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Sample records for non-specific gene copy

  1. Allele Mining in Barley Genetic Resources Reveals Genes of Race-Non-Specific Powdery Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Annika; Korzun, Viktor; Bayles, Rosemary; Rajaraman, Jeyaraman; Himmelbach, Axel; Hedley, Pete E.; Schweizer, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Race-non-specific, or quantitative, pathogen resistance is of high importance to plant breeders due to its expected durability. However, it is usually controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) and therefore difficult to handle in practice. Knowing the genes that underlie race-non-specific resistance (NR) would allow its exploitation in a more targeted manner. Here, we performed an association-genetic study in a customized worldwide collection of spring barley accessions for candidate genes of race-NR to the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh) and combined data with results from QTL mapping as well as functional-genomics approaches. This led to the identification of 11 associated genes with converging evidence for an important role in race-NR in the presence of the Mlo gene for basal susceptibility. Outstanding in this respect was the gene encoding the transcription factor WRKY2. The results suggest that unlocking plant genetic resources and integrating functional-genomic with genetic approaches can accelerate the discovery of genes underlying race-NR in barley and other crop plants. PMID:22629270

  2. Divergence of genes encoding non-specific lipid transfer proteins in the poaceae family.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cheol Seong; Jung, Jae Hyeong; Yim, Won Cheol; Lee, Byung-Moo; Seo, Yong Weon; Kim, Wook

    2007-10-31

    The genes encoding non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), members of a small multigene family, show a complex pattern of expressional regulation, suggesting that some diversification may have resulted from changes in their expression after duplication. In this study, the evolution of nsLTP genes within the Poaceae family was characterized via a survey of the pseudogenes and unigenes encoding the nsLTP in rice pseudomolecules and the NCBI unigene database. nsLTP-rich regions were detected in the distal portions of rice chromosomes 11 and 12; these may have resulted from the most recent large segmental duplication in the rice genome. Two independent tandem duplications were shown to occur within the nsLTP-rich regions of rice. The genomic distribution of the nsLTP genes in the rice genome differs from that in wheat. This may be attributed to gene migration, chromosomal rearrangement, and/or differential gene loss. The genomic distribution pattern of nsLTP genes in the Poaceae family points to the existence of some differences among cereal nsLTP genes, all of which diverged from an ancient gene. The unigenes encoding nsLTPs in each cereal species are clustered into five groups. The somewhat different distribution of nsLTP-encoding EST clones between the groups across cereal species imply that independent duplication(s) followed by subfunctionalization (and/or neofunctionalization) of the nsLTP gene family in each species occurred during speciation. PMID:17978574

  3. Pericentromeric genes for non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX)

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.; Kerr, B.; Mulley, J.; Turner, G.

    1994-07-15

    Extensive linkage analysis in three families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) have localized the gene in each family to the pericentromeric region of the chromosome. The MRX17 gene is localized with a peak lod of 2.41 ({theta} = 0.0) with the trinucleotide repeat polymorphism at the androgen receptor (AR) gene locus. The gene lies in the interval between the markers DSX255 and DXS990, as defined by recombinants. The MRX18 gene maps to the interval between the markers DXS538 and DXS1126, with a peak lod score of 2.01 ({theta} = 0.0) at the PFC gene locus. In the third family (Family E) with insufficient informative meioses for assignment of an MRX acronym, the maximum lod score is 1.8 at a recombination fraction of zero for several marker loci between DXS207 and DXS426. Exclusions from the regions of marker loci spanning Xq support the localization of the MRX gene in Family E to the pericentromeric region. Localizations of these and other MRX genes have determined that MRX2 and MRX19 map to distal Xp, MRX3, and MRX6 map to distal Xq, whilst the majority cluster in the pericentromeric region. In addition, we confirm that there are at least two distinct MRX genes near the centromere as delineated by the non-overlapping regional localizations of MRX17 and MRX18. Determination of these non-overlapping localizations is currently the only means of classifying non-syndromal forms of mental retardation and determining the minimum number of MRX loci. 27 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. How many X-linked genes for non-specific mental retardation (MRX) are there?

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Donnelly, A.J.; Mulley, J.C.

    1996-07-12

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is that proportion of mental retardation (MR) showing the distinctive pattern of inheritance associated with the X chromosome. XLMR is subdivided into syndromal and non-specific (MRX) forms. MRX is clinically homogeneous but genetically heterogeneous. Affected males in families segregating MRX have no consistent phenotypic expression apart from their MR to distinguish them from unaffected males or affected males in other MRX families. Syndromal MRs have additional neurological or phenotypic characteristics that define a syndrome, and most of these syndromes are rare. Within some families an affected male may show {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} syndromal signs, but where this is not evident in other affected males from the same family, the MR is diagnosed as non-specific. Delineation from fragile X syndrome or FRAXE MR can now be confidently made with the aid of direct molecular tests which detect the (CCG){sub n} expansion at either FRAXA or FRAXE. MRX can be expressed in carrier females but with milder manifestations. The gene in such cases could be partially dominant or result from a skewed X-inactivation pattern in neural tissue. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  6. Diversity of human copy number variation and multicopy genes.

    PubMed

    Sudmant, Peter H; Kitzman, Jacob O; Antonacci, Francesca; Alkan, Can; Malig, Maika; Tsalenko, Anya; Sampas, Nick; Bruhn, Laurakay; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E

    2010-10-29

    Copy number variants affect both disease and normal phenotypic variation, but those lying within heavily duplicated, highly identical sequence have been difficult to assay. By analyzing short-read mapping depth for 159 human genomes, we demonstrated accurate estimation of absolute copy number for duplications as small as 1.9 kilobase pairs, ranging from 0 to 48 copies. We identified 4.1 million "singly unique nucleotide" positions informative in distinguishing specific copies and used them to genotype the copy and content of specific paralogs within highly duplicated gene families. These data identify human-specific expansions in genes associated with brain development, reveal extensive population genetic diversity, and detect signatures consistent with gene conversion in the human species. Our approach makes ~1000 genes accessible to genetic studies of disease association. PMID:21030649

  7. Evolution of non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes in the Poaceae family: their duplication and diversity.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cheol Seong; Yim, Won Cheol; Moon, Jun-Cheol; Hung, Je Hyeong; Lee, Tong Geon; Lim, Sung Don; Cho, Seon Hae; Lee, Kwang Kook; Kim, Wook; Seo, Yong Weon; Lee, Byung-Moo

    2008-05-01

    Previously, the genes encoding non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) of the Poaceae family appear to evidence different genomic distribution and somewhat different shares of EST clones, which is suggestive of independent duplication(s) followed by functional diversity. To further evaluate the evolutionary fate of the Poaceae nsLTP genes, we have identified Ka/Ks values, conserved, mutated or lost cis-regulatory elements, responses to several elicitors, genome-wide expression profiles, and nsLTP gene-coexpression networks of both (or either) wheat and rice. The Ka/Ks values within each group and between groups appeared to be similar, but not identical, in both species. The conserved cis-regulatory elements, e.g. the RY repeat (CATGCA) element related to ABA regulation in group A, might be reflected in some degree of long-term conservation in transcriptional regulation post-dating speciation. In group A, wheat nsLTP genes, with the exception of TaLTP4, evidenced responses similar to those of plant elicitors; however, the rice nsLTP genes evidenced differences in expression profiles, even though the genes of both species have undergone purifying selection, thereby suggesting their independent functional diversity. The expression profiles of rice nsLTP genes with a microarray dataset of 155 gene expression omnibus sample (GSM) plates suggest that subfunctionalization is not the sole mechanism inherent to the evolutionary history of nsLTP genes but may, rather, function in concert with other mechanism(s). As inferred by the nsLTP gene-coexpression networks, the functional diversity of nsLTP genes appears not to be randomized, but rather to be specialized in the direction of specific biological processes over evolutionary time. PMID:18270740

  8. SHC2 gene copy number in multiple system atrophy (MSA)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Marcus C.; Garland, Emily M.; Hedges, Lora; Womack-Nunley, Bethany; Hamid, Rizwan; Phillips, John A.; Shibao, Cyndya A.; Raj, Satish R.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic, late onset, rapidly-progressing neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by autonomic failure, together with parkinsonian, cerebellar, and pyramidal motor symptoms. The pathologic hallmark is the glial cytoplasmic inclusion with alpha-synuclein aggregates. MSA is thus an alpha synucleinopathy. Recently, Sasaki et al. reported that heterozygosity for copy number loss of Src homology 2 domain containing-transforming protein 2 (SHC2) genes (heterozygous SHC2 gene deletions) occurred in DNAs from many Japanese individuals with MSA. Because background copy number variation (CNV) can be distinct in different human populations, we assessed SHC2 allele copy number in DNAs from a US cohort of individuals with MSA, to determine the contribution of SHC2 gene copy number variation in an American cohort followed at a US referral center for MSA. Our cohort included 105 carefully phenotyped individuals with MSA. Methods We studied 105 well characterized patients with MSA and 5 control subjects with reduced SHC2 gene copy number. We used two TaqMan Gene Copy Number Assays, to determine the copy number of two segments of the SHC2 gene that are separated by 27 Kb. Results Assay results of DNAs from all of our 105 subjects with MSA showed two copies of both segments of their SHC2 genes. Conclusion Our results indicate that SHC2 gene deletions underlie few, if any, cases of well characterized MSA in the US population. This is in contrast to the Japanese experience reported by Sasaki et al., likely reflecting heterogeneity of the disease in different genetic backgrounds. PMID:24170347

  9. Regional localisation of two non-specific X-linked mental retardation genes (MRX30 and MRX31)

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, A.J.; Mulley, J.C.; Ryan, A.K.; Partington, M.W.

    1996-07-12

    Two genes responsible for X-linked mental retardation have been localized by linkage analysis. MRX30 maps to a 28 cM region flanked by the loci DXS990 (Xq21.3) and DXS424 (Xq24). A significant multipoint lod score of 2.78 was detected between the loci DXS1120 and DXS456. MRX31 maps to a 12 cM region that spans the centromere from DXS1126 (Xp11.23) to DXS1124 (Xq13.3). Significant two-point lod scores, at a recombination fraction of zero, were obtained with the loci DXS991 (Zmax = 2.06), AR (Zmax = 3.44), PGK1P1 (Zmax = 2.06) and DXS453 (Zmax = 3.31). The MRX30 localization overlaps that of MRX8, 13, 20 and 26 and defines the position of a new MRX gene on the basis of a set of non-overlapping regional localizations. The MRX31 localization overlaps the localizations of many of the pericentromeric MRX loci (MRX 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 20, 22 and 26). There are now at least 8 distinct loci associated with non-specific mental retardation on the X chromosome defined, in order from pter to qter, by localization for MRX24, MRX2, MRX10, MRX1, MRX30, MRX27, FRAXE and MRX3. 32 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Regional localisation of a non-specific X-linked mental retardation gene (MRX19) to Xp22

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, A.J.; Gedeon, A.K.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M. |; Choo, K.H.A.; Danks, D.M.

    1994-07-15

    A gene responsible for a non-specific form of X-linked mental retardation (MRX19) was localized by linkage analysis. Exclusions and regional localization were made using 21 highly informative PCR-based markers along the X chromosome. Significant lod scores at a recombination fraction of zero were detected with the marker loci DXS207, DXS987 (Zmax = 3.58) and DXS999 (Zmax = 3.28) indicating that this gene is localized to the proximal portion of Xp22. Recombination between MRX19 and the flanking loci KAL and DXS989 was observed. The multipoint CEPH background map, with map distances in cM, is DXS996-1.8-KAL-19.0-DXS207-0.9-[DXS987,DXS443]-4.3-DXS999-3.5-DXS365-14.0-DXS989. Two other MRX disorders and two syndromal mental retardations, Coffin-Lowry syndrome and Partington syndrome, have been mapped to this region. There is a possibility that the 3 MRX disorders are the same entity. Most MRX disorders remain clustered around the pericentromeric region. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Genome Copy Numbers and Gene Conversion in Methanogenic Archaea▿

    PubMed Central

    Hildenbrand, Catherina; Stock, Tilmann; Lange, Christian; Rother, Michael; Soppa, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that one species of methanogenic archaea, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, is polyploid, while a second species, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus, is diploid. To further investigate the distribution of ploidy in methanogenic archaea, species of two additional genera—Methanosarcina acetivorans and Methanococcus maripaludis—were investigated. M. acetivorans was found to be polyploid during fast growth (tD = 6 h; 17 genome copies) and oligoploid during slow growth (doubling time = 49 h; 3 genome copies). M. maripaludis has the highest ploidy level found for any archaeal species, with up to 55 genome copies in exponential phase and ca. 30 in stationary phase. A compilation of archaeal species with quantified ploidy levels reveals a clear dichotomy between Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota: none of seven euryarchaeal species of six genera is monoploid (haploid), while, in contrast, all six crenarchaeal species of four genera are monoploid, indicating significant genetic differences between these two kingdoms. Polyploidy in asexual species should lead to accumulation of inactivating mutations until the number of intact chromosomes per cell drops to zero (called “Muller's ratchet”). A mechanism to equalize the genome copies, such as gene conversion, would counteract this phenomenon. Making use of a previously constructed heterozygous mutant strain of the polyploid M. maripaludis we could show that in the absence of selection very fast equalization of genomes in M. maripaludis took place probably via a gene conversion mechanism. In addition, it was shown that the velocity of this phenomenon is inversely correlated to the strength of selection. PMID:21097629

  12. Exploring the potential reservoirs of non specific TEM beta lactamase (blaTEM) gene in the Indo-Gangetic region: A risk assessment approach to predict health hazards.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Rani, Neetika; Amoah, Isaac Dennis; Stenström, Thor Axel; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-08-15

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria is an important public health and environmental contamination issue. Antimicrobials of β-lactam group accounts for approximately two thirds, by weight, of all antimicrobials administered to humans due to high clinical efficacy and low toxicity. This study explores β-lactam resistance determinant gene (blaTEM) as emerging contaminant in Indo-Gangetic region using qPCR in molecular beacon format. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) approach was adopted to predict risk to human health associated with consumption/exposure of surface water, potable water and street foods contaminated with bacteria having blaTEM gene. It was observed that surface water and sediments of the river Ganga and Gomti showed high numbers of blaTEM gene copies and varied significantly (p<0.05) among the sampling locations. The potable water collected from drinking water facility and clinical settings exhibit significant number of blaTEM gene copies (13±0.44-10200±316 gene copies/100mL). It was observed that E.crassipes among aquatic flora encountered in both the rivers had high load of blaTEM gene copies. The information on prevalence of environmental reservoirs of blaTEM gene containing bacteria in Indo-Gangetic region and risk associated will be useful for formulating strategies to protect public from menace of clinical risks linked with antimicrobial resistant bacteria. PMID:27111425

  13. Copy number variants including RAS pathway genes-How much RASopathy is in the phenotype?

    PubMed

    Lissewski, Christina; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Schanze, Ina; Zenker, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The RASopathies comprise a group of clinically overlapping developmental syndromes the common pathogenetic basis of which is dysregulated signal flow through the RAS-MAPK pathway. Mutations in several components or modifiers of the pathway have been identified in Noonan syndrome and related disorders. Over the past years copy number variants (CNVs) encompassing RAS pathway genes (PTPN11, RAF1, MEK2, or SHOC2) have been reported in children with developmental syndromes. These observations raised speculations that the associated phenotypes represent RASopathies, implying that the increased or reduced expression of the respective RAS pathway component and a consecutive dysregulation of RAS pathway signalling is responsible for the clinical picture. Herein, we present two individuals and three of their relatives harboring duplications of either 3p25.2 including the RAF1 locus or 19p13.3 including the MEK2 locus. Duplication carriers exhibited variable clinical phenotypes including non-specific facial dysmorphism, short stature, and learning difficulties. A careful review of the literature supported the impression that phenotypes associated with CNVs including RAS pathway genes commonly share non-specific symptoms with RASopathies, while the characteristic "gestalt" is lacking. Considering the known molecular pathogenesis of RASopathies, it is questionable that a modest increase in the expression of a functionally normal signaling component can mimic the effects of a qualitatively abnormal (hyperactive) mutant protein. We thus argue that current empirical and biological evidence is still insufficient to allow the conclusion that an altered copy number of a RAS pathway component is indeed the mechanism that is critical for the phenotype associated with CNVs including RASopathy genes. PMID:25974318

  14. Elevated Gene Copy Number Does Not Always Explain Elevated Amylase Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    German, Donovan P; Foti, Dolly M; Heras, Joseph; Amerkhanian, Hooree; Lockwood, Brent L

    2016-01-01

    Amylase activity variation in the guts of several model organisms appears to be explained by amylase gene copy number variation. We tested the hypothesis that amylase gene copy number is always elevated in animals with high amylolytic activity. We therefore sequenced the amylase genes and examined amylase gene copy number in prickleback fishes (family Stichaeidae) with different diets including two species of convergently evolved herbivores with the elevated amylase activity phenotype. We found elevated amylase gene copy number (six haploid copies) with sequence variation among copies in one herbivore (Cebidichthys violaceus) and modest gene copy number (two to three haploid copies) with little sequence variation in the remaining taxa, which included herbivores, omnivores, and a carnivore. Few functional differences in amylase biochemistry were observed, and previous investigations showed similar digestibility among the convergently evolved herbivores with differing amylase genetics. Hence, the phenotype of elevated amylase activity can be achieved by different mechanisms (i.e., elevated expression of fewer genes, increased gene copy number, or expression of more efficient amylase proteins) with similar results. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of available fish amylase genes show mostly lineage-specific duplication events leading to gene copy number variation, although a whole-genome duplication event or chromosomal translocation may have produced multiple amylase copies in the Ostariophysi, again showing multiple routes to the same result. PMID:27327179

  15. Gene expression in self-repressing system with multiple gene copies.

    PubMed

    Miekisz, Jacek; Szymańska, Paulina

    2013-02-01

    We analyze a simple model of a self-repressing system with multiple gene copies. Protein molecules may bound to DNA promoters and block their own transcription. We derive analytical expressions for the variance of the number of protein molecules in the stationary state in the self-consistent mean-field approximation. We show that the Fano factor (the variance divided by the mean value) is bigger for the one-gene case than for two gene copies and the difference decreases to zero as frequencies of binding and unbinding increase to infinity. PMID:23354928

  16. Human gene copy number spectra analysis in congenital heart malformations.

    PubMed

    Tomita-Mitchell, Aoy; Mahnke, Donna K; Struble, Craig A; Tuffnell, Maureen E; Stamm, Karl D; Hidestrand, Mats; Harris, Susan E; Goetsch, Mary A; Simpson, Pippa M; Bick, David P; Broeckel, Ulrich; Pelech, Andrew N; Tweddell, James S; Mitchell, Michael E

    2012-05-01

    The clinical significance of copy number variants (CNVs) in congenital heart disease (CHD) continues to be a challenge. Although CNVs including genes can confer disease risk, relationships between gene dosage and phenotype are still being defined. Our goal was to perform a quantitative analysis of CNVs involving 100 well-defined CHD risk genes identified through previously published human association studies in subjects with anatomically defined cardiac malformations. A novel analytical approach permitting CNV gene frequency "spectra" to be computed over prespecified regions to determine phenotype-gene dosage relationships was employed. CNVs in subjects with CHD (n = 945), subphenotyped into 40 groups and verified in accordance with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code, were compared with two control groups, a disease-free cohort (n = 2,026) and a population with coronary artery disease (n = 880). Gains (≥200 kb) and losses (≥100 kb) were determined over 100 CHD risk genes and compared using a Barnard exact test. Six subphenotypes showed significant enrichment (P ≤ 0.05), including aortic stenosis (valvar), atrioventricular canal (partial), atrioventricular septal defect with tetralogy of Fallot, subaortic stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, and truncus arteriosus. Furthermore, CNV gene frequency spectra were enriched (P ≤ 0.05) for losses at: FKBP6, ELN, GTF2IRD1, GATA4, CRKL, TBX1, ATRX, GPC3, BCOR, ZIC3, FLNA and MID1; and gains at: PRKAB2, FMO5, CHD1L, BCL9, ACP6, GJA5, HRAS, GATA6 and RUNX1. Of CHD subjects, 14% had causal chromosomal abnormalities, and 4.3% had likely causal (significantly enriched), large, rare CNVs. CNV frequency spectra combined with precision phenotyping may lead to increased molecular understanding of etiologic pathways. PMID:22318994

  17. Human gene copy number spectra analysis in congenital heart malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Donna K.; Struble, Craig A.; Tuffnell, Maureen E.; Stamm, Karl D.; Hidestrand, Mats; Harris, Susan E.; Goetsch, Mary A.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Bick, David P.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Pelech, Andrew N.; Tweddell, James S.; Mitchell, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical significance of copy number variants (CNVs) in congenital heart disease (CHD) continues to be a challenge. Although CNVs including genes can confer disease risk, relationships between gene dosage and phenotype are still being defined. Our goal was to perform a quantitative analysis of CNVs involving 100 well-defined CHD risk genes identified through previously published human association studies in subjects with anatomically defined cardiac malformations. A novel analytical approach permitting CNV gene frequency “spectra” to be computed over prespecified regions to determine phenotype-gene dosage relationships was employed. CNVs in subjects with CHD (n = 945), subphenotyped into 40 groups and verified in accordance with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code, were compared with two control groups, a disease-free cohort (n = 2,026) and a population with coronary artery disease (n = 880). Gains (≥200 kb) and losses (≥100 kb) were determined over 100 CHD risk genes and compared using a Barnard exact test. Six subphenotypes showed significant enrichment (P ≤ 0.05), including aortic stenosis (valvar), atrioventricular canal (partial), atrioventricular septal defect with tetralogy of Fallot, subaortic stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, and truncus arteriosus. Furthermore, CNV gene frequency spectra were enriched (P ≤ 0.05) for losses at: FKBP6, ELN, GTF2IRD1, GATA4, CRKL, TBX1, ATRX, GPC3, BCOR, ZIC3, FLNA and MID1; and gains at: PRKAB2, FMO5, CHD1L, BCL9, ACP6, GJA5, HRAS, GATA6 and RUNX1. Of CHD subjects, 14% had causal chromosomal abnormalities, and 4.3% had likely causal (significantly enriched), large, rare CNVs. CNV frequency spectra combined with precision phenotyping may lead to increased molecular understanding of etiologic pathways. PMID:22318994

  18. Genetic localisation of MRX27 to Xq24-26 defines another discrete gene for non-specific X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Connor, J.M.; Mulley, J.C.; Connor, J.M.; Glass, I.A.

    1996-07-12

    A large family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) was first described in 1991, with a suggestion of linkage to Xq26-27. The maximum lod score was 1.60 ({theta} = 0.10) with the F9 locus. The localization of this MRX gene has now been established by linkage to microsatellite markers. Peak pairwise lod scores of 4.02 and 4.01 ({theta} = 0.00) were attained at the DXS1114 and DXS994 loci respectively. This MRX gene is now designated MRX27 and is localized to Xq24-26 by recombination events detected by DXS424 and DXS102. This regional localization spans 26.2 cM on the genetic background map and defines another distinct MRX interval by linkage to a specific region of the X chromosome. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Copy number polymorphisms are not a common feature of innate immune genes.

    PubMed

    Linzmeier, Rose M; Ganz, Tomas

    2006-07-01

    Extensive copy number polymorphism was recently reported for innate immunity-related alpha-defensin genes DEFA1 and DEFA3 and beta-defensin genes DEFB4, DEFB103, and DEFB104. To establish whether such polymorphisms are a common feature of innate immune genes we used quantitative real-time PCR to determine the copy numbers of seven genes whose products have important innate immune functions. The genes encoding lysozyme, lactoferrin, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP18/LL-37), cathepsin G, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, azurocidin (CAP37/heparin-binding protein), and neutrophil elastase were each found to be single copy per haploid genome. These findings, along with the recent observation that defensin genes DEFA4, DEFA5, DEFA6, and DEFB1 are single copy, suggest that copy number polymorphisms are not a common feature of the innate immune genome but are restricted to a small subset of innate immunity-related genes. PMID:16617005

  20. Droplet digital PCR-aided screening and characterization of Pichia pastoris multiple gene copy strains.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Elena; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau

    2016-07-01

    Pichia (syn. Komagataella) pastoris is a widely used yeast platform for heterologous protein production. Expression cassettes are usually stably integrated into the genome of this host via homologous recombination. Although increasing gene dosage is a powerful strategy to improve recombinant protein production, an excess in the number of gene copies often leads to decreased product yields and increased metabolic burden, particularly for secreted proteins. We have constructed a series of strains harboring different copy numbers of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase gene (ROL), aiming to find the optimum gene dosage for secreted Rol production. In order to accurately determine ROL gene dosage, we implemented a novel protocol based on droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and cross validated it with conventional real-time PCR. Gene copy number determination based on ddPCR allowed for an accurate ranking of transformants according to their ROL gene dosage. Results indicated that ddPCR was particularly superior at lower gene dosages (one to five copies) over quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). This facilitated the determination of the optimal ROL gene dosage as low as two copies. The ranking of ROL gene dosage versus Rol yield was consistent at both small scale and bioreactor chemostat cultures, thereby easing clone characterization in terms of gene dosage dependent physiological effects, which could be discriminated even among strains differing by only one ROL copy. A selected two-copy strain showed twofold increase in Rol specific production in a chemostat culture over the single copy strain. Conversely, strains harboring more than two copies of the ROL gene showed decreased product and biomass yields, as well as altered substrate consumption specific rates, compared to the reference (one-copy) strain. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1542-1551. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26704939

  1. [Non-specific bronchial hyper-responsiveness and polymorphysm of xenobiotics biotransformation GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes under neutrophilic bronchial asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Mykaliuk, L V; Hryhola, O H

    2014-01-01

    With a view to study the effect of genes GSTT1 and GSTM1 deletion on the non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness in children with neutrophilic bronchial asthma (BA) 46 school age children having neutrophilic BA (1st clinical group) and their 48 coevals with eosinophilic phenotype of the disease (2nd clinical group) were subjected to a complex examination at the pulmo-allergologic department of the regional child clinical hospital of Chernivtsi. The study proved that genotype T1+M1del was more frequently registered in patients with the neutrophilic phenotype of the disease, and genotype T1delM1del was equifrequent in patients with different types of the inflammation of the respiratory ways. In patients with neutrophilic BA and deletion polymorphism of genes GSTT1 and GSTM1, there was a tendency to decreasing of the bronchial lability index through the decrease of bronchodilation, and bronchial response to histamine occurred to be higher than in children with the absence of polymorphism of the referred genes of the xenobiotics biotransformation system. PMID:24908960

  2. Low copy number of the salivary amylase gene predisposes to obesity.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Mario; El-Sayed Moustafa, Julia Sarah; Takousis, Petros; Pesce, Francesco; Bonnefond, Amélie; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna C; Sudmant, Peter H; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Al-Shafai, Mashael Nedham; Bottolo, Leonardo; Ozdemir, Erdal; So, Hon-Cheong; Davies, Robert W; Patrice, Alexandre; Dent, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Hysi, Pirro G; Dechaume, Aurélie; Huyvaert, Marlène; Skinner, Jane; Pigeyre, Marie; Caiazzo, Robert; Raverdy, Violeta; Vaillant, Emmanuel; Field, Sarah; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Weill, Jacques; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Jacobson, Peter; Sjostrom, Lars; Hammond, Christopher J; Deloukas, Panos; Sham, Pak Chung; McPherson, Ruth; Lee, Jeannette; Tai, E Shyong; Sladek, Robert; Carlsson, Lena M S; Walley, Andrew; Eichler, Evan E; Pattou, Francois; Spector, Timothy D; Froguel, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Common multi-allelic copy number variants (CNVs) appear enriched for phenotypic associations compared to their biallelic counterparts. Here we investigated the influence of gene dosage effects on adiposity through a CNV association study of gene expression levels in adipose tissue. We identified significant association of a multi-allelic CNV encompassing the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) with body mass index (BMI) and obesity, and we replicated this finding in 6,200 subjects. Increased AMY1 copy number was positively associated with both amylase gene expression (P = 2.31 × 10(-14)) and serum enzyme levels (P < 2.20 × 10(-16)), whereas reduced AMY1 copy number was associated with increased BMI (change in BMI per estimated copy = -0.15 (0.02) kg/m(2); P = 6.93 × 10(-10)) and obesity risk (odds ratio (OR) per estimated copy = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-1.26; P = 1.46 × 10(-10)). The OR value of 1.19 per copy of AMY1 translates into about an eightfold difference in risk of obesity between subjects in the top (copy number > 9) and bottom (copy number < 4) 10% of the copy number distribution. Our study provides a first genetic link between carbohydrate metabolism and BMI and demonstrates the power of integrated genomic approaches beyond genome-wide association studies. PMID:24686848

  3. Functional profiling and gene expression analysis of chromosomal copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucía; Montaner, David; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Tárraga, Joaquín; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Contrarily to the traditional view in which only one or a few key genes were supposed to be the causative factors of diseases, we discuss the importance of considering groups of functionally related genes in the study of pathologies characterised by chromosomal copy number alterations. Recent observations have reported the existence of regions in higher eukaryotic chromosomes (including humans) containing genes of related function that show a high degree of coregulation. Copy number alterations will consequently affect to clusters of functionally related genes, which will be the final causative agents of the diseased phenotype, in many cases. Therefore, we propose that the functional profiling of the regions affected by copy number alterations must be an important aspect to take into account in the understanding of this type of pathologies. To illustrate this, we present an integrated study of DNA copy number variations, gene expression along with the functional profiling of chromosomal regions in a case of multiple myeloma. PMID:17597935

  4. Selection of suitable endogenous reference genes for relative copy number detection in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential "single copy" genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3--high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1--medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2--low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane. PMID:24857916

  5. Flavonoid genes in petunia: addition of a limited number of gene copies may lead to a suppression of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    van der Krol, A R; Mur, L A; Beld, M; Mol, J N; Stuitje, A R

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of increased expression of genes involved in flower pigmentation, additional dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) or chalcone synthase (CHS) genes were transferred to petunia. In most transformants, the increased expression had no measurable effect on floral pigmentation. Surprisingly, however, in up to 25% of the transformants, a reduced floral pigmentation, accompanied by a dramatic reduction of DFR or CHS gene expression, respectively, was observed. This phenomenon was obtained with both chimeric gene constructs and intact CHS genomic clones. The reduction in gene expression was independent of the promoter driving transcription of the transgene and involved both the endogenous gene and the homologous transgene. The gene-specific collapse in expression was obtained even after introduction of only a single gene copy. The similarity between the sense transformants and regulatory CHS mutants suggests that this mechanism of gene silencing may operate in naturally occurring regulatory circuits. PMID:2152117

  6. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-01-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes. Images PMID:2494656

  7. Selection of Suitable Endogenous Reference Genes for Relative Copy Number Detection in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential “single copy” genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3—high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1—medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2—low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane. PMID:24857916

  8. Directed gene copy number amplification in Pichia pastoris by vector integration into the ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Hans; Mecklenbräuker, Astrid; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2009-12-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for heterologous protein production. One of the basic steps for strain improvement is to ensure a sufficient level of transcription of the heterologous gene, based on promoter strength and gene copy number. To date, high-copy-number integrants of P. pastoris are achievable only by screening of random events or by cloning of gene concatemers. Methods for rapid and reliable multicopy integration of the expression cassette are therefore desirable. Here we present such a method based on vector integration into the rDNA locus and post-transformational vector amplification by repeated selection on increased antibiotic concentrations. Data are presented for two exemplary products: human serum albumin, which is secreted into the supernatant, and human superoxide dismutase, which is accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The striking picture evolving is that intracellular protein production is tightly correlated with gene copy number, while use of the secretory pathway introduces a high clonal variability and the correlation with gene copy number is valid only for low gene copy numbers. PMID:19799640

  9. Copy number variation analysis identifies novel CAKUT candidate genes in children with a solitary functioning kidney

    PubMed Central

    Westland, Rik; Verbitsky, Miguel; Vukojevic, Katarina; Perry, Brittany J.; Fasel, David A.; Zwijnenburg, Petra J.G.; Bökenkamp, Arend; Gille, Johan J.P.; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Schreuder, Michiel F.; Gharavi, Ali G.; van Wijk, Joanna A.E.; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations associate with different developmental phenotypes and represent a major cause of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Because rare pathogenic copy number variations are often large and contain multiple genes, identification of the underlying genetic drivers has proven to be difficult. Here we studied the role of rare copy number variations in 80 patients from the KIMONO-study cohort for which pathogenic mutations in three genes commonly implicated in CAKUT were excluded. In total, 13 known or novel genomic imbalances in 11 of 80 patients were absent or extremely rare in 23,362 population controls. To identify the most likely genetic drivers for the CAKUT phenotype underlying these rare copy number variations, we used a systematic in silico approach based on frequency in a large dataset of controls, annotation with publicly available databases for developmental diseases, tolerance and haploinsufficiency scores, and gene expression profile in the developing kidney and urinary tract. Five novel candidate genes for CAKUT were identified that showed specific expression in the human and mouse developing urinary tract. Among these genes, DLG1 and KIF12 are likely novel susceptibility genes for CAKUT in humans. Thus, there is a significant role of genomic imbalance in the determination of kidney developmental phenotypes. Additionally, we defined a systematic strategy to identify genetic drivers underlying rare copy number variations. PMID:26352300

  10. Relationships between cell cycle regulator gene copy numbers and protein expression levels in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Chino, Ayako; Makanae, Koji; Moriya, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    We previously determined the copy number limits of overexpression for cell division cycle (cdc) regulatory genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the "genetic tug-of-war" (gTOW) method. In this study, we measured the levels of tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged target proteins when their copy numbers are increased in gTOW. Twenty analyzed genes showed roughly linear correlations between increased protein levels and gene copy numbers, which suggested a general lack of compensation for gene dosage in S. pombe. Cdc16 and Sid2 protein levels but not their mRNA levels were much lower than that expected by their copy numbers, which suggested the existence of a post-transcriptional down regulation of these genes. The cyclin Cig1 protein level and its mRNA level were much higher than that expected by its copy numbers, which suggested a positive feedback mechanism for its expression. A higher Cdc10 protein level and its mRNA level, probably due to cloning its gene into a plasmid, indicated that Cdc10 regulation was more robust than that previously predicted. PMID:24019917

  11. RUBIC identifies driver genes by detecting recurrent DNA copy number breaks.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Ewald; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Ten Hoeve, Jelle; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2016-01-01

    The frequent recurrence of copy number aberrations across tumour samples is a reliable hallmark of certain cancer driver genes. However, state-of-the-art algorithms for detecting recurrent aberrations fail to detect several known drivers. In this study, we propose RUBIC, an approach that detects recurrent copy number breaks, rather than recurrently amplified or deleted regions. This change of perspective allows for a simplified approach as recursive peak splitting procedures and repeated re-estimation of the background model are avoided. Furthermore, we control the false discovery rate on the level of called regions, rather than at the probe level, as in competing algorithms. We benchmark RUBIC against GISTIC2 (a state-of-the-art approach) and RAIG (a recently proposed approach) on simulated copy number data and on three SNP6 and NGS copy number data sets from TCGA. We show that RUBIC calls more focal recurrent regions and identifies a much larger fraction of known cancer genes. PMID:27396759

  12. Comparison of Copy Number of HSF Genes in Two Buffalo Genomes.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shardul Vikram; Mukherjee, Ayan; Brahma, Biswajit; Gohain, Moloya; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Saini, Sushil Kumar; Mishra, Purushottam; Ahlawat, Sonika; Upadhyaya, Ramesh C; Datta, Tirtha K; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    The copy number variation (CNV) is the number of copies of a particular gene in the genotype of an individual. Recent evidences show that the CNVs can vary in frequency and occurrence between breeds. These variations reportedly allowed different breeds to adapt to different environments. As copy number variations follow Mendelian pattern of inheritance, identification and distribution of these variants between populations can be used to infer the evolutionary history of the species. In this study, we have examined the absolute copy number of four Heat shock factor genes viz. HSF-1, 2, 4, and 5 in two different breeds of buffalo species using real-time PCR. Here, we report that the absolute copy number of HSF2 varies between the two breeds. In contrast no significant difference was observed in the copy number for HSF-1, 4, and 5 between the two breeds. Our results provide evidence for the presence of breed specific differences in HSF2 genomic copy number. This seems to be the first step in delineating the genetic factors underlying environmental adaptation between the two breeds. Nevertheless, a more detailed study is needed to characterize the functional consequence of this variation. PMID:26953680

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of single copy genes on Trichomonas vaginalis chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Zubáčová, Zuzana; Krylov, Vladimír; Tachezy, Jan

    2011-04-01

    The highly repetitive nature of the Trichomonas vaginalis genome and massive expansion of various gene families has caused difficulties in genome assembly and has hampered genome mapping. Here, we adapted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for T. vaginalis, which is sensitive enough to detect single copy genes on metaphase chromosomes. Sensitivity of conventional FISH, which did not allow single copy gene detection in T. vaginalis, was increased by means of tyramide signal amplification. Two selected single copy genes, coding for serine palmitoyltransferase and tryptophanase, were mapped to chromosome I and II, respectively, and thus could be used as chromosome markers. This established protocol provides an amenable tool for the physical mapping of the T. vaginalis genome and other essential applications, such as development of genetic markers for T. vaginalis genotyping. PMID:21195113

  14. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  15. Interactions between copy number and expression level of genes involved in fluconazole resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Abbes, Salma; Mary, Charles; Sellami, Hayet; Michel-Nguyen, Annie; Ayadi, Ali; Ranque, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to elucidate the relative involvement of drug resistance gene copy number and overexpression in fluconazole resistance in clinical C. glabrata isolates using a population-based approach. Methods: Fluconazole resistance levels were quantified using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) via Etest method. Both gene expression levels and gene copy number of CgCDR1, CgPDH1, CgERG11, and CgSNQ2 were assessed via quantitative real-time PCR. The influence of the main effects and first-level interactions of both the expression level and copy number of these genes on fluconazole resistance levels were analyzed using a multivariate statistical model. Results: Forty-three C. glabrata isolates were collected from 30 patients during in a hospital survey. In the multivariate analysis, C. glabrata fluconazole MICs were independently increased by CgSNQ2 overexpression (p < 10−4) and the interaction between CgPDH1 gene copy number and CgPDH1 expression level (p = 0.038). In contrast, both CgPDH1 overexpression (p = 0.049) and the interaction between CgSNQ2 and CgERG11 expression (p = 0.003) led to a significant decrease in fluconazole MICs. Conclusion: Fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata involves complex interactions between drug resistance gene expression and/or copy number. The population-based multivariate analysis highlighted the involvement of the CgSNQ2 gene in fluconazole resistance and the complex effect of the other genes such as PDH1 for which overexpression was associated with reduced fluconazole resistance levels, while the interaction between PDH1 overexpression and copy number was associated with increased resistance levels. PMID:24273749

  16. Variable rRNA gene copies in extreme halobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, J.L.; Marin, I.; Ramirez, L.; Amils, R. ); Abad, J.P.; Smith, C.L. )

    1988-08-25

    Using PFG electrophoresis techniques, the authors have examined the organization of rRNA gene in halobacterium species. The results show that the organization of rRNA genes among closely related halobacteria is quite heterogeneous. This contrasts with the high degree of conservation of rRNA sequence. The possible mechanism of such rRNA gene amplification and its evolutionary implications are discussed.

