to group G streptococcus, with no clearly identifiable source of infection. The patient was managed with antibiotic therapy rather than surgical intervention due to high surgical risk related to severe thrombocytopenia. Targeted antibiotics initiated early in the course of disease may prevent the need for surgical intervention. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical to avoid the high morbidity and mortality of life-threatening infections caused by group G streptococcus. PMID:27500083

  7. Group G streptococcal epizootic in a closed cat colony.

    PubMed Central

    Tillman, P C; Dodson, N D; Indiveri, M

    1982-01-01

    An epizootic of beta-hemolytic Lancefield group G streptococcal infections occurred in a specific-pathogen-free colony of laboratory cats. A total of 19 out of 68 animals in a single building were affected over a 10-day period. Clinical signs included fever, depression, lymphadenopathy, pharyngitis, and submandibular edema. The organism was recovered from the pharynx in two of five clinically normal cats from the affected building. Cultures from 12 animals in the same colony but housed in unaffected buildings were negative. Two doses of long-acting penicillin G 72 h apart stopped the outbreak and resulted in negative cultures for previously affected animals. Three months later, two new cases occurred in the same building. The disease was finally eradicated from the colony by depopulating the affected building. PMID:7161373

  8. Bacterial phenotype variants in group B streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sendi, Parham; Johansson, Linda; Dahesh, Samira; Van-Sorge, Nina M; Darenberg, Jessica; Norgren, Mari; Sjölin, Jan; Nizet, Victor; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2009-02-01

    We conducted genetic and functional analyses of isolates from a patient with group B streptococcal (GBS) necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. Tissue cultures simultaneously showed colonies with high hemolysis (HH) and low hemolysis (LH). Conversely, the HH and LH variants exhibited low capsule (LC) and high capsule (HC) expression, respectively. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the 2 GBS variants were of the same clonal origin. Genetic analysis found a 3-bp deletion in the covR gene of the HH/LC variant. Functionally, this isolate was associated with an increased growth rate in vitro and with higher interleukin-8 induction. However, in whole blood, opsonophagocytic and intracellular killing assays, the LH/HC phenotype demonstrated higher resistance to host phagocytic killing. In a murine model, LH/HC resulted in higher levels of bacteremia and increased host mortality rate. These findings demonstrate differences in GBS isolates of the same clonal origin but varying phenotypes. PMID:19193266

  9. Inflammasome/IL-1β Responses to Streptococcal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    LaRock, Christopher N.; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation mediated by the inflammasome and the cytokine IL-1β are some of the earliest and most important alarms to infection. These pathways are responsive to the virulence factors that pathogens use to subvert immune processes, and thus are typically activated only by microbes with potential to cause severe disease. Among the most serious human infections are those caused by the pathogenic streptococci, in part because these species numerous strategies for immune evasion. Since the virulence factor armament of each pathogen is unique, the role of IL-1β and the pathways leading to its activation varies for each infection. This review summarizes the role of IL-1β during infections caused by streptococcal pathogens, with emphasis on emergent mechanisms and concepts countering paradigms determined for other organisms. PMID:26500655

  10. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J H; Mcdonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  11. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J H; McDonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  12. A Multiplex Assay for Detection of Staphylococcal and Streptococcal Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Preeti; Wang, Ningyan; Chervin, Adam S; Quinn, Cheryl L; Stone, Jennifer D; Kranz, David M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcal and streptococcal exotoxins, also known as superantigens, mediate a range of diseases including toxic shock syndrome, and they exacerbate skin, pulmonary and systemic infections caused by these organisms. When present in food sources they can cause enteric effects commonly known as food poisoning. A rapid, sensitive assay for the toxins would enable testing of clinical samples and improve surveillance of food sources. Here we developed a bead-based, two-color flow cytometry assay using single protein domains of the beta chain of T cell receptors engineered for high-affinity for staphylococcal (SEA, SEB and TSST-1) and streptococcal (SpeA and SpeC) toxins. Site-directed biotinylated forms of these high-affinity agents were used together with commercial, polyclonal, anti-toxin reagents to enable specific and sensitive detection with SD50 values of 400 pg/ml (SEA), 3 pg/ml (SEB), 25 pg/ml (TSST-1), 6 ng/ml (SpeA), and 100 pg/ml (SpeC). These sensitivities were in the range of 4- to 80-fold higher than achieved with standard ELISAs using the same reagents. A multiplex format of the assay showed reduced sensitivity due to higher noise associated with the use of multiple polyclonal agents, but the sensitivities were still well within the range necessary for detection in food sources or for rapid detection of toxins in culture supernatants. For example, the assay specifically detected toxins in supernatants derived from cultures of Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these reagents can be used for simultaneous detection of the toxins in food sources or culture supernatants of potential pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:26305471

  13. Immunochemistry of the streptococcal group R cell wall polysaccharide antigen.

    PubMed

    Soprey, P; Slade, H D

    1972-01-01

    The group R streptococcal group antigen has been shown to be a polysaccharide located at the surface of the cell wall of the organism. The antigen was extracted from cell walls in 0.05 n HCl or 5% trichloracetic acid at 100 C, from whole cells at room temperature in 0.85% NaCl or 0.1 m acetate (pH 5.0), and by sonic oscillation. The antigen is largely destroyed when extracted from whole cells in 0.05 n HCl at 100 C. Acetate is recommended for routine extraction. The antigen extracted by sonic treatment was separated into six immunologically active fractions on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. The fractions were found to possess a common antigen which exhibited similar properties on immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. The purified antigen did not react with any other streptococcal group antisera. Adsorption of group R serum with the antigen removed all antibodies against whole cell antigen extracts of R cells. Chemical and enzymatic analysis of three fractions showed that the antigen was composed of d-glucose, d-galactose, rhamnose, and glucosamine. No significant quantities of phosphorus, glycerol, ribitol, or muramic acid were present. Significant inhibition of the quantitative precipitin determination by d-galactose and stachyose indicated that galactose in terminal alpha linkage was the immunodominant hexose in the antigen. d-Glucose and d-glucosamine possessed a partial inhibitory activity. N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and l-rhamnose did not produce significant inhibition. The results indicate that the R antigen is an immunologically specific structure which serves as a reliable means of identification of these streptococci as a serological group. PMID:4632470

  14. [Healthcare associated pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ceccato, Adrián; González, Alejandra; Heres, Marcela; Peluffo, Graciela; Monteverde, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a different entity from community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. There exist several risk factors that lead to it. Different features, severity and pathogens are described and there is controversy about the initial empirical treatment. The aim of this work was to analyze the etiology, clinical characteristics and evolution of the HCAP. It is a prospective and observational study that includes 60 patients; 32 had previous hospitalization during the last 90 days, 9 were under hemodialysis, 12 residents in nursing homes and 7 received outpatient intravenous therapy. The mean age was 63 years and the severity index was high. The most frequent comorbidities were cardiac. The radiological compromise was more than one lobe in 42% of cases and 18% had pleural effusion. Germ isolation was obtained in 30% of patients where the most isolated germ was Streptococcus pneumoniae (9 cases). There was only one case of multidrug-resistance. The mean length hospital stay was 11 days, six patients had complications and mortality was 5%. Complications but not mortality were significantly higher in the group of patients on hemodialysis (p value = 0.011 and 0.056 respectively). The antibiotic-resistance found do not justify a change in the antibiotic treatment commonly used for community acquired pneumonia. PMID:24561835

  15. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Gretchen L; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, "walking" pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  16. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  17. Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR).

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, C C; Jackson, L A; Campbell, L A; Grayston, J T

    1995-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR) is a recently recognized third species of the genus Chlamydia that causes acute respiratory disease. It is distinct from the other two chlamydial species that infect humans, C. trachomatis and C. psittaci, in elementary body morphology and shares less than 10% of the DNA homology with those species. The organism has a global distribution, with infection most common among children between the ages of 5 and 14 years. In children, TWAR infection is usually mild or asymptomatic, but it may be more severe in adults. Pneumonia and bronchitis are the most common clinical manifestations of infection, and TWAR is responsible for approximately 10% of cases of pneumonia and 5% of cases of bronchitis in the United States. The microimmunofluorescence serologic assay is specific for TWAR and can distinguish between recent and past infections. The organism can be isolated in cell culture; however, PCR techniques have recently facilitated its detection in tissues and clinical specimens. PMID:8665464

  18. Vaccinating welders against pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Cosgrove, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2011 the Department of Health in England recommended that welders should each receive a single dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23). This review assesses the evidence behind the advice and its practical implications. Method The review was informed by a systematic search in Medline, which related pneumonia to welding and/or exposure to metal fume, and was supplemented using the personal libraries of the authors. Findings There is consistent evidence that welders die more often of pneumonia, especially lobar pneumonia, are hospitalised more often with lobar and pneumococcal pneumonia, and more often develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). It is estimated that one case of IPD may be prevented over a 10-year period by vaccinating 588 welders against pneumococcal infection. Conclusions A good case exists that employers should offer PPV23 vaccination to welders and other employees exposed to metal fume. Additionally, reasonable measures must be taken to minimise exposure to welding fume and welders should be encouraged not to smoke. PMID:22764269

  19. Lipoid pneumonia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hadda, Vijay; Khilnani, Gopi C

    2010-12-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon disease caused by the presence of lipid in the alveoli. It is classified into two major groups, depending on whether the lipid/oil in the respiratory tract is from an exogenous (exogenous lipoid pneumonia) or endogenous/idiopathic (endogenous lipoid pneumonia) source. The usual presentation occurs with insidious onset and nonspecific respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea and/or cough. The main radiological findings include airspace consolidations, ground-glass attenuation, airspace nodules and 'crazy-paving' pattern. However, the radiological appearance of the disorder can mimic many other lung diseases, including carcinoma. Owing to the nonspecific clinical presentation and radiological features, the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. Pathologically, lipoid pneumonia is a chronic foreign body reaction to fat, characterized by lipid-laden macrophages. Diagnosis of this disease requires a high index of suspicion and can be confirmed by demonstration of lipid-laden macrophages in respiratory samples such as sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or fine-needle aspiration cytology/biopsy from lung lesions. Treatment protocols for this illness are poorly defined. PMID:21128754

  20. Pathophysiology of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Alcón, Amalia; Fàbregas, Neus; Torres, Antoni

    2005-03-01

    The development of pneumonia requires that a pathogen reach the alveoli and that the host defenses are overwhelmed by microorganism virulence or by the inoculum size. The endogenous sources of microorganisms are nasal carriers, sinusitis, oropharynx, gastric, or tracheal colonization, and hematogenous spread. Other external sources of contamination, such as intensive care unit workers, aerosols, or fibrobronchoscopy, must be considered as accidental. PMID:15802164

  1. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... have some symptoms of pneumonia after leaving the hospital. Coughing will slowly get better over 7 to 14 days. Sleeping and eating may take up to a week to return to normal. You may need to take time off work to care for your child.

  2. Rapid identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae in blood cultures by using the ImmuLex, Slidex and Wellcogen latex agglutination tests and the BinaxNOW antigen test.

    PubMed

    Altun, O; Athlin, S; Almuhayawi, M; Strålin, K; Özenci, V

    2016-04-01

    Rapid identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae in blood culture (BC) bottles is important for early directed antimicrobial therapy in pneumococcal bacteraemia. We evaluated a new latex agglutination (LA) test on BC bottles, the ImmuLex™ S. pneumoniae Omni (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark), and compared the performance with the Slidex® pneumo-Kit (bioMérieux, France) and the Wellcogen™ S. pneumoniae (Remel, UK) LA tests, as well as the BinaxNOW® S. pneumoniae (Alere, USA) antigen test. The four tests were directly applied on 358 positive BC bottles with Gram-positive cocci in pairs or chains and on 15 negative bottles. Valid test results were recorded in all cases for ImmuLex and BinaxNOW and in 88.5 % (330/373) and 94.1 % (351/373) of cases for Slidex and Wellcogen, respectively. Based on bottles positive for S. pneumoniae by conventional methods, the sensitivity of ImmuLex was 99.6 %, similar to the other tests (range, 99.6-100 %). Based on bottles positive for non-pneumococcal pathogens, the specificity of ImmuLex was 82.6 %, in comparison to 97.6 % for Slidex (p < 0.01) and 85.4 % for Wellcogen (p = ns). The BinaxNOW test had a lower specificity (64.1 %) than any LA test (p < 0.01). On BC bottles positive for α-haemolytic streptococci, ImmuLex was positive in 12/67 (17.9 %) cases, Slidex in 2/59 (3.4 %) cases, Wellcogen in 11/64 (17.2 %) cases and BinaxNOW in 25/67 (37.3 %) cases. In conclusion, the ImmuLex test provides a valid and sensitive technique for the rapid detection of S. pneumoniae in BC bottles, similar to the other compared methods. However, the specificity was sub-optimal, since the test may cross-react with other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26796552

  3. Clinical features and outcome of bone and joint infections with streptococcal involvement: 5-year experience of interregional reference centres in the south of France.

    PubMed

    Seng, P; Vernier, M; Gay, A; Pinelli, P-O; Legré, R; Stein, A

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcal bone and joint infections are less common than staphylococcal cases. Few studies have reported the cases with well-identified Streptococcus species. Their clinical features and prognosis are not clearly known to date. Moreover, no treatment regimen has yet been clarified. We reviewed the streptococcal bone and joint infection cases managed in our centres from January 2009 to December 2013. We described the epidemiology, clinical and microbiologic characteristics, treatment approach and outcome. Among the 93 cases, 83% of patients were men with a median age of 60 years, and 90% of patients had comorbidities or risk factors. Bacteraemia occurred in 14% of cases. Serious complications occurred in six patients, including severe sepsis (two cases) and infective endocarditis (two cases). Orthopaedic device infections were observed in 35% of cases, including 17 patients with internal osteosynthesis device infection, 14 with prosthetic joint infection and three with vertebral osteosynthesis device infection. The median time between orthopaedic device implantation and onset of infection was 447 days. Fourteen species of Streptococcus were identified, including 97 isolates using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and three isolates using molecular identification. The five most represented species included S. agalactiae (37%), S. dysgalactiae (12%), S. anginosus (11%), S. constellatus (10%) and S. pneumoniae (9%). Streptococci isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin, with the exception of one S. mitis isolate. Remission 1 year after the end of treatment was recorded in 83%. One patient died of infection; eight patients had infections that failed to respond to treatment; and seven patients experienced relapse. Twenty patients (22%) had an unfavourable functional outcome, including 19 amputations and one arthrodesis. Five significant prognostic factors associated with an unfavourable clinical outcome were identified

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Nicolò; Lewis, Russell E.; Giannella, Maddalena; Ambretti, Simone; Bartoletti, Michele; Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Cristini, Francesco; Trapani, Filippo; Gaibani, Paolo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Multidrug resistance associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among K. pneumoniae is endemic in southern Europe. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of resistance on the appropriateness of empirical therapy and treatment outcomes of K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) during a 2-year period at a 1420-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Italy. We identified 217 unique patient BSIs, including 92 (42%) KPC-positive, 49 (23%) ESBL-positive, and 1 (0.5%) metallo-beta-lactamase-positive isolates. Adequate empirical therapy was administered in 74% of infections caused by non-ESBL non-KPC strains, versus 33% of ESBL and 23% of KPC cases (p < 0.0001). To clarify the impact of resistance on BSI treatment outcomes, we compared several different models comprised of non-antibiotic treatment-related factors predictive of patients’ 30-day survival status. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score determined at the time of positive blood culture was superior to other investigated models, correctly predicting survival status in 83% of the study cohort. In multivariate analysis accounting for APACHE II, receipt of inadequate empirical therapy was associated with nearly a twofold higher rate of death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1–3.4; p = 0.02). Multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae accounted for two-thirds of all K. pneumoniae BSIs, high rates of inappropriate empirical therapy, and twofold higher rates of patient death irrespective of underlying illness. PMID:25398065

  5. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections: an overview.

    PubMed

    Esposito, S; Bianchini, S; Baggi, E; Fattizzo, M; Rigante, D

    2014-12-01

    The acronym PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) has been used to describe a syndrome characterized by various obsessions, compulsions, tics, hyperactivity, motor stereotypies, and paroxysmal movement disorders that are correlated with prior infection by group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes (GABHS) infections. Five clinical criteria can be used to diagnose PANDAS: (1) the presence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or any other tic disorders; (2) prepuberal onset (between 3 years of age and the start of puberty); (3) abrupt onset and relapsing-remitting symptom course; (4) a distinct association with GABHS infection; and (5) association with neurological abnormalities during exacerbations (adventitious movements or motoric hyperactivity). The exact pathogenesis of PANDAS remains unclear, and several theories that focus on multiple etiologic or contributive factors have emerged. PANDAS appears to be a neurobiological disorder that potentially complicates GABHS infections in genetically susceptible individuals. The current standard of care for PANDAS patients remains symptomatic, and cognitive behavioral therapy, such as exposure and response prevention, combined with family counseling and psychoeducation, should be the first approach for treating PANDAS. This review examines current theories of PANDAS pathogenesis, identifies possible treatments for managing this complex condition, and highlights areas for future research. Moving forward, developing more standardized diagnostic criteria and identifying specific laboratory markers to facilitate PANDAS diagnoses are crucial. PMID:24953744

  6. [Obsessive-compulsive disorder in children induced by streptococcal infection].

    PubMed

    Kochman, F; Hantouche, E G; Karila, L; Bayart, D; Bailly, D

    2001-11-24

    FROM OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER TO PANDAS: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) represents a potentially severe and handicapping disorder that affects several hundreds of thousands of children in France. OCD has, for many years, been considered as a neurosis resulting from mental conflicts. It is currently seen as a neurobiological disorder, the etiological substratum of which is more organic than mental. Recently a sub-type of OCD was isolated in children following infection by Group A b-hemolytic streptococci. This sub-type has been described as Paediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS). A NEW PHYSIOPATHOLOGICAL APPROACH: The putative dysimmune relationship between bacterial infection and neurotic disorder has led to the development of an original etiopathogenic model that may lead to new therapeutic strategies. The clinical case report of an adolescent presenting with trichotillomania associated with recurrent pharyngitis is a good illustration of this. PUBLISHED DATA: Data published in medical literature over the last 10 years indicates a 10% prevalence in the young suffering from OCD, i.e. 0.1 to 0.3% of the young population. PMID:11769071

  7. Pressure Sensitivity of Streptococcal Growth in Relation to Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Robert E.; Brown, William P.; Fenn, Wallace O.

    1971-01-01

    The sensitivity of Streptococcus faecalis growth to hydrostatic pressures ranging up to 550 atm was found to depend on the source of adenosine triphosphate for growth. Barotolerance of cultures growing in a complex medium with ribose as major catabolite appeared to be determined primarily by the pressure sensitivity of ribose-degrading enzymes. Apparent activation volumes for growth were nearly identical to those for lactate production from ribose, and yield coefficients per mole of ribose degraded were relatively independent of pressure. In contrast, cultures with glucose as main catabolite were less sensitive to pressure; glycolysis was less severely restricted under high pressure than was growth, and yield coefficients declined with pressure, especially above 400 atm. Thus, two distinct types of barotolerance could be defined—one dominated by catabolic reactions and one dominated by noncatabolic reactions. The results of experiments with a series of other catabolites further supported the view that catabolic reactions can determine streptococcal barotolerance. We also found that growing, glucose-degrading cultures increased in volume under pressure in the same manner that they do at 1 atm. Thus, it appeared that the bacterium has no alternative means of carrying out glycolysis under pressure without dilatation. Also, the observation that cultures grown under pressure did not contain abnormally large or morphologically deformed cells suggested that pressure did not inhibit cell division more than cell growth. PMID:4925191

  8. AN ELECTROPHORETIC STUDY OF A STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE AND ITS PRECURSOR

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, Theodore; Elliott, S. D.

    1951-01-01

    An electrophoretic study of crystalline preparations of a streptococcal proteinase and its precursor established their isoelectric points at pH values of 8.42 and 7.35 respectively (ionic strength 0.10). Preparations of the proteinase appeared to be electrophoretically homogeneous over a pH range of 5 to 8.5. Precursor preparations contained a relatively low concentration of the active enzyme visible as a separate peak in electrophoretic patterns of sufficiently concentrated solutions. Autocatalytic conversion of precursor to active enzyme was complete and resulted in a corresponding change in the electrophoretic pattern. Treatment of precursor preparations with trypsin produced incomplete conversion to the active enzyme and resulted in the formation of a modified precursor protein. This differed from the parent substance in electrophoretic mobility and in susceptibility to trypsin, but resembled it in immunological specificity and, as previously shown, in susceptibility to conversion to active enzyme by autocatalysis. Serological reactions of precursor and active enzyme components withdrawn from the cell after electrophoresis are described. It appears that the precursor protein may have two antigenic groups, one specific, the other shared by the active enzyme which behaves as a single antigen. PMID:14888818

  9. Degradation of 14C-labeled streptococcal cell walls by egg white lysozyme and lysosomal enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Gallis, H A; Miller, S E; Wheat, R W

    1976-01-01

    The resistance of native and trypsin-treated [14C] glucose-labeled cell walls to degradation by lysozyme and human lysosomal enzymes was confirmed. In contrast, chemically N-acetylated cell walls undergo significant degradation by these enzymes in the pH range of 4.5 to 5.5 without prior removal of the group-specific carbohydrate. N-acetylation after removal of the group A carbohydrate by formamide extraction renders the cell walls considerably more susceptible to these enzymes than by formamaide extraction alone. It appears, therefore, that unless N-acetylation can occur in vivo, streptococcal cell walls are minimally degraded, if at all, by human peripheral blood leukocytes or lysozyme. Examination of leukocyte extracts from normal subjects and patients with post-streptococcal syndromes revealed no qualitative differences in ability to dissolve streptococcal cell walls. Images PMID:773836

  10. Saline breast implant fluid collection and reactive arthritis in a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohannim, Omid; Rubin, Zachary; Taylor, Mihaela

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a potentially lethal condition with an increasing incidence over the last 30 years. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient with signs and symptoms of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This patient's presentation was unique in that it was followed by an accumulation of fluid at her breast implant in addition to a polyarticular reactive arthritis. We propose that the patient's reactive arthritis is consistent with the diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis, a variant of acute rheumatic fever, which similarly to its variant is immunologically driven. We hypothesize that the fluid collection around the patient's breast implant was triggered by her infection and was also immunologically mediated. PMID:21325958

  11. Case report: group B streptococcal bacteremia and sacroiliitis after mid-trimester dilation and evacuation.

    PubMed

    McKenna, T; O'Brien, K

    2009-09-01

    Group B streptococcal bacteremia with septic arthritis is a rare complication of second trimester dilation and evacuation, and may cause substantial post-operative morbidity. A 37-year-old gravida 4 para 1-0-2-1 presented with fever and right hip pain on post-operative day 11 from a second trimester dilation and evacuation for fetal trisomy 21. She was initially found to have septic arthritis involving the right sacroiliac joint and group B streptococcal bacteremia. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed a tricuspid valve, vegetation consistent with endocarditis. After prolonged parenteral antibiotic therapy, she developed septic pulmonary emboli that were successfully treated with anticoagulation therapy. Group B streptococcal infection is a potentially serious post-abortion complication that can cause sacroiliitis, endocarditis and septic pulmonary emboli. PMID:19710658

  12. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B antibodies in a mouse model of glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Y-H; Kuo, C-F; Huang, K-J; Wu, J-J; Lei, H-Y; Lin, M T; Chuang, W-J; Liu, C-C; Lin, C-F; Lin, Y-S

    2007-09-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B is an extracellular cysteine protease. Only nephritis-associated strains of group A streptococci secrete this protease and this may be involved in the pathogenesis of post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Mice were actively immunized with a recombinant protease inactive exotoxin B mutant or passively immunized with exotoxin B antibody. Characteristics of glomerulonephritis were measured using histology, immunoglobulin deposition, complement activation, cell infiltration, and proteinuria. None of the mice given bovine serum albumin or exotoxin A as controls showed any marked changes. Immunoglobulin deposition, complement activation, and leukocyte infiltration occurred only in the glomeruli of exotoxin B-hyperimmunized mice. One particular anti-exotoxin B monoclonal antibody, 10G, was cross-reactive with kidney endothelial cells and it caused kidney injury and proteinuria when infused into mice. This cross-reactivity may be involved in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis following group A streptococcal infection. PMID:17637712

  13. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae Flocculation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, T. L.; Taylor, K. A.; Thompson, A. P.; Younger, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae is a cause of community- and hospital-acquired lung, urinary tract, and blood stream infections. A common contaminant of indwelling catheters, it is theorized that a common infection pathway for this organism is via shedding of aggregates off of biofilm colonies. In an effort to better understand bacterial proliferation in the host bloodstream, we develop a PDE model for the flocculation dynamics of Klebsiella pneumoniae in suspension. Existence and uniqueness results are provided, as well as a brief description of the numerical approximation scheme. We generate artificial data and illustrate the requirements to accurately identify proliferation, aggregation, and fragmentation of flocs in the experimental domain of interest. PMID:18071828

  15. Diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children and adolescents: clinical picture limitations☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Aurelino Rocha; Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; Fontes, Maria Jussara Fernandes; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Bezário Facury; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the utility of clinical features for diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in pediatrics. METHODS: A total of 335 children aged 1-18 years old and presenting clinical manifestations of acute pharyngotonsillitis (APT) were subjected to clinical interviews, physical examinations, and throat swab specimen collection to perform cultures and latex particle agglutination tests (LPATs) for group A streptococcus (GAS) detection. Signs and symptoms of patients were compared to their throat cultures and LPATs results. A clinical score was designed based on the multivariate logistic regression analysis and also was compared to throat cultures and LPATs results. Positive throat cultures and/or LPATs results were used as a reference standard to establish definitive streptococcal APT diagnosis. RESULTS: 78 children (23.4%) showed positivity for GAS in at least one of the two diagnostic tests. Coryza absence (odds ratio [OR]=1.80; p=0.040), conjunctivitis absence (OR=2.47; p=0.029), pharyngeal erythema (OR=3.99; p=0.006), pharyngeal exudate (OR=2.02; p=0.011), and tonsillar swelling (OR=2.60; p=0.007) were significantly associated with streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. The highest clinical score, characterized by coryza absense, pharyngeal exudate, and pharyngeal erythema had a 45.6% sensitivity, a 74.5% especificity, and a likelihood ratio of 1.79 for streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical presentation should not be used to confirm streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis, because its performance as a diagnostic test is low. Thus, it is necessary to enhance laboratory test availability, especially of LPATs that allow an acurate and fast diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. PMID:25510990

  16. Fungal diagnostics in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-12-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. Although standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstays of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serological and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This article reviews the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  17. Fungal Diagnostics in Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Erika D.; Alexander, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. While standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstay of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serologic and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This chapter will review the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  18. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  19. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  20. Hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Alyssa S.; Bajwa, Rajinder P.S.; Russo, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged. First described in the Asian Pacific Rim, it now increasingly recognized in Western countries. Defining clinical features are the ability to cause serious, life-threatening community-acquired infection in younger healthy hosts, including liver abscess, pneumonia, meningitis and endophthalmitis and the ability to metastatically spread, an unusual feature for enteric Gram-negative bacilli in the non-immunocompromised. Despite infecting a healthier population, significant morbidity and mortality occurs. Although epidemiologic features are still being defined, colonization, particularly intestinal colonization, appears to be a critical step leading to infection. However the route of entry remains unclear. The majority of cases described to date are in Asians, raising the issue of a genetic predisposition vs. geospecific strain acquisition. The traits that enhance its virulence when compared with “classical” K. pneumoniae are the ability to more efficiently acquire iron and perhaps an increase in capsule production, which confers the hypermucoviscous phenotype. An objective diagnostic test suitable for routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is needed. If/when these strains become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials, we will be faced with a frightening clinical scenario. PMID:23302790

  1. Coxiella burnetii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marrie, T J

    2003-04-01

    This report reviews the pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestation of infections due to Coxiella burnetii. Q fever, a zoonosis, is due to infection with C. burnetii. This spore-forming microorganism is a small gram-negative coccobacillus that is an obligate intracellular parasite. The most common animal reservoirs are goats, cattle, sheep, cats, and occasionally dogs. The organism reaches high concentrations in the placenta of infected animals. Aerosolisation occurs at the time of parturition and infection follows inhalation of this aerosol. There are three distinct clinical syndromes of the acute form of the illness: nonspecific febrile illness, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The chronic form of Q fever is almost always endocarditis, but occasionally it is manifest as hepatitis, osteomyelitis or endovascular infection. The pneumonic form of the illness can range from very mild-to-severe pneumonia requiring assisted ventilation. Multiple round opacities are a common finding on chest radiography. Treatment with doxycycline or a fluoroquinolone is preferred. Susceptibility to macrolides is variable. In conclusion, Coxiella burnetii pneumonia should be considered when there is a suitable exposure history and when outbreaks of a pneumonic illness are being investigated. PMID:12762362

  2. [Travel-associated pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Geerdes-Fenge, H F

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory infections are responsible for up to 11% of febrile infections in travellers or immigrants from tropical and subtropical regions. The main pathogens are the same as in temperate climate zones: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, influenza viruses, Legionella pneumophila. However, some pulmonary diseases can be attributed to bacterial, parasitic, viral or fungal pathogens that are endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. The most commonly imported infections are malaria, dengue, and tuberculosis. Pulmonary symptoms and eosinophilia in returning travellers and migrants may be caused by several parasitic infections such as Katayama syndrome, Loeffler syndrome, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, amebiasis, paragonimiasis, echinococcosis, and toxocariasis. In Asia, Tsutsugamushi fever is transmitted by chiggers, spotted fever rickettsiae are transmitted by ticks. Transmission of zoonotic diseases occurs mainly via contact with infected animals or their excretions, human-to-human transmission is generally rare: MERS-CoA (dromedary camels), pulmonary hantavirus infection (rodents), tularemia (rabbits and hares), leptospirosis (rats), Q-fever (sheep and goats), very rarely anthrax (hides of ruminants) and pest (infected rats and wildlife). Inhalation of contaminated dust can cause infections with dimorphic fungi: histoplasmosis (bat guano) and coccidioidomycosis in America and parts of Africa, blastomycosis in America. Some infections can cause symptoms years after a stay in tropical or subtropical regions (melioidosis, tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension). Noninfectious respiratory diseases caused by inhalation of high amounts of air pollution or toxic dusts may also be considered. PMID:25290923

  3. T cell activation and cytokine release in streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nadal, D; Lauener, R P; Braegger, C P; Kaufhold, A; Simma, B; Lütticken, R; Seger, R A

    1993-05-01

    A 5-year-old girl with streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome during varicella infection had high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 but no interleukin-1 or interleukin-2 in the serum. Intravenous administration of gamma-globulin coincided with clinical improvement and with reduction of the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6. The data suggest that streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins trigger synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 in vivo; intravenously administered gamma-globulin may down-regulate the cytokine response. PMID:8496751

  4. From juvenile parkinsonism to encephalitis lethargica, a new phenotype of post-streptococcal disorders: case report.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Pedro; Soares-Fernandes, João; Jordão, Maria J; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-11-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy presented with a mild akinetic-rigid parkinsonism shortly after a post-streptococcal infection. After stopping corticoids, he had a rapid neurological deterioration to a fatal encephalitis lethargica-like syndrome. Serum analysis demonstrated consistently elevated anti-streptolysin-O. This case illustrates a new severe phenotype in the spectrum of the post-streptococcal disorders. This etiology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a movement disorder with a rapid detrimental evolution. PMID:18221898

  5. Methods and compositions for diagnosing and preventing a group B streptococcal infection

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Linda Jeannine; Seifert, Kyle N.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.; Bohnsack, John F.

    2009-09-15

    The present invention provides a group B streptococcal (GBS) surface antigen, designated epsilon antigen, that is co-expressed with the delta antigen on a subset of serotype III GBS. Epsilon is expressed on more pathogenic Restriction Digest Pattern (RDP) III-3 GBS, but not on RDP types 1, 2, or 4. Accordingly, the present invention provides compositions and methods for detecting a group B streptococcus serotype III, RDP III-3 strain. Vaccines and methods of identifying agents which inhibit adhesion of a group B streptococcal cell to a host cell are also provided.

  6. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  7. Inhibition of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B using allicin from garlic.

    PubMed

    Arzanlou, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB) is an important virulence factor of group A streptococci (GAS) and inactivation of SpeB results in the significantly decreased virulence of the bacterium. The protein is secreted as an inactive zymogen of 40 KDa (SpeBz) and undergoes proteolytic truncation to result in a 28 KDa mature active protease (SpeBm). In this study the effect of allicin on the proteolytic activity of SpeBm was evaluated using azocasein assay. Allicin neutralized the SpeBm proteolytic activity in a concentration dependent manner (IC50 = 15.71 ± 0.45 μg/ml). The loss of activity was completely reversed by subsequent treatment with a reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT; 10 mM final concentration), suggesting that allicin likely inhibits the SpeBm by forming a disulfide linkage with an active thiol group in its active site. This mechanism of action was further confirmed with the fact that DTT did not reverse the SpeBm activity in the presence of E-64, a cysteine protease-specific inhibitor, which works specially by forming a thioether linkage with free sulfhydryl groups in enzymes active site. The MIC of allicin against GAS was found to be 32 μg/ml. Exposure of GAS culture to allicin (25 μg/ml) inhibited maturation of SpeBz to the SpeBm. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that allicin inhibits the maturation of SpeBz and proteolytic activity of SpeBm and could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of GAS infections. PMID:26911644

  8. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia.

  9. Invasive group A streptococcal infection concurrent with 2009 H1N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Jean, Cynthia; Louie, Janice K; Glaser, Carol A; Harriman, Kathleen; Hacker, Jill K; Aranki, Faisal; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Farley, Susan; Ginsberg, Michele; Hernandez, Lisa B; Sallenave, Catherine S; Radner, Allen B

    2010-05-15

    We describe 10 patients with 2009 H1N1 influenza and concurrent invasive group A streptococcal infection with marked associated morbidity and mortality. Seven patients required intensive care, 8 required mechanical ventilation, and 7 died. Five of the patients, including 4 of the fatalities, were previously healthy. PMID:20377405

  10. Application of Whole-Genome Sequencing to an Unusual Outbreak of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Clement, Meredith E.; Sharma Kuinkel, Batu K.; Ruffin, Felicia; Flores, Anthony R.; Levinson, Howard; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Moore, Zack; Fowler, Vance G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome analysis was applied to investigate atypical point-source transmission of 2 invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections. Isolates were serotype M4, ST39, and genetically indistinguishable. Comparison with MGAS10750 revealed nonsynonymous polymorphisms in ropB and increased speB transcription. This study demonstrates the usefulness of whole-genome analyses for GAS outbreaks. PMID:27006966

  11. A possible post-streptococcal movement disorder with chorea and tics.

    PubMed

    Kerbeshian, J; Burd, L; Pettit, R

    1990-07-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed a movement disorder after a streptococcal infection. In the acute phase of the illness she exhibited simple and complex motor tics and chorea, but all abnormal movements ceased over the following eight months, without recurrence. This case raises questions about the relationship between tics, chorea and auto-immune reactivity. PMID:2391015

  12. Paedatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection in an Indian Adolescent--A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Sachin; Vaish, Supriya; Chopra, Saurabh; Singh, Vindyaprakash; Sharma, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a unique constellation of signs and symptoms that exist in a subset of children with rapid onset or exacerbation of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders due to an initial autoimmune reaction to a Group A Beta Hemolytic…

  13. Vigilant keratinocytes trigger pathogen-associated molecular pattern signaling in response to streptococcal M1 protein.

    PubMed

    Persson, Sandra T; Wilk, Laura; Mörgelin, Matthias; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-12-01

    The human skin exerts many functions in order to maintain its barrier integrity and protect the host from invading microorganisms. One such pathogen is Streptococcus pyogenes, which can cause a variety of superficial skin wounds that may eventually progress into invasive deep soft tissue infections. Here we show that keratinocytes recognize soluble M1 protein, a streptococcal virulence factor, as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern to release alarming inflammatory responses. We found that this interaction initiates an inflammatory intracellular signaling cascade involving the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase and the subsequent induction and mobilization of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. We also determined the imprint of the inflammatory mediators released, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene alpha, migration inhibitory factor, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, IL-1α, IL-1 receptor a, and ST2, in response to streptococcal M1 protein. The expression of IL-8 is dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 activity and subsequent activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and p38. Notably, this signaling seems to be distinct for IL-8 release, and it is not shared with the other inflammatory mediators. We conclude that keratinocytes participate in a proinflammatory manner in streptococcal pattern recognition and that expression of the chemoattractant IL-8 by keratinocytes constitutes an important protective mechanism against streptococcal M1 protein. PMID:26416902

  14. MYOCARDIAL NECROSIS PRODUCED IN ANIMALS BY MEANS OF CRYSTALLINE STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Aaron; Robertson, Theodore

    1954-01-01

    Focal myocardial necrosis that was often extensive was found in a high percentage of rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice given a single intravenous injection of crystalline streptococcal proteinase. The findings are discussed in relation to their possible implications for the pathogenesis of the cardiac lesions of rheumatic fever. PMID:13163324

  15. Vigilant Keratinocytes Trigger Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Response to Streptococcal M1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Laura; Mörgelin, Matthias; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The human skin exerts many functions in order to maintain its barrier integrity and protect the host from invading microorganisms. One such pathogen is Streptococcus pyogenes, which can cause a variety of superficial skin wounds that may eventually progress into invasive deep soft tissue infections. Here we show that keratinocytes recognize soluble M1 protein, a streptococcal virulence factor, as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern to release alarming inflammatory responses. We found that this interaction initiates an inflammatory intracellular signaling cascade involving the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase and the subsequent induction and mobilization of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. We also determined the imprint of the inflammatory mediators released, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene alpha, migration inhibitory factor, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, IL-1α, IL-1 receptor a, and ST2, in response to streptococcal M1 protein. The expression of IL-8 is dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 activity and subsequent activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and p38. Notably, this signaling seems to be distinct for IL-8 release, and it is not shared with the other inflammatory mediators. We conclude that keratinocytes participate in a proinflammatory manner in streptococcal pattern recognition and that expression of the chemoattractant IL-8 by keratinocytes constitutes an important protective mechanism against streptococcal M1 protein. PMID:26416902

  16. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  17. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process. PMID:27514593

  18. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  19. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  20. Granzyme A impairs host defense during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Vernooy, Juanita H; Medema, Jan P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Endeman, Henrik; Biesma, Douwe H; Boon, Louis; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Granzyme A (GzmA) is a serine protease produced by a variety of cell types involved in the immune response. We sought to determine the role of GzmA on the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. GzmA was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from CAP patients from the infected and contralateral uninfected side and in lung tissue slides from CAP patients and controls. In CAP patients, GzmA levels were increased in BALF obtained from the infected lung. Human lungs showed constitutive GzmA expression by both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells. In an experimental setting, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and GzmA-deficient (GzmA(-/-)) mice by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae In separate experiments, WT and GzmA(-/-) mice were treated with natural killer (NK) cell depleting antibodies. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, GzmA(-/-) mice showed a better survival and lower bacterial counts in BALF and distant body sites compared with WT mice. Although NK cells showed strong GzmA expression, NK cell depletion did not influence bacterial loads in either WT or GzmA(-/-) mice. These results implicate that GzmA plays an unfavorable role in host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia by a mechanism that does not depend on NK cells. PMID:27343190

  1. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Seed, W A

    1980-01-01

    We described three cases of eosinophilic pneumonia of unknown aetiology investigated clinically and by lung biopsy. The illnesses lasted between six and 20 weeks and consisted of cough, dyspnoea, malaise, and in two cases prolonged pyrexia. All had blood eosinophilia and chest radiographs showing widespread bilateral shadowing; in two cases this had a characteristic peripheral distribution. One patient recovered spontaneously and the other two responded to steroids, with disappearance of pyrexia within 12 hours and radiological clearing within 14 days. Lung function tests during the acute illness showed volume restriction or gas transfer defects or both in two cases. After remission all three showed abnormalities if small airways function. Lung biopsies performed during the acute illness were examined histologically and by transmission electron microscopy, and in two cases by immunofluorescence. There was both intra-alveolar and interstitial eosinophilic pneumonia with bronchiolitis obliterans, microgranulomata, and a vasculitis. Electron microscopy showed numerous eosinophils, many degranulated, and macrophages with phagocytosed eosinophilic granules and intracytoplasmic inclusions. In one case IgM, IgG, and IgA were demonstrated in the bronchial walls and interstitium. No IgE or complement was present. We believe that eosinophil granules are responsible for the tissue damage and fever and suggest mechanisms for this and for the response to steroid therapy. Images PMID:7003796

  2. [Exogenous lipoid pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Ramos, S A; Ramos-Solano, F

    1989-09-01

    We report 30 patients with exogenous lipoid pneumonia due to vegetal oil. This was employed in most of the cases during the first month of life for digestive tube symptomatology; clinical manifestations began three months following administrations, as a pneumonia or bronchopneumonia with a respiratory distress syndrome of variable severity. 60% of the thorax x-ray studies were abnormal, the main finding was opacity. One patient has alterations of the mechanics of deglutition; seven had gastroesophageal reflux. Arterial gasometry showed hypoxaemia and increase of alveolo-arterial gradient of oxygen in all. Ten patients died and all the survivors were reevaluated in september, 1988; 18 had normal physical findings. Thorax x-ray studies in 13 patients had right reticulate infiltration and 6 right apical opacity; ECG showed right ventricular hypertrophy in 3. Perfusion pulmonary gamagram with technetium 99 was abnormal in 5. Gastroesophageal reflux was evident in 2. Five were under treatment for several causes. Diagnosis and treatment is discussed. PMID:2604874

  3. Bronchoscopic diagnosis of pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Baselski, V S; Wunderink, R G

    1994-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are characterized by significant morbidity and mortality but also by a relative inability to establish a specific etiologic agent on clinical grounds alone. With the recognized shortcomings of expectorated or aspirated secretions toward establishing an etiologic diagnosis, clinicians have increasingly used bronchoscopy to obtain diagnostic samples. A variety of specimen types may be obtained, including bronchial washes or brushes, protected specimen brushings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and transbronchial biopsies. Bronchoscopy has been applied in three primary clinical settings, including the immunocompromised host, especially human immunodeficiency virus-infected and organ transplant patients; ventilator-associated pneumonia; and severe, nonresolving community- or hospital-acquired pneumonia in nonventilated patients. In each clinical setting, and for each specimen type, specific laboratory protocols are required to provide maximal information. These protocols should provide for the use of a variety of rapid microscopic and quantitative culture techniques and the use of a variety of specific stains and selective culture to detect unusual organism groups. PMID:7834604

  4. A Synthetic Virus-Like Particle Streptococcal Vaccine Candidate Using B-Cell Epitopes from the Proline-Rich Region of Pneumococcal Surface Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Tamborrini, Marco; Geib, Nina; Marrero-Nodarse, Aniebrys; Jud, Maja; Hauser, Julia; Aho, Celestine; Lamelas, Araceli; Zuniga, Armando; Pluschke, Gerd; Ghasparian, Arin; Robinson, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Alternatives to the well-established capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae that circumvent limitations arising from limited serotype coverage and the emergence of resistance due to capsule switching (serotype replacement) are being widely pursued. Much attention is now focused on the development of recombinant subunit vaccines based on highly conserved pneumococcal surface proteins and virulence factors. A further step might involve focusing the host humoral immune response onto protective protein epitopes using as immunogens structurally optimized epitope mimetics. One approach to deliver such epitope mimetics to the immune system is through the use of synthetic virus-like particles (SVLPs). SVLPs are made from synthetic coiled-coil lipopeptides that are designed to spontaneously self-assemble into 20–30 nm diameter nanoparticles in aqueous buffer. Multivalent display of epitope mimetics on the surface of SVLPs generates highly immunogenic nanoparticles that elicit strong epitope-specific humoral immune responses without the need for external adjuvants. Here, we set out to demonstrate that this approach can yield vaccine candidates able to elicit a protective immune response, using epitopes derived from the proline-rich region of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). These streptococcal SVLP-based vaccine candidates are shown to elicit strong humoral immune responses in mice. Following active immunization and challenge with lethal doses of streptococcus, SVLP-based immunogens are able to elicit significant protection in mice. Furthermore, a mimetic-specific monoclonal antibody is shown to mediate partial protection upon passive immunization. The results show that SVLPs combined with synthetic epitope mimetics may have potential for the development of an effective vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26501327

  5. A Synthetic Virus-Like Particle Streptococcal Vaccine Candidate Using B-Cell Epitopes from the Proline-Rich Region of Pneumococcal Surface Protein A.

