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Sample records for non-steady state multi-phase

  1. Measurement of non-steady-state free fatty acid turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.D.; Heiling, V.; Miles, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of non-steady-state equations for measuring changes in free fatty acid rate of appearance (Ra) is unknown. In the present study, endogenous lipolysis (traced with ({sup 14}C)-linoleate) was pharmacologically suppressed in six conscious mongrel dogs. A computer-responsive infusion pump was then used to deliver an intravenous oleic acid emulsion in both constant and linear gradient infusion modes. Both non-steady-state equations with various effective volumes of distribution (V) and steady-state equations were used to measure oleate Ra (({sup 14}C)oleate). Endogenous lipolysis did not change during the experiment. When oleate Ra increased in a linear gradient fashion, only non-steady-state equations with a large (150 ml/kg) V resulted in erroneous values (9% overestimate, P less than 0.05). In contrast, when oleate Ra decreased in a similar fashion, steady-state and standard non-steady-state equations (V = plasma volume = 50 ml/kg) overestimated total oleate Ra (18 and 7%, P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05, respectively). Overall, non-steady-state equations with an effective V of 90 ml/kg (1.8 x plasma volume) allowed the most accurate estimates of oleate Ra.

  2. Non-steady state tidal heating of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, D.; Hussmann, H.; Sohl, F.; Kurita, K.

    2014-06-01

    Enceladus is one of the most geologically active bodies in the Solar System. The satellite's diverse surface suggests that Enceladus was subject to past episodic heating. It is largely probable that the activity of Enceladus is not in a steady state. In order to analyze the non-steady state heating, thermal and orbital coupled calculation is needed because they affect each other. We perform the coupled calculation assuming conductive ice layer and low melting temperature. Although the heating state of Enceladus strongly depends on the rheological parameters used, episodic heating is induced if the Q-value of Saturn is less than 23,000 and Enceladus' core radius is less than 161 km. The duration of one episodic heating cycle is around one hundred million years. The cyclic change in ice thickness is consistent with the origin of a partial ocean which is suggested by plume emissions and diverse surface states of Enceladus. Although the obtained tidal heating rate is smaller than the observed heat flux of a few giga watt, other heating mechanisms involving e.g., liquid water and/or specific chemical reactions may be initiated by the formation of a partial or global subsurface ocean.

  3. Gain in the non-steady-state free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Min, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The non-steady-state self-consistent equation in the linear regime of the free-electron laser (FEL) and the low gain formulas in the non-steady-state FEL are derived in this paper. It is found that due to slippage the nonuniformity effect in the longitudinal distribution of the electron beam density is dominant in the influence of the electron pulse length on the gain of the FEL. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Dynamic evolution of initial instability during non-steady-state growth.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhibo; Zheng, Wenjian; Wei, Yanhong; Song, Kuijing

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic evolution of initial instability is investigated by an analytic model obtained by modifying the theory of Warren and Langer [Phys. Rev. E 47, 2702 (1993)] and the quantitative phase-field model in directional solidification under transient conditions for realistic parameters of a dilute alloy. The evolutions of tip velocity and concentration in the liquid side of the interface predicted by the analytic model agree very well with that from the phase-field simulation in the linear growth stage of the non-steady-state growth, indicating that the model could be used as a convenient method to study the initial instability during non-steady-state growth. The influences of non-steady-state conditions which include the increasing rate of pulling speed and temperature gradient at the onset of initial instability are investigated, and we find that, the initial instability seems to depend strongly on the non-steady-state conditions and the non-steady-state history, and thus, it should be primarily considered in the study of the transient growth. PMID:25019790

  5. Dynamic evolution of initial instability during non-steady-state growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhibo; Zheng, Wenjian; Wei, Yanhong; Song, Kuijing

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic evolution of initial instability is investigated by an analytic model obtained by modifying the theory of Warren and Langer [Phys. Rev. E 47, 2702 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevE.47.2702] and the quantitative phase-field model in directional solidification under transient conditions for realistic parameters of a dilute alloy. The evolutions of tip velocity and concentration in the liquid side of the interface predicted by the analytic model agree very well with that from the phase-field simulation in the linear growth stage of the non-steady-state growth, indicating that the model could be used as a convenient method to study the initial instability during non-steady-state growth. The influences of non-steady-state conditions which include the increasing rate of pulling speed and temperature gradient at the onset of initial instability are investigated, and we find that, the initial instability seems to depend strongly on the non-steady-state conditions and the non-steady-state history, and thus, it should be primarily considered in the study of the transient growth.

  6. Quantifying biases in non-steady state chamber measurements of soil-atmosphere gas exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limitations of non-steady state (NSS) chamber methods for determining soil-to-atmosphere trace gas exchange rates have been recognized for several decades. Of these limitations, the so-called “chamber effect” is one of the most challenging to overcome. The chamber effect can be defined as the inhere...

  7. TRACE GAS EMISSIONS IN CHAMBERS: A NON-STEADY-STATE DIFFUSION MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-steady-state (NSS) chambers are widely used to measure trace gas emissions from the Earth’s surface in the atmosphere. Unfortunately, traditional interpretations of time-dependent chamber concentrations often systematically underestimate predeployment exchange rates because they do not accuratel...

  8. Theoretical comparison of advanced methods for calculating nitrous oxide fluxes using non-steady state chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several flux-calculation (FC) schemes are available for determining soil-to-atmosphere emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and other trace gases using data from non-steady-state flux chambers. Recently developed methods claim to provide more accuracy in estimating the true pre-deployment flux (f0) comp...

  9. Mechanism of Non-Steady State Dissolution of Goethite in the Presence of Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all known organisms. Bacteria, fungi, and graminaceous plants are capable of exuding siderophores as part of an iron acquisition strategy. The production of these strong iron chelating ligands is induced by iron limited conditions. Grasses under iron stress, for example, exude phytosiderophores into the rhizosphere in a special diurnal rhythm (Roemheld and Marschner 1986). A few hours after sunrise the exudation starts, culminates around noon and is shut down again until about 4 hours after noon. The phytosiderophores diffuse into the rhizosphere (Marschner et al. 1986) and are passively back transported to the plants by advective flow induced by high transpiration around noon. Despite a fairly short residence time of the phytosiderophores in the rhizosphere, it is a very effective strategy for iron acquisition. To investigate the effect of such pulse inputs of siderophores on iron acquisition, we studied the dissolution mechanism of goethite (alpha-FeOOH), a mineral phase common in soils, under non-steady state conditions. In consideration of the chemical complexity of the rhizosphere, we also investigated the effect of other organic ligands commonly found in the rhizosphere (e. g. oxalate) on the dissolution kinetics. The dissolution experiments were conducted in batch reactors with a constant goethite solids concentration of 2.5 g/l, an ionic strength of 0.01 M, a pH of 6 and 100 microM oxalate. To induce non-steady state conditions, 3 mM phytosiderophores were added to a batch after the goethite-oxalate suspension reacted for a certain time period. Before the siderophore was added to the goethite-oxalate suspension, no dissolution of iron was observed. But, with the addition of the siderophore, a high rate was observed for the iron mobilization under these non-steady state conditions that subsequently was followed by a slow steady state dissolution rate. The results of these non-steady state experiments are very

  10. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths. PMID:25335512

  11. A series RCL circuit theory for analyzing non-steady-state water uptake of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths. PMID:25335512

  12. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths.

  13. Steady- and non-steady-state carbonate-silicate controls on atmospheric CO2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundquist, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    Two contrasting hypotheses have recently been proposed for the past long-term relation between atmospheric CO2 and the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle. One approach (Berner, 1990) suggests that CO2 levels have varied in a manner that has maintained chemical weathering and carbonate sedimentation at a steady state with respect to tectonically controlled decarbonation reactions. A second approach (Raymo et al., 1988), applied specificlly to the late Cenozoic, suggests a decrease in CO2 caused by an uplift-induced increase in chemical weathering, without regard to the rate of decarbonation. According to the steady-state (first) hypothesis, increased weathering and carbonate sedimentation are generally associated with increasing atmospheric CO2, whereas the uplift (second) hypothesis implies decreasing CO2 under the same conditions. An ocean-atmosphere-sediment model has been used to assess the response of atmospheric CO2 and carbonate sedimentation to global perturbations in chemical weathering and decarbonation reactions. Although this assessment is theoretical and cannot yet be related to the geologic record, the model simulations compare steady-state and non-steady-state carbonate-silicate cycle response. The e-fold response time of the 'CO2-weathering' feedback mechanism is between 300 and 400 ka. The response of carbonate sedimentation is much more rapid. These response times provide a measure of the strength of steady-state assumptions, and imply that certain systematic relations are sustained throughout steady-state and non-steady-state scenarios for the carbonate-silicate cycle. The simulations suggest that feedbacks can maintain the system near a steady state, but that non-steady-state effects may contribute to long-term trends. The steady-state and uplift hypotheses are not necessarily incompatible over time scales of a few million years. ?? 1991.

  14. Non-steady state effects in diurnal 180 discrimination by Picea sitchensis branches in the field.

    PubMed

    Seibt, U; Wingate, L; Berry, J A; Lloyd, J

    2006-05-01

    We report diurnal variations in 18O discrimination (18 delta) during photosynthesis (18 delta A) and respiration (18 delta R) of Picea sitchensis branches measured in branch chambers in the field. These observations were compared with predicted 18 delta (18 delta pred) based on concurrent measurements of branch gas exchange to evaluate steady state and non-steady state (NSS) models of foliage water 18O enrichment for predicting the impact of this ecosystem on the Delta 18O of atmospheric CO2. The non-steady state approach substantially improved the agreement between 18 delta pred and observed 18 delta (18 delta obs) compared with the assumption of isotopic steady state (ISS) for the Delta 18O signature of foliage water. In addition, we found direct observational evidence for NSS effects: extremely high apparent 18 delta values at dusk, dawn and during nocturnal respiration. Our experiments also show the importance of bidirectional foliage gas exchange at night (isotopic equilibration in addition to the net flux). Taken together, neglecting these effects leads to an underestimation of daily net canopy isofluxes from this forest by up to 30%. We expect NSS effects to be most pronounced in species with high specific leaf water content such as conifers and when stomata are open at night or when there is high relative humidity, and we suggest modifications to ecosystem and global models of delta 18O of CO2. PMID:17087476

  15. FORMULATION OF NON-STEADY-STATE DUST FORMATION PROCESS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, Takaya; Kozasa, Takashi

    2013-10-10

    The non-steady-state formation of small clusters and the growth of grains accompanied by chemical reactions are formulated under the consideration that the collision of key gas species (key molecule) controls the kinetics of dust formation process. The formula allows us to evaluate the size distribution and condensation efficiency of dust formed in astrophysical environments. We apply the formulation to the formation of C and MgSiO{sub 3} grains in the ejecta of supernovae, as an example, to investigate how the non-steady effect influences the formation process, condensation efficiency f{sub con,{sub ∞}}, and average radius a{sub ave,{sub ∞}} of newly formed grains in comparison with the results calculated with the steady-state nucleation rate. We show that the steady-state nucleation rate is a good approximation if the collision timescale of key molecule τ{sub coll} is much smaller than the timescale τ{sub sat} with which the supersaturation ratio increases; otherwise the effect of the non-steady state becomes remarkable, leading to a lower f{sub con,{sub ∞}} and a larger a{sub ave,{sub ∞}}. Examining the results of calculations, we reveal that the steady-state nucleation rate is applicable if the cooling gas satisfies Λ ≡ τ{sub sat}/τ{sub coll} ∼> 30 during the formation of dust, and find that f{sub con,{sub ∞}} and a{sub ave,{sub ∞}} are uniquely determined by Λ{sub on} at the onset time t{sub on} of dust formation. The approximation formulae for f{sub con,{sub ∞}} and a{sub ave,{sub ∞}} as a function of Λ{sub on} could be useful in estimating the mass and typical size of newly formed grains from observed or model-predicted physical properties not only in supernova ejecta but also in mass-loss winds from evolved stars.

  16. Non-steady state modelling of wheel-rail contact problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiral, A.; Alonso, A.; Baeza, L.; Giménez, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Among all the algorithms to solve the wheel-rail contact problem, Kalker's FastSim has become the most useful computation tool since it combines a low computational cost and enough precision for most of the typical railway dynamics problems. However, some types of dynamic problems require the use of a non-steady state analysis. Alonso and Giménez developed a non-stationary method based on FastSim, which provides both, sufficiently accurate results and a low computational cost. However, it presents some limitations; the method is developed for one time-dependent creepage and its accuracy for varying normal forces has not been checked. This article presents the required changes in order to deal with both problems and compares its results with those given by Kalker's Variational Method for rolling contact.