  17. Low AMY1 Gene Copy Number Is Associated with Increased Body Mass Index in Prepubertal Boys

    PubMed Central

    Verginelli, Fabio; De Lellis, Laura; Capelli, Cristian; Verzilli, Delfina; Chiarelli, Francesco; Mohn, Angelika; Cama, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Body Mass Index (BMI). Additional genetic variants, such as copy number variations (CNV), have also been investigated in relation to BMI. Recently, the highly polymorphic CNV in the salivary amylase (AMY1) gene, encoding an enzyme implicated in the first step of starch digestion, has been associated with obesity in adults and children. We assessed the potential association between AMY1 copy number and a wide range of BMI in a population of Italian school-children. Methods 744 children (354 boys, 390 girls, mean age (±SD): 8.4±1.4years) underwent anthropometric assessments (height, weight) and collection of saliva samples for DNA extraction. AMY1 copies were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Results A significant increase of BMI z-score by decreasing AMY1 copy number was observed in boys (β: -0.117, p = 0.033), but not in girls. Similarly, waist circumference (β: -0.155, p = 0.003, adjusted for age) was negatively influenced by AMY1 copy number in boys. Boys with 8 or more AMY1 copy numbers presented a significant lower BMI z-score (p = 0.04) and waist circumference (p = 0.01) when compared to boys with less than 8 copy numbers. Conclusions In this pediatric-only, population-based study, a lower AMY1 copy number emerged to be associated with increased BMI in boys. These data confirm previous findings from adult studies and support a potential role of a higher copy number of the salivary AMY1 gene in protecting from excess weight gain. PMID:27149670

  18. Copy number variations in IL22 gene are associated with Psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Traks, Tanel; Silm, Helgi; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2013-06-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) is a frequent, chronically relapsing, immune-mediated systemic disease with characteristic skin changes. IL22 is a cytokine of IL10 family, with significant proliferative effect on different cell lines. Copy number variations (CNV) have been discovered to have phenotypic consequences and are associated with various types of diseases. In the work presented here we analyzed the copy number variations in IL22 gene of exon1 and exon5. Our results showed that the IL22 gene exon1 was significantly associated with psoriasis severity (P<0.0001). However, the association between IL22 gene exon5 copy numbers and psoriasis was not detected. PMID:23395647

  19. 16Stimator: statistical estimation of ribosomal gene copy numbers from draft genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Perisin, Matthew; Vetter, Madlen; Gilbert, Jack A; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-04-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S) is an accepted marker of bacterial taxonomic diversity, even though differences in copy number obscure the relationship between amplicon and organismal abundances. Ancestral state reconstruction methods can predict 16S copy numbers through comparisons with closely related reference genomes; however, the database of closed genomes is limited. Here, we extend the reference database of 16S copy numbers to de novo assembled draft genomes by developing 16Stimator, a method to estimate 16S copy numbers when these repetitive regions collapse during assembly. Using a read depth approach, we estimate 16S copy numbers for 12 endophytic isolates from Arabidopsis thaliana and confirm estimates by qPCR. We further apply this approach to draft genomes deposited in NCBI and demonstrate accurate copy number estimation regardless of sequencing platform, with an overall median deviation of 14%. The expanded database of isolates with 16S copy number estimates increases the power of phylogenetic correction methods for determining organismal abundances from 16S amplicon surveys. PMID:26359911

  20. Hypoxia drives transient site-specific copy gain and drug-resistant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joshua C.; Atabakhsh, Elnaz; Kim, Jaegil; Biette, Kelly M.; Van Rechem, Capucine; Ladd, Brendon; Burrowes, Paul d.; Donado, Carlos; Mattoo, Hamid; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Song, Bing; Andriani, Grasiella; Joung, J. Keith; Iliopoulos, Othon; Montagna, Cristina; Pillai, Shiv; Getz, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Copy number heterogeneity is a prominent feature within tumors. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity remains poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia induces transient site-specific copy gains (TSSGs) in primary, nontransformed, and transformed human cells. Hypoxia-driven copy gains are not dependent on HIF1α or HIF2α; however, they are dependent on the KDM4A histone demethylase and are blocked by inhibition of KDM4A with a small molecule or the natural metabolite succinate. Furthermore, this response is conserved at a syntenic region in zebrafish cells. Regions with site-specific copy gain are also enriched for amplifications in hypoxic primary tumors. These tumors exhibited amplification and overexpression of the drug resistance gene CKS1B, which we recapitulated in hypoxic breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia provides a biological stimulus to create transient site-specific copy alterations that could result in heterogeneity within tumors and cell populations. These findings have major implications in our understanding of copy number heterogeneity and the emergence of drug resistance genes in cancer. PMID:25995187

  1. Identification and expression analysis of multiple FRO gene copies in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Del C Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma; Santoyo, G; Farías-Rodríguez, R; Macías-Rodríguez, L; Valencia-Cantero, E

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth. Commonly, this element is found in an oxidized form in soil, which is poorly available for plants. Therefore, plants have evolved ferric-chelate reductase enzymes (FRO) to reduce iron into a more soluble ferrous form. Fe scarcity in plants induce the FRO enzyme activity. Although the legume Medicago truncatula has been employed as a model for FRO activity studies, only one copy of the M. truncatula MtFRO1 gene has been characterized so far. In this study, we identified multiple gene copies of the MtFRO gene in the genome of M. truncatula by an in silico search, using BLAST analysis in the database of the M. truncatula Genome Sequencing Project and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and also determined whether they are functional. We identified five genes apart from MtFRO1, which had been already characterized. All of the MtFRO genes exhibited high identity with homologous FRO genes from Lycopersicon esculentum, Citrus junos and Arabidopsis thaliana. The gene copies also presented characteristic conserved FAD and NADPH motifs, transmembrane regions and oxidoreductase signature motifs. We also detected expression in five of the putative MtFRO sequences by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis, performed with mRNA from root and shoot tissues. Iron scarcity might be a condition for an elevated expression of the MtFRO genes observed in different M. truncatula tissues. PMID:23096909

  2. Identification of genes with a correlation between copy number and expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To elucidate gene expression associated with copy number changes, we performed a genome-wide copy number and expression microarray analysis of 25 pairs of gastric tissues. Methods We applied laser capture microdissection (LCM) to obtain samples for microarray experiments and profiled DNA copy number and gene expression using 244K CGH Microarray and Human Exon 1.0 ST Microarray. Results Obviously, gain at 8q was detected at the highest frequency (70%) and 20q at the second (63%). We also identified molecular genetic divergences for different TNM-stages or histological subtypes of gastric cancers. Interestingly, the C20orf11 amplification and gain at 20q13.33 almost separated moderately differentiated (MD) gastric cancers from poorly differentiated (PD) type. A set of 163 genes showing the correlations between gene copy number and expression was selected and the identified genes were able to discriminate matched adjacent noncancerous samples from gastric cancer samples in an unsupervised two-way hierarchical clustering. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 4 genes (C20orf11, XPO5, PUF60, and PLOD3) of the 163 genes validated the microarray results. Notably, some candidate genes (MCM4 and YWHAZ) and its adjacent genes such as PRKDC, UBE2V2, ANKRD46, ZNF706, and GRHL2, were concordantly deregulated by genomic aberrations. Conclusions Taken together, our results reveal diverse chromosomal region alterations for different TNM-stages or histological subtypes of gastric cancers, which is helpful in researching clinicopathological classification, and highlight several interesting genes as potential biomarkers for gastric cancer. PMID:22559327

  3. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs. PMID:26863414

  4. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs. PMID:26863414

  5. Diet and the evolution of human amylase gene copy number variation

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Claw, Katrina G.; Lee, Arthur S.; Fiegler, Heike; Redon, Richard; Werner, John; Villanea, Fernando A.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Misra, Rajeev; Carter, Nigel P.; Lee, Charles; Stone, Anne C.

    2008-01-01

    Starch consumption is a prominent characteristic of agricultural societies and hunter-gatherers in arid environments. In contrast, rainforest and circum-arctic hunter-gatherers and some pastoralists consume much less starch1-3. This behavioral variation raises the possibility that different selective pressures have acted on amylase, the enzyme responsible for starch hydrolysis4. We found that salivary amylase gene (AMY1) copy number is correlated positively with salivary amylase protein levels, and that individuals from populations with high-starch diets have on average more AMY1 copies than those with traditionally low-starch diets. Comparisons with other loci in a subset of these populations suggest that the level of AMY1 copy number differentiation is unusual. This example of positive selection on a copy number variable gene is one of the first in the human genome. Higher AMY1 copy numbers and protein levels likely improve the digestion of starchy foods, and may buffer against the fitness-reducing effects of intestinal disease. PMID:17828263

  6. Discovery of MicroRNA169 Gene Copies in Genomes of Flowering Plants through Positional Information

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Martín; Messing, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of microRNA (miRNA) families can be studied in sequenced plant genomes through sequence alignments. Here, we focused on miR169 in sorghum because of its implications in drought tolerance and stem-sugar content. We were able to discover many miR169 copies that have escaped standard genome annotation methods. A new miR169 cluster was found on sorghum chromosome 1. This cluster is composed of the previously annotated sbi-MIR169o together with two newly found MIR169 copies, named sbi-MIR169t and sbi-MIR169u. We also found that a miR169 cluster on sorghum chr7 consisting of sbi-MIR169l, sbi-MIR169m, and sbi-MIR169n is contained within a chromosomal inversion of at least 500 kb that occurred in sorghum relative to Brachypodium, rice, foxtail millet, and maize. Surprisingly, synteny of chromosomal segments containing MIR169 copies with linked bHLH and CONSTANS-LIKE genes extended from Brachypodium to dictotyledonous species such as grapevine, soybean, and cassava, indicating a strong conservation of linkages of certain flowering and/or plant height genes and microRNAs, which may explain linkage drag of drought and flowering traits and would have consequences for breeding new varieties. Furthermore, alignment of rice and sorghum orthologous regions revealed the presence of two additional miR169 gene copies (miR169r and miR169s) on sorghum chr7 that formed an antisense miRNA gene pair. Both copies are expressed and target different set of genes. Synteny-based analysis of microRNAs among different plant species should lead to the discovery of new microRNAs in general and contribute to our understanding of their evolution. PMID:23348041

  7. Discovery of MicroRNA169 gene copies in genomes of flowering plants through positional information.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Martín; Messing, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of microRNA (miRNA) families can be studied in sequenced plant genomes through sequence alignments. Here, we focused on miR169 in sorghum because of its implications in drought tolerance and stem-sugar content. We were able to discover many miR169 copies that have escaped standard genome annotation methods. A new miR169 cluster was found on sorghum chromosome 1. This cluster is composed of the previously annotated sbi-MIR169o together with two newly found MIR169 copies, named sbi-MIR169t and sbi-MIR169u. We also found that a miR169 cluster on sorghum chr7 consisting of sbi-MIR169l, sbi-MIR169m, and sbi-MIR169n is contained within a chromosomal inversion of at least 500 kb that occurred in sorghum relative to Brachypodium, rice, foxtail millet, and maize. Surprisingly, synteny of chromosomal segments containing MIR169 copies with linked bHLH and CONSTANS-LIKE genes extended from Brachypodium to dictotyledonous species such as grapevine, soybean, and cassava, indicating a strong conservation of linkages of certain flowering and/or plant height genes and microRNAs, which may explain linkage drag of drought and flowering traits and would have consequences for breeding new varieties. Furthermore, alignment of rice and sorghum orthologous regions revealed the presence of two additional miR169 gene copies (miR169r and miR169s) on sorghum chr7 that formed an antisense miRNA gene pair. Both copies are expressed and target different set of genes. Synteny-based analysis of microRNAs among different plant species should lead to the discovery of new microRNAs in general and contribute to our understanding of their evolution. PMID:23348041

  8. Evolution of Three Parent Genes and Their Retrogene Copies in Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Ryan S.; Clark, Denise V.

    2013-01-01

    Retrogenes form a class of gene duplicate lacking the regulatory sequences found outside of the mRNA-coding regions of the parent gene. It is not clear how a retrogene's lack of parental regulatory sequences affects the evolution of the gene pair. To explore the evolution of parent genes and retrogenes, we investigated three such gene pairs in the family Drosophilidae; in Drosophila melanogaster, these gene pairs are CG8331 and CG4960, CG17734 and CG11825, and Sep2 and Sep5. We investigated the embryonic expression patterns of these gene pairs across multiple Drosophila species. Expression patterns of the parent genes and their single copy orthologs are relatively conserved across species, whether or not a species has a retrogene copy, although there is some variation in CG8331 and CG17734. In contrast, expression patterns of the retrogene orthologs have diversified. We used the genome sequences of 20 Drosophila species to investigate coding sequence evolution. The coding sequences of the three gene pairs appear to be evolving predominantly under negative selection; however, the parent genes and retrogenes show some distinct differences in amino acid sequence. Therefore, in general, retrogene expression patterns and coding sequences are distinct compared to their parents and, in some cases, retrogene expression patterns diversify. PMID:23841016

  9. The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease gene (Pkd1) is a single-copy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.G.; Loehning, C.; Frischauf, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease 1 gene (PKD1) was mapped to chromosome 17 using somatic cell hybrid, BXD recombinant inbred strains, and FISH. The gene is located within a previously defined conserved synteny group that includes the mouse homologue of tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) and is linked to the {alpha} globin pseudogene Hba-ps4. Although the human genome contains multiple copies of genes related to PKD1, there is no evidence for more than one copy in the mouse genome. Like their human counterparts, the mouse Tsc2 and Pkd1 genes are arranged in a tail-to-tail orientation with a distance of only 63 bp between the polyadenylation signals of the two genes. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Genes and small RNA transcripts exhibit dosage-dependent expression pattern in maize copy-number alterations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes that tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplica...

  11. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A; Woodman, Scott E; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:26787600

  12. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  13. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Melanie G.; Rödelsperger, Christian; Witte, Hanh; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2015-01-01

    Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains´ pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as major target for

  14. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Melanie G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Witte, Hanh; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as major target for

  15. Copy number variations in the amylase gene (AMY2B) in Japanese native dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Tonoike, A; Hori, Y; Inoue-Murayama, M; Konno, A; Fujita, K; Miyado, M; Fukami, M; Nagasawa, M; Mogi, K; Kikusui, T

    2015-10-01

    A recent study suggested that increased copy numbers of the AMY2B gene might be a crucial genetic change that occurred during the domestication of dogs. To investigate AMY2B expansion in ancient breeds, which are highly divergent from modern breeds of presumed European origins, we analysed copy numbers in native Japanese dog breeds. Copy numbers in the Akita and Shiba, two ancient breeds in Japan, were higher than those in wolves. However, compared to a group of various modern breeds, Akitas had fewer copy numbers, whereas Shibas exhibited the same level of expansion as modern breeds. Interestingly, average AMY2B copy numbers in the Jomon-Shiba, a unique line of the Shiba that has been bred to maintain their appearance resembling ancestors of native Japanese dogs and that originated in the same region as the Akita, were lower than those in the Shiba. These differences may have arisen from the earlier introduction of rice farming to the region in which the Shiba originated compared to the region in which the Akita and the Jomon-Shiba originated. Thus, our data provide insights into the relationship between the introduction of agriculture and AMY2B expansion in dogs. PMID:26358734

  16. Selecting single-copy nuclear genes for plant phylogenetics: a preliminary analysis for the Senecioneae (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Inés; Costa, Andrea; Feliner, Gonzalo Nieto

    2008-03-01

    Compared to organelle genomes, the nuclear genome comprises a vast reservoir of genes that potentially harbor phylogenetic signal. Despite the valuable data that sequencing projects of model systems offer, relatively few single-copy nuclear genes are being used in systematics. In part this is due to the challenges inherent in generating orthologous sequences, a problem that is ameliorated when the gene family in question has been characterized in related organisms. Here we illustrate the utility of diverse sequence databases within the Asteraceae as a framework for developing single-copy nuclear genes useful for inferring phylogenies in the tribe Senecioneae. We highlight the process of searching for informative genes by using data from Helianthus annuus, Lactuca sativa, Stevia rebaudiana, Zinnia elegans, and Gerbera cultivar. Emerging from this process were several candidate genes; two of these were used for a phylogenetic assessment of the Senecioneae and were compared to other genes previously used in Asteraceae phylogenies. Based on the preliminary sampling used, one of the genes selected during the searching process was more useful than the two previously used in Asteraceae. The search strategy described is valid for any group of plants but its efficiency is dependent on the phylogenetic proximity of the study group to the species represented in sequence databases. PMID:18305978

  17. A Sensitive Method for Detecting Variation in Copy Numbers of Duplicated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pielberg, Gerli; Day, Andy E.; Plastow, Graham S.; Andersson, Leif

    2003-01-01

    Gene duplications are common in the vertebrate genome, and duplicated loci often show a variation in copy number that may have important phenotypic effects. Here we describe a powerful method for quantification of duplicated copies based on pyrosequencing. A reliable quantification was obtained by amplification of the duplication break-point and a corresponding nonduplicated sequence in a competitive PCR assay. A comparison with an independent method for quantification based on the Invader technology revealed an excellent correlation between the two methods. The pyrosequencing-based method was evaluated by analyzing variation in copy number at the duplicated KIT/Dominant white locus in pigs. We were able to distinguish haplotypes at this locus by combining the duplication breakpoint test with a diagnostic test for a functionally important splice mutation in the duplicated gene. An extensive allelic variation, including the presence of a new allele carrying a single KIT copy expected to encode a truncated KIT receptor, was revealed when analyzing white pigs from commercial lines. PMID:12952884

  18. Chromosomal instability selects gene copy number variants encoding core regulators of proliferation in ER+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Endesfelder, David; McGranahan, Nicholas; Howell, Mike; Parker, Peter J.; Downward, Julian; Swanton, Charles; Kschischo, Maik

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is associated with poor outcome in epithelial malignancies including breast carcinomas. Evidence suggests that prognostic signatures in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer define tumors with CIN and high proliferative potential. Intriguingly, CIN induction in lower eukaryotic cells and human cells is context-dependent, typically resulting in a proliferation disadvantage but conferring a fitness benefit under strong selection pressures. We hypothesised that CIN permits accelerated genomic evolution through the generation of diverse DNA copy number events that may be selected during disease development. In support of this hypothesis, we found evidence for selection of gene amplification of core regulators of proliferation in CIN-associated cancer genomes. Stable DNA copy number amplifications of the core regulators TPX2 and UBE2C were associated with expression of a gene module involved in proliferation. The module genes were enriched within prognostic signature gene sets for ER+ breast cancer, providing a logical connection between CIN and prognostic signature expression. Our results provide a framework to decipher the impact of intratumor heterogeneity on key cancer phenotypes, and they suggest that CIN provides a permissive landscape for selection of copy number alterations which drive cancer proliferation. PMID:24970479

  19. Focal DNA Copy Number Changes in Neuroblastoma Target MYCN Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mestdagh, Pieter; Menten, Björn; Lefever, Steve; Pattyn, Filip; De Brouwer, Sara; Sante, Tom; Schulte, Johannes Hubertus; Schramm, Alexander; Van Roy, Nadine; Van Maerken, Tom; Noguera, Rosa; Combaret, Valérie; Devalck, Christine; Westermann, Frank; Laureys, Geneviève; Eggert, Angelika; Vandesompele, Jo; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor arising from immature sympathetic nervous system cells. Recurrent genomic alterations include MYCN and ALK amplification as well as recurrent patterns of gains and losses of whole or large partial chromosome segments. A recent whole genome sequencing effort yielded no frequently recurring mutations in genes other than those affecting ALK. However, the study further stresses the importance of DNA copy number alterations in this disease, in particular for genes implicated in neuritogenesis. Here we provide additional evidence for the importance of focal DNA copy number gains and losses, which are predominantly observed in MYCN amplified tumors. A focal 5 kb gain encompassing the MYCN regulated miR-17∼92 cluster as sole gene was detected in a neuroblastoma cell line and further analyses of the array CGH data set demonstrated enrichment for other MYCN target genes in focal gains and amplifications. Next we applied an integrated genomics analysis to prioritize MYCN down regulated genes mediated by MYCN driven miRNAs within regions of focal heterozygous or homozygous deletion. We identified RGS5, a negative regulator of G-protein signaling implicated in vascular normalization, invasion and metastasis, targeted by a focal homozygous deletion, as a new MYCN target gene, down regulated through MYCN activated miRNAs. In addition, we expand the miR-17∼92 regulatory network controlling TGFß signaling in neuroblastoma with the ring finger protein 11 encoding gene RNF11, which was previously shown to be targeted by the miR-17∼92 member miR-19b. Taken together, our data indicate that focal DNA copy number imbalances in neuroblastoma (1) target genes that are implicated in MYCN signaling, possibly selected to reinforce MYCN oncogene addiction and (2) serve as a resource for identifying new molecular targets for treatment. PMID:23308108

  20. Prognostic value of MET, cyclin D1 and MET gene copy number in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenze; Song, Liping; Ai, Ting; Zhang, Yingbing; Gao, Ying; Cui, Jie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation of the expression of MET and cyclin D1 and MET gene copy number in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and patient clinicopathologic characteristics and survival. Sixty-one NSCLC tissue specimens were included in the study. The expression of MET and cyclin D1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and MET gene copy number was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Positive expression of MET and cyclin D1 protein and increased MET gene copy number occurred in 59.0%, 59.0% and 18.0% of 61 NSCLC tissues, respectively. MET-positivity correlated with poor differentiation (P = 0.009). Increased MET gene copy number was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.004) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.048), while the expression of cyclin D1 was not associated with any clinicopathologic parameters. There was a significant correlation between the expression of MET and MET gene copy number (P = 0.002). Additionally, the expression of cyclin D1 had a significant association with the expression of MET as well as MET gene copy number (P = 0.002 and P = 0.017, respectively). MET-positivity and increased MET gene copy number were significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively) in univariate analysis. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis confirmed that the expression of MET and MET gene copy number were prognostic indicators of NSCLC (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001, respectively). The overexpression of MET and the increased MET gene copy number might be adverse prognostic factors for NSCLC patients. The activation of the MET/cyclin D1 signaling pathway may contribute to carcinogenesis and the development of NSCLC, and may represent a target for therapy. PMID:23720678

  1. SMN1 gene copy number analyses for SMA healthy carriers in Italian population

    PubMed Central

    Patitucci, Alessandra; Magariello, Angela; Ungaro, Carmine; Muglia, Maria; Conforti, Francesca L.; Gabriele, Anna L.; Citrigno, Luigi; Sproviero, William; Mazzei, Rosalucia

    2012-01-01

    The routine molecular test for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) diagnosis is based on the detection of a homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1). The presence of the centromeric copy of the SMN gene (SMN2) does not allow the detection of the hemizygous absence of the SMN1 gene, which characterizes the disease carriers. The demand for a quantitative SMN1 test is permanently growing because there is a high incidence of carriers. The disease is severe and to date there are no effective pharmacological treatments. Here, we present a non-radioactive assay based on real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We analyzed eight SMA patients, 14 SMA relatives and 50 health individuals from Southern Italy by real time quantitative method in order to identify haploid deletion occurring in SMA carriers. SMN1 copy number was determined by the comparative threshold cycle method (ΔΔCt). The results confirmed the deletion in all homozygous patients and permitted an evaluation of the number of alleles in the healthy carriers. This method is fast, reproducible, and enables us to discriminate carriers from healthy homozygous, which is impossible with normal techniques.

  2. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C.; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine’s effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  3. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine's effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  4. Compensation for differences in gene copy number among yeast ribosomal proteins is encoded within their promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Danny; Sharon, Eilon; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Lubling, Yaniv; Shipony, Zohar; Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Keren, Leeat; Levo, Michal; Weinberger, Adina; Segal, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Coordinate regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes is key for controlling cell growth. In yeast, it is unclear how this regulation achieves the required equimolar amounts of the different RP components, given that some RP genes exist in duplicate copies, while others have only one copy. Here, we tested whether the solution to this challenge is partly encoded within the DNA sequence of the RP promoters, by fusing 110 different RP promoters to a fluorescent gene reporter, allowing us to robustly detect differences in their promoter activities that are as small as ∼10%. We found that single-copy RP promoters have significantly higher activities, suggesting that proper RP stoichiometry is indeed partly encoded within the RP promoters. Notably, we also partially uncovered how this regulation is encoded by finding that RP promoters with higher activity have more nucleosome-disfavoring sequences and characteristic spatial organizations of these sequences and of binding sites for key RP regulators. Mutations in these elements result in a significant decrease of RP promoter activity. Thus, our results suggest that intrinsic (DNA-dependent) nucleosome organization may be a key mechanism by which genomes encode biologically meaningful promoter activities. Our approach can readily be applied to uncover how transcriptional programs of other promoters are encoded. PMID:22009988

  5. No Evidence that MicroRNAs Coevolve with Genes Located in Copy Number Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jovelin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a widespread class of regulatory noncoding RNAs with key roles in physiology and development, conferring robustness to noise in regulatory networks. Consistent with this buffering function, it was recently suggested that human miRNAs coevolve with genes in copy number regions (copy number variation [CNV] genes) to reduce dosage imbalance. Here, I compare miRNA regulation between CNV and non-CNV genes in four model organisms. miRNA regulation of CNV genes is elevated in human and fly but reduced in nematode and zebrafish. By analyzing 31 human CNV data sets, careful analysis of human and chimpanzee orthologs, resampling genes within species and comparing structural variant types, I show that the apparent coevolution between CNV genes and miRNAs is due to the strong dependency between 3′-untranslated region length and miRNA target prediction. Deciphering the interplay between CNVs and miRNAs will likely require a deeper understanding of how miRNAs are embedded in regulatory circuits. PMID:25804521

  6. No Evidence that MicroRNAs Coevolve with Genes Located in Copy Number Regions.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a widespread class of regulatory noncoding RNAs with key roles in physiology and development, conferring robustness to noise in regulatory networks. Consistent with this buffering function, it was recently suggested that human miRNAs coevolve with genes in copy number regions (copy number variation [CNV] genes) to reduce dosage imbalance. Here, I compare miRNA regulation between CNV and non-CNV genes in four model organisms. miRNA regulation of CNV genes is elevated in human and fly but reduced in nematode and zebrafish. By analyzing 31 human CNV data sets, careful analysis of human and chimpanzee orthologs, resampling genes within species and comparing structural variant types, I show that the apparent coevolution between CNV genes and miRNAs is due to the strong dependency between 3'-untranslated region length and miRNA target prediction. Deciphering the interplay between CNVs and miRNAs will likely require a deeper understanding of how miRNAs are embedded in regulatory circuits. PMID:25804521

  7. Detection of MET Gene Copy Number in Cancer Samples Using the Droplet Digital PCR Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanni; Tang, En-Tzu; Du, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analysis of MET gene copy number (CN) has been considered to be a potential biomarker to predict the response to MET-targeted therapies in various cancers. However, the current standard methods to determine MET CN are SNP 6.0 in the genomic DNA of cancer cell lines and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in tumor models, respectively, which are costly and require advanced technical skills and result in relatively subjective judgments. Therefore, we employed a novel method, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), to determine the MET gene copy number with high accuracy and precision. Methods The genomic DNA of cancer cell lines or tumor models were tested and compared with the MET gene CN and MET/CEN-7 ratio determined by SNP 6.0 and FISH, respectively. Results In cell lines, the linear association of the MET CN detected by ddPCR and SNP 6.0 is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.867). In tumor models, the MET CN detected by ddPCR was significantly different between the MET gene amplification and non-amplification groups according to FISH (mean: 15.4 vs 2.1; P = 0.044). Given that MET gene amplification is defined as MET CN >5.5 by ddPCR, the concordance rate between ddPCR and FISH was 98.0%, and Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.760 (95% CI, 0.498–1.000; P <0.001). Conclusions The results demonstrated that the ddPCR method has the potential to quantify the MET gene copy number with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from SNP 6.0 and FISH in cancer cell lines and tumor samples, respectively. PMID:26765781

  8. Generating single-copy nuclear gene data for a recent adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Whittall, Justen B; Medina-Marino, Andrew; Zimmer, Elizabeth A; Hodges, Scott A

    2006-04-01

    Recent adaptive radiations provide an exceptional opportunity to understand the processes of speciation and adaptation. However, reconstructing the phylogenetic history of recent and rapidly evolving clades often requires the use of multiple, independent gene genealogies. Nuclear introns are an obvious source of the necessary data but their use is often limited because degenerate primers can amplify paralogous loci. To identify PCR primers for a large number of loci in an especially rapid adaptive radiation, that of the flowering plant genus Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae), we developed an efficient method for amplifying multiple single-copy nuclear loci by sequencing a modest number of clones from a cDNA library and designing PCR primers; with one primer anchored in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) and one primer in the coding region of each gene. Variation between paralogous loci evolves more quickly in 3'-UTR regions compared to adjacent exons, and therefore we achieved high specificity for isolating orthologous loci. Furthermore, we were able to identify genes containing large introns by amplifying genes from genomic DNA and comparing the PCR product size to that predicted from their cDNA sequence. In Aquilegia eight out of eleven loci were isolated with this method and six of these loci had introns. Among four genes sequenced for samples spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the genus, we found sequence variation at levels similar to that observed in ITS, further supporting the recent and rapid radiation in Aquilegia. We assessed the orthology of amplification products by phylogenetic congruence among loci, the presence of two well established phylogenetic relationships, and similarity among loci for levels of sequence variation. Higher levels of variation among samples for one locus suggest possible paralogy. Overall, this method provides an efficient means of isolating predominantly single-copy loci from both low and high-copy gene families, providing ample

  9. Somatic gene copy number alterations in colorectal cancer: new quest for cancer drivers and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Liang, L; Fang, J-Y; Xu, J

    2016-04-21

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the accumulation of genetic alterations, and somatic copy number alterations (CNAs) are crucial for the development of CRC. Genome-wide survey of CNAs provides opportunities for identifying cancer driver genes in an unbiased manner. The detection of aberrant CNAs may provide novel markers for the early diagnosis and personalized treatment of CRC. A major challenge in array-based profiling of CNAs is to distinguish the alterations that play causative roles from the random alterations that accumulate during colorectal carcinogenesis. In this view, we systematically discuss the frequent CNAs in CRC, focusing on functional genes that have potential diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic significance. PMID:26257062

  10. Plasmids with temperature-dependent copy number for amplification of cloned genes and their products.

    PubMed

    Uhlin, B E; Molin, S; Gustafsson, P; Nordström, K

    1979-06-01

    Miniplasmids (pKN402 and pKN410) were isolated from runaway-replication mutants of plasmid R1. At 30 degrees C these miniplasmids are present in 20--50 copies per cell of Escherichia coli, whereas at temperatures above 35 degrees C the plasmids replicate without copy number control during 2--3 h. At the end of this period plasmid DNA amounts to about 75% of the total DNA. During the gene amplification, growth and protein synthesis continue at normal rate leading to a drastic amplification of plasmid gene products. Plasmids pKN402 (4.6 Md) and pKN410 (10 Md) have single restriction sites for restriction endonucleases EcoRI and HindIII; in addition plamid pKN410 has a single BamHI site and carries ampicillin resistance. The plasmids can therefore be used as cloning vectors. Several genes were cloned into these vectors using the EcoRI sites; chromosomal as well as plasmid-coded beta-lactamase was found to be amplified up to 400-fold after thermal induction of the runaway replication. Vectors of this temperature-dependent class will be useful in the production of large quantities of genes and gene products. These plasmids have lost their mobilization capacity. Runaway replication is lethal to the host bacteria in rich media. These two properties contribute to the safe use of the plasmids as cloning vehicles. PMID:383579

  11. Copy number variation of genes involved in the hepatitis C virus-human interactome.

    PubMed

    Budzko, Lucyna; Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Jackowiak, Paulina; Kozlowski, Piotr; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a newly discovered form of intra-species genetic polymorphism that is defined as deletions or duplications of genome segments ranging from 1 kbp to several Mbp. CNV accounts for the majority of the genetic variation observed in humans (CNV regions cover more than 10% of the human genome); therefore, it may significantly influence both the phenotype and susceptibility to various diseases. Unfortunately, the impact of CNV on a number of diseases, including hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, remains largely unexplored. Here, we analyzed 421 human genes encoding proteins that have been shown to interact with HCV proteins or genomic RNA (proteins from the HCV-human interactome). We found that 19 of the 421 candidate genes are located in putative CNV regions. For all of these genes, copy numbers were determined for European, Asiatic and African populations using the multiplex ligation-dependent amplification (MLPA) method. As a result, we identified 4 genes, IGLL1, MLLT4, PDPK1, PPP1R13L, for which the CN-genotype ranged from 1 to 6. All of these genes are involved in host-virus interaction; thus, their polymorphism has a potential impact on the development of HCV infection and/or therapy outcome. PMID:27510840

  12. Overexpression and lack of copy number variation in the BMI-1 gene in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    MADATHAN KANDY, SIBIN; ISHWARA BHAT, DHANANJAYA; CHOPPAVARAPU, LAVANYA; SUVATHA, ARATI; GHATI KASTURIRANGAN, CHETAN

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are neoplasms of the brain that are associated with a poor prognosis. The B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) gene is one of the major cancer stem cell factors responsible for treatment failure in glioma. In the present study, the DNA-RNA-protein alterations in the BMI-1 gene were assessed in 50 glioma samples. Copy number variations in the BMI-1 gene were analyzed using SYBR® Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression analysis was performed using a Taqman assay and protein quantitation was performed using western blotting. A comparative Ct analysis showed the absence of copy number variations in all glioma samples. BMI-1 mRNA expression was found to be overexpressed in 36 out of 50 samples (72.0%), and 37 out of 50 samples showed overexpression (74.0%) of BMI-1 protein; this was statistically significant when compared with non-glioma tissues. It was observed that the protein and RNA expression in glioma were concordant. In this study on the BMI-1 gene, transcription and translation in glioma were observed and BMI-1 overexpression was found to be a common phenomenon. PMID:26722333