    PubMed

    Tamborrini, Marco; Geib, Nina; Marrero-Nodarse, Aniebrys; Jud, Maja; Hauser, Julia; Aho, Celestine; Lamelas, Araceli; Zuniga, Armando; Pluschke, Gerd; Ghasparian, Arin; Robinson, John A

    2015-01-01

    Alternatives to the well-established capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae that circumvent limitations arising from limited serotype coverage and the emergence of resistance due to capsule switching (serotype replacement) are being widely pursued. Much attention is now focused on the development of recombinant subunit vaccines based on highly conserved pneumococcal surface proteins and virulence factors. A further step might involve focusing the host humoral immune response onto protective protein epitopes using as immunogens structurally optimized epitope mimetics. One approach to deliver such epitope mimetics to the immune system is through the use of synthetic virus-like particles (SVLPs). SVLPs are made from synthetic coiled-coil lipopeptides that are designed to spontaneously self-assemble into 20-30 nm diameter nanoparticles in aqueous buffer. Multivalent display of epitope mimetics on the surface of SVLPs generates highly immunogenic nanoparticles that elicit strong epitope-specific humoral immune responses without the need for external adjuvants. Here, we set out to demonstrate that this approach can yield vaccine candidates able to elicit a protective immune response, using epitopes derived from the proline-rich region of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). These streptococcal SVLP-based vaccine candidates are shown to elicit strong humoral immune responses in mice. Following active immunization and challenge with lethal doses of streptococcus, SVLP-based immunogens are able to elicit significant protection in mice. Furthermore, a mimetic-specific monoclonal antibody is shown to mediate partial protection upon passive immunization. The results show that SVLPs combined with synthetic epitope mimetics may have potential for the development of an effective vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26501327

  6. Deletion of a Cation Transporter Promotes Lysis in Streptococcus pneumoniae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Jolanda; Andisi, Vahid Farshchi; Kim, Kwang S.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen which causes respiratory and serious invasive diseases. Mg2+ is essential for life, and its concentration varies throughout the human body. Magnesium uptake plays an important role in the virulence of many bacterial pathogens. To study the Mg2+ uptake of S. pneumoniae strain D39, a mutant was generated in SPD1383, a P-type ATPase with homology to the Salmonella Mg2+ transporter MgtA, which has also been shown to be a Ca2+ exporter in strain TIGR4. Under low-Ca2+ conditions, mutation led to a growth defect in complex medium and the gene was nearly essential for growth under low-Mg2+ conditions. Addition of Mg2+ restored the normal growth of the mutant in all cases, but the addition of other divalent cations had no effect. Addition of Ca2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ in the presence of high Mg2+ concentrations inhibited restoration of growth. The mutant was unable to proliferate in blood, which was also alleviated by the addition of Mg2+. The protein was located in the membrane and produced in various S. pneumoniae strains and pathogenic streptococcal species. Surprisingly, mutation of the gene led to an elevated toxicity for endothelial cells. This was caused by an increased amount of pneumolysin in the medium, mediated by elevated lysis of the mutant. Thus, in this study, we uncovered a role for SPD1383 in Mg2+ uptake and hypothesize that the protein is a Mg2+/Ca2+ antiporter. Furthermore, a disturbance in Mg2+ homeostasis seems to promote lysis of S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422174

  7. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infections of Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, James D.; Welliver, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    Although the hallmark of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is pneumonia, the organism is also responsible for a protean array of other symptoms. With an increased awareness of the board clinical spectrum of M. pneumoniae disease and the ready availability of the cold agglutinin and M. pneumoniae complement-fixation tests, interested clinicians will note additional clinical-mycoplasmal associations in their patients. PMID:782043

  8. [Lipoid pneumonia - an underestimated syndrome].

    PubMed

    Schwaiblmair, M; Berghaus, T; Haeckel, T; Wagner, T; Scheidt, W von

    2010-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia, first described by Laughlen 1925 may be classified as endogenous or exogenous. The endogenous form is seen when fat is deposited into the lung tissue. It is usually associated with proximal obstructive lesions, necrotic tissue after radio- or chemotherapy, with lipid storage disease or hyperlipidemia . Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from inhaling or aspirating animal, vegetable or mineral oil. There are usually some underlying neurological defects or esophageal abnormalities. Patients may present with cough, sputum, hemoptysis and chest pain or may be asymptomatic. There is no classic chest film appearance: it may appear as diffuse airspace infiltration or localized consolidation simulating tumour. Computed tomography is diagnostically helpful and shows hypodense areas measuring from -100 to - 30 Hounsfield units. Bronchoscopic biopsies are mandatory for histological confirmation of the diagnosis. Treatment of exogenous lipoid pneumonia has always been conservative by discontinuing the use of oil, correction of underlying defects that may favor aspiration and treatment of intercurrent pneumonia. Other measures, for example corticosteroid therapy, are of uncertain benefit. Complications of lipoid pneumonia that worsen prognosis are recurrent bacterial pneumonias including nontuberculous mycobacteria or aspergillus, or lung cancer that has developed in areas of pre-existing exogenous lipoid pneumonia. PMID:20024881

  9. Streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies induce microvascular cardiac endothelial proinflammatory phenotype in rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Delunardo, F; Scalzi, V; Capozzi, A; Camerini, S; Misasi, R; Pierdominici, M; Pendolino, M; Crescenzi, M; Sorice, M; Valesini, G; Ortona, E; Alessandri, C

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is characterized by the presence of anti-streptococcal group A antibodies and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA). Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and self proteins is a hallmark of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever. We aimed to identify, in RHD patients, autoantibodies specific to endothelial autoantigens cross-reactive with streptococcal proteins and to evaluate their role in inducing endothelial damage. We used an immunoproteomic approach with endothelial cell-surface membrane proteins in order to identify autoantigens recognized by AECA of 140 RHD patients. Cross-reactivity of purified antibodies with streptococcal proteins was analysed. Homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies were found through comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal antigens with human antigens. To investigate interleukin (IL)-1R-associated kinase (IRAK1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, we performed a Western blot analysis of whole extracts proteins from unstimulated or stimulated human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC-C). Adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors were studied by multiplex bead based immunoassay kits. We observed anti-vimentin antibodies in sera from 49% RHD AECA-positive patients. Cross-reactivity of purified anti-vimentin antibodies with heat shock protein (HSP)70 and streptopain streptococcal proteins was shown. Comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal HSP70 and streptopain with human vimentin, we found two homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were able to stimulate HMVEC-C inducing IRAK and NF-κB activation, adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In conclusion, streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies were able to activate microvascular cardiac endothelium by amplifying the inflammatory response

  10. Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Deresinski, Stan

    2014-01-01

    The continuing emergence of infections due to multidrug resistant bacteria is a serious public health problem. Klebsiella pneumoniae, which commonly acquires resistance encoded on mobile genetic elements, including ones that encode carbapenemases, is a prime example. K. pneumoniae carrying such genetic material, including both blaKPC and genes encoding metallo-β-lactamases, have spread globally. Many carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae are resistant to multiple antibiotic classes beyond β-lactams, including tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. The optimal treatment, if any, for infections due to these organisms is unclear but, paradoxically, appears to often require the inclusion of an optimally administered carbapenem. PMID:25343037

  11. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  12. Use of Streptococcus salivarius K12 in the prevention of streptococcal and viral pharyngotonsillitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Colombo, Maria; Zanvit, Alberto; Risso, Paolo; Rottoli, Amilcare S

    2014-01-01

    Background Streptococcus salivarius K12 is an oral probiotic strain releasing two lantibiotics (salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B) that antagonize the growth of S. pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans also affected by episodes of acute otitis media. S. salivarius K12 successfully colonizes the oral cavity, and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. We tested its preventive role in reducing the incidence of both streptococcal and viral pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis in children. Materials and methods We enrolled 61 children with a diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal disorders. Thirty-one of them were enrolled to be treated daily for 90 days with a slow-release tablet for oral use, containing no less than 1 billion colony-forming units/tablet of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®), and the remaining 30 served as the untreated control group. During treatment, they were all examined for streptococcal infection. Twenty children (ten per group) were also assessed in terms of viral infection. Secondary end points in both groups were the number of days under antibiotic and antipyretic therapy and the number of days off school (children) and off work (parents). Results The 30 children who completed the 90-day trial with Bactoblis® showed a significant reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (>90%), as calculated by comparing the infection rates of the previous year. No difference was observed in the control group. The treated group showed a significant decrease in the incidence (80%) of oral viral infections. Again, there was no difference in the control group. With regard to secondary end points, the number of days under antibiotic treatment of the treated and control groups were 30 and 900 respectively, days under antipyretic treatment 16 and 228, days of absence from school 16 and 228, and days of absence from work 16 and 228. The product was well tolerated by the subjects, with no side effects

  13. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  14. Application of the C3-Binding Motif of Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B to Protect Mice from Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Tsao, Nina; Cheng, Miao-Hui; Yang, Hsiu-Chen; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Ying-Pin; Lin, Kai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that produces several extracellular exotoxins to facilitate invasion and infection. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) has been demonstrated to be an important virulence factor of GAS. Our previous studies indicate that SPE B cleaves complement 3 (C3) and inhibits the activation of complement pathways. In this study, we constructed and expressed recombinant fragments of SPE B to examine the C3-binding site of SPE B. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and pull-down assays, we found that the C-terminal domain, containing amino-acid residues 345–398, of SPE B was the major binding site of human serum C3. We further identified a major, Ala376-Pro398, and a minor C3-binding motif, Gly346-Gly360, that both mediated the binding of C3 complement. Immunization with the C3-binding motifs protected mice against challenge with a lethal dose of non-invasive M49 strain GAS but not invasive M1 strains. To achieve higher efficiency against invasive M1 GAS infection, a combination of synthetic peptides derived from C-terminal epitope of streptolysin S (SLSpp) and from the major C3-binding motif of SPE B (PP6, Ala376-Pro398) was used to elicit specific immune response to those two important streptococcal exotoxins. Death rates and the severity of skin lesions decreased significantly in PP6/SLSpp-immunized mice that were infected with invasive M1 strains of GAS. These results indicate a combination of the C3-binding motif of SPE B and the protective epitope of SLS could be used as a subunit vaccine against invasive M1 strains group A streptococcal infection. PMID:25629609

  15. Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome: Life Saving Role of Peritoneal Lavage and Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Minako; Oyama, Fumie; Ito, Asami; Yokota, Megumi; Matsukura, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Kasai, Tomonori; Nitobe, Yohshiro; Morikawa, Akiko; Ozaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We encountered a case where an infection with group A streptococcus (GAS; ie, Streptococcus pyogenes) initially caused primary peritonitis and then subsequently caused streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The patient’s life was likely saved by an emergency laparotomy followed by extensive peritoneal lavage and drainage. CASE PRESENTATION A 40-year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department for lower abdominal pain and numbness in the extremities. She presented with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. An emergency laparotomy was performed, and ascites that resembled pus and general peritonitis were noted. Peritoneal lavage and drainage were performed, and GAS was isolated from peritoneal fluid. Gram staining of cervical polyp specimens revealed Gram-positive bacteria. CONCLUSIONS The patient was diagnosed with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome due to an ascending GAS infection originating from vagina. PMID:27579001

  16. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infection (PANDAS): a Controversial Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp Feitosa; Pelajo, Christina Feitosa

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of studying pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS), it is still not possible to confirm its existence and whether it is a poststreptococcal autoimmune disorder. Many controversies remain: the diagnostic criteria have not been validated, evidence of autoimmunity remains inconclusive, evidence of a genetic predisposition is weak, and streptococcal infections are common in childhood and could represent only a trigger of exacerbations of tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Patients who fit the PANDAS criteria appear to represent a subgroup of children with chronic tic disorder and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder who may experience symptom exacerbations after group A β-hemolytic streptococci infections; however, those infections are not the sole or even the most common antecedent of exacerbations. There is not enough evidence to support PANDAS as a unique clinical entity. PMID:21308506

  17. The contribution of group A streptococcal virulence determinants to the pathogenesis of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Reglinski, Mark; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is responsible for a wide range of pathologies ranging from mild pharyngitis and impetigo to severe invasive soft tissue infections. Despite the continuing susceptibility of the bacterium to β-lactam antibiotics there has been an unexplained resurgence in the prevalence of invasive GAS infection over the past 30 years. Of particular importance was the emergence of a GAS-associated sepsis syndrome that is analogous to the systemic toxicosis associated with TSST-1 producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Despite being recognized for over 20 years, the etiology of GAS associated sepsis and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome remains poorly understood. Here we review the virulence factors that contribute to the etiology of GAS associated sepsis with a particular focus on coagulation system interactions and the role of the superantigens in the development of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:24157731

  18. Plantar Purpura as the Initial Presentation of Viridians Streptococcal Shock Syndrome Secondary to Streptococcus gordonii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Su, Kuan-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shu-Fang; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Ben, Ren-Jy; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Viridians streptococcal shock syndrome is a subtype of toxic shock syndrome. Frequently, the diagnosis is missed initially because the clinical features are nonspecific. However, it is a rapidly progressive disease, manifested by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome within a short period. The disease course is generally fulminant and rarely presents initially as a purpura over the plantar region. We present a case of a 54-year-old female hospital worker diagnosed with viridians streptococcal shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus gordonii. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, fluid hydration, and use of inotropes and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient succumbed to the disease. Early diagnosis of the potentially fatal disease followed by a prompt antibiotic regimen and appropriate use of steroids are cornerstones in the management of this disease to reduce the risk of high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27366188

  19. The Streptococcal Cysteine Protease SpeB Is Not a Natural Immunoglobulin-Cleaving Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Helena; Vindebro, Reine

    2013-01-01

    The human bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes has developed a broad variety of virulence mechanisms to evade the actions of the host immune defense. One of the best-characterized factors is the streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB, an important multifunctional protease that contributes to group A streptococcal pathogenesis in vivo. Among many suggested activities, SpeB has been described to degrade various human plasma proteins, including immunoglobulins (Igs). In this study, we show that SpeB has no Ig-cleaving activity under physiological conditions and that only Igs in a reduced state, i.e., semimonomeric molecules, are cleaved and degraded by SpeB. Since reducing conditions outside eukaryotic cells have to be considered nonphysiological and IgG in a reduced state lacks biological effector functions, we conclude that SpeB does not contribute to S. pyogenes virulence through the proteolytic degradation of Igs. PMID:23569114

  20. The contribution of group A streptococcal virulence determinants to the pathogenesis of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is responsible for a wide range of pathologies ranging from mild pharyngitis and impetigo to severe invasive soft tissue infections. Despite the continuing susceptibility of the bacterium to β-lactam antibiotics there has been an unexplained resurgence in the prevalence of invasive GAS infection over the past 30 years. Of particular importance was the emergence of a GAS-associated sepsis syndrome that is analogous to the systemic toxicosis associated with TSST-1 producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Despite being recognized for over 20 years, the etiology of GAS associated sepsis and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome remains poorly understood. Here we review the virulence factors that contribute to the etiology of GAS associated sepsis with a particular focus on coagulation system interactions and the role of the superantigens in the development of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:24157731

  1. Group A Streptococcal Bacteremia without a Source is Associated with Less Severe Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gauguet, Stefanie; Ahmed, Asim A.; Zhou, Jing; Pfoh, Elizabeth R.; Ahnger-Pier, Kathryn K.; Harper, Marvin B.; Ozonoff, Al; Wessels, Michael R.; Lee, Grace M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed characteristics of 86 Group A streptococcal (GAS) bacteremia cases at Boston Children’s Hospital from 1992-2012. Twenty-three percent of children had severe disease, using ICU admission (18), disability (7), or death (2) as indicators. Children with bacteremia without a source (30% of cases) were less likely to have severe disease than children with focal infections in adjusted models. PMID:25319760

  2. A case of canine streptococcal meningoencephalitis diagnosed using universal bacterial polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Messer, Jeannette S; Wagner, Susan O; Baumwart, Ryan D; Colitz, Carmen M

    2008-01-01

    A 3-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was evaluated for acute, progressive neurological disease. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed neutrophilic pleocytosis. The dog later developed liver disease, thrombocytopenia, and anemia that were presumably secondary to ceftriaxone administration. Bacterial cultures of blood, urine, and CSF were negative. However, a universal bacterial polymerase chain reaction assay of CSF identified deoxyribonucleic acid from Streptococcus spp. The dog recovered with therapy for streptococcal encephalitis. PMID:18593857

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia? The signs and symptoms of pneumonia vary from ... have sudden changes in mental awareness. Complications of Pneumonia Often, people who have pneumonia can be successfully ...

  4. Identification, purification and characterization of a streptococcal protein antigen with a molecular weight of 3800.

    PubMed Central

    Giasuddin, A S; Lehner, T; Evans, R W

    1983-01-01

    A small molecular weight streptococcal antigen of about 3800 was isolated from Streptococcus mutans. The peptide was obtained by gel filtration of a predominantly 185,000 mol. wt. antigen preparation, with two major antigenic determinants (I/II), on Sephacryl S-200, in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). The 185,000 mol. wt. antigen was prepared from the culture supernatant of S. mutans by ammonium sulphate precipitation, DEAE cellulose chromatography and gel filtration on Sepharose 6B. The 3800 mol. wt. material gave a single band on SDS/polyacrylamide gel and reacted with antisera to streptococcal antigen I/II, I and II but not III. Furthermore, it was digested by pronase, contained only traces of carbohydrate and lipids were not detected. It is suggested that SA I/II is either synthesized in a range of molecular sizes from 185,000 to 3800 or the former is broken down by streptococcal proteases into smaller fragments. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:6197355

  5. Autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection: Sydenham chorea, PANDAS, and PANDAS variants.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Parano, Enrico; Rizzo, Renata; Trifiletti, Rosario R

    2006-09-01

    Streptococcal infection in children is usually benign and self-limited. In a small percentage of children, prominent neurologic and/or psychiatric sequelae can occur. Sydenham chorea is the best defined and best recognized. PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection) is a well-defined syndrome in which tics (motor and/or vocal) and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder consistently exacerbate in temporal correlation to a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. PANDAS constitutes a subset of children with tics, Tourette syndrome, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. In addition to strictly defined PANDAS, we and others have recognized several PANDAS variants, including adult-onset variant, a dystonic variant, a myoclonic variant, and a "chronic" PANDAS variant. The nosology and classification of these entities are rapidly evolving. The recognition that some pediatric neurobehavioral syndromes have infectious and/or immunologic triggers points to important new avenues of disease treatment. In this review, we summarize this complex and rapidly evolving area of clinical research. PMID:16970875

  6. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with group a streptococcal infection: the role of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Pavone, P; Rapisarda, V; Serra, A; Nicita, F; Spalice, A; Parano, E; Rizzo, R; Maiolino, L; Di Mauro, P; Vitaliti, G; Coco, A; Falsaperla, A; Trifiletti, R R; Cocuzza, S

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) is a well-defined syndrome in which tics (motor and/or vocal) and/or obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD) consistently exacerbate in temporal correlation to a Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal infection. In children with PANDAS, there is speculation about whether tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy might improve the neuropsychiatric course. Our objective was to examine whether such surgery impacted remission or, in patients without remission, modified clinical course of the disease, streptococcal antibody titers, neuronal antibodies or clinical severity of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and/or tics. Study participants (n = 120) with positive PANDAS criteria were recruited, examined, and divided into surgical or non-surgery groups. The surgical group consisted of children with tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy (n=56). The remaining children were categorized as non-surgery (n=64). Clinical follow-up was made every 2 months for more than 2 years. Surgery did not affect symptomatology progression, streptococcal and neuronal antibodies, or the clinical severity of neuropsychiatric symptoms in these children. In conclusion, in our series clinical progression, antibody production, and neuropsychiatric symptom severity did not differ on the basis of surgical status. We cannot uphold surgical management as likely to impact positive remission rates, course of OCD/tics, or antibody concentrations in children with PANDAS. PMID:25280028

  7. Evidence of streptococcal origin of acute non-necrotising cellulitis: a serological study.

    PubMed

    Karppelin, M; Siljander, T; Haapala, A-M; Aittoniemi, J; Huttunen, R; Kere, J; Vuopio, J; Syrjänen, J

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriological diagnosis is rarely achieved in acute cellulitis. Beta-haemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus are considered the main pathogens. The role of the latter is, however, unclear in cases of non-suppurative cellulitis. We conducted a serological study to investigate the bacterial aetiology of acute non-necrotising cellulitis. Anti-streptolysin O (ASO), anti-deoxyribonuclease B (ADN) and anti-staphylolysin (ASTA) titres were measured from acute and convalescent phase sera of 77 patients hospitalised because of acute bacterial non-necrotising cellulitis and from the serum samples of 89 control subjects matched for age and sex. Antibiotic treatment decisions were also reviewed. Streptococcal serology was positive in 53 (69%) of the 77 cases. Furthermore, ten cases without serological evidence of streptococcal infection were successfully treated with penicillin. Positive ASO and ADN titres were detected in ten (11%) and three (3%) of the 89 controls, respectively, and ASTA was elevated in three patients and 11 controls. Our findings suggest that acute non-necrotising cellulitis without pus formation is mostly of streptococcal origin and that penicillin can be used as the first-line therapy for most patients. PMID:25403372

  8. Selective modulation of superantigen-induced responses by streptococcal cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Rita G; Nizet, Victor; Jeng, Arthur; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Kotb, Malak

    2003-02-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) B, a streptococcal cysteine protease, is believed to be important in group A streptococcal (GAS) pathogenesis. The present study examined the effect of SpeB on the activity of superantigenic exotoxins secreted by M1T1 GAS isolates. The proliferative response of human lymphocytes to culture supernatant (SUP) from an SpeB(+) isolate increased significantly (P<.05) when the isolate was grown with N-[N-(L-3-trans-carboxyoxirane-2-carbonyl)-L-leucyl]-agmatine, a cysteine protease inhibitor. The lymphocyte-stimulating activity of SUP from a spontaneous SpeB(-) variant or SpeB(-) knockout (DeltaSpeB) mutant was also significantly higher than that of SUP from the SpeB(+) parent isolate (P<.001). The addition of recombinant SpeB to the DeltaSpeB mutant reduced the lymphocyte response to a level comparable to that with the SpeB(+) isolate. SpeB affected superantigens that stimulate cells expressing T cell receptor Vbeta (TCRBV)-4, TCRBV7, and TCRBV8 but not those that stimulate TCRBV2. SpeB has a selective proteolytic effect on GAS superantigens. PMID:12552423

  9. Oral streptococcal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mediates interaction with Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Hideki; Nonaka, Aya; Kataoka, Kosuke; Tanaka, Muneo; Shizukuishi, Satoshi

    2004-11-01

    Interaction of Porphyromonas gingivalis with plaque-forming bacteria is necessary for its colonization in periodontal pockets. Participation of Streptococcus oralis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and P. gingivalis fimbriae in this interaction has been reported. In this investigation, the contribution of various oral streptococcal GAPDHs to interaction with P. gingivalis fimbriae was examined. Streptococcal cell surface GAPDH activity was measured by incubation of a constant number of streptococci with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and analysis for the conversion of NAD+ to NADH based on the absorbance at 340 nm. Coaggregation activity was measured by a turbidimetric assay. Cell surface GAPDH activity was correlated with coaggregation activity (r = 0.854, P < 0.01) with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. S. oralis ATCC 9811 and ATCC 10557, Streptococcus gordonii G9B, Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556, and Streptococcus parasanguinis ATCC 15909 exhibited high cell surface GAPDH activity and coaggregation activity; consequently, their cell surface GAPDHs were extracted with mutanolysin and purified on a Cibacron Blue Sepharose column. Subsequently, their DNA sequences were elucidated. Purified GAPDHs bound P. gingivalis recombinant fimbrillin by Western blot assay, furthermore, their DNA sequences displayed a high degree of homology with one another. Moreover, S. oralis recombinant GAPDH inhibited coaggregation between P. gingivalis and the aforementioned five streptococcal strains in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that GAPDHs of various plaque-forming streptococci may be involved in their attachment to P. gingivalis fimbriae and that they may contribute to P. gingivalis colonization. PMID:15488735

  10. Post-infectious group A streptococcal autoimmune syndromes and the heart.

    PubMed

    Martin, William John; Steer, Andrew C; Smeesters, Pierre Robert; Keeble, Joanne; Inouye, Michael; Carapetis, Jonathan; Wicks, Ian P

    2015-08-01

    There is a pressing need to reduce the high global disease burden of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and its harbinger, acute rheumatic fever (ARF). ARF is a classical example of an autoimmune syndrome and is of particular immunological interest because it follows a known antecedent infection with group A streptococcus (GAS). However, the poorly understood immunopathology of these post-infectious diseases means that, compared to much progress in other immune-mediated diseases, we still lack useful biomarkers, new therapies or an effective vaccine in ARF and RHD. Here, we summarise recent literature on the complex interaction between GAS and the human host that culminates in ARF and the subsequent development of RHD. We contrast ARF with other post-infectious streptococcal immune syndromes - post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) and the still controversial paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), in order to highlight the potential significance of variations in the host immune response to GAS. We discuss a model for the pathogenesis of ARF and RHD in terms of current immunological concepts and the potential for application of in depth "omics" technologies to these ancient scourges. PMID:25891492

  11. Streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies induce microvascular cardiac endothelial proinflammatory phenotype in rheumatic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Delunardo, F; Scalzi, V; Capozzi, A; Camerini, S; Misasi, R; Pierdominici, M; Pendolino, M; Crescenzi, M; Sorice, M; Valesini, G; Ortona, E; Alessandri, C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is characterized by the presence of anti-streptococcal group A antibodies and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA). Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and self proteins is a hallmark of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever. We aimed to identify, in RHD patients, autoantibodies specific to endothelial autoantigens cross-reactive with streptococcal proteins and to evaluate their role in inducing endothelial damage. We used an immunoproteomic approach with endothelial cell-surface membrane proteins in order to identify autoantigens recognized by AECA of 140 RHD patients. Cross-reactivity of purified antibodies with streptococcal proteins was analysed. Homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies were found through comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal antigens with human antigens. To investigate interleukin (IL)-1R-associated kinase (IRAK1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, we performed a Western blot analysis of whole extracts proteins from unstimulated or stimulated human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC-C). Adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors were studied by multiplex bead based immunoassay kits. We observed anti-vimentin antibodies in sera from 49% RHD AECA-positive patients. Cross-reactivity of purified anti-vimentin antibodies with heat shock protein (HSP)70 and streptopain streptococcal proteins was shown. Comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal HSP70 and streptopain with human vimentin, we found two homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were able to stimulate HMVEC-C inducing IRAK and NF-κB activation, adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In conclusion, streptococcal–vimentin cross-reactive antibodies were able to activate microvascular cardiac endothelium by amplifying the inflammatory

  12. Inflammation-inducing Factors of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which causes mycoplasmal pneumonia in human, mainly causes pneumonia in children, although it occasionally causes disease in infants and geriatrics. Some pathogenic factors produced by M. pneumoniae, such as hydrogen peroxide and Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin have been well studied. However, these factors alone cannot explain this predilection. The low incidence rate of mycoplasmal pneumonia in infants and geriatrics implies that the strong inflammatory responses induced by M. pneumoniae coordinate with the pathogenic factors to induce pneumonia. However, M. pneumoniae lacks a cell wall and does not possess an inflammation-inducing endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In M. pneumoniae, lipoproteins were identified as an inflammation-inducing factor. Lipoproteins induce inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2. Because Mycoplasma species lack a cell wall and lipoproteins anchored in the membrane are exposed, lipoproteins and TLR2 have been thought to be important for the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. However, recent reports suggest that M. pneumoniae also induces inflammatory responses also in a TLR2-independent manner. TLR4 and autophagy are involved in this TLR2-independent inflammation. In addition, the CARDS toxin or M. pneumoniae cytadherence induces inflammatory responses through an intracellular receptor protein complex called the inflammasome. In this review, the inflammation-inducing factors of M. pneumoniae are summarized. PMID:27065977

  13. The gene for type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) is located in bacteriophage T12.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, C R; Ferretti, J J

    1984-01-01

    The infection of Streptococcus pyogenes T25(3) with the temperate bacteriophage T12 results in the conversion of the nontoxigenic strain to type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) production. Although previous research has established that integration of the bacteriophage genome into the host chromosome is not essential for exotoxin production, the location of the gene on the bacteriophage or bacterial chromosome had not been determined. In the present investigation, recombinant DNA techniques were used to determine whether the gene specifying type A streptococcal exotoxin (speA) production is located on the bacteriophage chromosome. Bacteriophage T12 was obtained from S. pyogenes T25(3)(T12) by induction with mitomycin C, and after isolation of bacteriophage DNA by phenol-chloroform extraction, the DNA was digested with restriction enzymes and ligated with Escherichia coli plasmid pHP34 or the Streptococcus-E. coli shuttle vector pSA3. Transformation of E. coli HB101 with the recombinant molecules allowed selection of E. coli clones containing bacteriophage T12 genes. Immunological assays with specific antibody revealed the presence of type A streptococcal exotoxin in sonicates of E. coli transformants. Subcloning experiments localized the speA gene to a 1.7-kilobase segment of the bacteriophage T12 genome flanked by SalI and HindIII sites. Introduction of the pSA3 vector containing the speA gene into Streptococcus sanguis (Challis) resulted in transformants that secreted the type A exotoxin. Immunological analysis showed that the type A streptococcal exotoxin produced by E. coli and S. sanguis transformants was identical to the type A exotoxin produced by S. pyogenes T25(3)(T12). Southern blot hybridizations with the cloned fragment confirmed its presence in the bacteriophage T12 genome and its absence in the T25(3) nonlysogen. Therefore, the gene for type A streptococcal exotoxin is located in the bacteriophage genome, and conversion of S. pyogenes T

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Kevin W.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Clark, Andrew T.; Dunne, W. Michael; Dixon, David J.; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; DiPasco, Peter J.; Osberghaus, William F.; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R.; Walter, Michael J.; Cobb, J. Perren; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, treatment involves only non-specific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar following disparate infections with similar mortalities. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Interventions Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple timepoints. Measurements and Main Results The host response was dependent upon the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro- and anti- inflammatory response was independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of 5 distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary MIP-2 and IL-10 with progression of infection while elevated plasma TNFsr2 and MCP-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hours. Conclusions Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a potential therapeutic

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Myophage Miro

    PubMed Central

    Mijalis, Eleni M.; Lessor, Lauren E.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen frequently associated with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections. Bacteriophage therapy against K. pneumoniae may be possible to combat these infections. The following describes the complete genome sequence and key features of the pseudo-T-even K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae myophage Miro. PMID:26430050

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Myophage Miro.

    PubMed

    Mijalis, Eleni M; Lessor, Lauren E; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen frequently associated with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections. Bacteriophage therapy against K. pneumoniae may be possible to combat these infections. The following describes the complete genome sequence and key features of the pseudo-T-even K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae myophage Miro. PMID:26430050

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia Associated With Methemoglobinemia and Anemia: An Overlooked Association?

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Abu Rmeileh, Ayman; Kornspan, Jonathan David; Abel, Roy; Mizrahi, Meir; Nir-Paz, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute methemoglobinemia and anemia in a patient with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We suggest that M. pneumoniae secretes a putative protein that can induce methemoglobin in red blood cells. Thus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae may induce methemoglobinemia in patients who have low oxygen saturation and anemia. PMID:26034771

  18. Pneumonia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Pneumonia in Children 小児肺炎 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Pneumonia 폐렴 - ...

  19. Streptococcal infection in the pathogenesis of Behçet's disease and clinical effects of minocycline on the disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, F; Oyama, N; Nishibu, A

    1997-12-01

    Although the precise pathoetiology of Behçet's disease (BD) remains obscure, patients with BD have a high incidence of chronic infectious foci, indicating an enhanced susceptibility to chronic tonsillitis, and dental caries. Sometimes, clinical symptoms appear after treatment of these foci in BD patients. It is believed that BD might be related to an allergic reaction to a bacterial infection in view of the many clinical symptoms, especially the presence of aphthous and genital ulcerations. An attempt to obtain cutaneous responses to bacterial antigens has been carried out using various vaccines developed from bacteria isolated from the ulcerative lesions and oral cavities of BD patients. BD patients often show intense hypersensitivity to various strains of streptococci, not only by their cutaneous reactions but also by in vitro testing. In this report, we describe our previous studies on the correlation between streptococcal antigens and the pathogenesis of BD and also discuss the recent reports of other authors. The intense hypersensitivity to streptococcal antigens acquired after streptococcal infection is thought to play an important role in the appearance of symptoms in BD patients since the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was enhanced when stimulated with streptococcal antigen in a culture system. Minocycline, an antibiotic to which certain strains of streptococci are sensitive, reduced the frequency of clinical symptoms in BD patients as well as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by BD-PBMC stimulated with streptococcal antigen. PMID:9509915

  20. [Therapeutic response to plasmapheresis in four cases with obsessive-compulsive disorder and tic disorder triggered by streptococcal infections].

    PubMed

    Beşiroğlu, Lütfullah; Ağargün, Mehmet Yücel; Ozbebit, Ozgür; Sözen, Mehmet; Dilek, Imdat; Güleç, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The acronym PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) has been assigned to a subgroup of patients experiencing pediatric onset obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics as a result of autoimmune response to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. It has been hypothesized that an immune process initiated by infection affects the basal ganglia and causes neuropsychiatric symptoms. In cases with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms, the use of treatment strategies that interrupt the autoimmune process responsible for the pathogenesis of PANDAS, such as therapeutic plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin, has been proposed. In this paper, we discuss the effect of plasmapheresis treatment in 4 adult cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder and tic disorder triggered by streptococcal infections. PMID:17853982

  1. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of type A streptococcal exotoxin: kinetics and regulation during growth of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C W; Ferretti, J J

    1981-01-01

    We describe the detection and quantitation of type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This sensitive and specific technique detected microgram amounts of type A exotoxin and was useful for studying the kinetics and regulation of type A exotoxin production during the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes NY5. Maximum production of type A exotoxin was observed during the mid-log phase of growth, similar to the production of other streptococcal extracellular products. When S. pyogenes NY5 was grown at 42 degrees C, decreases in both growth and type A exotoxin production were observed. The results obtained when we studied the influence of nutrient additives and metal ions on the production of type A exotoxin led to the conclusion that none of these factors significantly affected type A exotoxin synthesis and that regulation was constitutive. Images PMID:7026447

  2. Lipoid pneumonia: an uncommon entity.

    PubMed

    Khilnani, G C; Hadda, V

    2009-10-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare form of pneumonia caused by inhalation or aspiration of fat-containing substances like petroleum jelly, mineral oils, certain laxatives, etc. It usually presents as an insidious onset, chronic respiratory illness simulating interstitial lung diseases. Rarely, it may present as an acute respiratory illness, especially when the exposure to fatty substance(s) is massive. Radiological findings are diverse and can mimic many other diseases including carcinoma, acute or chronic pneumonia, ARDS, or a localized granuloma. Pathologically it is a chronic foreign body reaction characterized by lipid-laden macrophages. Diagnosis of this disease is often missed as it is usually not considered in the differential diagnoses of community-acquired pneumonia; it requires a high degree of suspicion. In suspected cases, diagnosis may be confirmed by demonstrating the presence of lipid-laden macrophages in sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, or fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy from the lung lesion. Treatment of this illness is poorly defined and constitutes supportive therapy, repeated bronchoalveolar lavage, and corticosteroids. PMID:19901490

  3. Lipoid pneumonia: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Chalhoub, Michel; Maroun, Rabih; Abi-Fadel, Francois; Zhao, Fan

    2011-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare medical condition, and is usually classified into two groups, ie, exogenous or endogenous, depending on the source of lipids found in the lungs. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia may result from the aspiration of food and lipids. Although most cases are asymptomatic, common symptoms include cough, dyspnea, chest pain, pleural effusions, fever, and hemoptysis. Radiologically, lipoid pneumonia can manifest as consolidations, pulmonary nodules, or soft-tissue densities. These presentations involve a wide differential diagnosis, including lung cancer. Other rare causes of fatty pulmonary lesions include hamartomas, lipomas, and liposarcomas. The avoidance of further exposures and the use of corticosteroids, antibiotics, and lavage comprise the mainstays of treatment. The exclusion of mycobacterial infections is important during diagnosis, in view of their known association. Generally, acute presentations run a benign course, if promptly treated. Chronic cases are more persistent and difficult to treat. Although the radiologic and pathologic diagnosis is fairly reliable, more research is needed to clarify the optimal treatment and expected outcomes. We report on a 54-year-old man presenting with progressively worsening cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea over a few weeks. The patient underwent multiple computed tomographies of the chest and bronchoscopies. All failed to diagnose lipoid pneumonia. The diagnosis was finally established using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Most of the paraffinoma was resected during this surgery. He was treated with antibiotics and steroids, and discharged from the hospital in stable condition. PMID:21349583

  4. Bacterial Pneumonia in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Marrie, Thomas J; File, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is common in the elderly person; its presentation in this population is often confounded by multiple comorbid illnesses, including those that result in confusion. Although severity-of-illness scoring systems might aid decision-making, clinical judgment following a careful assessment is key in deciding on the site of care and appropriate therapy. PMID:27394017

  5. Chitinases in Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah R.; Kottom, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia remains an important complication of immune suppression. The cell wall of Pneumocystis has been demonstrated to potently stimulate host inflammatory responses, with most studies focusing on β-glucan components of the Pneumocystis cell wall. In the current study, we have elaborated the potential role of chitins and chitinases in Pneumocystis pneumonia. We demonstrated differential host mammalian chitinase expression during Pneumocystis pneumonia. We further characterized a chitin synthase gene in Pneumocystis carinii termed Pcchs5, a gene with considerable homolog to the fungal chitin biosynthesis protein Chs5. We also observed the impact of chitinase digestion on Pneumocystis-induced host inflammatory responses by measuring TNFα release and mammalian chitinase expression by cultured lung epithelial and macrophage cells stimulated with Pneumocystis cell wall isolates in the presence and absence of exogenous chitinase digestion. These findings provide evidence supporting a chitin biosynthetic pathway in Pneumocystis organisms and that chitinases modulate inflammatory responses in lung cells. We further demonstrate lung expression of chitinase molecules during Pneumocystis pneumonia. PMID:22535444

  6. Polyradiculoneuritis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Holt, S; Khan, M M; Charles, R G; Epstein, E J

    1977-07-01

    A patient with severe Mycoplasma pneumonia developed polyradiculoneuritis and respiratory failure. The acute phase of the illness was complicated by a myocarditis, and recovery of neurological function was slow. Residual left hemidiaphragmatic paralysis was present 1 year after onset of the illness. PMID:882485

  7. Case of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by rapidly progressive group A hemolytic streptococcal infection during postoperative chemotherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Yuya; Tsuji, Kousuke; Banno, Kouji; Umene, Kiyoko; Katakura, Satomi; Kisu, Iori; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe infectious disease caused by group A hemolytic streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). This condition is a serious disease that involves rapidly progressive septic shock. We experienced a case of STSS caused by primary peritonitis during treatment with paclitaxel and cisplatin (TP therapy) as postoperative chemotherapy for cervical cancer. STSS mostly develops after extremity pain, but initial influenza-like symptoms of fever, chill, myalgia and gastrointestinal symptoms may also occur. TP therapy is used to treat many cancers, including gynecological cancer, but may cause adverse reactions of neuropathy and nephrotoxicity and sometimes fever, arthralgia, myalgia, abdominal pain and general malaise. The case reported here indicates that development of STSS can be delayed after chemotherapy and that primary STSS symptoms may be overlooked because they may be viewed as adverse reactions to chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of STSS during chemotherapy. PMID:23937219

  8. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by herbicide inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Takamasa; Tsubata, Yukari; Okimoto, Tamio; Hoshino, Teppei; Hamaguchi, Shun-Ichi; Isobe, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is caused by aspiration or inhalation of oily substances. Generally, lipoid pneumonia has non-specific clinical and radiological presentations and may be misdiagnosed as bacterial pneumonia. Our patient, a 68-year-old man who had been diagnosed with pneumonia on three previous occasions, was admitted to our hospital with a fourth similar episode. Computed tomography of the chest revealed extensive consolidations with air bronchograms in lung fields on the right side. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) increased ghost-like macrophages that stained positive for lipid. Our patient reported that he had sprayed herbicide in large quantities without wearing a mask. We analysed the BALF and herbicide by gas chromatography and diagnosed exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by inhalation of herbicide. Clinicians should be aware of lipoid pneumonia, which may present as infectious pneumonia. PMID:27516888