  17. Early non-steady-state population pharmacokinetics of oral cyclosporine in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Hyunjeong; Han, Seunghoon; Yim, Dong-Seok; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Soo-Youn; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Dae Joong; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Oh, Ha Young; Huh, Wooseong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the change in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of cyclosporine in the non-steady-state period in the first week after renal transplantation; the factors influencing this change, including genetic variability; and the time point concentration that correlated best with drug exposure. Data were obtained from 69 patients, and PK studies were conducted on postoperative days (PODs) 2, 3, and 7. Samples were taken pre-dose and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after drug administration. MDR1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were genotyped. A population PK analysis and correlational analysis between the concentration at each time point and the area under the time–concentration curve were performed. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption was chosen. The rate and extent of drug absorption showed a significant increase on POD3, followed by a slight decrease on POD7. Until POD3, 8 hours post-dose was the single time point concentration that correlated best with drug exposure and 3 hours was the best time point on POD7. In both analyses, the MDR1 genotype showed potential as a factor influencing PK change. We conclude that oral administration of cyclosporine and dose adjustment based on a single concentration measurement might result in unexpected drug exposure during this early posttransplantation period. PMID:25422583

  18. Open-circuit gas exchange analysis in the non-steady-state.

    PubMed

    Hughson, R L; Kowalchuk, J M; Prime, W M; Green, H J

    1980-03-01

    The serial measurement of oxygen uptake (VO2) of four subjects was calculated during the transition from rest to constant-load cycle ergometer work using an open-circuit gas exchange analysis system. In calculating VO2, the mixed expired gas concentrations were matched with the ventilatory volume by various delay factors. A delay factor equivalent to the passing of 20 L of expired ventilation through the mixing chamber yielded results which were most similar to the VO2 obtained by a computerized breath-by-breath analysis. Previous checks of the response of the system to changes in calibrating gas mixtures had indicated that it was necessary to pass approximately 20-25 L of gas through the system before a plateau response was observed. This volume remained relatively constant, independent of flow rate. It is proposed that an understanding of the response characteristics of an open circuit system will enable the accurate calculation of VO2 over short time intervals in the non-steady-state. PMID:7389042

  19. Physical model for non-steady-state dissolution of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Patel, M V; Fox, J L; Higuchi, W I

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a rigorous theoretical understanding of the dissolution behavior of dental enamel over the entire time-course of demineralization and to simulate by computer an erosion-type caries lesion according to the physical "hydroxyapatite model". The appropriate diffusion equations which account for simultaneous diffusion and equilibrium of all species in enamel pores, boundary layer, and bulk solution, and which also take into consideration surface reaction kinetics, were employed to allow for calculation of the micro-environmental solution concentration and changes in the mineral density as a function of time and distance within the enamel. This comprehensive physical model for non-steady-state enamel dissolution also explicitly takes into account changes in the diffusivity and the dissolution rate constant as a function of mineral density. Demineralization experiments were conducted in 0.1 mol/L sink acetate buffer (pH = 4.50, mu = 0.50), with ground bovine dental enamel blocks of known surface area mounted (with beeswax) in a rotating disk apparatus. Mineral density profiles were quantified by means of contact x-ray microradiography. The physical model was used to predict mineral density profiles for given demineralization treatments. The experimental profiles agreed quite well with the predicted profiles, when the effective diffusivity of the enamel was assumed to be a function of porosity and when changes in surface area of the crystallites were taken into consideration. PMID:3476613

  20. Sampling Soil CO2 for Isotopic Flux Partitioning: Non Steady State Effects and Methodological Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, H. S. K.; Robinson, D.; Midwood, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of δ13C of soil CO2 are used to partition the surface flux into autotrophic and heterotrophic components. Models predict that the δ13CO2 of the soil efflux is perturbed by non-steady state (NSS) diffusive conditions. These could be large enough to render δ13CO2 unsuitable for accurate flux partitioning. Field studies sometimes find correlations between efflux δ13CO2 and flux or temperature, or that efflux δ13CO2 is not correlated as expected with biological drivers. We tested whether NSS effects in semi-natural soil were comparable with those predicted. We compared chamber designs and their sensitivity to changes in efflux δ13CO2. In a natural soil mesocosm, we controlled temperature to generate NSS conditions of CO2 production. We measured the δ13C of soil CO2 using in situ probes to sample the subsurface, and dynamic and forced-diffusion chambers to sample the surface efflux. Over eight hours we raised soil temperature by 4.5 OC to increase microbial respiration. Subsurface CO2 concentration doubled, surface efflux became 13C-depleted by 1 ‰ and subsurface CO2 became 13C-enriched by around 2 ‰. Opposite changes occurred when temperature was lowered and CO2 production was decreasing. Different chamber designs had inherent biases but all detected similar changes in efflux δ13CO2, which were comparable to those predicted. Measurements using dynamic chambers were more 13C-enriched than expected, probably due to advection of CO2 into the chamber. In the mesocosm soil, δ13CO2 of both efflux and subsurface was determined by physical processes of CO2 production and diffusion. Steady state conditions are unlikely to prevail in the field, so spot measurements of δ13CO2 and assumptions based on the theoretical 4.4 ‰ diffusive fractionation will not be accurate for estimating source δ13CO2. Continuous measurements could be integrated over a period suitable to reduce the influence of transient NSS conditions. It will be difficult to disentangle

  1. Non-steady State Soil Organic Carbon Storage in Undisturbed Watersheds Due to Diffusive Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, K.; Amundson, R.; Heimsath, A. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2003-12-01

    Most soil C models assume that plant C inputs are matched by C loss through heterotrophic respiration. While these models are applicable for level terrain, on soil mantled uplands in hilly to mountainous regions, persistent soil mass transport represents a potentially large, but unstudied, flux of soil C. In this research we quantify the soil C erosional fluxes and non-steady state soil C storage within two undisturbed grass-covered hillslopes in Coastal California: Tennessee Valley (TV) (coastal Marin County) and Black Diamond (BD) (interior Contra Costa County). At both sites, previous geomorphic studies have quantified both the sediment transport processes (TV= gopher driven sediment transport; BD= abiotic soil shrink/swell) and their rates. Hillslope patterns of soil C storage were examined in relation to slope position with a hillslope sediment transport model. The average C erosion rates from convex slopes are between 1.4 and 2.7 g C m -2 yr-1 at TV and approximately 8 g C m-2 yr-1 at BD. The C erosional flux is locally as high as 14% of above ground net primary productivity (NPP) at TV and 8% at BD. The convex slopes are net C sinks because NPP likely exceeds respiration by a value equaling the size of C erosion. Eroded soils ultimately accumulate in depositional settings which have residence times on the order of 13kyrs at TV and 5.3kyrs at BD. At TV hollow, 15-24 kg C m-2 of soil C has accumulated at a long-term rate of 1.6-1.9 g C m-2 yr-1 . The present rates of C accumulation were calculated to be 0.3 g C m-2 yr-1 at TV and 0.6 g C m-2 yr-1 at BD. During the hollow infilling, the depositional C inputs have been greater than C accumulation rates, meaning that much of the incoming eroded C is ultimately oxidized to CO2. At both sites, a fraction of the eroded C is exported from the watershed (C of 0.1-0.5 g C m-2 yr-1 at TV and 2 g C m-2 yr-1 at BD). When all hillslope components are integrated, these watersheds are continuous atmospheric C sinks at rates

  2. The Mathematical Theory of Diffusion and Reaction in Enzymes Immoblized Artificial Membrane. The Theory of the Non-Steady State.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Malinidevi; Muthuramalingam, Rasi; Lakshmanan, Rajendran

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, mathematical model pertaining to the decomposition of enzyme-substrate complex in an artificial membrane is discussed. Here the transport through liquid membrane phases is considered. The model involves the system of non-linear reaction diffusion equations. The non-linear terms in this model are related to Michaelis-Menten reaction scheme. Approximate analytical expressions for the concentrations of substrate and product have been derived by solving the system of non-linear reaction diffusion equations using new approach of homotopy perturbation method for all values of Michaelis-Menten constant, diffusion coefficient, and rate constant. Approximate flux expression for substrate and product for non-steady-state conditions are also reported. A comparison of the analytical approximation and numerical simulation is also presented. The results obtained in this work are valid for the entire solution domain. PMID:26265446

  3. Solvent selection for cyclohexane-cyclohexene-benzene separation by extractive distillation using non-steady-state gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, A.; Diez, F.; Esteban, R.; Coca, J.

    1997-03-01

    The infinite-dilution activity coefficients of cyclohexane, cyclohexene, and benzene in N,N-dimethylformamide, N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, phenyl acetate, and dimethyl malonate have been determined at temperatures ranging from 40 to 80 C, by non-steady-state gas chromatography. From these data, the limiting selectivity-solvency properties for cyclohexane-benzene, cyclohexene-benzene, and cyclohexane-cyclohexene, in the presence of the aforementioned solvents, are studied, and the solvents tested are considered for the cyclohexane-cyclohexene-benzene separation by extractive distillation. According to the results, N,N-dimethylacetamide seems to be an adequate solvent for the cyclohexane-benzene and cyclohexene-benzene separations. The separation of cyclohexane-cyclohexene is the most difficult, in spite of the difference of boiling points, much higher than for cyclohexane-benzene.

  4. Non-steady-state measurement of in vivo receptor binding with positron emission tomography: Dose-response analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E. )

    1989-07-01

    We previously developed a non-steady-state technique using positron emission tomography (PET) and the radioligand 18F-spiperone (18F-SP) for the measurement of in vivo radioligand-receptor binding in brain. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the sensitivity of this method to alterations in the apparent number of available specific binding sites. Nine studies were performed on the same baboon. The animal was pretreated with varying doses of unlabeled SP (15-600 micrograms) to compete for specific binding sites. The experimental procedure included measurement of regional cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and the protein binding of 18F-SP in arterial blood. At least 3.5 hr after pretreatment, no-carrier-added 18F-SP (containing less than 3 micrograms SP) was administered intravenously. Sequential PET scans and measurements of arterial-blood radioactivity due to radioligand and its labeled metabolites continued for 3 hr. A 3-compartment model representing the in vivo behavior of radioligand was used to analyze the data. As expected, we found that an index of binding called the combined forward rate constant (which equals the product of the apparent maximum number of available specific binding sites and the association rate constant of radioligand for receptor) declined with increasing dose of unlabeled SP. Other estimated variables including the dissociation rate constant did not change. This demonstrates that our non-steady-state method for estimating radioligand-receptor binding kinetics can detect a decrease in the apparent number of available specific binding sites. This is an important step in the validation of this in vivo receptor binding assay and its subsequent application.

  5. Non-steady-state transport of superthermal electrons in the plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Nagy, Andrew F.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the time-dependent kinetic equation, which describes the transport of superthermal electrons in the splasmasphere between the two conjugate ionospheres, are presented. The model calculates the distribution function as a function of time, field-aligned distance, energy, and pitch-angle. The processes of refilling, depleting, and establishing steady-state conditions of superthermal electrons in the plasmasphere are discussed.

  6. Collisional evolution - an analytical study for the non steady-state mass distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira Martins, R.

    1999-05-01

    To study the collisional evolution of asteroidal groups one can use an analytical solution for the self-similar collision cascades. This solution is suitable to study the steady-state mass distribution of the collisional fragmentation. However, out of the steady-state conditions, this solution is not satisfactory for some values of the collisional parameters. In fact, for some values for the exponent of the mass distribution power law of an asteroidal group and its relation to the exponent of the function which describes "how rocks break" the author arrives at singular points for the equation which describes the collisional evolution. These singularities appear since some approximations are usually made in the laborious evaluation of many integrals that appear in the analytical calculations. They concern the cutoff for the smallest and the largest bodies. These singularities set some restrictions to the study of the analytical solution for the collisional equation. To overcome these singularities the author performed an algebraic computation considering the smallest and the largest bodies and he obtained the analytical expressions for the integrals that describe the collisional evolution without restriction on the parameters. However, the new distribution is more sensitive to the values of the collisional parameters. In particular the steady-state solution for the differential mass distribution has exponents slightly different from 11/6 for the usual parameters in the asteroid belt. The sensitivity of this distribution with respect to the parameters is analyzed for the usual values in the asteroidal groups. With an expression for the mass distribution without singularities, one can evaluate also its time evolution. The author arrives at an analytical expression given by a power series of terms constituted by a small parameter multiplied by the mass to an exponent, which depends on the initial power law distribution. This expression is a formal solution for the

  7. Calculator programs to deal with non-steady state, multiple dosage regimen clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ensom, R J; Nakagawa, R S

    1983-07-01

    Serum drug levels have become a useful tool in the optimization of dosage requirements for several therapeutically important drugs. In the acute care situation the interpretation of these levels is complicated by multiple dosage regimens and inadequate time to achieve steady-state serum drug levels. Mathematical equations describing first order single compartment pharmacokinetics have been compiled. An alpha-numeric programmable calculator has been programmed to accept information regarding up to seven different serial dosage regimens. The calculator is also programmed to predict concentrations at any time during a complex set of dosage regimens or peak, trough, and average concentrations given a maintenance dosage regimen. Examples are given to demonstrate the usefulness of the programs in the clinical setting. PMID:6688607

  8. Seasonal variations in ectotherm growth rates: Quantifying growth as an intermittent non steady state compensatory process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarini, Jean-Marc; Chauvaud, Laurent; Cloern, James E.; Clavier, Jacques; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Patry, Yann

    2011-04-01

    Generally, growth rates of living organisms are considered to be at steady state, varying only under environmental forcing factors. For example, these rates may be described as a function of light for plants or organic food resources for animals and these could be regulated (or not) by temperature or other conditions. But, what are the consequences for an individual's growth (and also for the population growth) if growth rate variations are themselves dynamic and not steady state? For organisms presenting phases of dormancy or long periods of stress, this is a crucial question. A dynamic perspective for quantifying short-term growth was explored using the daily growth record of the scallop Pecten maximus (L.). This species is a good biological model for ectotherm growth because the shell records growth striae daily. Independently, a generic mathematical function representing the dynamics of mean daily growth rate (MDGR) was implemented to simulate a diverse set of growth patterns. Once the function was calibrated with the striae patterns, the growth rate dynamics appeared as a forced damped oscillation during the growth period having a basic periodicity during two transitory phases (mean duration 43 days) and appearing at both growth start and growth end. This phase is most likely due to the internal dynamics of energy transfer within the organism rather than to external forcing factors. After growth restart, the transitory regime represents successive phases of over-growth and regulation. This pattern corresponds to a typical representation of compensatory growth, which from an evolutionary perspective can be interpreted as an adaptive strategy to coping with a fluctuating environment.