  13. Copy number variation of genes involved in the hepatitis C virus-human interactome

    PubMed Central

    Budzko, Lucyna; Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Jackowiak, Paulina; Kozlowski, Piotr; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a newly discovered form of intra-species genetic polymorphism that is defined as deletions or duplications of genome segments ranging from 1 kbp to several Mbp. CNV accounts for the majority of the genetic variation observed in humans (CNV regions cover more than 10% of the human genome); therefore, it may significantly influence both the phenotype and susceptibility to various diseases. Unfortunately, the impact of CNV on a number of diseases, including hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, remains largely unexplored. Here, we analyzed 421 human genes encoding proteins that have been shown to interact with HCV proteins or genomic RNA (proteins from the HCV-human interactome). We found that 19 of the 421 candidate genes are located in putative CNV regions. For all of these genes, copy numbers were determined for European, Asiatic and African populations using the multiplex ligation-dependent amplification (MLPA) method. As a result, we identified 4 genes, IGLL1, MLLT4, PDPK1, PPP1R13L, for which the CN-genotype ranged from 1 to 6. All of these genes are involved in host-virus interaction; thus, their polymorphism has a potential impact on the development of HCV infection and/or therapy outcome. PMID:27510840

  14. The positioning logic and copy number control of genes in bacteria under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Austin, Robert; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Lau, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells when challenged with sublethal concentrations of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin cease to divide and form long filaments which contain multiple bacterial chromosomes. These filaments are individual mesoscopic environmental niches which provide protection for a community of chromosomes (as opposed to cells) under mutagenic stress and can provide an evolutionary fitness advantage within the niche. We use comparative genomic hybridization to show that the mesoscopic niche evolves within 20 minutes of ciprofloxacin exposure via replication of multiple copies of genes expressing ATP dependent transporters. We show that this rapid genomic amplification is done in a time efficient manner via placement of the genes encoding the pumps near the origin of replication on the bacterial chromosome. The de-amplification of multiple copies back to the wild type number is a function of the duration is a function of the ciprofloxacin exposure duration: the longer the exposure, the slower the removal of the multiple copies. The project described was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute

  15. Increased copy number of the DLX4 homeobox gene in breast axillary lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Torresan, Clarissa; Oliveira, Márcia M C; Pereira, Silma R F; Ribeiro, Enilze M S F; Marian, Catalin; Gusev, Yuriy; Lima, Rubens S; Urban, Cicero A; Berg, Patricia E; Haddad, Bassem R; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Cavalli, Luciane R

    2014-05-01

    DLX4 is a homeobox gene strongly implicated in breast tumor progression and invasion. Our main objective was to determine the DLX4 copy number status in sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis to assess its involvement in the initial stages of the axillary metastatic process. A total of 37 paired samples of SLN metastasis and primary breast tumors (PBT) were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and array comparative genomic hybridization assays. DLX4 increased copy number was observed in 21.6% of the PBT and 24.3% of the SLN metastasis; regression analysis demonstrated that the DLX4 alterations observed in the SLN metastasis were dependent on the ones in the PBT, indicating that they occur in the primary tumor cell populations and are maintained in the early axillary metastatic site. In addition, regression analysis demonstrated that DLX4 alterations (and other DLX and HOXB family members) occurred independently of the ones in the HER2/NEU gene, the main amplification driver on the 17q region. Additional studies evaluating DLX4 copy number in non-SLN axillary lymph nodes and/or distant breast cancer metastasis are necessary to determine if these alterations are carried on and maintained during more advanced stages of tumor progression and if could be used as a predictive marker for axillary involvement. PMID:24947980

  16. Host Genetic Variants and Gene Expression Patterns Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus Copy Number in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Petrova, Velislava; Liu, Jimmy Z.; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Carl A.; Gall, Astrid; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) are commonly used in molecular genetics, supplying DNA for the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Projects, used to test chemotherapeutic agents, and informing the basis of a number of population genetics studies of gene expression. The process of transforming human B cells into LCLs requires the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a double-stranded DNA virus which through B-cell immortalisation maintains an episomal virus genome in every cell of an LCL at variable copy numbers. Previous studies have reported that EBV alters host-gene expression and EBV copy number may be under host genetic control. We performed a genome-wide association study of EBV genome copy number in LCLs and found the phenotype to be highly heritable, although no individual SNPs achieved a significant association with EBV copy number. The expression of two host genes (CXCL16 and AGL) was positively correlated and expression of ADARB2 was negatively correlated with EBV copy number in a genotype-independent manner. This study shows an association between EBV copy number and the gene expression profile of LCLs, and suggests that EBV copy number should be considered as a covariate in future studies of host gene expression in LCLs. PMID:25290448

  17. CopyRighter: a rapid tool for improving the accuracy of microbial community profiles through lineage-specific gene copy number correction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Culture-independent molecular surveys targeting conserved marker genes, most notably 16S rRNA, to assess microbial diversity remain semi-quantitative due to variations in the number of gene copies between species. Results Based on 2,900 sequenced reference genomes, we show that 16S rRNA gene copy number (GCN) is strongly linked to microbial phylogenetic taxonomy, potentially under-representing Archaea in amplicon microbial profiles. Using this relationship, we inferred the GCN of all bacterial and archaeal lineages in the Greengenes database within a phylogenetic framework. We created CopyRighter, new software which uses these estimates to correct 16S rRNA amplicon microbial profiles and associated quantitative (q)PCR total abundance. CopyRighter parses microbial profiles and, because GCN estimates are pre-computed for all taxa in the reference taxonomy, rapidly corrects GCN bias. Software validation with in silico and in vitro mock communities indicated that GCN correction results in more accurate estimates of microbial relative abundance and improves the agreement between metagenomic and amplicon profiles. Analyses of human-associated and anaerobic digester microbiomes illustrate that correction makes tangible changes to estimates of qPCR total abundance, α and β diversity, and can significantly change biological interpretation. For example, human gut microbiomes from twins were reclassified into three rather than two enterotypes after GCN correction. Conclusions The CopyRighter bioinformatic tools permits rapid correction of GCN in microbial surveys, resulting in improved estimates of microbial abundance, α and β diversity. PMID:24708850

  18. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  19. Copy number polymorphism in the α-globin gene cluster of European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Campos, R; Storz, J F; Ferrand, N

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genomic studies have revealed that mammals typically possess two or more tandemly duplicated copies of the α-globin (HBA) gene. The domestic rabbit represents an exception to this general rule, as this species was found to possess a single HBA gene. Previous electrophoretic surveys of HBA polymorphism in natural populations of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) revealed extensive geographic variation in the frequencies of three main electromorphs. The variation in frequency of two electromorphs is mainly partitioned between two distinct subspecies of European rabbit, and a third is restricted to the hybrid zone between the two rabbit subspecies in Iberia. Here we report the results of a survey of nucleotide polymorphism, which revealed HBA copy number polymorphism in Iberian populations of the European rabbit. By characterizing patterns of HBA polymorphism in populations from the native range of the European rabbit, we were able to identify the specific amino-acid substitutions that distinguish the previously characterized electromorphs. Within the hybrid zone, we observed the existence of a second HBA gene duplicate, named HBA2, that mostly represents a novel sequence haplotype, which occurs in higher frequency within the hybrid zone, and thus appears to have arisen in hybrids of the two distinct subspecies. Although this novel gene is also present in other wild Iberian populations, it is almost absent from French populations, which suggest a recent ancestry, associated with the establishment of the post-Pleistocene contact zone between the two European rabbit subspecies. PMID:22146981

  20. Mining from transcriptomes: 315 single-copy orthologous genes concatenated for the phylogenetic analyses of Orchidaceae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Min; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships are hotspots for orchid studies with controversial standpoints. Traditionally, the phylogenies of orchids are based on morphology and subjective factors. Although more reliable than classic phylogenic analyses, the current methods are based on a few gene markers and PCR amplification, which are labor intensive and cannot identify the placement of some species with degenerated plastid genomes. Therefore, a more efficient, labor-saving and reliable method is needed for phylogenic analysis. Here, we present a method of orchid phylogeny construction using transcriptomes. Ten representative species covering five subfamilies of Orchidaceae were selected, and 315 single-copy orthologous genes extracted from the transcriptomes of these organisms were applied to reconstruct a more robust phylogeny of orchids. This approach provided a rapid and reliable method of phylogeny construction for Orchidaceae, one of the most diversified family of angiosperms. We also showed the rigorous systematic position of holomycotrophic species, which has previously been difficult to determine because of the degenerated plastid genome. We concluded that the method presented in this study is more efficient and reliable than methods based on a few gene markers for phylogenic analyses, especially for the holomycotrophic species or those whose DNA sequences have been difficult to amplify. Meanwhile, a total of 315 single-copy orthologous genes of orchids are offered and more informative loci could be used in the future orchid phylogenetic studies. PMID:26380706

  1. Diversity and population-genetic properties of copy number variations and multicopy genes in cattle.

    PubMed

    Bickhart, Derek M; Xu, Lingyang; Hutchison, Jana L; Cole, John B; Null, Daniel J; Schroeder, Steven G; Song, Jiuzhou; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Lewin, Harris A; Liu, George E

    2016-06-01

    The diversity and population genetics of copy number variation (CNV) in domesticated animals are not well understood. In this study, we analysed 75 genomes of major taurine and indicine cattle breeds (including Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, and Romagnola), sequenced to 11-fold coverage to identify 1,853 non-redundant CNV regions. Supported by high validation rates in array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and qPCR experiments, these CNV regions accounted for 3.1% (87.5 Mb) of the cattle reference genome, representing a significant increase over previous estimates of the area of the genome that is copy number variable (∼2%). Further population genetics and evolutionary genomics analyses based on these CNVs revealed the population structures of the cattle taurine and indicine breeds and uncovered potential diversely selected CNVs near important functional genes, including AOX1, ASZ1, GAT, GLYAT, and KRTAP9-1 Additionally, 121 CNV gene regions were found to be either breed specific or differentially variable across breeds, such as RICTOR in dairy breeds and PNPLA3 in beef breeds. In contrast, clusters of the PRP and PAG genes were found to be duplicated in all sequenced animals, suggesting that subfunctionalization, neofunctionalization, or overdominance play roles in diversifying those fertility-related genes. These CNV results provide a new glimpse into the diverse selection histories of cattle breeds and a basis for correlating structural variation with complex traits in the future. PMID:27085184

  2. Diversity and population-genetic properties of copy number variations and multicopy genes in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bickhart, Derek M.; Xu, Lingyang; Hutchison, Jana L.; Cole, John B.; Null, Daniel J.; Schroeder, Steven G.; Song, Jiuzhou; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Lewin, Harris A.; Liu, George E.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and population genetics of copy number variation (CNV) in domesticated animals are not well understood. In this study, we analysed 75 genomes of major taurine and indicine cattle breeds (including Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, and Romagnola), sequenced to 11-fold coverage to identify 1,853 non-redundant CNV regions. Supported by high validation rates in array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and qPCR experiments, these CNV regions accounted for 3.1% (87.5 Mb) of the cattle reference genome, representing a significant increase over previous estimates of the area of the genome that is copy number variable (∼2%). Further population genetics and evolutionary genomics analyses based on these CNVs revealed the population structures of the cattle taurine and indicine breeds and uncovered potential diversely selected CNVs near important functional genes, including AOX1, ASZ1, GAT, GLYAT, and KRTAP9-1. Additionally, 121 CNV gene regions were found to be either breed specific or differentially variable across breeds, such as RICTOR in dairy breeds and PNPLA3 in beef breeds. In contrast, clusters of the PRP and PAG genes were found to be duplicated in all sequenced animals, suggesting that subfunctionalization, neofunctionalization, or overdominance play roles in diversifying those fertility-related genes. These CNV results provide a new glimpse into the diverse selection histories of cattle breeds and a basis for correlating structural variation with complex traits in the future. PMID:27085184

  3. Mining from transcriptomes: 315 single-copy orthologous genes concatenated for the phylogenetic analyses of Orchidaceae

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Min; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships are hotspots for orchid studies with controversial standpoints. Traditionally, the phylogenies of orchids are based on morphology and subjective factors. Although more reliable than classic phylogenic analyses, the current methods are based on a few gene markers and PCR amplification, which are labor intensive and cannot identify the placement of some species with degenerated plastid genomes. Therefore, a more efficient, labor-saving and reliable method is needed for phylogenic analysis. Here, we present a method of orchid phylogeny construction using transcriptomes. Ten representative species covering five subfamilies of Orchidaceae were selected, and 315 single-copy orthologous genes extracted from the transcriptomes of these organisms were applied to reconstruct a more robust phylogeny of orchids. This approach provided a rapid and reliable method of phylogeny construction for Orchidaceae, one of the most diversified family of angiosperms. We also showed the rigorous systematic position of holomycotrophic species, which has previously been difficult to determine because of the degenerated plastid genome. We concluded that the method presented in this study is more efficient and reliable than methods based on a few gene markers for phylogenic analyses, especially for the holomycotrophic species or those whose DNA sequences have been difficult to amplify. Meanwhile, a total of 315 single-copy orthologous genes of orchids are offered and more informative loci could be used in the future orchid phylogenetic studies. PMID:26380706

  4. Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is currently under threat of extinction due to an unusual fatal contagious cancer called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) diversity in Tasmanian devils. Results Here we report the characterization of the genomic regions encompassing MHC Class I and Class II genes in the Tasmanian devil. Four genomic regions approximately 960 kb in length were assembled and annotated using BAC contigs and physically mapped to devil Chromosome 4q. 34 genes and pseudogenes were identified, including five Class I and four Class II loci. Interestingly, when two haplotypes from two individuals were compared, three genomic copy number variants with sizes ranging from 1.6 to 17 kb were observed within the classical Class I gene region. One deletion is particularly important as it turns a Class Ia gene into a pseudogene in one of the haplotypes. This deletion explains the previously observed variation in the Class I allelic number between individuals. The frequency of this deletion is highest in the northwestern devil population and lowest in southeastern areas. Conclusions The third sequenced marsupial MHC provides insights into the evolution of this dynamic genomic region among the diverse marsupial species. The two sequenced devil MHC haplotypes revealed three copy number variations that are likely to significantly affect immune response and suggest that future work should focus on the role of copy number variations in disease susceptibility in this species. PMID:22404855

  5. The Porcine TSPY Gene Is Tricopy but Not a Copy Number Variant

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Anh T.; Oluwole, Olutobi; King, William Allan; Revay, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    The testis-specific protein Y-encoded (TSPY) gene is situated on the mammalian Y-chromosome and exhibits some remarkable biological characteristics. It has the highest known copy number (CN) of all protein coding genes in the human and bovine genomes (up to 74 and 200, respectively) and also shows high individual variability. Although the biological function of TSPY has not yet been elucidated, its specific expression in the testis and several identified binding domains within the protein suggests roles in male reproduction. Here we describe the porcine TSPY, as a multicopy gene with three copies located on the short arm of the Y-chromosome with no variation at three exon loci among 20 animals of normal reproductive health from four breeds of domestic pigs (Piétrain, Landrace, Duroc and Yorkshire). To further investigate the speculation that porcine TSPY is not a copy number variant, we have included five Low-fertility boars and five boars with exceptional High-fertility records. Interestingly, there was no difference between the High- and Low-fertile groups, but we detected slightly lower TSPY CN at all three exons (2.56-2.85) in both groups, as compared to normal animals, which could be attributed to technical variability or somatic mosaicism. The results are based on both relative quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Chromosomal localization of the porcine TSPY was done using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with gene specific PCR probes. PMID:26133983

  6. Multiple copies of a bile acid-inducible gene in Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Mallonee, D H; White, W B; Hylemon, P B

    1990-01-01

    Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 is an anaerobic intestinal bacterium which possesses inducible bile acid 7-dehydroxylation activity. Several new polypeptides are produced in this strain following induction with cholic acid. Genes coding for two copies of a bile acid-inducible 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA1 and baiA2) have been previously cloned and sequenced. We now report on a gene coding for a third copy of this 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA3). The baiA3 gene has been cloned in lambda DASH on an 11.2-kilobase DNA fragment from a partial Sau3A digest of the Eubacterium DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the baiA3 gene revealed 100% homology with the baiA1 gene within the coding region of the 27,000-dalton polypeptides. The baiA2 gene shares 81% sequence identity with the other two genes at the nucleotide level. The flanking nucleotide sequences associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 genes are identical for 930 bases in the 5' direction from the initiation codon and for at least 325 bases in the 3' direction from the stop codon, including the putative promoter regions for the genes. An additional open reading frame (occupying from 621 to 648 bases, depending on the correct start codon) was found in the identical 5' regions associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 clones. The 5' sequence 930 bases upstream from the baiA1 and baiA3 genes was totally divergent. The baiA2 gene, which is part of a large bile acid-inducible operon, showed no homology with the other two genes either in the 5' or 3' direction from the polypeptide coding region, except for a 15-base-pair presumed ribosome-binding site in the 5' region. These studies strongly suggest that a gene duplication (baiA1 and baiA3) has occurred and is stably maintained in this bacterium. Images PMID:2376563

  7. Copy Number Variation of UGT 2B Genes in Indian Families Using Whole Genome Scans

    PubMed Central

    Veerappa, Avinash M.; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B (UGT2B) is a family of genes involved in metabolizing steroid hormones and several other xenobiotics. These UGT2B genes are highly polymorphic in nature and have distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Copy number variations (CNVs) status of UGT2B17 in Indian population is not known and their disease associations have been inconclusive. It was therefore of interest to investigate the CNV profile of UGT2B genes. Methods. We investigated the presence of CNVs in UGT2B genes in 31 members from eight Indian families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip. Results. Our data revealed >50% of the study members carried CNVs in UGT2B genes, of which 76% showed deletion polymorphism. CNVs were observed more in UGT2B17 (76.4%) than in UGT2B15 (17.6%). Molecular network and pathway analysis found enrichment related to steroid metabolic process, carboxylesterase activity, and sequence specific DNA binding. Interpretation and Conclusion. We report the presence of UGT2B gene deletion and duplication polymorphisms in Indian families. Network analysis indicates the substitutive role of other possible genes in the UGT activity. The CNVs of UGT2B genes are very common in individuals indicating that the effect is neutral in causing any suspected diseases. PMID:27092269

  8. Phylogenetic Resolution of Deep Eukaryotic and Fungal Relationships Using Highly Conserved Low-Copy Nuclear Genes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ren; Sun, Yazhou; Zhao, Yue; Geiser, David; Ma, Hong; Zhou, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive and reliable eukaryotic tree of life is important for many aspects of biological studies from comparative developmental and physiological analyses to translational medicine and agriculture. Both gene-rich and taxon-rich approaches are effective strategies to improve phylogenetic accuracy and are greatly facilitated by marker genes that are universally distributed, well conserved, and orthologous among divergent eukaryotes. In this article, we report the identification of 943 low-copy eukaryotic genes and we show that many of these genes are promising tools in resolving eukaryotic phylogenies, despite the challenges of determining deep eukaryotic relationships. As a case study, we demonstrate that smaller subsets of ∼20 and 52 genes could resolve controversial relationships among widely divergent taxa and provide strong support for deep relationships such as the monophyly and branching order of several eukaryotic supergroups. In addition, the use of these genes resulted in fungal phylogenies that are congruent with previous phylogenomic studies that used much larger datasets, and successfully resolved several difficult relationships (e.g., forming a highly supported clade with Microsporidia, Mitosporidium and Rozella sister to other fungi). We propose that these genes are excellent for both gene-rich and taxon-rich analyses and can be applied at multiple taxonomic levels and facilitate a more complete understanding of the eukaryotic tree of life. PMID:27604879

  9. A Chromosome 8 Gene-Cluster Polymorphism with Low Human Beta-Defensin 2 Gene Copy Number Predisposes to Crohn Disease of the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Fellermann, Klaus; Stange, Daniel E.; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schmalzl, Hartmut; Wehkamp, Jan; Bevins, Charles L.; Reinisch, Walter; Teml, Alexander; Schwab, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Stange, Eduard F.

    2006-01-01

    Defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides that protect the intestinal mucosa against bacterial invasion. It has been suggested that deficient defensin expression may underlie the chronic inflammation of Crohn disease (CD). The DNA copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster on chromosome 8p23.1 is highly polymorphic within the healthy population, which suggests that the defective beta-defensin induction in colonic CD could be due to low beta-defensin–gene copy number. Here, we tested this hypothesis, using genomewide DNA copy number profiling by array-based comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction analysis of the human beta-defensin 2 (HBD-2) gene. We showed that healthy individuals, as well as patients with ulcerative colitis, have a median of 4 (range 2–10) HBD-2 gene copies per genome. In a surgical cohort with ileal or colonic CD and in a second large cohort with inflammatory bowel diseases, those with ileal resections/disease exhibited a normal median HBD-2 copy number of 4, whereas those with colonic CD had a median of only 3 copies per genome (P=.008 for the surgical cohort; P=.032 for the second cohort). Overall, the copy number distribution in colonic CD was shifted to lower numbers compared with controls (P=.002 for both the surgical cohort and the cohort with inflammatory bowel diseases). Individuals with ⩽3 copies have a significantly higher risk of developing colonic CD than did individuals with ⩾4 copies (odds ratio 3.06; 95% confidence interval 1.46–6.45). An HBD-2 gene copy number of <4 was associated with diminished mucosal HBD-2 mRNA expression (P=.033). In conclusion, a lower HBD-2 gene copy number in the beta-defensin locus predisposes to colonic CD, most likely through diminished beta-defensin expression. PMID:16909382

  10. Role of multiple gene copies in particulate methane monooxygenase activity in the methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Stolyar, S; Costello, A M; Peeples, T L; Lidstrom, M E

    1999-05-01

    Genes for the subunits of particulate methane monooxygenase, PmoABC, have been sequenced from the gamma-proteobacterial methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. M. capsulatus Bath contains two complete copies of pmoCAB, as well as a third copy of pmoC. The two pmoCAB regions were almost identical at the nucleotide sequence level, differing in only 13 positions in 3183 bp. At the amino acid level, each translated gene product contained only one differing residue in each copy. However, the pmoC3 sequence was more divergent from the two other pmoC copies at both the far N-terminus and far C-terminus. Chromosomal insertion mutations were generated in all seven genes. Null mutants could not be obtained for pmoC3, suggesting that it may play an essential role in growth on methane. Null mutants were obtained for pmoC1, pmoC2, pmoA1, pmoA2, pmoB1 and pmoB2. All of these mutants grew on methane, demonstrating that both gene copies were functional. Copy 1 mutants showed about two-thirds of the wild-type whole-cell methane oxidation rate, while copy 2 mutants showed only about one-third of the wild-type rate, indicating that both gene copies were necessary for wild-type particulate methane monooxygenase activity. It was not possible to obtain double null mutants that were defective in both pmo copies, which may indicate that some expression of pMMO is important for growth. PMID:10376840

  11. Population structuring of multi-copy, antigen-encoding genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Artzy-Randrup, Yael; Rorick, Mary M; Day, Karen; Chen, Donald; Dobson, Andrew P; Pascual, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple independently circulating strains in pathogen populations that undergo sexual recombination is a central question of epidemiology with profound implications for control. An agent-based model is developed that extends earlier ‘strain theory’ by addressing the var gene family of Plasmodium falciparum. The model explicitly considers the extensive diversity of multi-copy genes that undergo antigenic variation via sequential, mutually exclusive expression. It tracks the dynamics of all unique var repertoires in a population of hosts, and shows that even under high levels of sexual recombination, strain competition mediated through cross-immunity structures the parasite population into a subset of coexisting dominant repertoires of var genes whose degree of antigenic overlap depends on transmission intensity. Empirical comparison of patterns of genetic variation at antigenic and neutral sites supports this role for immune selection in structuring parasite diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00093.001 PMID:23251784

  12. Mapping of single-copy genes by TSA-FISH in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We work on the development of transgenic sexing strains in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Tortricidae), which would enable to produce male-only progeny for the population control of this pest using sterile insect technique (SIT). To facilitate this research, we have developed a number of cytogenetic and molecular tools, including a physical map of the codling moth Z chromosome using BAC-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization with bacterial artificial chromosome probes). However, chromosomal localization of unique, single-copy sequences such as a transgene cassette by conventional FISH remains challenging. In this study, we adapted a FISH protocol with tyramide signal amplification (TSA-FISH) for detection of single-copy genes in Lepidoptera. We tested the protocol with probes prepared from partial sequences of Z-linked genes in the codling moth. Results Using a modified TSA-FISH protocol we successfully mapped a partial sequence of the Acetylcholinesterase 1 (Ace-1) gene to the Z chromosome and confirmed thus its Z-linkage. A subsequent combination of BAC-FISH with BAC probes containing anticipated neighbouring Z-linked genes and TSA-FISH with the Ace-1 probe allowed the integration of Ace-1 in the physical map of the codling moth Z chromosome. We also developed a two-colour TSA-FISH protocol which enabled us simultaneous localization of two Z-linked genes, Ace-1 and Notch, to the expected regions of the Z chromosome. Conclusions We showed that TSA-FISH represents a reliable technique for physical mapping of genes on chromosomes of moths and butterflies. Our results suggest that this technique can be combined with BAC-FISH and in the future used for physical localization of transgene cassettes on chromosomes of transgenic lines in the codling moth or other lepidopteran species. Furthermore, the developed protocol for two-colour TSA-FISH might become a powerful tool for synteny mapping in non-model organisms. PMID:25471491

  13. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41–48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups. PMID:27354512

  14. Assessment of Complement C4 Gene Copy Number Using the Paralog Ratio Test

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Michelle M.A.; Boteva, Lora; Morris, David L.; Zhou, Bi; Wu, Yee Ling; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Yu, Chack Yung; Rioux, John D.; Hollox, Edward J.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The complement C4 locus is in the class III region of the MHC, and exhibits copy number variation. Complement C4 null alleles have shown association with a number of diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, most studies to date have used protein immunophenotyping and not direct interrogation of the genome to determine C4 null allele status. Moreover, a lack of accurate C4 gene copy number (GCN) estimation and tight linkage disequilibrium across the disease-associated MHC haplotypes has confounded attempts to establish whether or not these associations are causal. We have therefore developed a high through-put paralog ratio test (PRT) in association with two restriction enzyme digest variant ratio tests (REDVRs) to determine total C4 GCN, C4A GCN, and C4B GCN. In the densely genotyped CEU cohort we show that this method is accurate and reproducible when compared to gold standard Southern blot copy number estimation with a discrepancy rate of 9%. We find a broad range of C4 GCNs in the CEU and the 1958 British Birth Cohort populations under study. In addition, SNP-C4 CNV analyses show only moderate levels of correlation and therefore do not support the use of SNP genotypes as proxies for complement C4 GCN. PMID:20506482

  15. Frequent loss of lineages and deficient duplications accounted for low copy number of disease resistance genes in Cucurbitaceae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The sequenced genomes of cucumber, melon and watermelon have relatively few R-genes, with 70, 75 and 55 copies only, respectively. The mechanism for low copy number of R-genes in Cucurbitaceae genomes remains unknown. Results Manual annotation of R-genes in the sequenced genomes of Cucurbitaceae species showed that approximately half of them are pseudogenes. Comparative analysis of R-genes showed frequent loss of R-gene loci in different Cucurbitaceae species. Phylogenetic analysis, data mining and PCR cloning using degenerate primers indicated that Cucurbitaceae has limited number of R-gene lineages (subfamilies). Comparison between R-genes from Cucurbitaceae and those from poplar and soybean suggested frequent loss of R-gene lineages in Cucurbitaceae. Furthermore, the average number of R-genes per lineage in Cucurbitaceae species is approximately 1/3 that in soybean or poplar. Therefore, both loss of lineages and deficient duplications in extant lineages accounted for the low copy number of R-genes in Cucurbitaceae. No extensive chimeras of R-genes were found in any of the sequenced Cucurbitaceae genomes. Nevertheless, one lineage of R-genes from Trichosanthes kirilowii, a wild Cucurbitaceae species, exhibits chimeric structures caused by gene conversions, and may contain a large number of distinct R-genes in natural populations. Conclusions Cucurbitaceae species have limited number of R-gene lineages and each genome harbors relatively few R-genes. The scarcity of R-genes in Cucurbitaceae species was due to frequent loss of R-gene lineages and infrequent duplications in extant lineages. The evolutionary mechanisms for large variation of copy number of R-genes in different plant species were discussed. PMID:23682795

  16. Copy number variation analysis implicates the cell polarity gene glypican 5 as a human spina bifida candidate gene

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Boland, Riley; Smith, Tiffany L.; Hulstrand, Alissa M.; Northrup, Hope; Hakeman, Matthew; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Yung, Christina K.; Long, Abby; Brouillette, Rachel B.; Au, Kit Sing; Gurnett, Christina; Houston, Douglas W.; Cornell, Robert A.; Manak, J. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Family and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component to NTDs. However, despite more than three decades of research, the genes involved in human NTDs remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that rare copy number variants (CNVs), especially de novo germline CNVs, are a significant risk factor for NTDs. We used array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify rare CNVs in 128 Caucasian and 61 Hispanic patients with non-syndromic lumbar-sacral myelomeningocele. We also performed aCGH analysis on the parents of affected individuals with rare CNVs where parental DNA was available (42 sets). Among the eight de novo CNVs that we identified, three generated copy number changes of entire genes. One large heterozygous deletion removed 27 genes, including PAX3, a known spina bifida-associated gene. A second CNV altered genes (PGPD8, ZC3H6) for which little is known regarding function or expression. A third heterozygous deletion removed GPC5 and part of GPC6, genes encoding glypicans. Glypicans are proteoglycans that modulate the activity of morphogens such as Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), both of which have been implicated in NTDs. Additionally, glypicans function in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and several PCP genes have been associated with NTDs. Here, we show that GPC5 orthologs are expressed in the neural tube, and that inhibiting their expression in frog and fish embryos results in NTDs. These results implicate GPC5 as a gene required for normal neural tube development. PMID:23223018

  17. Copy number variation analysis implicates the cell polarity gene glypican 5 as a human spina bifida candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, Alexander G; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Boland, Riley; Smith, Tiffany L; Hulstrand, Alissa M; Northrup, Hope; Hakeman, Matthew; Dierdorff, Jason M; Yung, Christina K; Long, Abby; Brouillette, Rachel B; Au, Kit Sing; Gurnett, Christina; Houston, Douglas W; Cornell, Robert A; Manak, J Robert

    2013-03-15

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Family and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component to NTDs. However, despite more than three decades of research, the genes involved in human NTDs remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that rare copy number variants (CNVs), especially de novo germline CNVs, are a significant risk factor for NTDs. We used array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify rare CNVs in 128 Caucasian and 61 Hispanic patients with non-syndromic lumbar-sacral myelomeningocele. We also performed aCGH analysis on the parents of affected individuals with rare CNVs where parental DNA was available (42 sets). Among the eight de novo CNVs that we identified, three generated copy number changes of entire genes. One large heterozygous deletion removed 27 genes, including PAX3, a known spina bifida-associated gene. A second CNV altered genes (PGPD8, ZC3H6) for which little is known regarding function or expression. A third heterozygous deletion removed GPC5 and part of GPC6, genes encoding glypicans. Glypicans are proteoglycans that modulate the activity of morphogens such as Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), both of which have been implicated in NTDs. Additionally, glypicans function in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and several PCP genes have been associated with NTDs. Here, we show that GPC5 orthologs are expressed in the neural tube, and that inhibiting their expression in frog and fish embryos results in NTDs. These results implicate GPC5 as a gene required for normal neural tube development. PMID:23223018

  18. Acquired copy number alterations of miRNA genes in acute myeloid leukemia are uncommon

    PubMed Central

    Ramsingh, Giridharan; Jacoby, Meagan A.; Shao, Jin; De Jesus Pizzaro, Rigoberto E.; Shen, Dong; Trissal, Maria; Getz, Angela H.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and has been implicated in leukemic transformation. Whether somatic copy number alterations (CNAs) are a frequent cause of altered miRNA gene expression is largely unknown. Herein, we used comparative genomic hybridization with a custom high-resolution miRNA-centric array and/or whole-genome sequence data to identify somatic CNAs involving miRNA genes in 113 cases of AML, including 50 cases of de novo AML, 18 cases of relapsed AML, 15 cases of secondary AML following myelodysplastic syndrome, and 30 cases of therapy-related AML. We identified a total of 48 somatic miRNA gene-containing CNAs that were not identified by routine cytogenetics in 20 patients (18%). All these CNAs also included one or more protein coding genes. We identified a single case with a hemizygous deletion of MIR223, resulting in the complete loss of miR-223 expression. Three other cases of AML were identified with very low to absent miR-223 expression, an miRNA gene known to play a key role in myelopoiesis. However, in these cases, no somatic genetic alteration of MIR223 was identified, suggesting epigenetic silencing. These data show that somatic CNAs specifically targeting miRNA genes are uncommon in AML. PMID:24009227

  19. A Worldwide Analysis of Beta-Defensin Copy Number Variation Suggests Recent Selection of a High-Expressing DEFB103 Gene Copy in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Robert J; Machado, Lee R; Zuccherato, Luciana W; Antolinos, Suzanne; Xue, Yali; Shawa, Nyambura; Gilman, Robert H; Cabrera, Lilia; Berg, Douglas E; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Kelly, Paul; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Hollox, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    Beta-defensins are a family of multifunctional genes with roles in defense against pathogens, reproduction, and pigmentation. In humans, six beta-defensin genes are clustered in a repeated region which is copy-number variable (CNV) as a block, with a diploid copy number between 1 and 12. The role in host defense makes the evolutionary history of this CNV particularly interesting, because morbidity due to infectious disease is likely to have been an important selective force in human evolution, and to have varied between geographical locations. Here, we show CNV of the beta-defensin region in chimpanzees, and identify a beta-defensin block in the human lineage that contains rapidly evolving noncoding regulatory sequences. We also show that variation at one of these rapidly evolving sequences affects expression levels and cytokine responsiveness of DEFB103, a key inhibitor of influenza virus fusion at the cell surface. A worldwide analysis of beta-defensin CNV in 67 populations shows an unusually high frequency of high-DEFB103-expressing copies in East Asia, the geographical origin of historical and modern influenza epidemics, possibly as a result of selection for increased resistance to influenza in this region. Hum Mutat 32:743–750, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21387465

  20. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes increases with copy number in multiple cancer types.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Qu, Hong

    2016-04-26

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process through which epithelial cells transform into mesenchymal cells. EMT-implicated genes initiate and promote cancer metastasis because mesenchymal cells have greater invasive and migration capacities than epithelial cells. In this pan-cancer analysis, we explored the relationship between gene expression changes and copy number variations (CNVs) for EMT-implicated genes. Based on curated 377 EMT-implicated genes from the literature, we identified 212 EMT-implicated genes associated with more frequent copy number gains (CNGs) than copy number losses (CNLs) using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Then by correlating these CNV data with TCGA gene expression data, we identified 71 EMT-implicated genes with concordant CNGs and gene up-regulation in 20 or more tumor samples. Of those, 14 exhibited such concordance in over 110 tumor samples. These 14 genes were predominantly apoptosis regulators, which may implies that apoptosis is critical during EMT. Moreover, the 71 genes with concordant CNG and up-regulation were largely involved in cellular functions such as phosphorylation cascade signaling. This is the first observation of concordance between CNG and up-regulation of specific genes in hundreds of samples, which may indicate that somatic CNGs activate gene expression by increasing the gene dosage. PMID:27029057

  1. Primers for low-copy nuclear genes in Metrosideros and cross-amplification in Myrtaceae1

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Yohan; Johansen, Jennifer; Sakishima, Tomoko; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Stacy, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Primers were developed to amplify low-copy nuclear genes in Hawaiian Metrosideros (Myrtaceae). • Methods and Results: Data from a pooled 454 Titanium run of the partial transcriptomes of four Metrosideros taxa were used to identify the loci of interest. Ten exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) markers were amplified and sequenced directly with success in Metrosideros, as well as in a representative selection of Myrtaceae, including Syzygium, Psidium, and Melaleuca for most of the markers. The loci amplified ranged between 500 and 1100 bp, and up to 117 polymorphic sites were observed within an individual gene alignment. Two introns contained microsatellites in some of the species. • Conclusions: These novel primer pairs should be useful for phylogenetic analysis and population genetics of a broad range of Myrtaceae, particularly the diverse fleshy-fruited tribes Syzygieae and Myrteae. PMID:25309837