  9. Etiology of Cellulitis and Clinical Prediction of Streptococcal Disease: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Trond; Oppegaard, Oddvar; Kittang, Bård R.; Mylvaganam, Haima; Langeland, Nina; Skrede, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Background. The importance of bacteria other than group A streptococci (GAS) in different clinical presentations of cellulitis is unclear, commonly leading to treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of this study was to describe the etiological and clinical spectrum of cellulitis and identify clinical features predicting streptococcal etiology. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 216 patients hospitalized with cellulitis. Clinical details were registered. Bacterial culture was performed from blood, cutaneous or subcutaneous tissue, and/or swabs from skin lesions. Paired serum samples were analyzed for anti-streptolysin O and anti-deoxyribonuclease B antibodies. Results. Serology or blood or tissue culture confirmed β-hemolytic streptococcal (BHS) etiology in 72% (146 of 203) of cases. An additional 13% (27 of 203) of cases had probable BHS infection, indicated by penicillin response or BHS cultured from skin swabs. β-hemolytic streptococcal etiology was predominant in all clinical subgroups, including patients without sharply demarcated erythema. β-hemolytic group C or G streptococci (GCS/GGS) were more commonly isolated than GAS (36 vs 22 cases). This predominance was found in the lower extremity infections. Group C or G streptococci in swabs were associated with seropositivity just as often as GAS. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from swabs as a single pathogen in 24 cases, 14 (64%) of which had confirmed BHS etiology. Individual BHS-associated clinical characteristics increased the likelihood of confirmed BHS disease only slightly; positive likelihood ratios did not exceed 2.1. Conclusions. β-hemolytic streptococci were the dominating cause of cellulitis in all clinical subgroups and among cases with S aureus in cutaneous swabs. Group C or G streptococci were more frequently detected than GAS. No single clinical feature substantially increased the probability of confirmed BHS etiology. PMID:26734653

  10. Pediatric Autoimmune Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections and Tourette's Syndrome in Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Spinello, Chiara; Laviola, Giovanni; Macrì, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Tourette's Syndrome (TS) – a multifactorial pediatric disorder characterized by the recurrent exhibition of motor tics and/or vocal utterances – can partly depend on immune dysregulation provoked by early repeated streptococcal infections. The natural and adaptive antibody-mediated reaction to streptococcus has been proposed to potentially turn into a pathological autoimmune response in vulnerable individuals. Specifically, in conditions of increased permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB), streptococcus-induced antibodies have been proposed to: (i) reach neuronal targets located in brain areas responsible for motion control; and (ii) contribute to the exhibition of symptoms. This theoretical framework is supported by indirect evidence indicating that a subset of TS patients exhibit elevated streptococcal antibody titers upon tic relapses. A systematic evaluation of this hypothesis entails preclinical studies providing a proof of concept of the aforementioned pathological sequelae. These studies shall rest upon individuals characterized by a vulnerable immune system, repeatedly exposed to streptococcus, and carefully screened for phenotypes isomorphic to the pathological signs of TS observed in patients. Preclinical animal models may thus constitute an informative, useful tool upon which conducting targeted, hypothesis-driven experiments. In the present review we discuss the available evidence in preclinical models in support of the link between TS and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS), and the existing gaps that future research shall bridge. Specifically, we report recent preclinical evidence indicating that the immune responses to repeated streptococcal immunizations relate to the occurrence of behavioral and neurological phenotypes reminiscent of TS. By the same token, we discuss the limitations of these studies: limited evidence of behavioral phenotypes

  11. Pediatric Autoimmune Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections and Tourette's Syndrome in Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Spinello, Chiara; Laviola, Giovanni; Macrì, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Tourette's Syndrome (TS) - a multifactorial pediatric disorder characterized by the recurrent exhibition of motor tics and/or vocal utterances - can partly depend on immune dysregulation provoked by early repeated streptococcal infections. The natural and adaptive antibody-mediated reaction to streptococcus has been proposed to potentially turn into a pathological autoimmune response in vulnerable individuals. Specifically, in conditions of increased permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB), streptococcus-induced antibodies have been proposed to: (i) reach neuronal targets located in brain areas responsible for motion control; and (ii) contribute to the exhibition of symptoms. This theoretical framework is supported by indirect evidence indicating that a subset of TS patients exhibit elevated streptococcal antibody titers upon tic relapses. A systematic evaluation of this hypothesis entails preclinical studies providing a proof of concept of the aforementioned pathological sequelae. These studies shall rest upon individuals characterized by a vulnerable immune system, repeatedly exposed to streptococcus, and carefully screened for phenotypes isomorphic to the pathological signs of TS observed in patients. Preclinical animal models may thus constitute an informative, useful tool upon which conducting targeted, hypothesis-driven experiments. In the present review we discuss the available evidence in preclinical models in support of the link between TS and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS), and the existing gaps that future research shall bridge. Specifically, we report recent preclinical evidence indicating that the immune responses to repeated streptococcal immunizations relate to the occurrence of behavioral and neurological phenotypes reminiscent of TS. By the same token, we discuss the limitations of these studies: limited evidence of behavioral phenotypes

  12. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Japan and Therapeutic Strategies for Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia) is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is important for etiological and epidemiological studies of acute respiratory infections. In Japan, nation-wide surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been conducted as a part of the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) program. This surveillance started in 1981, and significant increases in the numbers of M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients were noted in 1984, 1988, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2015. The epidemics in 2011 and 2012 were particularly widespread and motivated researchers to conduct detailed epidemiological studies, including genotyping and drug resistance analyses of M. pneumoniae isolates. The genotyping studies based on the p1 gene sequence suggested that the p1 gene type 1 lineage has been dominant in Japan since 2003, including the epidemic period during 2011–2012. However, more detailed p1 typing analysis is required to determine whether the type 2 lineages become more relevant after the dominance of the type 1 lineage. There has been extensive research interest in implications of the p1 gene types on the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections. Serological characterizations of sera from patients have provided a glimpse into these associations, showing the presence of type specific antibody in the patient sera. Another important epidemiological issue of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP). MRMPs were noted among clinical isolates in Japan after 2000. At present, the isolation rate of MRMPs from pediatric patients is estimated at 50–90% in Japan, depending on the specific location. In view of the situation, Japanese societies have issued guiding principles for treating M. pneumoniae pneumonia. In these guiding principles, macrolides are still recommended as the first-line drug, however, if

  13. A Pediatric Case of Acute Generalized Pustular Eruption without Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Nobuko; Yoshizawa, Hideka

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular lesions characterized by acute onset with fever occur in pustulosis acuta generalisata, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and generalized pustular psoriasis. In the present report, we describe a pediatric case of generalized pustular eruption that was not completely consistent with clinical features. Our patient had no evidence of a post-streptococcal infection. We observed scattered symmetric eruption of discrete pustules with an inflammatory halo on normal skin. The eruption was absent on her palms and soles of the feet. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports in the English literature of cases with clinical features similar to those of our patient. PMID:27462226

  14. Delayed onset of right congenital diaphragmatic hernia associated with Group B streptococcal sepsis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Parida, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    A full-term male neonate was initially managed for respiratory distress which developed few hours after birth. His initial chest radiograph was normal, and blood culture revealed Group B streptococcal (GBS) sepsis. He subsequently developed progressive right chest opacification that did not improve with medical management. Imaging done few days later revealed right-sided diaphragmatic hernia. The 12-day-old neonate underwent primary repair of the diaphragmatic defect and had an uneventful recovery. This case report intends to highlight this unique association between early onset GBS sepsis and delayed onset of the right congenital diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:27046983

  15. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome in three cats.

    PubMed

    Taillefer, Mylène; Dunn, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    Three 8-week-old kittens were presented with a history of acute, generalized weakness and severe fever. One cat was dead upon presentation, and necropsy findings were supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. During their clinical courses, two of the three kittens developed a progressive, marked swelling of one or more limbs. One moribund and severely hypothermic cat was euthanized a few hours after presentation, and necropsy was also supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. One kitten recovered. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome was suspected because of the fulminant progression of the septicemia. PMID:15347623

  16. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis in children: a distinct entity from acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is a debate whether post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) is a separate entity or a condition on the spectrum of acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We believe that PSRA is a distinct entity and in this paper we review the substantial differences between PSRA and ARF. We show how the demographic, clinical, genetic and treatment characteristics of PSRA differ from ARF. We review diagnostic criteria and regression formulas that attempt to classify patients with PSRA as opposed to ARF. The important implication of these findings may relate to the issue of prophylactic antibiotics after PSRA. However, future trials will be necessary to conclusively answer that question. PMID:22013970

  17. Detection of streptococcal mutants presumed to be defective in sugar catabolism.

    PubMed

    Feary, T W; Mayo, J A

    1984-06-01

    The tetrazolium method for detection of bacterial mutants defective in sugar catabolism was modified for use with streptococci. The critical factors were (i) the concentration of tetrazolium, which must be titrated to determine the optimum concentration for each species or even strain, and (ii) anaerobic incubation of tetrazolium-containing agar plates. When used with standard mutagenesis protocols, this method yielded lactose-negative mutants of nine streptococcal strains representing six species. A collection of lactose-negative mutants of streptococcus, sanguis Challis was characterized and contained phospho-beta-galactosidase, lactose phosphotransferase, and general phosphotransferase mutants. PMID:6378096

  18. Neuronal surface glycolytic enzymes are autoantigen targets in post-streptococcal autoimmune CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Candler, Paul M; Church, Andrew J; Wait, Robin; Pocock, Jennifer M; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2006-03-01

    Infection with the Group A Streptococcus (GAS) can result in immune mediated brain disease characterised by a spectrum of movement and psychiatric disorders. We have previously described anti-neuronal antibodies in patients that bind to a restricted group of brain antigens with molecular weights 40 kDa, 45 kDa (doublet) and 60 kDa. The aim of this study was to define these antigens using 2-dimensional electrophoresis or ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, followed by mass spectrometry. The findings were confirmed using commercial antibodies, commercial antigens and recombinant human antigens. The autoantigens were neuronal glycolytic enzymes--NGE (pyruvate kinase M1, aldolase C, neuronal-specific and non-neuronal enolase). These are multifunctional proteins that are all expressed intracellularly and on the neuronal cell surface. On the neuronal plasma membrane, NGE are involved in energy metabolism, cell signalling and synaptic neurotransmission. Anti-NGE antibodies were more common in the 20 unselected post-streptococcal CNS patients compared to 20 controls. In vitro experiments using cultured neurons showed that commercial anti-NGE antibodies induced apoptosis compared to blank incubation and control anti-HuD antibody. GAS also expresses glycolytic enzymes on cell surfaces that have 0-49% identity with human NGE, suggesting molecular mimicry and autoimmune cross-reactivity may be the pathogenic mechanism in post-streptococcal CNS disease. PMID:16356555

  19. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): Experience at a Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Caitlin E.; Blackwood, R. Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) is an autoimmune disorder presenting with obsessive compulsive disorder and/or tics. Like Sydenham’s chorea, its presumed pathogenesis consists of autoantibodies cross-reacting with neurons in response to a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection (GASI). There are currently no diagnostic laboratory findings and management ranges from antibiotic prophylaxis to intravenous immunoglobulin to plasmapheresis. The diagnosis remains controversial, resulting in inconsistent referrals and significant patient anxiety. Methods A retrospective study was performed on all patients referred to the Pediatric Infectious Disease Division with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Patients were analyzed by demographics, medical history, co-morbidities, symptoms, prior treatment, laboratory tests, management strategies, and treatment outcomes. Results From 2003 to 2013, there were 21 patients with a pre-referral diagnosis of PANDAS. Only five met the diagnostic criteria. No patient at referral had an objective scale to monitor symptoms. Eight referrals had a major psychiatric disorder, and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria (p<0.01). Discussion The majority of the patients referred with a pre-diagnosis of PANDAS do not fulfill diagnostic criteria nor do they have objective criteria for symptom monitoring. Major psychiatric disorders do not seem to be associated with PANDAS, and better physician education may prevent misdiagnoses. Multidisciplinary management is recommended. PMID:26196024

  20. Viridans Group Streptococcal Infections in Children After Chemotherapy or Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maryke J.; Claxton, Sarah; Pizer, Barry; Lane, Steven; Cooke, Richard P.D.; Paulus, Stéphane; Carrol, Enitan D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS) are associated with high mortality rates in febrile neutropenia; yet there are no recent European pediatric studies to inform antimicrobial therapy. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics, outcome, and resistance patterns of children with VGS bacteremia (VGSB) undergoing treatment of malignancy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Patients aged 0 to 18 years, admitted to a tertiary pediatric hemato-oncology center with VGSB, from 2003 to 2013, were included in the study. All data were collected retrospectively from medical records. A total of 54 bacteremic episodes occurred in 46 patients. The most common underlying diagnosis was relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Streptococcus mitis was the most frequent organism. A total of 30% of isolates were resistant to penicillin and 100% sensitive to vancomycin. There were 8 episodes (14.8%) of Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome; 6 resulted in admission to intensive care and 3 of these patients died of multiorgan failure. The potentially fatal nature of VGSB is confirmed. The high risk in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia is of note. Research is needed to develop risk-stratification scores that identify children at risk of Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome to guide empirical antimicrobial therapy in febrile neutropenia. PMID:26945409

  1. Isolation and detection of human IgA using a streptococcal IgA-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Charlotta; Linse, Sara; Areschoug, Thomas; Woof, Jenny M; Reinholdt, Jesper; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2002-08-01

    Bacterial proteins that bind to the Fc part of IgG have found widespread use in immunology. A similar protein suitable for the isolation and detection of human IgA has not been described. Here, we show that a 50-residue synthetic peptide, designated streptococcal IgA-binding peptide (Sap) and derived from a streptococcal M protein, can be used for single-step affinity purification of human IgA. High affinity binding of IgA required the presence in Sap of a C-terminal cysteine residue, not present in the intact M protein. Passage of human serum through a Sap column caused depletion of >99% of the IgA, and elution of the column allowed quantitative recovery of highly purified IgA, for which the proportions of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were the same as in whole serum. Moreover, immobilized Sap could be used for single-step purification of secretory IgA of both subclasses from human saliva, with a recovery of approximately 45%. The Sap peptide could also be used to specifically detect IgA bound to Ag. Together, these data indicate that Sap is a versatile Fc-binding reagent that may open new possibilities for the characterization of human IgA. PMID:12133959

  2. Streptococcal Pharyngitis in a Two-Month-Old Infant: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sajadian, Seyyed Mohammad Sajad; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus is the most common cause of bacterial pharyngitis among 5 - 15-year-old children, but it is uncommon in children less than three years old and rarely happens in infants less than one year old. Case Presentation The patient was a 62-day-old female infant who presented with fever and poor feeding since two days before admission. At the time of admission, the patient was febrile and ill. Upon examination, a rectal temperature of 38.5°C, multiple right-sided submandibular lymphadenopathies, pharyngeal erythema, and tonsillar exudates were detected. Twenty-four hours after the throat swab was collected and cultured, Streptococcus pyogenes grew on a sheep blood agar medium. The patient’s mother, who also experienced similar symptoms, had a positive throat swab culture for S. pyogenes. Conclusions Although Streptococcal pharyngitis is rare in children less than three years old and the necessity of treatment is not well clarified, in case of streptococcal infection in parents and the occurrence of similar signs and symptoms in their child, considering S. pharyngitis as a possible differential diagnosis seems rational.

  3. The Role of Nephritis-Associated Plasmin Receptor (NAPlr) in Glomerulonephritis Associated with Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Nobuyuki; Yamakami, Kazuo; Sakurai, Yutaka; Takechi, Hanako; Yamamoto, Kojiro; Oshima, Naoki; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that glomerulonephritis can occur after streptococcal infection, which is classically referred to as acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The pathogenic mechanism of APSGN has been described by so-called immune complex theory, which involves glomerular deposition of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen and subsequent formation of immune complexes in situ and/or the deposition of circulating antigen-antibody complexes. However, the exact entity of the causative antigen has remained a matter of debate. We isolated a nephritogenic antigen for APSGN from the cytoplasmic fractions of group A streptococcus (GAS) depending on the affinity for IgG of APSGN patients. The amino acid and the nucleotide sequences of the isolated protein revealed to be highly identical to those of reported plasmin(ogen) receptor of GAS. Thus, we termed this antigen nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr). Immunofluorescence staining of the renal biopsy tissues with anti-NAPlr antibody revealed glomerular NAPlr deposition in essentially all patients with early-phase APSGN. Furthermore, glomerular plasmin activity was detected by in situ zymography in the distribution almost identical to NAPlr deposition in renal biopsy tissues of APSGN patients. These data suggest that NAPlr has a direct, nonimmunologic function as a plasmin receptor and may contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN by maintaining plasmin activity. PMID:23118507

  4. High burden of invasive group A streptococcal disease in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R; Patel, M; Currie, B J; Holt, D C; Harris, T; Krause, V

    2016-04-01

    Although the incidence of invasive group A streptococcal disease in northern Australia is very high, little is known of the regional epidemiology and molecular characteristics. We conducted a case series of Northern Territory residents reported between 2011 and 2013 with Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from a normally sterile site. Of the 128 reported episodes, the incidence was disproportionately high in the Indigenous population at 69·7/100 000 compared to 8·8/100 000 in the non-Indigenous population. Novel to the Northern Territory is the extremely high incidence in haemodialysis patients of 2205·9/100 000 population; and for whom targeted infection control measures could prevent transmission. The incidences in the tropical north and semi-arid Central Australian regions were similar. Case fatality was 8% (10/128) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurred in 14 (11%) episodes. Molecular typing of 82 isolates identified 28 emm types, of which 63 (77%) were represented by four emm clusters. Typing confirmed transmission between infant twins. While the diverse range of emm types presents a challenge for effective coverage by vaccine formulations, the limited number of emm clusters raises optimism should cluster-specific cross-protection prove efficacious. Further studies are required to determine effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for contacts and to inform public health response. PMID:26364646

  5. Novel Curcumin Diclofenac Conjugate Enhanced Curcumin Bioavailability and Efficacy in Streptococcal Cell Wall-induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jain, S K; Gill, M S; Pawar, H S; Suresh, Sarasija

    2014-09-01

    Curcumin-diclofenac conjugate as been synthesized by esterification of phenolic group of curcumin with the acid moiety of diclofenac, and characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, FTIR, DSC, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. The relative solubility of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate, curcumin and diclofenac; stability of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate in intestinal extract; permeability study of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate using the everted rat intestinal sac method; stability of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate in gastrointestinal fluids and in vitro efficacy have been evaluated. In vivo bioavailability of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate and curcumin in Sprague-Dawley rats, and antiarthritic activity of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate, curcumin and diclofenac in modified streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model in Balb/c mice to mimic rheumatoid arthritis in humans have also been studied. In all of the above studies, curcumin-diclofenac conjugate exhibited enhanced stability as compared to curcumin; its activity was twice that of diclofenac in inhibiting thermal protein denaturation taken as a measure of in vitro antiinflammatory activity; it enhanced the bioavailability of curcumin by more than five folds, and significantly (P<0.01) alleviated the symptoms of arthritis in streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model as compared to both diclofenac and curcumin. PMID:25425755

  6. IdeS, a novel streptococcal cysteine proteinase with unique specificity for immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Johansson, Björn P; Björck, Lars

    2002-04-01

    Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that proteolytic mechanisms significantly contribute to the molecular interplay between Streptococcus pyogenes, an important human pathogen, and its host. Here we describe the identification, purification and characterization of a novel extracellular cysteine proteinase produced by S.pyogenes. This enzyme, designated IdeS for Immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of S.pyogenes, is distinct from the well-characterized streptococcal cysteine proteinase, SpeB, and cleaves human IgG in the hinge region with a high degree of specificity. Thus, other human proteins, including immunoglobulins M, A, D and E, are not degraded by IdeS. The enzyme efficiently cleaves IgG antibodies bound to streptococcal surface structures, thereby inhibiting the killing of S.pyogenes by phagocytic cells. This and additional observations on the distribution and expression of the ideS gene indicate that IdeS represents a novel and significant bacterial virulence determinant, and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:11927545

  7. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B cleaves properdin and inhibits complement-mediated opsonophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Nina; Tsai, Wan-Hua; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Wang, Chiou-Huey; Kuo, Chih-Feng

    2006-01-20

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B), a cysteine protease, is an important virulence factor in group A streptococcal (GAS) infection. The reduction of phagocytic activity by SPE B may help prevent bacteria from being ingested. In this study, we investigated the mechanism SPE B uses to enable bacteria to resist opsonophagocytosis. Using Western blotting and an affinity column immobilized with SPE B, we found that both SPE B and C192S, an SPE B mutant lacking protease activity, bound to serum properdin, and that SPE B, but not C192S, degraded serum properdin. Further study showed that SPE B-treated, but not C192S-treated, serum blocked the alternative complement pathway. Reconstitution of properdin into SPE B-treated serum unblocked the alternative pathway. GAS opsonized with SPE B-treated serum was more resistant to neutrophil killing than GAS opsonized with C192S-treated or normal serum. These results suggest that a novel SPE B mechanism, one which degrades serum properdin, enables GAS to resist opsonophagocytosis. PMID:16329996

  8. IdeS, a novel streptococcal cysteine proteinase with unique specificity for immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Johansson, Björn P.; Björck, Lars

    2002-01-01

    Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that proteolytic mechanisms significantly contribute to the molecular interplay between Streptococcus pyogenes, an important human pathogen, and its host. Here we describe the identification, purification and characterization of a novel extracellular cysteine proteinase produced by S.pyogenes. This enzyme, designated IdeS for Immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of S.pyogenes, is distinct from the well-characterized streptococcal cysteine proteinase, SpeB, and cleaves human IgG in the hinge region with a high degree of specificity. Thus, other human proteins, including immunoglobulins M, A, D and E, are not degraded by IdeS. The enzyme efficiently cleaves IgG antibodies bound to streptococcal surface structures, thereby inhibiting the killing of S.pyogenes by phagocytic cells. This and additional observations on the distribution and expression of the ideS gene indicate that IdeS represents a novel and significant bacterial virulence determinant, and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:11927545

  9. A one-year study of streptococcal infections and their complications among Ethiopian children.

    PubMed Central

    Tewodros, W.; Muhe, L.; Daniel, E.; Schalén, C.; Kronvall, G.

    1992-01-01

    Post-streptococcal complications are known to be common among Ethiopian children. Little is known, however, about the epidemiology of beta-haemolytic streptococci in Ethiopia. A total of 816 children were studied during a one-year period: 24 cases of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), 44 chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD), 44 acute post streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), 143 tonsillitis, 55 impetigo, and 506 were apparently healthy children. Both ARF and APSGN occurred throughout the year with two peaks during the rainy and cold seasons. The female:male ratio among ARF patients was 1.4:1 and 1:1.9 among APSGN. The monthly carrier rate of beta-haemolytic streptococci group A varied from 7.5-39%, average being 17%. T type 2 was the most frequent serotype. Marked seasonal fluctuations were noted in the distribution of serogroups among apparently healthy children. Beta-haemolytic streptococci group A dominated during the hot and humid months of February-May. Strains were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, except for tetracycline. PMID:1397112

  10. An Unbiased Systems Genetics Approach to Mapping Genetic Loci Modulating Susceptibility to Severe Streptococcal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Abdeltawab, Nourtan F.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Kansal, Rita; Rowe, Sarah L.; Su, Yin; Gardner, Lidia; Brannen, Charity; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Attia, Ramy R.; Abdelsamed, Hossam A.; Taylor, William L.; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.; Kotb, Malak

    2008-01-01

    Striking individual differences in severity of group A streptococcal (GAS) sepsis have been noted, even among patients infected with the same bacterial strain. We had provided evidence that HLA class II allelic variation contributes significantly to differences in systemic disease severity by modulating host responses to streptococcal superantigens. Inasmuch as the bacteria produce additional virulence factors that participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease, we sought to identify additional gene networks modulating GAS sepsis. Accordingly, we applied a systems genetics approach using a panel of advanced recombinant inbred mice. By analyzing disease phenotypes in the context of mice genotypes we identified a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) on Chromosome 2 between 22 and 34 Mb that strongly predicts disease severity, accounting for 25%–30% of variance. This QTL harbors several polymorphic genes known to regulate immune responses to bacterial infections. We evaluated candidate genes within this QTL using multiple parameters that included linkage, gene ontology, variation in gene expression, cocitation networks, and biological relevance, and identified interleukin1 alpha and prostaglandin E synthases pathways as key networks involved in modulating GAS sepsis severity. The association of GAS sepsis with multiple pathways underscores the complexity of traits modulating GAS sepsis and provides a powerful approach for analyzing interactive traits affecting outcomes of other infectious diseases. PMID:18421376

  11. Modification of the classical Lancefield assay of group A streptococcal killing to reduce inter-donor variation.

    PubMed

    Reglinski, Mark; Lynskey, Nicola N; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2016-05-01

    The lack of a surrogate-of-immunity assay presents a major barrier to Streptococcus pyogenes research. Modification of the Lancefield assay to include an antibody digestion step reduced inter-donor variation and permitted detection of the anti-streptococcal activity of intravenous immunoglobulin and convalescent serum, thus facilitating retrospective evaluation of immunity using stored samples. PMID:27030640

  12. Differential neutrophil responses to bacterial stimuli: Streptococcal strains are potent inducers of heparin-binding protein and resistin-release

    PubMed Central

    Snäll, Johanna; Linnér, Anna; Uhlmann, Julia; Siemens, Nikolai; Ibold, Heike; Janos, Marton; Linder, Adam; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Herwald, Heiko; Johansson, Linda; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical for the control of bacterial infections, but they may also contribute to disease pathology. Here we explore neutrophil responses, in particular the release of sepsis-associated factors heparin-binding protein (HBP) and resistin in relation to specific bacterial stimuli and sepsis of varying aetiology. Analyses of HBP and resistin in plasma of septic patients revealed elevated levels as compared to non-infected critically ill patients. HBP and resistin correlated significantly in septic patients, with the strongest association seen in group A streptococcal (GAS) cases. In vitro stimulation of human neutrophils revealed that fixed streptococcal strains induced significantly higher release of HBP and resistin, as compared to Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli. Similarly, neutrophils stimulated with the streptococcal M1-protein showed a significant increase in co-localization of HBP and resistin positive granules as well as exocytosis of these factors, as compared to LPS. Using a GAS strain deficient in M1-protein expression had negligible effect on neutrophil activation, while a strain deficient in the stand-alone regulator MsmR was significantly less stimulatory as compared to its wild type strain. Taken together, the findings suggest that the streptococcal activation of neutrophils is multifactorial and involves, but is not limited to, proteins encoded by the FCT-locus. PMID:26887258

  13. Modification of the classical Lancefield assay of group A streptococcal killing to reduce inter-donor variation

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Lynskey, Nicola N.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a surrogate-of-immunity assay presents a major barrier to Streptococcus pyogenes research. Modification of the Lancefield assay to include an antibody digestion step reduced inter-donor variation and permitted detection of the anti-streptococcal activity of intravenous immunoglobulin and convalescent serum, thus facilitating retrospective evaluation of immunity using stored samples. PMID:27030640

  14. Streptococcal Upper Respiratory Tract Infections and Exacerbations of Tic and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms: A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leckman, James F.; King, Robert A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Coffey, Barbara J.; Singer, Harvey S.; Dure, Leon S., IV; Grantz, Heidi; Katsovich, Liliya; Lin, Haiqun; Lombroso, Paul J.; Kawikova, Ivana; Johnson, Dwight R.; Kurlan, Roger M.; Kaplan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this blinded, prospective, longitudinal study was to determine whether new group A beta hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infections are temporally associated with exacerbations of tic or obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms in children who met published criteria for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders…

  15. Comparative Genomics of the Mucoid and Nonmucoid Strains of Streptococcus pyogenes, Isolated from the Same Patient with Streptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Haruno; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Takizawa, Asako; Moro, Kunihiko; Kishi, Yuki; Takahashi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mucoid (MTB313) and nonmucoid (MTB314) strains of group A streptococcus emm type 1 were simultaneously isolated from a single patient suffering from streptococcal meningitis. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that MTB313 carried a nucleotide substitution within rocA, which generated an amber termination codon. PMID:25883280

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus mitis Strain SVGS_061 Isolated from a Neutropenic Patient with Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Holder, Michael; Ajami, Nadim J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Thompson, Erika J; Kalia, Awdhesh; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mitisfrequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence ofS. mitisstrain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. PMID:27056234

  17. Use of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Treatment of Twelve Youths with Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, Miro; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This is a case series describing 12 youths treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS). Although it is a clinically based series, the case reports provide new information about the short-term benefits of IVIG therapy, and are the first descriptions of long-term outcome for PANDAS patients. PMID:25658609

  18. Immunoreactivity of anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies to human heart valves. Evidence for multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Cunningham, M. W.; McManus, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Association of group A streptococci with acute rheumatic fever and valvular heart disease is well established; however the basis of valve injury remains unclear. In this study, anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cross-reactive with myocardium were reacted with sections from 22 rheumatic valves, nine normal, five endocarditic, one 'floppy,' and one Marfan valve. In immunohistochemical studies, MAb reactivity was observed with cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle cells, cell surface and cytoplasm of endothelial cells lining valves, and valvular interstitial cells. Endothelial basement membrane and elastin fibrils reacted with the MAbs, whereas collagen was unreactive. Similar reactivity was seen with sera from acute rheumatic fever patients. The anti-streptococcal MAbs reacted with intravalvular myosin and vimentin in Western blots, and purified elastin competitively inhibited the binding of the anti-streptococcal MAbs to whole group A streptococci. The data show that human heart valves have numerous sites of immunoreactivity with anti-streptococcal MAbs and acute rheumatic fever sera of potential importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatic valvular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1704188

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus mitis Strain SVGS_061 Isolated from a Neutropenic Patient with Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Holder, Michael; Ajami, Nadim J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Thompson, Erika J.; Kalia, Awdhesh

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis frequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence of S. mitis strain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. PMID:27056234

  20. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  1. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-07-01

    Biofilm-grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline-binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  2. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm‐grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline‐binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  3. Complete genome sequence of a serotype 11A, ST62 Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive isolate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen representing a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. We sequenced the genome of a serotype 11A, ST62 S. pneumoniae invasive isolate (AP200), that was erythromycin-resistant due to the presence of the erm(TR) determinant, and carried out analysis of the genome organization and comparison with other pneumococcal genomes. Results The genome sequence of S. pneumoniae AP200 is 2,130,580 base pair in length. The genome carries 2216 coding sequences (CDS), 56 tRNA, and 12 rRNA genes. Of the CDSs, 72.9% have a predicted biological known function. AP200 contains the pilus islet 2 and, although its phenotype corresponds to serotype 11A, it contains an 11D capsular locus. Chromosomal rearrangements resulting from a large inversion across the replication axis, and horizontal gene transfer events were observed. The chromosomal inversion is likely implicated in the rebalance of the chromosomal architecture affected by the insertions of two large exogenous elements, the erm(TR)-carrying Tn1806 and a functional prophage designated ϕSpn_200. Tn1806 is 52,457 bp in size and comprises 49 ORFs. Comparative analysis of Tn1806 revealed the presence of a similar genetic element or part of it in related species such as Streptococcus pyogenes and also in the anaerobic species Finegoldia magna, Anaerococcus prevotii and Clostridium difficile. The genome of ϕSpn_200 is 35,989 bp in size and is organized in 47 ORFs grouped into five functional modules. Prophages similar to ϕSpn_200 were found in pneumococci and in other streptococcal species, showing a high degree of exchange of functional modules. ϕSpn_200 viral particles have morphologic characteristics typical of the Siphoviridae family and are capable of infecting a pneumococcal recipient strain. Conclusions The sequence of S. pneumoniae AP200 chromosome revealed a dynamic genome, characterized by chromosomal rearrangements and horizontal gene transfers

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Siphophage Sushi

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dat T.; Lessor, Lauren E.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is associated with numerous nosocomial infections, including respiratory and urinary tract infections in humans. The following reports the complete genome sequence of K. pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae T1-like siphophage Sushi and describes its major features. PMID:26337889

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Siphophage Sushi.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dat T; Lessor, Lauren E; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is associated with numerous nosocomial infections, including respiratory and urinary tract infections in humans. The following reports the complete genome sequence of K. pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae T1-like siphophage Sushi and describes its major features. PMID:26337889

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOEpatents

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  7. Effect of Xylitol on Growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Presence of Fructose and Sorbitol

    PubMed Central

    Tapiainen, Terhi; Kontiokari, Tero; Sammalkivi, Laura; Ikäheimo, Irma; Koskela, Markku; Uhari, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Xylitol is effective in preventing acute otitis media by inhibiting the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae. To clarify this inhibition we used fructose, which is known to block similar growth inhibition observed in Streptococcus mutans. In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of sorbitol in inhibiting the growth of pneumococci, as sorbitol is widely used for indications similar to those for which xylitol is used. The addition of 5% xylitol to the growth medium resulted in marked growth inhibition, an effect which was totally eliminated in the presence of 1, 2.5, or 5% fructose but not in the presence of 1 or 5% glucose, 1% galactose, or 1% sucrose. This finding implies that xylitol-induced inhibition of pneumococcal growth is mediated via the fructose phosphotransferase system in a way similar to that in which mutans group streptococcal growth is inhibited. The addition of sorbitol at concentrations of 1, 2.5, or 5% to the growth medium did not affect the growth of pneumococci and neither inhibited nor enhanced the xylitol-induced growth impairment. Thus, it seems that xylitol is the only commercially used sugar substitute proven to have an antimicrobial effect on pneumococci. PMID:11120960

  8. Th1/Th2 Cytokine Profile and Its Diagnostic Value in Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liu, Yu-jie; Zhao, Xiao-le; Shang, Shi-qiang; Wu, Lang; Ye, Qing; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: The levels of Th1/Th2 cytokine can alter in pathogenic infection in children with pneumonia. Objectives: To evaluate Th1/Th2 cytokine profile and its diagnostic value in M. pneumoniae pneumonia in children. Patients and Methods: Children with M. pneumoniae mono-infection and 30 healthy children were tested with cytokines assay. We used real time PCR to detect M. pneumoniae in children with pneumonia. Results: M. pneumoniae test was positive in 2188 (16.62%) out of 13161 pneumonia children. Children aged 5 - 9 years had the highest rate and summer was a season with high rate of M. pneumoniae incidence in Zhejiang province. During the course of study, in 526 pneumonia children with M. pneumoniae mono-infection and 30 healthy children cytokines assay was performed. IL-2 level of M. pneumoniae pneumonia children was lower than that of healthy children (median levels, pg/mL: IL-2: 3.2 vs. 5.7, P = 0.00), while IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ were higher than in healthy children (median levels, pg/mL: IL-4: 3.2 vs. 1.5, P = 0.00; IL-10: 5.6 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; IFN-γ: 20.4 vs. 4.8, P = 0.001). Conclusions: IL-2 decreases and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ increase in children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia, which has a promising prospect in diagnosis of this disease in clinical practice. PMID:26848377

  9. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): An Evolving Concept.

    PubMed

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS) originated from the observational work of Swedo and collaborators, who formalized their definition in 1998 in a set of operational criteria. The application of these criteria, which focuses on tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms as core symptoms, has encountered difficulties, eventually leading to a high rate of misdiagnosis. In particular, the core feature represented by the association between newly diagnosed infections and neuropsychiatric symptom relapses in youths with this diagnosis could not be demonstrated by longitudinal studies. Exploratory studies aiming to identify clinical or cognitive features that could discriminate PANDAS from other pediatric obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders present methodological limitations, and therefore are not conclusive. Other behavioral features, in addition to obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics, have been included in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndromes (PANS) and childhood acute neuropsychiatric syndromes (CANS), two new concepts recently proposed in order to define a much broader clinical spectrum encompassing etiologically diverse entities. Given the uncertainties on the clinical definition of PANDAS, it is not surprising that evidence in support of a post-infectious, immune-mediated pathophysiology is also insufficient. Anti-dopamine receptor antibodies might be relevant to both Sydenham's chorea (SC)-the prototypical post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder-and some rare forms of encephalitis targeting the basal ganglia specifically, but studies exploring their association with children fulfilling Swedo's criteria for PANDAS have been inconclusive. Moreover, we lack evidence in favor of the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis or tonsillectomy in patients fulfilling Swedo's criteria for PANDAS, whereas a response to immune-mediated treatments like intravenous immunoglobulins has been documented by

  10. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS) originated from the observational work of Swedo and collaborators, who formalized their definition in 1998 in a set of operational criteria. The application of these criteria, which focuses on tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms as core symptoms, has encountered difficulties, eventually leading to a high rate of misdiagnosis. In particular, the core feature represented by the association between newly diagnosed infections and neuropsychiatric symptom relapses in youths with this diagnosis could not be demonstrated by longitudinal studies. Exploratory studies aiming to identify clinical or cognitive features that could discriminate PANDAS from other pediatric obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders present methodological limitations, and therefore are not conclusive. Other behavioral features, in addition to obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics, have been included in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndromes (PANS) and childhood acute neuropsychiatric syndromes (CANS), two new concepts recently proposed in order to define a much broader clinical spectrum encompassing etiologically diverse entities. Given the uncertainties on the clinical definition of PANDAS, it is not surprising that evidence in support of a post-infectious, immune-mediated pathophysiology is also insufficient. Anti-dopamine receptor antibodies might be relevant to both Sydenham’s chorea (SC)—the prototypical post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder—and some rare forms of encephalitis targeting the basal ganglia specifically, but studies exploring their association with children fulfilling Swedo’s criteria for PANDAS have been inconclusive. Moreover, we lack evidence in favor of the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis or tonsillectomy in patients fulfilling Swedo’s criteria for PANDAS, whereas a response to immune-mediated treatments like intravenous immunoglobulins has been

  11. Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae, United States.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaotian; Lee, Stella; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yi-Wei; Stiles, Jeffrey; Hong, Tao; Todd, Kathleen; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Xiao, Li; Atkinson, T Prescott; Waites, Ken B

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is highly prevalent in Asia and is now being reported from Europe. Few data on MRMP are available in the United States. Using genotypic and phenotypic methods, we detected high-level MRMP in 13.2% of 91 M. pneumoniae--positive specimens from 6 US locations. PMID:26196107

  12. Pericardiectomy for Pleuropericardial Effusion Complicating Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Quarti, Andrea; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Soura, Elli; Pozzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Severe pericardial effusion is a rare complication of bacterial pneumonia and it usually disappears under medical treatment. Herein we report a case of a girl with a congenital immunodeficient syndrome and bacterial pneumonia, who developed recurrent and life-threatening pericardial effusion refractory to medical treatment. She was finally treated with pericardiectomy. PMID:20585369

  13. Gallium-67 pulmonary uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Morais, J.; Carrier, L.; Gariepy, G.; Le Bel, L.; Chartrand, R.; Picard, D.

    1988-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on the findings on chest x-ray, white blood count, and transbronchial biopsy. After reporting a case of Ga-67 lung uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia, its histopathology is discussed and the mechanisms of Ga-67 uptake by inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  14. Fast folding of a prototypic polypeptide: the immunoglobulin binding domain of streptococcal protein G.

    PubMed

    Kuszewski, J; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1994-11-01

    The folding of the small (56 residues) highly stable B1 immunoglobulin binding domain (GB1) of streptococcal protein G has been investigated by quenched-flow deuterium-hydrogen exchange. This system represents a paradigm for the study of protein folding because it exhibits no complicating features superimposed upon the intrinsic properties of the polypeptide chain. Collapse to a semicompact state exhibiting partial order, reflected in protection factors for ND-NH exchange up to 10-fold higher than that expected for a random coil, occurs within the dead time (< or = 1 ms) of the quenched flow apparatus. This is followed by the formation of the fully native state, as monitored by the fractional proton occupancy of 26 backbone amide groups spread throughout the protein, in a single rapid concerted step with a half-life of 5.2 ms at 5 degrees C. PMID:7703841

  15. Lyme disease and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS): an overview.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Hanna; Cameron, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a complex, multisystemic illness. As the most common vector- borne disease in the United States, LD is caused by bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, with potential coinfections from agents of anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and ehrlichiosis. Persistent symptoms and clinical signs reflect multiorgan involvement with episodes of active disease and periods of remission, not sparing the coveted central nervous system. The capability of microorganisms to cause and exacerbate various neuropsychiatric pathology is also seen in pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), a recently described disorder attributed to bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in which neurologic tics and obsessive-compulsive disorders are sequelae of the infection. In the current overview, LD and PANDAS are juxtaposed through a review of their respective infectious etiologies, clinical presentations, mechanisms of disease development, courses of illness, and treatment options. Future directions related to immunoneuropsychiatry are also discussed. PMID:22393303

  16. Acute nonrheumatic streptococcal myocarditis resembling ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction in a young patient

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Margarita; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Olivas-Chacon, Cristina; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Taveras, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocarditis can be induced by various concomitant disease processes including infections. Most of these cases are viral in origin; however, bacterial infections are also implicated to a lesser degree. Group A streptococcus is a frequent culprit in bacterial-induced myocarditis. Its diagnosis is suspected by the presence of signs and symptoms of rheumatic fever as established by the Jones criteria. The development and refinement of current diagnostic tools has improved our ability to identify specific pathogens. It has been found that group A streptococcus may be responsible for more cases of infection-induced acute myocarditis than previously thought, and often without the clinical features of rheumatic fever. We present the case of a 43-year-old man hospitalized with chest pain that was initially diagnosed as an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Further evaluation confirmed that his chief complaint was due to acute nonrheumatic streptococcal myocarditis. PMID:25829649

  17. Lyme disease and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS): an overview

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hanna; Cameron, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a complex, multisystemic illness. As the most common vector- borne disease in the United States, LD is caused by bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, with potential coinfections from agents of anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and ehrlichiosis. Persistent symptoms and clinical signs reflect multiorgan involvement with episodes of active disease and periods of remission, not sparing the coveted central nervous system. The capability of microorganisms to cause and exacerbate various neuropsychiatric pathology is also seen in pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), a recently described disorder attributed to bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in which neurologic tics and obsessive-compulsive disorders are sequelae of the infection. In the current overview, LD and PANDAS are juxtaposed through a review of their respective infectious etiologies, clinical presentations, mechanisms of disease development, courses of illness, and treatment options. Future directions related to immunoneuropsychiatry are also discussed. PMID:22393303

  18. [Secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia following neonatal group B Streptococcal septicaemia in a preterm infant].