  9. Seasonal variations in ectotherm growth rates: Quantifying growth as an intermittent non steady state compensatory process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guarini, J.-M.; Chauvaud, Laurent; Cloern, J.E.; Clavier, J.; Coston-Guarini, J.; Patry, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Generally, growth rates of living organisms are considered to be at steady state, varying only under environmental forcing factors. For example, these rates may be described as a function of light for plants or organic food resources for animals and these could be regulated (or not) by temperature or other conditions. But, what are the consequences for an individual's growth (and also for the population growth) if growth rate variations are themselves dynamic and not steady state? For organisms presenting phases of dormancy or long periods of stress, this is a crucial question. A dynamic perspective for quantifying short-term growth was explored using the daily growth record of the scallop Pecten maximus (L.). This species is a good biological model for ectotherm growth because the shell records growth striae daily. Independently, a generic mathematical function representing the dynamics of mean daily growth rate (MDGR) was implemented to simulate a diverse set of growth patterns. Once the function was calibrated with the striae patterns, the growth rate dynamics appeared as a forced damped oscillation during the growth period having a basic periodicity during two transitory phases (mean duration 43. days) and appearing at both growth start and growth end. This phase is most likely due to the internal dynamics of energy transfer within the organism rather than to external forcing factors. After growth restart, the transitory regime represents successive phases of over-growth and regulation. This pattern corresponds to a typical representation of compensatory growth, which from an evolutionary perspective can be interpreted as an adaptive strategy to coping with a fluctuating environment. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Modelling the non steady state downward flux of particles at the PAP site in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, R.; Lampitt, R.; Riley, J.; Lemoigne, F.; Marsay, C.; Giering, S.; Martin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The biological carbon pump, mediated principally via the sinking of organic matter from the surface ocean, is a significant term in the global carbon cycle. It transfers annually 5-15 GT C yr-1 out of the photic zone, an amount comparable to the annual accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere driven by anthropogenic processes, and mediates a storage of CO2 in the ocean interior without which atmospheric CO2 would be much larger than it is today. Yet most of the material exported from the photic zone does not penetrate the deep ocean, instead it is mineralised in the twilight zone with fluxes in the thin 100m thick layer under the photic zone being extremely rapidly attenuated. The shape of this attenuation varies in time and space yet appears to be a critical determinand over atmosphere - ocean CO2 partitioning. Attempts to predict this attenuation using independent measures of heterotrophic activity have often not yielded the observed pattern of attenuation implying substantial uncertainties in one or more of the terms that enter into the comparison. In this talk we will describe direct estimates of particle flux made using drifting neutrally buoyant traps at the PAP site in 2009. We show that although we can make substantial progress towards closing the mid water C budget we still have a significant excess of carbon consumption over supply. We believe that this is due to erroneous steady state assumptions, a hypothesis we explore via simple numerical models.

  11. Modelling non-steady-state isotope enrichment of leaf water in a gas-exchange cuvette environment.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Simonin, Kevin A; Loucos, Karen E; Barbour, Margaret M

    2015-12-01

    The combined use of a gas-exchange system and laser-based isotope measurement is a tool of growing interest in plant ecophysiological studies, owing to its relevance for assessing isotopic variability in leaf water and/or transpiration under non-steady-state (NSS) conditions. However, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model, originally developed for open-field scenarios, is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment where isotope composition of water vapour (δv ) is intrinsically linked to that of transpiration (δE ). Here, we modified the F&C model to make it directly compatible with the δv -δE dynamic characteristic of a typical cuvette setting. The resultant new model suggests a role of 'net-flux' (rather than 'gross-flux' as suggested by the original F&C model)-based leaf water turnover rate in controlling the time constant (τ) for the approach to steady sate. The validity of the new model was subsequently confirmed in a cuvette experiment involving cotton leaves, for which we demonstrated close agreement between τ values predicted from the model and those measured from NSS variations in isotope enrichment of transpiration. Hence, we recommend that our new model be incorporated into future isotope studies involving a cuvette condition where the transpiration flux directly influences δv . There is an increasing popularity among plant ecophysiologists to use a gas-exchange system coupled to laser-based isotope measurement for investigating non-steady state (NSS) isotopic variability in leaf water (and/or transpiration); however, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment due to its implicit assumption of isotope composition of water vapor (δv ) being constant and independent of that of transpiration (δE ). In the present study, we modified the F&C model to make it compatible with the dynamic relationship between δv and δE as is typically associated

  12. Evaluation of CETP activity in vivo under non-steady-state conditions: influence of anacetrapib on HDL-TG flux.

    PubMed

    McLaren, David G; Previs, Stephen F; Phair, Robert D; Stout, Steven J; Xie, Dan; Chen, Ying; Salituro, Gino M; Xu, Suoyu S; Castro-Perez, Jose M; Opiteck, Gregory J; Akinsanya, Karen O; Cleary, Michele A; Dansky, Hayes M; Johns, Douglas G; Roddy, Thomas P

    2016-03-01

    Studies in lipoprotein kinetics almost exclusively rely on steady-state approaches to modeling. Herein, we have used a non-steady-state experimental design to examine the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in mediating HDL-TG flux in vivo in rhesus macaques, and therefore, we developed an alternative strategy to model the data. Two isotopomers ([(2)H11] and [(13)C18]) of oleic acid were administered (orally and intravenously, respectively) to serve as precursors for labeling TGs in apoB-containing lipoproteins. The flux of a specific TG (52:2) from these donor lipoproteins to HDL was used as the measure of CETP activity; calculations are also presented to estimate total HDL-TG flux. Based on our data, we estimate that the peak total postprandial TG flux to HDL via CETP is ∼ 13 mg · h(-1) · kg(-1) and show that this transfer was inhibited by 97% following anacetrapib treatment. Collectively, these data demonstrate that HDL TG flux can be used as a measure of CETP activity in vivo. The fact that the donor lipoproteins can be labeled in situ using well-established stable isotope tracer techniques suggests ways to measure this activity for native lipoproteins in free-living subjects under any physiological conditions. PMID:26658238

  13. Finite element and physical simulations of non-steady state metal flow and temperature distribution in twin roll strip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomi, Masanori; Mori, Kenichiro; Osakada, Kozo

    1995-12-31

    Non-steady-state metal flow and temperature distribution in twin roll strip casting are simulated by the finite element method. In the present simulation, the viscoplastic finite element method is combined with that for heat conduction to calculate the metal flow and the temperature distribution during the casting process. The solid, mushy and liquid phases are assumed to be viscoplastic materials with individual flow stresses. In the temperature analysis, the latent heat due to solidification of the molten metal is taken into account by using the temperature recovery method. Since the metal flow and temperature distribution do not often attain to steady states, they are simulated by the stepwise calculation. To examine the accuracy of the calculated results, physical simulation of plane-strain twin roll strip casting is carried out by use of paraffin wax as a model material. The calculated profiles of the solid region agree qualitatively well with the experimental ones. Twin roll strip casting processes for stainless steel are also simulated. An optimum roll speed for obtaining a strip without a liquid zone under a minimum rolling load is obtained from the results of the simulation.

  14. A Non-Steady-State Condition in Sediments at the Gashydrate Stability Boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for Gashydrate Dissociation or Just Dynamic Methane Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treude, T.; Krause, S.; Bertics, V. J.; Steinle, L.; Niemann, H.; Liebetrau, V.; Feseker, T.; Burwicz, E.; Krastel, S.; Berndt, C.

    2014-12-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009, GRL 36, doi:10.1029/2009GL039191). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014, Science 343: 284-287). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. δ18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study

  15. A non-steady-state condition in sediments at the gas hydrate stability boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for gas hydrate dissociation or just dynamic methane transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treude, Tina; Krause, Stefan; Bertics, Victoria; Steinle, Lea; Niemann, Helge; Liebetrau, Volker; Feseker, Tomas; Burwicz, Ewa; Krastel, Sebastian; Berndt, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. d18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study site (e.g. water depth, temperature profile, salinity

  16. Semiempirical multi-phase Equation of state of Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gongmu; Liu, Hai-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Equation of state (EOS) is the fundamental characteristic of matter determining its thermodynamic properties over a wide range of the phase diagram. EOS are based on a three-term Helmholtz free energy, given as a function of the specific volume V and temperature T. Semiempirical EOS use with great efficiency results obtained by theories and experimental data. Al serves as a standard material for high pressure region ,the EOS for this metal need to be especially exact and reliable. We construct the EOS for Al can describe the phase solid, liquid and gas, it agrees with IEX and DAC experiment data and the other theories data well.

  17. Semiempirical multi-phase Equation of state of Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gongmu; Liu, Haifeng; Zhao, Yanhong; Iapcm Eos Team

    2013-06-01

    Equation of state(EOS) is the fundamental characteristic of matter determining its thermodynamic properties over a wide range of the phase diagram. EOS are based on a three-term Helmholtz free energy, given as a function of the specific volume V and temperature T. Semiempirical EOS use with great efficiency results obtained by theories and experimental data. Al serves as a standard material for high pressure region, the EOS for this metal need to be especially exact and reliable. We construct the EOS for Al can describe the phase solid, liquid and gas, it agrees with IEX and DAC experiment data and the other theories data well. This research is supported by the Science and Technology Development Foundation of Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2010A0101001).

  18. The role of C and Mn at the austenite/pearlite reaction front during non-steady-state pearlite growth in a Fe-C-Mn steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Capdevila, Carlos

    2015-04-18

    The role of C and Mn during the growth of pearlite under non-steady state conditions is analyzed by comparing the phase compositions of austenite, ferrite and cementite (γ+α+θ) through the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and atom probe tomography (APT) measurements across the austenite/pearlite interface. Furthermore, a local Mn enrichment and C depletion at the austenite/pearlite interface has been measured, which causes a change in the driving force with time during divergent pearlite growth.

  19. Steady state or non-steady state? Identifying driving mechanisms of oxygen isotope signatures of leaf transpiration in functionally distinct plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    observed plant functional types. However, in accordance with our findings in the lab, species specific differences in the leaf water turn over time, significantly influenced the amount of time plants transpired at non-steady state during the day (Dubbert et al., 2013, 2014). Our results emphasize the significance of considering isotopic non-steady state of transpiration and specifically to account for the specific differences of plant species resulting from distinct physiological traits of their leaves when applying isoflux models in ecosystem studies. Dubbert, M; Cuntz, M; Piayda, A; Maguas, C; Werner, C: Partitioning evapotranspiration - Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes. J Hydrol (2013) Dubbert, M; Piayda, A; Cuntz, M; Correia, AC; Costa e Silva, F; Pereira, JS; Werner, C: Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange, Frontiers in Plant Science (2014a)

  20. A dynamic, non-steady state approach for paritioning of soil evaporation and plant water use at landscape scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caylor, K. K.; Wayland, H.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Seperate characterization of plant water use and soil evaporation are critical to understanding ecohydrological dynamics of dryland ecosystems and for efficiently managing water in dryland agriculture. The application of stable isotopes as a tracer of these individual fluxes has been constrained by obtaining robust measurements of the isotopic composition of plant water use (δT) that may be scaled up to the ecosystem level. Of particular concern is the fact that the isotopic composition of plant transpiration is usually assumed to be equal to the isotopic composition of xylem water; the so-called steady-state assumption. However, our results and the findings of other published studies strongly suggest that steady state conditions are unrealistic for vegetation in dynamic natural environments. This talk focuses on the development of a simple framework for using relationships between plant transpiration and δT to partition ET at the landscape level. Our method uses a newly-derived empirical relationship between leaf conductance and isotopic fractionation during transpiration to solve a system of equations that can provide solutions to the fraction of total ET composed of bare soil evaporation and transpiration. We apply our method to a time series of evapotranspiration fluxes and near-surface water vapor isotopic composition at a field station in central Kenya and compare the results with partitioning obtained from both steady-state approaches and non-isotopic approaches for partitioning.