  2. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  3. Finding Single Copy Genes Out of Sequenced Genomes for Multilocus Phylogenetics in Non-Model Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Feau, Nicolas; Decourcelle, Thibaut; Husson, Claude; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure; Dutech, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Historically, fungal multigene phylogenies have been reconstructed based on a small number of commonly used genes. The availability of complete fungal genomes has given rise to a new wave of model organisms that provide large number of genes potentially useful for building robust gene genealogies. Unfortunately, cross-utilization of these resources to study phylogenetic relationships in the vast majority of non-model fungi (i.e. “orphan” species) remains an unexamined question. To address this problem, we developed a method coupled with a program named “PHYLORPH” (PHYLogenetic markers for ORPHans). The method screens fungal genomic databases (107 fungal genomes fully sequenced) for single copy genes that might be easily transferable and well suited for studies at low taxonomic levels (for example, in species complexes) in non-model fungal species. To maximize the chance to target genes with informative regions, PHYLORPH displays a graphical evaluation system based on the estimation of nucleotide divergence relative to substitution type. The usefulness of this approach was tested by developing markers in four non-model groups of fungal pathogens. For each pathogen considered, 7 to 40% of the 10–15 best candidate genes proposed by PHYLORPH yielded sequencing success. Levels of polymorphism of these genes were compared with those obtained for some genes traditionally used to build fungal phylogenies (e.g. nuclear rDNA, β-tubulin, γ-actin, Elongation factor EF-1α). These genes were ranked among the best-performing ones and resolved accurately taxa relationships in each of the four non-model groups of fungi considered. We envision that PHYLORPH will constitute a useful tool for obtaining new and accurate phylogenetic markers to resolve relationships between closely related non-model fungal species. PMID:21533204

  4. Indexing Effects of Copy Number Variation on Genes Involved in Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; D’Abate, Lia; Merico, Daniele; Chan, Ada; Zarrei, Mehdi; Tammimies, Kristiina; Walker, Susan; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Yuen, Ryan K. C.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Mathonnet, Géraldine; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Nizard, Sonia; Shago, Mary; Joseph-George, Ann M.; Noor, Abdul; Carter, Melissa T.; Yoon, Grace; Kannu, Peter; Tihy, Frédérique; Thorland, Erik C.; Marshall, Christian R.; Buchanan, Janet A.; Speevak, Marsha; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in clinical genomics is to predict whether copy number variation (CNV) affecting a gene or multiple genes will manifest as disease. Increasing recognition of gene dosage effects in neurodevelopmental disorders prompted us to develop a computational approach based on critical-exon (highly expressed in brain, highly conserved) examination for potential etiologic effects. Using a large CNV dataset, our updated analyses revealed significant (P < 1.64 × 10−15) enrichment of critical-exons within rare CNVs in cases compared to controls. Separately, we used a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to construct an unbiased protein module from prenatal and adult tissues and found it significantly enriched for critical exons in prenatal (P < 1.15 × 10−50, OR = 2.11) and adult (P < 6.03 × 10−18, OR = 1.55) tissues. WGCNA yielded 1,206 proteins for which we prioritized the corresponding genes as likely to have a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. We compared the gene lists obtained from critical-exon and WGCNA analysis and found 438 candidate genes associated with CNVs annotated as pathogenic, or as variants of uncertain significance (VOUS), from among 10,619 developmental delay cases. We identified genes containing CNVs previously considered to be VOUS to be new candidate genes for neurodevelopmental disorders (GIT1, MVB12B and PPP1R9A) demonstrating the utility of this strategy to index the clinical effects of CNVs. PMID:27363808

  5. Indexing Effects of Copy Number Variation on Genes Involved in Developmental Delay.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; D'Abate, Lia; Merico, Daniele; Chan, Ada; Zarrei, Mehdi; Tammimies, Kristiina; Walker, Susan; Gazzellone, Matthew J; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Yuen, Ryan K C; Devriendt, Koenraad; Mathonnet, Géraldine; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Nizard, Sonia; Shago, Mary; Joseph-George, Ann M; Noor, Abdul; Carter, Melissa T; Yoon, Grace; Kannu, Peter; Tihy, Frédérique; Thorland, Erik C; Marshall, Christian R; Buchanan, Janet A; Speevak, Marsha; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Scherer, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in clinical genomics is to predict whether copy number variation (CNV) affecting a gene or multiple genes will manifest as disease. Increasing recognition of gene dosage effects in neurodevelopmental disorders prompted us to develop a computational approach based on critical-exon (highly expressed in brain, highly conserved) examination for potential etiologic effects. Using a large CNV dataset, our updated analyses revealed significant (P < 1.64 × 10(-15)) enrichment of critical-exons within rare CNVs in cases compared to controls. Separately, we used a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to construct an unbiased protein module from prenatal and adult tissues and found it significantly enriched for critical exons in prenatal (P < 1.15 × 10(-50), OR = 2.11) and adult (P < 6.03 × 10(-18), OR = 1.55) tissues. WGCNA yielded 1,206 proteins for which we prioritized the corresponding genes as likely to have a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. We compared the gene lists obtained from critical-exon and WGCNA analysis and found 438 candidate genes associated with CNVs annotated as pathogenic, or as variants of uncertain significance (VOUS), from among 10,619 developmental delay cases. We identified genes containing CNVs previously considered to be VOUS to be new candidate genes for neurodevelopmental disorders (GIT1, MVB12B and PPP1R9A) demonstrating the utility of this strategy to index the clinical effects of CNVs. PMID:27363808

  6. A novel rare copy number variant of the ABCF1 gene identified among dengue fever patients from Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hoh, B P; Sam, S S; Umi, S H; Mahiran, M; Nik Khairudin, N Y; Rafidah Hanim, S; Abubakar, S

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a form of genetic variation in addition to single nucleotide polymorphisms. The significance of CNV in the manifestation of a number of diseases is only recently receiving considerable attention. We genotyped 163 dengue patients from Peninsular Malaysia for genes possibly linked to dengue infection using quantitative real-time PCR. Here, we report a serendipitous discovery of a novel rare CNV of the ABCF1 gene among the dengue patients. Among these patients, two had a gain of 1 copy (CN = 3) and one had lost 1 copy (CN = 1), indicating that a rare CNV of the ABCF1 gene was detected among dengue patients from Peninsular Malaysia. Although the gene is suspected to regulate inflammatory responses and pathogen-induced cytokine storm, its relevance to dengue requires further investigation. PMID:24634119

  7. Genomic Copy Number Dictates a Gene-Independent Cell Response to CRISPR/Cas9 Targeting | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system enables genome editing and somatic cell genetic screens in mammalian cells. We performed genome-scale loss-of-function screens in 33 cancer cell lines to identify genes essential for proliferation/survival and found a strong correlation between increased gene copy number and decreased cell viability after genome editing. Within regions of copy-number gain, CRISPR/Cas9 targeting of both expressed and unexpressed genes, as well as intergenic loci, led to significantly decreased cell proliferation through induction of a G2 cell-cycle arrest.

  8. Refining analyses of copy number variation identifies specific genes associated with developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Coe, Bradley P; Witherspoon, Kali; Rosenfeld, Jill A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Bosco, Paolo; Friend, Kathryn L; Baker, Carl; Buono, Serafino; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H; Hoischen, Alex; Pfundt, Rolph; Krumm, Nik; Carvill, Gemma L; Li, Deana; Amaral, David; Brown, Natasha; Lockhart, Paul J; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Alberti, Antonino; Shaw, Marie; Pettinato, Rosa; Tervo, Raymond; de Leeuw, Nicole; Reijnders, Margot R F; Torchia, Beth S; Peeters, Hilde; O'Roak, Brian J; Fichera, Marco; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Shendure, Jay; Mefford, Heather C; Haan, Eric; Gécz, Jozef; de Vries, Bert B A; Romano, Corrado; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-10-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are associated with many neurocognitive disorders; however, these events are typically large, and the underlying causative genes are unclear. We created an expanded CNV morbidity map from 29,085 children with developmental delay in comparison to 19,584 healthy controls, identifying 70 significant CNVs. We resequenced 26 candidate genes in 4,716 additional cases with developmental delay or autism and 2,193 controls. An integrated analysis of CNV and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) data pinpointed 10 genes enriched for putative loss of function. Follow-up of a subset of affected individuals identified new clinical subtypes of pediatric disease and the genes responsible for disease-associated CNVs. These genetic changes include haploinsufficiency of SETBP1 associated with intellectual disability and loss of expressive language and truncations of ZMYND11 in individuals with autism, aggression and complex neuropsychiatric features. This combined CNV and SNV approach facilitates the rapid discovery of new syndromes and genes involved in neuropsychiatric disease despite extensive genetic heterogeneity. PMID:25217958

  9. Genomic Copy Number Variation Affecting Genes Involved in the Cell Cycle Pathway: Implications for Somatic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Iourov, Ivan Y.; Vorsanova, Svetlana G.; Zelenova, Maria A.; Korostelev, Sergei A.; Yurov, Yuri B.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic genome variations (mosaicism) seem to represent a common mechanism for human intercellular/interindividual diversity in health and disease. However, origins and mechanisms of somatic mosaicism remain a matter of conjecture. Recently, it has been hypothesized that zygotic genomic variation naturally occurring in humans is likely to predispose to nonheritable genetic changes (aneuploidy) acquired during the lifetime through affecting cell cycle regulation, genome stability maintenance, and related pathways. Here, we have evaluated genomic copy number variation (CNV) in genes implicated in the cell cycle pathway (according to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes/KEGG) within a cohort of patients with intellectual disability, autism, and/or epilepsy, in which the phenotype was not associated with genomic rearrangements altering this pathway. Benign CNVs affecting 20 genes of the cell cycle pathway were detected in 161 out of 255 patients (71.6%). Among them, 62 individuals exhibited >2 CNVs affecting the cell cycle pathway. Taking into account the number of individuals demonstrating CNV of these genes, a support for this hypothesis appears to be presented. Accordingly, we speculate that further studies of CNV burden across the genes implicated in related pathways might clarify whether zygotic genomic variation generates somatic mosaicism in health and disease. PMID:26421275

  10. Evolutionary relationships among copies of feather beta ({beta}) keratin genes from several avian orders.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Travis C; French, Jeffrey O; Heincelman, Traci J; Jones, Kenneth L; Sawyer, Roger H

    2008-10-01

    The feather beta (β) keratins of the white leghorn chicken (order Galliformes, Gallus gallus domesticus) are the products of a multigene family that includes claw, feather, feather-like, and scale genes (Presland et al. 1989a). Here we characterize the feather β-keratin genes in additional bird species. We designed primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) using sequences available from chicken, cloned the resulting amplicons to isolate individual copies, and sequenced multiple clones from each PCR reaction for which we obtained amplicons of the expected size. Feather β-keratins of 18 species from eight avian orders demonstrate DNA sequence variation within and among taxa, even in the protein-coding regions of the genes. Phylogenies of these data suggest that Galliformes (fowl-like birds), Psittaciformes (parrots), and possibly Falconiformes (birds of prey) existed as separate lineages before duplication of the feather β-keratin gene began in Ciconiiformes (herons, storks, and allies), Gruiformes (cranes, rails, and allies), and Piciformes (woodpeckers and allies). Sequences from single species of Coraciiformes (kingfishers) and Columbiformes (pigeons) are monophyletic and strikingly divergent, suggesting feather β-keratin genes in these birds also diverged after these species last shared a common ancestor with the other taxa investigated. Overall, these data demonstrate considerable variation in this structural protein in the relatively recent history of birds, and raise questions concerning the origin and homology of claw, feather-like, and scale β-keratins of birds and the reptilian β-keratins. PMID:21669807

  11. Effects of chromosomal gene copy number and locations on polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis by Escherichia coli and Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jin; Wang, Huan; Fu, Xiao-Zhi; Gao, Xue; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal integration and expression of heterologous gene(s) are favored in industrial biotechnology due to the inheriting expression stability. Yet, chromosomal expression is commonly weaker than plasmid one. The effect on gene expression level at 13 chromosomal locations in Escherichia coli was investigated using the polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthesis pathway encoded by a phaCAB operon as a reporter. When 11 copies of phaCAB were randomly integrated into 11 of the 13 chromosomal locations, respectively, 5.2 wt% of PHB was produced. PHB (34.1 wt%) was accumulated by a recombinant E. coli inserted chromosomally with 50 copies of phaCAB in the active asnB site using a Cre-loxP recombination method. This PHB accumulation level was equivalent to a medium-copy-number plasmid expression system, suggesting the importance of chromosomal gene copy number for PHB production by E. coli. This result was used to manipulate a Halomonas strain. One copy of genes scpAB encoding methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase was inserted into the strongest expression site porin in the chromosome of the 2-methylcitrate synthase (prpC) deleted mutant Halomonas TD08, leading to the synthesis of poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from glucose as the sole carbon source. The chromosome-engineered strain produced PHBV consisting of 5-12 mol% 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) stably compared with unstable fluctuation of 7-25 mol% 3HV by a medium-copy-number plasmid system. These results demonstrated that chromosome engineering based on active transcriptional site and gene copy number is more feasible for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis in Halomonas TD08 compared with in E. coli. PMID:25758961

  12. Phylogeny and Divergence Times of Gymnosperms Inferred from Single-Copy Nuclear Genes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zu-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms. PMID:25222863

  13. Clinical features associated with copy number variations of the 14q32 imprinted gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Fox, Joyce E; Descartes, Maria; Brewer, Fallon; Stroud, Tracy; Gorski, Jerome L; Upton, Sheila J; Moeschler, John B; Monteleone, Berrin; Neill, Nicholas J; Lamb, Allen N; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Ravnan, J Britt

    2015-02-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for imprinted chromosomes can cause abnormal phenotypes due to absent or overexpression of imprinted genes. UPD(14)pat causes a unique constellation of features including thoracic skeletal anomalies, polyhydramnios, placentomegaly, and limited survival; its hypothesized cause is overexpression of paternally expressed RTL1, due to absent regulatory effects of maternally expressed RTL1as. UPD(14)mat causes a milder condition with hypotonia, growth failure, and precocious puberty; its hypothesized cause is absence of paternally expressed DLK1. To more clearly establish how gains and losses of imprinted genes can cause disease, we report six individuals with copy number variations of the imprinted 14q32 region identified through clinical microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. Three individuals presented with UPD(14)mat-like phenotypes (Temple syndrome) and had apparently de novo deletions spanning the imprinted region, including DLK1. One of these deletions was shown to be on the paternal chromosome. Two individuals with UPD(14)pat-like phenotypes had 122-154kb deletions on their maternal chromosomes that included RTL1as but not the differentially methylated regions that regulate imprinted gene expression, providing further support for RTL1 overexpression as a cause for the UPD(14)pat phenotype. The sixth individual is tetrasomic for a 1.7Mb segment, including the imprinted region, and presents with intellectual disability and seizures but lacks significant phenotypic overlap with either UPD(14) syndrome. Therefore, the 14q32 imprinted region is dosage sensitive, with deletions of different critical regions causing UPD(14)mat- and UPD(14)pat-like phenotypes, while copy gains are likely insufficient to recapitulate these phenotypes. PMID:25756153

  14. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method. PMID:26808495

  15. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method. PMID:26808495

  16. Target genes discovery through copy number alteration analysis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, De-Leung; Chen, Yen-Hsieh; Shih, Jou-Ho; Lin, Chi-Hung; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Chen, Chian-Feng

    2013-12-21

    High-throughput short-read sequencing of exomes and whole cancer genomes in multiple human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cohorts confirmed previously identified frequently mutated somatic genes, such as TP53, CTNNB1 and AXIN1, and identified several novel genes with moderate mutation frequencies, including ARID1A, ARID2, MLL, MLL2, MLL3, MLL4, IRF2, ATM, CDKN2A, FGF19, PIK3CA, RPS6KA3, JAK1, KEAP1, NFE2L2, C16orf62, LEPR, RAC2, and IL6ST. Functional classification of these mutated genes suggested that alterations in pathways participating in chromatin remodeling, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, JAK/STAT signaling, and oxidative stress play critical roles in HCC tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, because there are few druggable genes used in HCC therapy, the identification of new therapeutic targets through integrated genomic approaches remains an important task. Because a large amount of HCC genomic data genotyped by high density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays is deposited in the public domain, copy number alteration (CNA) analyses of these arrays is a cost-effective way to reveal target genes through profiling of recurrent and overlapping amplicons, homozygous deletions and potentially unbalanced chromosomal translocations accumulated during HCC progression. Moreover, integration of CNAs with other high-throughput genomic data, such as aberrantly coding transcriptomes and non-coding gene expression in human HCC tissues and rodent HCC models, provides lines of evidence that can be used to facilitate the identification of novel HCC target genes with the potential of improving the survival of HCC patients. PMID:24379610

  17. Soluble normal and mutated DNA sequences from single-copy genes in human blood.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, G D; Pribish, D M; Valone, F H; Memoli, V A; Bzik, D J; Yao, S L

    1994-01-01

    Healthy individuals have soluble (extracellular) DNA in their blood, and increased amounts are present in cancer patients. Here we report the detection of specific sequences of the cystic fibrosis and K-ras genes in plasma DNA from normal donors by amplification with the polymerase chain reaction. In addition, mutated K-ras sequences are identified by polymerase chain reaction utilizing allele-specific primers in the plasma or serum from three patients with pancreatic carcinoma that contain mutated K-ras genes. The mutations are confirmed by direct sequencing. These results indicate that sequences of single-copy genes can be identified in normal plasma and that the sequences of mutated oncogenes can be detected and identified with allele-specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction in plasma or serum from patients with malignant tumors containing identical mutated genes. Mutated oncogenes in plasma and serum may represent tumor markers that could be useful for diagnosis, determining response to treatment, and predicting prognosis. PMID:8118388

  18. Screen for mitochondrial DNA copy number maintenance genes reveals essential role for ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoh, Atsushi; Cannino, Giuseppe; Gerards, Mike; Buckley, Suzanne; Kazancioglu, Selena; Scialo, Filippo; Lihavainen, Eero; Ribeiro, Andre; Dufour, Eric; Jacobs, Howard T

    2014-01-01

    The machinery of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is only partially characterized and is of wide interest due to its involvement in disease. To identify novel components of this machinery, plus other cellular pathways required for mtDNA viability, we implemented a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells, assaying for loss of fluorescence of mtDNA nucleoids stained with the DNA-intercalating agent PicoGreen. In addition to previously characterized components of the mtDNA replication and transcription machineries, positives included many proteins of the cytosolic proteasome and ribosome (but not the mitoribosome), three proteins involved in vesicle transport, some other factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis or nuclear gene expression, > 30 mainly uncharacterized proteins and most subunits of ATP synthase (but no other OXPHOS complex). ATP synthase knockdown precipitated a burst of mitochondrial ROS production, followed by copy number depletion involving increased mitochondrial turnover, not dependent on the canonical autophagy machinery. Our findings will inform future studies of the apparatus and regulation of mtDNA maintenance, and the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics and signaling in modulating mtDNA copy number. PMID:24952591

  19. Autism genome-wide copy number variation reveals ubiquitin and neuronal genes

    PubMed Central

    Glessner, Joseph T.; Wang, Kai; Cai, Guiqing; Korvatska, Olena; Kim, Cecilia E.; Wood, Shawn; Zhang, Haitao; Estes, Annette; Brune, Camille W.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Imielinski, Marcin; Frackelton, Edward C.; Reichert, Jennifer; Crawford, Emily L.; Munson, Jeffrey; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Annaiah, Kiran; Thomas, Kelly; Hou, Cuiping; Glaberson, Wendy; Flory, James; Otieno, Frederick; Garris, Maria; Soorya, Latha; Klei, Lambertus; Piven, Joseph; Meyer, Kacie J.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Sakurai, Takeshi; Game, Rachel M.; Rudd, Danielle S.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; McDougle, Christopher J.; Davis, Lea K.; Miller, Judith; Posey, David J.; Michaels, Shana; Kolevzon, Alexander; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Bernier, Raphael; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Dawson, Geraldine; Owley, Thomas; McMahon, William M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Sweeney, John A.; Nurnberger, John I.; Coon, Hilary; Sutcliffe, James S.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Bucan, Maja; Cook, Edwin H.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Devlin, Bernie; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders with complex genetic origins1–4. Previous studies focusing on candidate genes or genomic regions have identified several copy number variations (CNVs) that are associated with an increased risk of ASDs5–9. Here we present the results from a whole-genome CNV study on a cohort of 859 ASD cases and 1,409 healthy children of European ancestry who were genotyped with ~550,000 single nucleotide polymorphism markers, in an attempt to comprehensively identify CNVs conferring susceptibility to ASDs. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 1,336 ASD cases and 1,110 controls of European ancestry. Besides previously reported ASD candidate genes, such as NRXN1 (ref. 10) and CNTN4 (refs 11, 12), several new susceptibility genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules, including NLGN1 and ASTN2, were enriched with CNVs in ASD cases compared to controls (P = 9.5 × 10−3). Furthermore, CNVs within or surrounding genes involved in the ubiquitin pathways, including UBE3A, PARK2, RFWD2 and FBXO40, were affected by CNVs not observed in controls (P = 3.3 × 10−3). We also identified duplications 55 kilobases upstream of complementary DNA AK123120 (P = 3.6 × 10−6). Although these variants may be individually rare, they target genes involved in neuronal cell-adhesion or ubiquitin degradation, indicating that these two important gene networks expressed within the central nervous system may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of ASD. PMID:19404257

  20. Rare copy number variation discovery and cross-disorder comparisons identify risk genes for ADHD.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Anath C; Crosbie, Jennifer; Barbosa, Nicole; Goodale, Tara; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Rickaby, Jessica; Gazzellone, Matthew; Carson, Andrew R; Howe, Jennifer L; Wang, Zhuozhi; Wei, John; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Fiebig, Andreas; Franke, Andre; Schreiber, Stefan; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Fernandez, Bridget A; Roberts, Wendy; Arnold, Paul D; Szatmari, Peter; Marshall, Christian R; Schachar, Russell; Scherer, Stephen W

    2011-08-10

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and persistent condition characterized by developmentally atypical and impairing inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. We identified de novo and rare copy number variations (CNVs) in 248 unrelated ADHD patients using million-feature genotyping arrays. We found de novo CNVs in 3 of 173 (1.7%) ADHD patients for whom we had DNA from both parents. These CNVs affected brain-expressed genes: DCLK2, SORCS1, SORCS3, and MACROD2. We also detected rare inherited CNVs in 19 of 248 (7.7%) ADHD probands, which were absent in 2357 controls and which either overlapped previously implicated ADHD loci (for example, DRD5 and 15q13 microduplication) or identified new candidate susceptibility genes (ASTN2, CPLX2, ZBBX, and PTPRN2). Among these de novo and rare inherited CNVs, there were also examples of genes (ASTN2, GABRG1, and CNTN5) previously implicated by rare CNVs in other neurodevelopmental conditions including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To further explore the overlap of risks in ADHD and ASD, we used the same microarrays to test for rare CNVs in an independent, newly collected cohort of 349 unrelated individuals with a primary diagnosis of ASD. Deletions of the neuronal ASTN2 and the ASTN2-intronic TRIM32 genes yielded the strongest association with ADHD and ASD, but numerous other shared candidate genes (such as CHCHD3, MACROD2, and the 16p11.2 region) were also revealed. Our results provide support for a role for rare CNVs in ADHD risk and reinforce evidence for the existence of common underlying susceptibility genes for ADHD, ASD, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:21832240

  1. Gene copy number alterations in the azoospermia-associated AZFc region and their effect on spermatogenic impairment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuncheng; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Ruyang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Miaofei; Qin, Yufeng; Lin, Yuan; Guo, Xuejiang; Ni, Bixian; Zhao, Yang; Diao, Nancy; Chen, Feng; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Zhibin; Wang, Xinru

    2014-09-01

    The azoospermia factor c (AZFc) region in the long arm of human Y chromosome is characterized by massive palindromes. It harbors eight multi-copy gene families that are expressed exclusively or predominantly in testis. To assess systematically the role of the AZFc region and these eight gene families in spermatogenesis, we conducted a comprehensive molecular analysis (including Y chromosome haplogrouping, AZFc deletion typing and gene copy quantification) in 654 idiopathic infertile men and 781 healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. The b2/b3 partial deletion (including both deletion-only and deletion-duplication) was consistently associated with spermatogenic impairment. In the subjects without partial AZFc deletions, a notable finding was that the frequency of DAZ and/or BPY2 copy number alterations in the infertile group was significantly higher than in the controls. Combined patterns of DAZ and/or BPY2 copy number abnormality were associated with spermatogenic impairment when compared with the pattern of all AZFc genes with common level copies. In addition, in Y chromosome haplogroup O1 (Y-hg O1), the frequency of copy number alterations of all eight gene families was significantly higher in the case group than that in the control group. Our findings indicate that the DAZ, BPY2 genes may be prominent players in spermatogenesis, and genomic rearrangements may be enriched in individuals belonging to Y-hg O1. Our findings emphasize the necessity of routine molecular analysis of AZFc structural variation during the workup of azoospermia and/or oligozoospermia, which may diminish the genetic risk of assisted reproduction. PMID:24935076

  2. New primers for promising single-copy genes in fungal phylogenetics and systematics.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, I; Crespo, A; Divakar, P K; Fankhauser, J D; Herman-Sackett, E; Kalb, K; Nelsen, M P; Nelson, N A; Rivas-Plata, E; Shimp, A D; Widhelm, T; Lumbsch, H T

    2009-12-01

    Developing powerful phylogenetic markers is a key concern in fungal phylogenetics. Here we report degenerate primers that amplify the single-copy genes Mcm7 (MS456) and Tsr1 (MS277) across a wide range of Pezizomycotina (Ascomycota). Phylogenetic analyses of 59 taxa belonging to the Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, Lichinomycetes and Sordariomycetes, indicate the utility of these loci for fungal phylogenetics at taxonomic levels ranging from genus to class. We also tested the new primers in silico using sequences of Saccharomycotina, Taphrinomycotina and Basidiomycota to predict their potential of amplifying widely across the Fungi. The analyses suggest that the new primers will need no, or only minor sequence modifications to amplify Saccharomycotina, Taphrinomycotina and Basidiomycota. PMID:20198159

  3. Primers for low-copy nuclear genes in the Melastomataceae1

    PubMed Central

    Reginato, Marcelo; Michelangeli, Fabián A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Low-copy nuclear gene primers were developed for phylogenetic studies across the Melastomataceae. Methods and Results: Total genomic libraries from eight species in the Melastomataceae along with one transcriptome were used for marker identification and primer design. Eight exon-primed intron-crossing markers were amplified with success in taxa of nine tribes in the Melastomataceae. The new markers were directly sequenced for eight samples of closely related species of Miconia (Chaenanthera clade) in the tribe Miconieae. The DNA sequences for the eight loci ranged from 660 to 818 aligned base pairs. Compared with four commonly used markers in other studies, the loci developed here had a higher number of variable sites than plastid spacers (7–16 vs. 26–45) and comparable variation to the ribosomal spacers (28–39). Conclusions: The novel primer pairs should be useful for a broad range of studies of systematics and evolution in the diverse Melastomataceae. PMID:26819862

  4. Prioritizing Clinically Relevant Copy Number Variation from Genetic Interactions and Gene Function Data

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Justin; Girdea, Marta; Stavropoulos, James; Brudno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly necessary to develop computerized methods for identifying the few disease-causing variants from hundreds discovered in each individual patient. This problem is especially relevant for Copy Number Variants (CNVs), which can be cheaply interrogated via low-cost hybridization arrays commonly used in clinical practice. We present a method to predict the disease relevance of CNVs that combines functional context and clinical phenotype to discover clinically harmful CNVs (and likely causative genes) in patients with a variety of phenotypes. We compare several feature and gene weighing systems for classifying both genes and CNVs. We combined the best performing methodologies and parameters on over 2,500 Agilent CGH 180k Microarray CNVs derived from 140 patients. Our method achieved an F-score of 91.59%, with 87.08% precision and 97.00% recall. Our methods are freely available at https://github.com/compbio-UofT/cnv-prioritization. Our dataset is included with the supplementary information. PMID:26437450

  5. Methylation of tumor suppressor genes is related with copy number aberrations in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murria, Rosa; Palanca, Sarai; de Juan, Inmaculada; Egoavil, Cecilia; Alenda, Cristina; García-Casado, Zaida; Juan, María J; Sánchez, Ana B; Santaballa, Ana; Chirivella, Isabel; Segura, Ángel; Hervás, David; Llop, Marta; Barragán, Eva; Bolufer, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship of promoter methylation in tumor suppressor genes with copy-number aberrations (CNA) and with tumor markers in breast cancer (BCs). The study includes 98 formalin fixed paraffin-embedded BCs in which promoter methylation of 24 tumour suppressor genes were assessed by Methylation-Specific Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MS-MLPA), CNA of 20 BC related genes by MLPA and ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, CK18, EGFR, Cadherin-E, P53, Ki-67 and PARP expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cluster analysis classed BCs in two groups according to promoter methylation percentage: the highly-methylated group (16 BCs), containing mostly hyper-methylated genes, and the sparsely-methylated group (82 BCs) with hypo-methylated genes. ATM, CDKN2A, VHL, CHFR and CDKN2B showed the greatest differences in the mean methylation percentage between these groups. We found no relationship of the IHC parameters or pathological features with methylation status, except for Catherin-E (p = 0.008). However the highly methylated BCs showed higher CNA proportion than the sparsely methylated BCs (p < 0.001, OR = 1.62; IC 95% [1.26, 2.07]). CDC6, MAPT, MED1, PRMD14 and AURKA showed the major differences in the CNA percentage between the two groups, exceeding the 22%. Methylation in RASSF1, CASP8, DAPK1 and GSTP1 conferred the highest probability of harboring CNA. Our results show a new link between promoter methylation and CNA giving support to the importance of methylation events to establish new BCs subtypes. Our findings may be also of relevance in personalized therapy assessment, which could benefit the hyper methylated BC patients group. PMID:25628946

  6. Rare Copy Number Variations in Adults with Tetralogy of Fallot Implicate Novel Risk Gene Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Costain, Gregory; Merico, Daniele; Migita, Ohsuke; Liu, Ben; Yuen, Tracy; Rickaby, Jessica; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Marshall, Christian R.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Structural genetic changes, especially copy number variants (CNVs), represent a major source of genetic variation contributing to human disease. Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common form of cyanotic congenital heart disease, but to date little is known about the role of CNVs in the etiology of TOF. Using high-resolution genome-wide microarrays and stringent calling methods, we investigated rare CNVs in a prospectively recruited cohort of 433 unrelated adults with TOF and/or pulmonary atresia at a single centre. We excluded those with recognized syndromes, including 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We identified candidate genes for TOF based on converging evidence between rare CNVs that overlapped the same gene in unrelated individuals and from pathway analyses comparing rare CNVs in TOF cases to those in epidemiologic controls. Even after excluding the 53 (10.7%) subjects with 22q11.2 deletions, we found that adults with TOF had a greater burden of large rare genic CNVs compared to controls (8.82% vs. 4.33%, p = 0.0117). Six loci showed evidence for recurrence in TOF or related congenital heart disease, including typical 1q21.1 duplications in four (1.18%) of 340 Caucasian probands. The rare CNVs implicated novel candidate genes of interest for TOF, including PLXNA2, a gene involved in semaphorin signaling. Independent pathway analyses highlighted developmental processes as potential contributors to the pathogenesis of TOF. These results indicate that individually rare CNVs are collectively significant contributors to the genetic burden of TOF. Further, the data provide new evidence for dosage sensitive genes in PLXNA2-semaphorin signaling and related developmental processes in human cardiovascular development, consistent with previous animal models. PMID:22912587

  7. Copy Number Variations in the Survival Motor Neuron Genes: Implications for Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Butchbach, Matthew E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an early-onset, autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of spinal α-motor neurons. This loss of α-motor neurons is associated with muscle weakness and atrophy. SMA can be classified into five clinical grades based on age of onset and severity of the disease. Regardless of clinical grade, proximal SMA results from the loss or mutation of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1) on chromosome 5q13. In humans a large tandem chromosomal duplication has lead to a second copy of the SMN gene locus known as SMN2. SMN2 is distinguishable from SMN1 by a single nucleotide difference that disrupts an exonic splice enhancer in exon 7. As a result, most of SMN2 mRNAs lack exon 7 (SMNΔ7) and produce a protein that is both unstable and less than fully functional. Although only 10–20% of the SMN2 gene product is fully functional, increased genomic copies of SMN2 inversely correlates with disease severity among individuals with SMA. Because SMN2 copy number influences disease severity in SMA, there is prognostic value in accurate measurement of SMN2 copy number from patients being evaluated for SMA. This prognostic value is especially important given that SMN2 copy number is now being used as an inclusion criterion for SMA clinical trials. In addition to SMA, copy number variations (CNVs) in the SMN genes can affect the clinical severity of other neurological disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and progressive muscular atrophy (PMA). This review will discuss how SMN1 and SMN2 CNVs are detected and why accurate measurement of SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers is relevant for SMA and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27014701

  8. Human defensin gene copy number polymorphisms: comprehensive analysis of independent variation in alpha- and beta-defensin regions at 8p22-p23.