    PubMed

    Vedel-Werts, F; Desandes, R; Rouabah, M; Bach, P; de Miscault, G; Hascoët, J-M; Hamon, I

    2007-07-01

    We report on a case of a secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia following group B streptococcal (GBS) septicaemia in a very low birth weight infant born at 30 weeks. After initial improvement, the diagnosis of a secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia was suspected with the persistent radiological pulmonary right-sided image on the chest x-ray and the clinical degradation. The diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasonography on day 43. The postoperative course was simple. Persistent respiratory distress in a neonate, after a GBS septicaemia associated with a right pulmonary opacity on the chest x-ray, should prompt a careful evaluation. A secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia should be considered. Treatment is surgery, the prognosis is good in the absence of pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:17451917

  19. Group A streptococcal strains isolated in Lao People's Democratic Republic from 2004 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Rattanavong, S; Dance, D A B; Davong, V; Baker, C; Frost, H; Phetsouvanh, R; Vongsouvath, M; Newton, P N; Steer, A C; Smeesters, P R

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data regarding group A streptococcal (GAS) infections in South East Asia are scarce with no information from Laos. We characterized emm types, emm clusters and the antibiotic resistance profile of 124 GAS isolates recovered in Laos during 2004-2013. Most strains were recovered from skin and invasive infections (76% and 19%, respectively). Thirty-four emm types were identified as belonging to 12 emm clusters and no novel emm types were identified. No significant differences were observed in the distribution of emm types or emm clusters according to age or site of recovery (skin or invasive infections). There was moderate strain diversity in this country but considerable differences in emm-type distribution between Laos, Thailand and Cambodia. Vaccine coverage was high for the J8 vaccine candidate. The theoretical coverage for the 30-valent vaccine candidate needs further investigation. Antibiotic resistance was moderate to erythromycin and chloramphenicol (8% and 7%, respectively) and low to ofloxacin (<1%). PMID:26645633

  20. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, post-streptococcal syndromes and psychogenic movement disorders: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Peila, Elena; Mortara, Paolo; Cicerale, Alessandro; Pinessi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 15-year-old boy presenting with sudden attacks of hyperkinetic movements of the limbs, trunk and neck. Clinical features were suggestive of paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, but the elevated antistreptolysin O antibody titre and history of recurrent upper airways infection led us to consider a post-streptococcal syndrome as a possible diagnosis. The patient started therapy with benzathine penicillin, sodium valproate and clonazepam without any significant improvement. A successive psychiatric assessment revealed the presence of a psychogenic movement disorder. Psychodynamic psychotherapy and individual counselling were started with progressive improvement of psychological symptoms and gradual resolution of hyperkinetic episodes, without any recurrence recorded during the follow-up (10 months). PMID:25795754

  1. Rationale and design of the African group A streptococcal infection registry: the AFROStrep study

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Dylan D; Engel, Mark E; Whitelaw, Andrew; Alemseged, Abdissa; Sadoh, Wilson E; Ali, Sulafa K M; Sow, Samba O; Dale, James; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Group A β-haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS), a Gram-positive bacterium, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes, causes pyoderma, pharyngitis and invasive disease. Repeated GAS infections may lead to autoimmune diseases such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Invasive GAS (iGAS) disease is an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The burden of GAS infections is, however, unknown in Africa because of lack of surveillance systems. Methods and analysis The African group A streptococcal infection registry (the AFROStrep study) is a collaborative multicentre study of clinical, microbiological, epidemiological and molecular characteristics for GAS infection in Africa. The AFROStrep registry comprises two components: (1) active surveillance of GAS pharyngitis cases from sentinel primary care centres (non-iGAS) and (2) passive surveillance of iGAS disease from microbiology laboratories. Isolates will also be subjected to DNA isolation to allow for characterisation by molecular methods and cryopreservation for long-term storage. The AFROStrep study seeks to collect comprehensive data on GAS isolates in Africa. The biorepository will serve as a platform for vaccine development in Africa. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval for the AFROStrep registry has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee at the University of Cape Town (HREC/REF: R006/2015). Each recruiting site will seek ethics approval from their local ethics’ committee. All participants will be required to provide consent for inclusion into the registry as well as for the storage of isolates and molecular investigations to be conducted thereon. Strict confidentiality will be applied throughout. Findings and updates will be disseminated to collaborators, researchers, health planners and colleagues through peer-reviewed journal articles, conference publications and proceedings. PMID:26916694

  2. Microbial Analysis of Bite Marks by Sequence Comparison of Streptococcal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Darnell M.; Stanton, Jo-Ann L.; García, José A.; Mason, Chris; Rand, Christy J.; Kieser, Jules A.; Tompkins, Geoffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Bite mark injuries often feature in violent crimes. Conventional morphometric methods for the forensic analysis of bite marks involve elements of subjective interpretation that threaten the credibility of this field. Human DNA recovered from bite marks has the highest evidentiary value, however recovery can be compromised by salivary components. This study assessed the feasibility of matching bacterial DNA sequences amplified from experimental bite marks to those obtained from the teeth responsible, with the aim of evaluating the capability of three genomic regions of streptococcal DNA to discriminate between participant samples. Bite mark and teeth swabs were collected from 16 participants. Bacterial DNA was extracted to provide the template for PCR primers specific for streptococcal 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene, 16S–23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB). High throughput sequencing (GS FLX 454), followed by stringent quality filtering, generated reads from bite marks for comparison to those generated from teeth samples. For all three regions, the greatest overlaps of identical reads were between bite mark samples and the corresponding teeth samples. The average proportions of reads identical between bite mark and corresponding teeth samples were 0.31, 0.41 and 0.31, and for non-corresponding samples were 0.11, 0.20 and 0.016, for 16S rRNA, ITS and rpoB, respectively. The probabilities of correctly distinguishing matching and non-matching teeth samples were 0.92 for ITS, 0.99 for 16S rRNA and 1.0 for rpoB. These findings strongly support the tenet that bacterial DNA amplified from bite marks and teeth can provide corroborating information in the identification of assailants. PMID:23284761

  3. Similar cytokine induction profiles of a novel streptococcal exotoxin, MF, and pyrogenic exotoxins A and B.

    PubMed Central

    Norrby-Teglund, A; Norgren, M; Holm, S E; Andersson, U; Andersson, J

    1994-01-01

    The cytokine production induced by a newly discovered streptococcal exotoxin, MF, and the pyrogenic exotoxins SpeA and SpeB was determined by in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy blood donors. The induction and kinetics of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were studied at the single-cell level by use of cytokine-specific monoclonal antibodies and intracellular immunofluorescent juxtanuclear staining. The cytokine-producing cells, with the exception of IL-1-expressing cells, had a characteristic morphology generated by the accumulation of cytokines in the Golgi organelle. MF, SpeA, and SpeB induced a massive gamma interferon and TNF-beta response in 10 to 16% of the PBMCs after 48 to 96 h of cell stimulation. In contrast, IL-2 and TNF-alpha production was detected in only 1 to 3% of the PBMCs. The induction of a lymphocyte TH2 phenotype response, including production of IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10, was weak. However, the monokines, IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and IL-8, were consistently found and gradually produced, peaking at 24 h in approximately 5 to 8% of the PBMCs. MF showed extensive cytokine- and proliferation-inducing capacities equal to those of SpeA and SpeB, which suggests that MF is also a superantigen. A marked interindividual variation could be noted both in the proliferative response and in the cytokine induction of lymphocytes isolated from different individuals, which may be one explanation for the varying clinical severity noticed during group A streptococcal infections. Images PMID:8063387

  4. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  5. Decreased Interleukin-10 Responses in Children with Severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Boyu; Liu, Yan; Fei, Guanghe; Wang, Linding

    2016-01-01

    Several cytokines may play roles in the immunological pathogenesis of mycoplasmal pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In this study, we investigated serum cytokine profiles in children with mycoplasmal pneumonia. The serum levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-10, and IL-18 were examined using ELISA kits in 34 patients with M. pneumoniae infection (Group 1, 11 with severe mycoplasmal pneumonia; Group 2, 13 with mild mycoplasmal pneumonia; Group 3, 10 with asthma) and 32 age-matched, non-infected controls. The serum levels of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-18 increased significantly in patients with mycoplasmal pneumonia compared with those in controls (P<0.01). The serum levels of IL-10 decreased significantly in Group 1 compared with those in Group 2 (P<0.01). The serum levels of IL-18 increased significantly in Group 1 compared with those in Group 2 (P<0.01). The serum levels of IL-10 and IL-18 decreased significantly in 10 M. pneumoniae-infected patients with asthma compared with those in 24 M. pneumoniae-infected patients without asthma (P<0.01). We examined the level of interleukins (IL-8, IL-10 and IL-18) after the patients started therapy. The data showed that IL-18 were lower after therapy (P<0.01). Collectively, our data suggested that these cytokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of mycoplasmal pneumonia. PMID:26751073

  6. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection among healthy children and children hospitalised with pneumonia in Greece.

    PubMed

    Triga, M G; Anthracopoulos, M B; Saikku, P; Syrogiannopoulos, G A

    2002-04-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae has been recognized as a cause of respiratory tract infection in humans, and its prevalence has been shown to vary among different age groups and populations. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody was determined by serological investigation in 343 healthy children and in 77 children consecutively hospitalised for pneumonia in southwestern Greece. Seventy-eight (22.7%) healthy children had IgG Chlamydia pneumoniae titers > or =1/8. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody in the age groups 6 months-5 years, 6-9 years and 10-15 years was 7.9%, 11.4% and 36%, respectively. One child hospitalised for pneumonia had serological results consistent with acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The results of the present study suggest a low prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody among preschoolers in Greece, followed by a steep rise in children 10-15 years of age. Chlamydia pneumoniae is not a common etiologic agent of childhood pneumonia requiring hospitalisation. PMID:12072942

  7. Streptococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... and group B. Group A strep causes Strep throat - a sore, red throat, sometimes with white spots on the tonsils Scarlet fever - an illness that follows strep throat. It causes a red rash on the body. ...

  8. Streptococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strep throat - a sore, red throat, sometimes with white spots on the tonsils Scarlet fever - an illness that follows strep throat. It causes a red rash on the body. Impetigo - a skin infection Toxic shock syndrome Cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease) Group ...

  9. Variable Sensitivity to Bacterial Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors Reveals Subpopulations of Streptococcus pneumoniae with Two Distinct Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Daniel R.; Ingraham, Karen A.; Stanhope, Michael J.; Rittenhouse, Stephen; Jarvest, Richard L.; O'Hanlon, Peter J.; Brown, James R.; Holmes, David J.

    2003-01-01

    As reported previously (J. R. Jarvest et al., J. Med. Chem. 45:1952-1962, 2002), potent inhibitors (at nanomolar concentrations) of Staphylococcus aureus methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetS; encoded by metS1) have been derived from a high-throughput screening assay hit. Optimized compounds showed excellent activities against staphylococcal and enterococcal pathogens. We report on the bimodal susceptibilities of S. pneumoniae strains, a significant fraction of which was found to be resistant (MIC, ≥8 mg/liter) to these inhibitors. Using molecular genetic techniques, we have found that the mechanism of resistance is the presence of a second, distantly related MetS enzyme, MetS2, encoded by metS2. We present evidence that the metS2 gene is necessary and sufficient for resistance to MetS inhibitors. PCR analysis for the presence of metS2 among a large sample (n = 315) of S. pneumoniae isolates revealed that it is widespread geographically and chronologically, occurring at a frequency of about 46%. All isolates tested also contained the metS1 gene. Searches of public sequence databases revealed that S. pneumoniae MetS2 was most similar to MetS in Bacillus anthracis, followed by MetS in various non-gram-positive bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species, with streptococcal MetS being considerably less similar. We propose that the presence of metS2 in specific strains of S. pneumoniae is the result of horizontal gene transfer which has been driven by selection for resistance to some unknown class of naturally occurring antibiotics with similarities to recently reported synthetic MetS inhibitors. PMID:12760849

  10. Not your typical pneumonia: a case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Ashley; Rouf, Emran; Whittle, Jeff

    2007-11-01

    The constellation of chronic cough, dyspnea, and hemoptysis can include a broad range of differential diagnoses. Although uncommon, exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP) should be considered when patients present with this symptom complex. We report a case of a 72-year-old female who presented with hemoptysis, cough, and dyspnea. The admission computed tomography scan of the chest revealed progressive interstitial infiltrates. Bronchoscopy revealed diffuse erythema without bleeding. Culture and cytology of lavage fluid were negative. Open-lung biopsy revealed numerous lipid-laden macrophages and multinucleated foreign-body giant cells. On further questioning, the patient admitted to the daily use of mineral oil for constipation. The diagnosis of ELP was made. The literature review revealed that many cases typically present with chronic cough with or without dyspnea. Our case illustrates an unusual presenting symptom of hemoptysis and the need to identify patients who can be at risk of developing this rare condition. PMID:17846847

  11. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... who are receiving chemotherapy are also at increased risk. You work in construction or agriculture. Working in environments where you breathe in dust, chemicals, air pollution or toxic fumes can damage ...

  12. Streptococcal R plasmid pIP501: endonuclease site map, resistance determinant location, and construction of novel derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R P; Macrina, F L

    1983-01-01

    The streptococcal resistance plasmid pIP501 (30 kilobase pairs [kb]) encodes resistance to chloramphenicol (Cmr) and erythromycin (Emr) and is capable of conjugative transfer among numerous streptococcal species. By using a streptococcal host-vector recombinant DNA system, the Cmr and Emr determinants of pIP501 were localized to 6.3-kb HindIII and 2.1-kb HindIII-AvaI fragments, respectively. pIP501 was lost at a frequency of 22% in Streptococcus sanguis cells grown at 42 degrees C but was stable in cells grown at 37 degrees C (less than 1% frequency of loss). Sequences from a cryptic multicopy plasmid, pVA380-1, were substituted for the pIP501 Emr determinant in vitro, and the resulting recombinant plasmid, designated pVA797, was recovered in transformed S. sanguis cells. The replication of pVA797 was governed by the pVA380-1 sequences based on temperature-stable replication and incompatibility with pVA380-1-derived replicons. The self-ligation of partially cleaved HindIII pIP501 DNA fragments allowed the localization of a pIP501 region involved in autonomous plasmid replication. A small pIP501 derivative (pVA798) obtained from this experiment had a greatly increased copy number but was unstably inherited. Our data indicate that the sequences encoding the resistance determinants and some of the plasmid replication machinery are relatively clustered on the pIP501 molecule. The properties of pVA797 and pVA798 indicate that these molecules will enhance current streptococcal genetic systems from the standpoint of conjugative mobilization (pVA797) and gene amplification (pVA798). PMID:6304011

  13. Structural and antigenic types of cell wall polysaccharides from viridans group streptococci with receptors for oral actinomyces and streptococcal lectins.

    PubMed

    Cisar, J O; Sandberg, A L; Reddy, G P; Abeygunawardana, C; Bush, C A

    1997-12-01

    Lectin-mediated interactions between oral viridans group streptococci and actinomyces may play an important role in microbial colonization of the tooth surface. The presence of two host-like motifs, either GalNAc beta1-->3Gal (Gn) or Gal beta1-->3GalNAc (G), in the cell wall polysaccharides of five streptococcal strains accounts for the lactose-sensitive coaggregations of these bacteria with Actinomyces naeslundii. Three streptococcal strains which have Gn-containing polysaccharides also participate in GalNAc-sensitive coaggregations with strains of Streptococcus gordonii and S. sanguis. Each Gn- or G-containing polysaccharide is composed of a distinct phosphodiester-linked hexa- or heptasaccharide repeating unit. The occurrence of these polysaccharides on 19 additional viridans group streptococcal strains that participate in lactose-sensitive coaggregations with actinomyces was examined. Negatively charged polysaccharides that reacted with Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, a Gal and GalNAc binding plant lectin, were isolated from 17 strains by anion exchange column chromatography of mutanolysin-cell wall digests. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance and immunodiffusion identified each of 16 polysaccharides as a known Gn- or G-containing structural type and one polysaccharide as a new but closely related Gn-containing type. Unlike the reactions of lectins, the cross-reactions of most rabbit antisera with these polysaccharides were correlated with structural features other than the host-like motifs. Gn-containing polysaccharides occurred primarily on the strains of S. sanguis and S. oralis while G-containing polysaccharides were more common among the strains of S. gordonii and S. mitis examined. The findings strongly support the hypothesis that lectin-mediated recognition of these streptococci by other oral bacteria depends on a family of antigenically diverse Gn- and G-containing cell wall polysaccharides, the occurrence of which may differ between streptococcal

  14. Structural and antigenic types of cell wall polysaccharides from viridans group streptococci with receptors for oral actinomyces and streptococcal lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Cisar, J O; Sandberg, A L; Reddy, G P; Abeygunawardana, C; Bush, C A

    1997-01-01

    Lectin-mediated interactions between oral viridans group streptococci and actinomyces may play an important role in microbial colonization of the tooth surface. The presence of two host-like motifs, either GalNAc beta1-->3Gal (Gn) or Gal beta1-->3GalNAc (G), in the cell wall polysaccharides of five streptococcal strains accounts for the lactose-sensitive coaggregations of these bacteria with Actinomyces naeslundii. Three streptococcal strains which have Gn-containing polysaccharides also participate in GalNAc-sensitive coaggregations with strains of Streptococcus gordonii and S. sanguis. Each Gn- or G-containing polysaccharide is composed of a distinct phosphodiester-linked hexa- or heptasaccharide repeating unit. The occurrence of these polysaccharides on 19 additional viridans group streptococcal strains that participate in lactose-sensitive coaggregations with actinomyces was examined. Negatively charged polysaccharides that reacted with Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, a Gal and GalNAc binding plant lectin, were isolated from 17 strains by anion exchange column chromatography of mutanolysin-cell wall digests. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance and immunodiffusion identified each of 16 polysaccharides as a known Gn- or G-containing structural type and one polysaccharide as a new but closely related Gn-containing type. Unlike the reactions of lectins, the cross-reactions of most rabbit antisera with these polysaccharides were correlated with structural features other than the host-like motifs. Gn-containing polysaccharides occurred primarily on the strains of S. sanguis and S. oralis while G-containing polysaccharides were more common among the strains of S. gordonii and S. mitis examined. The findings strongly support the hypothesis that lectin-mediated recognition of these streptococci by other oral bacteria depends on a family of antigenically diverse Gn- and G-containing cell wall polysaccharides, the occurrence of which may differ between streptococcal

  15. Group A streptococcal growth phase-associated virulence factor regulation by a novel operon (Fas) with homologies to two-component-type regulators requires a small RNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Kreikemeyer, B; Boyle, M D; Buttaro, B A; Heinemann, M; Podbielski, A

    2001-01-01

    A novel growth phase-associated two-component-type regulator, Fas (fibronectin/fibrinogen binding/haemolytic activity/streptokinase regulator), of Streptococcus pyogenes was identified in the M1 genome sequence, based on homologies to the histidine protein kinase (HPK) and response regulator (RR) part of the Staphylococcus aureus Agr and Streptococcus pneumoniae Com quorum-sensing systems. The fas operon, present in all 12 tested M serotypes, was transcribed as polycystronic message (fasBCA) and contained genes encoding two potential HPKs (FasB and FasC) and one RR (FasA). Downstream of fasBCA, we identified a small 300 nucleotide monocistronic transcript, designated fasX, that did not appear to encode true peptide sequences. Measurements of luciferase promoter fusions revealed a growth phase-associated transcription of fasBCA and fasX, with peak activities during the late exponential phase. Insertional mutagenesis disrupting fasBCA and fasA led to a phenotype similar to agr-null mutations in S. aureus, with prolonged expression of extracellular matrix protein-binding adhesins and reduced expression of secreted virulence factors such as streptokinase and streptolysin S. In addition, fasX transcription was dependent on the RR FasA; however, deletion mutagenesis of fasX resulted in a similar phenotype to that of the fasBCA or fasA mutants. Complementation of the fasX deletion mutant, with the fasX gene expressed in trans from a plasmid, restored the wild-type fasBCA regulation pattern. This strongly suggested that fasX, a putative non-translated RNA, is the main effector molecule of the fas regulon. However, using spent culture supernatants from wild-type and fas mutant strains, we were not able to show an influence on the logarithmic growth phase expression of fas and dependent genes. Thus, despite structural and functional similarities between fas and agr, to date the fas operon appears not to be involved in group A streptococcal (GAS) quorum-sensing regulation

  16. Rare extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Kiran; Enright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons syndrome (SJS) is a rare extra-pulmonary complication of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. We present the case of a 26-year-old man with fever, cough, extensive oral mucosal ulceration and a widespread truncal rash. He was diagnosed with M. pneumoniae-induced SJS. He responded well to antibiotics and steroids initially, but went on to develop pseudomembranous conjunctivitis requiring bilateral amniotic membrane grafting. SJS is most commonly drug-induced, however, M. pneumoniae is the commonest infectious cause and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. It is also important to get specialist care involved early to minimise the long-term effects of any complications. PMID:26837942

  17. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:27004381

  18. Statins in pneumonia--magic versus science?

    PubMed

    Kruger, Peter S; Thomas, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the use of statins as an adjunct in the treatment of pneumonia, some with conflicting conclusions. The most recent of these large observational studies again suggests statin use is associated with an improved outcome for patients with pneumonia. How best to incorporate these findings into current practice is of great interest. Hidden confounders plague database interrogation and so cast doubt on the real or causal nature of observed associations. Data from large, observational studies must be complemented by smaller biological studies and randomised controlled trials in an effort to complete missing pieces in the biological puzzle of the use of statins in patients with pneumonia. PMID:23025797

  19. Many radiologic facies of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.G.

    1981-12-01

    In 1978, 89 patients were treated for (S. pneumoniae) pneumonia at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Only 40 cases met rather strict diagnostic criteria. Of these, 12 demonstrated the classical consolidative (air space) pattern usually ascribed to this disease. A bronchopneumonic (patch) pattern was demonstrated in an equal number of patients; interstitial (irregular linear) infiltrates were manifest in nine cases and a mixed interstitial and patchy presentation shown in seven cases. Absence of the consolidative pattern does not exclude pneumococcal pneumonia. Bacteriologic investigation is required to determine the proper diagnosis and course of therapy.

  20. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  1. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated—if any—cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  2. Pneumonia in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Drinka, Paul J; Crnich, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    Pneumonia syndromes may be caused by infection or the aspiration of food, acid, or particulate material. Antibiotic-resistant organisms or recurrent aspiration should be considered if the response to treatment is poor. Clinicians should consider discontinuing antibiotics if the resident's status rapidly returns to baseline after a noninfectious macro-aspiration event. The natural history of this process, however, is not well characterized. Diagnostic procedures including sputum gram stain, culture, and urinary antigen testing should be pursued to diagnose pathogens not covered by empiric therapy or to focus therapy with narrow spectrum agents. Sources of aspiration, including pharyngeal dysphagia, periodontal disease, and gastric regurgitation, should be identified and treated in hopes of preventing recurrence. PMID:16165077

  3. Coccidioidomycosis with diffuse miliary pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sotello, David; Rivas, Marcella; Fuller, Audra; Mahmood, Tashfeen; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a well-known infection in the southwestern United States, and its occurrence is becoming more frequent in endemic areas. This disease can have a significant economic and medical impact; therefore, accurate diagnosis is crucial. In conjunction with patient symptoms, residence in or travel to an endemic area is essential for diagnosis. Diagnosis is usually made with serology, culture, or biopsy and confirmed with DNA probe technology. Pulmonary disease is the most common presentation and is seen in almost 95% of all cases. One-half to two-thirds of all Coccidioides infections are asymptomatic or subclinical. Most pulmonary infections are self-limited and do not require treatment except in special populations. When treatment is warranted, itraconazole and fluconazole are frequently used. Diffuse miliary pneumonia is uncommon and is especially rare in immunocompetent patients. Herein we describe a rare presentation of miliary coccidioidomycosis in a nonimmunocompromised patient. PMID:26722164

  4. Genetics and Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Chu, Sarah G; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Rosas, Ivan O

    2016-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in elucidating the genetics of parenchymal lung diseases, particularly idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). IIPs are a heterogeneous group of diffuse interstitial lung diseases of uncertain etiology, diagnosed only after known causes of interstitial lung disease have been excluded. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most common IIP. Through candidate gene approaches and genome wide association studies, much light has been shed on the genetic origins of IIPs, enhancing our understanding of risk factors and pathogenesis. However, significant work remains to be accomplished in identifying novel genetic variants and characterizing the function of validated candidate genes in lung pathobiology, their interplay with environmental factors, and ultimately translating these discoveries to patient care. PMID:27231858

  5. Lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant.

    PubMed

    Yampara Guarachi, Gladis Isabel; Barbosa Moreira, Valeria; Santos Ferreira, Angela; Sias, Selma M De A; Rodrigues, Cristovão C; Teixeira, Graça Helena M do C

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O) evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement. PMID:25374742

  6. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... not recommended. Learn more . Lower Your Risk with Vaccines In the United States, there are vaccines that ...

  7. Lipoid Pneumonia in a Gas Station Attendant

    PubMed Central

    Yampara Guarachi, Gladis Isabel; Barbosa Moreira, Valeria; Santos Ferreira, Angela; Sias, Selma M. De A.; Rodrigues, Cristovão C.; Teixeira, Graça Helena M. do C.

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O) evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement. PMID:25374742

  8. A College Epidemic of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, David; Cochran, Burt

    1979-01-01

    The article reports on an outbreak of mycoplasma pneumoniae at the California Polytechnic State University including a historical background of the disease, clinical features, laboratory findings for treated patients, treatment, and clinical clues for diagnosis. (JMF)

  9. Candida Pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Ronny M.; Linssen, Catharina F.; Guion, Nele; van Mook, Walther N.; Bergmans, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    It has been questioned if Candida pneumonia exists as a clinical entity. Only histopathology can establish the definite diagnosis. Less invasive diagnostic strategies lack specificity and have been insufficiently validated. Scarcity of this pathomechanism and nonspecific clinical presentation make validation and the development of a clinical algorithm difficult. In the present study, we analyze whether Candida pneumonia exists in our critical care population. We used a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen database that we have built in a structural diagnostic approach to ventilator-associated pneumonia for more than a decade consisting of 832 samples. Microbiological data were linked to clinical information and available autopsy data. We searched for critically ill patients with respiratory failure with no other microbiological or clinical explanation than exclusive presence of Candida species in BAL fluid. Five cases could be identified with Candida as the likely cause of pneumonia. PMID:25734099

  10. Klebsiella pneumoniae Liver Abscess and Metastatic Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jason T.; Lewis, Catherine R.; Danner, Omar K.; Wilson, Kenneth L.; Matthews, L. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well-known cause of liver abscess. Higher rates of liver abscess associated with Klebsiella pneumoniae are seen in Taiwan. Metastatic endophthalmitis is a common complication associated with a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Case Report. We report a case of a 67-year-old Korean female with Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess. The patient developed metastatic endophthalmitis and ultimately succumbed to her disease despite aggressive medical and surgical treatment. Conclusion. Dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Liver abscesses preferably should be treated with percutaneous drainage, but surgical treatment is needed in some cases. Metastatic spread to the eye is a common complication that must be treated aggressively with intravenous antibiotics and surgical intervention if necessary. PMID:26788530

  11. Relationships between periodontal disease and bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, F A; Mylotte, J M

    1996-10-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (e.g., penicillin-resistant pneumococci) suggests that bacterial pneumonia will assume increasing importance in the coming years. Thus, knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and risk factors for, bacterial pneumonia is critical to the development of strategies for prevention and treatment of these infections. Bacterial pneumonia in adults is the result of aspiration of oropharyngeal flora into the lower respiratory tract and failure of host defense mechanisms to eliminate the contaminating bacteria, which multiply in the lung and cause infection. It is recognized that community-acquired pneumonia and lung abscesses can be the result of infection by anaerobic bacteria; dental plaque would seem to be a logical source of these bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease. It is also possible that patients with high risk for pneumonia, such as hospitalized patients and nursing home residents, are likely to pay less attention to personal hygiene than healthy patients. One important dimension of this personal neglect may be diminished attention to oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may promote oropharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogens (PRPs) including Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, etc.), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. This paper provides the rationale for the development of this hypothesis especially as it pertains to mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients and nursing home residents, two patient groups with a high risk for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:8910830

  12. Subselective magnification angiography of experimental pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, J.J.; Alazraki, N.P.; Jassy, L.N.

    1983-04-01

    An experiment was designed to determine whether or not acute pneumococcal pneumonia in dogs is associated with intravascular thrombosis, or with angiographic features distinguishable from pulmonary embolism. In dogs with normal baseline chest radiographs and perfusion scans, pneumonia was produced by transbronchial instillation of type III pneumococcus. After 2 days, perfusion scans demonstrated discrete appropriate defects. In vivo magnification pulmonary arteriography, postmortem pulmonary arteriography, and histologic examination disclosed no evidence of thrombi.

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae in orange juice concentrate.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, F A; Hazen, T C; López-Torres, A J; Rechani, P

    1985-01-01

    Fecal coliform-positive, capsule-forming Klebsiella pneumoniae cells were observed in high densities (10(4) to 10(8) CFU/100 ml) in two commercial batches of frozen orange juice concentrate at a cannery in Puerto Rico. Contamination of both lots was gross and included off colors and odors. Isolates of K. pneumoniae from these concentrates revealed growth at 4, 25, and 34 degrees C with generation times from 0.39 to 1.84 h. PMID:3893321

  14. Pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: An update.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, R; Ghosh, A; Chandolia, A

    2016-01-01

    Genus Mycoplasma, belonging to the class Mollicutes, encompasses unique lifeforms comprising of a small genome of 8,00,000 base pairs and the inability to produce a cell wall under any circumstances. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the most common pathogenic species infecting humans. It is an atypical respiratory bacteria causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children and adults of all ages. Although atypical pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae can be managed in outpatient settings, complications affecting multiple organ systems can lead to hospitalization in vulnerable population. M. pneumoniae infection has also been associated with chronic lung disease and bronchial asthma. With the advent of molecular methods of diagnosis and genetic, immunological and ultrastructural assays that study infectious disease pathogenesis at subcellular level, newer virulence factors of M. pneumoniae have been recognized by researchers. Structure of the attachment organelle of the organism, that mediates the crucial initial step of cytadherence to respiratory tract epithelium through complex interaction between different adhesins and accessory adhesion proteins, has been decoded. Several subsequent virulence mechanisms like intracellular localization, direct cytotoxicity and activation of the inflammatory cascade through toll-like receptors (TLRs) leading to inflammatory cytokine mediated tissue injury, have also been demonstrated to play an essential role in pathogenesis. The most significant update in the knowledge of pathogenesis has been the discovery of Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome toxin (CARDS toxin) of M. pneumoniae and its ability of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosylation and inflammosome activation, thus initiating airway inflammation. Advances have also been made in terms of the different pathways behind the genesis of extrapulmonary complications. This article aims to comprehensively review the recent advances in the knowledge of pathogenesis of this

  15. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections in Research and Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described>15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. Methods: A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). Results were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). Results: As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86–92%), school issues (75–81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60–65%), urinary symptoms (42–81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. Conclusions: The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association

  16. Biological and Epidemiological Features of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Pre- and Post-Conjugate Vaccine Eras: a United States Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lindsay; McGee, Lesley; Tomczyk, Sara; Beall, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae inflicts a huge disease burden as the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and meningitis. Soon after mainstream antibiotic usage, multiresistant pneumococcal clones emerged and disseminated worldwide. Resistant clones are generated through adaptation to antibiotic pressures imposed while naturally residing within the human upper respiratory tract. Here, a huge array of related commensal streptococcal strains transfers core genomic and accessory resistance determinants to the highly transformable pneumococcus. β-Lactam resistance is the hallmark of pneumococcal adaptability, requiring multiple independent recombination events that are traceable to nonpneumococcal origins and stably perpetuated in multiresistant clonal complexes. Pneumococcal strains with elevated MICs of β-lactams are most often resistant to additional antibiotics. Basic underlying mechanisms of most pneumococcal resistances have been identified, although new insights that increase our understanding are continually provided. Although all pneumococcal infections can be successfully treated with antibiotics, the available choices are limited for some strains. Invasive pneumococcal disease data compiled during 1998 to 2013 through the population-based Active Bacterial Core surveillance program (U.S. population base of 30,600,000) demonstrate that targeting prevalent capsular serotypes with conjugate vaccines (7-valent and 13-valent vaccines implemented in 2000 and 2010, respectively) is extremely effective in reducing resistant infections. Nonetheless, resistant non-vaccine-serotype clones continue to emerge and expand. PMID:27076637

  17. Frequency of streptococcal upper respiratory tract infections and HLA-Cw*06 allele in 70 patients with guttate psoriasis from northern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Rębała, Krzysztof; Wysocka, Joanna; Roszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Szczerkowska, Zofia; Placek, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The association of guttate psoriasis with a streptococcal throat infection and HLA-Cw*06 allele is well established in different populations. Nevertheless, only few studies on this form of disease have been performed in the Polish population. Aim To analyze the frequencies of streptococcal-induced guttate psoriasis and HLA-Cw*06 allele in 70 patients with guttate psoriasis originating from northern Poland. Material and methods Seventy patients with guttate psoriasis and 24 healthy volunteers were enrolled into the study. Both groups were sex- and age-matched. The evidence of streptococcal infection was based on the positive throat swabs and/or elevated ASO titers. The modified method, including PCR-SSP and PCR-RFLP, was applied to HLA-Cw*06 genotyping. Results HLA-Cw*06 allele was confirmed in 49 (70%) out of 70 patients, which is significantly higher than in the control population (30%) (p = 0.001). Evidence for streptococcal infection was found in 34 (48.5%) subjects with psoriasis. Twenty-seven of them (79%) carried HLA-Cw*06 allele. In 36 individuals in whom no evidence of streptococcal infection was found, 14 (39%) did not carry HLA-Cw*06 allele. Conclusions Our data confirm that HLA-Cw*06 is a major, but not imperative, genetic determinant for guttate psoriasis. PMID:26755910

  18. Call to action on world pneumonia day.

    PubMed

    Hajjeh, Rana; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2012-11-01

    This month, on November 12, the world will recognize the fourth annual World Pneumonia Day. First launched in 2009 by a coalition of global health leaders (1), World Pneumonia Day aims to raise awareness about pneumonia's toll on the world's children and to promote interventions to protect against, treat, and prevent the disease. Pneumonia continues to be the leading killer of young children around the world, causing ≈14% of all deaths in children 1 month to 5 years of age (2). It is a critical disease for countries to conquer in order to reach Millennium Development Goal 4: reducing the child mortality rate by two thirds from 1990 to 2015 (3). Most children who die from pneumonia live in developing countries, where such factors as malnutrition, crowding, and lack of access to quality health care increase the risk for death. Pneumonia kills few children in industrialized countries, although it remains among the top 10 causes of deaths in the United States, for example, because of deaths in older adults (4). PMID:23092708

  19. Radiological diagnosis of pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Kiekara, O; Korppi, M; Tanska, S; Soimakallio, S

    1996-02-01

    During 12 months in 1981-82, 201 children were hospitalized due to radiologically verified definite or probable pneumonia. In 1985, 194 chest radiographs (anteroposterior views) were re-evaluated jointly by two radiologists, and classified into three categories: alveolar, interstitial and probable pneumonia. In 127 cases definite pneumonia was diagnosed on both occasions, alveolar in 48 cases and interstitial in 79 cases. Variation between the two evaluations 3 years apart was observed in 46 (24%) of the 194 cases; the adjusted kappa (0.47) was in the modest region. Factors contributing to this variation were young age, less than 12 months, and the presence of interstitial infiltration, bronchial obstruction and low C-reactive protein. Factors associated with less marked variation were the presence of alveolar infiltration, auscultatory fine rates and elevated C-reactive protein. The microbial aetiology of infection, assessed by viral and bacterial antigen and antibody assays, showed no association with diagnostic variation. A lateral view of the chest radiograph was obtained from 158 patients; it was positive in 99 (91%) of the 109 cases with definite pneumonia. In only three cases the diagnosis was based on the lateral view alone. Our results show that the radiological diagnosis of pneumonia is difficult in children, especially in young children with interstitial pneumonia. PMID:8932509

  20. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection with Neurologic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Bora Carman, Kursat; Cagrı Dinleyici, Ener

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection include encephalitis, optic neuritis, acute psychosis, stroke, cranial nerve palsies, aseptic meningitis and also it may be implicated in immune mediated neurological diseases such as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and transverse myelitis. Case Presentation: We present five cases with acute neurological diseases after M. pneumoniae infection. The clinical presentations were characterized by encephalitis in 2 patients, Gullain-Barre syndrome in 2 patients, transverse myelitis in 1 patient. M. pneumoniae infection was detected in serum by serological method. Only two patients had respiratory symptoms preceding M. pneumoniae infection. Brain MRI revealed hyperintensities on corpus striatum and mesencephalon in one patient with encephalitis, the other had front parietal coalescent periventricular white matter lesions on T2 images. The patient with transverse myelitis had cervical, dorsal and lumbar scattered hyperintense lesions on T2 images. Two patients were treated with high dose steroid, the other two patients received treatment with intravenous immune globuline. Conclusion: M. pneumoniae may reveal different neurologic complications with different radiologic findings. PMID:25793076

  1. Pneumonia in the neutropenic cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Ost, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among neutropenic cancer patients, particularly those with acute leukemia. Even with empiric therapy, case fatality rates of neutropenic pneumonias remain unacceptably high. However, recent advances in the management of neutropenic pneumonia offer hope for improved outcomes in the cancer setting. This review summarizes recent literature regarding the clinical presentation, microbiologic trends, diagnostic advances and therapeutic recommendations for cancer-related neutropenic pneumonia. Recent findings While neutropenic patients acquire pathogens both in community or nosocomial settings, patients’ obligate healthcare exposures result in the frequent identification of multidrug resistant bacterial organisms on conventional culture-based assessment of respiratory secretions. Modern molecular techniques, including expanded use of galactomannan testing, have further facilitated identification of fungal pathogens, allowing for aggressive interventions that appear to improve patient outcomes. Multiple interested societies have issued updated guidelines for antibiotic therapy of suspected neutropenic pneumonia. The benefit of antibiotic medications may be further enhanced by agents that promote host responses to infection. Summary Neutropenic cancer patients have numerous potential causes for pulmonary infiltrates and clinical deterioration, with lower respiratory tract infections among the most deadly. Early clinical suspicion, diagnosis and intervention for neutropenic pneumonia provide cancer patients’ best hope for survival. PMID:25784246

  2. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  3. Risk Factors and Clinical Impact of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase–Producing K. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gasink, Leanne B.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Synnestvedt, Marie; Fishman, Neil O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen with serious clinical and infection control implications. To our knowledge, no study has specifically examined risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae or its impact on mortality. METHODS To identify risk factors for infection or colonization with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, a case-control study was performed. Case patients with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were compared with control subjects with carbapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae. A cohort study evaluated the association between KPC-producing K. pneumoniae and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS Fifty-six case patients and 863 control subjects were identified. In multivariable analysis, independent risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were (1) severe illness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.25–8.25), (2) prior fluoroquinolone use (AOR, 3.39; 95% CI, 1.50, 7.66), and (3) prior extended-spectrum cephalosporin use (AOR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.18, 5.52). Compared with samples from other anatomic locations, K. pneumoniae isolates from blood samples were less likely to harbor KPC (AOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.86). KPC-producing K. pneumoniae was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (AOR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.87–6.91). CONCLUSIONS KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen associated with significant mortality. Our findings highlight the urgent need to develop strategies for prevention and infection control. Limiting use of certain antimicrobials, specifically fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins, use may be effective strategies. PMID:19860564

  4. Experimental design approach in recombinant protein expression: determining medium composition and induction conditions for expression of pneumolysin from Streptococcus pneumoniae in Escherichia coli and preliminary purification process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) causes several serious diseases including pneumonia, septicemia and meningitis. The World Health Organization estimates that streptococcal pneumonia is the cause of approximately 1.9 million deaths of children under five years of age each year. The large number of serotypes underlying the disease spectrum, which would be reflected in the high production cost of a commercial vaccine effective to protect against all of them and the higher level of amino acid sequence conservation as compared to polysaccharide structure, has prompted us to attempt to use conserved proteins for the development of a simpler vaccine. One of the most prominent proteins is pneumolysin (Ply), present in almost all the serotypes known at the moment, which shows an effective protection against S. pneumoniae infections. Results We have cloned the pneumolysin gene from S. pneumoniae serotype 14 and studied the effects of eight variables related to medium composition and induction conditions on the soluble expression of rPly in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and a 28-4 factorial design was applied. Statistical analysis was carried out to compare the conditions used to evaluate the expression of soluble pneumolysin; rPly activity was evaluated by hemolytic activity assay and served as the main response to evaluate the proper protein expression and folding. The optimized conditions, validated by the use of triplicates, include growth until an absorbance of 0.8 (measured at 600 nm) with 0.1 mM IPTG during 4 h at 25°C in a 5 g/L yeast extract, 5 g/L tryptone, 10 g/L NaCl, 1 g/L glucose medium, with addition of 30 μg/mL kanamycin. Conclusions This experimental design methodology allowed the development of an adequate process condition to attain high levels (250 mg/L) of soluble expression of functional rPly in E. coli, which should contribute to reduce operational costs. It was possible to recover the protein in its active form with 75

  5. Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Le Thanh; Thach, Hoang Ngoc; Tuan, Ta Anh; Nam, Dao Huu; Dien, Tran Minh; Sato, Yuko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawachi, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles. PMID:26926035

  6. [A study on early-onset group "B" streptococcal neonatal infection].