  1. Investigation of a 10 MHz, non-steady state cavity for pulse energy enhancement of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Sven; Wunderlich, Stefano; Eidam, Tino; Shestaev, Evgeny; Gottschall, Thomas; Carstens, Henning; Holzberger, Simon; Pupeza, Ioachim; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Here, we present a passive 30-m long enhancement cavity that supports a steady-state enhancement of 198, which is the highest enhancement that has ever been reached in such a long cavity. Furthermore, we demonstrate the extraction of a short burst with a total energy of 53.6 μJ employing an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as a switching device. The cavity was seeded with pulses of 1.49 μJ energy at 10 MHz repetition rate. The individual output coupled pulses showed an energy enhancement of up to 8.5 while the whole burst contained the entire energy of 36 input pulses. In the last section theoretical considerations for the single pulse extraction are presented and briefly discussed.

  2. Effective gas permeability of Tight Gas Sandstones as function of capillary pressure - a non-steady state approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann-Hildenbrand, Alexandra; Dietrichs, Joyce P.; Krooss, Bernhard M.

    2014-05-01

    Single- and two-phase (gas/water) fluid transport in tight sandstones has been studied by conducting series of permeability tests on core plugs of nine tight sandstones of the Southern North Sea. Experiments comprised 1) steady state single-phase gas permeability tests, yielding absolute (Klinkenberg-corrected) permeability coefficients between 1E-17 and 1E-19 m ^ 2, 2) steady state permeability tests with water yielding absolute permeability coefficients from 1E-16 to 1E-19 m ^ 2 3) dynamic gas breakthrough (drainage and imbibition) experiments yielding effective gas permeability coefficients between 1E-17 and 1E-22 m ^ 2. Petrophysical standard methods (He-pycnometry, Archimedes method, NMR, Hg-injection porosimetry) were used to assess the porosity and characterize the pore structure of the samples. The key-results are as follows: - Permeability coefficients decrease with increasing confining pressure (10 to 30 MPa) by less than one order of magnitude. - Intrinsic permeability coefficients determined with water are always lower than Klinkenberg-corrected gas permeability coefficients. - Gas permeability coefficients after capillary breakthrough clearly increase with increasing pressure difference, confirming capillary pressure-controlled change in gas saturation. For all samples several repetitive drainage/imbibition cycles were conducted to monitor the dynamic process of water displacement and gas transport. At any given pressure difference, the effective gas permeability is higher during spontaneous imbibition than during drainage. - For all samples a maximum drainage/desaturation-curve was defined, yielding the maximum effective (apparent) gas permeability as function of the initial pressure difference. - An exponential relationship was obtained between the intrinsic (water) permeability and maximum effective gas permeability for pressure differences from 1 to 10 MPa. - A weak relationship exists between the capillary displacement pressure determined from

  3. Contributions of evaporation, isotopic non-steady state transpiration and atmospheric mixing on the delta18O of water vapour in Pacific Northwest coniferous forests.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Ta; Ehleringer, James R; Bond, Barbara J; Paw U, Kyaw Tha

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the 2H and 18O of atmospheric water vapour provide information for integrating aspects of gas exchange within forest canopies. In this study, we show that diurnal fluctuations in the oxygen isotope ratio (delta 18O) as high as 4% per hundred were observed for water vapour (delta (18)Ovp) above and within an old-growth coniferous forest in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Values of delta 18Ovp decreased in the morning, reached a minimum at midday, and recovered to early-morning values in the late afternoon, creating a nearly symmetrical diurnal pattern for two consecutive summer days. A mass balance budget was derived and assessed for the 18O of canopy water vapour over a 2-d period by considering the 18O-isoflux of canopy transpiration, soil evaporation and the air entering the canopy column. The budget was used to address two questions: (1) do delta 18O values of canopy water vapour reflect the biospheric influence, or are such signals swamped by atmospheric mixing? and (2) what mechanisms drive temporal variations of delta 18Ovp? Model calculations show that the entry of air into the canopy column resulted in an isotopically depleted 18O-isoflux in the morning of day 1, causing values of delta 18Ovp, to decrease. An isotopically enriched 18O-isoflux resulting from transpiration then offset this decreased delta 18Ovp later during the day. Contributions of 18O-isoflux from soil evaporation were relatively small on day 1 but were more significant on day 2, despite the small H2(16)O fluxes. From measurements of leaf water volume and sapflux, we determined the turnover time of leaf water in the needles of Douglas-fir trees as approximately 11 h at midday. Such an extended turnover time suggests that transpiration may not have occurred at the commonly assumed isotopic steady state. We tested a non-steady state model for predicting delta 18O of leaf water. Our model calculations show that assuming isotopic steady state increased isoflux of

  4. A First-Principles Multi-phase Equation of State of Carbon under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, A A; Benedict, X L; Young, D A; Schwegler, E; Bonev, S A

    2008-02-01

    We describe the construction of a multi-phase equation of state for carbon at extreme pressures based on ab initio electronic structure calculations of two solid phases (diamond and BC8) and the liquid. Solid-phase free energies are built from knowledge of the cold curves and phonon calculations, together with direct ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of the equation of state, which are used to extract anharmonic corrections to the phonon free energy. The liquid free energy is constructed based on results from molecular dynamics calculations and constraints determined from previously calculated melting curves, assuming a simple solid-like free energy model. The resulting equation of state is extended to extreme densities and temperatures with a Thomas Fermi-based free energy model. Comparisons to available experimental results are discussed.

  5. Voltage variation with temperature for Li/SOCl{sub 2} and Li/MnO{sub 2} cells using a non steady state method

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, M.L.; Liberto, N.C.

    1994-12-31

    Several investigations have been carried out over the past 15 years relating to the heat generating characteristics of Li/SOCl{sub 2} cells. All have used steady state methods, some involving the direct heat generation by calorimetry and others using the temperature dependence of the cell open circuit voltage. There has been a wide variation in results from these investigations with d(OCV)/dT values ranging from about {minus}0.2 to +1.026 reported in the literature. A non steady state method is being developed to examine cell voltage changes with temperature. This method was applied to Li/SOCl{sub 2} and Li/MnO{sub 2} cells at OCV and under load. Both types of cell at OCV showed negative coefficients for voltage changes with temperature during both heating and cooling cycles. Cells at CCV and cells with high microcalorimetry outputs showed positive coefficients for voltage changes with temperature. The results suggest that temperature dependence data obtained by extrapolating from a cell under load to the open circuit condition can lead to erroneous results. d(OCV)/dT for a Li/SOCl{sub 2} cell changed direction and back again, when the cell OCV passed through a value of 3.718 volts. This is believed to represent a direct observation of the thermoneutral potential.

  6. Non-steady-state measurement of in vivo radioligand binding with positron emission tomography: specificity analysis and comparison with in vitro binding

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Moerlein, S.M.; Hwang, D.R.; Todd, R.D. )

    1991-05-01

    We previously have developed a non-steady-state method for in vivo measurement of radioligand-receptor binding in brain using positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 18}F-spiperone ({sup 18}F-SP). This method has proven to be highly sensitive to the detection of decreases in the apparent number of available specific binding sites. The purposes of this investigation are to demonstrate the specificity of this PET assay and compare findings to in vitro binding assays. Three to six studies were performed in each of five male baboons. Each animal was pretreated with either ketanserin (serotonergic (S2)), eticlopride (dopaminergic (D2)), or unlabeled SP to compete with {sup 18}F-SP for specific binding sites. Sequential PET scans and arterial-blood samples were collected for 3 hr after intravenous injection of {sup 18}F-SP. Data were analyzed with a three-compartment model that considered the accumulation of radiolabeled metabolites in arterial blood. Five baboons were killed, and radioligand-receptor binding in vitro was measured by homogenate techniques. There was no detectable in vitro or in vivo specific binding of SP in cerebellum. The specific binding of SP in striatal tissue in vitro was approximately 74% to D2 sites and 26% to S2 sites, whereas ketanserin displaced all specific binding in frontal cortex. In close agreement, specific binding measured in vivo with PET revealed that 68% of apparent striatal binding could be blocked by pretreatment with eticlopride, and 34% by ketanserin.

  7. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-06-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  8. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone - A case study using uranium isotopes at Peña Blanca, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-10-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and 234U/ 238U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and α-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Peña Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced 234U/ 238U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using 234U/ 238U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  9. Multi phase field model for solid state transformation with elastic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, I.; Apel, M.

    2006-05-01

    A multi phase field model is presented for the investigation of the effect of transformation strain on the transformation kinetics, morphology and thermodynamic stability in multi phase materials. The model conserves homogeneity of stress in the diffuse interface between elastically inhomogeneous phases, in which respect it differs from previous models. The model is formulated consistently with the multi phase field model for diffusional and surface driven phase transitions [I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, B. Nestler, M. Seeßelberg, R. Prieler, G.J. Schmitz, J.L.L. Rezende, A phase field concept for multiphase systems, Physica D 94 (1996) 135-147; J. Tiaden, B. Nestler, H.J. Diepers, I. Steinbach, The multiphase-field model with an integrated concept for modeling solute diffusion, Physica D 115 (1998) 73-86; I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, A generalized field method for multiphase transformations using interface fields, Physica D 134 (1999) 385] and gives a consistent description of interfacial tension, multi phase thermodynamics and elastic stress balance in multiple junctions between an arbitrary number of grains and phases. Some aspects of the model are demonstrated with respect to numerical accuracy and the relation between transformation strain, external stress and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  10. A multi-phase ferrofluid flow model with equation of state for thermomagnetic pumping and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aursand, Eskil; Gjennestad, Magnus Aa.; Yngve Lervåg, Karl; Lund, Halvor

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional multi-phase flow model for thermomagnetically pumped ferrofluid with heat transfer is proposed. The thermodynamic model is a combination of a simplified particle model and thermodynamic equations of state for the base fluid. The magnetization model is based on statistical mechanics, taking into account non-uniform particle size distributions. An implementation of the proposed model is validated against experiments from the literature, and found to give good predictions for the thermomagnetic pumping performance. However, the results reveal a very large sensitivity to uncertainties in heat transfer coefficient predictions.

  11. Non-steady Reconnection in Global Simulations of Magnetosphere Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Sibeck, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.

    2008-01-01

    To analyze the non-steady magnetic reconnection during quasi-steady solar wind driving we employed high resolution global MHD model BATSRUS with non-MHD corrections in diffusion regions around the reconnection sites. To clarify the role of small-scale non-MHD effects on the global magnetospheric dynamic we performed simulations with different models of dissipation. We found that magnetopause surface is not in steady state even during extended periods of steady solar wind conditions. The so-called tilted reconnection lines become unstable due to formation of pressure bubbles, strong core field flux tubes, vortices, and traveling magnetic field cavities. Non-steady dayside reconnection results in formation of flux tubes with bended axis magnetically connecting magnetic field cavities generated at flanks and strong core segments formed near the subsolar region. We found that the rate of magnetic flux loading to the tail lobes is not very sensitive to the dissipation mechanism and details of the dayside reconnection. On the other hand the magnetotail reconnection rate, the speed of the reconnection site retreat and the global magnetotail dynamics strongly depend on the model of dissipation. THEMIS and Cluster observations are consistent with signatures predicted by simulations.

  12. Implementation of a complex multi-phase equation of state for cerium and its correlation with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, Frank J; Jensen, Brian J; Elkin, Vyacheslav M

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of cerium combined with its interesting material properties makes it a desirable material to examine dynamically. Characteristics such as the softening of the material before the phase change, low pressure solid-solid phase change, predicted low pressure melt boundary, and the solid-solid critical point add complexity to the construction of its equation of state. Currently, we are incorporating a feedback loop between a theoretical understanding of the material and an experimental understanding. Using a model equation of state for cerium we compare calculated wave profiles with experimental wave profiles for a number of front surface impact (cerium impacting a plated window) experiments. Using the calculated release isentrope we predict the temperature of the observed rarefaction shock. These experiments showed that the release state occurs at different magnitudes, thus allowing us to infer where dynamic {gamma} - {alpha} phase boundary is.