    PubMed

    Linzmeier, Rose M; Ganz, Tomas

    2005-10-01

    To investigate defensin gene copy number polymorphisms, a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed and used to study DNA from 27 unrelated individuals of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds. The DEFB4 and DEFB103A genes varied in tandem, with copy numbers 2 to 8, with a mode of 6 per diploid genome (PDG). The combined copy numbers of the DEFA1 and DEFA3 genes ranged from 5 to 14, with a mode of 10 copies PDG. The copy numbers of the DEFA1/3 genes varied independently of those of the DEFB4 and DEFB103A genes. The amount of HNP-1 and HNP-3 peptides expressed in neutrophils was found to be proportional to the combined copy number of DEFA1 and DEFA3. The DEFA3 allele was absent in 7/27 subjects. The highly copy-number-variable DEFA1 and DEFA3 genes are flanked by other defensin genes present uniformly at 2 copies PDG. The remarkable variability in defensin gene copy numbers could contribute to differences in individual resistance to infections. PMID:16039093

  9. Association of copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene 2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene with the natural history in a Chinese spinal muscular atrophy cohort.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu-jin; Ge, Xiu-shan; Bai, Jin-li; Wang, Li-wen; Cao, Yan-yan; Lu, Yan-yu; Jin, Yu-wei; Wang, Hong; Song, Fang

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene copy distribution and the association of copy number with survival in 232 Chinese spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. The SMN2 and NAIP copy numbers correlated positively with the median onset age (r = 0.72 and 0.377). The risk of death for patients with fewer copies of SMN2 or NAIP was much higher than for those with more copies (P < .01). The survival probabilities at 5 years were 5.1%, 90.7%, and 100% for 2, 3, and 4 SMN2 copies and 27.9%, 66.7%, and 87.2% for 0, 1, and 2 NAIP copies, respectively. Our results indicated that combined SMN1-SMN2-NAIP genotypes with fewer copies were associated with earlier onset age and poorer survival probability. Better survival status for Chinese type I SMA might due to a higher proportion of 3 SMN2 and a lower rate of zero NAIP. PMID:25330799

  10. Copy number variation of E3 ubiquitin ligase genes in peripheral blood leukocyte and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Haoran; Tian, Tian; Zhu, Lin; Zhou, Haibo; Hu, Hanqing; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Xia; Hu, Fulan; Zhao, Yashuang; Wang, Guiyu

    2016-01-01

    Given that E3 ubiquitin ligases (E3) regulate specific protein degradation in many cancer-related biological processes. E3 copy number variation (CNV) may affect the development and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, we detected CNVs of five E3 genes in 518 CRC patients and 518 age, gender and residence matched controls in China, and estimated the association between E3 gene CNVs and CRC risk and prognosis. We also estimated their interactions with environmental factors and CRC risk. We find a significant association between the CNVs of MDM2 and CRC risk (amp v.s. wt: odds ratio = 14.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 163.74, P = 0.032), while SKP2 CNVs may significantly decrease CRC risk (del v.s. wt: odds ratio = 0.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.10, 1.00, P = 0.050). However, we find no significant association between the CNVs of other genes and CRC risk. The only significant gene-environment interaction effects are between SKP2 CNVs and consumption of fish and/or fruit (P = 0.014 and P = 0.035) and between FBXW7 CNVs and pork intake (P = 0.040). Finally, we find marginally significant association between β-TRCP CNVs and CRC prognosis (amp v.s. wt, hazard ratio = 0.42, 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 0.97, P = 0.050). PMID:27417709

  11. Copy number variation of E3 ubiquitin ligase genes in peripheral blood leukocyte and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bi, Haoran; Tian, Tian; Zhu, Lin; Zhou, Haibo; Hu, Hanqing; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Xia; Hu, Fulan; Zhao, Yashuang; Wang, Guiyu

    2016-01-01

    Given that E3 ubiquitin ligases (E3) regulate specific protein degradation in many cancer-related biological processes. E3 copy number variation (CNV) may affect the development and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, we detected CNVs of five E3 genes in 518 CRC patients and 518 age, gender and residence matched controls in China, and estimated the association between E3 gene CNVs and CRC risk and prognosis. We also estimated their interactions with environmental factors and CRC risk. We find a significant association between the CNVs of MDM2 and CRC risk (amp v.s. wt: odds ratio = 14.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 163.74, P = 0.032), while SKP2 CNVs may significantly decrease CRC risk (del v.s. wt: odds ratio = 0.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.10, 1.00, P = 0.050). However, we find no significant association between the CNVs of other genes and CRC risk. The only significant gene-environment interaction effects are between SKP2 CNVs and consumption of fish and/or fruit (P = 0.014 and P = 0.035) and between FBXW7 CNVs and pork intake (P = 0.040). Finally, we find marginally significant association between β-TRCP CNVs and CRC prognosis (amp v.s. wt, hazard ratio = 0.42, 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 0.97, P = 0.050). PMID:27417709

  12. Evaluation of copy number variations reveals novel candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder-associated pathways

    PubMed Central

    Griswold, Anthony J.; Ma, Deqiong; Cukier, Holly N.; Nations, Laura D.; Schmidt, Mike A.; Chung, Ren-Hua; Jaworski, James M.; Salyakina, Daria; Konidari, Ioanna; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Wright, Harry H.; Abramson, Ruth K.; Williams, Scott M.; Menon, Ramkumar; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable, yet relatively few associated genetic loci have been replicated. Copy number variations (CNVs) have been implicated in autism; however, the majority of loci contribute to <1% of the disease population. Therefore, independent studies are important to refine associated CNV regions and discover novel susceptibility genes. In this study, a genome-wide SNP array was utilized for CNV detection by two distinct algorithms in a European ancestry case–control data set. We identify a significantly higher burden in the number and size of deletions, and disrupting more genes in ASD cases. Moreover, 18 deletions larger than 1 Mb were detected exclusively in cases, implicating novel regions at 2q22.1, 3p26.3, 4q12 and 14q23. Case-specific CNVs provided further evidence for pathways previously implicated in ASDs, revealing new candidate genes within the GABAergic signaling and neural development pathways. These include DBI, an allosteric binder of GABA receptors, GABARAPL1, the GABA receptor-associated protein, and SLC6A11, a postsynaptic GABA transporter. We also identified CNVs in COBL, deletions of which cause defects in neuronal cytoskeleton morphogenesis in model vertebrates, and DNER, a neuron-specific Notch ligand required for cerebellar development. Moreover, we found evidence of genetic overlap between ASDs and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric diseases. These genes include glutamate receptors (GRID1, GRIK2 and GRIK4), synaptic regulators (NRXN3, SLC6A8 and SYN3), transcription factor (ZNF804A) and RNA-binding protein FMR1. Taken together, these CNVs may be a few of the missing pieces of ASD heritability and lead to discovering novel etiological mechanisms. PMID:22543975

  13. Copy number variants in patients with intellectual disability affect the regulation of ARX transcription factor gene.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Minaka; Manning, Elizabeth; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Krecsmarik, Monika; Hawkins, Thomas A; Giacomotto, Jean; Zhao, Ting; Mueller, Thomas; Bader, Patricia I; Cheung, Sau W; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bain, Nicole L; Hackett, Anna; Reddy, Chilamakuri C S; Mechaly, Alejandro S; Peers, Bernard; Wilson, Stephen W; Lenhard, Boris; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Gecz, Jozef; Becker, Thomas S; Rinkwitz, Silke

    2015-11-01

    Protein-coding mutations in the transcription factor-encoding gene ARX cause various forms of intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. In contrast, variations in surrounding non-coding sequences are correlated with milder forms of non-syndromic ID and autism and had suggested the importance of ARX gene regulation in the etiology of these disorders. We compile data on several novel and some already identified patients with or without ID that carry duplications of ARX genomic region and consider likely genetic mechanisms underlying the neurodevelopmental defects. We establish the long-range regulatory domain of ARX and identify its brain region-specific autoregulation. We conclude that neurodevelopmental disturbances in the patients may not simply arise from increased dosage due to ARX duplication. This is further exemplified by a small duplication involving a non-functional ARX copy, but with duplicated enhancers. ARX enhancers are located within a 504-kb region and regulate expression specifically in the forebrain in developing and adult zebrafish. Transgenic enhancer-reporter lines were used as in vivo tools to delineate a brain region-specific negative and positive autoregulation of ARX. We find autorepression of ARX in the telencephalon and autoactivation in the ventral thalamus. Fluorescently labeled brain regions in the transgenic lines facilitated the identification of neuronal outgrowth and pathfinding disturbances in the ventral thalamus and telencephalon that occur when arxa dosage is diminished. In summary, we have established a model for how breakpoints in long-range gene regulation alter the expression levels of a target gene brain region-specifically, and how this can cause subtle neuronal phenotypes relating to the etiology of associated neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:26337422

  14. DNA Copy Number Variants of Known Glaucoma Genes in Relation to Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yutao; Garrett, Melanie E.; Yaspan, Brian L.; Bailey, Jessica Cooke; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Brilliant, Murray; Budenz, Donald L.; Christen, William G.; Fingert, John H.; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Kang, Jae H.; Lee, Richard K.; Lichter, Paul; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Realini, Anthony; Richards, Julia E.; Schuman, Joel S.; Scott, William K.; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J.; Vollrath, Douglas; Weinreb, Robert; Wollstein, Gadi; Zack, Donald J.; Zhang, Kang; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Allingham, R. Rand; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Hauser, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the role of DNA copy number variants (CNVs) of known glaucoma genes in relation to primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. Our study included DNA samples from two studies (NEIGHBOR and GLAUGEN). All the samples were genotyped with the Illumina Human660W_Quad_v1 BeadChip. After removing non–blood-derived and amplified DNA samples, we applied quality control steps based on the mean Log R Ratio and the mean B allele frequency. Subsequently, data from 3057 DNA samples (1599 cases and 1458 controls) were analyzed with PennCNV software. We defined CNVs as those ≥5 kilobases (kb) in size and interrogated by ≥5 consecutive probes. We further limited our investigation to CNVs in known POAG-related genes, including CDKN2B-AS1, TMCO1, SIX1/SIX6, CAV1/CAV2, the LRP12-ZFPM2 region, GAS7, ATOH7, FNDC3B, CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN, WDR36, SRBD1, TBK1, and GALC. Results. Genomic duplications of CDKN2B-AS1 and TMCO1 were each found in a single case. Two cases carried duplications in the GAS7 region. Genomic deletions of SIX6 and ATOH7 were each identified in one case. One case carried a TBK1 deletion and another case carried a TBK1 duplication. No controls had duplications or deletions in these six genes. A single control had a duplication in the MYOC region. Deletions of GALC were observed in five cases and two controls. Conclusions. The CNV analysis of a large set of cases and controls revealed the presence of rare CNVs in known POAG susceptibility genes. Our data suggest that these rare CNVs may contribute to POAG pathogenesis and merit functional evaluation. PMID:25414181

  15. Low-copy repeats at the human VIPR2 gene predispose to recurrent and nonrecurrent rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Beri, Silvana; Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Giorda, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Submicroscopic structural variations, including deletions, duplications, inversions and more complex rearrangements, are widespread in normal human genomes. Inverted segmental duplications or highly identical low-copy repeat (LCR) sequences can mediate the formation of inversions and more complex structural rearrangements through non-allelic homologous recombination. In a patient with 7q36 inverted duplication/terminal deletion, we demonstrated the central role of a pair of short inverted LCRs in the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor gene (VIPR2)-LCRs in generating the rearrangement. We also revealed a relatively common VIPR2-LCR-associated inversion polymorphism disrupting the gene in almost 1% of healthy subjects, and a small number of complex duplications/triplications. In genome-wide studies of several thousand patients, a significant association of rare microduplications with variable size, all involving VIPR2, with schizophrenia was recently described, suggesting that altered vasoactive intestinal peptide signaling is likely implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Genetic testing for VIPR2-LCR-associated inversions should be performed on available cohorts of psychiatric patients to evaluate their potential pathogenic role. PMID:23073313

  16. Intragenic homogenization and multiple copies of prey-wrapping silk genes in Argiope garden spiders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    aciniform silk. It is likely that intragenic concerted evolution and functional constraints on A. argentata AcSp1 repeats result in extreme repeat homogeneity. The maintenance of multiple AcSp1 encoding loci in Argiope genomes supports the hypothesis that Argiope spiders require rapid and efficient protein production to support their prolific use of aciniform silk for prey-wrapping and web-decorating. In addition, multiple gene copies may represent the early stages of spidroin diversification. PMID:24552485

  17. Laminin-binding integrin gene copy number alterations in distinct epithelial-type cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harryman, William L; Pond, Erika; Singh, Parminder; Little, Andrew S; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Nagle, Raymond B; Cress, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Background: The laminin-binding integrin (LBI) family are cell adhesion molecules that are essential for invasion and metastasis of human epithelial cancers and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance. We investigated whether copy number alteration (CNA) or mutations of a five-gene signature (ITGB4, ITGA3, LAMB3, PLEC, and SYNE3), representing essential genes for LBI adhesion, would correlate with patient outcomes within human epithelial-type tumor data sets currently available in an open access format. Methods: We investigated the relative alteration frequency of an LBI signature panel (integrin β4 (ITGB4), integrin α3 (ITGA3), laminin β3 chain (LAMB3), plectin (PLEC), and nesprin 3 (SYNE3)), independent of the epithelial cancer type, within publically available and published data using cBioPortal and Oncomine software. We rank ordered the results using a 20% alteration frequency cut-off and limited the analysis to studies containing at least 100 samples. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were analyzed to determine if alterations in the LBI signature correlated with patient survival. The Oncomine data mining tool was used to compare the heat map expression of the LBI signature without SYNE3 (as this was not included in the Oncomine database) to drug resistance patterns. Results: Twelve different cancer types, representing 5,647 samples, contained at least a 20% alteration frequency of the five-gene LBI signature. The frequency of alteration ranged from 38.3% to 19.8%. Within the LBI signature, PLEC was the most commonly altered followed by LAMB3, ITGB4, ITGA3, and SYNE3 across all twelve cancer types. Within cancer types, there was little overlap of the individual amplified genes from each sample, suggesting different specific amplicons may alter the LBI adhesion structures. Of the twelve cancer types, overall survival was altered by CNA presence in bladder urothelial carcinoma (p=0.0143*) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma and endocervical adenocarcinoma (p=0

  18. Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenation and species tree inference methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite a recent new classification, a stable tree of life for the cycads has been elusive, particularly regarding resolution of Bowenia, Stangeria and Dioon. In this study we apply five single copy nuclear genes (SCNGs) to the phylogeny of the order Cycadales. We specifically aim to evaluate seve...

  19. The mouse X chromosome is enriched for multi-copy testis genes exhibiting post-meiotic expression

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jacob L.; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; Park, Peter J.; Warburton, Peter E.; Page, David C.; Turner, James M.A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the prevailing view, mammalian X chromosomes are enriched in spermatogenesis genes expressed before meiosis1–3 and deficient in spermatogenesis genes expressed after meiosis2,3. The paucity of post-meiotic genes on the X chromosome has been interpreted as a consequence of Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) – the complete silencing of genes on the XY bivalent at meiotic prophase4,5. Recent studies have concluded that MSCI-initiated silencing persists beyond meiosis6–8 and that most X-genes remain repressed in round spermatids7. We report here that 33 multi-copy gene families, representing ~273 mouse X-linked genes, are expressed in the testis and that this expression is predominantly in post-meiotic cells. RNA FISH and microarray analysis show that the maintenance of X chromosome post-meiotic repression is incomplete. Furthermore, X-linked multi-copy genes exhibit expression levels similar to those of autosomal genes. Thus, not only is the mouse X chromosome enriched for spermatogenesis genes functioning before meiosis, but in addition ~18% of mouse X-linked genes exhibit post-meiotic expression. PMID:18454149

  20. Use of the MLPA Assay in the Molecular Diagnosis of Gene Copy Number Alterations in Human Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stuppia, Liborio; Antonucci, Ivana; Palka, Giandomenico; Gatta, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is a recently developed technique able to evidence variations in the copy number of several human genes. Due to this ability, MLPA can be used in the molecular diagnosis of several genetic diseases whose pathogenesis is related to the presence of deletions or duplications of specific genes. Moreover, MLPA assay can also be used in the molecular diagnosis of genetic diseases characterized by the presence of abnormal DNA methylation. Due to the large number of genes that can be analyzed by a single technique, MLPA assay represents the gold standard for molecular analysis of all pathologies derived from the presence of gene copy number variation. In this review, the main applications of the MLPA technique for the molecular diagnosis of human diseases are described. PMID:22489151

  1. Glioblastomas with copy number gains in EGFR and RNF139 show increased expressions of carbonic anhydrase genes transformed by ENO1

    PubMed Central

    Beckner, Marie E.; Pollack, Ian F.; Nordberg, Mary L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prominence of glycolysis in glioblastomas may be non-specific or a feature of oncogene-related subgroups (i.e. amplified EGFR, etc.). Relationships between amplified oncogenes and expressions of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis, directly or indirectly via pH, were therefore investigated. Methods Using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, copy numbers (CN) of 78 oncogenes were quantified in 24 glioblastomas. Related expressions of metabolic genes encoding lactate dehydrogenases (LDHA, LDHC), carbonic anhydrases (CA3, CA12), monocarboxylate transporters (SLC16A3 or MCT4, SLC16A4 or MCT5), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY), glycogen synthase1 (GYS1), hypoxia inducible factor-1A (HIF1A), and enolase1 (ENO1) were determined in 22 by RT-qPCR. To obtain supra-glycolytic levels and adjust for heterogeneity, concurrent ENO1 expression was used to mathematically transform the expression levels of metabolic genes already normalized with delta-delta crossing threshold methodology. Results Positive correlations with EGFR occurred for all metabolic genes. Significant differences (Wilcoxon Rank Sum) for oncogene CN gains in tumors of at least 2.00-fold versus less than 2.00-fold occurred for EGFR with CA3's expression (p < 0.03) and for RNF139 with CA12 (p < 0.004). Increased CN of XIAP associated negatively. Tumors with less than 2.00-fold CN gains differed from those with gains for XIAP with CA12 (p < 0.05). Male gender associated with CA12 (p < 0.05). Conclusions Glioblastomas with CN increases in EGFR had elevated CA3 expression. Similarly, tumors with RNF149 CN gains had elevated CA12 expression. General significance In larger studies, subgroups of glioblastomas may emerge according to oncogene-related effects on glycolysis, such as control of pH via effects on carbonic anhydrases, with prognostic and treatment implications. PMID:27051584

  2. Comparison of cyanobacterial microcystin synthetase (mcy) E gene transcript levels, mcy E gene copies, and biomass as indicators of microcystin risk under laboratory and field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Felexce F; Madramootoo, Chandra A; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-01-01

    Increased incidences of mixed assemblages of microcystin-producing and nonproducing cyanobacterial strains in freshwater bodies necessitate development of reliable proxies for cyanotoxin risk assessment. Detection of microcystin biosynthetic genes in water blooms of cyanobacteria is generally indicative of the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial strains. Although much effort has been devoted toward elucidating the microcystin biosynthesis mechanisms in many cyanobacteria genera, little is known about the impacts of co-occurring cyanobacteria on cellular growth, mcy gene expression, or mcy gene copy distribution. The present study utilized conventional microscopy, qPCR assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study how competition between microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa CPCC 299 and Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 126 impacts mcyE gene expression, mcyE gene copies, and microcystin concentration under controlled laboratory conditions. Furthermore, analyses of environmental water samples from the Missisquoi Bay, Quebec, enabled us to determine how the various potential toxigenic cyanobacterial biomass proxies correlated with cellular microcystin concentrations in a freshwater lake. Results from our laboratory study indicated significant downregulation of mcyE gene expression in mixed cultures of M. aeruginosa plus P. agardhii on most sampling days in agreement with depressed growth recorded in the mixed cultures, suggesting that interaction between the two species probably resulted in suppressed growth and mcyE gene expression in the mixed cultures. Furthermore, although mcyE gene copies and McyE transcripts were detected in all laboratory and field samples with measureable microcystin levels, only mcyE gene copies showed significant positive correlations (R2 > 0.7) with microcystin concentrations, while McyE transcript levels did not. These results suggest that mcyE gene copies are better indicators of potential risks from microcystins

  3. Detection and quantification of Histomonas meleagridis by real-time PCR targeting single copy genes.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Imtiaz; Jaskulska, Barbara; Hess, Michael; Bilic, Ivana

    2015-09-15

    Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite that can infect gallinaceous birds, affects mainly the liver and caeca of infected birds. As a consequence of the recent ban of chemotherapeuticals in Europe and the USA, histomonosis gained somewhat more attention due to its re-emergence and the fact that there is no effective treatment available. Therefore, special attention is now also given towards the diagnosis and the control of the disease. In the actual study we report the development of highly specific and sensitive real-time PCR methods for detection and quantification of the parasite, based on two protein coding genes, Fe-hydrogenase (FeHYD) and rpb1. Both genes seem to be in a single copy in H. meleagridis as shown by southern blotting and absolute quantification using real-time PCRs on samples containing a known amount of the parasite. The real-time PCR assays based on FeHYD and rpb1 genes were found to be an efficient method for the quantification and detection of H. meleagridis in in vitro grown cultures, tissues of infected birds and in faecal samples. Both real-time PCRs were able to detect up to a single cell in in vitro cultures of H. meleagridis and in fecal samples spiked with H. meleagridis. Finally, qPCR assays were shown to be highly specific for H. meleagridis as samples containing either of the two H. meleagridis genotypes were positive, whereas samples containing other protozoa such as Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, Trichomonas gallinae, Simplicimonas sp., Tritrichomonas sp., Parahistomonas wenrichi, Dientamoebidae sp. and Blastocystis sp. were all negative. PMID:26319200

  4. Rare Copy Number Variants in Tourette Syndrome Disrupt Genes in Histaminergic Pathways and Overlap with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Thomas V; Sanders, Stephan J; Yurkiewicz, Ilana R; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Kim, Young-Shin; Fishman, Daniel O; Raubeson, Melanie J; Song, Youeun; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Ho, Winson SC; Bilguvar, Kaya; Glessner, Joseph; Chu, Su Hee; Leckman, James F.; King, Robert A; Gilbert, Donald L; Heiman, Gary A; Tischfield, Jay A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Devlin, Bernie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Mane, Shrikant M; Günel, Murat; State, Matthew W

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of copy number variation (CNV) have successfully characterized loci and molecular pathways involved in a range of neuropsychiatric conditions. We conducted an analysis of rare CNVs in Tourette Syndrome (TS) to identify novel risk regions and relevant molecular pathways, evaluate the burden of structural variation in cases versus controls, and to assess the overlap of identified variations with those implicated in other neuropsychiatric syndromes. Methods We conducted a case-control study of 460 individuals with TS, including 148 parent-child trios and 1131 controls. CNV analysis was undertaken using 370K to 1M probe arrays, and genome-wide genotyping data was used to match cases and controls for ancestry. Transmitted and de novo CNVs present in < 1% of the population were evaluated. Results While there was no significant increase in the number of de novo or transmitted rare CNVs in cases versus controls, pathway analysis using multiple algorithms showed enrichment of genes within histamine receptor (H1R and H2R) signaling pathways (p=5.8×10-4-1.6×10-2) as well as “axon guidance”, “cell adhesion”, “nervous system development” and “synaptic structure and function” processes. Genes mapping within rare CNVs in TS showed significant overlap with those previously identified in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but not intellectual disability or schizophrenia. Three large, likely-pathogenic, de novo events were identified, including one disrupting multiple gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor genes. Conclusions We identify further evidence supporting recent findings regarding the involvement of histaminergic and GABAergic mechanisms in the etiology of TS and show an overlap of rare CNVs in TS and ASD. PMID:22169095

  5. A Low-Copy-Number Plasmid for Retrieval of Toxic Genes from BACs and Generation of Conditional Targeting Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Na, Giyoun; Wolfe, Andrew; Ko, CheMyong; Youn, Hyesook; Lee, Young-Min; Byun, Sung June; Jeon, Iksoo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones are widely used for retrieving genomic DNA sequences for gene targeting. In this study, low-copy-number plasmids pBAC-FB, pBAC-FC, and pBAC-DE, which carry the F plasmid replicon, were generated from pBACe3.6. pBAC-FB was successfully used to retrieve a sequence of a BAC that was resistant to retrieval by a high-copy-number plasmid via λ Red-mediated recombineering (gap-repair cloning). This plasmid was also used to retrieve two other genes from BAC, indicating its general usability retrieving genes from BAC. The retrieved genes were manipulated in generating targeting vectors for gene knockouts by recombineering. The functionality of the targeting vector was further validated in a targeting experiment with C57BL/6 embryonic stem cells. The low-copy-number plasmid pBAC-FB is a plasmid of choice to retrieve toxic DNA sequences from BACs and to manipulate them to generate gene-targeting constructs by recombineering. PMID:22945876

  6. Copy number variation and microdeletions of the Y chromosome linked genes and loci across different categories of Indian infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anju; Yadav, Sandeep Kumar; Misro, Man Mohan; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 34 azoospermic (AZ), 43 oligospermic (OS), and 40 infertile males with normal spermiogram (INS) together with 55 normal fertile males (NFM) from the Indian population. AZ showed more microdeletions in the AZFa and AZFb regions whereas oligospermic ones showed more microdeletions in the AZFc region. Frequency of the AZF partial deletions was higher in males with spermatogenic impairments than in INS. Significantly, SRY, DAZ and BPY2 genes showed copy number variation across different categories of the patients and much reduced copies of the DYZ1 repeat arrays compared to that in normal fertile males. Likewise, INS showed microdeletions, sequence and copy number variation of several Y linked genes and loci. In the context of infertility, STS deletions and copy number variations both were statistically significant (p = 0.001). Thus, semen samples used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) and assisted reproductive technology (ART) must be assessed for the microdeletions of AZFa, b and c regions in addition to the affected genes reported herein. Present study is envisaged to be useful for DNA based diagnosis of different categories of the infertile males lending support to genetic counseling to the couples aspiring to avail assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26638807

  7. Focal Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as New Candidate Driver Genes in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Johannes; Schaap, Gerard R.; Baas, Frank; Ylstra, Bauke; Hulsebos, Theo J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, <3 Mb). For this purpose, we subjected 26 primary tumors of osteosarcoma patients to high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and identified 139 somatic focal CNAs. Of these, 72 had at least one gene located within or overlapping the focal CNA, with a total of 94 genes. For 84 of these genes, the expression status in 31 osteosarcoma samples was determined by expression microarray analysis. This enabled us to identify the genes of which the over- or underexpression was in more than 35% of cases in accordance to their copy number status (gain or loss). These candidate genes were subsequently validated in an independent set and furthermore corroborated as driver genes by verifying their role in other tumor types. We identified CMTM8 as a new candidate tumor suppressor gene and GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. PMID:25551557

  8. [CONSTRUCTION AND PROPERTIES OF THE FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS VACCINE STRAIN WITHOUT ONE COPY OF THE IGLC GENE AND WITHOUT RECA GENE].

    PubMed

    Mokrievich, A N; Vakhrameeva, G M; Titareva, G M; Bakhteeva, I V; Mironova, R I; Kombarova, T I; Kravchenko, T B; Dyatlov, I A; Pavlov, V M

    2015-01-01

    The live vaccine based on the Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica vaccine strain 15 NIIEG line is used in Russia against tularemia. This vaccine is highly effective, but fairly unstable. Therefore, development of stable live tularemia vaccine with minimal side effect is rather urgent. The method of allel removal in the F. tularensis vaccine strain was used to remove one copy of the iglC gene, which is required to provide intracellular production of the vaccine strain, as well as removal of the recA gene. The latter is crucial for homological recombination. pGM5 suicide vector based on pHV33 bireplicon plasmid was constructed to provide replacement of intact F. tularensis chromosome segments by modified segments. Modified chromosome segments contain F. Tularensis DNA fragment without iglC structural gene segment 545 p. b. (in pGMΔiglC plasmid), as well as DNA fragment containing no recA structural gene segment 1060 p.b. (pGMΔrecA plasmid). The constructed 15/23-1ΔrecA mutant, in contrast to the vaccine strain 15, was capable of reproducing in the macrophage-like cells J774A.1 line, whereas the efficiency of the reproduction was 8-10 times less. BALB/c mouse responded to immunization by the 15/23-1ΔrecA strain by smaller weight decrease (-2%) as compared to the strain 15 (-14%). Bacteria of the 15/23-1ΔrecA strain were virtually incapable of germinating from the BALB/c murine spleen 14 days after invasion, whereas bacteria of the strain 15 were found in the murine organs even after 21 days. The F. tularensis 15/23-1ΔrecA strain having smaller reaction ability can be used as a basis for construction of stable live safe tularemia vaccine. PMID:26665740

  9. Digital genotyping of macrosatellites and multicopy genes reveals novel biological functions associated with copy number variation of large tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Brahmachary, Manisha; Guilmatre, Audrey; Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J

    2014-06-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5-10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality 'finished' human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed "repeat induced gene silencing", which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in modulating

  10. Industrial fuel ethanol yeasts contain adaptive copy number changes in genes involved in vitamin B1 and B6 biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stambuk, Boris U.; Dunn, Barbara; Alves, Sergio L.; Duval, Eduarda H.; Sherlock, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Fuel ethanol is now a global energy commodity that is competitive with gasoline. Using microarray-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), we have determined gene copy number variations (CNVs) common to five industrially important fuel ethanol Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains responsible for the production of billions of gallons of fuel ethanol per year from sugarcane. These strains have significant amplifications of the telomeric SNO and SNZ genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of vitamins B6 (pyridoxine) and B1 (thiamin). We show that increased copy number of these genes confers the ability to grow more efficiently under the repressing effects of thiamin, especially in medium lacking pyridoxine and with high sugar concentrations. These genetic changes have likely been adaptive and selected for in the industrial environment, and may be required for the efficient utilization of biomass-derived sugars from other renewable feedstocks. PMID:19897511

  11. Aluminum tolerance is associated with higher MATE1 gene copy-number in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome structure variation, including copy-number (CNV) and presence/absence variation (PAV), comprise a large extent of maize genetic diversity but their effect on phenotypes remains largely unexplored. Here we describe how copy-number variation in a major aluminum (Al) tolerance locus contributes ...

  12. Molecular and functional characterization of a second copy of the aflatoxin regulatory gene, aflR-2, from Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed

    Cary, Jeffrey W; Dyer, John M; Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Wright, Maureen S; Liang, Shun-Hsin; Linz, John E

    2002-07-19

    The genes required for the synthesis of aflatoxin (AF) in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus have been shown to be clustered on a chromosome in these fungi. Transcription of most of these genes is dependent upon the activity of the aflR gene, also present on the gene cluster, which encodes a zinc binuclear cluster DNA-binding protein. While many strains of A. parasiticus have only one copy of aflR (aflR-1), many others contain a second copy of this gene (aflR-2) which resides on a duplicated region of the aflatoxin gene cluster. Targeted disruption of aflR-1 generated a number of non-aflatoxin producing transformants of A. parasiticus SU-1 which still harbored a wild-type aflR-2 gene. Southern and Northern hybridization analyses and ELISA assays demonstrated that aflR-1 had been successfully inactivated in strain AFS10. DNA sequence analysis showed that aflR-2 was capable of encoding a deduced 47 kDa protein. Northern and RT-PCR analysis of RNA from a toxin producing strain indicated that aflR-2 was transcribed at extremely low levels compared to aflR-1. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from AFS10 demonstrated that mRNAs of aflatoxin pathway genes were not processed to their mature forms. Functional analysis of aflr-2 protein in a yeast system showed that it was not activating transcription. PMID:12084578

  13. Genes and Small RNA Transcripts Exhibit Dosage-Dependent Expression Pattern in Maize Copy-Number Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Lithio, Andrew; Dash, Sudhansu; Weber, David F; Wise, Roger; Nettleton, Dan; Peterson, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes which tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplications (<100 kb) often exhibit dosage-dependent expression, whereas large duplications (>50 Mb) are more often dosage compensated. However, little or nothing is known about expression in moderately-sized (1-50 Mb) segmental duplications, and about the response of small RNAs to dosage change. Here, we compared maize (Zea mays) plants with two, three, and four doses of a 14.6-Mb segment of chromosome 1 that contains ∼300 genes. Plants containing the duplicated segment exhibit dosage-dependent effects on ear length and flowering time. Transcriptome analyses using GeneChip and RNA-sequencing methods indicate that most expressed genes and unique small RNAs within the duplicated segments exhibit dosage-dependent transcript levels. We conclude that dosage effect is the predominant regulatory response for both genes and unique small RNA transcripts in the segmental dosage series we tested. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of small RNA expression in plant gene dosage variants. Because segmental duplications comprise a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, these findings provide important new insight into the regulation of genes and small RNAs in response to dosage changes. PMID:27129738

  14. Specificity and non-specificity in RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by complex networks of interactions between RNAs and proteins. Proteins that interact with RNA have been traditionally viewed as either specific or non-specific; specific proteins interact preferentially with defined RNA sequence or structure motifs, whereas non-specific proteins interact with RNA sites devoid of such characteristics. Recent studies indicate that the binary “specific vs. non-specific” classification is insufficient to describe the full spectrum of RNA–protein interactions. Here, we review new methods that enable quantitative measurements of protein binding to large numbers of RNA variants, and the concepts aimed as describing resulting binding spectra: affinity distributions, comprehensive binding models and free energy landscapes. We discuss how these new methodologies and associated concepts enable work towards inclusive, quantitative models for specific and non-specific RNA–protein interactions. PMID:26285679

  15. Improving detection and genetic counseling in carriers of spinal muscular atrophy with two copies of the SMN1 gene.

    PubMed

    Alías, L; Barceló, M J; Bernal, S; Martínez-Hernández, R; Also-Rallo, E; Vázquez, C; Santana, A; Millán, J M; Baiget, M; Tizzano, E F

    2014-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron1 gene (SMN1). Global carrier frequency is around 1 in 50 and carrier detection is crucial to define couples at risk to have SMA offspring. Most SMA carriers have one SMN1 copy and are currently detected using quantitative methods. A few, however, have two SMN1 genes in cis (2/0 carriers), complicating carrier diagnosis in SMA. We analyzed our experience in detecting 2/0 carriers from a cohort of 1562 individuals, including SMA parents, SMA relatives, and unrelated individuals of the general population. Interestingly, in three couples who had an SMA child, both the parents had two SMN1 copies. Families of this type have not been previously reported. Our results emphasize the importance of performing a detailed carrier study in SMA parents with two SMN1 copies. Expanding the analysis to other key family members might confirm potential 2/0 carriers. Finally, when a partner of a known carrier presents two SMN1 copies, the study of both parents will provide a more accurate diagnosis, thus optimizing genetic counseling. PMID:23799925

  16. Chromosomal instability selects gene copy-number variants encoding core regulators of proliferation in ER+ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Endesfelder, David; Burrell, Rebecca A; Kanu, Nnennaya; McGranahan, Nicholas; Howell, Mike; Parker, Peter J; Downward, Julian; Swanton, Charles; Kschischo, Maik

    2014-09-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is associated with poor outcome in epithelial malignancies, including breast carcinomas. Evidence suggests that prognostic signatures in estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer define tumors with CIN and high proliferative potential. Intriguingly, CIN induction in lower eukaryotic cells and human cells is context dependent, typically resulting in a proliferation disadvantage but conferring a fitness benefit under strong selection pressures. We hypothesized that CIN permits accelerated genomic evolution through the generation of diverse DNA copy-number events that may be selected during disease development. In support of this hypothesis, we found evidence for selection of gene amplification of core regulators of proliferation in CIN-associated cancer genomes. Stable DNA copy-number amplifications of the core regulators TPX2 and UBE2C were associated with expression of a gene module involved in proliferation. The module genes were enriched within prognostic signature gene sets for ER(+) breast cancer, providing a logical connection between CIN and prognostic signature expression. Our results provide a framework to decipher the impact of intratumor heterogeneity on key cancer phenotypes, and they suggest that CIN provides a permissive landscape for selection of copy-number alterations that drive cancer proliferation. PMID:24970479

  17. Detection of Copy Number Variants Reveals Association of Cilia Genes with Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yonghui; Zhao, Huizhi; Sheng, Xiaoming; Zou, Jizhen; Lip, Va; Xie, Hua; Guo, Jin; Shao, Hong; Bao, Yihua; Shen, Jianliang; Niu, Bo; Gusella, James F.; Wu, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs) detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. Methods The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants) CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. Results Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV). Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05). Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24–5.87). Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05), corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27–8.01). Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. Conclusions Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis. PMID:23349908

  18. Copy number variation of lipocalin family genes for male-specific proteins in tilapia and its association with gender.