    PubMed

    Vacheva, R; Todorova, M; Decheva, A; Yarakova, N; Kraleva, I; Takova, Ts; Dimitrova, N; Dobreva, A

    2012-01-01

    The results achieved with 80% reduction in the incidence of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) sepsis following the implementation of the preliminary (1996, 2002) and subsequently the revised (2010) guidelines for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis imposed the discussion on a large scale of the updated:--algorithms for GBS screening (35-37 weeks of gestation) with the recommended dosage of penicillin-G for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for women having normal labor and delivery;--algorithms for GBS screening and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for women with preterm labor (PPROM) or premature rupture of membranes (PROM);--intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for women with penicillin allergy;--algorithm for management of newborns with respect to risk of early-onset GBS disease. The present study is aimed at studying the distribution of the early-onset GBS disease in our country based on the data of leading obstetrics & gynecology clinics and wards. The aim is to diferrentiate clinically the cases and investigate the influence of the known risk factors on the part of the mother. A special accent is put over the microbiological diagnostics of cases in view of CDC expanded recommendations on the laboratory methods for identification of GBS. As a final conclusion the necessity for introduction of an official registration of the early- and late-onset GBS disease in the country is emphasized. PMID:23390859

  7. Association of human leukocyte antigen with outcomes of infectious diseases: the streptococcal experience.

    PubMed

    Kotb, M; Norrby-Teglund, A; McGeer, A; Green, K; Low, D E

    2003-01-01

    The role of host genetic factors in determining susceptibility to infections has become more evident. Certain individuals appear to be predisposed to certain infections, whereas others are protected. By studying the immune response and the genetic makeup of susceptible and resistant individuals a better understanding of the disease process can be achieved. Infections caused by group A streptococci offer an excellent model to study host-pathogen interactions and how the host genetic variation can influence the infection outcome. These studies showed that the same clone of these bacteria can cause severe or non-severe invasive disease. This difference was largely related to the human leukocyte antigen class 11 type of the patient. Certain class II haplotypes present the streptococcal superantigens in a way that results in responses, whereas others present the same superantigens in a way that elicits very potent inflammatory responses that can lead to organ failure and shock. These findings underscore the role of host genetic factors in determining the outcome of serious infections and warrants further investigations into how the same or different genetic factors affect susceptibility to other emerging and re-emerging pathogens. PMID:14620152

  8. A murine model for neuropsychiatric disorders associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kurt L; Hornig, Mady; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Jabado, Omar; Lipkin, W Ian

    2004-02-18

    A syndrome of motoric and neuropsychiatric symptoms comprising various elements, including chorea, hyperactivity, tics, emotional lability, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, can occur in association with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection. We tested the hypothesis that an immune response to GABHS can result in behavioral abnormalities. Female SJL/J mice were immunized and boosted with a GABHS homogenate in Freund's adjuvant, whereas controls received Freund's adjuvant alone. When sera from GABHS-immunized mice were tested for immunoreactivity to mouse brain, a subset was found to be immunoreactive to several brain regions, including deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN), globus pallidus, and thalamus. GABHS-immunized mice having serum immunoreactivity to DCN also had increased IgG deposits in DCN and exhibited increased rearing behavior in open-field and hole-board tests compared with controls and with GABHS-immunized mice lacking serum anti-DCN antibodies. Rearing and ambulatory behavior were correlated with IgG deposits in the DCN and with serum immunoreactivity to GABHS proteins in Western blot. In addition, serum from a GABHS mouse reacted with normal mouse cerebellum in nondenaturing Western blots and immunoprecipitated C4 complement protein and alpha-2-macroglobulin. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that immune response to GABHS can result in motoric and behavioral disturbances and suggest that anti-GABHS antibodies cross-reactive with brain components may play a role in their pathophysiology. PMID:14973249

  9. A Glimpse of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome from Comparative Genomics of S. suis 2 Chinese Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zheng, Feng; Pan, Xiuzhen; Liu, Di; Li, Ming; Song, Yajun; Zhu, Xinxing; Sun, Haibo; Feng, Tao; Guo, Zhaobiao; Ju, Aiping; Ge, Junchao; Dong, Yaqing; Sun, Wen; Jiang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jun; Yan, Jinghua; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Xiaoning; Gao, George F.; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Jian; Yu, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is an important zoonotic pathogen, causing more than 200 cases of severe human infection worldwide, with the hallmarks of meningitis, septicemia, arthritis, etc. Very recently, SS2 has been recognized as an etiological agent for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which was originally associated with Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) in Streptococci. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying STSS are poorly understood. Methods and Findings To elucidate the genetic determinants of STSS caused by SS2, whole genome sequencing of 3 different Chinese SS2 strains was undertaken. Comparative genomics accompanied by several lines of experiments, including experimental animal infection, PCR assay, and expression analysis, were utilized to further dissect a candidate pathogenicity island (PAI). Here we show, for the first time, a novel molecular insight into Chinese isolates of highly invasive SS2, which caused two large-scale human STSS outbreaks in China. A candidate PAI of ∼89 kb in length, which is designated 89K and specific for Chinese SS2 virulent isolates, was investigated at the genomic level. It shares the universal properties of PAIs such as distinct GC content, consistent with its pivotal role in STSS and high virulence. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first PAI candidate from S. suis worldwide. Our finding thus sheds light on STSS triggered by SS2 at the genomic level, facilitates further understanding of its pathogenesis and points to directions of development on some effective strategies to combat highly pathogenic SS2 infections. PMID:17375201

  10. Relative value of selective group A streptococcal agar incubated under different atmospheres.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, L; Ranucci, A; Ravagnan, G; Chiesa, C

    1995-01-01

    A commercially available selective group A streptococcal agar (ssA) was evaluated for the recovery of group A streptococci (GAS) in comparison with recovery from simultaneous cultures on conventional sheep blood agar (SBA). Both sets of plates were incubated in air, 5% CO2, and anaerobically for 48 h, with a first reading taken at 24 h. A total of 402 (67.0%) GAS were isolated from the 600 specimens that were submitted. Recovery of GAS was significantly greater after 48 h of incubation than after 24 h of incubation for each medium-atmosphere combination. After 48 h of incubation, the sensitivities of GAS detection obtained by each culture technique were as follows: ssA-anaerobic atmosphere, 98.5%; SBA-anaerobic atmosphere, 89.5%; ssA-CO2 atmosphere, 88.0%; SBA-air, 86.5%; SBA-CO2 atmosphere, 82.0%; and ssA-air, 74.6%. There were no cultures positive in air or CO2 which were not positive anaerobically on either medium. The increased sensitivity of detecting positive GAS cultures when incubation was done in an ssA-anaerobic atmosphere for 48 h uncovered patients truly infected with the organisms. PMID:7494053

  11. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  12. Effects of meteorologic factors and schooling on the seasonality of group A streptococcal pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Hervás, Daniel; Hervás-Masip, Juan; Ferrés, Laia; Ramírez, Antonio; Pérez, José L; Hervás, Juan A

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children attended at a hospital emergency department in the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic factors and schooling. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of children aged 1-15 years with a diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis between January 2006 and December 2011. The number of S. pyogenes pharyngitis was correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, solar radiation, and schooling, using regression and time series techniques. A total of 906 patients (median, 4 years old) with S. pyogenes pharyngitis, confirmed by throat culture, were attended during the study period. A seasonal pattern was observed with a peak activity in June and a minimum in September. Mean temperature, solar radiation, and school holidays were the best predicting variables (R(2) = 0.68; p < 0.001). S. pyogenes activity increased with the decrease of mean temperature (z = -2.4; p < 0.05), the increase of solar radiation (z = 4.2; p < 0.001), and/or the decrease in school holidays (z = -2.4; p < 0.05). In conclusion, S. pyogenes pharyngitis had a clear seasonality predominating in springtime, and an association with mean temperature, solar radiation, and schooling was observed. The resulting model predicted 68 % of S. pyogenes pharyngitis. PMID:26446674

  13. Effects of meteorologic factors and schooling on the seasonality of group A streptococcal pharyngitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervás, Daniel; Hervás-Masip, Juan; Ferrés, Laia; Ramírez, Antonio; Pérez, José L.; Hervás, Juan A.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children attended at a hospital emergency department in the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic factors and schooling. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of children aged 1-15 years with a diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis between January 2006 and December 2011. The number of S. pyogenes pharyngitis was correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, solar radiation, and schooling, using regression and time series techniques. A total of 906 patients (median, 4 years old) with S. pyogenes pharyngitis, confirmed by throat culture, were attended during the study period. A seasonal pattern was observed with a peak activity in June and a minimum in September. Mean temperature, solar radiation, and school holidays were the best predicting variables ( R 2 = 0.68; p < 0.001 ). S. pyogenes activity increased with the decrease of mean temperature ( z = -2.4; p < 0.05), the increase of solar radiation ( z = 4.2; p < 0.001), and/or the decrease in school holidays ( z = -2.4; p < 0.05). In conclusion, S. pyogenes pharyngitis had a clear seasonality predominating in springtime, and an association with mean temperature, solar radiation, and schooling was observed. The resulting model predicted 68 % of S. pyogenes pharyngitis.

  14. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  15. Enhanced susceptibility of mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes to type II group B streptococcal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, M S; Fuselier, P A

    1983-01-01

    Since diabetes mellitus predisposes adults to group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteremia, a murine model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and type II GBS bacteremia was developed to assess certain immune factors which might influence susceptibility to infection. In diabetic mice, the 50% lethal dose for two strains of type II GBS was significantly lower (greater than 1 log10 decrease in CFU per milliliter) than in control animals. This enhanced virulence of GBS for diabetic animals was associated with prolonged bacteremia, persistent sequestration of organisms in the splanchnic reticuloendothelial system, and a shift from splenic to hepatic clearance. Although immunization of control and diabetic animals resulted in high concentrations of type-specific serum antibody, it had no effect on late reticuloendothelial system sequestration in diabetics. In contrast, depletion of complement by treatment of mice with cobra venom factor blocked reticuloendothelial system clearance and resulted in fatal infection in both diabetic and control mice. These results indicate that neither type-specific antibody nor an intact complement system is adequate for effective clearance of type II GBS bacteremia in mice with experimentally induced diabetes. This clearance deficit could be the result of a defect in hepatocyte membrane receptors necessary for removal of this encapsulated microorganism. PMID:6339383

  16. Immunochemical analysis of streptococcal group A, B, and C carbohydrates, with emphasis on group A.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, J C; Wicher, K; McCarty, M

    1982-01-01

    Streptococcal group A, B, and C carbohydrates were analyzed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis, and inhibition of immunoprecipitation. Extracts of streptococci group A or C were shown by counterimmunoelectrophoresis to contain both anodic and cathodic migrating components. In immunoelectrophoresis, group A and C substances formed a continuous precipitation line stretching from the anode to the cathode, suggesting a heterogeneous population of molecules with immunochemical identity. This identity was confirmed by inhibition of immunoprecipitation, in which both anodic and cathodic immunoprecipitates were inhibited by the same constituent sugars: group A-anti-A was inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine, and group C-anti-C was inhibited by N-acetylgalactosamine. Extracts of group B showed only anodic migration in counterimmunoelectrophoresis and a narrow, anodic arc in immunoelectrophoresis. The group B-anti-B reaction was inhibited by rhamnose. Carbohydrates of variant strains of group A streptococci were also analyzed by the same methods. The results suggest that the heterogeneity of group A carbohydrate may have resulted from attachment of various amounts of N-acetylglucosamine to the polyrhamnose backbone. Images PMID:7049950

  17. Randomized, single-blind evaluation of cefadroxil and phenoxymethyl penicillin in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pichichero, M E; Disney, F A; Aronovitz, G H; Talpey, W B; Green, J L; Francis, A B

    1987-01-01

    A total of 150 children from two pediatric practices with clinical and bacteriologic evidence of acute group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis randomly received cefadroxil monohydrate (75 children) or phenoxymethyl penicillin (75 children). Cefadroxil was given once daily, while penicillin was given three times daily. The treatment groups were similar in age, sex, race, illness severity, and acute GABHS symptomatology. Throat cultures were routine 3 to 5 days after the start of therapy and 2 and 14 days after the end of therapy. The bacterial cure rates were 90% (62 of 69) for cefadroxil-treated patients and 76% (52 of 68) for penicillin-treated patients. This difference was significant (P less than 0.04). The clinical response was satisfactory in 91% of cefadroxil-treated patients and 89% of penicillin-treated patients. We conclude that once-daily cefadroxil is at least as effective as three-times-daily penicillin in producing bacteriologic eradication and clinical symptomatic improvement in children with GABHS pharyngitis. PMID:3113329

  18. Nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and impaired cerebral blood flow autoregulation in group B streptococcal neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mertineit, C; Samlalsingh-Parker, J; Glibetic, M; Ricard, G; Noya, F J; Aranda, J V

    2000-03-01

    Impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) contributes to CNS damage during neonatal meningitis. We tested (i) the hypothesis that cerebrovascular autoregulation is impaired during early onset group B streptococcal (GBS) meningitis, (ii) whether this impairment is regulated by vasoactive mediators such as prostaglandins and (or) nitric oxide (NO), and (iii) whether this impairment is preventable by specific and (or) nonspecific inhibitors: dexamethasone, ibuprofen, and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine, a NO inhibitor. Sterile saline or 10(9) colony-forming units (cfu) of heat-killed GBS was injected into the cerebral ventricle of newborn piglets. CBF autoregulation was determined by altering cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) with balloon-tipped catheters placed in the aorta. GBS produced a narrow range of CBF autoregulation due to an impairment at the upper limit of CPP. We report that in vivo in the early stages (first 2 h) of induced GBS inflammation (i) GBS impairs the upper limit of cerebrovascular autoregulation; (ii) ibuprofen, dexamethasone, and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine not only prevent this GBS-induced autoregulatory impairment but improve the range of cerebrovascular autoregulation; (iii) these autoregulatory changes do not involve circulating cerebral prostanoids; and (iv) the observed changes correlate with the induction of NO synthase gene expression. Thus, acute early onset GBS-induced impairment of the upper limit of CBF autoregulation can be correlated with increases of NO synthase production, suggesting that NO is a vasoactive mediator of CBF. PMID:10721813

  19. Effect of Group A Streptococcal Cysteine Protease on Invasion of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-Jane; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Kuei-Yuan; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lei, Huan-Yao; Chen, Fen-Fen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    1998-01-01

    Cysteine protease of group A streptococci (GAS) is considered an important virulence factor. However, its role in invasiveness of GAS has not been investigated. We demonstrated in this study that two strains of protease-producing GAS had the ability to invade A-549 human respiratory epithelial cells. Isogenic protease mutants were constructed by using integrational plasmids to disrupt the speB gene and confirmed by Southern hybridization and Western immunoblot analyses. No extracellular protease activity was produced by the mutants. The mutants had growth rates similar to those of the wild-type strains and produced normal levels of other extracellular proteins. When invading A-549 cells, the mutants had a two- to threefold decrease in activity compared to that of the wild-type strains. The invasion activity increased when the A-549 cells were incubated with purified cysteine protease and the mutant. However, blockage of the cysteine protease with a specific cysteine protease inhibitor, E-64, decreased the invasion activity of GAS. Intracellular growth of GAS was not found in A-549 cells. The presence or absence of protease activity did not affect the adhesive ability of GAS. These results suggested that streptococcal cysteine protease can enhance the invasion ability of GAS in human respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:9529068

  20. Effect of group A streptococcal cysteine protease on invasion of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P J; Kuo, C F; Lin, K Y; Lin, Y S; Lei, H Y; Chen, F F; Wang, J R; Wu, J J

    1998-04-01

    Cysteine protease of group A streptococci (GAS) is considered an important virulence factor. However, its role in invasiveness of GAS has not been investigated. We demonstrated in this study that two strains of protease-producing GAS had the ability to invade A-549 human respiratory epithelial cells. Isogenic protease mutants were constructed by using integrational plasmids to disrupt the speB gene and confirmed by Southern hybridization and Western immunoblot analyses. No extracellular protease activity was produced by the mutants. The mutants had growth rates similar to those of the wild-type strains and produced normal levels of other extracellular proteins. When invading A-549 cells, the mutants had a two- to threefold decrease in activity compared to that of the wild-type strains. The invasion activity increased when the A-549 cells were incubated with purified cysteine protease and the mutant. However, blockage of the cysteine protease with a specific cysteine protease inhibitor, E-64, decreased the invasion activity of GAS. Intracellular growth of GAS was not found in A-549 cells. The presence or absence of protease activity did not affect the adhesive ability of GAS. These results suggested that streptococcal cysteine protease can enhance the invasion ability of GAS in human respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:9529068

  1. The effect of chlorhexidine varnish treatment on salivary mutans streptococcal levels in child orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Sandham, H J; Nadeau, L; Phillips, H I

    1992-01-01

    A chlorhexidine dental varnish was applied to the teeth of 26 children, ten to 17 years of age, in an attempt to limit the increase in colonization by mutans streptococci that normally accompanies the placement of fixed orthodontic appliances and to assess the acceptance of the application procedure. Despite the insertion of the appliances in the month following the varnish application, the numbers of detectable salivary mutans streptococci in the children were found to remain significantly lower than baseline values for seven months (p less than 0.01). Among the 26 children, 16 exhibited high counts (greater than 2.5 x 10(5) cfu/mL saliva) at baseline, but none exhibited such counts until three months post-treatment, when one child did. By seven months, eight children had high counts. No significant difference in effectiveness was observed between varnish formulations containing 10% or 20% chlorhexidine acetate, or between children of different ages or past caries experience. The lack of drop-outs and the results of a questionnaire indicated that acceptance of the treatment by the children was excellent. The study indicates that chlorhexidine varnish therapy was acceptable to the children and was effective in suppressing oral mutans streptococcal levels for long periods, even when used prior to the placement of fixed orthodontic appliances. PMID:1740553

  2. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  3. Autoimmune neurological disorders associated with group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Yasuo; Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Hongou, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Keiko; Shimoda, Konomi; Kanda, Sachiko; Hoshino, Ai; Hanafusa, Yukiko; Kumada, Satoko; Kurihara, Eiji; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-08-01

    Although central nervous system (CNS) disorders associated with group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection occur only rarely, Sydenham's chorea is a well-recognized disease that can arise following infection. Children may develop a tic, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and extrapyramidal movement subsequent to GABHS infection. These disorders have been termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococci (PANDAS). Herein we report one case each of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), PANDAS and subacute encephalitis associated with GABHS infection. To evaluate the pathogenesis of the CNS disorders associated with GABHS infection, we measured levels of neurotransmitters, cytokines, anti-neuronal autoantibodies, and performed immunohistochemistry using patient sera to stain human brain sections. All three cases showed psychiatric behavioral disorders. Immunotherapy was effective, and homovanillic acid levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were elevated at the acute stage in all three cases. In each case of ADEM and PANDAS, immunohistochemistry demonstrated neuronal impairment in the basal ganglia during the acute stage. Neuronal immunoreactivity was visualized in the cerebral cortex at the acute stage in the case of subacute encephalitis. There was no direct correlation between immunoreactivity of patient sera on the brain sections and positivity of anti-neuronal autoantibodies or CSF biomarkers. The results suggest that autoimmune responses may modulate neurotransmission, and the use of patient serum for immunohistochemistry is a sensitive screening method for the detection of anti-neuronal autoantibodies in CNS disorders associated with GABHS infection. PMID:23142103

  4. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B inhibits apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages through protein S cleavage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Wu, Yueh-Ying; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Han, Chia-Li; Wang, Shuying; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages plays an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Previous study indicated that streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) reduces phagocytic activity in group A streptococcus (GAS) infection. Here, we demonstrate that SPE B causes an inhibitory effect on protein S-mediated phagocytosis. In the presence of SPE B, serum- and purified protein S-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells were significantly inhibited. The binding abilities of protein S to apoptotic cells were decreased by treatment with SPE B. Bacterial culture supernatants from GAS NZ131 strain also caused a reduction of protein S binding to apoptotic cells, but speB mutant strain did not. SPE B directly cleaved protein S in vitro and in vivo, whereas a lower level of cleavage occurred in mice infected with a speB isogenic mutant strain. SPE B-mediated initial cleavage of protein S caused a disruption of phagocytosis, and also resulted in a loss of binding ability of protein S-associated C4b-binding protein to apoptotic cells. Taken together, these results suggest a novel pathogenic role of SPE B that initiates protein S degradation followed by the inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages. PMID:27181595

  5. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B inhibits apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages through protein S cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Wu, Yueh-Ying; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Han, Chia-Li; Wang, Shuying; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages plays an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Previous study indicated that streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) reduces phagocytic activity in group A streptococcus (GAS) infection. Here, we demonstrate that SPE B causes an inhibitory effect on protein S-mediated phagocytosis. In the presence of SPE B, serum- and purified protein S-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells were significantly inhibited. The binding abilities of protein S to apoptotic cells were decreased by treatment with SPE B. Bacterial culture supernatants from GAS NZ131 strain also caused a reduction of protein S binding to apoptotic cells, but speB mutant strain did not. SPE B directly cleaved protein S in vitro and in vivo, whereas a lower level of cleavage occurred in mice infected with a speB isogenic mutant strain. SPE B-mediated initial cleavage of protein S caused a disruption of phagocytosis, and also resulted in a loss of binding ability of protein S-associated C4b-binding protein to apoptotic cells. Taken together, these results suggest a novel pathogenic role of SPE B that initiates protein S degradation followed by the inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages. PMID:27181595

  6. Group A Streptococcus intranasal infection promotes CNS infiltration by streptococcal-specific Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Smith, Erica D.; Knowland, Daniel; Hsu, Martin; Platt, Maryann; Bittner-Eddy, Peter; Cohen, Brenda; Southern, Peter; Latimer, Elizabeth; Harley, Earl; Agalliu, Dritan; Cleary, P. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) infection induces the production of Abs that cross-react with host neuronal proteins, and these anti-GAS mimetic Abs are associated with autoimmune diseases of the CNS. However, the mechanisms that allow these Abs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and induce neuropathology remain unresolved. We have previously shown that GAS infection in mouse models induces a robust Th17 response in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Here, we identified GAS-specific Th17 cells in tonsils of humans naturally exposed to GAS, prompting us to explore whether GAS-specific CD4+ T cells home to mouse brains following i.n. infection. Intranasal challenge of repeatedly GAS-inoculated mice promoted migration of GAS-specific Th17 cells from NALT into the brain, BBB breakdown, serum IgG deposition, microglial activation, and loss of excitatory synaptic proteins under conditions in which no viable bacteria were detected in CNS tissue. CD4+ T cells were predominantly located in the olfactory bulb (OB) and in other brain regions that receive direct input from the OB. Together, these findings provide insight into the immunopathology of neuropsychiatric complications that are associated with GAS infections and suggest that crosstalk between the CNS and cellular immunity may be a general mechanism by which infectious agents exacerbate symptoms associated with other CNS autoimmune disorders. PMID:26657857

  7. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates in Japanese pediatric patients has increased rapidly, there have been no reports concerning macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adolescents aged 16 to 19 years old. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adolescent patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A total of 99 cases with M. pneumoniae pneumonia confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were analyzed. Forty-five cases were pediatric patients less than 16 years old, 26 cases were 16 to 19-year-old adolescent patients and 28 cases were adult patients. Primers for domain V of 23S rRNA were used and DNA sequences of the PCR products were compared with the sequence of an M. pneumoniae reference strain. Results Thirty of 45 pediatric patients (66%), 12 of 26 adolescent patients (46%) and seven of 28 adult patients (25%) with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were found to be infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MR patients). Although the prevalence of resistant strains was similar in pediatric patients between 2008 and 2011, an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains was observed in adolescent patients. Among 30 pediatric MR patients, 26 had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (A2063G) and four had an A-to-G transition at position 2064 (A2064G). In 12 adolescent MR patients, 10 showed an A2063G transition and two showed an A2064G transition, and in seven adult MR patients, six showed an A2063G transition and one showed an A2064G transition. Conclusions The prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae is high among adolescent patients as well as pediatric patients less than 16-years old. To prevent outbreaks of M. pneumoniae infection, especially macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, in closed populations including among families, in schools and in university students, physicians should pay

  8. [THREE CASES OF DRUG-INDUCED PNEUMONIA CAUSED BY MESALAZINE].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Norimichi; Yokomura, Koshi; Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takefumi; Matsui, Takashi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    We report three cases of drug-induced pneumonia caused by mesalazine. They were all diagnosed as ulcerative colitis and treated with mesalazine orally. Our three cases and literature review revealed that mesalazine-induced pneumonia resemble like eosinophilic pneumonia or organizing pneumonia and that have good prognosis with drug cessation or administration of corticosteroid. The patient of ulcerative colitis is increasing every year and it is anticipated that the patient with mesalazine-induced pneumonia may also increase. In the treatment of ulcerative colitis with mesalazine, we should pay attention with patient's cough or fever for early detection of drug-induced pneumonia. PMID:26727138

  9. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Project: A 21st Century Childhood Pneumonia Etiology Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katherine L.; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Murdoch, David R.; Feikin, Daniel R.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Maloney, Susan A.; Sow, Samba; Thea, Donald M.; Scott, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project is a 7-country, standardized, comprehensive evaluation of the etiologic agents causing severe pneumonia in children from developing countries. During previous etiology studies, between one-quarter and one-third of patients failed to yield an obvious etiology; PERCH will employ and evaluate previously unavailable innovative, more sensitive diagnostic techniques. Innovative and rigorous epidemiologic and analytic methods will be used to establish the causal association between presence of potential pathogens and pneumonia. By strategic selection of study sites that are broadly representative of regions with the greatest burden of childhood pneumonia, PERCH aims to provide data that reflect the epidemiologic situation in developing countries in 2015, using pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines. PERCH will also address differences in host, environmental, and/or geographic factors that might determine pneumonia etiology and, by preserving specimens, will generate a resource for future research and pathogen discovery. PMID:22403238

  10. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in the Pediatric Population in Germany during 2000-2001

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Lütticken, Rudolf; Bryskier, André; Al-Lahham, Adnan

    2003-01-01

    In a nationwide study in Germany covering 13 clinical microbiology laboratories, a total of 307 Streptococcus pyogenes (mainly pharyngitis) and 333 Streptococcus pneumoniae (respiratory tract infections) strains were collected from outpatients less than 16 years of age. The MICs of penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin A, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and telithromycin were determined by the microdilution method. In S. pyogenes isolates, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin, 0%; erythromycin A, 13.7%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin showed good activity against S. pyogenes isolates (MIC90 = 0.25 μg/ml; MIC range, 0.016 to 16 μg/ml). Three strains were found to be telithromycin-resistant (MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml). Erythromycin-resistant strains were characterized for the underlying resistance genotype, with 40.5% having the efflux type mef(A), 38.1% having the erm(A), and 9.5% having the erm(B) genotypes. emm typing of macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes isolates showed emm types 4 (45.2%), 77 (26.2%), and 12 (11.9%) to be predominant. In S. pneumoniae, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin intermediate, 7.5%; penicillin resistant, 0%; erythromycin A, 17.4%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin was highly active against pneumococcal isolates (MIC90 ≤ 0.016 μg/ml; range, 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml). The overall resistance profile of streptococcal respiratory tract isolates is still favorable, but macrolide resistance is of growing concern in Germany. PMID:12543648

  11. Identification of a human immunodominant B-cell epitope within the immunoglobulin A1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Francesca; Beghetto, Elisa; Spadoni, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca; Felici, Franco; Oggioni, Marco R; Gargano, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The IgA1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a proteolytic enzyme that specifically cleaves the hinge regions of human IgA1, which dominates most mucosal surfaces and is the major IgA isotype in serum. This protease is expressed in all of the known pneumococcal strains and plays a major role in pathogen's resistance to the host immune response. The present work was focused at identifying the immunodominant regions of pneumococcal IgA1 protease recognized by the human antibody response. Results An antigenic sequence corresponding to amino acids 420–457 (epiA) of the iga gene product was identified by screening a pneumococcal phage display library with patients' sera. The epiA peptide is conserved in all pneumococci and in two out of three S. mitis strains, while it is not present in other oral streptococci so far sequenced. This epitope was specifically recognized by antibodies present in sera from 90% of healthy adults, thus representing an important target of the humoral response to S. pneumoniae and S. mitis infection. Moreover, sera from 68% of children less than 4 years old reacted with the epiA peptide, indicating that the human immune response against streptococcal antigens occurs during childhood. Conclusion The broad and specific recognition of the epiA polypeptide by human sera demonstrate that the pneumococcal IgA1 protease contains an immunodominant B-cell epitope. The use of phage display libraries to identify microbe or disease-specific antigens recognized by human sera is a valuable approach to epitope discovery. PMID:18088426

  12. Gamma globulin, Evan's blue, aprotinin A PLA2 inhibitor, tetracycline and antioxidants protect epithelial cells against damage induced by synergism among streptococcal hemolysins, oxidants and proteinases: relation to the prevention of post-streptococcal sequelae and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Sadovnic, M

    1998-11-01

    An in vitro model was employed to study the potential role of streptococcal extra-cellular products, rich in streptolysin O, in cellular injury as related to streptococcal infections and post-streptococcal sequelae. Extra-cellular products (EXPA) rich in streptolysin O were isolated from type 4, group A hemolytic streptococci grown in a chemostat, in a synthetic medium. EXPA induced moderate cytopathogenic changes in monkey kidney epithelial cells and in rat heart cells pre-labeled with 3H-arachidonate. However very strong toxic effects were induced when EXP was combined with oxidants (glucose oxides generated H2O2, AAPH-induced peroxyl radical (ROO.), NO generated by sodium nitroprusside) and proteinases (plasmin, trypsin). Cell killing was distinctly synergistic in nature. Cell damage induced by the multi-component cocktails was strongly inhibited either by micromolar amounts of gamma globulin, and Evan's blue which neutralized SLO activity, by tetracycline, trasylol (aprotinin), epsilon amino caproic acid and by soybean trypsin inhibitor, all proteinase inhibitors as well as by a non-penetrating PLA2 inhibitor A. The results suggest that fasciitis, myositis and sepsis resulting from infections with hemolytic streptococci might be caused by a coordinated 'cross-talk' among microbial, leukocyte and additional host-derived pro-inflammatory agents. Since attempts to prolong lives of septic patients by the exclusive administration of single antagonists invariably failed, it is proposed that the administration of 'cocktails' of putative inhibitors against major pro-inflammatory agonizes generated in inflammation and infection might protect against the deleterious effects caused by the biochemical and pharmacological cascades which are known to be activated in sepsis. PMID:9848686

  13. PRImary care Streptococcal Management (PRISM) study: identifying clinical variables associated with Lancefield group A β-haemolytic streptococci and Lancefield non-Group A streptococcal throat infections from two cohorts of patients presenting with an acute sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Little, Paul; Moore, Michael; Hobbs, F D R; Mant, David; McNulty, Cliodna; Williamson, Ian; Cheng, Edith; Stuart, Beth; Kelly, Joanne; Barnett, Jane; Mullee, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between features of acute sore throat and the growth of streptococci from culturing a throat swab. Design Diagnostic cohort. Setting UK general practices. Participants Patients aged 5 or over presenting with an acute sore throat. Patients were recruited for a second cohort (cohort 2, n=517) consecutively after the first (cohort 1, n=606) from similar practices. Main outcome Predictors of the presence of Lancefield A/C/G streptococci. Results The clinical score developed from cohort 1 had poor discrimination in cohort 2 (bootstrapped estimate of area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve (0.65), due to the poor validity of the individual items in the second data set. Variables significant in multivariate analysis in both cohorts were rapid attendance (prior duration 3 days or less; multivariate adjusted OR 1.92 cohort, 1.67 cohort 2); fever in the last 24 h (1.69, 2.40); and doctor assessment of severity (severely inflamed pharynx/tonsils (2.28, 2.29)). The absence of coryza or cough and purulent tonsils were significant in univariate analysis in both cohorts and in multivariate analysis in one cohort. A five-item score based on Fever, Purulence, Attend rapidly (3 days or less), severely Inflamed tonsils and No cough or coryza (FeverPAIN) had moderate predictive value (bootstrapped area under the ROC curve 0.73 cohort 1, 0.71 cohort 2) and identified a substantial number of participants at low risk of streptococcal infection (38% in cohort 1, 36% in cohort 2 scored ≤1, associated with a streptococcal percentage of 13% and 18%, respectively). A Centor score of ≤1 identified 23% and 26% of participants with streptococcal percentages of 10% and 28%, respectively. Conclusions Items widely used to help identify streptococcal sore throat may not be the most consistent. A modified clinical scoring system (FeverPAIN) which requires further validation may be clinically helpful in identifying individuals who are

  14. The management of pneumonia in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; Capdevila, J A; Muñoz, P

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia generates a high workload for internal medicine departments. Management of this disease is challenging, because patients are usually elderly and have multiple comorbid conditions. Furthermore, the interpretation and adherence to guidelines are far from clear in this setting. We report the opinion of 43 internists especially interested in infectious diseases that were questioned at the 2011 XXXII National Conference of Spanish Society of Internal Medicine about the main issues involved in the management of pneumonia in the internal medicine departments, namely, classification, admission criteria, microbiological workup, therapeutic management, discharge policy, and prevention of future episodes. Participants were asked to choose between 2 options for each statement by 4 investigators. Consensus could not be reached in many cases. The most controversial issues concerned recognition and management of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Most participants were aware of the differences in terms of underlying diseases, etiological distribution, and outcome of HCAP compared with community-acquired pneumonia, but only a minority agreed to manage HCAP as hospital-acquired pneumonia, as suggested by some guidelines. A clinical patient-to-patient approach proved to be the option preferred by internists in the management of HCAP. PMID:23664752

  15. The management of pneumonia in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; Capdevila, J A; Muñoz, P

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia generates a high workload for internal medicine departments. Management of this disease is challenging, because patients are usually elderly and have multiple comorbid conditions. Furthermore, the interpretation and adherence to guidelines are far from clear in this setting. We report the opinion of 43 internists especially interested in infectious diseases that were questioned at the 2011 XXXII National Conference of Spanish Society of Internal Medicine about the main issues involved in the management of pneumonia in the internal medicine departments, namely, classification, admission criteria, microbiological workup, therapeutic management, discharge policy, and prevention of future episodes. Participants were asked to choose between 2 options for each statement by 4 investigators. Consensus could not be reached in many cases. The most controversial issues concerned recognition and management of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Most participants were aware of the differences in terms of underlying diseases, etiological distribution, and outcome of HCAP compared with community-acquired pneumonia, but only a minority agreed to manage HCAP as hospital-acquired pneumonia, as suggested by some guidelines. A clinical patient-to-patient approach proved to be the option preferred by internists in the management of HCAP. PMID:26530942

  16. Ventilator associated pneumonia in major paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alan David; Deal, Cailin; Argent, Andrew Charles; Hudson, Donald Anthony; Rode, Heinz

    2014-09-01

    More than three-quarters of deaths related to major burns are a consequence of infection, which is frequently ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). A retrospective study was performed, over a five-year period, of ventilated children with major burns. 92 patients were included in the study; their mean age was 3.5 years and their mean total body surface area burn was 30%. 62% of the patients sustained flame burns, and 31% scalds. The mean ICU stay was 10.6 days (range 2-61 days) and the mean ventilation time was 8.4 days (range 2-45 days). There were 59 documented episodes of pneumonia in 52 patients with a rate of 30 infections per 1000 ventilator days. Length of ventilation and the presence of inhalational injury correlate with the incidence of VAP. 17.4% of the patients died (n=16); half of these deaths may be attributed directly to pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and Staphylococcus aureus were the most prominent aetiological organisms. Broncho-alveolar lavage was found to be more specific and sensitive at identifying the organism than other methods. This study highlights the importance of implementing strictly enforced strategies for the prevention, detection and management of pneumonia in the presence of major burns. PMID:24468505

  17. A family outbreak of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, K; Frew, C E; Carrington, D

    1992-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae, a newly described Chlamydia species, has been shown to be a cause of acute respiratory tract infection in both adults and children, but its role in human infection is still under investigation. Here we present a family outbreak of C. pneumoniae infection where three members of a family presented with a 'flu-like illness' and acute upper respiratory tract infection which did not improve despite penicillin or septrin therapy. No history of exposure to birds, pets or animals was obtained. As C. pneumoniae isolation from respiratory secretions is not without difficulty, diagnosis usually relies currently on serum-based tests. In this study C. pneumoniae specific IgM determined by the micro-immunofluorescence test was detected in the three clinical cases. All three cases had an elevated complement-fixing antibody titre to Psittacosis-LGV antigen, which may have suggested psittacosis, if type-specific tests had not been performed. In addition, three other members of the family had C. pneumoniae-specific IgG antibody although specific IgM was absent. These three younger members of the family had been symptomatic in the month preceding symptoms in their older sibling and their parents. All the symptomatic members of the family made a complete recovery on tetracycline therapy. PMID:1522345

  18. Immune ageing and susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Mariana Torrente; Mitchell, Timothy J; Lord, Janet M

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a complex Gram-positive bacterium comprising over 90 different serotypes and is a major cause of pneumonia. Susceptibility to S. pneumoniae is remarkably age-related being greatest in children under 5 years old and adults over 65. Whilst the immaturity of the immune system is largely responsible for poor immunity in the former, the underlying causes of susceptibility in older adults is complex. Immunity to S. pneumoniae is mediated predominantly through the inflammatory response in the nasopharyngeal mucosa recruiting phagocytes (neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages) which recognise the pathogen via TLR2 and ingest and kill the bacteria, with the induction of Th17 cells being required to maintain neutrophil recruitment and ensure clearance of the infection. In this review we discuss the impact of ageing upon these aspects of immunity to S. pneumoniae, as well as age-related changes to the serotypes present in the adult nasopharyngeal tract which could further influence susceptibility to infection. PMID:26472172

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae NanC

    PubMed Central

    Owen, C. David; Lukacik, Petra; Potter, Jane A.; Sleator, Olivia; Taylor, Garry L.; Walsh, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that causes a range of disease states. Sialidases are important bacterial virulence factors. There are three pneumococcal sialidases: NanA, NanB, and NanC. NanC is an unusual sialidase in that its primary reaction product is 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en, also known as DANA), a nonspecific hydrolytic sialidase inhibitor. The production of Neu5Ac2en from α2–3-linked sialosides by the catalytic domain is confirmed within a crystal structure. A covalent complex with 3-fluoro-β-N-acetylneuraminic acid is also presented, suggesting a common mechanism with other sialidases up to the final step of product formation. A conformation change in an active site hydrophobic loop on ligand binding constricts the entrance to the active site. In addition, the distance between the catalytic acid/base (Asp-315) and the ligand anomeric carbon is unusually short. These features facilitate a novel sialidase reaction in which the final step of product formation is direct abstraction of the C3 proton by the active site aspartic acid, forming Neu5Ac2en. NanC also possesses a carbohydrate-binding module, which is shown to bind α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialosides, as well as N-acetylneuraminic acid, which is captured in the crystal structure following hydration of Neu5Ac2en by NanC. Overall, the pneumococcal sialidases show remarkable mechanistic diversity while maintaining a common structural scaffold. PMID:26370075

  20. Group B Streptococcal Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and Potential Association with Pelvic Examination and PAP Smear.