  13. Promoting state health department evidence-based cancer and chronic disease prevention: a multi-phase dissemination study with a cluster randomized trial component

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer and other chronic diseases reduce quality and length of life and productivity, and represent a significant financial burden to society. Evidence-based public health approaches to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases have been identified in recent decades and have the potential for high impact. Yet, barriers to implement prevention approaches persist as a result of multiple factors including lack of organizational support, limited resources, competing emerging priorities and crises, and limited skill among the public health workforce. The purpose of this study is to learn how best to promote the adoption of evidence based public health practice related to chronic disease prevention. Methods/design This paper describes the methods for a multi-phase dissemination study with a cluster randomized trial component that will evaluate the dissemination of public health knowledge about evidence-based prevention of cancer and other chronic diseases. Phase one involves development of measures of practitioner views on and organizational supports for evidence-based public health and data collection using a national online survey involving state health department chronic disease practitioners. In phase two, a cluster randomized trial design will be conducted to test receptivity and usefulness of dissemination strategies directed toward state health department chronic disease practitioners to enhance capacity and organizational support for evidence-based chronic disease prevention. Twelve state health department chronic disease units will be randomly selected and assigned to intervention or control. State health department staff and the university-based study team will jointly identify, refine, and select dissemination strategies within intervention units. Intervention (dissemination) strategies may include multi-day in-person training workshops, electronic information exchange modalities, and remote technical assistance. Evaluation methods include pre

  14. Non-steady state cracking in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Chai, L.

    1989-01-01

    A micromechanics analytical model based on the consistent shear lag theory is developed for predicting the failure modes in a fiber-reinforced unidirectional ceramic matrix composite. The model accounts for the relatively large matrix stiffness. The fiber and matrix stresses are established as functions of the applied stress, crack geometry, and most importantly, the microstructural properties of the constituents. From the predicted stress, the mode of failure is established based on the point stress criterion. The role of the microstructural properties on the failure mode and ultimate strength is assessed.

  15. Dynamics of Non-steady Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  16. DYNAMICS OF NON-STEADY SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-20

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  17. Yield and energy absorption in single and multi-phase glassy polymers subjected to multiaxial stress states: Theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Ramaswamy

    This thesis investigates the macroscopic yield behavior and microscopic energy absorption mechanisms in single and multiphase polymers. One unique aspect is the evaluation of polymers under multiaxial loading conditions. This is important because in many applications polymers are subjected to complex loading conditions and hence optimal design requires experimental evaluation and modeling of behavior under multiaxial stress states. This work has resulted in a more quantitative understanding of yield and energy absorption in the different polymers considered. Multiaxial stress states are achieved using thin-walled hollow cylinder specimens. The hollow tubes are simultaneously subjected to internal pressure and axial load, leading to biaxial stress states. Stress states ranging from uniaxial compression to equibiaxial tension are interrogated using the same specimen geometry, a procedure uncovering true material behavior. In the first part of this study, a generalized model for the yield behavior of single-phase polymers is evaluated for a polycarbonate system. The generalized model accounts not only accounts for viscoelasticity (i.e., rate and temperature dependence) but also the effect of pressure on yield behavior. The effects of physical aging on the behavior of amorphous polycarbonate are also highlighted. For rubber-modified polymers, existing models for both macroscopic yield behavior and the onset of microscopic damage (e.g., cavitation) are evaluated under multiaxial conditions (chapter 3). Serious discrepancies are found for both cases, prompting an investigation into the nature of energy absorption mechanisms in the materials. Apart from the chosen rubber-modified systems, a toughening mechanism in the form of overlapping parallel cracks is identified to be generic to a range of polymers (chapter 4). The last part of the thesis (chapter 5) involves a quantitative investigation of interactions in overlapping crack patterns. This effort is vital, because for

  18. Multi-Phase Driver Education Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst-Euless-Bedford Independent School District, Hurst, TX.

    For use in planning and conducting functional multi-phase driver education programs, this teacher's guide consists of four phases of instruction: classroom activities, simulated application, in-car range practice, and in-car public practice. Contents are divided into three instructional sections, with the first combining the classroom activities…

  19. An adaptive confidence limit for periodic non-steady conditions fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Hao; Ni, Mengqi; Zhang, Milu; Dong, Jingjing; Benbouzid, Mohamed El Hachemi; Hu, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    System monitoring has become a major concern in batch process due to the fact that failure rate in non-steady conditions is much higher than in steady ones. A series of approaches based on PCA have already solved problems such as data dimensionality reduction, multivariable decorrelation, and processing non-changing signal. However, if the data follows non-Gaussian distribution or the variables contain some signal changes, the above approaches are not applicable. To deal with these concerns and to enhance performance in multiperiod data processing, this paper proposes a fault detection method using adaptive confidence limit (ACL) in periodic non-steady conditions. The proposed ACL method achieves four main enhancements: Longitudinal-Standardization could convert non-Gaussian sampling data to Gaussian ones; the multiperiod PCA algorithm could reduce dimensionality, remove correlation, and improve the monitoring accuracy; the adaptive confidence limit could detect faults under non-steady conditions; the fault sections determination procedure could select the appropriate parameter of the adaptive confidence limit. The achieved result analysis clearly shows that the proposed ACL method is superior to other fault detection approaches under periodic non-steady conditions.

  20. LDA study of non-steady flame propagation in a constant volume duct

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Cheng, R.K.; Sawyer, R.F.

    1984-09-01

    This work investigates the development of tulip shaped flames during laminar flame propagation in a closed duct. In particular the interaction of a laminar flame front with its self-induced non-steady flow field is examined as a possible source of the tulip phenomenon. The flame generated flow is measured with a laser Doppler anemometer (LDA). The flame shape and its position are recorded with high-speed schlieren cinematography. Comparison of the qualitative schlieren and the quantitative LDA data records provides insight into the flame/flow relationship.

  1. Identification of Steady and Non-Steady Gait of Humanexoskeleton Walking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żur, K. K.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper a method of analysis of exoskeleton multistep locomotion was presented by using a computer with the preinstalled DChC program. The paper also presents a way to analytically calculate the ",motion indicator", as well as the algorithm calculating its two derivatives. The algorithm developed by the author processes data collected from the investigation and then a program presents the obtained final results. Research into steady and non-steady multistep locomotion can be used to design two-legged robots of DAR type and exoskeleton control system

  2. Modelling Galaxies with a 3D Multi-Phase ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfst, Stefan; Theis, Christian; Hensler, Gerhard

    We present a modified TREE-SPH code to model galaxies in three dimensions. The model includes a multi-phase description of the interstellar medium which combines two numerical techniques. A diffuse warm/hot gas phase is modelled by SPH, whereas a cloudy medium is represented by a sticky particle scheme. Interaction processes (such as star formation and feedback), cooling, and mixing by condensation and evaporation, are taken into account. Here we apply our model to the evolution of a Milky Way type galaxy. After an initial stage, a quasi-equilibrium state is reached. It is characterised by a star formation rate of ~1 Msolar yr-1. Condensation and evaporation rates are in balance at 0.1-1 Msolar yr-1.

  3. MANE: A MULTIPHASE, AQUEOUS, NON-STEADY STATE EQUILIBRIUM MODEL FOR SIMULATING SOIL-WATER INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemical equilibrium models have been developed to help assess environmental chemistry problems, but few were specifically developed as research and teaching tools for use in conjunction with soil chemistry experiments. MANE model was developed to calculate equilibri...

  4. Toward a Non-Steady Subgrid Flame Model for Turbulent Thermonuclear Combustion (cont.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Messer, O. E. B.; Plewa, T.; Khokhlov, A. M.

    2005-05-01

    Simulations of Type Ia supernova explosions are characterized by vastly disparate spatial scales, spanning some 12 orders of magnitude. This large dynamic range cannot be modeled in any single modern direct numerical simulation. Therefore, a subgrid model has to be employed in the supernova explosion simulations to describe physical processes taking place on unresolved scales. We are concerned with the extension of the Khokhlov's subgrid flame model to a non-steady regime. We study the flame surface evolution subject to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in periodic domains. We seek correlations between the flame surface creation and destruction processes and basic parameters of the physical system. We found that in the fully developed turbulence the flame surface destruction strength is roughly constant and of the order of 1/L3, where L is the characteristic Rayleigh-Taylor bubble size. The flame surface creation and destruction processes reflect the interplay between the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the flame's tendency to smooth its surface. We found that this relationship can be well characterized by Froude number. In addition, the flame surface creation strength correlates with the magnitude of the vorticity component in the direction of gravitational acceleration. These findings provide a foundation for the future time-dependent subgrid flame model. We thank J. B. Gallagher, S. Needham, D. Sheeler for their contributions to this project. This research has been supported by the U. S. Department of Energy contract B523820.

  5. Phase-field modeling of multi-phase solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta; Wheeler, Adam A.

    2002-08-01

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is now proposed which describes both multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  6. Multi-phase SPH modelling of violent hydrodynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Athanasios; Rogers, Benedict D.; Stansby, Peter K.; Domínguez, José M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the acceleration of multi-phase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using a graphics processing unit (GPU) enabling large numbers of particles (10-20 million) to be simulated on just a single GPU card. With novel hardware architectures such as a GPU, the optimum approach to implement a multi-phase scheme presents some new challenges. Many more particles must be included in the calculation and there are very different speeds of sound in each phase with the largest speed of sound determining the time step. This requires efficient computation. To take full advantage of the hardware acceleration provided by a single GPU for a multi-phase simulation, four different algorithms are investigated: conditional statements, binary operators, separate particle lists and an intermediate global function. Runtime results show that the optimum approach needs to employ separate cell and neighbour lists for each phase. The profiler shows that this approach leads to a reduction in both memory transactions and arithmetic operations giving significant runtime gains. The four different algorithms are compared to the efficiency of the optimised single-phase GPU code, DualSPHysics, for 2-D and 3-D simulations which indicate that the multi-phase functionality has a significant computational overhead. A comparison with an optimised CPU code shows a speed up of an order of magnitude over an OpenMP simulation with 8 threads and two orders of magnitude over a single thread simulation. A demonstration of the multi-phase SPH GPU code is provided by a 3-D dam break case impacting an obstacle. This shows better agreement with experimental results than an equivalent single-phase code. The multi-phase GPU code enables a convergence study to be undertaken on a single GPU with a large number of particles that otherwise would have required large high performance computing resources.

  7. Multi-phase reactive transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.

    1995-07-01

    Physicochemical processes in the near-field region of a high-level waste repository may involve a diverse set of phenomena including flow of liquid and gas, gaseous diffusion, and chemical reaction of the host rock with aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures. This report develops some of the formalism for describing simultaneous multicomponent solute and heat transport in a two-phase system for partially saturated porous media. Diffusion of gaseous species is described using the Dusty Gas Model which provides for simultaneous Knudsen and Fickian diffusion in addition to Darcy flow. A new form of the Dusty Gas Model equations is derived for binary diffusion which separates the total diffusive flux into segregative and nonsegregative components. Migration of a wetting front is analyzed using the quasi-stationary state approximation to the Richards` equation. Heat-pipe phenomena are investigated for both gravity- and capillary-driven reflux of liquid water. An expression for the burnout permeability is derived for a gravity-driven heat-pipe. Finally an estimate is given for the change in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution which could occur in the region of condensate formation in a heat-pipe.

  8. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  9. Non-steady dynamics of atmospheric turbulence interaction with wind turbine loadings through blade-boundary-layer-resolved CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh

    precursor simulation as inflow conditions, a second simulation is performed on a smaller domain around the wind turbine using finite volume CFD with a body-fitted grid to compute the unsteady blade loads in response to atmospheric turbulence. Analysis of the precursor LES shows that the advective time scales of energy containing eddies passing through the wind turbine rotor are of order multiple rotation time scales of the rotor. From blade element momentum theory coupled with LES of the ABL, we find that the energy-containing eddies were found to cause large temporal fluctuations (+/-50%) in the integrated moments, primarily due to changes in the local flow angle relative to the local chord sections. A low-dissipation pseudo-spectral algorithm was applied to the ABL LES. A finite volume algorithm was required to resolve the flow features around the complex blade geometry. The effect of the finite volume algorithm on the accuracy of it's prediction of the rough-surface ABL was assessed using the method of Brasseur and Wei [1]. We found that finite volume algorithms need finer horizontal grid resolution to retain the same accuracy as the corresponding pseudo-spectral simulations. These results were used to design our computational framework to accurately propagate the turbulence eddies through the finite volume domain. The ability of our computational framework to capture blade boundary layer dynamics in response to atmospheric turbulence is intimately associated with the extreme care taken in the design of our grid and with the development of a new hybrid URANS-LES turbulence model. The analysis of load fluctuations on a single rotating blade in a daytime atmosphere using blade-boundary-layer-resolved CFD has yielded two key results: (1) Whereas non-steady blade loadings are generally described as the response to non-steadiness in wind speed, our analysis show that time changes in wind vector direction are a much greater contributor to load transients, and strongly impact

  10. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  11. Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-07-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  12. A Virtual Reality Technique for Multi-phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loth, Eric; Sherman, William; Auman, Aric; Navarro, Christopher

    2004-04-01

    A virtual reality (VR) technique has been developed to allow user immersion (stereo-graphic rendering, user tracking and object interactivity) in generic unsteady three-dimensional multi-phase flow data sets. This article describes the structure and logic used to design and construct a VR technique that employs a multi-phase flow-field computed a priori as an input (i.e. simulations are conducted beforehand with a researcher's multi-phase CFD code). The input field for this flow visualization is divided into two parts: the Eulerian three-dimensional grid nodes and velocities for the continuous fluid properties (specified using conventional TECLOT data format) and the Lagrangian time-history trajectory files for the dispersed fluid. While tracking the dispersed phase trajectories as animated spheres of adjustable size and number, the continuous-phase flow can be simultaneously rendered with velocity vectors, iso-contour surfaces and planar flood-contour maps of different variables. The geometric and notional view of the combined visualization of both phases is interactively controlled throughout a user session. The resulting technique is demonstrated with a 3-D unsteady data set of Lagrangian particles dispersing in a Eulerian description of a turbulent boundary layer, stemming from a direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. Modeling Non-Steady Isotopic Effects Caused by Biological Kinetic Transient Complexation During Denitrification in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, F.; Riley, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    The composition and location of 15N atoms on N2O molecules has been used to characterize soil biological N cycling and N2O surface emissions. Besides the complexity of the processes related to N2O transformations and movements (e.g., chain-like denitrification reaction, soil moisture and temperature dynamics, aqueous and gaseous advection and diffusion) which make interpretation of the isotopic N2O composition very difficult, a theoretical aspect has been overlooked. The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications makes common use of first-order and quasi steady-state assumptions, according to which the rates of change of the concentration of intermediate complexes can be neglected. When isotopically-labeled reactants are used, these assumptions are not necessarily accurate since isotopic effects during complexation occur at orders of magnitude that compare with the truncation used under first-order and quasi steady-state conditions. Both assumptions, in fact, always lead to a constant fractionation factor and may therefore yield incorrect estimates of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the reaction signature. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems reported by Menyailo and Hungate (2006), where high 15N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with quasi steady-state Monod kinetics. When the quasi steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Monod kinetics accounting for isotopic effect occurring at the complexes accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi steady state Monod kinetics.