    PubMed

    Shirak, A; Golik, M; Lee, B-Y; Howe, A E; Kocher, T D; Hulata, G; Ron, M; Seroussi, E

    2008-11-01

    Lipocalins are involved in the binding of small molecules like sex steroids. We show here that the previously reported tilapia male-specific protein (MSP) is a lipocalin encoded by a variety of paralogous and homologous genes in different tilapia species. Exon-intron boundaries of MSP genes were typical of the six-exon genomic structure of lipocalins, and the transcripts were capable of encoding 200 amino-acid polypeptides that consisted of a putative signal peptide and a lipocalin domain. Cysteine residues are conserved in positions analogous to those forming the three disulfide bonds characteristic of the ligand pocket. The calculated molecular mass of the secreted MSP (20.4 kDa) was less than half of that observed, suggesting that it is highly glycosylated like its homologue tributyltin-binding protein. Analysis of sequence variations revealed three types of paralogs MSPA, MSPB and MSPC. Expression of both MSPA and MSPB was detected in testis. In haploid Oreochromis niloticus embryos, each of these types consisted of two closely related paralogs, and asymmetry between MSP copy numbers on the maternal (six copies) and the paternal (three copies) chromosomes was observed. Using this polymorphism we mapped MSPA and MSPC to linkage group 12 of an F(2) mapping family derived from a cross between O. niloticus and Oreochromis aureus. Females with high MSP copy number were more frequent by more than twofold than males. Gender-MSPC combinations showed significant deviation from expected Mendelian segregation (P=0.009) suggesting elimination of males with MSPC copies. We discuss different hypotheses to explain this elimination, including possibility for allelic conflict resulted by the hybridization. PMID:18648387

  19. Gene copy number variations in the leukocyte genome of hepatocellular carcinoma patients with integrated hepatitis B virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guixia; Cheng, Kai; Cao, Guangwen; Wu, Mengchao; Cheng, Shuqun; Liu, Shanrong

    2016-01-01

    Integration of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA into the human liver cell genome is believed to promote HBV-related carcinogenesis. This study aimed to quantify the integration of HBV DNA into the leukocyte genome in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients in order to identify potential biomarkers for HBV-related diseases. Whole-genome comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) chip array analyses were performed to screen gene copy number variations (CNV) in the leukocyte genome, and the results were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The commonly detected regions included chromosome arms 19p, 5q, 1q and 15p, where 200 copy number gain events and 270 copy number loss events were noted. In particular, gains were observed in 5q35.3 (OR4F3) and 19p13.3 (OR4F17) in 90% of the samples. Successful homologous recombination of OR4F3 and the HBV P gene was demonstrated, and the amplification at 5q35.3 is potentially associated with the integration of HBV P gene into natural killer cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that the combination of OR4F3 and OR4F17 a novel potential biomarker of HBV-related diseases. PMID:26769853

  20. Single-copy gene based 50 K SNP chip for genetic studies and molecular breeding in rice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Jayaswal, Pawan Kumar; Panda, Kabita; Mandal, Paritra; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Balwant; Mishra, Shefali; Singh, Yashi; Singh, Renu; Rai, Vandna; Gupta, Anita; Raj Sharma, Tilak; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is the most abundant DNA sequence variation present in plant genomes. Here, we report the design and validation of a unique genic-SNP genotyping chip for genetic and evolutionary studies as well as molecular breeding applications in rice. The chip incorporates 50,051 SNPs from 18,980 different genes spanning 12 rice chromosomes, including 3,710 single-copy (SC) genes conserved between wheat and rice, 14,959 SC genes unique to rice, 194 agronomically important cloned rice genes and 117 multi-copy rice genes. Assays with this chip showed high success rate and reproducibility because of the SC gene based array with no sequence redundancy and cross-hybridisation problems. The usefulness of the chip in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies of cultivated and wild rice germplasm was demonstrated. Furthermore, its efficacy was validated for analysing background recovery in improved mega rice varieties with submergence tolerance developed through marker-assisted backcross breeding. PMID:26111882

  1. Phylogeny reconstruction in the Caesalpinieae grade (Leguminosae) based on duplicated copies of the sucrose synthase gene and plastid markers.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, Vincent; Bruneau, Anne

    2012-10-01

    The Caesalpinieae grade (Leguminosae) forms a morphologically and ecologically diverse group of mostly tropical tree species with a complex evolutionary history. This grade comprises several distinct lineages, but the exact delimitation of the group relative to subfamily Mimosoideae and other members of subfamily Caesalpinioideae, as well as phylogenetic relationships among the lineages are uncertain. With the aim of better resolving phylogenetic relationships within the Caesalpinieae grade, we investigated the utility of several nuclear markers developed from genomic studies in the Papilionoideae. We cloned and sequenced the low copy nuclear gene sucrose synthase (SUSY) and combined the data with plastid trnL and matK sequences. SUSY has two paralogs in the Caesalpinieae grade and in the Mimosoideae, but occurs as a single copy in all other legumes tested. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses suggest the two nuclear markers are congruent with plastid DNA data. The Caesalpinieae grade is divided into four well-supported clades (Cassia, Caesalpinia, Tachigali and Peltophorum clades), a poorly supported clade of Dimorphandra Group genera, and two paraphyletic groups, one with other Dimorphandra Group genera and the other comprising genera previously recognized as the Umtiza clade. A selection analysis of the paralogs, using selection models from PAML, suggests that SUSY genes are subjected to a purifying selection. One of the SUSY paralogs, under slightly stronger positive selection, may be undergoing subfunctionalization. The low copy SUSY gene is useful for phylogeny reconstruction in the Caesalpinieae despite the presence of duplicate copies. This study confirms that the Caesalpinieae grade is an artificial group, and highlights the need for further analyses of lineages at the base of the Mimosoideae. PMID:22699157

  2. Regulation of tubulin levels and microtubule assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: consequences of altered tubulin gene copy number.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, W; Weinstein, B; Solomon, F

    1990-01-01

    Microtubule organization in the cytoplasm is in part a function of the number and length of the assembled polymers. The intracellular concentration of tubulin could specify those parameters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains constructed with moderately decreased or increased copy numbers of tubulin genes provide an opportunity to study the cellular response to a steady-state change in tubulin concentration. We found no evidence of a mechanism for adjusting tubulin concentrations upward from a deficit, nor did we find a need for such a mechanism: cells with no more than 50% of the wild-type tubulin level were normal with respect to a series of microtubule-dependent properties. Strains with increased copies of both alpha- and beta-tubulin genes, or of alpha-tubulin genes alone, apparently did down regulate their tubulin levels. As a result, they contained greater than normal concentrations of tubulin but much less than predicted from the increase in gene number. Some of this down regulation occurred at the level of protein. These strains were also phenotypically normal. Cells could contain excess alpha-tubulin protein without detectable consequences, but perturbations resulting in excess beta-tubulin genes may have affected microtubule-dependent functions. All of the observed regulation of levels of tubulin can be explained as a response to toxicity associated with excess tubulin proteins, especially if beta-tubulin is much more toxic than alpha-tubulin. Images PMID:2204811

  3. Identification of proximal spinal muscular atrophy carriers and patients by analysis of SMNT and SMNC gene copy number.

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, P E; Parsons, D W; Simard, L R; Rochette, C; Ray, P N; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W; Burghes, A H

    1997-01-01

    The survival motor neuron (SMN) transcript is encoded by two genes, SMNT and SMNC. The autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy that maps to 5q12 is caused by mutations in the SMNT gene. The SMNT gene can be distinguished from the SMNC gene by base-pair changes in exons 7 and 8. SMNT exon 7 is not detected in approximately 95% of SMA cases due to either deletion or sequence-conversion events. Small mutations in SMNT now have been identified in some of the remaining nondeletion patients. However, there is no reliable quantitative assay for SMNT, to distinguish SMA compound heterozygotes from non-5q SMA-like cases (phenocopies) and to accurately determine carrier status. We have developed a quantitative PCR assay for the determination of SMNT and SMNC gene-copy number. This report demonstrates how risk estimates for the diagnosis and detection of SMA carriers can be modified by the accurate determination of SMNT copy number. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9199562

  4. Assessment of Tumor Heterogeneity, as Evidenced by Gene Expression Profiles, Pathway Activation, and Gene Copy Number, in Patients with Multifocal Invasive Lobular Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Nadine; Advani, Pooja P.; Serie, Daniel J.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Necela, Brian M.; Axenfeld, Bianca C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Feathers, Ryan W.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Crook, Julia E.; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) comprises approximately ~10–20% of breast cancers. In general, multifocal/multicentric (MF/MC) breast cancer has been associated with an increased rate of regional lymph node metastases. Tumor heterogeneity between foci represents a largely unstudied source of genomic variation in those rare patients with MF/MC ILC. Methods We characterized gene expression and copy number in 2 or more foci from 11 patients with MF/MC ILC (all ER+, HER2-) and adjacent normal tissue. RNA and DNA were extracted from 3x1.5mm cores from all foci. Gene expression (730 genes) and copy number (80 genes) were measured using Nanostring PanCancer and Cancer CNV panels. Linear mixed models were employed to compare expression in tumor versus normal samples from the same patient, and to assess heterogeneity (variability) in expression among multiple ILC within an individual. Results 35 and 34 genes were upregulated (FC>2) and down-regulated (FC<0.5) respectively in ILC tumor relative to adjacent normal tissue, q<0.05. 9/34 down-regulated genes (FIGF, RELN, PROM1, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2, KIT) had changes larger than CDH1, a hallmark of ILC. Copy number changes in these patients were relatively few but consistent across foci within each patient. Amplification of three genes (CCND1, FADD, ORAOV1) at 11q13.3 was present in 2/11 patients in both foci. We observed significant evidence of within-patient between-foci variability (heterogeneity) in gene expression for 466 genes (p<0.05 with FDR 8%), including CDH1, FIGF, RELN, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2 and KIT. Conclusions There was substantial variation in gene expression between ILC foci within patients, including known markers of ILC, suggesting an additional level of complexity that should be addressed. PMID:27078887

  5. Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome; Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies(Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Sczyrba, Alex

    2011-10-13

    DOE JGI's Alex Sczyrba on "Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome" and "Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  6. Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome; Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies(Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Sczyrba, Alex [DOE JGI

    2013-01-22

    DOE JGI's Alex Sczyrba on "Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome" and "Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  7. Non-Specific Immunotherapies and Adjuvants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and spinal cord. Other drugs that boost the immune system Some other drugs boost the immune system in a non-specific way, similar to cytokines. ... and CTLA-4, which normally help keep the immune system in check. While these checkpoint proteins are important ...

  8. Comparison of a quantitative Real-Time PCR assay and droplet digital PCR for copy number analysis of the CCL4L genes.

    PubMed

    Bharuthram, Avani; Paximadis, Maria; Picton, Anabela C P; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2014-07-01

    The controversy surrounding the findings that copy number variation, of the CCL3 encoding genes, influences HIV-1 infection and disease progression has been in part attributed to the variable results obtained from methods used for copy number evaluation. Like CCL3, the genes encoding the CC chemokine CCL4, also a natural ligand of the CCR5 receptor, are found to occur in population-specific multiple copy number and have been shown to play a protective role against HIV-1. This study evaluated the standard method of quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for CCL4L gene copy number determination. The CCL4 encoding genes are CCL4, occurring in two copies per diploid genome (pdg), and the non-allelic CCL4L genes, comprised of CCL4L1 and CCL4L2, which are both found in multiple copies pdg. Copy number of CCL4L, CCL4L1 and CCL4L2 was determined in a cohort of HIV-1-uninfected individuals from the South African Black (n=23) and Caucasian (n=32) population groups using qPCR and ddPCR. A stronger correlation between the number of CCL4L copies and the sum of CCL4L1 and CCL4L2 copies generated by ddPCR (r=0.99, p<0.0001) compared to qPCR (r=0.87, p<0.0001) was observed. Real-Time qPCR exhibited greater inaccuracy at higher copy numbers which is particularly relevant to our cohort of Black individuals who have a higher range of CCL4L copies (3-6) compared to Caucasians (0-4) and a higher population median (4 and 2, respectively). Medians and ranges of CCL4L1 (Black: 2, 0-4, Caucasian: 0, 0-2) and CCL4L2 (Black: 2, 1-5, Caucasian: 2, 0-3) were also higher in the Black population. Droplet digital PCR was shown to be a far superior method to qPCR for assessment of CCL4 gene copy number variation, the accuracy of which is essential for studies of the contribution of variable gene copy number to phenotypic outcomes of host infection and disease course. PMID:24727646

  9. A Meta-Analysis of Retinoblastoma Copy Numbers Refines the List of Possible Driver Genes Involved in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kooi, Irsan E.; Mol, Berber M.; Massink, Maarten P. G.; de Jong, Marcus C.; de Graaf, Pim; van der Valk, Paul; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Moll, Annette C.; te Riele, Hein; Cloos, Jacqueline; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2016-01-01

    Background While RB1 loss initiates retinoblastoma development, additional somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) can drive tumor progression. Although SCNAs have been identified with good concordance between studies at a cytoband resolution, accurate identification of single genes for all recurrent SCNAs is still challenging. This study presents a comprehensive meta-analysis of genome-wide SCNAs integrated with gene expression profiling data, narrowing down the list of plausible retinoblastoma driver genes. Methods We performed SCNA profiling of 45 primary retinoblastoma samples and eight retinoblastoma cell lines by high-resolution microarrays. We combined our data with genomic, clinical and histopathological data of ten published genome-wide SCNA studies, which strongly enhanced the power of our analyses (N = 310). Results Comprehensive recurrence analysis of SCNAs in all studies integrated with gene expression data allowed us to reduce candidate gene lists for 1q, 2p, 6p, 7q and 13q to a limited gene set. Besides the well-established driver genes RB1 (13q-loss) and MYCN (2p-gain) we identified CRB1 and NEK7 (1q-gain), SOX4 (6p-gain) and NUP205 (7q-gain) as novel retinoblastoma driver candidates. Depending on the sample subset and algorithms used, alternative candidates were identified including MIR181 (1q-gain) and DEK (6p gain). Remarkably, our study showed that copy number gains rarely exceeded change of one copy, even in pure tumor samples with 100% homozygosity at the RB1 locus (N = 34), which is indicative for intra-tumor heterogeneity. In addition, profound between-tumor variability was observed that was associated with age at diagnosis and differentiation grades. Interpretation Since focal alterations at commonly altered chromosome regions were rare except for 2p24.3 (MYCN), further functional validation of the oncogenic potential of the described candidate genes is now required. For further investigations, our study provides a refined and revised set

  10. Optimization of Critical Hairpin Features Allows miRNA-based Gene Knockdown Upon Single-copy Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Myburgh, Renier; Cherpin, Ophélie; Schlaepfer, Erika; Rehrauer, Hubert; Speck, Roberto F; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Salmon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Gene knockdown using micro RNA (miRNA)-based vector constructs is likely to become a prominent gene therapy approach. It was the aim of this study to improve the efficiency of gene knockdown through optimizing the structure of miRNA mimics. Knockdown of two target genes was analyzed: CCR5 and green fluorescent protein. We describe here a novel and optimized miRNA mimic design called mirGE comprising a lower stem length of 13 base pairs (bp), positioning of the targeting strand on the 5′ side of the miRNA, together with nucleotide mismatches in upper stem positions 1 and 12 placed on the passenger strand. Our mirGE proved superior to miR-30 in four aspects: yield of targeting strand incorporation into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC); incorporation into RISC of correct targeting strand; precision of cleavage by Drosha; and ratio of targeting strand over passenger strand. A triple mirGE hairpin cassette targeting CCR5 was constructed. It allowed CCR5 knockdown with an efficiency of over 90% upon single-copy transduction. Importantly, single-copy expression of this construct rendered transduced target cells, including primary human macrophages, resistant to infection with a CCR5-tropic strain of HIV. Our results provide new insights for a better knockdown efficiency of constructs containing miRNA. Our results also provide the proof-of-principle that cells can be rendered HIV resistant through single-copy vector transduction, rendering this approach more compatible with clinical applications. PMID:25350582

  11. C-kit overexpression correlates with KIT gene copy numbers increases in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Xiaozhen; Feng, Xiaolong; Liu, Jian; Lv, Shuhua; Zhang, Wei; Niu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We determined c-kit expression in the stroma and epithelia of benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors (PTs), respectively, as well as the relationship between c-kit expression in stromal elements and KIT gene copy number variations (CNVs). To assess c-kit expression and KIT CNVs, 348 PT cases were studied: 120 (34.4 %) benign cases, 115 (33.1 %) borderline cases, and 113 (32.5 %) malignant cases. All of these cases were evaluated for c-kit (CD117) expression using immunohistochemistry. Forty-two cases (29 c-kit-positive in the stromal cells cases and 13 negative cases) were investigated for KIT gene CNVs via genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The overall rate of c-kit positivity in the stroma was 46.8 %, as well as 24.2, 53.1, and 64.6 %, respectively, in PTs of three different grades. However, in the majority of cases, the epithelia were c-kit positive (98.2 %), and the positivity was 100, 99.1, and 95 % in PTs of three different grades, respectively. There was a significant change in the expression of c-kit in the stroma and epithelia according to grade (P < 0.001, P = 0.014). From the genomic PCR results, we can confirm that c-kit positivity in the stroma is directly correlated with KIT gene copy numbers increases (P = 0.003, P = 0.041). We demonstrated that c-kit expression in the stroma of PTs is positively associated with malignancy. c-Kit epithelial positivity was inversely correlated with PTs malignancy. c-Kit overexpression in the stroma was related to KIT gene copy numbers increases. PMID:25534827

  12. Pervasive gene content variation and copy number variation in maize and its undomesticated progenitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different individuals of the same species are generally thought to have very similar genomes. However, there is growing evidence that structural variation in the form of copy number variation (CNV) and presence-absence variation (PAV) can lead to variation in the genome content of individuals withi...

  13. Whole-genome sequencing reveals the diversity of cattle copy number variations and multicopy genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structural and functional impacts of copy number variations (CNVs) on livestock genomes are not yet well understood. We identified 1853 CNV regions using population-scale sequencing data generated from 75 cattle representing 8 breeds (Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, Romagnol...

  14. Identification of copy number variable gene families in Holstein and Jersey cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variants (CNV) represent a large proportion of genetic variation within the cattle genome that has yet to be accurately characterized by SNP genotyping arrays. While significant progress has been made in the identification of CNVs within individual animals using next generation sequence ...

  15. The gene copy ratios of SMN1/SMN2 in Japanese carriers with type I spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Diep Tran, T; Kroepfl, T; Saito, M; Nagura, M; Ichiseki, H; Kubota, M; Toda, T; Sakakihara, Y

    2001-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with progressive weakness and atrophy of voluntary muscles. The survival motor neuron gene (SMN) is present in two highly homologous copies (SMN1 and SMN2) on chromosome 5q13. Homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of SMN1 is responsible for spinal muscular atrophy. In spinal muscular atrophy patients, SMN2 partially compensates for the lack of SMN1. Previously, we reported the relatively high incidence of a large deletion including the SMN1 region in Japanese spinal muscular atrophy type I patients. In order to further establish the genetic background of Japanese spinal muscular atrophy type I patients, we investigated the SMN1/SMN2 ratio in the carriers. In normal individuals, there is one copy of each gene on the chromosome (the SMN1/SMN2 ratio was 1). Among 15 carriers (14 parents and one carrier sibling of Japanese type I spinal muscular atrophy patients with homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of SMN1), we found that the SMN1/SMN2 ratio was 0.5 or 1 in 11 (73.3%) carriers. The remaining four carriers had an SMN1/SMN2 ratio of 1/3. This finding supports the idea that deletion rather than conversion is the main genetic event in type I spinal muscular atrophy. In addition, the ratio of SMN1/SMN2 among Japanese carriers, which was thought to be higher than that of the Western population, was compatible with the results obtained in Western populations. For further insight into the characteristic genetic background of spinal muscular atrophy in Japanese, determination of the gene copy number is essential. PMID:11504604

  16. Genomic mosaicism with increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number in single neurons from sporadic Alzheimer's disease brains

    PubMed Central

    Bushman, Diane M; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Siddoway, Benjamin; Westra, Jurgen W; Rivera, Richard R; Rehen, Stevens K; Yung, Yun C; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that individual neurons of the brain can display somatic genomic mosaicism of unknown function. In this study, we report altered genomic mosaicism in single, sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons characterized by increases in DNA content and amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number. AD cortical nuclei displayed large variability with average DNA content increases of ∼8% over non-diseased controls that were unrelated to trisomy 21. Two independent single-cell copy number analyses identified amplifications at the APP locus. The use of single-cell qPCR identified up to 12 copies of APP in sampled neurons. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting APP, combined with super-resolution microscopy detected primarily single fluorescent signals of variable intensity that paralleled single-cell qPCR analyses. These data identify somatic genomic changes in single neurons, affecting known and unknown loci, which are increased in sporadic AD, and further indicate functionality for genomic mosaicism in the CNS. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05116.001 PMID:25650802

  17. Detailed gene copy number and RNA expression analysis of the 17q12-23 region in primary breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Willis, Simon; Hutchins, Anne-Marie; Hammet, Fleur; Ciciulla, John; Soo, Wee-Kheng; White, David; van der Spek, Peter; Henderson, Michael A; Gish, Kurt; Venter, Deon J; Armes, Jane E

    2003-04-01

    Chromosome region 17q12-23 commonly shows an increase in DNA copy number in breast cancers, suggesting that several oncogenes are located at this site. We performed a high-resolution expression array and comparative genomic hybridization analysis of genes mapped to the entire 17q12-23 region, to identify novel candidate oncogenes. We identified 24 genes that showed significant overexpression in breast cancers with gain of 17q12-23, compared to cancers without gain. These genes included previously identified oncogenes, together with several novel candidate oncogenes. FISH analysis using specific gene probes hybridized to tissue arrays confirmed the underlying amplification of overexpressed genes. This high-resolution analysis of the 17q12-23 region indicates that several established and novel candidate oncogenes, including a Wnt-signaling pathway member, are amplified and overexpressed within individual primary breast cancer samples. We were also able to confirm the presence of two apparently separate and reciprocally amplified groups of genes within this region. Investigation of these genes and their functional interactions will facilitate our understanding of breast oncogenesis and optimal management of this disease. PMID:12619162

  18. PCR amplification of a multi-copy mitochondrial gene (cox3) improves detection of Cytauxzoon felis infection as compared to a ribosomal gene (18S).

    PubMed

    Schreeg, Megan E; Marr, Henry S; Griffith, Emily H; Tarigo, Jaime L; Bird, David M; Reichard, Mason V; Cohn, Leah A; Levy, Michael G; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2016-07-30

    Cytauxzoon felis is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that infects felids. Clinical disease caused by acute C. felis infection rapidly progresses in domestic cats, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Accurately diagnosing cytauxzoonosis as soon as possible during acute infection would allow for earlier initiation of antiprotozoal therapy which could lead to higher survival rates. Molecular detection of parasite rRNA genes (18S) by PCR has previously been shown to be a sensitive method of diagnosing C. felis infections. Based on evidence from related apicomplexan species, we hypothesized that C. felis mitochondrial genes would exist at higher copy numbers than 18S and would be a more sensitive diagnostic target. In this study we have designed a PCR assay targeting the C. felis mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). Herein we demonstrate that (1) the cox3 PCR can detect as low as 1 copy of DNA target and can detect C. felis in samples with known mitochondrial sequence heterogeneity, (2) cox3 copy number is increased relative to 18S in blood and tissue samples from acutely infected cats, and (3) the cox3 PCR is more sensitive than 18S PCR for detection of C. felis during early infections. PMID:27369587

  19. Association study of copy number variants in FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene with risk of ankylosing spondylitis in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yang, Xiao; Cai, Guoqi; Xin, Lihong; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Li, Xiaona; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Kang; Xia, Guo; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2016-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common inherited autoimmune disease. Copy number variation (CNV) of DNA segments has been found to be an important part of genetic variation, and the FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs have been associated with various autoimmune disorders. The aim of the study was to determine whether CNVs of FCGR3A and FCGR3B were also associated with the susceptibility of AS. A total of 801 individuals including 402 AS patients and 399 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The copy numbers of FCGR3 gene (two fragments, included FCGR3A and FCGR3B) were measured by AccuCopy™ methods. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were used to evaluate association between FCGR3 gene CNVs and AS susceptibility. P values, odds ratio, and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the effects of risk. Significantly, difference in the frequencies of FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs was founded between the patients with AS and controls. For the FCGR3A gene, a low (≤3) copy number was significantly associated with AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 2.17, 95 % CI (1.41, 3.34), P < 0.001, adjusted OR 2.22, 95 % CI (1.44, 3.43), P < 0.001)]. A low FCGR3B copy number was also significantly associated with increasing risk of AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 1.87, 95 % CI (1.25, 2.79), P = 0.002, adjusted OR 1.94, 95 % CI (1.29, 2.91), P = 0.001)]; however, both the high FCGR3A and FCGR3B copy numbers (≥5) were not significantly associated with the risk of AS (≥5 copies versus 4 copies). The lower copy numbers (≤3) of FCGR3A and FCGR3B genes confer a risk factor for AS susceptibility. PMID:26494566

  20. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

    PubMed

    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  1. Further support for aneuploidy tolerance in wild yeast and effects of dosage compensation on gene copy-number evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gasch, Audrey P; Hose, James; Newton, Michael A; Sardi, Maria; Yong, Mun; Wang, Zhishi

    2016-01-01

    In our prior work by Hose et al., we performed a genome-sequencing survey and reported that aneuploidy was frequently observed in wild strains of S. cerevisiae. We also profiled transcriptome abundance in naturally aneuploid isolates compared to isogenic euploid controls and found that 10–30% of amplified genes, depending on the strain and affected chromosome, show lower-than-expected expression compared to gene copy number. In Hose et al., we argued that this gene group is enriched for genes subject to one or more modes of dosage compensation, where mRNA abundance is decreased in response to higher dosage of that gene. A recent manuscript by Torres et al. refutes our prior work. Here, we provide a response to Torres et al., along with additional analysis and controls to support our original conclusions. We maintain that aneuploidy is well tolerated in the wild strains of S. cerevisiae that we studied and that the group of genes enriched for those subject to dosage compensation show unique evolutionary signatures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14409.001 PMID:26949252

  2. PAX5-positive T-cell Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas Associated with Extra Copies of the PAX5 Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Andrew L; Law, Mark E; Inwards, David J; Dogan, Ahmet; McClure, Rebecca F; Macon, William R

    2010-01-01

    Cell lineage is the major criterion by which lymphomas are classified. Immunohistochemistry has greatly facilitated lymphoma diagnosis by detecting expression of lineage-associated antigens. However, loss or aberrant expression of these antigens may present diagnostic challenges. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell lymphoma that shows morphologic and phenotypic overlap with classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a tumor of B-cell derivation. Staining for the B-cell transcription factor, PAX5, has been suggested to be helpful in this differential, as it is positive in most classical Hodgkin lymphomas, but absent in anaplastic large cell lymphomas. Herein, we report four systemic T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphomas positive for PAX5 by immunohistochemistry, with weak staining intensity similar to that seen in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. All diagnoses were confirmed by a combination of morphologic, phenotypic, and molecular criteria. Three cases were ALK-negative and one was ALK-positive. PAX5 immunohistochemistry was negative in 198 additional peripheral T-cell lymphomas, including 66 anaplastic large cell lymphomas. Unexpectedly, though PAX5 translocations were absent, all evaluable PAX5-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas showed extra copies of the PAX5 gene locus by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In contrast, only 4% of PAX5-negative peripheral T-cell lymphomas had extra copies of PAX5. We conclude that aberrant expression of PAX5 occurs rarely in T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and may be associated with extra copies of the PAX5 gene. PAX5-positive lymphomas with morphologic features overlapping different lymphoma types should be evaluated with an extensive immunohistochemical panel and/or molecular studies to avoid diagnostic errors that could lead to inappropriate treatment. Since PAX5 overexpression causes T-cell neoplasms in experimental models, PAX5 may have contributed to lymphomagenesis in our cases. PMID:20118907

  3. Copy number variation of a gene cluster encoding endopolygalacturonase mediates flesh texture and stone adhesion in peach

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Ma, Baiquan; Zheng, Hongyu; Fang, Ting; Ogutu, Collins; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Texture is an important attribute affecting consumer perception of fruit quality. Peach melting flesh and flesh adhesion to stone (endocarp) are simply inherited and controlled by the F-M locus on linkage group (LG) 4. Here, we report that two genes encoding endopolygalacturonase (endoPG) in the F-M locus, designated PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM, are associated with the melting flesh and stone adhesion traits. PpendoPGM controls melting flesh while PpendoPGF has pleiotropic effects on both melting flesh and stone adhesion. The F-M locus has three allelic copy number variants of endoPG, H1 (PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM), H2 (PpendoPGM), and H3 (null). The H2 haplotype represents the ancestral one while the H1 and H3 haplotypes are two variants due to duplication and deletion of PpendoPGM, respectively. Accessions with H1H1, H1H2, or H1H3 genotypes show the freestone or semi-freestone and melting flesh phenotype, while both H2H2 and H2H3 accessions have the clingstone and melting flesh phenotype. The H3H3 accessions have the clingstone and non-melting flesh phenotype. Our study not only demonstrates a driving role of gene copy number variations in flesh texture diversification in fruit trees, but also provides a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programmes. PMID:26850878

  4. Copy number variation of a gene cluster encoding endopolygalacturonase mediates flesh texture and stone adhesion in peach.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Ma, Baiquan; Zheng, Hongyu; Fang, Ting; Ogutu, Collins; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-03-01

    Texture is an important attribute affecting consumer perception of fruit quality. Peach melting flesh and flesh adhesion to stone (endocarp) are simply inherited and controlled by the F-M locus on linkage group (LG) 4. Here, we report that two genes encoding endopolygalacturonase (endoPG) in the F-M locus, designated PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM, are associated with the melting flesh and stone adhesion traits. PpendoPGM controls melting flesh while PpendoPGF has pleiotropic effects on both melting flesh and stone adhesion. The F-M locus has three allelic copy number variants of endoPG, H1 (PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM), H2 (PpendoPGM), and H3 (null). The H2 haplotype represents the ancestral one while the H1 and H3 haplotypes are two variants due to duplication and deletion of PpendoPGM, respectively. Accessions with H1H1, H1H2, or H1H3 genotypes show the freestone or semi-freestone and melting flesh phenotype, while both H2H2 and H2H3 accessions have the clingstone and melting flesh phenotype. The H3H3 accessions have the clingstone and non-melting flesh phenotype. Our study not only demonstrates a driving role of gene copy number variations in flesh texture diversification in fruit trees, but also provides a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programmes. PMID:26850878

  5. Phylogenomic approaches to common problems encountered in the analysis of low copy repeats: The sulfotransferase 1A gene family example

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Michael E; Benner, Steven A

    2005-01-01

    Background Blocks of duplicated genomic DNA sequence longer than 1000 base pairs are known as low copy repeats (LCRs). Identified by their sequence similarity, LCRs are abundant in the human genome, and are interesting because they may represent recent adaptive events, or potential future adaptive opportunities within the human lineage. Sequence analysis tools are needed, however, to decide whether these interpretations are likely, whether a particular set of LCRs represents nearly neutral drift creating junk DNA, or whether the appearance of LCRs reflects assembly error. Here we investigate an LCR family containing the sulfotransferase (SULT) 1A genes involved in drug metabolism, cancer, hormone regulation, and neurotransmitter biology as a first step for defining the problems that those tools must manage. Results Sequence analysis here identified a fourth sulfotransferase gene, which may be transcriptionally active, located on human chromosome 16. Four regions of genomic sequence containing the four human SULT1A paralogs defined a new LCR family. The stem hominoid SULT1A progenitor locus was identified by comparative genomics involving complete human and rodent genomes, and a draft chimpanzee genome. SULT1A expansion in hominoid genomes was followed by positive selection acting on specific protein sites. This episode of adaptive evolution appears to be responsible for the dopamine sulfonation function of some SULT enzymes. Each of the conclusions that this bioinformatic analysis generated using data that has uncertain reliability (such as that from the chimpanzee genome sequencing project) has been confirmed experimentally or by a "finished" chromosome 16 assembly, both of which were published after the submission of this manuscript. Conclusion SULT1A genes expanded from one to four copies in hominoids during intra-chromosomal LCR duplications, including (apparently) one after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans. Thus, LCRs may provide a means for amplifying

  6. Homoeologous copy-specific expression patterns of MADS-box genes for floral formation in allopolyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miku; Tanaka, Hiroko; Shitsukawa, Naoki; Kitagawa, Satoshi; Takumi, Shigeo; Murai, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The consensus model for floral organ formation in higher plants, the so-called ABCDE model, proposes that floral whorl-specific combinations of class A, B, C, D, and E genes specify floral organ identity. Class A, B, C, D and E genes encode MADS-box transcription factors; the single exception being the class A gene APETALA2. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is a hexaploid species with a genome constitution AABBDD; the hexaploid originated from a cross between tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB) and diploid Aegilops tauschii (DD). Tetraploid wheat is thought to have originated from a cross between the diploid species T. urartu (AA) and Ae. speltoides (BB). Consequently, the hexaploid wheat genome contains triplicated homoeologous copies (homoeologs) of each gene derived from the different ancestral diploid species. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of homoeologs of class B, C and D MADS-box genes during floral development. For the class B gene wheat PISTILLATA2 (WPI2), the homoeologs from the A and D genomes were expressed, while expression of the B genome homoeolog was suppressed. For the class C gene wheat AGAMOUS1 (WAG1), the homoeologs on the A and B genomes were expressed, while expression of the D genome homoeolog was suppressed. For the class D gene wheat SEEDSTICK (WSTK), the B genome homoeolog was preferentially expressed. These differential patterns of homoeolog expression were consistently observed among different hexaploid wheat varieties and synthetic hexaploid wheat lines developed by artificial crosses between tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii. These results suggest that homoeolog-specific regulation of the floral MADS-box genes occurs in allopolyploid wheat. PMID:26616759

  7. The evolution of single-copy Drosophila nuclear 4f-rnp genes: spliceosomal intron losses create polymorphic alleles.

    PubMed

    Feiber, Amy L; Rangarajan, Janaki; Vaughn, Jack C

    2002-10-01

    This study provides the first report in which spliceosomal intron losses within a single-copy gene create functional polymorphic alleles in a population. 4f-rnp has previously been shown to be a nuclear gene that is localized on the X chromosome in D. melanogaster and to have eight short spliceosomal introns. An insect species survey was done via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of a 1028-bp gene fragment spanning introns 4-8, which are located in the 3' half of the gene. The results show that 4f-rnp and (thus far) introns 7 and 8 are at least as old as order Odonata (dragonflies), an early-diverging insect line. Unexpectedly, several species within the dipteran family Drosophilidae were found to contain two differently sized 4f-rnp gene sequence variants, owing to precise in-frame intron losses. Results of single-male D. melanogaster PCR analyses show that the two gene size variants are allelic and that the intron loss mechanism appears to be biased toward the 3' end of the gene. A stable potential stem-loop has been identified in D. melanogaster, predicted to fold the 4f-rnp mRNA 3' terminus into a natural primer for subsequent reverse transcription into cDNA. When results are displayed in a phylogenetic context, multiple independent intron loss events are identified. These observations support a model in which frequently occurring cDNAs have led to numerous independent intron losses via homologous recombination/gene conversion during 4f-rnp gene evolution. The results provide insights into the evolution of intron loss and may lead to improved understanding of the dynamics of this process in natural populations. PMID:12355261

  8. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Nicholas J.; Smirnov, Ivan; Yu, Mamie; Hariono, Sujatmi; Silber, Joachim; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors, genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  9. miRNA and miRNA target genes in copy number variations occurring in individuals with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short, non-coding RNAs modulating expression of human protein coding genes (miRNA target genes). Their dysfunction is associated with many human diseases, including neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been recently shown that genomic copy number variations (CNVs) can cause aberrant expression of integral miRNAs and their target genes, and contribute to intellectual disability (ID). Results To better understand the CNV-miRNA relationship in ID, we investigated the prevalence and function of miRNAs and miRNA target genes in five groups of CNVs. Three groups of CNVs were from 213 probands with ID (24 de novo CNVs, 46 familial and 216 common CNVs), one group of CNVs was from a cohort of 32 cognitively normal subjects (67 CNVs) and one group of CNVs represented 40 ID related syndromic regions listed in DECIPHER (30 CNVs) which served as positive controls for CNVs causing or predisposing to ID. Our results show that 1). The number of miRNAs is significantly higher in de novo or DECIPHER CNVs than in familial or common CNV subgroups (P < 0.01). 2). miRNAs with brain related functions are more prevalent in de novo CNV groups compared to common CNV groups. 3). More miRNA target genes are found in de novo, familial and DECIPHER CNVs than in the common CNV subgroup (P < 0.05). 4). The MAPK signaling cascade is found to be enriched among the miRNA target genes from de novo and DECIPHER CNV subgroups. Conclusions Our findings reveal an increase in miRNA and miRNA target gene content in de novo versus common CNVs in subjects with ID. Their expression profile and participation in pathways support a possible role of miRNA copy number change in cognition and/or CNV-mediated developmental delay. Systematic analysis of expression/function of miRNAs in addition to coding genes integral to CNVs could uncover new causes of ID. PMID:23937676

  10. Genome-wide copy number variation study associates metabotropic glutamate receptor gene networks with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Josephine; Glessner, Joseph T; Wang, Kai; Takahashi, Nagahide; Shtir, Corina J; Hadley, Dexter; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Zhang, Haitao; Kim, Cecilia E; Robison, Reid; Lyon, Gholson J; Flory, James H; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Imielinski, Marcin; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward C; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Sakurai, Takeshi; Rabin, Cara; Middleton, Frank A; Thomas, Kelly A; Garris, Maria; Mentch, Frank; Freitag, Christine M; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Todorov, Alexandre A; Reif, Andreas; Rothenberger, Aribert; Franke, Barbara; Mick, Eric O; Roeyers, Herbert; Buitelaar, Jan; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Banaschewski, Tobias; Ebstein, Richard P; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Renner, Tobias J; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Meyer, Jobst; Pálmason, Haukur; Seitz, Christiane; Loo, Sandra K; Smalley, Susan L; Biederman, Joseph; Kent, Lindsey; Asherson, Philip; Anney, Richard J L; Gaynor, J William; Shaw, Philip; Devoto, Marcella; White, Peter S; Grant, Struan F A; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Rapoport, Judith L; Williams, Nigel M; Nelson, Stanley F; Faraone, Stephen V; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common, heritable neuropsychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. We performed a whole-genome copy number variation (CNV) study on 1,013 cases with ADHD and 4,105 healthy children of European ancestry using 550,000 SNPs. We evaluated statistically significant findings in multiple independent cohorts, with a total of 2,493 cases with ADHD and 9,222 controls of European ancestry, using matched platforms. CNVs affecting metabotropic glutamate receptor genes were enriched across all cohorts (P = 2.1 × 10−9). We saw GRM5 (encoding glutamate receptor, metabotropic 5) deletions in ten cases and one control (P = 1.36 × 10−6). We saw GRM7 deletions in six cases, and we saw GRM8 deletions in eight cases and no controls. GRM1 was duplicated in eight cases. We experimentally validated the observed variants using quantitative RT-PCR. A gene network analysis showed that genes interacting with the genes in the GRM family are enriched for CNVs in ~10% of the cases (P = 4.38 × 10−10) after correction for occurrence in the controls. We identified rare recurrent CNVs affecting glutamatergic neurotransmission genes that were overrepresented in multiple ADHD cohorts. PMID:22138692

  11. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  12. Expression of Individual Copies of Methylococcus capsulatus Bath Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stolyar, Sergei; Franke, Marion; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2001-01-01

    The expression of the two gene clusters encoding the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was assessed by analysis of transcripts and by use of chromosomal gene fusions. The results suggest that the two clusters are functionally redundant but that relative expression alters depending on the copper levels available for growth. PMID:11160118

  13. Expression of individual copies of Methylococcus capsulatus bath particulate methane monooxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Stolyar, S; Franke, M; Lidstrom, M E

    2001-03-01

    The expression of the two gene clusters encoding the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was assessed by analysis of transcripts and by use of chromosomal gene fusions. The results suggest that the two clusters are functionally redundant but that relative expression alters depending on the copper levels available for growth. PMID:11160118

  14. Combined examination of sequence and copy number variations in human deafness genes improves diagnosis for cases of genetic deafness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Copy number variations (CNVs) are the major type of structural variation in the human genome, and are more common than DNA sequence variations in populations. CNVs are important factors for human genetic and phenotypic diversity. Many CNVs have been associated with either resistance to diseases or identified as the cause of diseases. Currently little is known about the role of CNVs in causing deafness. CNVs are currently not analyzed by conventional genetic analysis methods to study deafness. Here we detected both DNA sequence variations and CNVs affecting 80 genes known to be required for normal hearing. Methods Coding regions of the deafness genes were captured by a hybridization-based method and processed through the standard next-generation sequencing (NGS) protocol using the Illumina platform. Samples hybridized together in the same reaction were analyzed to obtain CNVs. A read depth based method was used to measure CNVs at the resolution of a single exon. Results were validated by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) based method. Results Among 79 sporadic cases clinically diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss, we identified previously-reported disease-causing sequence mutations in 16 cases. In addition, we identified a total of 97 CNVs (72 CNV gains and 25 CNV losses) in 27 deafness genes. The CNVs included homozygous deletions which may directly give rise to deleterious effects on protein functions known to be essential for hearing, as well as heterozygous deletions and CNV gains compounded with sequence mutations in deafness genes that could potentially harm gene functions. Conclusions We studied how CNVs in known deafness genes may result in deafness. Data provided here served as a basis to explain how CNVs disrupt normal functions of deafness genes. These results may significantly expand our understanding about how various types of genetic mutations cause deafness in humans. PMID:25342930

  15. Sequence polymorphisms at the growth hormone GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z gene copies and their relationship with dairy traits in domestic sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Vacca, G M; Dettori, M L; Balia, F; Luridiana, S; Mura, M C; Carcangiu, V; Pazzola, M

    2013-09-01

    The purpose was to analyze the growth hormone GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z gene copies and to assess their possible association with milk traits in Sarda sheep. Two hundred multiparous lactating ewes were monitored. The two gene copies were amplified separately and each was used as template for a nested PCR, to investigate single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of the 5'UTR, exon-1, exon-5 and 3'UTR DNA regions. SSCP analysis revealed marked differences in the number of polymorphic patterns between the two genes. Sequencing revealed five nucleotide changes at the GH1/GH2-N gene. Five nucleotide changes occurred at the GH2-Z gene: one was located in exon-5 (c.556G > A) and resulted in a putative amino acid substitution G186S. All the nucleotide changes were copy-specific, except c.*30delT, which was common to both GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z. Variability in the promoter regions of each gene might have consequences on the expression level, due to the involvement in potential transcription factor binding sites. Both gene copies influenced milk yield. A correlation with milk protein and casein content was also evidenced. These results may have implications that make them useful for future breeding strategies in dairy sheep breeding. PMID:23653010

  16. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  17. Copy Number and Orientation Determine the Susceptibility of a Gene to Silencing by Nearby Heterochromatin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sabl, J. F.; Henikoff, S.