    PubMed

    Daner, William E; Meeks, Brett D; Foster, William C; Boardman, Norman D

    2016-01-01

    Group B streptococcal (GBS) infection of a native joint in a nonpregnant adult is uncommon. While many women are colonized with this flora, it rarely becomes pathogenic in its adult host. GBS associated joint infections have been reported, most of which have been related to hematogenous seeding from unknown sources. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports of a GBS joint infection in association with a pelvic exam and Papanicolaou (PAP) smear. In this case report, we present a case of GBS sepsis of a native shoulder, possibly resulting from a routine pelvic exam and PAP smear. PMID:26981299

  1. Group B Streptococcal Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and Potential Association with Pelvic Examination and PAP Smear

    PubMed Central

    Daner, William E.; Meeks, Brett D.; Foster, William C.; Boardman, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Group B streptococcal (GBS) infection of a native joint in a nonpregnant adult is uncommon. While many women are colonized with this flora, it rarely becomes pathogenic in its adult host. GBS associated joint infections have been reported, most of which have been related to hematogenous seeding from unknown sources. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports of a GBS joint infection in association with a pelvic exam and Papanicolaou (PAP) smear. In this case report, we present a case of GBS sepsis of a native shoulder, possibly resulting from a routine pelvic exam and PAP smear. PMID:26981299

  2. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae caused different microbial structure and correlation network in lung microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heping; Dai, Wenkui; Qiu, Chuangzhao; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Wenjian; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Yuzheng; Yang, Zhenyu; Feng, Xin; Zhou, Qian; Han, Lijuan; Li, Yinhu

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most serious diseases for children, with which lung microbiota are proved to be associated. We performed 16S rDNA analysis on broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for 32 children with tracheomalacia (C group), pneumonia infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (D1 group) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) (D2 group). Children with tracheomalacia held lower microbial diversity and accumulated Lactococcus (mean ± SD, 45.21%±5.07%, P value <0.05), Porphyromonas (0.12%±0.31%, P value <0.05). D1 and D2 group were enriched by Streptococcus (7.57%±11.61%, P value <0.01 when compared with D2 group) and Mycoplasma (0.67%±1.25%, P value <0.01) respectively. Bacterial correlation in C group was mainly intermediated by Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. Whilst, D1 group harbored simplest microbial correlation in three groups, and D2 group held the most complicated network, involving enriched Staphylococcus (0.26%±0.71%), Massilia (0.81%±2.42%). This will be of significance for understanding pneumonia incidence and progression more comprehensively, and discerning between bacterial infection and carriage. PMID:27293852

  3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae caused different microbial structure and correlation network in lung microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heping; Dai, Wenkui; Qiu, Chuangzhao; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Wenjian; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Yuzheng; Yang, Zhenyu; Feng, Xin; Zhou, Qian; Han, Lijuan; Li, Yinhu; Zheng, Yuejie

    2016-06-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most serious diseases for children, with which lung microbiota are proved to be associated. We performed 16S rDNA analysis on broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for 32 children with tracheomalacia (C group), pneumonia infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (D1 group) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) (D2 group). Children with tracheomalacia held lower microbial diversity and accumulated Lactococcus (mean ± SD, 45.21%±5.07%, P value <0.05), Porphyromonas (0.12%±0.31%, P value <0.05). D1 and D2 group were enriched by Streptococcus (7.57%±11.61%, P value <0.01 when compared with D2 group) and Mycoplasma (0.67%±1.25%, P value <0.01) respectively. Bacterial correlation in C group was mainly intermediated by Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. Whilst, D1 group harbored simplest microbial correlation in three groups, and D2 group held the most complicated network, involving enriched Staphylococcus (0.26%±0.71%), Massilia (0.81%±2.42%). This will be of significance for understanding pneumonia incidence and progression more comprehensively, and discerning between bacterial infection and carriage. PMID:27293852

  4. Retrospective survey for sialidase activity in Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates from cases of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sialidase is a well-known virulence factor of other respiratory pathogens, but was only recently documented to occur in some species of Mycoplasma. The sialidase activity expressed can vary quantitatively among strains within a species of mycoplasma, from undetectable to amounts that correlate positively with strain virulence. Very few isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae had ever been examined for sialidase activity, so it was unknown whether sialidase may contribute to diseases involving this species. Findings No sialidase activity was detected by spectrofluorometric assay of 15 laboratory strains and 91 clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae banked over many years from patients having radiologically-confirmed, uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. Conclusions The annotated genome of strain M129 (GenBank NC_000912, ATCC 29342), also isolated from a patient with pneumonia, accurately represents the absence of sialidase genes from strains of M. pneumoniae typically associated with uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. A possible involvement of sialidase in neurologic or other extra-respiratory manifestations of M. pneumoniae mycoplasmosis remains to be investigated. PMID:21676241

  5. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chee-Kin

    2013-03-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon condition. This is a report of a 29-year-old woman diagnosed with endogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. The patient's endogenous lipoid pneumonia resolved completely after treatment for Legionella pneumophila infection. This suggests that early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of the underlying infection may prevent any long-term sequelae of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:23546039

  6. Pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department: focus on healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Capdevila, J A; Martínez Alarcón, J; Muñoz, P; López Álvarez, J; Bouza, E

    2012-08-01

    Patients with pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department (IMD) are often at risk of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The importance of HCAP is controversial. We invited physicians from 72 IMDs to report on all patients with pneumonia hospitalized in their department during 2 weeks (one each in January and June 2010) to compare HCAP with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). We analysed 1002 episodes of pneumonia: 58.9% were CAP, 30.6% were HCAP and 10.4% were HAP. A comparison between CAP, HCAP and HAP showed that HCAP patients were older (77, 83 and 80.5 years; p < 0.001), had poorer functional status (Barthel 100, 30 and 65; p < 0.001) and had more risk factors for aspiration pneumonia (18, 50 and 34%; p < 0.001). The frequency of testing to establish an aetiological diagnosis was lower among HCAP patients (87, 72 and 79; p < 0.001), as was adherence to the therapeutic recommendations of guidelines (70, 23 and 56%; p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality increased progressively between CAP, HCAP and HAP (8, 19 and 27%; p < 0.001). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the main pathogen in CAP and HCAP. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused 17 and 12.3% of HCAP. In patients with a confirmed aetiological diagnosis, the independent risk factors for pneumonia due do difficult-to-treat microorganisms (Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa or MRSA) were HCAP, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and higher Port Severity Index. Our data confirm the importance of maintaining high awareness of HCAP among patients treated in IMDs, because of the different aetiologies, therapy requirements and prognosis of this population. PMID:22284436

  7. [Lipoid pneumonia: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Rocha-Cabrera, P; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of lipoid pneumonia treated in our Health Centre. It is a disease that occurs rarely, but is important in Primary Care. This condition has been known since 1925, when it was first described by Laughlen, who described a case of lipoid pneumonia secondary to an injection of oil in the nasopharyngeal area. Today it is a rarity, and it is most frequently associated with the use of oil-based nasal drops (which are now decreasing in use). Its aetiology may be endogenous or exogenous. Although the pathological diagnosis is generally the most important, sometimes a lesion in the chest X-ray can lead us to suspect it due to the patient's history. This was a case of acute lipoid pneumonia in a young patient, who periodically performed as a "fire eater". PMID:23452539

  8. Lobar pneumonia treated by Musgrave Park physicians

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2009-01-01

    In the decade 1935-45 the treatment of lobar pneumonia in the developed and warring world underwent a series of evolutions—anti-sera, specific anti-sera, refinement of sulpha drugs, sulpha and anti-sera, the introduction of penicillin for bacteriology, then ophthalmology, and then for penicillin-sensitive bacterial infections such as lobar pneumonia with its many Cooper types of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Penicillin for civilian use was essentially banned in World War II, a ban that early in 1941 two Musgrave Park physicians tried to circumvent. Strict secrecy on the details of penicillin production was enforced. The treatment option chosen by the Musgrave Park physicians in 1941, and the non-availability of penicillin led to sequelae affecting the post-Belfast careers of both patient and physicians. PMID:19568449

  9. Imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Foong, Kap Sum; Lee, Ashley; Pekez, Marijeta; Bin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Drugs, toxins, and infections are known to cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Daptomycin and minocycline are the commonly reported antibiotics associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. In this study, we present a case of imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The patient presented with fever, acute hypoxic respiratory distress, and diffuse ground-glass opacities on the chest CT a day after the initiation of imipenem/cilastatin. Patient also developed peripheral eosinophilia. A reinstitution of imipenem/cilastatin resulted in recurrence of the signs and symptoms. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage showed 780 nucleated cells/mm(3) with 15% eosinophil. The patient's clinical condition improved significantly after the discontinuation of imipenem/cilastatin therapy and the treatment with corticosteroid. PMID:26944380

  10. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  11. Repetitive DNA sequences in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of different repetitive DNA sequences called RepMP1 and RepMP2 were identified in the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The number of these repeated elements, their nucleotide sequence and their localization on a physical map of the M. pneumoniae genome were determined. The results show that RepMP1 appears at least 10 times and RepMP2 at least 8 times in the genome. The repeated elements are dispersed on the chromosome and, in three cases, linked to each other by a homologous DNA sequence of 400 bp. The elements themselves are 300 bp (for RepMP1) and 150 bp (for RepMP2) long showing a high degree of homology. One copy of RepMP2 is a translated part of the gene for the major cytadhesin protein P1 which is responsible for the adsorption of M. pneumoniae to its host cell. Images PMID:3138660

  12. Complement resistance mechanisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Doorduijn, Dennis J; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Schaik, Willem; Bardoel, Bart W

    2016-10-01

    The current emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causes major problems in hospitals worldwide. To survive within the host, bacterial pathogens exploit several escape mechanisms to prevent detection and killing by the immune system. As a major player in immune defense, the complement system recognizes and destroys bacteria via different effector mechanisms. The complement system can label bacteria for phagocytosis or directly kill Gram-negative bacteria via insertion of a pore-forming complex in the bacterial membrane. The multi-drug resistant pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae exploits several mechanisms to resist complement. In this review, we present an overview of strategies used by K. pneumoniae to prevent recognition and killing by the complement system. Understanding these complement evasion strategies is crucial for the development of innovative strategies to combat K. pneumoniae. PMID:27364766

  13. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia: A rare form of nonbacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Prashant; Kumar, Kuldeep; Mittal, Sarita; Goyal, Nidhi; Trikha, Sahil; Vashisth, Arti

    2016-04-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a rare disease characterized by bilateral basilar infiltrates and histological findings of organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of "fibrin balls." Here, we report a 43-year-old female with complaints of fever, dry cough, and shortness of breath with hypoxemia. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed diffuse confluent consolidation in bilateral lung zones. Bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy revealed features of AFOP. With prednisolone treatment, there was an improvement in her condition. AFOP is a rare disease and should be taken into consideration and differential diagnosis of severe acute pneumonias with no significant comorbidities. PMID:27303141

  14. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia: A rare form of nonbacterial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Prashant; Kumar, Kuldeep; Mittal, Sarita; Goyal, Nidhi; Trikha, Sahil; Vashisth, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a rare disease characterized by bilateral basilar infiltrates and histological findings of organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of “fibrin balls.” Here, we report a 43-year-old female with complaints of fever, dry cough, and shortness of breath with hypoxemia. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed diffuse confluent consolidation in bilateral lung zones. Bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy revealed features of AFOP. With prednisolone treatment, there was an improvement in her condition. AFOP is a rare disease and should be taken into consideration and differential diagnosis of severe acute pneumonias with no significant comorbidities. PMID:27303141

  15. Pneumonia identification using statistical feature selection

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fei; Vanderwende, Lucy; Wurfel, Mark M; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2012-01-01

    Objective This paper describes a natural language processing system for the task of pneumonia identification. Based on the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with a patient, the task is to identify whether or not the patient is positive for pneumonia. Design A binary classifier was employed to identify pneumonia from a dataset of multiple types of clinical notes created for 426 patients during their stay in the intensive care unit. For this purpose, three types of features were considered: (1) word n-grams, (2) Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, and (3) assertion values associated with pneumonia expressions. System performance was greatly increased by a feature selection approach which uses statistical significance testing to rank features based on their association with the two categories of pneumonia identification. Results Besides testing our system on the entire cohort of 426 patients (unrestricted dataset), we also used a smaller subset of 236 patients (restricted dataset). The performance of the system was compared with the results of a baseline previously proposed for these two datasets. The best results achieved by the system (85.71 and 81.67 F1-measure) are significantly better than the baseline results (50.70 and 49.10 F1-measure) on the restricted and unrestricted datasets, respectively. Conclusion Using a statistical feature selection approach that allows the feature extractor to consider only the most informative features from the feature space significantly improves the performance over a baseline that uses all the features from the same feature space. Extracting the assertion value for pneumonia expressions further improves the system performance. PMID:22539080

  16. Membrane topology and DNA-binding ability of the Streptococcal CpsA protein.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Brett R; Lowe, Beth A; Neely, Melody N

    2011-01-01

    Many streptococcal pathogens require a polysaccharide capsule for survival in the host during systemic infection. The highly conserved CpsA protein is proposed to be a transcriptional regulator of capsule production in streptococci, although the regulatory mechanism is unknown. Hydropathy plots of CpsA predict an integral membrane protein with 3 transmembrane domains and only 27 cytoplasmic residues, whereas other members of the LytR_cpsA_psr protein family are predicted to have a single transmembrane domain. This unique topology, with the short cytoplasmic domain, membrane localization, and large extracellular domain, suggests a novel mechanism of transcriptional regulation. Therefore, to determine the actual membrane topology of CpsA, specific protein domains were fused to beta-galactosidase or alkaline phosphatase. Enzymatic assays confirmed that the predicted membrane topology for CpsA is correct. To investigate how this integral membrane protein may be functioning in regulation of capsule transcription, purified full-length and truncated forms of CpsA were used in electrophoretic mobility shift assays to characterize the ability to bind the capsule operon promoter. Assays revealed that full-length, purified CpsA protein binds specifically to DNA containing the capsule promoter region. Furthermore, the large extracellular domain is not required for DNA binding, but all cytoplasmic regions of CpsA are necessary and sufficient for specific binding to the capsule operon promoter. This is the first demonstration of a member of this protein family interacting with its target DNA. Taken together, CpsA, as well as other members of the LytR_cpsA_psr protein family, appears to utilize a unique mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:21097630

  17. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289. PMID:26029848

  18. Metal-mediated modulation of streptococcal cysteine protease activity and its biological implications.

    PubMed

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Landero Figueroa, Julio A; Caruso, Joseph A; Kotb, Malak

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB), the major secreted protease produced by group A streptococcus (GAS), cleaves both host and bacterial proteins and contributes importantly to the pathogenesis of invasive GAS infections. Modulation of SpeB expression and/or its activity during invasive GAS infections has been shown to affect bacterial virulence and infection severity. Expression of SpeB is regulated by the GAS CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system, and we demonstrated that bacteria with mutations in the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system are selected for during localized GAS infections and that these bacteria lack SpeB expression and exhibit a hypervirulent phenotype. Additionally, in a separate study, we showed that expression of SpeB can also be modulated by human transferrin- and/or lactoferrin-mediated iron chelation. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to investigate the possible roles of iron and other metals in modulating SpeB expression and/or activity in a manner that would potentiate bacterial virulence. Here, we report that the divalent metals zinc and copper inhibit SpeB activity at the posttranslational level. Utilizing online metal-binding site prediction servers, we identified two putative metal-binding sites in SpeB, one of which involves the catalytic-dyad residues (47)Cys and (195)His. Based on our findings, we propose that zinc and/or copper availability in the bacterial microenvironment can modulate the proteolytic activity of SpeB in a manner that preserves the integrity of several other virulence factors essential for bacterial survival and dissemination within the host and thereby may exacerbate the severity of invasive GAS infections. PMID:24799625

  19. Metal-Mediated Modulation of Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Activity and Its Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB), the major secreted protease produced by group A streptococcus (GAS), cleaves both host and bacterial proteins and contributes importantly to the pathogenesis of invasive GAS infections. Modulation of SpeB expression and/or its activity during invasive GAS infections has been shown to affect bacterial virulence and infection severity. Expression of SpeB is regulated by the GAS CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system, and we demonstrated that bacteria with mutations in the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system are selected for during localized GAS infections and that these bacteria lack SpeB expression and exhibit a hypervirulent phenotype. Additionally, in a separate study, we showed that expression of SpeB can also be modulated by human transferrin- and/or lactoferrin-mediated iron chelation. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to investigate the possible roles of iron and other metals in modulating SpeB expression and/or activity in a manner that would potentiate bacterial virulence. Here, we report that the divalent metals zinc and copper inhibit SpeB activity at the posttranslational level. Utilizing online metal-binding site prediction servers, we identified two putative metal-binding sites in SpeB, one of which involves the catalytic-dyad residues 47Cys and 195His. Based on our findings, we propose that zinc and/or copper availability in the bacterial microenvironment can modulate the proteolytic activity of SpeB in a manner that preserves the integrity of several other virulence factors essential for bacterial survival and dissemination within the host and thereby may exacerbate the severity of invasive GAS infections. PMID:24799625

  20. Functional Analysis of the Quorum-Sensing Streptococcal Invasion Locus (sil)

    PubMed Central

    Belotserkovsky, Ilia; Baruch, Moshe; Peer, Asaf; Dov, Eran; Ravins, Miriam; Mishalian, Inbal; Persky, Merav; Smith, Yoav; Hanski, Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide variety of human diseases, and at the same time, GAS can also circulate without producing symptoms, similar to its close commensal relative, group G streptococcus (GGS). We previously identified, by transposon-tagged mutagenesis, the streptococcal invasion locus (sil). sil is a quorum-sensing regulated locus which is activated by the autoinducer peptide SilCR through the two-component system SilA-SilB. Here we characterize the DNA promoter region necessary for SilA-mediated activation. This site is composed of two direct repeats of 10 bp, separated by a spacer of 11 bp. Fusion of this site to gfp allowed us to systematically introduce single-base substitutions in the repeats region and to assess the relative contribution of various positions to promoter strength. We then developed an algorithm giving different weights to these positions, and performed a chromosome-wide bioinformatics search which was validated by transcriptome analysis. We identified 13 genes, mostly bacteriocin related, that are directly under the control of SilA. Having developed the ability to quantify SilCR signaling via GFP accumulation prompted us to search for GAS and GGS strains that sense and produce SilCR. While the majority of GAS strains lost sil, all GGS strains examined still possess the locus and ∼63% are able to respond to exogenously added SilCR. By triggering the autoinduction circle using a minute concentration of synthetic SilCR, we identified GAS and GGS strains that are capable of sensing and naturally producing SilCR, and showed that SilCR can be sensed across these streptococci species. These findings suggest that sil may be involved in colonization and establishment of commensal host-bacterial relationships. PMID:19893632

  1. Behavioral and neural effects of intra-striatal infusion of anti-streptococcal antibodies in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Dafna; Benhar, Itai; Alvarez, Kathy; Mascaro-Blanco, Adita; Brimberg, Lior; Frenkel, Dan; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Joel, Daphna

    2014-01-01

    Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) infection is associated with a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The leading hypothesis regarding this association proposes that a GAS infection induces the production of auto-antibodies, which cross-react with neuronal determinants in the brain through the process of molecular mimicry. We have recently shown that exposure of rats to GAS antigen leads to the production of anti-neuronal antibodies concomitant with the development of behavioral alterations. The present study tested the causal role of the antibodies by assessing the behavior of naïve rats following passive transfer of purified antibodies from GAS-exposed rats. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) purified from the sera of GAS-exposed rats was infused directly into the striatum of naïve rats over a 21-day period. Their behavior in the induced-grooming, marble burying, food manipulation and beam walking assays was compared to that of naïve rats infused with IgG purified from adjuvant-exposed rats as well as of naïve rats. The pattern of in vivo antibody deposition in rat brain was evaluated using immunofluorescence and colocalization. Infusion of IgG from GAS-exposed rats to naïve rats led to behavioral and motor alterations partially mimicking those seen in GAS-exposed rats. IgG from GAS-exposed rats reacted with D1 and D2 dopamine receptors and 5HT-2A and 5HT-2C serotonin receptors in vitro. In vivo, IgG deposits in the striatum of infused rats colocalized with specific brain proteins such as dopamine receptors, the serotonin transporter and other neuronal proteins. Our results demonstrate the potential pathogenic role of autoantibodies produced following exposure to GAS in the induction of behavioral and motor alterations, and support a causal role for autoantibodies in GAS-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24561489

  2. Epidemiology, outcome and emm types of invasive group A streptococcal infections in Finland.

    PubMed

    Siljander, T; Lyytikäinen, O; Vähäkuopus, S; Snellman, M; Jalava, J; Vuopio, J

    2010-10-01

    In 2006, Finnish nationwide surveillance showed an increase of invasive group A streptococcal (iGAS) disease and clinicians were alarmed by severe disease manifestations, prompting the investigation of recent trends and outcome for iGAS. A case of iGAS was defined as Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Cases during 1998-2007 and isolates during 2004-2007 were included. Case-patients' 7-day outcome was available for 2004-2007. Isolates were emm typed. A total of 1,318 cases of iGAS were identified. The average annual incidence was 2.5/100,000 population. The rate was higher in males than females in persons aged 45-64 years, but lower in persons aged 25-34 years. The annual incidence was highest in 2007 (3.9/100,000). Occasional peaks occurred during midwinter and midsummer. The most common emm types were 28 (21%), 1 (16%), 84 (10%), 75 (7%) and 89 (6%). During 2004-2007, emm1 replaced emm28 as the most predominant type. The overall case fatality was 8%. Cases with emm1 were associated with high case fatality (14% vs. 8% in other types; p < 0.02); that of emm28 infections was 2% (p < 0.01). Changes in emm type prevalence influenced incidence and case fatality. Differences in age- and sex-specific incidence and seasonal patterns suggest variations in predisposing factors and underlying conditions. PMID:20563620

  3. Degradation of Complement 3 by Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B Inhibits Complement Activation and Neutrophil Opsonophagocytosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Tsao, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B), a cysteine protease, is an important virulence factor in group A streptococcus (GAS) infection. The inhibition of phagocytic activity by SPE B may help prevent bacteria from being ingested. In this study, we examined the mechanism SPE B uses to enable bacteria to resist opsonophagocytosis. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that SPE B-treated serum impaired the activation of the classical, the lectin, and the alternative complement pathways. In contrast, C192S, a SPE B mutant lacking protease activity, had no effect on complement activation. Further study showed that cleavage of serum C3 by SPE B, but not C192S, blocked zymosan-induced production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils as a result of decreased deposition of C3 fragments on the zymosan surface. Reconstitution of C3 into SPE B-treated serum unblocked zymosan-mediated neutrophil activation dose dependently. SPE B-treated, but not C192S-treated, serum also impaired opsonization of C3 fragments on the surface of GAS strain A20. Moreover, the amount of C3 fragments on the A20 cell surface, a SPE B-producing strain, was less than that on its isogenic mutant strain, SW507, after opsonization with normal serum. A20 opsonized with SPE B-treated serum was more resistant to neutrophil killing than A20 opsonized with normal serum, and SPE B-mediated resistance was C3 dependent. These results suggest a novel SPE B mechanism, one which degrades serum C3 and enables GAS to resist complement damage and opsonophagocytosis. PMID:18174338

  4. Association between use of rapid antigen detection tests and adherence to antibiotics in suspected streptococcal pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Carl; Hernández, Silvia; Sierra, Nuria; Moragas, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Bayona, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few studies have analysed adherence to antibiotic treatment in pharyngitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) and treatment adherence among patients 18 years of age or over with pharyngitis treated with different antibiotic regimens. Design Prospective study from 2003 to 2008. Setting Office-based physician practices. Intervention The adherence of patients prior to the use of RADTs – no test was available until mid-2006 – was compared with the adherence associated with the use of RADTs. Subjects Patients with suspected streptococcal pharyngitis. Main outcome measures Patient adherence was assessed by electronic monitoring. The adherence outcomes considered were antibiotic-taking adherence, correct dosing, and good timing adherence during at least 80% of the antibiotic course. Results A total of 196 patients were recruited. The percentage of container openings was 77.9%±17.7%, being significantly higher for patients in whom the RADTs were performed compared with those in whom this test was not undertaken (80.1% vs. 70.8% for thrice-daily antibiotic regimens and 88.1% vs. 76.5% for twice-daily regimens; p < 0.01). The other variables of adherence were also better among patients undergoing RADT in both those who took at least 80% of the pills (71.3% vs. 42.2%; p < 0.001) as well as those with good timing adherence (52.5% vs. 32.8%; p < 0.01). Furthermore, correct dosing was always greater when the patient had undergone an RADT. Conclusion Adherence to antibiotic treatment is higher when an RADT is carried out at the consultation prior to administration of antibiotic treatment. PMID:20201628

  5. SepM, a Streptococcal Protease Involved in Quorum Sensing, Displays Strict Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saswati; Cao, Luyang; Kim, Albert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus mutans, a causative agent of dental caries, relies on multiple quorum-sensing (QS) pathways that coordinate the expression of factors needed for colonization in the oral cavity. S. mutans uses small peptides as QS signaling molecules that typically are secreted into the outside milieu. Competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) is one such QS signaling molecule that functions through the ComDE two-component signal transduction pathway. CSP is secreted through NlmTE, a dedicated ABC transporter that cleaves off the N-terminal leader peptide to generate a mature peptide that is 21 residues long (CSP-21). We recently identified a surface-localized protease, SepM, which further cleaves the CSP-21 peptide at the C-terminal end and removes the last 3 residues to generate CSP-18. CSP-18 is the active QS molecule that interacts with the ComD sensor kinase to activate the QS pathway. In this study, we show that SepM specifically cleaves CSP-21 between the Ala18 and Leu19 residues. We also show that SepM recognizes only Ala at position 18 and Leu at position 19, although some CSP-18 variants with a substitution at position 18 can function equally as well as the QS peptide. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SepM homologs from other streptococci are capable of processing CSP-21 to generate functional CSP-18. IMPORTANCE SepM is a membrane-associated streptococcal protease that processes competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to generate an active quorum-sensing molecule in S. mutans. SepM belongs to the S16 family of serine proteases, and in this study, we found that SepM behaves as an endopeptidase. SepM displays strict substrate specificity and cleaves the peptide bond between the Ala and Leu residues. This is the first report of an endopeptidase that specifically cleaves these two residues. PMID:26553848

  6. Approach to a child with recurrent pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Taha Ibrahim; Elnazir, Basil

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia, or inflammation of the lungs parenchyma associated with consolidation of alveolar spaces, is a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood particularly among children below 5 years of age. It is one of the common causes of admission to the paediatric ward. The aim of this article is to provide a guide to a systemic approach for diagnosis and treatment of children with recurrent pneumonia while not over investigating those with common but usually unrecognised conditions such as asthma or recurrent simple viral infections. PMID:27493439

  7. latrogenic lipoid pneumonia in an adult horse.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Lucy; Cummins, Carolyn; Maischberger, Eva; Katz, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A 20-year-old gelding presented with a history of acute respiratory distress which began immediately after administration of a mineral oil and water mix, via nasogastric intubation, for treatment of suspected gastrointestinal dysfunction. An initial presumptive diagnosis of acute lipoid pneumonia was made; this was further supported by evidence of arterial hypoxaemia and oxygen desaturation on arterial blood gas analysis, ultrasonographic signs of bilateral ventral lung consolidation and a mixed bronchoalveolar-interstitial lung pattern seen on thoracic radiographs. Despite intensive supportive therapy the horse's condition continued to deteriorate and the decision was made for humane euthanasia. Gross necropsy findings supported the clinical diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:21851746

  8. Idiopathic lipoid pneumonia successfully treated with prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Lococo, Filippo; Cesario, Alfredo; Porziella, Venanzio; Mulè, Antonino; Petrone, Gianluigi; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, Pierluigi

    2012-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia (LP) is a rare type of pneumonia that is radiologically characterized by lung infiltrates, although imaging alone may not be diagnostic. We describe an unusual 61-year-old patient with idiopathic LP presenting as a solitary pulmonary nodule mimicking lung cancer because of its rapid growth. After treatment with oral prednisone, a control chest radiogram indicated complete normalization of the radiologic features. This case shows that LP should be considered in the diagnostic assessment of any undefined pulmonary mass, after malignancy has been pathologically excluded. PMID:21419490

  9. [Treatment of pneumonia in childhood (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weippl, G

    1976-01-01

    It is necessary to start with antibiotic treatment in infections of the lower respiratory system, especially pneumonias. The finding of the infectious agent is difficult and without security. With simple investigations, as sedimentation rate, white blood cell count and cell differentiation there is a possibility of 80% to get a diagnosis of bacterial infection. In 25 patients aged 1 1/2 to 9 years with x-ray diagnosis of pneumonia the results of treatment with cephacetril (100 mg/kg/d) are given. Clinical symptoms disappeared after 5 days, the average time of illness was 12 days. One patient got a severe pleural effusion. PMID:934680

  10. [Severe stomatitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection].

    PubMed

    Barfod, T S; Pedersen, C

    1999-11-15

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is sometimes followed by systemic reactions such as erythema multiforme major/Stevens-Johnsons syndrome. In the described case, a 30 year-old man developed severe inflammation of the oral mucous membranes following respiratory infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae. There was also conjunctivitis and diarrhoea, and a target-like eruption was seen on the penis, but apart from slight perioral erythema and periorbital swelling, no further skin involvement was seen. The patient was treated with macrolide antibiotics for 14 days and gradually recovered. PMID:10611837

  11. Carcinoma of the lung complicating lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Felson, B.; Ralaisomay, G.

    1983-11-01

    The authors have encountered four cases of oil aspiration pneumonia complicated by carcinoma. Each had a clear-cut history of chronic intake of an oily substance, radiographic changes, and histologically documented oil aspiration pneumonia. Lung cancer later appeared in the involved area. A small number of similar cases also have been reported. The implication is that oil aspiration pneumonitis may induce bronchogenic carcinoma, particularly either the alveolar cell or the squamous cell variety. The radiographic diagnosis of the malignant transformation is difficult, and consequently the prognosis is poor.

  12. Effects of Microgravity on Streptoccoccus Pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These gels were obtained by two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, in which proteins move different substances through a polyacrylamide gel matrix based on their molecular weight and total charge in an electric field. The gels illustrate principal investigator David Niesel's findings that exposure to modeled microgravity results in some Streptoccoccus Pneumonia's proteins being upregulated and others being downregulated. In 2D protein profiles of whole cell lysates of Streptoccoccus Pneumonia, 6,304 cultured under normal gravity (left), appear to be expressed at higher levels indicated with black circles. Red circles (right) indicate proteins that were grown under modeled microgravity in a high aspect ratio vessel HARV).

  13. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping

  14. The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Andrea L.; Huber, Victor C.; Chaussee, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses. PMID:27047460

  15. Complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ben; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Young Jin; Son, Byong Kwan; Lim, Myung Kwan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 5-year-old girl who developed left hemiparesis and left facial palsy, 6 days after the initiation of fever and respiratory symptoms due to pneumonia. Chest radiography, conducted upon admission, showed pneumonic infiltration and pleural effusion in the left lung field. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Brain magnetic resonance angiography and transfemoral cerebral angiography revealed complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was identified by a 4-fold increase in IgG antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were elevated, while laboratory exams in order to identify other predisposing factors of pediatric stroke were all negative. This is the first reported pediatric case in English literature of a M. pneumoniae-associated cerebral infarction involving complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. PMID:27186223

  16. A protein fragment of streptococcal cell surface antigen I/II which prevents adhesion of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, G H; Evans, P; Todryk, S; Buckett, P; Kelly, C G; Lehner, T

    1993-01-01

    Attachment of Streptococcus mutans to the tooth surface involves a cell surface protein with an M(r) of 185,000, termed streptococcal antigen (SA) I/II. Four overlapping fragments of the gene encoding SA I/II were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant polypeptides were assayed for adhesion-binding activity to salivary receptors and for recognition by a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against SA I/II. Two of the MAbs which are known to prevent colonization of S. mutans in vivo bound the recombinant polypeptide comprising residues 816 to 1161. In vitro adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads was also inhibited specifically by a polypeptide (residues 816 to 1213) encompassing the same region. The evidence from the MAbs preventing colonization of S. mutans and the adherence inhibition assay suggests that an adhesion-binding activity resides within the portion of SA I/II comprising residues 816 to 1213, which is highly conserved among oral streptococcal species. Images PMID:7691754

  17. Ras regulates alveolar macrophage formation of CXC chemokines and neutrophil activation in streptococcal M1 protein-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songen; Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Herwald, Heiko; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-06-15

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is associated with a high mortality rate. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most frequently associated with STSS. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signaling in M1 protein-induced lung injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received the Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Administration of FTS reduced M1 protein-induced neutrophil recruitment, edema formation and tissue damage in the lung. M1 protein challenge increased Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras activity decreased M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils and secretion of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, FTS abolished M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Ras inhibition decreased chemokine-mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that Ras signaling is a potent regulator of CXC chemokine formation and neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Thus, inhibition of Ras activity might be a useful way to antagonize streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung injury. PMID:24704370

  18. Association of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with clinical components of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, D F; Schwartz, B; Black, C M; Todd, J K; Elliott, J; Breiman, R F; Facklam, R R

    1993-01-01

    Sixty-two invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strains, including 32 strains isolated from patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), were analyzed for the following phenotypic and genotypic characteristics: M-protein type, serum opacity factor production, protease production, the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) genes A, B, and C, and in vitro production of SpeA and SpeB. These characteristics were analyzed for possible associations with each other as well as with clinical components of STSS. M-type 1, the most commonly isolated M-type, was significantly associated with protease production. Protease activity was significantly associated with the clinical sign of soft tissue necrosis. M-type 1 and 3 strains from STSS patients were significantly associated with the clinical signs of shock and organ involvement as well as with SpeA production in vitro. Finally, the production of SpeA was significantly associated with the clinical component of shock and organ involvement as well as with rash. These data suggest that STSS does not make up a single syndrome but, rather, that the multiple STSS clinical criteria probably reflect different phenotypic characteristics of individual S. pyogenes isolates. PMID:8335368

  19. A comparative study of the diagnostic methods for Group A streptococcal sore throat in two reference hospitals in Yaounde, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Bomki, Cynthia Mbimenyuy; Djomou, François; Toukam, Michel; Ndze, Valantine Ngum; Lyonga, Emilia Enjema; Mbakop, Calixte Didier; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sore throat is a common complaint in general practice which is more frequent in children. The most frequent pathogenic bacteria associated with this infection is Streptococcus pyogenes. Rapid Antigen Diagnostic Test (RADT) facilitates the rapid identification and consequently prompt treatment of patients, prevents complications, and also reduces the risk of spread of Group A Streptococcus (GAS). The main objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of a rapid streptococcal antigen detection test in patients with sore throat. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out from January to April 2011 on patients aged 3 to 72 years consulting for pharyngitis or sore throat at the paediatric and Ear, Nose and Throat units of the University Teaching Hospital Yaounde and the Central Hospital Yaounde. Two throat swabs were collected per patient. One was used for the rapid test and the other for standard bacteriological analysis. Results The prevalence of GAS in the study population was 22.5%. Out of the 71 samples collected, the RADT detected group A streptococcal antigens in 12 of 16 positive cultures giving a sensitivity of 75%. The specificity of the rapid test was 96%, with positive predictive value of 85.7%, and negative predictive value of 93% respectively. Conclusion Rapid test may have an additional value in the management of patients with high risk of having GAS infection. However, tests with a higher sensitivity are needed for accurate and reliable results for early diagnosis of patients with sore throat caused by GAS.

  20. Characterization of Five Zoonotic Streptococcus suis Strains from Germany, Including One Isolate from a Recent Fatal Case of Streptococcal Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome in a Hunter.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Hudemann, Christoph; Hossain, Hamid M; Hewer, Angela; Tello, Khodr; Bandorski, Dirk; Rohde, Manfred; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph Georg

    2015-12-01

    A Streptococcus suis isolate from a German hunter with streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (STSLS) and four additional zoonotic isolates were genotyped as mrp(+) epf* (variant 1890) sly(+) cps2(+). All five zoonotic German strains were characterized by high multiplication in human blood samples ex vivo, but induction of only low levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared to a Chinese STSLS strain. PMID:26424844

  1. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: an update for outpatients management].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Noémie; Gehri, Mario; Gervaix, Alain; Guinan, Stéphane; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2016-02-17

    Pneumonia should be considered in febrile children with tachypnea and/or chest recession. Virus are the most common cause of pneumonia in children under 5 years old. Streptococcus pneumonia can be found at any age. Mycoplasma pneumonia is more frequent in older children. Systematic chest radiograph is not necessary but must be obtained in patients with hypoventilation and in those with failed initial antibiotic therapy. Mycoplasma pneumonia should be tested according to patient age and response to initial antibiotic. First line antibiotherapy is amoxicilline. Antibiotic treatment is frequently not necessary in children under 5 but should be considered depending on clinical presentation and C reactive protein value. PMID:27039458

  2. Risk and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in a city hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J.

    1993-01-01

    Because aspiration pneumonia contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, this study was undertaken to identify risk factors for morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia in 1985 and 1990 were studied. Factors associated with death from aspiration pneumonia were: altered mental status, cerebrovascular accident, endotracheal intubation, tachycardia, and hypoxemia. Fever, cough, and unilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph were associated with survival. Attention to proper positioning of comatose patients, aggressive treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, and strict attention to endotracheal tubes and tracheostomies should decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. PMID:8350375

  3. H1N1 influenza pneumonia and bacterial coinfection.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Robles, Alejandro; Sangil, Anna; Benet, Susana; Viladot, Maria Eugenia; Pascual, Vanesa; Barreiro, Bienvenido

    2011-12-01

    The model described by Bewick et al seems to be able to distinguish between H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia and non-H1N1 community acquired pneumonia (CAP) based on five criteria. However, bacterial infection in the influenza group has not been accurately excluded. Therefore, this model could misidentify these patients and lead to an inappropriate treatment. We conducted a prospective observational study to compare mixed pneumonia vs viral pneumonia. In the mixed pneumonia group patients were older, had higher levels of procalcitonine and higher scores of severity. In our cohort the model proposed by Bewick et al would not identify patients with coinfection. PMID:21994246

  4. Genetic Analysis of Sporadic and Familial Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in understanding the biology and clinical course of interstitial pneumonia, the etiology of this disease remains elusive. Epidemiologic studies have consistently identified cigarette smoke as an important exposure; however, most smokers do not develop interstitial pneumonia and many individuals with interstitial pneumonia do not smoke cigarettes. Moreover, interstitial pneumonias have been reported to cluster in families. Thus, a more thorough understanding of the genetic etiology of interstitial pneumonia may prove critically important in defining the biology and clinical course of this complex human disease. PMID:18403331

  5. Molecular Epidemiological Characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated with Bacteremia among Patients with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ryota; Shindo, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ando, Masahiko; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kimura, Kouji; Yagi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Some important virulence factors have been elucidated in Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. We investigated the relationship between virulence factors and multilocus sequence types (STs) and assessed the risk factors for bacteremia in patients with pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae. From April 2004 through April 2012, a total of 120 K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with pneumonia (23 with bacteremia and 97 without bacteremia) were collected from 10 medical institutions in Japan. Additionally, 10 strains of K. pneumoniae serotype K2 that were isolated >30 years ago were included in this study. These isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the characteristics of their virulence factors, such as hypermucoviscosity phenotype and RmpA and aerobactin production between patients with and without bacteremia, were examined. MLST analysis was performed on the 120 isolates from patients with pneumonia, and some sequence type groups were defined as genetic lineages (GLs). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia (21.7%) than in those without bacteremia (7.2%). The majority of the strains with serotype K2 were classified into GL14 or GL65, and rmpA and the gene for aerobactin were present in all GL65-K2 strains but absent in all GL14-K2 strains. In a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for bacteremia included GL65 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81 to 49.31), as well as neoplastic disease (AOR, 9.94; 95% CI, 2.61 to 37.92), immunosuppression (AOR, 17.85; 95% CI, 1.49 to 214.17), and hypoalbuminemia (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.29 to 17.61). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia and was associated with the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae. PMID:25568434

  6. Role of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae/Interleukin-8/Neutrophil Axis in the Pathogenesis of Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Yuqing; Zhu, Canhong; Hao, Chuangli; Fan, Mingyue; Ji, Wei; Yan, Yongdong

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil infiltration is the characteristic pathological feature of M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP). This study aimed to explore the associations among neutrophil activity, clinical presentation, and role of the M. pneumoniae/interleukin-8 (IL-8)/neutrophil axis in the pathogenesis of MPP. A total of 42 patients with MPP were prospectively enrolled in the study. Neutrophil activity, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and neutrophil elastase (NE), were measured. Clinical information was collected for all patients and control group. In vitro, IL-8 production was measured at different time points after M. pneumoniae infection of bronchial epithelial cells, and neutrophil activity was analyzed after IL-8 stimulation. The percentage of neutrophil in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was higher in the group of patients with high levels of M. pneumoniae DNA than in those with low levels of M. pneumoniae DNA (P < 0.05). IL-8, MMP-9, and NE in patients with MPP significantly increased compared with controls and decreased after treatment (P < 0.05). MPO and MMP-9 were associated with duration of fever (r = 0.332, P < 0.05) and length of stay (r = 0.342, P < 0.05), respectively. In vitro, M. pneumoniae induced IL-8 production by bronchial epithelial cells in a time dependent manner. MPO, MMP-9 and NE production by neutrophils significantly increased compared with medium controls after IL-8 stimulation. In summary, the M. pneumoniae/IL-8/neutrophil axis likely plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of MPP. PMID:26752656

  7. Factors Associated with Streptococcal Bacteremia in Diarrheal Children under Five Years of Age and Their Outcome in an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem Bin; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Shahunja, K. M.; Kabir, Senjuti; Chowdhury, Fahmida; Faruque, Abu Syeed Golam; Das, Sumon Kumar; Sarker, Mohammad Habibur Rahman; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Streptococcal bacteremia is common in diarrheal children with high morbidity and mortality, no systematic data are available on Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children. We sought to evaluate the factors associated with Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age and their outcome. Methods We used an unmatched case-control design to investigate the associated factors with Streptococcal bacteremia in all the diarrheal children under five years of age through electronic medical record system of Dhaka hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. We had simultaneously used a retrospective cohort design to further evaluate the outcome of our study children. All the enrolled children had their blood culture done between January 2010 and December 2012. Comparison was made among the children with (cases = 26) and without Streptococcal bacteremia (controls = 78). Controls were selected randomly from hospitalized diarrheal children under five years of age. Results Cases had proportionately higher deaths compared to controls, but it was statistically insignificant (15% vs. 10%, p = 0.49). The cases more often presented with severe dehydration, fever, respiratory distress, severe sepsis, and abnormal mental status compared to the controls (for all p<0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, it has been found that Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age was independently associated with nutritional edema (OR: 5.86, 95% CI = 1.28–26.80), hypoxemia (OR: 19.39, 95% CI = 2.14–175.91), fever (OR: 4.44, 95% CI = 1.13–17.42), delayed capillary refill time (OR: 7.00, 95% CI = 1.36–35.93), and respiratory distress (OR: 2.69, 95% CI = 1.02–7.12). Conclusions and Significance The results of our analyses suggest that diarrheal children under five years of age presenting with nutritional edema, hypoxemia, fever, delayed

  8. [Thousand faces of Streptococcus pneumonia (pneumococcus) infections].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Bálint Gergely; Lénárt, Katalin Szidónia; Kádár, Béla; Gombos, Andrea; Dezsényi, Balázs; Szanka, Judit; Bobek, Ilona; Prinz, Gyula

    2015-11-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are high worldwide and in Hungary among paediatric as well as adult populations. Pneumococci account for 35-40% of community acquired adult pneumonias requiring hospitalization, while 25-30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonias are accompanied by bacteraemia. 5-7% of all infections are fatal but this rate is exponentially higher in high risk patients and elderly people. Mortality could reach 20% among patients with severe invasive pneumococcal infections. Complications may develop despite administration of adequate antibiotics. The authors summarize the epidemiology of pneumococcal infections, pathogenesis of non-invasive and invasive disease and present basic clinical aspects through demonstration of four cases. Early risk stratification, sampling of hemocultures, administration of antibiotics and wider application of active immunization could reduce the mortality of invasive disease. Anti-pneumococcal vaccination is advisable for adults of ≥50 years and high risk patients of ≥18 years who are susceptible to pneumococcal disease. PMID:26498896

  9. Q fever pneumonia in children in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    To, H; Kako, N; Zhang, G Q; Otsuka, H; Ogawa, M; Ochiai, O; Nguyen, S V; Yamaguchi, T; Fukushi, H; Nagaoka, N; Akiyama, M; Amano, K; Hirai, K

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of Q fever pneumonia among children with atypical pneumonia from whom only an acute-phase serum sample was available was traced by using an indirect immunofluorescence (IF) test, nested PCR, and isolation. Twenty (34.5%) of 58 sera were found to have both polyvalent and immunoglobulin M antibodies to the phase II antigen of Coxiella burnetii by the IF test. Q fever pneumonia was present in 23 (39.7%) of 58 patients as determined by both the nested PCR and isolation and in 20 patients as determined by the IF test. The sensitivities for nested PCR and isolation were 100%, and that for the IF test was 87%. Our results indicate that nested PCR was faster and more sensitive than isolation and the IF test in the diagnosis of acute Q fever when a single acute-phase serum was available. These findings suggest that C. burnetii is an important cause of atypical pneumonia in children in Japan. PMID:8904431

  10. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    PubMed

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26993450

  11. Pneumatoceles and pneumothorax after Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sauleda, J; Aran, X; Gea, J; Aguar, M C; Sanz, M; Broquetas, J M

    1993-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is common in patients with AIDS. The usual chest X-ray pattern is a diffuse interstitial pulmonary infiltrate. Nevertheless, unusual roentgenographic forms can appear. A patient with PCP that resulted in pneumatoceles and a further pneumothorax is described. PMID:8284529

  12. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia. Clinical and radiological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Claudia Mauro; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2011-05-01