  14. Scaling Relations and Non-Steady Propagation of Thermonuclear Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, O. E. B.; Zhang, J.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Plewa, T.

    2004-12-01

    The scaling for turbulent flame speeds in white dwarf environments determined by Khokhlov (1995) is the basis for the subgrid flame speed model currently used in FLASH simulations of Type Ia supernovae. This scaling law, or some other steady-state approximation, is used by other SNe simulation groups as well. We have extended the numerical experiments of Khokhlov (1995) to cover a range of possible densities and effective gravitational accelerations. We have also performed these numerical experiments with and without adaptive mesh refinement and for a set of effective resolutions, including much higher resolutions than presented in the earlier work. This library of simulations is being used to formulate the basis for a new set of subgrid flame models, wherein the response of the flame to turbulent pulsations is no longer assumed to be steady-state.

  15. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, A.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1995-12-19

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe{sub 2} where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor. 15 figs.

  16. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, Angus A.; Yang, Li-Chung

    1995-01-01

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe.sub.2 where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor.

  17. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Methods for Fluid Mechanics: Thermal, Multi-phase and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikatamarla, Shyam; Boesch, F.; Frapolli, N.; Mazloomi, A.; Karlin, I.

    2014-11-01

    With its roots in statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a paradigm-changing innovation, offering for the first time an intrinsically parallel CFD algorithm. Over the past two decades, LBM has achieved numerous results in the field of CFD and is now in a position to challenge state-of-the art CFD techniques. Major restyling of LBM resulted in an unconditionally stable entropic LBM which restored Second Law (Boltzmann H theorem) in the LBM kinetics and thus enabled affordable direct simulations of fluid turbulence. In this talk, we shall review recent advances in ELBM as a practical, modeling-free tool for simulation of complex flow phenomenon. We shall present recent simulations of fluid turbulence including turbulent channel flow, flow past a circular cylinder, creation and dynamics of vortex tubes, and flow past a surface mounted cube. Apart from its achievements in turbulent flow simulations, ELBM has also presented us the opportunity to extend lattice Boltzmann method to higher order lattices which shall be employed for turbulent, multi-phase and thermal flow simulations. A new class of entropy functions are proposed to handle non-ideal equation of state and surface tension terms in multi-phase flows. It is shown the entropy principle brings unconditional stability and thermodynamic consistency to all the three flow regimes considered here. Acknowledgements: ERC Advanced Grant ``ELBM'' and CSCS grant s437 are deeply acknowledged. References:

  18. Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Beñat; Afonso, Juan Carlos; Zlotnik, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow (MPMCRF) controls a number of important complex geodynamic/geochemical problems, such as melt generation and percolation, metasomatism, rheological weakening, magmatic differentiation, ore emplacement, and fractionation of chemical elements, to name a few. These interacting processes occur over very different spatial and temporal scales and under very different physico-chemical conditions. Therefore, there is a strong motivation in geodynamics for investigating the equations governing MPMCRF, their mathematical structure and properties, and the numerical techniques necessary to obtain reliable and accurate results. In this contribution we present results from a novel numerical framework to solve multiscale MPMCRF problems in geodynamic contexts. Our approach is based on the effective tracking of the most basic building blocks: internal energy and chemical composition. This is achieved through the combination of rigorous solutions to the conservation equations (mass, energy and momentum) for each dynamic phase (instead of the more common "mixture-type" approach) and the transport equation for the chemical species, within the context of classical irreversible thermodynamics. Interfacial processes such as phase changes, chemical diffusion+reaction, and surface tension effects are explicitly incorporated in the context of ensemble averaging. Phase assemblages, mineral and melt compositions, and all other physical parameters of multi-phase systems are obtained through dynamic free-energy minimization procedures.

  19. Multi-phase shock simulations with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omang, M. G.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present an approach to the implementation of a multi-phase description in the numerical Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The work is based on previous work, but has been modified to suit the applications of interest, in this case shock propagation through dusty gases. Theoretical models for multi-phase systems rely on the introduction of a number of terms describing the interaction between the different phases; drag and heat exchange are two examples. These terms contain parameters, the value of many of which must be determined empirically. We present results on the effect of changing values of some of the important parameters and compare our results to experimental and numerical results published in the literature. Our numerical results generally agree well with published results, taking uncertainties concerning accuracy in existing experimental data and details in the choice of parameters for numerical results into consideration. In particular, we find that a reduction in dust particle size is an efficient way of increasing shock retardation for a given dust loading.

  20. A density-weighted reacting model for multi-phase turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S. H.; Abou-Ellail, M. M. M.

    1994-01-01

    A reacting multi-fluid model, based on the Favre-averaged separate transport equations for reactig gas-liquid 'multi-phase' flow, is presented. New density-weighted (Favre-averaged) separate transport equations for multi-phase mixture fraction f and its variance g are derived. The new multi-fluid transport equations for f and g equally applicable to spray flames as well as liquid metal fuel combustors. The fuel spray is discretized into a number of size groups; each group is considered as a separate 'fluid' or 'phase'. A probability density function (pdf) approach to the reaction process is adopted. An evaporation variable e is introduced, which is a measure of a nonequilibrium phase state, defining a two-variable pdf as a function of f and e. The instantaneous thermo-chemical properties are computed from a nonequilibrium model. The predicted results, using the present density-weighted multi-fluid model, for an airblast kerosene spray flame are compared with corresponding experimental data. The present multi-fluid model result are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data for the whole spray flame length.

  1. Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  2. Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian–Eulerian and Eulerian–Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian–Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian–Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian–Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  3. Multi-phased anaerobic baffled reactor treating food waste.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, A; Chen, C-L; Rajagopal, R; Wu, D; Mao, Y; Ho, I J R; Lim, J W; Wang, J-Y

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to identify the performance of a multi-phased anaerobic baffled reactor (MP-ABR) with food waste (FW) as the substrate for biogas production and thereby to promote an efficient energy recovery and treatment method for the wastes with high organic solid content through phase separation. A four-chambered ABR was operated at an HRT of 30 days with an OLR of 0.5-1.0 g-VS/Ld for a period of 175 days at 35 ± 1°C. Consistent overall removal efficiencies of 85.3% (CODt), 94.5% (CODs), 89.6% (VFA) and 86.4% (VS) were observed throughout the experiment displaying a great potential to treat FW. Biogas generated was 215.57 mL/g-VS removed d. Phase separation was observed and supported by the COD and VFA trends, and an efficient recovery of bioenergy from FW was achieved. PMID:25704096

  4. Analysis of the Multi-Phase Copying Garbage Collection Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorszki, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    The multi-phase copying garbage collection was designed to avoid the need for large amount of reserved memory usually required for the copying types of garbage collection algorithms. The collection is performed in multiple phases using the available free memory. This paper proves that the number of phases depends on the size of the reserved memory and the ratio of the garbage and accessible objects. The performance of the implemented algorithm is tested in a fine-grained parallel Prolog system. We find that reserving only 10% of memory for garbage collection is sufficient for good performance in practice. Additionally, an improvement of the generic algorithm specifically for the tested parallel Prolog system is described.

  5. A framework for modeling non-steady-state concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds indoors ― II. Interactions with particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a method for dynamic modeling of the interactions of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) with airborne and settled particulate matter in the indoor environment. This method is fully compatible with the other components within the framework. Despite the unc...

  6. Differential heating and cooling rates in bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus Lowe): a model of non-steady state heat exchange.

    PubMed

    Malte, Hans; Larsen, Christina; Musyl, Michael; Brill, Richard

    2007-08-01

    We analyzed water temperature, visceral cavity temperature and depth data from archival tags retrieved from bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) at liberty in the central Pacific for up to 57 days using a mathematical model of heat exchange. Our model took into account the transfer of heat between the portions of the myotomes comprising red muscle fibers adjacent to the spinal column and served by vascular counter current heat exchanges (henceforth referred to as ;red muscle') and the water, as well as between the red muscle and the temperature sensor of the archival tags in the visceral cavity. Our model successfully predicted the recorded visceral cavity temperatures during vertical excursions provided that the rate constants for heat transfer between the ambient water and the red muscle during cooling (k(low)) and those during heating (k(high)) were very dissimilar. Least-squares fitting of k(low) and k(high) for the entire period that the fish were at liberty yielded values generally in the ranges 0.02-0.04 min(-1) and 0.2-0.6 min(-1) (respectively), with an average ratio k(high)/k(low) of approximately 12. Our results confirmed those from previous studies showing that bigeye tuna have extensive physiological thermoregulatory abilities probably exerted through changes of blood flow patterns that controlled the efficiency of vascular countercurrent heat exchanges. There was a small but significant negative correlation between k(low) and size, whereas there was no correlation between k(high) and size. The maximum swimming speeds during vertical excursions (calculated from the pressure data) occurred midway during ascents and averaged approximately 2 FL s(-1) (where FL=fork length), although speeds as high approximately 4-7 FL s(-1) were also noted. PMID:17644676

  7. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studies, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  8. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studied, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  9. Multi-speed multi-phase resolver converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean (Inventor); Howard, David (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A multiphase converter circuit generates a plurality of sinusoidal outputs of displaced phase and given speed value from the output of an angular resolver system attachable to a motor excited by these multi-phase outputs, the resolver system having a lower speed value than that of the motor. The angular resolver system provides in parallel format sequential digital numbers indicative of the amount of rotation of the shaft of an angular position sensor associated with the angular resolver system. These numbers are used to excite simultaneously identical addresses of a plurality of addressable memory systems, each memory system having stored therein at sequential addresses sequential values of a sinusoidal wavetrain of a given number of sinusoids. The stored wavetrain values represent sinusoids displaced from each other in phase according to the number of output phases desired. A digital-to-analog converter associated with each memory system converts each accessed word to a corresponding analog value to generate attendant to rotation of the angular resolver a sinusoidal wave of proper phase at each of the plurality of outputs. By properly orienting the angular resolver system with respect to the rotor of the motor, essentially ripple-free torque is supplied to the rotor. The angular resolver system may employ an analog resolver feeding an integrated circuit resolver-to-digital converter to produce the requisite digital values serving as addresses. Alternative versions employing incremental or absolute encoders are also described.

  10. Multi-speed multi-phase resolver converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multiphase converter circuit generates a plurality of sinusoidal outputs of displaced phase and given speed value from the output of an angular resolver system attachable to a motor excited by these multi-phase outputs, the resolver system having a lower speed value than that of the motor. The angular resolver system provides in parallel format sequential digital numbers indicative of the amount of rotation of the shaft of an angular position sensor associated with the angular resolver system. These numbers are used to excite simultaneously identical addresses of a plurality of addressable memory systems, each memory system having stored therein at sequential addresses sequential values of a sinusoidal wavetrain of a given number of sinusoids. The stored wavetrain values represent sinusoids displaced from each other in phase according to the number of output phases desired. A digital-to-analog converter associated with each memory system converts each accessed word to a corresponding analog value to generate attendant to rotation of the angular resolver a sinusoidal wave of proper phase at each of the plurality of outputs. By properly orienting the angular resolver system with respect to the rotor of the motor, essentially ripple-free torque is supplied to the rotor. The angular resolver system may employ an analog resolver feeding an integrated circuit resolver-to-digital converter to produce the requisite digital values serving as addresses. Alternative versions employing incremental or absolute encoders are also described.