    1996-01-01

    The classical phenomenon of position-effect variegation (PEV) is the mosaic expression that occurs when a chromosomal rearrangement moves a euchromatic gene near heterochromatin. A striking feature of this phenomenon is that genes far away from the junction with heterochromatin can be affected, as if the heterochromatic state ``spreads.'' We have investigated classical PEV of a Drosophila brown transgene affected by a heterochromatic junction ~60 kb away. PEV was enhanced when the transgene was locally duplicated using P transposase. Successive rounds of P transposase mutagenesis and phenotypic selection produced a series of PEV alleles with differences in phenotype that depended on transgene copy number and orientation. As for other examples of classical PEV, nearby heterochromatin was required for gene silencing. Modifications of classical PEV by alterations at a single site are unexpected, and these observations contradict models for spreading that invoke propagation of heterochromatin along the chromosome. Rather, our results support a model in which local alterations affect the affinity of a gene region for nearby heterochromatin via homology-based pairing, suggesting an alternative explanation for this 65-year-old phenomenon. PMID:8852844

  18. Assessing the Impact of Copy Number Variants on miRNA Genes in Autism by Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Marrale, Maurizio; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Calì, Francesco; Romano, Valentino

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders with complex genetic origins. Previous studies have investigated the role of de novo Copy Number Variants (CNVs) and microRNAs as important but distinct etiological factors in ASD. We developed a novel computational procedure to assess the potential pathogenic role of microRNA genes overlapping de novo CNVs in ASD patients. Here we show that for chromosomes # 1, 2 and 22 the actual number of miRNA loci affected by de novo CNVs in patients was found significantly higher than that estimated by Monte Carlo simulation of random CNV events. Out of 24 miRNA genes over-represented in CNVs from these three chromosomes only hsa-mir-4436b-1 and hsa-mir-4436b-2 have not been detected in CNVs from non-autistic subjects as reported in the Database of Genomic Variants. Altogether the results reported in this study represent a first step towards a full understanding of how a dysregulated expression of the 24 miRNAs genes affect neurodevelopment in autism. We also propose that the procedure used in this study can be effectively applied to CNVs/miRNA genes association data in other genomic disorders beyond autism. PMID:24667286

  19. Copy Number Variation of CCL3-like Genes Affects Rate of Progression to Simian-AIDS in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; de Candia, Paola; Chabot, Adrien; Schwartz, Stuart; Henderson, Les; Ling, Binhua; Hunter, Meredith; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael; Eichler, Evan E.; Ventura, Mario; Rogers, Jeffrey; Marx, Preston

    2009-01-01

    Variation in genes underlying host immunity can lead to marked differences in susceptibility to HIV infection among humans. Despite heavy reliance on non-human primates as models for HIV/AIDS, little is known about which host factors are shared and which are unique to a given primate lineage. Here, we investigate whether copy number variation (CNV) at CCL3-like genes (CCL3L), a key genetic host factor for HIV/AIDS susceptibility and cell-mediated immune response in humans, is also a determinant of time until onset of simian-AIDS in rhesus macaques. Using a retrospective study of 57 rhesus macaques experimentally infected with SIVmac, we find that CCL3L CNV explains approximately 18% of the variance in time to simian-AIDS (p<0.001) with lower CCL3L copy number associating with more rapid disease course. We also find that CCL3L copy number varies significantly (p<10−6) among rhesus subpopulations, with Indian-origin macaques having, on average, half as many CCL3L gene copies as Chinese-origin macaques. Lastly, we confirm that CCL3L shows variable copy number in humans and chimpanzees and report on CCL3L CNV within and among three additional primate species. On the basis of our findings we suggest that (1) the difference in population level copy number may explain previously reported observations of longer post-infection survivorship of Chinese-origin rhesus macaques, (2) stratification by CCL3L copy number in rhesus SIV vaccine trials will increase power and reduce noise due to non-vaccine-related differences in survival, and (3) CCL3L CNV is an ancestral component of the primate immune response and, therefore, copy number variation has not been driven by HIV or SIV per se. PMID:19165326

  20. Short Stature in Isodicentric Y Chromosome and Three Copies of the SHOX Gene: Clinical Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Valetto, Angelo; Bertini, Veronica; Michelucci, Angela; Toschi, Benedetta; Dati, Eleonora; Baroncelli, Giampietro I; Bertelloni, Silvano

    2016-04-01

    Short stature homeobox gene (SHOX) mutations and pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) deletions encompassing SHOX are known causes of Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and isolated short stature, while 3 copies of SHOX in cases with triple sex chromosome constitution are responsible for tall stature. Duplications involving SHOX have been rarely reported, and they were found in individuals with short, normal and tall stature. An adopted boy with short stature, isodicentric Y chromosome and 3 copies of SHOX is described. Normal growth hormone (GH) secretion and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) increase during an IGF1 generation test were found, ruling out impaired GH-IGF1 axis. No other organic or psychiatric causes of impaired growth were found. GH treatment improved linear growth, as reported in children with SHOX haploinsufficiency. This new report and the review of literature support that SHOX duplication may cause short stature, especially in those children with duplications of the 5'SHOX regulatory elements. Chromosome analysis and detailed molecular characterization of the duplicated region should be warranted in individuals with SHOX duplications in order to investigate the presence of occult chromosome imbalance. Additional reports and follow-up till adult height are needed to give conclusions on long-term efficacy and safety of GH treatment in short children with SHOX duplication. PMID:27194969

  1. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  2. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M.; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A.A.; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G.; Armour, John A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. PMID:25788522

  3. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A A; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G; Armour, John A L

    2015-06-15

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. PMID:25788522

  4. Divergence patterns of genic copy number variation in natural populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) reveal three conserved genes with major population-specific expansions

    PubMed Central

    Pezer, Željka; Harr, Bettina; Teschke, Meike; Babiker, Hiba; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation represents a major source of genetic divergence, yet the evolutionary dynamics of genic copy number variation in natural populations during differentiation and adaptation remain unclear. We applied a read depth approach to genome resequencing data to detect copy number variants (CNVs) ≥1 kb in wild-caught mice belonging to four populations of Mus musculus domesticus. We complemented the bioinformatics analyses with experimental validation using droplet digital PCR. The specific focus of our analysis is CNVs that include complete genes, as these CNVs could be expected to contribute most directly to evolutionary divergence. In total, 1863 transcription units appear to be completely encompassed within CNVs in at least one individual when compared to the reference assembly. Further, 179 of these CNVs show population-specific copy number differences, and 325 are subject to complete deletion in multiple individuals. Among the most copy-number variable genes are three highly conserved genes that encode the splicing factor CWC22, the spindle protein SFI1, and the Holliday junction recognition protein HJURP. These genes exhibit population-specific expansion patterns that suggest involvement in local adaptations. We found that genes that overlap with large segmental duplications are generally more copy-number variable. These genes encode proteins that are relevant for environmental and behavioral interactions, such as vomeronasal and olfactory receptors, as well as major urinary proteins and several proteins of unknown function. The overall analysis shows that genic CNVs contribute more to population differentiation in mice than in humans and may promote and speed up population divergence. PMID:26149421

  5. Multi-copy venom genes hidden in de novo transcriptome assemblies, a cautionary tale with the snakelocks sea anemone Anemonia sulcata (Pennant, 1977).

    PubMed

    Macrander, Jason; Broe, Michael; Daly, Marymegan

    2015-12-15

    Using a partial transcriptome of the snakelocks anemone (Anemonia sulcata) we identify toxin gene candidates that were incorrectly assembled into several Trinity components. Our approach recovers hidden diversity found within some toxin gene families that would otherwise go undetected when using Trinity, a widely used program for venom-focused transcriptome reconstructions. Unidentified hidden transcripts may significantly impact conclusions made regarding venom composition (or other multi-copy conserved genes) when using Trinity or other de novo assembly programs. PMID:26464059

  6. Single-copy nuclear gene primers for Streptanthus and other Brassicaceae from genomic scans, published data, and ESTs1

    PubMed Central

    Cacho, N. Ivalú; Strauss, Sharon Y.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We report 11 primer sets for nine single-copy nuclear genes in Streptanthus and other Thelypodieae (Brassicaceae) and their utility at tribal-level and species-level phylogenetics in this poorly resolved group. • Methods and Results: We selected regions based on a cross-referenced matrix of previous studies and public Brassica expressed sequence tags. To design primers, we used alignments of low-depth-coverage Illumina sequencing of genomic DNA for two species of Brassica mapped onto Arabidopsis thaliana. We report several primer combinations for five regions that consistently amplified a single band and yielded high-quality sequences for at least 70% of the species assayed, and for four additional regions whose utility might be clade specific. • Conclusions: Our primers will be useful in improving resolution at shallow depths across the Thelypodieae, and likely in other Brassicaceae. PMID:25202560

  7. A next-generation sequencing method for overcoming the multiple gene copy problem in polyploid phylogenetics, applied to Poa grasses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is important from a phylogenetic perspective because of its immense past impact on evolution and its potential future impact on diversification, survival and adaptation, especially in plants. Molecular population genetics studies of polyploid organisms have been difficult because of problems in sequencing multiple-copy nuclear genes using Sanger sequencing. This paper describes a method for sequencing a barcoded mixture of targeted gene regions using next-generation sequencing methods to overcome these problems. Results Using 64 3-bp barcodes, we successfully sequenced three chloroplast and two nuclear gene regions (each of which contained two gene copies with up to two alleles per individual) in a total of 60 individuals across 11 species of Australian Poa grasses. This method had high replicability, a low sequencing error rate (after appropriate quality control) and a low rate of missing data. Eighty-eight percent of the 320 gene/individual combinations produced sequence reads, and >80% of individuals produced sufficient reads to detect all four possible nuclear alleles of the homeologous nuclear loci with 95% probability. We applied this method to a group of sympatric Australian alpine Poa species, which we discovered to share an allopolyploid ancestor with a group of American Poa species. All markers revealed extensive allele sharing among the Australian species and so we recommend that the current taxonomy be re-examined. We also detected hypermutation in the trnH-psbA marker, suggesting it should not be used as a land plant barcode region. Some markers indicated differentiation between Tasmanian and mainland samples. Significant positive spatial genetic structure was detected at <100 km with chloroplast but not nuclear markers, which may be a result of restricted seed flow and long-distance pollen flow in this wind-pollinated group. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that 454 sequencing of barcoded amplicon mixtures can be used to

  8. Heterogeneous EGFR Gene Copy Number Increase Is Common in Colorectal Cancer and Defines Response to Anti-EGFR Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ålgars, Annika; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Sundström, Jari; Jokilehto, Terhi; Ristimäki, Ari; Ristamäki, Raija; Carpén, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Anti-EGFR therapy is commonly used to treat colorectal cancer (CRC), although only a subset of patients benefit from the treatment. While KRAS mutation predicts non-responsiveness, positive predictive markers are not in clinical practice. We previously showed that immunohistochemistry (IHC)-guided EGFR gene copy number (GCN) analysis may identify CRC patients benefiting from anti-EGFR treatment. Here we tested the predictive value of such analysis in chemorefractory metastatic CRC, elucidated EGFR GCN heterogeneity within the tumors, and evaluated the association between EGFR GCN, KRAS status, and anti-EGFR antibody response in CRC cell lines. The chemorefractory patient cohort consisted of 54 KRAS wild-type (WT) metastatic CRC patients. EGFR GCN status was analyzed by silver in situ hybridization using a cut-off value of 4.0 EGFR gene copies/cell. KRAS-WT and KRAS mutant CRC cell lines with different EGFR GCN were used in in vitro studies. The chemorefractory CRC tumors with EGFR GCN increase (≥4.0) responded better to anti-EGFR therapy than EGFR GCN (<4.0) tumors (clinical benefit, P = 0.0004; PFS, HR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.12–0.46). EGFR GCN counted using EGFR IHC guidance was significantly higher than the value from randomly selected areas verifying intratumoral EGFR GCN heterogeneity. In CRC cell lines, EGFR GCN correlated with EGFR expression. Best anti-EGFR response was seen with KRAS-WT, EGFR GCN = 4 cells and poorest response with KRAS-WT, EGFR GCN = 2 cells. Anti-EGFR response was associated with AKT and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was effectively inhibited only in cells with KRAS-WT and increased EGFR GCN. In conclusion, IHC-guided EGFR GCN is a promising predictor of anti-EGFR treatment efficacy in chemorefractory CRC. PMID:24940619

  9. RefCNV: Identification of Gene-Based Copy Number Variants Using Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lun-Ching; Das, Biswajit; Lih, Chih-Jian; Si, Han; Camalier, Corinne E.; McGregor, Paul M.; Polley, Eric

    2016-01-01

    With rapid advances in DNA sequencing technologies, whole exome sequencing (WES) has become a popular approach for detecting somatic mutations in oncology studies. The initial intent of WES was to characterize single nucleotide variants, but it was observed that the number of sequencing reads that mapped to a genomic region correlated with the DNA copy number variants (CNVs). We propose a method RefCNV that uses a reference set to estimate the distribution of the coverage for each exon. The construction of the reference set includes an evaluation of the sources of variability in the coverage distribution. We observed that the processing steps had an impact on the coverage distribution. For each exon, we compared the observed coverage with the expected normal coverage. Thresholds for determining CNVs were selected to control the false-positive error rate. RefCNV prediction correlated significantly (r = 0.96–0.86) with CNV measured by digital polymerase chain reaction for MET (7q31), EGFR (7p12), or ERBB2 (17q12) in 13 tumor cell lines. The genome-wide CNV analysis showed a good overall correlation (Spearman’s coefficient = 0.82) between RefCNV estimation and publicly available CNV data in Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. RefCNV also showed better performance than three other CNV estimation methods in genome-wide CNV analysis. PMID:27147817

  10. Chromosome 10 and RET gene copy number alterations in hereditary and sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Raffaele; Romei, Cristina; Cosci, Barbara; Vivaldi, Agnese; Bottici, Valeria; Renzini, Giulia; Ugolini, Clara; Tacito, Alessia; Basolo, Fulvio; Pinchera, Aldo; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    About 30% of hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma (MTC) have been demonstrated to harbour imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET alleles. We studied the RET copy number alterations (RET CNA) in 65 MTC and their correlation with RET mutation and patients' outcome. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization and Real-time PCR revealed RET CNA in 27.7% MTC but only in a variable percentage of cells. In sporadic MTC, RET CNA were represented by chromosome 10 aneuploidy while in hereditary MTC by RET amplification. A significant higher prevalence of RET CNA was observed in RET mutated MTC (P=0.003). RET CNA was also associated to a poorer outcome (P=0.005). However, the multivariate analysis revealed that only RET mutation and advanced clinical stage correlated with the worst outcome. In conclusion, 30% MTC harbour RET CNA in variable percentage of cells suggesting cell heterogeneity. RET CNA can be considered a poor prognostic factor potentiating the poor prognostic role of RET mutation. PMID:21867742

  11. MHC gene copy number variation in Tasmanian devils: implications for the spread of a contagious cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V.; Marzec, Jolanta; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Tasmanian devils face extinction owing to the emergence of a contagious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a clonal cancer spread owing to a lack of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barriers in Tasmanian devil populations. We present a comprehensive screen of MHC diversity in devils and identify 25 MHC types and 53 novel sequences, but conclude that overall levels of MHC diversity at the sequence level are low. The majority of MHC Class I variation can be explained by allelic copy number variation with two to seven sequence variants identified per individual. MHC sequences are divided into two distinct groups based on sequence similarity. DFTD cells and most devils have sequences from both groups. Twenty per cent of individuals have a restricted MHC repertoire and contain only group I or only group II sequences. Counterintuitively, we postulate that the immune system of individuals with a restricted MHC repertoire may recognize foreign MHC antigens on the surface of the DFTD cell. The implication of these results for management of DFTD and this endangered species are discussed. PMID:20219742

  12. MET Gene Copy Number Predicts Worse Overall Survival in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC); A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dimou, Anastasios; Non, Lemuel; Chae, Young Kwang; Tester, William J.; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives MET is a receptor present in the membrane of NSCLC cells and is known to promote cell proliferation, survival and migration. MET gene copy number is a common genetic alteration and inhibition o MET emerges as a promising targeted therapy in NSCLC. Here we aim to combine in a meta-analysis, data on the effect of high MET gene copy number on the overall survival of patients with resected NSCLC. Methods Two independent investigators applied parallel search strategies with the terms “MET AND lung cancer”, “MET AND NSCLC”, “MET gene copy number AND prognosis” in PubMed through January 2014. We selected the studies that investigated the association of MET gene copy number with survival, in patients who received surgery. Results Among 1096 titles that were identified in the initial search, we retrieved 9 studies on retrospective cohorts with adequate retrievable data regarding the prognostic impact of MET gene copy number on the survival of patients with NSCLC. Out of those, 6 used FISH and the remaining 3 used RT PCR to assess the MET gene copy number in the primary tumor. We calculated the I2 statistic to assess heterogeneity (I2 = 72%). MET gene copy number predicted worse overall survival when all studies were combined in a random effects model (HR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.22–2.60). When only the studies that had at least 50% of adenocarcinoma patients in their populations were included, the effect was significant (five studies, HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.23–1.94). This was not true when we included only the studies with no more than 50% of the patients having adenocarcinoma histology (four studies HR 2.18, 95% CI 0.97–4.90). Conclusions Higher MET gene copy number in the primary tumor at the time of diagnosis predicts worse outcome in patients with NSCLC. This prognostic impact may be adenocarcinoma histology specific. PMID:25232729

  13. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:27299603

  14. Novel pathogenic mutations and copy number variations in the VPS13A gene in patients with chorea-acanthocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tomiyasu, Akiyuki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Ichiba, Mio; Ueno, Shuichi; Saiki, Shinji; Morimoto, Mizuki; Kobal, Jan; Kageyama, Yasufumi; Inui, Toshio; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Yamada, Tatsuo; Kanemori, Yuji; Jung, Hans H; Tanaka, Haruhiko; Orimo, Satoshi; Afawi, Zaid; Blatt, Ilan; Aasly, Jan; Ujike, Hiroshi; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Josephs, Keith A; Tohge, Rie; Rodrigues, Guilherme Riccioppo; Dupré, Nicolas; Yamada, Hidetaka; Yokochi, Fusako; Kotschet, Katya; Takei, Takanobu; Rudzińska, Monika; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Penco, Silvana; Fujiwara, Masaki; Tojo, Kana; Sano, Akira

    2011-07-01

    Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the vacuolar protein sorting 13 homolog A (VPS13A) gene that encodes chorein. It is characterized by adult-onset chorea, peripheral acanthocytes, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive mutation screen, including sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis, of the VPS13A gene in ChAc patients. All 73 exons and flanking regions of VPS13A were sequenced in 35 patients diagnosed with ChAc. To detect CNVs, we also performed real-time quantitative PCR and long-range PCR analyses for the VPS13A gene on patients in whom only a single heterozygous mutation was detected. We identified 36 pathogenic mutations, 20 of which were previously unreported, including two novel CNVs. In addition, we investigated the expression of chorein in 16 patients by Western blotting of erythrocyte ghosts. This demonstrated the complete absence of chorein in patients with pathogenic mutations. This comprehensive screen provides an accurate and useful method for the molecular diagnosis of ChAc. PMID:21598378

  15. Single-Copy Nuclear Genes Place Haustorial Hydnoraceae within Piperales and Reveal a Cretaceous Origin of Multiple Parasitic Angiosperm Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Julia; Salomo, Karsten; Der, Joshua P.; Wafula, Eric K.; Bolin, Jay F.; Maass, Erika; Frenzke, Lena; Samain, Marie-Stéphanie; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Extreme haustorial parasites have long captured the interest of naturalists and scientists with their greatly reduced and highly specialized morphology. Along with the reduction or loss of photosynthesis, the plastid genome often decays as photosynthetic genes are released from selective constraint. This makes it challenging to use traditional plastid genes for parasitic plant phylogenetics, and has driven the search for alternative phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary markers. Thus, evolutionary studies, such as molecular clock-based age estimates, are not yet available for all parasitic lineages. In the present study, we extracted 14 nuclear single copy genes (nSCG) from Illumina transcriptome data from one of the “strangest plants in the world”, Hydnora visseri (Hydnoraceae). A ∼15,000 character molecular dataset, based on all three genomic compartments, shows the utility of nSCG for reconstructing phylogenetic relationships in parasitic lineages. A relaxed molecular clock approach with the same multi-locus dataset, revealed an ancient age of ∼91 MYA for Hydnoraceae. We then estimated the stem ages of all independently originated parasitic angiosperm lineages using a published dataset, which also revealed a Cretaceous origin for Balanophoraceae, Cynomoriaceae and Apodanthaceae. With the exception of Santalales, older parasite lineages tend to be more specialized with respect to trophic level and have lower species diversity. We thus propose the “temporal specialization hypothesis” (TSH) implementing multiple independent specialization processes over time during parasitic angiosperm evolution. PMID:24265760

  16. Increased gene copy number of the vesicle SNARE VAMP7 disrupts human male urogenital development through altered estrogen action

    PubMed Central

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Han, Shuo; Louet, Jean-Francois; Zhang, Bin; Romero, Karina; Addai, Josephine; Sahin, Aysegul; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lamb, Dolores J

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle transport is intimately connected with key nuclear functions and transcriptional regulation. Here, children born with congenital genitourinary tract masculinization disorders were analyzed by array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization, which revealed the presence of de novo copy number gains on Xq28 encompassing the VAMP7 gene encoding a vesicle-trafficking protein. Humanized VAMP7 BAC transgenic mice displayed cryptorchidism, urethral defects, and hypospadias. Mutant mice exhibited reduced penile length, focal spermatogenic anomalies, diminished sperm motility, and subfertility. VAMP7 colocalized with estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) in the presence of ligand. Elevated levels of VAMP7 markedly intensified ESR1 transcriptional activity by increasing ESR1 protein cellular content upon ligand stimulation and up-regulated the expression of estrogen-responsive genes including ATF3, CYR61, and CTGF, all of which are implicated in human hypospadias. Hence, increased gene dosage of the SNARE protein, VAMP7, enhances estrogen receptor action in male genitourinary tissues, affects the virilization of the reproductive tract, and results in genitourinary birth defects in humans. PMID:24880616

  17. Risk stratification of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia patients based on gene expression, mutations and copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Mirji, Gauri; Bhat, Jaydeep; Kode, Jyoti; Banavali, Shripad; Sengar, Manju; Khadke, Prashant; Sait, Osama; Chiplunkar, Shubhada

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression, copy number variations (CNV), mutations and survival were studied to delineate TCRγδ+T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a distinct subgroup from TCRαβ+T-ALL. Gene Ontology analysis showed that differential regulation of genes involved in pathways for leukemogenesis, apoptosis, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and antigen processing/presentation may offer a survival benefit to TCRγδ+T-ALL patients. Genes involved in disease biology and having equal expression in both the subgroups, were further analysed for mutations and CNV using droplet digital PCR. TCRγδ+T-ALL patients exhibited differential level of mutations for NOTCH1 and IKZF3; however BRAF mutations were detected at equal levels in both the subgroups. Although TCRγδ+T-ALL patients with these mutations demonstrated improved disease-free survival (DFS) as compared TCRαβ+T-ALL patients, it was not statistically significant. Patients with homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/CDKN2B showed poor DFS in each subgroup. TCRγδ+T-ALL patients with wild type/heterozygous deletion of CDKN2A/CDKN2B possess significantly better DFS over TCRαβ+T-ALL patients (p=0.017 and 0.045, respectively). Thus, the present study has for the first time demonstrated TCRγδ clonality and CDKN2A/CDKN2B CNV together as potential prognostic markers in management of T-ALL. Further understanding the functional significance of differentially regulated genes in T-ALL patients would aid in designing risk based treatment strategies in subset specific manner. PMID:27070758

  18. Copy number variations in the NF1 gene region are infrequent and do not predispose to recurrent type-1 deletions.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Katharina; Kluwe, Lan; Cooper, David N; Brems, Hilde; De Raedt, Thomas; Legius, Eric; Mautner, Viktor-Felix; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2008-05-01

    Gross deletions of the NF1 gene at 17q11.2 belong to the group of 'genomic disorders' characterized by local sequence architecture that predisposes to genomic rearrangements. Segmental duplications within regions associated with genomic disorders are prone to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which mediates gross rearrangements. Copy number variants (CNVs) without obvious phenotypic consequences also occur frequently in regions of genomic disorders. In the NF1 gene region, putative CNVs have been reportedly detected by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). These variants include duplications and deletions within the NF1 gene itself (CNV1) and a duplication that encompasses the SUZ12 gene, the distal NF1-REPc repeat and the RHOT1 gene (CNV2). To explore the possibility that these CNVs could have played a role in promoting deletion mutagenesis in type-1 deletions (the most common type of gross NF1 deletion), non-affected transmitting parents of patients with type-1 NF1 deletions were investigated by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). However, neither CNV1 nor CNV2 were detected. This would appear to exclude these variants as frequent mediators of NAHR giving rise to type-1 deletions. Using MLPA, we were also unable to confirm CNV1 in healthy controls as previously reported. We conclude that locus-specific techniques should be used to independently confirm putative CNVs, originally detected by array CGH, to avoid false-positive results. In one patient with an atypical deletion, a duplication in the region of CNV2 was noted. This duplication could have occurred concomitantly with the deletion as part of a complex rearrangement or may alternatively have preceded the deletion. PMID:18212816

  19. A NOTCH1 gene copy number gain is a prognostic indicator of worse survival and a predictive biomarker to a Notch1 targeting antibody in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arcaroli, John J.; Tai, W.M.; McWilliams, Ryan; Bagby, Stacey; Blatchford, Patrick J.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Purkey, Alicia; Quackenbush, Kevin S.; Song, Eun-Kee; Pitts, Todd M.; Gao, Dexiang; Lieu, Chris; McManus, Martine; Tan, Aik Choon; Zheng, Xianxian; Zhang, Qin; Ozeck, Mark; Olson, Peter; Jiang, Zhi-Qin; Kopetz, Scott; Jimeno, Antonio; Keysar, Stephen; Eckhardt, Gail; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Notch1 receptor has been shown to facilitate the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) and has been identified as an independent predictor of disease progression and worse survival. Although mutations in the NOTCH1 receptor have not been described in CRC, we have previously discovered a NOTCH1 gene copy number gain in a portion of CRC tumor samples. Here, we demonstrated that a NOTCH1 gene copy number gain is significantly associated with worse survival and a high percentage of gene duplication in a cohort of patients with advanced CRC. In our CRC patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) model, tumors harboring a NOTCH1 gain exhibited significant elevation of the Notch1 receptor, JAG1 ligand and cleaved Notch1 activity. In addition, a significant association was identified between a gain in NOTCH1 gene copy number and sensitivity to a Notch1-targeting antibody. These findings suggest that patients with metastatic CRC that harbor a gain in NOTCH1 gene copy number have worse survival and that targeting this patient population with a Notch1 antibody may yield improved outcomes. PMID:26152787

  20. A NOTCH1 gene copy number gain is a prognostic indicator of worse survival and a predictive biomarker to a Notch1 targeting antibody in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arcaroli, John J; Tai, W M; McWilliams, Ryan; Bagby, Stacey; Blatchford, Patrick J; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Purkey, Alicia; Quackenbush, Kevin S; Song, Eun-Kee; Pitts, Todd M; Gao, Dexiang; Lieu, Chris; McManus, Martine; Tan, Aik Choon; Zheng, Xianxian; Zhang, Qin; Ozeck, Mark; Olson, Peter; Jiang, Zhi-Qin; Kopetz, Scott; Jimeno, Antonio; Keysar, Stephen; Eckhardt, Gail; Messersmith, Wells A

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Notch1 receptor has been shown to facilitate the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) and has been identified as an independent predictor of disease progression and worse survival. Although mutations in the NOTCH1 receptor have not been described in CRC, we have previously discovered a NOTCH1 gene copy number gain in a portion of CRC tumor samples. Here, we demonstrated that a NOTCH1 gene copy number gain is significantly associated with worse survival and a high percentage of gene duplication in a cohort of patients with advanced CRC. In our CRC patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) model, tumors harboring a NOTCH1 gain exhibited significant elevation of the Notch1 receptor, JAG1 ligand and cleaved Notch1 activity. In addition, a significant association was identified between a gain in NOTCH1 gene copy number and sensitivity to a Notch1-targeting antibody. These findings suggest that patients with metastatic CRC that harbor a gain in NOTCH1 gene copy number have worse survival and that targeting this patient population with a Notch1 antibody may yield improved outcomes. PMID:26152787

  1. Genes, Exomes, Genomes, Copy Number: What is Their Future in Pediatric Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Matthew G.; Jüppner, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The influence of genetic variation on the pathogenesis of pediatric kidney disease extends from the earliest stages of kidney development in utero to conditions arising throughout a child’s life. Major advances in genomic technologies, computing power, and bioinformatics analyses have resulted in the accelerated discovery of novel genes and risk loci associated with both inherited and sporadic forms of pediatric kidney disease. In this review, we will highlight studies over the past year that used diverse approaches to discover novel genes and loci associated with pediatric renal disease. We will also discuss reports that investigate the association with disease of previously discovered risk variants in novel populations, different phenotypes, or in model systems. Finally, we will discuss how we believe genomic inquiry will evolve in pediatric kidney disease in the future. Together, these studies illustrate that almost every child with a kidney condition could participate in some form of genomic investigation.