    Lipoid pneumonia results from the pulmonary accumulation of endogenous or exogenous lipids. Host tissue reactions to the inhaled substances differ according to their chemical characteristics. Symptoms can vary significantly among individuals, ranging from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening disease. Acute, sometimes fatal, cases can occur, but the disease is usually indolent. Possible complications include superinfection by nontuberculous mycobacteria, pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory insufficiency, cor pulmonale, and hypercalcemia. The radiological findings are nonspecific, and the disease presents with variable patterns and distribution. For this reason, lipoid pneumonia may mimic many other diseases. The diagnosis of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is based on a history of exposure to oil, characteristic radiological findings, and the presence of lipid-laden macrophages on sputum or BAL analysis. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the best imaging modality for the diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. The most characteristic CT finding in LP is the presence of negative attenuation values within areas of consolidation. There are currently no studies in the literature that define the best therapeutic option. However, there is a consensus that the key measure is identifying and discontinuing exposure to the offending agent. Treatment in patients without clinical symptoms remains controversial, but in patients with diffuse pulmonary damage, aggressive therapies have been reported. They include whole lung lavage, systemic corticosteroids, and thoracoscopy with surgical debridement. PMID:21185165

  13. Aspiration pneumonia in children: an iconographic essay*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Antonio; Pessanha, Laís Bastos; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Martins, Diego Lima Nava; Rondina, Ronaldo Garcia; Silva, Jamine Ronacher Passos

    2015-01-01

    In most cases of aspiration pneumonia in children, the disease is specific to this age group. Clinical and radiological correlation is essential for the diagnosis. The present pictorial essay is aimed at showing typical images of the most common etiologies. PMID:26811557

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. PMID:24387877

  15. Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae as an Otopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R.; Sabharwal, Vishakha; Pelton, Stephen; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Among 34 Spn sequential isolates from middle ear fluid we found a case of a nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae (NT-Spn) in a child with AOM. The strain was pneumolysin PCR positive and capsule gene PCR negative. Virulence of the NT-Spn was confirmed in a chinchilla model of AOM. PMID:21251566

  16. [Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Füri, Julia; Oestmann, Andreas; Repond, Fernand

    2016-04-13

    We report the case of a 88 years old patient with cough and new onset confusion. Delirium was caused by a necrotizing Methicillin-sensible staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy for several weeks and fall of inflammatory markers the patient died from consequences of delirium. PMID:27078731

  17. Cases of parasitic pneumonia in Scottish cattle.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic pneumonia in cattleNutritional osteodystrophy in cattleWhite liver disease in lambsErysipelas in pigsLead poisoning and atherosclerosis in an eagle These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for October 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26851101

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Easow, Joshy Maducolil; Joseph, Noyal Mariya; Shankar, Pathiyil Ravi; Rajamony, Asish Purushothaman; Dhungel, Banodita Acharya; Shivananda, P G

    2011-07-01

    We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae. This study was conducted from January 2000 to August 2007 at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. The isolates were identified based on standard bacteriological techniques. Antibiotic susceptibility testing used the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method; penicillin resistance was confirmed by agar dilution method. During the study period, there were 312 S. pneumoniae isolates. Penicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol resistance were observed in 5, 34.3, 7.4, 11.1 and 0.4% of isolates, respectively. Resistance to all tested antibiotics declined with time except for penicillin, in which resistance increased. Penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae were significantly co-resistant to erythromycin. Co-resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin were observed in trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistant isolates. Penicillin resistance is increasing; therefore, measures to ensure judicious use of beta-lactams and macrolides (inducers of penicillin resistance) should be advocated to control the development of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae. PMID:22299473

  19. [Multidrug resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae: multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Ben Salah, Dorra; Besbes, Makram; Mahjoubi, Faouzia; Ghozzi, Rafiaa; Ben Redjeb, Saida; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hammami, Adnène

    2002-01-01

    The extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, especially the third generation cephalosporins (C3G), was followed by the emergence of newer plasmid mediated betalactamases called extended spectrum betalactamases (ESBLs). To assess the impact of K. pneumoniae resistant to 3GC in Tunisia, this study was conducted in 3 teaching hospitals. A total of 1110 strains of K pneumoniae was collected. The antibiotics susceptibilities were tested by diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton agar. The quality control was regularly performed. I ESBLs producing solates were detected using the double-disc synergy test. Data analysis was done using the Whonet 4 software. 23.6% K. pneumoniae isolates showed phenotype pattern of ESBLs producers. The double-disc synergy test was positive in 75% of the cases. These isolates were recovered from hospitalized patients in different wards but mainly from pediatrics (23.6%), medicine (23.2%), surgery (22.9%), intensive care units (11%) and neonatology (11%). 54% were isolated from urines, 22% from blood cultures. These isolates remained susceptible to imipenem (100%) and most of them to cefoxitin (96.4%) but all had associated resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The prevalence of multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae is high. This resistance can be minimized by the implementation of infection control measures including handwashing and isolation procedures. PMID:12071040

  20. Correlation between Radiological and Pathological Findings in Patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Studies focused on the pathological–radiological correlation of human Mycoplasma (M) pneumoniae pneumonia have rarely been reported. Therefore, we extensively reviewed the literature regarding pathological and radiological studies of Mycoplasma pneumonia, and compared findings between open lung biopsy specimen and computed tomography (CT). Major three correlations were summarized. (1) Peribronchial and perivascular cuffing characterized by mononuclear cells infiltration was correlated with bronchovascular bundles thickening on CT, which was the most common finding of this pneumonia. (2) Cellular bronchitis in the small airways accompanied with exudates or granulation tissue in the lumen revealed as centrilobular nodules on CT. (3) Neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen radiologically demonstrated as air-space consolidation or ground-glass opacities. In M. pulmonis-infected mice model, pathologic patterns are strikingly different according to host cell-mediated immunity (CMI) levels; treatment with interleukin-2 lead to marked cellular bronchitis in the small airways and treatment with prednisolone or cyclosporin-A lead to neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen. Patients with centrilobular nodules predominant radiologic pattern have a high level of CMI, measuring by tuberculin skin test. From these findings, up-regulation of host CMI could change radiological pattern to centrilobular nodules predominant, on the other hand down-regulation of host CMI would change radiological pattern to ground-glass opacity and consolidation. It was suggested the pathological features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia may be altered by the level of host CMI. PMID:27242720

  1. SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 levels in children with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Lin-Hua; Lu, Quan; Han, Li-Ying; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the potential biomarkers from pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D), Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6), and 56-kD a human type I protein (HTI-56) in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. This retrospective study, self-controlled study enrolled 34 Chinese children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia. The levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were assessed and compared between patients with unilateral lung infection and contralateral lungs without any abnormal findings. Significant differences in the levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 were observed in infected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples compared with uninfected samples (all P<0.05); however, there was no correlation between the serum level of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 and their levels in infected and uninfected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples (P>0.05). Conclusion: The high levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 in infected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples may reflect the injury of alveolar epithelium caused by M. pneumoniae. Instead of SP-D in uninfected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained by invasive bronchoscopy, serum SP-D may serve as a convenient medium to distinguish lung infection caused by M. pneumoniae. PMID:26617840

  2. A cohort study of bacteremic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Guillamet, Cristina Vazquez; Vazquez, Rodrigo; Noe, Jonas; Micek, Scott T.; Kollef, Marin H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacteremic pneumonia is usually associated with greater mortality. However, risk factors associated with hospital mortality in bacteremic pneumonia are inadequately described. The study was a retrospective cohort study, conducted in Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2008–2015). For purposes of this investigation, antibiotic susceptibility was determined according to ceftriaxone susceptibility, as ceftriaxone represents the antimicrobial agent most frequently recommended for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia as opposed to nosocomial pneumonia. Two multivariable analyses were planned: the first model included resistance to ceftriaxone as a variable, whereas the second model included the various antibiotic-resistant species (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae). In all, 1031 consecutive patients with bacteremic pneumonia (mortality 37.1%) were included. The most common pathogens associated with infection were S aureus (34.1%; methicillin resistance 54.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (28.0%), P aeruginosa (10.6%), anaerobic bacteria (7.3%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (5.6%). Compared with ceftriaxone-susceptible pathogens (46.8%), ceftriaxone-resistant pathogens (53.2%) were significantly more likely to receive inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (IIAT) (27.9% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001) and to die during hospitalization (41.5% vs 32.0%; P = 0.001). The first logistic regression analysis identified IIAT with the greatest odds ratio (OR) for mortality (OR 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–3.2, P < 0.001). Other independent predictors of mortality included age, mechanical ventilation, immune suppression, prior hospitalization, prior antibiotic administration, septic shock, comorbid conditions, and severity of illness. In the second multivariable analysis that included the antibiotic-resistant species, IIAT was still associated with excess mortality, and P aeruginosa infection was

  3. [Risk Factor Analysis of Pneumonia after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Shuichi; Nakamura, Ken; Uchida, Tetsuro; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki; Morikane, Keita

    2016-08-01

    Pneumonia is a major and life-threatening complication after cardiovascular surgery. The objective of our study was to describe epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. From January 2007 to December 2011, 511 consecutive patients (age 67.3±11.9;336 men, 175 women) were enrolled in this study. Pneumonia was diagnosed according to Centers of Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria for healthcare associated infection. Data collection included preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative variables. The overall incidence of pneumonia was 72 cases(14.0%). The mortality in pneumonia group was significantly higher than that in non-pneumonia group (16.6% vs 4.3%, Odds ratio 4.4 p<0.001). Multi-logistic analysis revealed that elderly patient, preoperative congestive heart failure, preoperative hemodialysis, and operation of the thoracic aorta were independent risk factors for pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27476560

  4. [A rare cause of pneumonia: Shewanella putrefaciens].

    PubMed

    Durdu, Bülent; Durdu, Yasemin; Güleç, Nuray; Islim, Filiz; Biçer, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. Although it is accepted as saprophytic, different clinical syndromes, most commonly skin or soft tissue infections, have been associated with S.putrefaciens, mainly in immunocompromised cases and patients with underlying diseases. However, pneumonia cases due to S.putrefaciens are quite limited in the literature. In this report, a case of pneumonia caused by S.putrefaciens was presented. A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, cough, sputum and weakness. The patient has had brochiectasis since childhood and has used periodical antibiotic therapies due to pneumoniae episodes. She was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings, and empirical antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of sputum yielded abundant leucocytes and gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown in the sputum culture was identified as S.putrefaciens by conventional methods and API 20 NE (BioMerieux, France) system. The isolate was found susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cephoperazon-sulbactam, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin and trimethoprime-sulphametoxazole; whereas resistant to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin and cefuroxime, by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. According to the antibiogram results, the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone (1 x 2 g, intravenous). The patient was discharged with complete cure after 14 days of therapy. In conclusion, S.putrefaciens should be considered in patients with predisposing factors as an unusual cause of pneumonia and the characteristics such as H2S production and sensitivity to third generation cephalosporins and penicillins should be used

  5. A study on early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal infection, Bulgaria, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Todorova-Christova, M; Vacheva, R; Decheva, A; Nikolov, A; Slancheva, B; Stoichkova, D; Christova, E; Shopova, E; Hitrova, S; Masseva, A; Yarakova, N; Kraleva, I; Takova, T S; Dimitrova, N; Dobreva, A

    2014-09-01

    This study examines neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) colonization and its relation to early-onset GBS disease (EOGBSD), based upon the experience of leading obstetrics and gynecology centers in Bulgaria. The objectives of the study were to update neonatal colonization rates and to assess relationships between clinically differentiated cases (culture-proven GBS newborns) and risk factors inherent to the infant and mother, using a computerized file. The neonatal GBS colonization rate ranged from 5.48 to 12.19 per 1000 live births. Maternal-fetal infection (MFI, a provisional clinical diagnosis in culture-proven colonized infants with initial signs of infection that is usually overcome with antibiotic treatment) and/or intrapartum asphyxia (IA) have been demonstrated as the most frequent clinical manifestations, with significant correlations for the primary diagnosis, but not affirmative for the final diagnosis at discharge, resulting from adequate treatment of neonates. MFI and IA were significantly related to prematurity, and reciprocally, prematurity was associated with the risk of MFI, indirectly suggesting that preterm birth or PPROM (preterm premature rupture of membranes, an obstetric indication associated with early labor and delivery, one of the major causes of preterm birth) is a substantial risk factor for EOGBSD. The regression analysis indicated that in the case of a newborn with MFI, a birth weight 593.58 g lower than the birth weight of an infant without this diagnosis might be expected. Testing the inverse relationship, i.e., the way birth weight influences a certain diagnosis (logistic regression) established the presence of a relationship between birth weight categories (degree of prematurity) and the diagnosis of MFI. The proportions and odds ratios, converted into probabilities that a baby would develop MFI, indicate the particularly high risk for newborns with extremely low and very low birth weight: extremely low birth weight (≤1000 g), the

  6. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  7. Invasive Group B Streptococcal Disease in South Africa: Importance of Surveillance Methodology.

    PubMed

    Quan, Vanessa; Verani, Jennifer R; Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Meiring, Susan; Cutland, Clare L; Schrag, Stephanie J; Madhi, Shabir A

    2016-01-01

    Data on neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) invasive disease burden are needed to refine prevention policies. Differences in surveillance methods and investigating for cases can lead to varying disease burden estimates. We compared the findings of laboratory-based passive surveillance for GBS disease across South Africa, and for one of the provinces compared this to a real-time, systematic, clinical surveillance in a population-defined region in Johannesburg, Soweto. Passive surveillance identified a total of 799 early-onset disease (EOD, <7 days age) and 818 LOD (late onset disease, 7-89 days age) cases nationwide. The passive surveillance provincial incidence varied for EOD (range 0.00 to 1.23/1000 live births), and was 0.03 to 1.04/1000 live births for LOD. The passive surveillance rates for Soweto, were not significantly different compared to those from the systematic surveillance (EOD 1.23 [95%CI 1.06-1.43] vs. 1.50 [95%CI 1.30-1.71], respectively, rate ratio 0.82 [95%CI 0.67-1.01]; LOD 1.04 [95% CI 0.90-1.23] vs. 1.22 [95%CI 1.05-1.42], rate ratio 0.85 [95% CI 0.68-1.07]). A review of the few cases missed in the passive system in Soweto, suggested that missing key identifiers, such as date of birth, resulted in their omission during the electronic data extraction process. Our analysis suggests that passive surveillance provides a modestly lower estimate of invasive GBS rates compared to real time sentinel-site systematic surveillance, however, this is unlikely to be the reason for the provincial variability in incidence of invasive GBS disease in South Africa. This, possibly reflects that invasive GBS disease goes undiagnosed due to issues related to access to healthcare, poor laboratory capacity and varying diagnostic procedures or empiric antibiotic treatment of neonates with suspected sepsis in the absence of attempting to making a microbiological diagnosis. An efficacious GBS vaccine for pregnant women, when available, could be used as a probe to better

  8. Invasive Group B Streptococcal Disease in South Africa: Importance of Surveillance Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Meiring, Susan; Cutland, Clare L.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2016-01-01

    Data on neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) invasive disease burden are needed to refine prevention policies. Differences in surveillance methods and investigating for cases can lead to varying disease burden estimates. We compared the findings of laboratory-based passive surveillance for GBS disease across South Africa, and for one of the provinces compared this to a real-time, systematic, clinical surveillance in a population-defined region in Johannesburg, Soweto. Passive surveillance identified a total of 799 early-onset disease (EOD, <7 days age) and 818 LOD (late onset disease, 7–89 days age) cases nationwide. The passive surveillance provincial incidence varied for EOD (range 0.00 to 1.23/1000 live births), and was 0.03 to 1.04/1000 live births for LOD. The passive surveillance rates for Soweto, were not significantly different compared to those from the systematic surveillance (EOD 1.23 [95%CI 1.06–1.43] vs. 1.50 [95%CI 1.30–1.71], respectively, rate ratio 0.82 [95%CI 0.67–1.01]; LOD 1.04 [95% CI 0.90–1.23] vs. 1.22 [95%CI 1.05–1.42], rate ratio 0.85 [95% CI 0.68–1.07]). A review of the few cases missed in the passive system in Soweto, suggested that missing key identifiers, such as date of birth, resulted in their omission during the electronic data extraction process. Our analysis suggests that passive surveillance provides a modestly lower estimate of invasive GBS rates compared to real time sentinel-site systematic surveillance, however, this is unlikely to be the reason for the provincial variability in incidence of invasive GBS disease in South Africa. This, possibly reflects that invasive GBS disease goes undiagnosed due to issues related to access to healthcare, poor laboratory capacity and varying diagnostic procedures or empiric antibiotic treatment of neonates with suspected sepsis in the absence of attempting to making a microbiological diagnosis. An efficacious GBS vaccine for pregnant women, when available, could be used as a

  9. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and serology in pediatric community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Kensei; Nishimura, Naoko; Ohshima, Yasunori; Arakawa, Yasuko; Hosono, Haruki; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Iwata, Yasushi; Nakane, Kazumasa; Funahashi, Keiji; Ozaki, Takao

    2012-10-01

    Rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia is required for treatment with effective antimicrobial agents without delay; however, this capacity has not yet been established in clinical practice. Recently, a novel nucleic acid amplification method termed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has been used to rapidly diagnose various infectious diseases. In this study, we prospectively evaluated the efficacy of the LAMP assay to rapidly diagnose M. pneumoniae pneumonia in clinical practice. Three hundred sixty-eight children (median age, 3.8 years; range, 0.1-14.3 years) admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2010 for community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled in this study. We obtained throat swabs on admission to detect M. pneumoniae DNA and paired serum samples on admission and at discharge to assay M. pneumoniae antibody titers. M. pneumoniae pneumonia was diagnosed by either a positive LAMP assay or a fourfold or greater increase in antibody titer. Overall, 46 children (12.5% of the patients with pneumonia) were diagnosed with M. pneumoniae pneumonia; of these, 27 (58.7%) were aged less than 6 years. Of the aforementioned 46 children, 38 (82.6%) and 37 (80.4%) were identified by LAMP and serology, respectively. When the results of serology were taken as the standard, the sensitivity and specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the LAMP assay were 78.4%, 97.3%, 76.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. We concluded the LAMP assay may be useful for rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:22370920

  10. Early Additional Immune-Modulators for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia in Children: An Observation Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Churl; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Shin, Myung-Seok; Kang, Jin-Han

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) pneumonia is a self-limiting disease, but some patients complain of progressive pneumonia, despite of appropriate antibiotic treatment. We aimed to introduce the role of immune-modulators (corticosteroid and/or intravenous immunoglobulin, IVIG) treatment for childhood MP pneumonia based on previous our experiences. Materials and Methods A retrospective case series analysis for 183 children with MP pneumonia was performed. MP pneumonia patients were diagnosed by two Immunoglobulin M (IgM) tests: the micro-particle agglutination method (≥1:40) and the cold agglutination test (≥1:4), and were examined twice at the initial admission and at discharge. Among 183 MP pneumonia patients, 90 patients with persistent fever for over 48 hours after admission or those with severe respiratory symptoms and signs received additional prednisolone (82 patients, 1 mg/kg/day) or intravenous methylprednisolone (8 patients, 5-10 mg/kg/day) with antibiotics. Four patients with aggravated clinical symptoms and chest radiographic findings after corticosteroid treatment received IVIG (1 g/kg/day, 1-2 doses). Results Mean age of 183 patients was 5.5 ± 3.2 years (6 months-15 years), and the male: female ratio was 1.1:1 (96:87). Fifty-seven patients (31%) were seroconverters and 126 seropositive patients showed increased diagnostic IgM antibody titres during admission (over 4 folds). The majority of the patients who received corticosteroids (86/90 cases) showed rapid defervescence within 48 hours with improved clinical symptoms, regardless of the used antibiotics. Also, 4 patients who received additional IVIG improved both clinically and radiographically within 2 days without adverse reaction. Conclusions In the era of macrolide-resistant MP strains, early additional immune-modulator therapy with antibiotics might prevent from the disease progression and reduce the disease morbidity without adverse reaction. PMID:25566403

  11. Dysphagia, dystussia, and aspiration pneumonia in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hideki; Miyagi, Midori; Ebihara, Takae; Okazaki, Tatsuma

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development and wide distribution of guidelines for pneumonia, death from pneumonia is increasing due to population aging. Conventionally, aspiration pneumonia was mainly thought to be one of the infectious diseases. However, we have proven that chronic repeated aspiration of a small amount of sterile material can cause the usual type of aspiration pneumonia in mouse lung. Moreover, chronic repeated aspiration of small amounts induced chronic inflammation in both frail elderly people and mouse lung. These observations suggest the need for a paradigm shift of the treatment for pneumonia in the elderly. Since aspiration pneumonia is fundamentally based on dysphagia, we should shift the therapy for aspiration pneumonia from pathogen-oriented therapy to function-oriented therapy. Function-oriented therapy in aspiration pneumonia means therapy focusing on slowing or reversing the functional decline that occurs as part of the aging process, such as “dementia → dysphagia → dystussia → atussia → silent aspiration”. Atussia is ultimate dysfunction of cough physiology, and aspiration with atussia is called silent aspiration, which leads to the development of life-threatening aspiration pneumonia. Research pursuing effective strategies to restore function in the elderly is warranted in order to decrease pneumonia deaths in elderly people. PMID:27076964

  12. No Carbapenem Resistance in Pneumonia Caused by Klebsiella Species

    PubMed Central

    Yayan, Josef; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Rasche, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Klebsiella species are a common cause of community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic resistance to the class of carbapenem in patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species is unusual. New studies report carbapenem resistance in patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. This article examines, retrospectively, antibiotic resistance in patients with community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. The data of all patients with community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species were collected from the hospital charts at the HELIOS Clinic, Witten/Herdecke University, Wuppertal, Germany, within the study period 2004 to 2014. An antibiogram was created from all of the study patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. Sensitivity and resistance profiles were performed for the different antibiotics that have been consistently used in the treatment of patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. All demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of all of the patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species were collected from the patients’ records. During the study period of January 1, 2004, to August 12, 2014, 149 patients were identified with community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia affected by Klebsiella species. These patients had a mean age of 70.6 ± 13 (107 [71.8%, 95% CI 64.6%–79%] men and 42 [28.2%, 95% CI 21%–35.4%] women). In all of the patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species, there was resistance to ampicillin (P < 0.0001). Many patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species (75.3%) also showed resistance to piperacillin (P < 0.0001). However, no patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species showed resistance to imipenem or meropenem (P < 0.0001). Antibiotic resistance to the antibiotic class of carbapenem was not detected in patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. PMID:25674753

  13. No carbapenem resistance in pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species.

    PubMed

    Yayan, Josef; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Rasche, Kurt

    2015-02-01

    Klebsiella species are a common cause of community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic resistance to the class of carbapenem in patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species is unusual. New studies report carbapenem resistance in patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species.This article examines, retrospectively, antibiotic resistance in patients with community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species.The data of all patients with community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species were collected from the hospital charts at the HELIOS Clinic, Witten/Herdecke University, Wuppertal, Germany, within the study period 2004 to 2014. An antibiogram was created from all of the study patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. Sensitivity and resistance profiles were performed for the different antibiotics that have been consistently used in the treatment of patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. All demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of all of the patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species were collected from the patients' records.During the study period of January 1, 2004, to August 12, 2014, 149 patients were identified with community- and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia affected by Klebsiella species. These patients had a mean age of 70.6 ± 13 (107 [71.8%, 95% CI 64.6%-79%] men and 42 [28.2%, 95% CI 21%-35.4%] women). In all of the patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species, there was resistance to ampicillin (P < 0.0001). Many patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species (75.3%) also showed resistance to piperacillin (P < 0.0001). However, no patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species showed resistance to imipenem or meropenem (P < 0.0001).Antibiotic resistance to the antibiotic class of carbapenem was not detected in patients with pneumonia caused by Klebsiella species. PMID:25674753

  14. Polyamine transporter in Streptococcus pneumoniae is essential for evading early innate immune responses in pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aswathy N.; Thornton, Justin A.; Stokes, John; Sunesara, Imran; Swiatlo, Edwin; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common bacterial etiology of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults worldwide. Genomic plasticity, antibiotic resistance and extreme capsular antigenic variation complicates the design of effective therapeutic strategies. Polyamines are ubiquitous small cationic molecules necessary for full expression of pneumococcal virulence. Polyamine transport system is an attractive therapeutic target as it is highly conserved across pneumococcal serotypes. In this study, we compared an isogenic deletion strain of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 in polyamine transport operon (ΔpotABCD) with the wild type in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Our results show that the wild type persists in mouse lung 24 h post infection while the mutant strain is cleared by host defense mechanisms. We show that intact potABCD is required for survival in the host by providing resistance to neutrophil killing. Comparative proteomics analysis of murine lungs infected with wild type and ΔpotABCD pneumococci identified expression of proteins that could confer protection to wild type strain and help establish infection. We identified ERM complex, PGLYRP1, PTPRC/CD45 and POSTN as new players in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Additionally, we found that deficiency of polyamine transport leads to up regulation of the polyamine synthesis genes speE and cad in vitro. PMID:27247105

  15. Polyamine transporter in Streptococcus pneumoniae is essential for evading early innate immune responses in pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rai, Aswathy N; Thornton, Justin A; Stokes, John; Sunesara, Imran; Swiatlo, Edwin; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common bacterial etiology of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults worldwide. Genomic plasticity, antibiotic resistance and extreme capsular antigenic variation complicates the design of effective therapeutic strategies. Polyamines are ubiquitous small cationic molecules necessary for full expression of pneumococcal virulence. Polyamine transport system is an attractive therapeutic target as it is highly conserved across pneumococcal serotypes. In this study, we compared an isogenic deletion strain of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 in polyamine transport operon (ΔpotABCD) with the wild type in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Our results show that the wild type persists in mouse lung 24 h post infection while the mutant strain is cleared by host defense mechanisms. We show that intact potABCD is required for survival in the host by providing resistance to neutrophil killing. Comparative proteomics analysis of murine lungs infected with wild type and ΔpotABCD pneumococci identified expression of proteins that could confer protection to wild type strain and help establish infection. We identified ERM complex, PGLYRP1, PTPRC/CD45 and POSTN as new players in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Additionally, we found that deficiency of polyamine transport leads to up regulation of the polyamine synthesis genes speE and cad in vitro. PMID:27247105

  16. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  17. Pneumonia and empyema: causal, casual or unknown

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Parapneumonic effusions complicating pneumonia are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Along with increased mortality, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema often necessitate prolonged treatment, longer hospital stay and interventions. Parapneumonic effusions arise from inflammation in the lungs and pleural space from direct invasion of bacteria, cascade of inflammatory events and bacteriologic virulence features. Patient factors and comorbidities also contribute to the pathophysiology of parapneumonic effusion development. The evolution of parapneumonic effusion can be divided into three progressive stages: (I) exudative stage; (II) fibrinopurulent stage; and (III) organizing stage with pleural peel formation. These stages can help categorize effusions into groups in order to evaluate the risk of a complicated course requiring intervention. We recommend that clinical data be evaluated and a stepwise approach be taken in management of these patients. This review article discusses current understanding of the development and relationship of parapneumonic effusions with pneumonia. PMID:26150912

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  19. Acute pneumonia in a fire-eater.

    PubMed

    Dell' Omo, M; Murgia, N; Chiodi, M; Giovenali, P; Cecati, A; Gambelunghe, A

    2010-01-01

    Fire-eater's lung, an acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia, is caused when street performers accidentally inhale pyrofluids. We report the case of a young fire-eater who, 12 hours after inhaling an iso-alkanebased pyrofluid, developed fever, dyspnoea, dry cough and intense right chest pain. Radiographic signs of pneumonia emerged two days later. Computed tomography (CT) scans visualized an irregular area of parenchymal consolidation with an air bronchiologram and peripheral ground-glass opacities in the right middle lobe. The diagnostic work-up included microbiological and lung function tests, optic fibre bronchoscopy and an in-depth cyto-immunological analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Symptoms gradually improved over a few days. A CT scan one month later showed the thickened parenchymal area in the right middle lobe had almost completely disappeared. PMID:21244782

  20. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa. PMID:24788402

  1. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Huerta, Arturo; Domingo, Rebeca; Soler, Néstor

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic disease causing increasing healthcare costs worldwide. Another respiratory disease causing high costs and morbidity is community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Because of the constant growth in the population with both diseases (CAP and COPD), analyzing their clinical characteristics is important. Several cellular factors are known to contribute to differences in clinical expression: some lead to COPD exacerbations while others lead to symptoms of pneumonia. The use of new biomarkers (procalcitonin, pro-adrenomedullin and copeptin) help to distinguish among these clinical pictures. To decrease morbidity and mortality, clinical guidelines on antibiotic therapy must be followed and this therapy should be prescribed to patients with CAP and COPD. There are also prevention measures such as the pneumococcal vaccine whose role in the prevention of pneumococcal CAP should be further studied. The present review aims to elucidate some of the above-mentioned issues. PMID:20620690

  2. Rothia mucilaginosa pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Baeza Martínez, Carlos; Zamora Molina, Lucia; García Sevila, Raquel; Gil Carbonell, Joan; Ramos Rincon, José Manuel; Martín Serrano, Concepción

    2014-11-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-postive coccus that occurs as part of the normal flora of the oropharynx and upper respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infections caused by this organism are rare and usually occur in immunocompromised patients. This is the case of an immunocompetent 47-year-old woman with right upper lobe pneumonia in which R.mucilaginosa was isolated in sputum and bronchial aspirate. Infections caused by this agent in the last four years in our hospital were reviewed. The most common predisposing factor was COPD with bronchiectasis. R.mucilaginosa was identified as the causative agent for pneumonia in only two cases, of which one was our case and the other was a patient with lung cancer. PMID:24568756

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae: virulence factors, pathogenesis, and vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    AlonsoDeVelasco, E; Verheul, A F; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1995-01-01

    Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are close to being licensed, a more profound knowledge of the virulence factors responsible for the morbidity and mortality caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is necessary. This review deals with the major structures of pneumococci involved in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease and their interference with the defense mechanisms of the host. It is well known that protection against S. pneumoniae is the result of phagocytosis of invading pathogens. For this process, complement and anticapsular polysaccharide antibodies are required. Besides, relatively recent experimental data suggest that protection is also mediated by the removal of disintegrating pneumococci and their degradation products (cell wall, pneumolysin). These structures seem to be major contributors to illness and death caused by pneumococci. An effective conjugate vaccine should therefore preferably include the capsular polysaccharide and at least one of these inflammatory factors. PMID:8531887

  4. Understanding, preventing and eradicating Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Suzana Meira; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Cândido, Elizabete de Souza; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2016-04-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to aggregate and form biofilm represents a great problem for public health, since they present extracellular components that encase these micro-organisms, making them more resistant to antibiotics and host immune attack. This may become worse when antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains form biofilms. However, antibiofilm screens with different compounds may reveal potential therapies to prevent/treat biofilm infections. Here, we focused on Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic bacterium that causes different types of infections, including in the bloodstream, meninges, lungs, urinary system and at surgical sites. We also highlight aspects involved in the formation and maintenance of K. pneumoniae biofilms, as well as resistance and the emergence of new trends to combat this health challenge. PMID:27064296

  5. Cytoskeletal elements in the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegermann, Jan; Herrmann, Richard; Mayer, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a pathogenic eubacterium lacking a cell wall. Three decades ago, a "rod", an intracellular cytoskeletal structure, was discovered that was assumed to define and stabilize the elongated cell shape. Later, by treatment with detergent, a "Triton shell" (i.e. a fraction of detergent-insoluble cell material) could be obtained, believed to contain additional cytoskeletal elements. Now, by application of a modified Triton X-100 treatment, we are able to demonstrate that M. pneumoniae possesses a cytoskeleton consisting of a blade-like rod and a peripheral lining located close to the inner face of the cytoplasmic membrane, exhibiting features of a highly regular network. Attached "stalks" may support the cytoplasmic membrane. The rod was connected to the cell periphery by "spokes" and showed a defined ultrastructure. Its proximal end was found to be attached to a wheel-like complex. Fibrils extended from the proximal end of the rod into the cytoplasm.

  6. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Mimicking Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Linga, Karthika R.; Khoor, Andras; Phelan, Jonathan A.; Mira-Avendano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a known complication after catheter ablation of arrhythmias. Surprisingly, little information is available on its manifestations in the lung. We describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented from an outside hospital with worsening shortness of breath after catheter ablation of pulmonary veins for atrial fibrillation. After an initial diagnosis of pneumonia and its nonimprovement with antibiotics, a surgical lung biopsy was done and interpreted as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with vascular changes consistent with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Later, she was admitted to our institution where a transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and subsequent computed tomography (CT) angiogram of the heart showed severe stenosis of all four pulmonary veins. The previous lung biopsy was rereviewed and reinterpreted as severe parenchymal congestion mimicking NSIP. Our case demonstrates that PVS is an underrecognized complication of catheter ablation, and increased awareness among both clinicians and pathologists is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26779359

  7. Corynebacterial pneumonia in an African hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Williams, C; Wu, C C

    1998-04-01

    A 3-mo-old, male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was anorectic and lethargic for a period of 3 days prior to death. Necropys revealed lungs that were diffusely firm, dark red, and dorsally adhered by fibrinous tags to the pericardial sac. Histopathology revealed necrosuppurative bronchopneumonia with pulmonary abscesses and suppurative pericarditis and myocarditis. A Corynebacterium sp. was isolated from the lungs. We believe this is the first reported case of corynebacterial pneumonia in an African hedgehog. PMID:9577794

  8. [Pharmacogenetics of community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Suleĭmanov, S Sh; Molchanova, O V; Kirpichnikova, N V; Sukhotina, N V; Gorbach, A A

    2010-01-01

    The rate of acetylation of xenobiotics affects the course and prognosis of infectious diseases. The efficacy of antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in RA-patients is lower than that in LA-ones. In order to ensure the best antimicrobial effect on the onset of the disease it is required to use regimens with the maximum permissible dose of antibacterial drugs in the regions where the rapid type prevails. PMID:21400754

  9. Diagnostic strategies for healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Eva; Torres, Antoni

    2009-02-01

    The first point of a good diagnostic strategy for healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is correct classification of patients with specific criteria, as suggested by the last American Thoracic Society/ Infectious Diseases Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines. However, clinical practice and recent literature have suggested new risk factors for multidrug-resistant infection (MRI): the presence of permanent indwelling devices, prior antibiotic use in the last 3 months, chronic and advanced pulmonary diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, etc.), history of alcoholism, and immunosuppression. The clinical presentation in HCAP patients is often unusual (mild respiratory symptoms and frequent extrapulmonary manifestations) due to different factors: advanced age, neurological disorders, and multiple chronic comorbidities. Moreover, HCAP commonly presents a worse clinical course than community-acquired pneumonia, a prolonged length of stay, and a mortality rate close to hospital-acquired pneumonia. Chest radiography and routine laboratory markers (including C-reactive protein) are always needed for clinical evaluation and severity assessment. The clinical use of new biomarkers of infection and sepsis (procalcitonin, etc.) is currently being investigated. Extensive microbiological testing to overcome the high prevalence of MRI in HCAP, including urinary antigens for Legionella and Streptococcus pneumoniae; blood cultures; Gram staining and low respiratory tract secretions (sputum, tracheobronchial aspirate, fibrobronchial aspirate, protected specimen brush, bronchoalveolar lavage); and cultures for aerobic, anaerobic, mycobacterial, and fungal pathogens are recommended, whereas the indication for serology tests for respiratory viruses and atypical pathogens is low. By contrast, the new polymerase chain reaction-based techniques for the rapid identification (2 to 4 hours) of microbial pathogens in respiratory samples (nasopharyngeal swab

  10. Mapping the Evolution of Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Chandler C.; Stegger, Marc; Stahlhut, Steen G.; Hansen, Dennis S.; Engelthaler, David M.; Andersen, Paal S.; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Keim, Paul; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly invasive, community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infections have recently emerged, resulting in pyogenic liver abscesses. These infections are caused by hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (hvKP) isolates primarily of capsule serotype K1 or K2. Hypervirulent K1 isolates belong to clonal complex 23 (CC23), indicating that this clonal lineage has a specific genetic background conferring hypervirulence. Here, we apply whole-genome sequencing to a collection of K. pneumoniae isolates to characterize the phylogenetic background of hvKP isolates with an emphasis on CC23. Most of the hvKP isolates belonged to CC23 and grouped into a distinct monophyletic clade, revealing that CC23 is a unique clonal lineage, clearly distinct from nonhypervirulent strains. Separate phylogenetic analyses of the CC23 isolates indicated that the CC23 lineage evolved recently by clonal expansion from a single common ancestor. Limited grouping according to geographical origin was observed, suggesting that CC23 has spread globally through multiple international transmissions. Conversely, hypervirulent K2 strains clustered in genetically unrelated groups. Strikingly, homologues of a large virulence plasmid were detected in all hvKP clonal lineages, indicating a key role in K. pneumoniae hypervirulence. The plasmid encodes two siderophores, aerobactin and salmochelin, and RmpA (regulator of the mucoid phenotype); all these factors were found to be restricted to hvKP isolates. Genomic comparisons revealed additional factors specifically associated with CC23. These included a distinct variant of a genomic island encoding yersiniabactin, colibactin, and microcin E492. Furthermore, additional novel genomic regions unique to CC23 were revealed which may also be involved in the increased virulence of this important clonal lineage. PMID:26199326

  11. Acremonium Pneumonia: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fakharian, Atefeh; Dorudinia, Atosa; Mansouri, Davood; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Acremonium spp. cause human superficial infections including mycetoma, onychomycosis and keratitis. There are a few reports of systemic involvement in immunocompromised patients. However, isolated pulmonary infection in otherwise healthy hosts has never been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a 59 year-old diabetic man with non-resolving pneumonia due to Acremonium spp. and provide a consensus review of the published clinical cases of systemic and respiratory tract infections. PMID:26528372

  12. Optimization of conditions for the efficient production of mutan in streptococcal cultures and post-culture liquids.

    PubMed

    Wiater, A; Szczodrak, J; Pleszczyńska, M

    2005-01-01

    The strain Streptococcus sobrinus CCUG 21020 was found to produce water-insoluble and adhesive mutan. The factors influencing both stages of the mutan production, i.e. streptococcal cultures and glucan synthesis in post-culture supernatants were standardized. The application of optimized process parameters for mutan production on a larger scale made it possible to obtain approximately 2.2 g of water-insoluble glucan per 11 of culture supernate--this productivity was higher than the best reported in the literature. It was shown that some of the tested beet sugars might be successfully utilized as substitutes for pure sucrose in the process of mutan synthesis. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses confirmed that the insoluble biopolymer synthesized by a mixture of crude glucosyltransferases was a mixed-linkage (1-->3), (1-->6)-alpha-D-glucan (the so-called mutan) with a greater proportion of 1,3 to 1,6 linkages. PMID:15813222

  13. [Physical examination of the lungs in suspected pneumonia].

    PubMed

    de Jongh, Tjeerd O H; Thiadens, Henk A

    2011-01-01

    Physical examination of the lungs is easy to perform, but the interobserver agreement is poor due to lack of standardisation in the findings. The use of an electronic stethoscope with computerised analysis of the lung sounds might improve diagnostic accuracy. General signs such as fever and an accelerated respiratory and pulse rate increase the probability of a pneumonia. Percussion dullness increases the probability of pneumonia, but its absence does not exclude a pneumonia. Bronchial or decreased breath sounds or crackles increase the probability of pneumonia, but their absence does not exclude a pneumonia. There are no physical diagnostic findings that have a very high predictive value for a pneumonia; all findings should therefore be combined. PMID:21329538

  14. [Legionella pneumonia successfully treated despite late diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, H; Takazakura, E

    1997-05-01

    Status asthmaticus developed in a 72-year-old man who was being treated with oral prednisolone for severe persistent asthma. The dosage of prednisolone was increased, and amikacin was injected to treat pneumonia that had developed in the right lung. Progressive pulmonary infiltrates, respiratory compromise, and hypoxemia developed, and the patient eventually required mechanical ventilation. Antibiotic treatment was changed to imipenem/cilastatin, piperacillin, gentamicin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, and minocycline. Liver injury developed. More than one month after the patient was admitted, Legionella pneumonia was diagnosed. Levofloxacin (400 mg/day) was then given orally, in combination with injected imipenem/cilastatin. Liver function did not deteriorate, and the pneumonia resolved. Most diagnoses of Legionnaires' disease are made retrospectively by examination of serum. In this case, antibiotics active against Legionella pneumophila had been used before the diagnosis was established, which probably contributed to the patient's recovery. When aminoglycosides or beta-lactam antibiotics are ineffective, administration of agents effective against Legionnaires' disease should be considered. PMID:9234637

  15. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Churton, Nicholas W. V.; Misra, Raju V.; Howlin, Robert P.; Allan, Raymond N.; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N.; Gharbia, Saheer E.; Edwards, Richard J.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Webb, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  16. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Churton, Nicholas W V; Misra, Raju V; Howlin, Robert P; Allan, Raymond N; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N; Gharbia, Saheer E; Edwards, Richard J; Clarke, Stuart C; Webb, Jeremy S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  17. [Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-negative adults].