  11. Computer Based Porosity Design by Multi Phase Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burblies, Andreas; Busse, Matthias

    2008-02-01

    A numerical simulation technique called Multi Phase Topology Optimization (MPTO) based on finite element method has been developed and refined by Fraunhofer IFAM during the last five years. MPTO is able to determine the optimum distribution of two or more different materials in components under thermal and mechanical loads. The objective of optimization is to minimize the component's elastic energy. Conventional topology optimization methods which simulate adaptive bone mineralization have got the disadvantage that there is a continuous change of mass by growth processes. MPTO keeps all initial material concentrations and uses methods adapted from molecular dynamics to find energy minimum. Applying MPTO to mechanically loaded components with a high number of different material densities, the optimization results show graded and sometimes anisotropic porosity distributions which are very similar to natural bone structures. Now it is possible to design the macro- and microstructure of a mechanical component in one step. Computer based porosity design structures can be manufactured by new Rapid Prototyping technologies. Fraunhofer IFAM has applied successfully 3D-Printing and Selective Laser Sintering methods in order to produce very stiff light weight components with graded porosities calculated by MPTO.

  12. Mechanical properties of irradiated multi-phase polycrystalline BCC materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dingkun; Xiao, Xiazi; Xue, Jianming; Chu, Haijian; Duan, Huiling

    2015-04-01

    Structure materials under severe irradiations in nuclear environments are known to degrade because of irradiation hardening and loss of ductility, resulting from irradiation-induced defects such as vacancies, interstitials and dislocation loops, etc. In this paper, we develop an elastic-viscoplastic model for irradiated multi-phase polycrystalline BCC materials in which the mechanical behaviors of individual grains and polycrystalline aggregates are both explored. At the microscopic grain scale, we use the internal variable model and propose a new tensorial damage descriptor to represent the geometry character of the defect loop, which facilitates the analysis of the defect loop evolutions and dislocation-defect interactions. At the macroscopic polycrystal scale, the self-consistent scheme is extended to consider the multiphase problem and used to bridge the individual grain behavior to polycrystal properties. Based on the proposed model, we found that the work-hardening coefficient decreases with the increase of irradiation-induced defect loops, and the orientation/loading dependence of mechanical properties is mainly attributed to the different Schmid factors. At the polycrystalline scale, numerical results for pure Fe match well with the irradiation experiment data. The model is further extended to predict the hardening effect of dispersoids in oxide-dispersed strengthened steels by the considering the Orowan bowing. The influences of grain size and irradiation are found to compete to dominate the strengthening behaviors of materials.

  13. Dynamic Dielectrophoresis Model of Multi-Phase Ionic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Luo, Jing; Guo, Dan; Wen, Shizhu

    2015-01-01

    Ionic-based dielectrophoretic microchips have attracted significant attention due to their wide-ranging applications in electro kinetic and biological experiments. In this work, a numerical method is used to simulate the dynamic behaviors of ionic droplets in a microchannel under the effect of dielectrophoresis. When a discrete liquid dielectric is encompassed within a continuous fluid dielectric placed in an electric field, an electric force is produced due to the dielectrophoresis effect. If either or both of the fluids are ionic liquids, the magnitude and even the direction of the force will be changed because the net ionic charge induced by an electric field can affect the polarization degree of the dielectrics. However, using a dielectrophoresis model, assuming ideal dielectrics, results in significant errors. To avoid the inaccuracy caused by the model, this work incorporates the electrode kinetic equation and defines a relationship between the polarization charge and the net ionic charge. According to the simulation conditions presented herein, the electric force obtained in this work has an error exceeding 70% of the actual value if the false effect of net ionic charge is not accounted for, which would result in significant issues in the design and optimization of experimental parameters. Therefore, there is a clear motivation for developing a model adapted to ionic liquids to provide precise control for the dielectrophoresis of multi-phase ionic liquids. PMID:25699513

  14. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn

    2002-10-28

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray microtomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. Pilot multi-phase experiments have been performed, proving the ability to detect two phases in certain large fractures. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the

  15. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarad; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi

    2002-04-20

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in

  16. Modelling galaxies with a 3d multi-phase ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfst, S.; Theis, Ch.; Hensler, G.

    2006-04-01

    We present a new particle code for modelling the evolution of galaxies. The code is based on a multi-phase description for the interstellar medium (ISM). We include star formation (SF), stellar feedback by massive stars and planetary nebulae, phase transitions, and interactions between gas clouds and ambient diffuse gas, namely condensation, evaporation, drag, and energy dissipation. The last is realised by radiative cooling and inelastic cloud-cloud collisions. We present new schemes for SF and stellar feedback that include a consistent calculation of the star-formation efficiency (SFE) based on ISM properties, as well as a detailed redistribution of the feedback energy into the different ISM phases. As a first test we show a model of the evolution of a present day Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the model exhibits a quasi-stationary behaviour in global properties like mass fractions or surface densities, the evolution of the ISM is strongly variable locally depending on the local SF and stellar feedback. We start only with two distinct phases, but a three-phase ISM is formed soon and consists of cold molecular clouds, a warm gas disk, and a hot gaseous halo. Hot gas is also found in bubbles in the disk accompanied by type II supernovae explosions. The volume-filling factor of the hot gas in the disk is 35%. The mass spectrum of the clouds follows a power-law with an index of α ≈ -2. The star-formation rate (SFR) is 1.6 M⊙ yr-1 on average, decreasing slowly with time due to gas consumption. In order to maintain a constant SFR, gas replenishment, e.g. by infall, of the order 1 M⊙ yr-1 is required. Our model is in fair agreement with Kennicutt's (1998, ApJ, 498, 541) SF law including the cut-off at 10 M⊙ pc-2. Models with a constant SFE, i.e. no feedback on the SF, fail to reproduce Kennicutt's law. We performed a parameter study varying the particle resolution, feedback energy, cloud radius, SF time scale, and metallicity. In most these cases the evolution

  17. The SW Sextantis-type star 2MASS J01074282+4845188: an unusual bright accretion disk with non-steady emission and a hot white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khruzina, T.; Dimitrov, D.; Kjurkchieva, D.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Cataclysmic variables (CVs) present a short evolutional stage of binary systems. The nova-like stars are rare objects, especially those with eclipses (only several tens). But precisely these allow to determine the global parameters of their configurations and to learn more about the late stage of stellar evolution. Aims: The light curve solution allows one to determine the global parameters of the newly discovered nova-like eclipsing star 2MASS J01074282+4845188 and to estimate the contribution of the different light sources. Methods: We present new photometric and spectral observations of 2MASS J01074282+4845188. To obtain a light curve solution we used a model of a nova-like star whose emission sources are a white dwarf surrounded by an accretion disk, a secondary star filling its Roche lobe, a hot spot and a hot line. The obtained global parameters are compared with those of the eclipsing nova-like UX UMa. Results: 2MASS J01074282+4845188 shows the deepest permanent eclipse among the known nova-like stars. It is reproduced by covering the very bright accretion disk by the secondary component. The luminosity of the disk is much bigger than that of the rest light sources. The determined high temperature of the disk is typical for that observed during the outbursts of CVs. The primary of 2MASS J01074282+4845188 is one of the hottest white dwarfs in CVs. The temperature of 5090 K of its secondary is also quite high and more appropriate for a long-period SW Sex star. It might be explained by the intense heating from the hot white dwarf and the hot accretion disk of the target. Conclusions: The high mass accretion rate Ṁ = 8 × 10-9 M⊙ yr-1, the broad and single-peaked Hα emission profile, and the presence of an S-wave are sure signs for the SW Sex classification of 2MASS J01074282+4845188. The obtained flat temperature distribution along the disk radius as well as the deviation of the energy distribution from the black-body law are evidence of the non-steady

  18. Evaluation of a rapid, multi-phase MRE sequence in a heart-simulating phantom

    PubMed Central

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Araoz, Philip A.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to validate stiffness estimates of a phantom undergoing cyclic deformation obtained using a multi-phase magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) imaging sequence by comparison with those obtained using a single-phase MRE sequence and to quantify the stability of the multi-phase-derived stiffness estimates as a function of deformation frequency and imaging parameters. A spherical rubber-shell of 10 cm diameter and 1 cm thickness was connected to a computerized flow pump to produce cyclic pressure variations within the phantom. The phantom was imaged at cyclic pressures between 18–72 bpm using single-phase and multi-phase MRE acquisitions. The shear stiffness of the phantom was resolved using a spherical-shell wave inversion algorithm. Shear stiffness was averaged over the slice of interest and plotted against pressure within the phantom. A linear correlation was observed between stiffness and pressure. Good correlation (R2=0.98) was observed between the stiffness estimates obtained using the standard single-phase and the multi-phase pulse sequences. Stiffness estimates obtained using multi-phase MRE were stable when the fraction of the deformation period required for acquisition of a single image was not greater than 42%. The results demonstrate the potential of multi-phase MRE technique for imaging dynamic organs, such as the heart. PMID:19572388

  19. Numerical analysis for the multi-phase flow of pulverized coal injection inside blast furnace tuyere

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.

    2005-09-01

    The pulverized coal injection (PCI) system was modified from single lance injection into double lance injection at No. 3 Blast Furnace of CSC. It is beneficial to reduce the cost of coke. However, the injected coal was found very close to the inner wall of the tuyere during the operation, such as to cause the possibility of erosion for the tuyere. In this study a three-dimensional mathematical model has been developed based on a computational fluid dynamics software PHOENICS to simulate the fluid flow phenomena inside blast furnace tuyere. The model was capable of handling steady-state, three-dimensional multi-phase flow of pulverized coal injection. The model was applied to simulate the flow patterns of the injection coal inside the tuyere with two kinds of lance design for the PCI system. The distribution of injection coal was simulated such as to estimate the possibility of erosion for the tuyere. The calculated results agreed with the operating experience of CSC plant and the optimum design of double lance was suggested. The model was also applied to simulate the oxygen concentration distribution with these different oxygen enrichments for the coal/oxygen lance system. The calculated results agreed with the experimental measurement. These test results demonstrate that the model is both reasonably reliable and efficient.

  20. Pseudorapidity dependence of short-range correlations from a multi-phase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei-Juan, Wang; Gang, Chen; Guo-Liang, Ma; Yuan-Fang, Wu

    2016-03-01

    Using a multi-phase transport model (AMPT) that includes both initial partonic and hadronic interactions, we study neighboring bin multiplicity correlations as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at . It is observed that for Au+Au collisions, the short-range correlations of final particles have a trough at central pseudorapidity, while for AuAu collisions, the short-range correlations of final particles have a peak at central pseudorapidity. Our findings indicate that the pseudorapidity dependence of short-range correlations should contain some new physical information, and are not a simple result of the pseudorapidity distribution of final particles. The AMPT results with and without hadronic scattering are compared. It is found that hadron scattering can only increase the short-range correlations to some level, but is not responsible for the different correlation shapes for different energies. Further study shows that the different pseudorapidity dependence of short-range correlations are mainly due to partonic evolution and the following hadronization scheme. Supported by GBL31512, Major State Basic Research Devolopment Program of China (2014CB845402), NSFC (11475149, 11175232, 11375251, 11421505, 11221504)

  1. Lattice Boltzmann multi-phase simulations in porous media using Multiple GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toelke, J.; De Prisco, G.; Mu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Ingrain's digital rock physics lab computes the physical properties and fluid flow characteristics of oil and gas reservoir rocks including shales, carbonates and sandstones. Ingrain uses advanced lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM) to simulate multiphase flow in the rocks (porous media). We present a very efficient implementation of these methods based on CUDA. Because LBM operates on a finite difference grid, is explicit in nature, and requires only next-neighbor interactions, it is suitable for implementation on GPUs. Since GPU hardware allows for very fine grain parallelism, every lattice site can be handled by a different core. Data has to be loaded from and stored to the device memory in such a way that dense access to the memory is ensured. This can be achieved by accessing the lattice nodes with respect to their contiguous memory locations [1,2]. The simulation engine uses a sparse data structure to represent the grid and advanced algorithms to handle the moving fluid-fluid interface. The simulations are accelerated on one GPU by one order of magnitude compared to a state of the art multicore desktop computer. The engine is parallelized using MPI and runs on multiple GPUs in the same node or across the Infiniband network. Simulations with up to 50 GPUs in parallel are presented. With this simulator using it is possible to perform pore scale multi-phase (oil-water-matrix) simulations in natural porous media in a commercial manner and to predict important rock properties like absolute permeability, relative permeabilites and capillary pressure [3,4]. Results and videos of these simulations in complex real world porous media and rocks are presented and discussed.

  2. Absence of Squirt Singularities for the Multi-Phase Muskat Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Diego; Gancedo, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study the evolution of multiple fluids with different constant densities in porous media. This physical scenario is known as the Muskat and the (multi-phase) Hele-Shaw problems. In this context we prove that the fluids do not develop squirt singularities.