  2. Molecular characterization of a second copy of holocarboxylase synthetase gene (hcs2) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Denis, Laurence; Grossemy, Marie; Douce, Roland; Alban, Claude

    2002-03-22

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS), catalyzing the covalent attachment of biotin, is ubiquitously represented in living organisms. Indeed, the biotinylation is a post-translational modification that allows the transformation of inactive biotin-dependent carboxylases, which are committed in fundamental metabolisms such as fatty acid synthesis, into their active holo form. Among other living organisms, plants present a peculiarly complex situation. In pea, HCS activity has been detected in three subcellular compartments and the systematic sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome revealed the occurrence of two hcs genes (hcs1 and hcs2). Hcs1 gene product had been previously characterized at molecular and biochemical levels. Here, by PCR amplification, we cloned an hcs2 cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana (Ws ecotype) mRNA. We observed the occurrence of multiple cDNA forms which resulted from the alternative splicing of hcs2 mRNA. Furthermore, we evidenced a nucleotide polymorphism at the hcs2 gene within the Ws ecotype, which affected splicing of hcs2 mRNA. This contrasted sharply with the situation at hcs1 locus. However, this polymorphism had no apparent effect on total HCS activity in planta. Finally, hcs2 mRNAs were found 4-fold less abundant than hcs1 mRNA and the most abundant hcs2 mRNA spliced variant should code for a truncated protein. We discuss the possible role of such a multiplicity of putative HCS proteins in plants and discuss the involvement of each of hcs genes in the correct realization of biotinylation. PMID:11784724

  3. Identification of Multiple Forms of RNA Transcripts Associated with Human-Specific Retrotransposed Gene Copies.

    PubMed

    Mori, Saori; Hayashi, Masaaki; Inagaki, Shun; Oshima, Takuji; Tateishi, Ken; Fujii, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains thousands of retrocopies, mostly as processed pseudogenes, which were recently shown to be prevalently transcribed. In particular, those specifically acquired in the human lineage are able to modulate gene expression in a manner that contributed to the evolution of human-specific traits. Therefore, knowledge of the human-specific retrocopies that are transcribed or their full-length transcript structure contributes to better understand human genome evolution. In this study, we identified 16 human-specific retrocopies that harbor 5' CpG islands by in silico analysis and showed that 12 were transcribed in normal tissues and cancer cell lines with a variety of expression patterns, including cancer-specific expression. Determination of the structure of the transcripts associated with the retrocopies revealed that none were transcribed from their 5' CpG islands, but rather, from inside the 3' UTR and the nearby 5' flanking region of the retrocopies as well as the promoter of neighboring genes. The multiple forms of the transcripts, such as chimeric and individual transcripts in both the sense and antisense orientation, might have introduced novel post-transcriptional regulation into the genome during human evolution. These results shed light on the potential role of human-specific retrocopies in the evolution of gene regulation and genomic disorders. PMID:27389689

  4. Identification of Multiple Forms of RNA Transcripts Associated with Human-Specific Retrotransposed Gene Copies

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Saori; Hayashi, Masaaki; Inagaki, Shun; Oshima, Takuji; Tateishi, Ken; Fujii, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains thousands of retrocopies, mostly as processed pseudogenes, which were recently shown to be prevalently transcribed. In particular, those specifically acquired in the human lineage are able to modulate gene expression in a manner that contributed to the evolution of human-specific traits. Therefore, knowledge of the human-specific retrocopies that are transcribed or their full-length transcript structure contributes to better understand human genome evolution. In this study, we identified 16 human-specific retrocopies that harbor 5′ CpG islands by in silico analysis and showed that 12 were transcribed in normal tissues and cancer cell lines with a variety of expression patterns, including cancer-specific expression. Determination of the structure of the transcripts associated with the retrocopies revealed that none were transcribed from their 5′ CpG islands, but rather, from inside the 3′ UTR and the nearby 5′ flanking region of the retrocopies as well as the promoter of neighboring genes. The multiple forms of the transcripts, such as chimeric and individual transcripts in both the sense and antisense orientation, might have introduced novel post-transcriptional regulation into the genome during human evolution. These results shed light on the potential role of human-specific retrocopies in the evolution of gene regulation and genomic disorders. PMID:27389689

  5. Effect of dietary glutamine on growth performance, non-specific immunity, expression of cytokine genes, phosphorylation of target of rapamycin (TOR), and anti-oxidative system in spleen and head kidney of Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai; Zhang, Jing-Xiu; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary glutamine on the growth performance, cytokines, target of rapamycin (TOR), and antioxidant-related parameters in the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed the basal (control) and glutamine-supplemented (12.0 g glutamine kg(-1) diet) diets for 6 weeks. Results indicated that the dietary glutamine supplementation improved the growth performance, spleen protein content, serum complement 3 content, and lysozyme activity in fish. In the spleen, glutamine down-regulated the expression of the interleukin 1 and interleukin 10 genes, and increased the level of phosphorylation of TOR protein. In the head kidney, glutamine down-regulated the tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 10 gene expressions, phosphorylated and total TOR protein levels, while up-regulated the transforming growth factor β2 gene expression. Furthermore, the protein carbonyl content was decreased in the spleen of fish fed glutamine-supplemented diet; conversely, the anti-hydroxyl radical capacity and glutathione content in the spleen were increased by glutamine. However, diet supplemented with glutamine did not affect the lipid peroxidation, anti-superoxide anion capacity, and antioxidant enzyme activities in the spleen. Moreover, all of these antioxidant parameters in the head kidney were not affected by glutamine. Results from the present experiment showed the importance of dietary supplementation of glutamine in benefaction of the growth performance and several components of the innate immune system, and the deferential role in cytokine gene expression, TOR kinase activity, and antioxidant status between the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp. PMID:25675866

  6. Increased MET and HGF gene copy numbers are associated with trastuzumab failure in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minuti, G; Cappuzzo, F; Duchnowska, R; Jassem, J; Fabi, A; O'Brien, T; Mendoza, A D; Landi, L; Biernat, W; Czartoryska-Arłukowicz, B; Jankowski, T; Zuziak, D; Zok, J; Szostakiewicz, B; Foszczyńska-Kłoda, M; Tempińska-Szałach, A; Rossi, E; Varella-Garcia, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: To investigate whether copy number gain of MET or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) affect trastuzumab sensitivity in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Methods: We analysed 130 HER2-positive MBC treated with trastuzumab-based therapy. MET and HGF gene copy numbers (GCN) were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in primary breast cancer samples. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was applied to find the best cutoff point for both MET and HGF GCN. Results: MET FISH-positive cases (N=36, mean ⩾3.72) had a significantly higher trastuzumab failure rate (44.4% vs 16.0% P=0.001) and a significantly shorter time to progression (5.7 vs 9.9 months; HR 1.74; P=0.006) than MET FISH-negative cases (N=94, mean <3.72). Hepatocyte growth factor GCN was evaluated in 84 cases (64.6%). Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified 33 HGF FISH-positive patients (mean HGF GCN ⩾3.01). HGF FISH-positive status was significantly associated with higher risk of failure (30.3% vs 7.8% P=0.007) as compared with HGF FISH-negative cases (N=51, mean <3.01). MET and HGF FISH-positive status was highly correlated (P<0.001) and combination of both biomarkers did not increase predictive value of either considered separately. Conclusion: High GCNs of MET and HGF associate with an increased risk of trastuzumab-based therapy failure in HER2-positive MBC. PMID:22850551

  7. A recombinant rabies virus encoding two copies of the glycoprotein gene confers protection in dogs against a virulent challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Yang, Youtian; Sun, Zhaojin; Chen, Jing; Ai, Jun; Dun, Can; Fu, Zhen F; Niu, Xuefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal antigen responsible for the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) and is the major modality of protective immunity in animals. A recombinant RABV HEP-Flury strain was generated by reverse genetics to encode two copies of the G-gene (referred to as HEP-dG). The biological properties of HEP-dG were compared to those of the parental virus (HEP-Flury strain). The HEP-dG recombinant virus grew 100 times more efficiently in BHK-21 cell than the parental virus, yet the virulence of the dG recombinant virus in suckling mice was lower than the parental virus. The HEP-dG virus can improve the expression of G-gene mRNA and the G protein and produce more offspring viruses in cells. The amount of G protein revealed a positive relationship with immunogenicity in mice and dogs. The inactivated HEP-dG recombinant virus induced higher levels of VNA and conferred better protection against virulent RABV in mice and dogs than the inactivated parental virus and a commercial vaccine. The protective antibody persisted for at least 12 months. These data demonstrate that the HEP-dG is stable, induces a strong VNA response and confers protective immunity more effectively than the RABV HEP-Flury strain. HEP-dG could be a potential candidate in the development of novel inactivated rabies vaccines. PMID:24498294

  8. Cloning of the promoter of NDE1, a gene implicated in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders through copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, N J

    2016-06-01

    Copy number variation at 16p13.11 has been associated with a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, with duplication of this region being more common in individuals with schizophrenia. A prominent candidate gene within this locus is NDE1 (Nuclear Distribution Element 1) given its known importance for neurodevelopment, previous associations with mental illness and its well characterized interaction with the Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) protein. In order to accurately model the effect of NDE1 duplication, it is important to first gain an understanding of how the gene is expressed. The complex promoter system of NDE1, which produces three distinct transcripts, each encoding for the same full-length NDE1 protein (also known as NudE), was therefore cloned and tested in human cell lines. The promoter for the longest of these three NDE1 transcripts was found to be responsible for the majority of expression in these systems, with its extended 5' untranslated region (UTR) having a limiting effect on its expression. These results thus highlight and clone the promoter elements required to generate systems in which the NDE1 protein is exogenously expressed under its native promoter, providing a biologically relevant model of 16p13.11 duplication in major mental illness. PMID:26975893

  9. Ultra dense array CGH and discovery of micro-copy number alterations and gene fusions in cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    Przybytkowski, Ewa; Aguilar-Mahecha, Adrianan; Nabavi, Sheida; Tonellato, Peter J.; Basik, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of molecular alterations specific to cancer facilitates the discovery of predictive and prognostic biomarkers important to targeted therapeutics. Alterations critical to cancer therapeutics include copy number alterations (CNAs) such as gene amplifications and deletions as well as genomic rearrangements resulting in gene fusions. There are two genome-wide technologies used to detect CNAs: next generation sequencing (NGS) and dense microarray based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Array CGH is a mature robust technology of lower cost and more accessible than NGS. This chapter describes the protocol steps and analysis required to obtain reliable aCGH results from clinical samples. Technical options and various necessary compromises related to the nature of clinical material are considered and the consequences of these choices for data analysis and interpretation are discussed. The chapter includes brief description of the data analysis, even though analysis is often performed by bioinformaticians. Today’s cancer research requires collaboration of clinicians, molecular biologist and mathematicians. Acquaintance with the basic principles related to the extraction of the data from arrays, its normalization and the algorithms available for analysis provides a baseline for mutual understanding and communication. PMID:23412781

  10. Single tube genotyping of CYP2A6 gene deletion based on copy number determination by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-hui; Xun, Xiao-jie; Pang, Cong; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hui; Chen, Chao; Dai, Peng-gao

    2014-12-01

    The CYP2A6*4 allele, characterized as the whole deletion of this gene, is closely associated with nicotine dependence, cancer susceptibility, and drug responsiveness. It has long been a significant challenge for pharmacogenetics scientists to develop a reliable method to detect this molecular variant due to its high homology with its homologous genes CYP2A6 and CYP2A3 in the clinical setting. Here, we introduce a quantitative real-time PCR assay that specifically amplifies CYP2A6 by designing a specific set of primers and the probe, which effectively prevent the amplification of the CYP2A7 and CYP2A13 alleles. CYP2A6 gene copy numbers were normalized to albumin (ALB) which was co-amplified simultaneously in a single-tube duplex reaction and at a setting as the internal reference gene. The established assay was validated with a selection of previously genotyped DNA samples, which harbored none, one or two CYP2A6 gene copies. The results were in complete concordance with previously published data and no overlap between the three groups was observed. Further analysis of a cohort of 120 samples revealed high specificity and sensitivity of this assay as demonstrated by the agreement of determined gene copy numbers in all of the cases. In conclusion, this novel assay allows reliable and sensitive detection of the CYP2A6 gene deletion, which will be useful for pharmacogenetics studies and routine clinical settings. PMID:25446842

  11. Targeted array comparative genomic hybridization--a new diagnostic tool for the detection of large copy number variations in nemaline myopathy-causing genes.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, K; Laari, L; Lehtokari, V-L; Lunkka-Hytönen, M; Angelini, C; Petty, R; Hackman, P; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Pelin, K

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a heterogeneous group of congenital myopathies. Mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB) are the main cause of recessively inherited NM. NEB is one of the most largest genes in human. To date, 68 NEB mutations, mainly small deletions or point mutations have been published. The only large mutation characterized is the 2.5 kb deletion of exon 55 in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. To investigate any copy number variations in this enormous gene, we designed a novel custom comparative genomic hybridization microarray, NM-CGH, targeted towards the seven known genes causative for NM. During the validation of the NM-CGH array we identified two novel deletions in two different families. The first is the largest deletion characterized in NEB to date, (∼53 kb) encompassing 24 exons. The second deletion (1 kb) covers two exons. In both families, the copy number change was the second mutation to be characterized and shown to have been inherited from one of the healthy carrier parents. In addition to these novel mutations, copy number variation was identified in four samples in three families in the triplicate region of NEB. We conclude that this method appears promising for the detection of copy number variations in NEB. PMID:23010307

  12. High copy number variation of cancer-related microRNA genes and frequent amplification of DICER1 and DROSHA in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Czubak, Karol; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Klonowska, Katarzyna; Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Kowalewski, Janusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that miRNAs may be a class of genetic elements that can either drive or suppress oncogenesis. In this study we analyzed the somatic copy number variation of 14 miRNA genes frequently found to be either over- or underexpressed in lung cancer, as well as two miRNA biogenesis genes, DICER1 and DROSHA, in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our analysis showed that most analyzed miRNA genes undergo substantial copy number alteration in lung cancer. The most frequently amplified miRNA genes include the following: miR-30d, miR-21, miR-17 and miR-155. We also showed that both DICER1 and DROSHA are frequently amplified in NSCLC. The copy number variation of DICER1 and DROSHA correlates well with their expression and survival of NSCLC and other cancer patients. The increased expression of DROSHA and DICER1 decreases and increases the survival, respectively. In conclusion, our results show that copy number variation may be an important mechanism of upregulation/downregulation of miRNAs in cancer and suggest an oncogenic role for DROSHA. PMID:26156018

  13. High copy number variation of cancer-related microRNA genes and frequent amplification of DICER1 and DROSHA in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Czubak, Karol; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Klonowska, Katarzyna; Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Kowalewski, Janusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2015-09-15

    A growing body of evidence indicates that miRNAs may be a class of genetic elements that can either drive or suppress oncogenesis. In this study we analyzed the somatic copy number variation of 14 miRNA genes frequently found to be either over- or underexpressed in lung cancer, as well as two miRNA biogenesis genes, DICER1 and DROSHA, in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our analysis showed that most analyzed miRNA genes undergo substantial copy number alteration in lung cancer. The most frequently amplified miRNA genes include the following: miR-30d, miR-21, miR-17 and miR-155. We also showed that both DICER1 and DROSHA are frequently amplified in NSCLC. The copy number variation of DICER1 and DROSHA correlates well with their expression and survival of NSCLC and other cancer patients. The increased expression of DROSHA and DICER1 decreases and increases the survival, respectively. In conclusion, our results show that copy number variation may be an important mechanism of upregulation/downregulation of miRNAs in cancer and suggest an oncogenic role for DROSHA. PMID:26156018

  14. Idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Belloli, Elizabeth A; Beckford, Rosemarie; Hadley, Ryan; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is an interstitial lung disease that may be idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disease, toxins or numerous other causes. Idiopathic NSIP is a rare diagnosis and requires exclusion of these other possible causes. Patients typically present in mid-adulthood with dyspnoea, cough and often constitutional symptoms including fever and fatigue. The disease has a female predominance, and more than 50% of patients have never smoked. Physical exam features mild hypoxaemia and inspiratory rales. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate restriction and a low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include predominantly lower lobe subpleural reticular changes, traction bronchiectasis and ground-glass opacities; honeycombing is rarely seen. An evaluation of the underlying pathology is necessary for a firm diagnosis. Histologically, alveolar and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation and fibrosis are seen in a temporally uniform pattern with preserved underlying alveolar architecture. NSIP must be differentiated from other parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A thorough exposure history and assessment for underlying connective tissue diseases are highly important, as positive findings in these categories would likely denote a case of secondary NSIP. A multi-disciplinary discussion that includes pulmonologist(s), radiologist(s) and pathologist(s) assists in reaching a consensus diagnosis and improves diagnostic accuracy. Treatment of idiopathic NSIP, although not well proven, is generally instituted in the form of immunosuppression. Prognosis is favourable compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although the diagnosis still carries an attributable mortality. Herein we will summarize the clinical characteristics and management of idiopathic NSIP. PMID:26564810

  15. Copy Number Variation of TLR-7 Gene and its Association with the Development of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Female Patients from Yucatan Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Guillermo Valencia; Cruz, Darig Cámara; González Herrera, Lizbeth J; Pérez Mendoza, Gerardo J; Adrián Amaro, Guadalupe I; Nakazawa Ueji, Yumi E; Angulo Ramírez, Angélica V

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against self-antigens, which occurs most often in women between 15 and 40 years of age. The innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of SLE through TLR- 7. Genetic factors such as copy number variation (CNV) of target genes may contribute to disease development, but this possible risk has not yet been studied in SLE patients from Yucatan, Mexico. The CNV of TLR-7 gene was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan probes in 80 SLE women and 150 control subjects. The results showed that 10% of SLE patients exhibited more than two copies of TLR-7 gene, whereas no mRNA overexpression was detected. These data suggested that increased CNV of the TLR-7 gene in Yucatan SLE women can be a risk factor for this disease. PMID:25512712

  16. Dissection of the fusarium I2 gene cluster in tomato reveals six homologs and one active gene copy.

    PubMed Central

    Simons, G; Groenendijk, J; Wijbrandi, J; Reijans, M; Groenen, J; Diergaarde, P; Van der Lee, T; Bleeker, M; Onstenk, J; de Both, M; Haring, M; Mes, J; Cornelissen, B; Zabeau, M; Vos, P

    1998-01-01

    The I2 locus in tomato confers resistance to race 2 of the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f sp lycopersici. The selective restriction fragment amplification (AFLP) positional cloning strategy was used to identify I2 in the tomato genome. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone covering approximately 750 kb encompassing the I2 locus was isolated, and the AFLP technique was used to derive tightly linked AFLP markers from this YAC clone. Genetic complementation analysis in transgenic R1 plants using a set of overlapping cosmids covering the I2 locus revealed three cosmids giving full resistance to F. o. lycopersici race 2. These cosmids shared a 7-kb DNA fragment containing an open reading frame encoding a protein with similarity to the nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeat family of resistance genes. At the I2 locus, we identified six additional homologs that included the recently identified I2C-1 and I2C-2 genes. However, cosmids containing the I2C-1 or I2C-2 gene could not confer resistance to plants, indicating that these members are not the functional resistance genes. Alignments between the various members of the I2 gene family revealed two significant variable regions within the leucine-rich repeat region. They consisted of deletions or duplications of one or more leucine-rich repeats. We propose that one or both of these leucine-rich repeats are involved in Fusarium wilt resistance with I2 specificity. PMID:9634592

  17. Opposite Regulation of the Copy Number and the Expression of Plastid and Mitochondrial Genes by Light and Acetate in the Green Flagellate Chlorogonium.

    PubMed Central

    Kroymann, J.; Schneider, W.; Zetsche, K.

    1995-01-01

    In the unicellular green alga Chlorogonium elongatum (Chlamydomonadaceae), the formation of both the photosynthetic and the respiratory apparatus is under the control of light and acetate. Autotrophically cultured cells possess a 3-fold higher copy number of the plastid genes rbcL and psbA than cells cultivated in the dark with acetate (heterotrophic cells). Under mixotrophic conditions (light and acetate), both genes are present at an intermediate level. This pattern is repeated at the mRNA level. The amounts of rbcL and psbA mRNAs are approximately 3-fold higher in autotrophic cells than in heterotrophic ones and are intermediate in mixotrophic cells. As expected, the copy number of the nuclear-encoded rbcS gene is constant irrespective of the applied culture conditions. RbcS mRNA, however, is 7-fold more frequent in autotrophic than in heterotrophic cells. Again, mixotrophic cells show an intermediate level. In contrast to genes encoding plastid proteins, the copy number and transcript level of the mitochondrial cob gene are approximately 5-fold higher in heterotrophic cells than in autotrophic ones. As before, mixotrophic cells take an intermediate position. Therefore, light and acetate control the genes involved in the formation of either the photosynthetic or the respiratory apparatus in a coordinated but opposite manner. PMID:12228568

  18. A molecular phylogeny of Zamia L.: a multi-gene approach using single-copy nuclear genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Zamia, with approximately 70 species, is the most morphologically and ecologically diverse genus in the Cycadales. We present the preliminary results of a multi-gene phylogenetic analysis of the genus Zamia including over 90% of the currently accepted species in the genus. A concatenated ...

  19. Characterisation of full-length mitochondrial copies and partial nuclear copies (numts) of the cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genes of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Hammondia heydorni and Hammondia triffittae (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae).

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Genomic DNA was extracted from three oocyst isolates of Hammondia triffittae from foxes and two oocyst isolates of Hammondia heydorni from dogs, as well as from cell culture-derived tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii (RH strain) and Neospora caninum (NC-Liverpool strain), and examined by PCR with primers targeting the cytochrome b (cytb) and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) genes in order to characterise both genes and, if possible, the remainder of the mitochondrial genome of these species. Several primers were designed and used in various combinations to amplify regions within and between both genes and to determine gene order. When certain forward primers targeting cytb were used in combination with certain reverse primers targeting cox1, two overlapping sequences were obtained for each species and isolate studied, which showed that a full-length copy of cytb was followed 36-37 bp downstream by a full-length copy of cox1, and these sequences are believed to represent the true mitochondrial genes and the gene order in the mitochondrial genome of the four species examined. The cytb of T. gondii, N. caninum, H. heydorni and H. triffittae comprised a total of 1,080 bp (359 amino acids) and used ATG and TAA as start and stop codon, respectively. The cox1 of these species also used TAA as stop codon, whereas the most likely start codon was ATG, resulting in a gene comprising 1,491 bp (496 amino acids). Pair-wise sequence comparisons based on either cytb or cox1 clearly separated T. gondii from N. caninum and both of these species from the two Hammondia species, whereas the latter two species were 100 % identical at cytb and shared 99.3 % identity at cox1. Phylogenetic analyses using the maximum-likelihood method confirmed these findings and placed T. gondii in a clade separate from the three other species and all four Toxoplasmatinae in a sister clade to Eimeria spp. PCR with other primers and/or primer pairs than those used to obtain the full

  20. Elevated PDGFRB gene copy number gain is prognostic for improved survival outcomes in resected malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Anne S; Harun, Nusrat; Fujimoto, Junya; Devito, Vikki; Lee, J Jack; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Mehran, Reza; Rice, David; Moran, Cesar; Hong, Waun Ki; Shen, Li; Suraokar, Milind; Wistuba, Ignacio

    2014-06-01

    PDGF/PDGFR pathway has been implicated in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) carcinogenesis, and evidence suggests autocrine mechanisms of proliferation. We sought to evaluate the incidence of PDGFRB gene copy number gain (CNG) by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PDGFR pathway protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and correlate it to patient clinical outcome. Eighty-eight archived tumor blocks from resected MPM with full clinical information were used to perform IHC biomarkers (PDGFRα, PDGFRβ, p-PDGFRβ) and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of PDGFRB gene CNG. Spearman rank correlation, Wilcoxon rank-sum test, Kruskal-Wallis test, BLiP plots, and Kaplan-Meier method were used to analyze the biomarkers and correlation to clinical outcome. Several correlations between the IHC biomarkers were seen; however, none correlated to clinically relevant patient demographics or histology. In the CNG analysis, PDGFRB gene CNG in >10% of tumor cells had lower cytoplasmic p-PDGFRβ (P=.029), while PDGFRB gene CNG in >40% of tumor cells had a higher cytoplasmic PDGFRβ (P=.04). PDGFRB gene CNG status did not associate with patient demographics or tumor characteristics. PDGFR pathway IHC biomarkers did not associate with survival outcomes. However, patients with PDGFRB CNG >40% of tumor cells had improved relapse-free survival (HR 0.25 [95% CI 0.09-0.72], P=.0096) and improved overall survival (HR 0.32 [95% CI 0.11-0.89], P=.029). PDGFRB CNG >40% of MPM tumor cells is a potential prognostic biomarker for surgery and may identify a unique population of mesothelioma patients. Future validation of this biomarker in prospective trials is needed. From a retrospective review of archived tissue specimens from patients with resected malignant pleural mesothelioma tumors, we show that patients with PDGFRB CNG >40% of tumor cells had improved relapse-free survival (HR 0.25 [95% CI 0.09-0.72], P=.0096) and improved overall survival (HR 0.32 [95% CI 0

  1. Identification and qualification of 500 nuclear, single-copy, orthologous genes for the Eupulmonata (Gastropoda) using transcriptome sequencing and exon capture.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Luisa C; Köhler, Frank; Murray, Kevin D; O'Hara, Tim; Moussalli, Adnan

    2016-09-01

    The qualification of orthology is a significant challenge when developing large, multiloci phylogenetic data sets from assembled transcripts. Transcriptome assemblies have various attributes, such as fragmentation, frameshifts and mis-indexing, which pose problems to automated methods of orthology assessment. Here, we identify a set of orthologous single-copy genes from transcriptome assemblies for the land snails and slugs (Eupulmonata) using a thorough approach to orthology determination involving manual alignment curation, gene tree assessment and sequencing from genomic DNA. We qualified the orthology of 500 nuclear, protein-coding genes from the transcriptome assemblies of 21 eupulmonate species to produce the most complete phylogenetic data matrix for a major molluscan lineage to date, both in terms of taxon and character completeness. Exon capture targeting 490 of the 500 genes (those with at least one exon >120 bp) from 22 species of Australian Camaenidae successfully captured sequences of 2825 exons (representing all targeted genes), with only a 3.7% reduction in the data matrix due to the presence of putative paralogs or pseudogenes. The automated pipeline Agalma retrieved the majority of the manually qualified 500 single-copy gene set and identified a further 375 putative single-copy genes, although it failed to account for fragmented transcripts resulting in lower data matrix completeness when considering the original 500 genes. This could potentially explain the minor inconsistencies we observed in the supported topologies for the 21 eupulmonate species between the manually curated and 'Agalma-equivalent' data set (sharing 458 genes). Overall, our study confirms the utility of the 500 gene set to resolve phylogenetic relationships at a range of evolutionary depths and highlights the importance of addressing fragmentation at the homolog alignment stage for probe design. PMID:27289081

  2. Whole Genome Pathway Analysis Identifies an Association of Cadmium Response Gene Loss with Copy Number Variation in Mutant p53 Bearing Uterine Endometrial Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stupack, Dwayne G

    2016-01-01

    Background Massive chromosomal aberrations are a signature of advanced cancer, although the factors promoting the pervasive incidence of these copy number alterations (CNAs) are poorly understood. Gatekeeper mutations, such as p53, contribute to aneuploidy, yet p53 mutant tumors do not always display CNAs. Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma (UCEC) offers a unique system to begin to evaluate why some cancers acquire high CNAs while others evolve another route to oncogenesis, since about half of p53 mutant UCEC tumors have a relatively flat CNA landscape and half have 20–90% of their genome altered in copy number. Methods We extracted copy number information from 68 UCEC genomes mutant in p53 by the GISTIC2 algorithm. GO term pathway analysis, via GOrilla, was used to identify suppressed pathways. Genes within these pathways were mapped for focal or wide distribution. Deletion hotspots were evaluated for temporal incidence. Results Multiple pathways contributed to the development of pervasive CNAs, including developmental, metabolic, immunological, cell adhesion and cadmium response pathways. Surprisingly, cadmium response pathway genes are predicted as the earliest loss events within these tumors: in particular, the metallothionein genes involved in heavy metal sequestration. Loss of cadmium response genes were associated with copy number changes and poorer prognosis, contrasting with 'copy number flat' tumors which instead exhibited substantive mutation. Conclusion Metallothioneins are lost early in the development of high CNA endometrial cancer, providing a potential mechanism and biological rationale for increased incidence of endometrial cancer with cadmium exposure. Developmental and metabolic pathways are altered later in tumor progression. PMID:27391266

  3. Phylogeny of the genus Chrysanthemum L.: evidence from single-copy nuclear gene and chloroplast DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping-Li; Wan, Qian; Guo, Yan-Ping; Yang, Ji; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemum L. (Asteraceae-Anthemideae) is a genus with rapid speciation. It comprises about 40 species, most of which are distributed in East Asia. Many of these are narrowly distributed and habitat-specific. Considerable variations in morphology and ploidy are found in this genus. Some species have been the subjects of many studies, but the relationships between Chrysanthemum and its allies and the phylogeny of this genus remain poorly understood. In the present study, 32 species/varieties from Chrysanthemum and 11 from the allied genera were analyzed using DNA sequences of the single-copy nuclear CDS gene and seven cpDNA loci (psbA-trnH, trnC-ycf6, ycf6-psbM, trnY-rpoB, rpS4-trnT, trnL-F, and rpL16). The cpDNA and nuclear CDS gene trees both suggest that 1) Chrysanthemum is not a monophyletic taxon, and the affinity between Chrysanthemum and Ajania is so close that these two genera should be incorporated taxonomically; 2) Phaeostigma is more closely related to the Chrysanthemum+Ajania than other generic allies. According to pollen morphology and to the present cpDNA and CDS data, Ajania purpurea is a member of Phaeostigma. Species differentiation in Chrysanthemum appears to be correlated with geographic and environmental conditions. The Chinese Chrysanthemum species can be divided into two groups, the C. zawadskii group and the C. indicum group. The former is distributed in northern China and the latter in southern China. Many polyploid species, such as C. argyrophyllum, may have originated from allopolyploidization involving divergent progenitors. Considering all the evidence from present and previous studies, we conclude that geographic and ecological factors as well as hybridization and polyploidy play important roles in the divergence and speciation of the genus Chrysanthemum. PMID:23133665

  4. Phylogeny of the Genus Chrysanthemum L.: Evidence from Single-Copy Nuclear Gene and Chloroplast DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping-Li; Wan, Qian; Guo, Yan-Ping; Yang, Ji; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemum L. (Asteraceae-Anthemideae) is a genus with rapid speciation. It comprises about 40 species, most of which are distributed in East Asia. Many of these are narrowly distributed and habitat-specific. Considerable variations in morphology and ploidy are found in this genus. Some species have been the subjects of many studies, but the relationships between Chrysanthemum and its allies and the phylogeny of this genus remain poorly understood. In the present study, 32 species/varieties from Chrysanthemum and 11 from the allied genera were analyzed using DNA sequences of the single-copy nuclear CDS gene and seven cpDNA loci (psbA-trnH, trnC-ycf6, ycf6-psbM, trnY-rpoB, rpS4-trnT, trnL-F, and rpL16). The cpDNA and nuclear CDS gene trees both suggest that 1) Chrysanthemum is not a monophyletic taxon, and the affinity between Chrysanthemum and Ajania is so close that these two genera should be incorporated taxonomically; 2) Phaeostigma is more closely related to the Chrysanthemum+Ajania than other generic allies. According to pollen morphology and to the present cpDNA and CDS data, Ajania purpurea is a member of Phaeostigma. Species differentiation in Chrysanthemum appears to be correlated with geographic and environmental conditions. The Chinese Chrysanthemum species can be divided into two groups, the C. zawadskii group and the C. indicum group. The former is distributed in northern China and the latter in southern China. Many polyploid species, such as C. argyrophyllum, may have originated from allopolyploidization involving divergent progenitors. Considering all the evidence from present and previous studies, we conclude that geographic and ecological factors as well as hybridization and polyploidy play important roles in the divergence and speciation of the genus Chrysanthemum. PMID:23133665

  5. Long-Read Single Molecule Sequencing to Resolve Tandem Gene Copies: The Mst77Y Region on the Drosophila melanogaster Y Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Krsticevic, Flavia J; Schrago, Carlos G; Carvalho, A Bernardo

    2015-06-01

    The autosomal gene Mst77F of Drosophila melanogaster is essential for male fertility. In 2010, Krsticevic et al. (Genetics 184: 295-307) found 18 Y-linked copies of Mst77F ("Mst77Y"), which collectively account for 20% of the functional Mst77F-like mRNA. The Mst77Y genes were severely misassembled in the then-available genome assembly and were identified by cloning and sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The genomic structure of the Mst77Y region and the possible existence of additional copies remained unknown. The recent publication of two long-read assemblies of D. melanogaster prompted us to reinvestigate this challenging region of the Y chromosome. We found that the Illumina Synthetic Long Reads assembly failed in the Mst77Y region, most likely because of its tandem duplication structure. The PacBio MHAP assembly of the Mst77Y region seems to be very accurate, as revealed by comparisons with the previously found Mst77Y genes, a bacterial artificial chromosome sequence, and Illumina reads of the same strain. We found that the Mst77Y region spans 96 kb and originated from a 3.4-kb transposition from chromosome 3L to the Y chromosome, followed by tandem duplications inside the Y chromosome and invasion of transposable elements, which account for 48% of its length. Twelve of the 18 Mst77Y genes found in 2010 were confirmed in the PacBio assembly, the remaining six being polymerase chain reaction-induced artifacts. There are several identical copies of some Mst77Y genes, coincidentally bringing the total copy number to 18. Besides providing a detailed picture of the Mst77Y region, our results highlight the utility of PacBio technology in assembling difficult genomic regions such as tandemly repeated genes. PMID:25858959

  6. Long-Read Single Molecule Sequencing to Resolve Tandem Gene Copies: The Mst77Y Region on the Drosophila melanogaster Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Krsticevic, Flavia J.; Schrago, Carlos G.; Carvalho, A. Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The autosomal gene Mst77F of Drosophila melanogaster is essential for male fertility. In 2010, Krsticevic et al. (Genetics 184: 295−307) found 18 Y-linked copies of Mst77F (“Mst77Y”), which collectively account for 20% of the functional Mst77F-like mRNA. The Mst77Y genes were severely misassembled in the then-available genome assembly and were identified by cloning and sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The genomic structure of the Mst77Y region and the possible existence of additional copies remained unknown. The recent publication of two long-read assemblies of D. melanogaster prompted us to reinvestigate this challenging region of the Y chromosome. We found that the Illumina Synthetic Long Reads assembly failed in the Mst77Y region, most likely because of its tandem duplication structure. The PacBio MHAP assembly of the Mst77Y region seems to be very accurate, as revealed by comparisons with the previously found Mst77Y genes, a bacterial artificial chromosome sequence, and Illumina reads of the same strain. We found that the Mst77Y region spans 96 kb and originated from a 3.4-kb transposition from chromosome 3L to the Y chromosome, followed by tandem duplications inside the Y chromosome and invasion of transposable elements, which account for 48% of its length. Twelve of the 18 Mst77Y genes found in 2010 were confirmed in the PacBio assembly, the remaining six being polymerase chain reaction−induced artifacts. There are several identical copies of some Mst77Y genes, coincidentally bringing the total copy number to 18. Besides providing a detailed picture of the Mst77Y region, our results highlight the utility of PacBio technology in assembling difficult genomic regions such as tandemly repeated genes. PMID:25858959

  7. Two Functional Copies of the DGCR6 Gene Are Present on Human Chromosome 22q11 Due to a Duplication of an Ancestral Locus

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Lisa; Stankiewicz, Pavel; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Pandita, Raj K.; Shaffer, Lisa; Lupski, James; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2001-01-01

    The DGCR6 (DiGeorge critical region) gene encodes a putative protein with sequence similarity to gonadal (gdl), a Drosophila melanogaster gene of unknown function. We mapped the DGCR6 gene to chromosome 22q11 within a low copy repeat, termed sc11.1a, and identified a second copy of the gene, DGCR6L, within the duplicate locus, termed sc11.1b. Both sc11.1 repeats are deleted in most persons with velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), and they map immediately adjacent and internal to the low copy repeats, termed LCR22, that mediate the deletions associated with VCFS/DGS. We sequenced genomic clones from both loci and determined that the putative initiator methionine is located further upstream than originally described, but in a position similar to the mouse and chicken orthologs. DGCR6L encodes a highly homologous, functional copy of DGCR6, with some base changes rendering amino acid differences. Expression studies of the two genes indicate that both genes are widely expressed in fetal and adult tissues. Evolutionary studies using FISH mapping in several different species of ape combined with sequence analysis of DGCR6 in a number of different primate species indicate that the duplication is at least 12 million years old and may date back to before the divergence of Catarrhines from Platyrrhines, 35 mya. These data suggest that there has been selective evolutionary pressure toward the functional maintenance of both paralogs. Interestingly, a full-length HERV-K provirus integrated into the sc11.1a locus after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans. PMID:11157784

  8. Insight into the Molecular Evolution of Non-Specific Lipid Transfer Proteins via Comparative Analysis Between Rice and Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Wei; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Karuppanapandian, Thirupathi; Liu, Aihua; Kim, Wook; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was conducted on 9 kDa non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes from nine plant species. Each of the five classified types in angiosperms exhibited eight conserved cysteine patterns. The most abundant nsLTP genes fell into the type I category, which was particularly enriched in a grass-specific lineage of clade I.1. Six pairs of tandem copies of nsLTP genes on the distal region of rice chromosomes 11 and 12 were well-preserved under concerted evolution, which was not observed in sorghum. The transgenic promoter–reporter assay revealed that both rice and sorghum nsLTP genes of type I displayed a relatively conserved expression feature in the epidermis of growing tissue, supporting its functional roles in cutin synthesis or defence against phytopathogens. For type I, the frequent expression in the stigma and seed are indicative of functional involvement in pistil–pollen interactions and seed development. By way of contrast, several type V genes were observed, mainly in the vascular bundle of the rosette as well as the young shoots, which might be related with vascular tissue differentiation or defence signalling. Compared with sorghum, the highly redundant tissue-specific expression pattern among members of rice nsLTP genes in clade I.1 suggests that concerted evolution via gene conversion favours the preservation of crucial expression motifs via the homogenization of proximal promoter sequences under high selection constraints. However, extensive regulatory subfunctionalization might also have occurred under relative low selection constraints, resulting in functional divergence at the expression level. PMID:22368182

  9. Chopping Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses ways an editor can cut out words to help the reader understand quickly. Discusses dead wood, redundancy, redundancy in thought, smothered verbs, false precision, editing and academia, and making copy smoother. (SR)

  10. Copy number variation in the region harboring SOX9 gene in dogs with testicular/ovotesticular disorder of sex development (78,XX; SRY-negative).

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Szczerbal, Izabela; Pausch, Hubert; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Nizanski, Wojciech; Payan-Carreira, Rita; Fries, Ruedi; Kozlowski, Piotr; Switonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Although the disorder of sex development in dogs with female karyotype (XX DSD) is quite common, its molecular basis is still unclear. Among mutations underlying XX DSD in mammals are duplication of a long sequence upstream of the SOX9 gene (RevSex) and duplication of the SOX9 gene (also observed in dogs). We performed a comparative analysis of 16 XX DSD and 30 control female dogs, using FISH and MLPA approaches. Our study was focused on a region harboring SOX9 and a region orthologous to the human RevSex (CanRevSex), which was located by in silico analysis downstream of SOX9. Two highly polymorphic copy number variable regions (CNVRs): CNVR1 upstream of SOX9 and CNVR2 encompassing CanRevSex were identified. Although none of the detected copy number variants were specific to either affected or control animals, we observed that the average number of copies in CNVR1 was higher in XX DSD. No copy variation of SOX9 was observed. Our extensive studies have excluded duplication of SOX9 as the common cause of XX DSD in analyzed samples. However, it remains possible that the causative mutation is hidden in highly polymorphic CNVR1. PMID:26423656