    PubMed

    Rouyer, M; Stoclin, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    In HIV-negative adults, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia can be observed when immunodeficiency is present, especially in case of drug-induced immune suppression (steroids, chemotherapy, transplantation). Clinical, radiological, and biological presentations are different in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals with different immunodeficiency profiles. In HIV-negative patients, dyspnea occurs more quickly (median duration of 5 days to get a diagnosis), diagnosis is more difficult because of less Pneumocystis in bronchoalveolar lavage, and mortality is higher than in HIV-positive individuals. Lung CT-scan typically shows diffuse ground glass opacities, but peri-bronchovascular condensations or ground glass opacities clearly limited by interlobular septa can also be observed. Lymphopenia is common but CD4+ T-cells count is rarely performed. HIV-negative patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia are co-infected with bacteria, viruses or fungi in about 30% cases. Bronchoalveolar lavage is often more neutrophilic than in HIV-positive individuals. PCR and β-D-glucan have good sensitivity but poor specificity to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains the first choice of treatment. Duration is 14 days in HIV-negative patients whereas it is typically of 21 days in HIV-positive individuals. Adjunctive corticosteroids are of beneficial effect in HIV-positive adult patients with substantial hypoxaemia but are not recommended in HIV-negative patients, as they could be deleterious in some individuals. PMID:26572261

  18. Absence of SpeB production in virulent large capsular forms of group A streptococcal strain 64.

    PubMed

    Raeder, R; Harokopakis, E; Hollingshead, S; Boyle, M D

    2000-02-01

    Passage in human blood of group A streptococcal isolate 64p was previously shown to result in the enhanced expression of M and M-related proteins. Similarly, when this isolate was injected into mice via an air sac model for skin infection, organisms recovered from the spleens showed both increased expression of M and M-related proteins and increased skin-invasive potential. We show that these phenotypic changes were not solely the result of increased transcription of the mRNAs encoding the M and M-related gene products. Rather, the altered expression was associated with posttranslational modifications of the M and M-related proteins that occur in this strain, based on the presence or absence of another virulence protein, the streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB. The phenotypic variability also correlates with colony size variation. Large colonies selected by both regimens expressed more hyaluronic acid, which may explain differences in colony morphology. All large-colony variants were SpeB negative and expressed three distinct immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding proteins in the M and M-related protein family. Small-colony variants were SpeB positive and bound little IgG through their M and M-related proteins because these proteins, although made, were degraded or altered in profile by the SpeB protease. We conclude that passage in either human blood or a mouse selects for a stable, phase-varied strain of group A streptococci which is altered in many virulence properties. PMID:10639442

  19. Vaccine based on a ubiquitous cysteinyl protease and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A protects against Streptococcus pyogenes sepsis and toxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    Background The gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes is a common pathogen of humans that causes invasive infections, toxic-shock syndrome, rheumatic fever, necrotizing fasciitis and other diseases. Detection of antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates has renewed interest in development of new vaccine approaches for control S. pyogenes sepsis. In the study presented, a novel protein vaccine was examined. The vaccine was based on a recombinant protein fusion between streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), a cysteinyl protease expressed by all clinical isolates, and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SpeA), a superantigen produced by a large subset of isolates. Results A novel protein was produced by mutating the catalytic site of SpeB and the receptor binding surface of SpeA in a fusion of the two polypeptides. Vaccination of HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice with the SpeA-SpeB fusion protein protected against a challenge with the wild-type SpeA that was lethal to naïve controls, and vaccinated mice were protected from an otherwise lethal S. pyogenes infection. Conclusion These results suggest that the genetically attenuated SpeA-SpeB fusion protein may be useful for controlling S. pyogenes infections. Vaccination with the SpeA-SpeB fusion protein described in this study may potentially result in protective immunity against multiple isolates of S. pyogenes due to the extensive antibody cross-reactivity previously observed among all sequence variants of SpeB and the high frequency of SpeA-producing strains. PMID:18976486

  20. Streptococcal SpeB Cleaved PAR-1 Suppresses ERK Phosphorylation and Blunts Thrombin-Induced Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Ender, Miriam; Andreoni, Federica; Zinkernagel, Annelies Sophie; Schuepbach, Reto Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background The family of 4 related protease-activated receptors (PAR-1, 2, 3 & 4) expressed by mammalian cells allow to sense for and react to extracellular proteolytic activity. Since major human bacterial pathogens secret a wide array of protease(-s) we investigated whether they interfere with human PAR function. Methodology/Principal Findings Supernatants from cultures of major human bacterial pathogens were assayed for the presence of protease(-s) capable to cleave overexpressed human PAR-1, 2, 3 and 4 reporter constructs. Group A streptococcus (GAS) was found to secret a PAR-1-cleaving protease. Experiments involving genetical and pharmacological gain and loss of function identified streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B SpeB as the protease responsible. On the host’s side analysis of overexpressed PAR-1 carrying alanine substitutions and deletions showed the amino acid residue leucine44 on PAR-1’s extracellular N-terminus to be the only cleavage site. Complementary studies on endogenously expressed PAR-1 using PAR-1 blocking antibodies further supported our conclusion. Through PAR-1 cleavage SpeB efficiently blunted thrombin-induced induction of the ERK-pathway in endothelial cells and prevented platelets aggregation in response to thrombin. Conclusions/Significance Our results identify a novel function of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB. By cleaving human PAR-1 at the N-terminal amino acid residue leucine44 SpeB rendered endothelial cells unresponsive to thrombin and prevented human platelets from thrombin-induced aggregation. These results suggest that by blunting PAR-1 signaling, SpeB modulates various innate host responses directed against invasive GAS potentially helping the invasive bacteria to escape. This may allow to tailor additional treatments in the future since upon invasion of the blood stream endothelial cells as well as platelets and mononuclear cells respond to PAR-1 agonists aiming to prevent further bacterial dissemination. PMID

  1. Determining Antibody-Binding Site of Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B to Protect Mice from Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Nina; Cheng, Miao-Hui; Yang, Hsiu-Chen; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Liu, Yi-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B), a cysteine protease, is an important virulence factor in group A streptococcal (GAS) infection. SPE B binds and cleaves antibody isotypes and further impairs the immune system by inhibiting complement activation. In this study, we examined the antibody-binding site of SPE B and used it to block SPE B actions during GAS infection. We constructed different segments of the spe B gene and induced them to express different recombinant fragments of SPE B. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we found that residues 345–398 of the C-terminal domain of SPE B (rSPE B345–398), but not the N-terminal domain, was the major binding site for antibody isotypes. Using a competitive ELISA, we also found that rSPE B345–398 bound to the Fc portion of IgG. The in vitro functional assays indicate that rSPE B345–398 not only interfered with cleavage of antibody isotypes but also interfered with SPE B-induced inhibition of complement activation. Immunization of BALB/c mice using rSPE B345–398 was able to induce production of a high titer of anti-rSPE B345–398 antibodies and efficiently protected mice from GAS-induced death. These findings suggest that SPE B uses its C-terminal domain to bind the Fc portion of IgG and that immunization of mice with this binding domain (rSPE B345–398) could protect mice from GAS infection. PMID:23383045

  2. Influence of group A streptococcal acid glycoprotein on expression of major virulence factors and internalization by epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Marouni, Mehran J; Ziomek, Edmund; Sela, Shlomo

    2003-08-01

    A single transposon insertion upstream to the open-reading-frame identified as the streptococcal acid glycoprotein (sagp) gene rendered a Tn916 isolate of Streptococcus pyogenes with elevated susceptibility to internalization by the epithelial cells. The role of SAGP in S. pyogenes internalization was further studied using isogenic mutant containing an in-frame deletion within the sagp gene. The sagp mutant displayed slower growth-rate and showed 5-fold higher internalization efficiency than the parent strain. Transcription of sagp at the logarithmic phase, but not at the stationary phase of the growth was repressed by csrR, the global regulator gene. At the same time, mutation of the sagp gene partially decreased the transcription of hasA, a gene that is required for capsule synthesis. The mutation had no effect on transcription of the emm3 gene, encoding for the M protein. The most striking effect of the sagp mutation was a down-regulation of the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB) at both translational and transcriptional level. Treatment of the SAGP mutant cells with the exogenous mSpeB (mature protease) only partially reduced their susceptibility to internalization. The exogenous mSpeB was more effective in reducing the internalization efficiency of a speB mutant and brought it to the level observed for the parent strain. In overall, results show that CsrR, directly or indirectly, affects the expression of SAGP, and that the SAGP modulates expression of not only SpeB, but also other genes that facilitate S. pyogenes internalization. PMID:12901845

  3. Absence of SpeB Production in Virulent Large Capsular Forms of Group A Streptococcal Strain 64

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, Roberta; Harokopakis, Evlambia; Hollingshead, Susan; Boyle, Michael D. P.

    2000-01-01

    Passage in human blood of group A streptococcal isolate 64p was previously shown to result in the enhanced expression of M and M-related proteins. Similarly, when this isolate was injected into mice via an air sac model for skin infection, organisms recovered from the spleens showed both increased expression of M and M-related proteins and increased skin-invasive potential. We show that these phenotypic changes were not solely the result of increased transcription of the mRNAs encoding the M and M-related gene products. Rather, the altered expression was associated with posttranslational modifications of the M and M-related proteins that occur in this strain, based on the presence or absence of another virulence protein, the streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB. The phenotypic variability also correlates with colony size variation. Large colonies selected by both regimens expressed more hyaluronic acid, which may explain differences in colony morphology. All large-colony variants were SpeB negative and expressed three distinct immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding proteins in the M and M-related protein family. Small-colony variants were SpeB positive and bound little IgG through their M and M-related proteins because these proteins, although made, were degraded or altered in profile by the SpeB protease. We conclude that passage in either human blood or a mouse selects for a stable, phase-varied strain of group A streptococci which is altered in many virulence properties. PMID:10639442

  4. Infection with and Carriage of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Children

    PubMed Central

    Meyer Sauteur, Patrick M.; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Nadal, David; Berger, Christoph; Vink, Cornelis; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.

    2016-01-01

    “Atypical” pneumonia was described as a distinct and mild form of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) already before Mycoplasma pneumoniae had been discovered and recognized as its cause. M. pneumoniae is detected in CAP patients most frequently among school-aged children from 5 to 15 years of age, with a decline after adolescence and tapering off in adulthood. Detection rates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or serology in children with CAP admitted to the hospital amount 4–39%. Although the infection is generally mild and self-limiting, patients of every age can develop severe or extrapulmonary disease. Recent studies indicate that high rates of healthy children carry M. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract and that current diagnostic PCR or serology cannot discriminate between M. pneumoniae infection and carriage. Further, symptoms and radiologic features are not specific for M. pneumoniae infection. Thus, patients may be unnecessarily treated with antimicrobials against M. pneumoniae. Macrolides are the first-line antibiotics for this entity in children younger than 8 years of age. Overall macrolides are extensively used worldwide, and this has led to the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, which may be associated with severe clinical features and more extrapulmonary complications. This review focuses on the characteristics of M. pneumoniae infections in children, and exemplifies that simple clinical decision rules may help identifying children at high risk for CAP due to M. pneumoniae. This may aid physicians in prescribing appropriate first-line antibiotics, since current diagnostic tests for M. pneumoniae infection are not reliably predictive. PMID:27047456

  5. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia induced by aspiration of insecticide.

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, Keisuke; Kamitani, Takeshi; Matsuo, Yoshio; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Sunami, Shunya; Jinnouchi, Mikako; Nagao, Michinobu; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare disorder caused by inhalation and/or aspiration of oil-based substances. The confirmed diagnosis of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is difficult, especially in cases for which it is impossible to ascertain a history of inhalation or aspiration. We present a case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia due to aspiration of insecticide, for which the computed tomography findings of fat attenuation within the lesion were helpful in reaching a correct diagnosis. PMID:21952608

  6. The Clinical Characteristics and Predictors of Refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Yunlian; Li, Shuxian; Yang, Dehua; Wu, Xiling; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics of refracory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (RMPP), and explore the related factors predicting RMPP. Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on 634 children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) hospitalized in our hospital between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2014. The clinical features, laboratory data, radiological findings between the RMPP group and the general Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (GMPP) group were compared and the predictive values of related factors were analyzed. Results The median age of the RMPP patients (n = 145) was much older than that of the GMPP patients (n = 489) (P<0.01). We also found more severe presentations, higher incidence of extra-pulmonary complications and more serious radiological findings in RMPP group, which needed oxygen more often, longer antibiotics administration and intensive care (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), immunoglobulin A (IgM), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and the percentage of neutrophils, CD8+ in RMPP group were significantly higher than those in GMPP group (P<0.05); while the levels of prealbumin (PAB) were lower than that in GMPP group (P<0.01). In ROC curve analysis, the percentage of neutrophil, CRP, LDH, PAB, IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-γ were useful for differentiating patients with RMPP from those with GMPP. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the CRP≥16.5mg/L, LDH ≥417IU/L and IL-6 ≥14.75pg/ml were significant predictors regarding to RMPP. Conclusions CRP≥16.5mg/L, LDH ≥417IU/L and IL-6 ≥14.75pg/ml might be the significant predictors of RMPP in children, which can aid in early recognition of RMPP. PMID:27227519

  7. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  8. Percutaneous CT-Guided Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosing Pneumonia and Mimics of Pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas; Galani, Panagiota Mylona, Sophia; Pomoni, Maria; Mpatakis, Nikolaos

    2004-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of percutaneous core needle biopsy (CNB) relative to fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. In this prospective study we present our experience with 48 thoracic FNAs and CNBs carried out on 48 patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. Samples were obtained from all patients using both CNB (with an automated 18-G core biopsy needle and a gun) and FNA (with a 22-G needle). A specific diagnosis was made in 10/48 cases (20.83%) by FNA and in 42/48 (87.5%) by CNB. The main complications encountered were pneumothorax (n = 4) and hemoptysis (n = 2), yielding a total complication rate of 12.5%. We concluded that CNB using an automated biopsy gun results in a higher diagnostic accuracy for pneumonia and pneumonia mimic biopsies than FNA. Complications should be considered and proper patient observation should follow the procedure.

  9. Relation of physicians' predicted probabilities of pneumonia to their utilities for ordering chest x-rays to detect pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Heckerling, P S; Tape, T G; Wigton, R S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the relation between physicians' predicted probabilities of pneumonia and their utilities for ordering chest x-rays to detect pneumonia, the authors studied 52 physicians who ordered chest x-rays of 886 patients presenting to an emergency department with fever or respiratory complaints. Physicians estimated the probability of pneumonia prior to obtaining the results of the chest x-ray. Utilities were assessed by asking physicians to consider a hypothetical patient presenting with acute respiratory symptoms, with unknown chest x-ray status, and to rank on a scale from +50 ("best thing I could do") to -50 ("worst thing I could do") their rating scale utilities for not diagnosing pneumonia and not ordering a chest x-ray when the patient had pneumonia (i.e., missing a pneumonia), and for diagnosing pneumonia and ordering a chest x-ray when the patient did not have pneumonia (i.e., ordering an unnecessary x-ray). The utility for ordering an unnecessary x-ray was negatively correlated with average predicted probability (r = -0.1495, p = 0.29), whereas the utility for missing a pneumonia was positively correlated with average predicted probability (r = 0.2254, p = 0.11), although the correlations were not statistically significant. Relative chagrin, defined as the difference in these utilities, was significantly inversely correlated with average predicted probability (r = -0.2992, p less than 0.035), even after adjusting for the prevalence of pneumonia seen by each physician (partial r = -0.42, p less than 0.0027). It is concluded that physicians who experienced greater regret over missing a pneumonia than over ordering an unnecessary x-ray estimated lower probabilities of pneumonia for patients for whom they ordered x-rays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1538630

  10. The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) etiology for tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms: hypothesis or entity? Practical considerations for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Kurlan, Roger; Kaplan, Edward L

    2004-04-01

    Clinicians have been faced with much publicity and contradictory scientific evidence regarding a recently described condition termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS). It has been proposed that children with PANDAS experience tics, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and perhaps other neuropsychiatric symptoms as an autoimmune response to streptococcal infection. We review current scientific information and conclude that PANDAS remains a yet-unproven hypothesis. Until more definitive scientific proof is forthcoming, there seems to be insufficient evidence to support 1) routine microbiologic or serologic testing for group A streptococcus in children who present with neuropsychiatric symptoms or 2) the clinical use of antibiotic or immune-modifying therapies in such patients. The optimum diagnostic and therapeutic approach awaits the results of additional research studies. PMID:15060240

  11. Risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-I; Song, J-H; Kim, S H; Chung, D R; Peck, K R; So, T M; Hsueh, P-R

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical features of community-onset levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia and to identify risk factors for levofloxacin resistance. Using the database of a surveillance study of community-acquired pneumococcal infections in Asian countries, we conducted a nested case-control study to identify risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Of 981 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 (4.7 %) had levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, of whom 39 evaluable cases were included in the analysis. All cases were from Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Among patients with levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae, 490 controls were selected based on patient country. Of the 39 cases of levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia, 23 (59.0 %) were classified as healthcare-associated, while 164 (33.5 %) of the 490 controls of levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (P = 0.001) were classified as healthcare-associated. Multivariate analysis showed that previous treatment with fluoroquinolones, cerebrovascular disease, and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia (all P < 0.05). Levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococci pose an important new public health threat in our region, and more information on the emergence and spread of these resistant strains will be necessary to prevent spread throughout the population. PMID:24062235

  12. Different Pathways of Choline Metabolism in Two Choline-Independent Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Their Impact on Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Arun S.; Denapaite, Dalia; Gehre, Florian; Brückner, Reinhold; Vollmer, Waldemar; Hakenbeck, Regine; Tomasz, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The two recently characterized Streptococcus pneumoniae strains—R6Chi and R6Cho−—that have lost the unique auxotrophic requirement of this bacterial species for choline differ in their mechanisms of choline independence. In strain R6Chi the mechanism is caused by a point mutation in tacF, a gene that is part of the pneumococcal lic2 operon, which is essential for growth and survival of the bacteria. Cultures of lic2 mutants of the encapsulated strain D39Chi growing in choline-containing medium formed long chains, did not autolyze, had no choline in their cell wall, and were completely avirulent in the mouse intraperitoneal model. In contrast, while the Cho− strain carried a complete pneumococcal lic2 operon and had no mutations in the tacF gene, deletion of the entire lic2 operon had no effect on the growth or phenotype of strain Cho−. These observations suggest that the biochemical functions normally dependent on determinants of the pneumococcal lic2 operon may also be carried out in strain Cho− by a second set of genetic elements imported from Streptococcus oralis, the choline-independent streptococcal strain that served as the DNA donor in the heterologous transformation event that produced strain R6Cho−. The identification in R6Cho− of a large (20-kb) S. oralis DNA insert carrying both tacF and licD genes confirms this prediction and suggests that these heterologous elements may represent a “backup” system capable of catalyzing P-choline incorporation and export of teichoic acid chains under conditions in which the native lic2 operon is not functional. PMID:18621904

  13. Epidemiology of pneumonia in a burn care unit: the influence of inhalation trauma on pneumonia and of pneumonia on burn mortality

    PubMed Central

    Liodaki, E.; Kalousis, K.; Mauss, K.L.; Kisch, T.; Mailaender, P.; Stang, F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study is to determine the epidemiological characteristics of burn patients developing pneumonia, as well as the predisposing factors and the mortality of these patients. Infectious complications present serious problems in severely burned patients. Pneumonia, in particular, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Patients with inhalation injuries are exposed to a greater risk due to the possible development of infectious complications in the lower respiratory tract. During their stay in our Burn Care Unit, 22.9% of our burn patients developed pneumonia and 10.9 % of these patients died. Risk factors for the development of pneumonia in burn patients were found to be inhalation trauma, high ABSI score, the Baux and modified Baux index, and high ASA score (p<0.01). Age and gender showed no significant correlation to the incidence of pneumonia. In this study we were able to determine the incidence of pneumonia in burn patients, their mortality and the strong correlation of the presence of inhalation injury with the development of pneumonia.

  14. Substance P Mediates Reduced Pneumonia Rates After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung; Stepien, David; Hanseman, Dennis; Robinson, Bryce; Goodman, Michael D.; Pritts, Timothy A.; Caldwell, Charles C.; Remick, Daniel G.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Traumatic brain injury results in significant morbidity and mortality and is associated with infectious complications, particularly pneumonia. However, whether traumatic brain injury directly impacts the host response to pneumonia is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the nature of the relationship between traumatic brain injury and the prevalence of pneumonia in trauma patients and investigate the mechanism of this relationship using a murine model of traumatic brain injury with pneumonia. Design Data from the National Trauma Data Bank and a murine model of traumatic brain injury with postinjury pneumonia. Setting Academic medical centers in Cincinnati, OH, and Boston, MA. Patients/Subjects Trauma patients in the National Trauma Data Bank with a hospital length of stay greater than 2 days, age of at least 18 years at admission, and a blunt mechanism of injury. Subjects were female ICR mice 8–10 weeks old. Interventions Administration of a substance P receptor antagonist in mice. Measurements and Main Results Pneumonia rates were measured in trauma patients before and after risk adjustment using propensity scoring. In addition, survival and pulmonary inflammation were measured in mice undergoing traumatic brain injury with or without pneumonia. After risk adjustment, we found that traumatic brain injury patients had significantly lower rates of pneumonia compared to blunt trauma patients without traumatic brain injury. A murine model of traumatic brain injury reproduced these clinical findings with mice subjected to traumatic brain injury demonstrating increased bacterial clearance and survival after induction of pneumonia. To determine the mechanisms responsible for this improvement, the substance P receptor was blocked in mice after traumatic brain injury. This treatment abrogated the traumatic brain injury–associated increases in bacterial clearance and survival. Conclusions The data demonstrate that patients with traumatic

  15. [Differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Deĭkina, O N; Mishin, V Iu; Demikhova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to enhance the efficiency of differential diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hundred and fifty-nine adult patients were examined. These included 78 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 81 with community-acquired p neumonia. The clinical features of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 48) and mild community-acquired pneumonia (n = 51) were compared. The course of caseous pneumonia (n = 30) was compared with that of moderate and severe community-acquired pneumonia (n = 30). Significant differences in the manifestations of the intoxication and bronchopulmonary syndrome were not found in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Physical studies showed that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, moist rale (54.9%) and crepitation (11.8%) were prevalent, but in those with infiltrative tuberculosis rale was absent in 60.4% of cases and the pattern of respiration was unchanged in 79.2%. Chest X-ray studies indicated that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, lower lobar inflammatory changes were predominant in 62.8% of cases whereas in those with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis the process was mainly bilateral (43.8%) with the presence of destructive changes (83.3%) and bronchogenic dissemination (66.7%). In patients with caseous pneumonia, the intoxication syndrome was more significant than in those with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Chest X-ray studies demonstrated that in patients with caseous pneumonia, specific changes were bilateral with the involvement of 2 lobes or more, with destruction and bronchogenic dissemination while in those with community-acquired pneumonia, the pulmonary processes were predominantly bilateral (76.6%) at the lower lobar site (36.7%). PMID:17338353

  16. Characterisation of an oxidative response inhibitor produced by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, F. E.; Elson, C. J.; Mitchell, T. J.; Andrew, P. W.; Catterall, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pneumonia caused by infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a major clinical problem. Reactive oxygen species contribute to the killing of these bacteria by polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs). Defence mechanisms of Str pneumoniae which counter reactive oxygen species are characterised. METHODS--PMNs were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in the presence and absence of Str pneumoniae and supernatants from them, and superoxide (O2-) production was measured by the reduction of ferricytochrome c. RESULTS--Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not Klebsiella pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus, inhibited PMA stimulated superoxide production by PMNs. Washed PMNs which had been preincubated with Str pneumoniae autolysis phase supernatants also exhibited depressed H2O2 production in response to PMA. The inhibitory activity was not attributable to non-specific cytotoxicity as assessed by release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, nor did the supernatants inhibit PMA stimulated degranulation of PMNs. Fractionation of the autolysis phase supernatants revealed inhibitory activity in both the fractions greater than and less than 10 kD. Like pneumolysin the inhibitory activity was heat sensitive. However, both a parent and pneumolysin negative mutant Str pneumoniae, and autolysis phase supernatants from them, inhibited PMN superoxide production. Antisera to pneumolysin failed to abrogate the inhibitory effect of intact Str pneumoniae or autolysis phase supernatants from types 1 or 14 Str pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS--The inhibitory effect of Str pneumoniae on the respiratory burst of PMNs is not shared by two other common lung pathogens. The existence of a novel inhibitor of the PMN respiratory burst, distinct from pneumolysin, has been demonstrated. The inhibitor is specific for the respiratory burst and is active both in the logarithmic phase of growth and during autolysis. PMID:8066562

  17. Streptococcal IgA-binding proteins bind in the Calpha 2-Calpha 3 interdomain region and inhibit binding of IgA to human CD89.

    PubMed

    Pleass, R J; Areschoug, T; Lindahl, G; Woof, J M

    2001-03-16

    Certain pathogenic bacteria express surface proteins that bind to the Fc part of human IgA or IgG. These bacterial proteins are important as immunochemical tools and model systems, but their biological function is still unclear. Here, we describe studies of three streptococcal proteins that bind IgA: the Sir22 and Arp4 proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes and the unrelated beta protein of group B streptococcus. Analysis of IgA domain swap and point mutants indicated that two loops at the Calpha2/Calpha3 domain interface are critical for binding of the streptococcal proteins. This region is also used in binding the human IgA receptor CD89, an important mediator of IgA effector function. In agreement with this finding, the three IgA-binding proteins and a 50-residue IgA-binding peptide derived from Sir22 blocked the ability of IgA to bind CD89. Further, the Arp4 protein inhibited the ability of IgA to trigger a neutrophil respiratory burst via CD89. Thus, we have identified residues on IgA-Fc that play a key role in binding of different streptococcal IgA-binding proteins, and we have identified a mechanism by which a bacterial IgA-binding protein may interfere with IgA effector function. PMID:11096107

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  19. Lipoid pneumonia--a case of refractory pneumonia in a child treated with ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Wieteska-Klimczak, Anna; Własienko, Anna; Mazur, Agnieszka; Ziołkowski, Jerzy; Jaworska, Joanna; Kościesza, Andrzej; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Książyk, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia (LP) is a chronic inflammation of the lung parenchyma with interstitial involvement due to the accumulation of endogenous or exogenous lipids. Exogenous LP (ELP) is associated with the aspiration or inhalation of oil present in food, oil-based medications or radiographic contrast media. The clinical manifestations of LP range from asymptomatic cases to severe pulmonary involvement, with respiratory failure and death, according to the quantity and duration of the aspiration. The diagnosis of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is based on a history of exposure to oil and the presence of lipid-laden macrophages on sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) analysis. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the imaging technique of choice for evaluation of patients with suspected LP. The best therapeutic strategy is to remove the oil as early as possible through bronchoscopy with multiple BALs and interruption in the use of mineral oil. Steroid therapy remains controversial, and should be reserved for severe cases. We describe a case of LP due to oil aspiration in 3-year-old girl with intractable epilepsy on ketogenic diet. Diagnostic problems were due to non-specific symptoms that were mimicking serious infectious pneumonia. A high index of suspicion and precise medical history is required in cases of refractory pneumonia and fever unresponsive to conventional therapy. Gastroesophageal reflux and a risk of aspiration may be regarded as relative contraindications to the ketogenic diet. Conservative treatment, based on the use of oral steroids, proved to be an efficient therapeutic approach in this case. PMID:23996884

  20. Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae, United States1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stella; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yi-Wei; Stiles, Jeffrey; Hong, Tao; Todd, Kathleen; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Xiao, Li; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Waites, Ken B.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is highly prevalent in Asia and is now being reported from Europe. Few data on MRMP are available in the United States. Using genotypic and phenotypic methods, we detected high-level MRMP in 13.2% of 91 M. pneumoniae­–positive specimens from 6 US locations. PMID:26196107

  1. Klebsiella pneumoniae Antimicrobial Drug Resistance, United States, 1998–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Guillermo V.; Master, Ronald N.; Clark, Richard B.; Fyyaz, Madiha; Duvvuri, Padmaraj; Ekta, Gupta

    2013-01-01

    We studied antimicrobial-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae for 1998–2010 by using data from The Surveillance Network. Susceptibility results (n = 3,132,354) demonstrated significant increases in resistance to all antimicrobial drugs studied, except tetracycline. Cross-resistance among carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae was lower for tetracycline and amikacin. PMID:23260464

  2. Genome Sequences of Five Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, L. Letti; Rusconi, Brigida; Gildersleeve, Heidi; Qi, Chao; McLaughlin, Milena; Seshu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a nosocomial pathogen of emerging importance and displays resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics, such as carbapenems. Here, we report the genome sequences of five clinical K. pneumoniae isolates, four of which are carbapenem resistant. Carbapenem resistance is conferred by hydrolyzing class A β-lactamases found adjacent to transposases. PMID:26966211

  3. Minimum intravenous infectious dose of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The minimum intravenous infectious dose for ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) WLC1 was determined using twenty-four 6 month-old lambs. Twelve groups of two 6 month-old lambs were inoculated intravenously with tissue culture fluid containing ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) WLC1 titer...

  4. Serum zinc and pneumonia in nursing home elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc plays an important role in immune function. The association between serum zinc and pneumonia in the elderly has not been studied. The study aim is to determine if serum zinc concentrations in nursing home elderly are associated with incidence and duration of pneumonia, total and duration of ant...

  5. Legionella pneumophila pneumonia during pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaillac, Nelly; Floccard, Bernard; Ould, Thierry; Benatir, Farida; Levrat, Albrice; Meunier, Pierre; Allaouchiche, Bernard

    2006-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila pneumonia during pregnancy can have serious consequences for the mother and lead to fetal distress. We report a case of L. pneumophila pneumonia in a pregnant woman at 31 weeks gestation. With early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, the outcome was favorable with delivery of a healthy infant at 40 weeks gestation. PMID:16246423

  6. Pneumonia Frequencies with Different Enteral Tube Feeding Access Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Henry M.

    2002-01-01

    Over a 24-month period, 25 adults with mental retardation being fed via a gastrostomy tube experienced 40 cases of pneumonia during 508 person-months of observations, whereas 5 individuals being fed via a jejunostromy tube did not experience any pneumonia during 96 person-months of observation. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  7. Increased incidence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in Norway 2011.

    PubMed

    Blystad, H; Ånestad, G; Vestrheim, D F; Madsen, S; Rønning, K

    2012-01-01

    Epidemics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have recently been reported from England and Wales and from Denmark. A similar increase in M. pneumoniae infections was noted in Norway late autumn 2011.The epidemic has resulted in shortage of erythromycin and the use of alternative antibiotics has been recommended. PMID:22321136

  8. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen associated with Legionella pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Casanova-Roman, Manuel; Casas, Javier; Sanchez-Porto, Antonio; Nacle, Belen

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the spleen associated with Legionella pneumonia is a rare and life-threatening complication; only three cases have been reported to date. The authors describe a case of a 47-year-old man who presented with pneumonia and abdominal pain. He underwent a splenectomy, and was successfully treated with clarithromycin and levofloxacin. PMID:21886641

  9. Epidemiological comparison of three Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia epidemics in a single hospital over 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Youn, You-Sook; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Shin, Myung-Seok; Kang, Jin-Han

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) pneumonia epidemics have occurred in 3- to 4-year cycles in Korea. We evaluated the epidemiologic characteristics of MP pneumonia in Daejeon, Korea, from 2003 to 2012. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 779 medical records of children (0-15 years of old) with MP pneumonia admitted to our institution and compared the data from 3 recent epidemics. Results In 779 patients, the mean age and male-to-female ratio were 5.0±2.2 years and 1:1, and most cases were observed in autumn. There were three epidemics during the study period, in 2003, 2006-2007, and 2011. In our comparison of the three epidemics, we found no differences in mean age, the male-to-female ratio, hospital stay, or the rate of seroconverters during hospitalization. All three epidemics began in early summer and peaked in September 2003 and 2011 and in October 2006 and then gradually decreased until the next year's spring season, although the 2006 epidemic extended further into 2007. The peak age groups in the children in 2003 and 2006 were 3-6 year-olds (57.5% and 56%, respectively), but in the 2011 epidemic, the peak group was 1-4 year-olds (46.5%). The proportion of the <2 years of age group was 20%, 15.7% and 28.8%, and >10 years of age group was 5.2%, 13.8%, and 14.8% of total patients, respectively. Conclusion MP pneumonia outbreaks occurred every 3-4 years. The pattern of 3 recent epidemics was similar in demographic characteristics and seasonality with some variations in each outbreak. PMID:26124847

  10. Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae induced ventilator-associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Q; Zhou, M; Zou, M; Liu, W-e

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (hvKP) induced ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and the microbiological characteristics and epidemiology of the hvKP strains. A retrospective study of 49 mechanically ventilated patients with K. pneumoniae induced VAP was conducted at a university hospital in China from January 2014 to December 2014. Clinical characteristics and K. pneumoniae antimicrobial susceptibility and biofilm formation were analyzed. Genes of capsular serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57 and virulence factors plasmid rmpA(p-rmpA), iroB, iucA, mrkD, entB, iutA, ybtS, kfu and allS were also evaluated. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses were used to study the clonal relationship of the K. pneumoniae strains. Strains possessed p-rmpA and iroB and iucA were defined as hvKP. Of 49 patients, 14 patients (28.6 %) were infected by hvKP. Antimicrobial resistant rate was significantly higher in cKP than that in hvKP. One ST29 K54 extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing hvKP strain was detected. The prevalence of K1 and K2 in hvKP was 42.9 % and 21.4 %, respectively. The incidences of K1, K2, K20, p-rmpA, iroB, iucA, iutA, Kfu and alls were significantly higher in hvKP than those in cKP. ST23 was dominant among hvKP strains, and all the ST23 strains had identical RAPD pattern. hvKP has become a common pathogen of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients in China. Clinicians should increase awareness of hvKP induced VAP and enhance epidemiologic surveillance. PMID:26753990

  11. [A case of bettolepsy in acute pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Valenkevich, L N; Markelova, N N

    1992-03-01

    Literature lists more than 300 case reports of bettolepsy developing mainly in chronic diseases of the respiratory organs (chronic bronchitis, bronchial asthma, pulmonary emphysema, cor pulmonale) as well as in patients with epilepsy and organic brain diseases. The authors describe a case of bettolepsy in a patient with acute (croupous) pneumonia without respiratory diseases in the anamnesis and without a burdened neurological status. The role of nicotin and alcohol in the development of bettolepsy is shown. The problems of pathogenesis, clinical picture, differential diagnosis and treatment of bettolepsy are discussed. PMID:1413706

  12. [Exogenous lipoid pneumonia--case report].

    PubMed

    Costa, Antonio Santos; Noya, Rafael; Calvo, Teresa Campos; Severo, R; Afonso, Abel

    2005-01-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP) is an infrequent pathology that results from the aspiration or inhalation of exogenous hydrocarbon. The acute form may be seen in cases of accidental aspiration of fatlike material traditionally described in fire-eaters. The authors present the case report of an acutELP in a 19 year-old patient, fire-eater, admitted at the Emergency Room after inhalation of petroleum. By conclusion, some brief considerations on clinical-imagiological aspects of this situation are discussed. PMID:16514716

  13. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in developing countries*

    PubMed Central

    De Armas Rodríguez, Y.; Wissmann, G.; Müller, A.L.; Pederiva, M.A.; Brum, M.C.; Brackmann, R.L.; Capó De Paz, V.; Calderón, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is a serious fungal infection among immunocompromised patients. In developed countries, the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of PcP have been clearly defined and well documented. However, in most developing countries, relatively little is known about the prevalence of pneumocystosis. Several articles covering African, Asian and American countries were reviewed in the present study. PcP was identified as a frequent opportunistic infection in AIDS patients from different geographic regions. A trend to an increasing rate of PcP was apparent in developing countries from 2002 to 2010. PMID:21894262

  14. Pasteurella multocida pneumonia complicated by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Martyn, V; Swift, D

    1984-02-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. She proved to have a Pasteurella multocida pneumonia, with blood stream invasion by the organism, and required positive pressure ventilation for 53 days. Penicillin G., the drug of choice for this infection, failed to reverse the steady decline in her arterial oxygen-tension, and it was only after treatment with chloramphenicol and prednisolone that she began to improve. Serological tests strongly indicated the presence of a Staphylococcus aureus infection and the delay in giving antibiotics appropriate to this second pathogen may have been the reason for the patient's initial downhill course. PMID:6709548

  15. Inverse relation between disease severity and expression of the streptococcal cysteine protease, SpeB, among clonal M1T1 isolates recovered from invasive group A streptococcal infection cases.

    PubMed

    Kansal, R G; McGeer, A; Low, D E; Norrby-Teglund, A; Kotb, M

    2000-11-01

    The streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB) is one of the major virulence factors produced by group A streptococci (GAS). In this study we investigated if differences exist in SpeB production by clonally related M1T1 clinical isolates derived from patients with invasive infections. Twenty-nine of these isolates were from nonsevere cases and 48 were from severe cases, including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis (NF) cases. The expression and amount of the 28-kDa SpeB protein produced were determined by quantitative Western blotting, and protease activity was measured by a fluorescent enzymatic assay. A high degree of variation in SpeB expression was seen among the isolates, and this variation seemed to correlate with the severity and/or clinical manifestation of the invasive infection. The mean amount of 28-kDa SpeB protein and cysteine protease activity produced by isolates from nonsevere cases was significantly higher than that from STSS cases (P = 0.001). This difference was partly due to the fact that 41% of STSS isolates produced little or no SpeB compared to only 14% of isolates recovered in nonsevere cases. Moreover, the cysteine protease activity among those isolates that expressed SpeB was significantly lower for STSS isolates than for isolates from nonsevere cases (P = 0.001). Increased SpeB production was also inversely correlated with intact M protein expression, and inhibition of cysteine protease activity blocked the cleavage of the surface M protein. Together, the data support the existence of both an "on-off" and a posttranslational regulatory mechanism(s) controlling SpeB production, and they suggest that isolates with the speB gene in the "off" state are more likely to spare the surface M protein and to be isolated from cases of severe rather than nonsevere invasive infection. These findings may have important implications for the role of SpeB in host-pathogen interactions via regulation of the expression of GAS

  16. Inverse Relation between Disease Severity and Expression of the Streptococcal Cysteine Protease, SpeB, among Clonal M1T1 Isolates Recovered from Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita G.; McGeer, Allison; Low, Donald E.; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Kotb, Malak

    2000-01-01

    The streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB) is one of the major virulence factors produced by group A streptococci (GAS). In this study we investigated if differences exist in SpeB production by clonally related M1T1 clinical isolates derived from patients with invasive infections. Twenty-nine of these isolates were from nonsevere cases and 48 were from severe cases, including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis (NF) cases. The expression and amount of the 28-kDa SpeB protein produced were determined by quantitative Western blotting, and protease activity was measured by a fluorescent enzymatic assay. A high degree of variation in SpeB expression was seen among the isolates, and this variation seemed to correlate with the severity and/or clinical manifestation of the invasive infection. The mean amount of 28-kDa SpeB protein and cysteine protease activity produced by isolates from nonsevere cases was significantly higher than that from STSS cases (P = 0.001). This difference was partly due to the fact that 41% of STSS isolates produced little or no SpeB compared to only 14% of isolates recovered in nonsevere cases. Moreover, the cysteine protease activity among those isolates that expressed SpeB was significantly lower for STSS isolates than for isolates from nonsevere cases (P = 0.001). Increased SpeB production was also inversely correlated with intact M protein expression, and inhibition of cysteine protease activity blocked the cleavage of the surface M protein. Together, the data support the existence of both an “on-off” and a posttranslational regulatory mechanism(s) controlling SpeB production, and they suggest that isolates with the speB gene in the “off” state are more likely to spare the surface M protein and to be isolated from cases of severe rather than nonsevere invasive infection. These findings may have important implications for the role of SpeB in host-pathogen interactions via regulation of the expression of

  17. Increasing Pneumocystis Pneumonia, England, UK, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Maini, Rishma; Sheridan, Elizabeth A.; Lamagni, Theresa; Nichols, Gordon; Delpech, Valerie; Phin, Nick

    2013-01-01

    After an increase in the number of reported cases of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in England, we investigated data from 2000–2010 to verify the increase. We analyzed national databases for microbiological and clinical diagnoses of P. jirovecii pneumonia and associated deaths. We found that laboratory-confirmed cases in England had increased an average of 7% per year and that death certifications and hospital admissions also increased. Hospital admissions indicated increased P. jirovecii pneumonia diagnoses among patients not infected with HIV, particularly among those who had received a transplant or had a hematologic malignancy. A new risk was identified: preexisting lung disease. Infection rates among HIV-positive adults decreased. The results confirm that diagnoses of potentially preventable P. jirovecii pneumonia among persons outside the known risk group of persons with HIV infection have increased. This finding warrants further characterization of risk groups and a review of P. jirovecii pneumonia prevention strategies. PMID:23622345

  18. "Diesel siphoner's lung": Exogenous lipoid pneumonia following hydrocarbon aspiration.

    PubMed

    Venkatnarayan, Kavitha; Madan, Karan; Walia, Ritika; Kumar, Jaya; Jain, Deepali; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an unusual and uncommon form of pneumonia caused by aspiration of fatty substances. Hydrocarbon pneumonitis following aspiration of diesel is a form of exogenous lipoid pneumonia wherein, aspirated diesel reaches the alveoli rapidly without evoking any significant cough, but initiates an intense inflammatory reaction in the pulmonary parenchyma. This is a rarely described clinical scenario, although the practice of diesel siphonage from automobiles is a common practice in developing countries. We herein describe a 40-year-old male patient, in whom the diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia was delayed for a long duration and highlight the importance of taking a detailed occupational exposure history in patients with non-resolving pneumonia to rule out the underlying possibility of this rare clinical entity. PMID:24669087

  19. Wavelet augmented cough analysis for rapid childhood pneumonia diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kosasih, Keegan; Abeyratne, Udantha R; Swarnkar, Vinayak; Triasih, Rina

    2015-04-01

    Pneumonia is the cause of death for over a million children each year around the world, largely in resource poor regions such as sub-Saharan Africa and remote Asia. One of the biggest challenges faced by pneumonia endemic countries is the absence of a field deployable diagnostic tool that is rapid, low-cost and accurate. In this paper, we address this issue and propose a method to screen pneumonia based on the mathematical analysis of cough sounds. In particular, we propose a novel cough feature inspired by wavelet-based crackle detection work in lung sound analysis. These features are then combined with other mathematical features to develop an automated machine classifier, which can separate pneumonia from a range of other respiratory diseases. Both cough and crackles are symptoms of pneumonia, but their existence alone is not a specific enough marker of the disease. In this paper, we hypothesize that the mathematical analysis of cough sounds allows us to diagnose pneumonia with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Using a bedside microphone, we collected 815 cough sounds from 91 patients with respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia, asthma, and bronchitis. We extracted wavelet features from cough sounds and combined them with other features such as Mel Cepstral coefficients and non-Gaussianity index. We then trained a logistic regression classifier to separate pneumonia from other diseases. As the reference standard, we used the diagnosis by physicians aided with laboratory and radiological results as deemed necessary for a clinical decision. The methods proposed in this paper achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 63%, respectively, in separating pneumonia patients from non-pneumonia patients based on wavelet features alone. Combining the wavelets with features from our previous work improves the performance further to 94% and 88% sensitivity and specificity. The performance far surpasses that of the WHO criteria currently in common use in

  20. Lung dendritic cells facilitate extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination during pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Alva; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DCs-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DCs-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection. PMID:23802100