  3. A CUDA based parallel multi-phase oil reservoir simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaza, Ayham; Awotunde, Abeeb A.; Fairag, Faisal A.; Al-Mouhamed, Mayez A.

    2016-09-01

    Forward Reservoir Simulation (FRS) is a challenging process that models fluid flow and mass transfer in porous media to draw conclusions about the behavior of certain flow variables and well responses. Besides the operational cost associated with matrix assembly, FRS repeatedly solves huge and computationally expensive sparse, ill-conditioned and unsymmetrical linear system. Moreover, as the computation for practical reservoir dimensions lasts for long times, speeding up the process by taking advantage of parallel platforms is indispensable. By considering the state of art advances in massively parallel computing and the accompanying parallel architecture, this work aims primarily at developing a CUDA-based parallel simulator for oil reservoir. In addition to the initial reported 33 times speed gain compared to the serial version, running experiments showed that BiCGSTAB is a stable and fast solver which could be incorporated in such simulations instead of the more expensive, storage demanding and usually utilized GMRES.

  4. Dual-Family Viscous Shock Waves in n Conservation Laws with Application to Multi-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesin, Dan; Mailybaev, Alexei A.

    2006-09-01

    We consider shock waves satisfying the viscous profile criterion in general systems of n conservation laws. We study S i, j dual-family shock waves, which are associated with a pair of characteristic families i and j. We explicitly introduce defining equations relating states and speeds of S i, j shocks, which include the Rankine Hugoniot conditions and additional equations resulting from the viscous profile requirement. We then develop a constructive method for finding the general local solution of the defining equations for such shocks and derive formulae for the sensitivity analysis of S i, j shocks under change of problem parameters. All possible structures of solutions to the Riemann problems containing S i, j shocks and classical waves are described. As a physical application, all types of S i, j shocks with i>j are detected and studied in a family of models for multi-phase flow in porous media.

  5. Protecting HAZMAT personnel: A multi-phase process

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, P. )

    1993-03-01

    Protecting personnel during hazardous substance releases is a process requiring several integrated elements. Managers must ensure the proper training has occurred and the appropriate personal protective equipment is available. They also must have a thorough understanding of applicable regulations, a well-defined contingency planning program, a ready inventory of air monitoring equipment and provisions for outside assistance. Several regulations apply to an organization that could be responsible for an oil or hazardous substance spill. These have been issued by several regulatory agencies, primarily the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). For treatment, storage and disposal facilities and both large and small quantity generators under the jurisdiction of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), several rules detail emergency planning and training requirements. Title 2 of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) established requirements that apply to nearly all industries mainly for emergency incident and chemical use notification. The goal of its provisions, also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), is to enable states and communities to improve chemical safety and better protect public health and the environment.

  6. Towards Understanding Simulated Feedback in AMR and SPH Codes and the Multi-Phase Nature of the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, N. L.; Bower, R. G.; Theuns, T.; Vorobyov, E. I.

    2012-07-01

    Feedback from supernova is believed to be a key ingredient for regulating star formation within galaxies, however modelling it self-consistently is prohibitively expensive. Even superbubbles which are formed from multiple supernova occuring in close proximity, are only a few hundred parsecs across — tiny compared to the sizes of many galaxies. Thus any simulation which aims to study the large scale properties of galaxies, groups and clusters cannot currently resolve the ISM into its true multi-phase nature. In order to overcome this limitation, many cosmological simulations which are run in both AMR and SPH codes, adopt polytropic equations of state. These approximate the physics of the ISM below those scales which can be resolved where the ISM splits to become multi-phase. However we show that when identical sub-grid physical recipes for cooling, star formation and feedback are included into both SPH and AMR codes, they do not necessarily yield the same results. Instead, we find that energy is dissipated far more readily in an AMR code, allowing supernova driven winds to stall. This prevents supernova feedback in AMR simulations from removing sufficient gas to adaquately regulate the star formation rate. Whereas in SPH codes the winds can remove more gas, with wind particles able to stream more freely out of the galaxy. Determining which of these codes provides a more physically correct description is extremely difficult, however it clearly highlights the need for a more robust model for the ISM. For a better understanding of the means by which energy from feedback is redistributed within the ISM, we present our new multi-phase chemodynamic model in the FLASH AMR code. We seperate the ISM into a hot tenuous gas phase and an almost collisionless compact molecular cloud component. Both phases are modelled on the adaptive mesh, the hot gas being modelled by using the standard Euler equations for compressible fluid dynamics whilst the collisionless component is

  7. Direct simulation of multi-phase MHD flows on an unstructured Cartesian adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Ni, Ming-Jiu

    2014-08-01

    An approach for direct simulation of the multi-phase magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flows has been developed in the present study on an unstructured Cartesian adaptive system. The approach is based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method for capturing the interface with the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) technique used to well resolve the interface and the boundary layer. The Lorentz force is calculated using the consistent and conservative scheme, which is specially designed on a Cartesian adaptive mesh to conserve the physical conservation laws. The continuous-surface-tension (CSF) formulation is adopted for surface tension calculation. Moreover, the interfacial flows driven by thermal Marangoni effects at multifluid interfaces are also studied with a special numerical treatment presented. The method is able to simulate bubble motion in liquid metal under magnetic field irrespective of high density ratio and electric conductivity ratio. The proposed scheme for multi-phase MHD flows is validated by experimental results as well as analytical solutions.

  8. Effect of forward looking sites on a multi-phase lattice hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhu, Poonam; Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2016-03-01

    A new multi-phase lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model is proposed by considering the effect of multi-forward looking sites on a unidirectional highway. We examined the qualitative properties of proposed model through linear as well as nonlinear stability analysis. It is shown that the multi-anticipation effect can significantly enlarge the stability region on the phase diagram and exhibit three-phase traffic flow. It is also observed that the multi-forward looking sites have prominent influence on traffic flow when driver senses the relative flux of leading vehicles. Theoretical findings are verified using numerical simulation which confirms that the traffic jam is suppressed efficiently by considering the information of leading vehicles in unidirectional multi-phase traffic flow.

  9. High-order accurate multi-phase simulations: building blocks and whats tricky about them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummer, Florian

    2015-11-01

    We are going to present a high-order numerical method for multi-phase flow problems, which employs a sharp interface representation by a level-set and an extended discontinuous Galerkin (XDG) discretization for the flow properties. The shape of the XDG basis functions is dynamically adapted to the position of the fluid interface, so that the spatial approximation space can represent jumps in pressure and kinks in velocity accurately. By this approach, the `hp-convergence' property of the classical discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method can be preserved for the low-regularity, discontinuous solutions, such as those appearing in multi-phase flows. Within the past years, several building blocks of such a method were presented: this includes numerical integration on cut-cells, the spatial discretization by the XDG method, precise evaluation of curvature and level-set algorithms tailored to the special requirements of XDG-methods. The presentation covers a short review on these building-block and their integration into a full multi-phase solver. A special emphasis is put on the discussion of the several pitfalls one may expire in the formulation of such a solver. German Research Foundation.

  10. Development of an Efficient Meso- scale Multi-phase Flow Solver in Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taehun

    2015-10-20

    The proposed research aims at formulating a predictive high-order Lattice Boltzmann Equation for multi-phase flows relevant to nuclear energy related application - namely, saturated and sub-cooled boiling in reactors, and liquid- liquid mixing and extraction for fuel cycle separation. An efficient flow solver will be developed based on the Finite Element based Lattice Boltzmann Method (FE- LBM), accounting for phase-change heat transfer and capable of treating multiple phases over length scales from the submicron to the meter. A thermal LBM will be developed in order to handle adjustable Prandtl number, arbitrary specific heat ratio, a wide range of temperature variations, better numerical stability during liquid-vapor phase change, and full thermo-hydrodynamic consistency. Two-phase FE-LBM will be extended to liquid–liquid–gas multi-phase flows for application to high-fidelity simulations building up from the meso-scale up to the equipment sub-component scale. While several relevant applications exist, the initial applications for demonstration of the efficient methods to be developed as part of this project include numerical investigations of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomena in nuclear reactor fuel bundles, and liquid-liquid mixing and interfacial area generation for liquid-liquid separations. In addition, targeted experiments will be conducted for validation of this advanced multi-phase model.

  11. Multi-phase functionalization of titanium for enhanced photon absorption in the vis-NIR region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Pooja; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-10-01

    Inadequate absorption of Near Infrared (NIR) photons by conventional silicon solar cells has been a major stumbling block towards the attainment of a high efficiency “full spectrum” solar cell. An effective enhancement in the absorption of such photons is desired as they account for a considerable portion of the tappable solar energy. In this work, we report a remarkable gain observed in the absorption of photons in the near infrared and visible region (400 nm-1000 nm) by a novel multi-phased oxide of titanium. Synthesised via a single step ultra-fast laser pulse interaction with pure titanium, characterisation studies have identified this oxide of titanium to be multi-phased and composed of Ti3O, (TiO.716)3.76 and TiO2 (rutile). Computed to have an average band gap value of 2.39 eV, this ultrafast laser induced multi-phased titanium oxide has especially exhibited steady absorption capability in the NIR range of 750-1000 nm, which to the best of our knowledge, was never reported before. The unique NIR absorption properties of the laser functionalised titanium coupled with the simplicity and versatility of the ultrafast laser interaction process involved thereby provides tremendous potential towards the photon sensitization of titanium and thereafter for the inception of a “full spectrum” solar device.

  12. Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Arctic Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Menon, Surabi

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 Multi-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) IOP at the ARM NSA site focused on measuring the properties of autumn transition-season arctic stratus and the environmental conditions controlling them, including concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei. Our work aims to use a large-eddy simulation (LES) code with embedded size-resolved aerosol and cloud microphysics to identify factors controlling multi-phase arctic stratus. Our preliminary simulations of autumn transition-season clouds observed during the 1994 Beaufort and Arctic Seas Experiment (BASE) indicated that low concentrations of ice nuclei, which were not measured, may have significantly lowered liquid water content and thereby stabilized cloud evolution. However, cloud drop concentrations appeared to be virtually immune to changes in liquid water content, indicating an active Bergeron process with little effect of collection on drop number concentration. We will compare these results with preliminary simulations from October 8-13 during MPACE. The sensitivity of cloud properties to uncertainty in other factors, such as large-scale forcings and aerosol profiles, will also be investigated. Based on the LES simulations with M-PACE data, preliminary results from the NASA GlSS single-column model (SCM) will be used to examine the sensitivity of predicted cloud properties to changing cloud drop number concentrations for multi-phase arctic clouds. Present parametrizations assumed fixed cloud droplet number concentrations and these will be modified using M-PACE data.

  13. Multi-phase functionalization of titanium for enhanced photon absorption in the vis-NIR region

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Pooja; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate absorption of Near Infrared (NIR) photons by conventional silicon solar cells has been a major stumbling block towards the attainment of a high efficiency “full spectrum” solar cell. An effective enhancement in the absorption of such photons is desired as they account for a considerable portion of the tappable solar energy. In this work, we report a remarkable gain observed in the absorption of photons in the near infrared and visible region (400 nm–1000 nm) by a novel multi-phased oxide of titanium. Synthesised via a single step ultra-fast laser pulse interaction with pure titanium, characterisation studies have identified this oxide of titanium to be multi-phased and composed of Ti3O, (TiO.716)3.76 and TiO2 (rutile). Computed to have an average band gap value of 2.39 eV, this ultrafast laser induced multi-phased titanium oxide has especially exhibited steady absorption capability in the NIR range of 750–1000 nm, which to the best of our knowledge, was never reported before. The unique NIR absorption properties of the laser functionalised titanium coupled with the simplicity and versatility of the ultrafast laser interaction process involved thereby provides tremendous potential towards the photon sensitization of titanium and thereafter for the inception of a “full spectrum” solar device. PMID:26477578

  14. Dioxin Chronology and Fluxes in Sediments of the Houston Ship Channel, Texas: Influences of Non-steady State Sediment Transport and Total Organic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, K.; Santschi, P.; Raifai, H.; Suarez, M.; Brinkmeyer, R.; Hung, C.; Schindler, K.; Andres, M.; Weaver, E.

    2007-05-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (dioxins) are persistent contaminants that bio-accumulate and pose serious risks to biota and humans. The primary objective of this study was to determine the history and mechanisms of dioxin accumulation in sediments of the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) using analytical data on natural and anthropogenic radionuclides (7Be, 137Cs and 210Pb) and dioxins. Results showed that present-day sedimentary dioxin accumulation rates are orders of magnitude higher than atmospheric inputs to the HSC, as determined from a wetland sediment core (FW1) and direct measurements. Most stations showed dioxin peaks in the near surface, indicating continuing inputs despite federal regulations. Stations with high dioxin inventories (11270 > 11193 > 16499 > 15979 > 11261) reflect accentuated accumulation in the HSC as one moves west towards Buffalo Bayou (11270, 15979), at the confluence of the HSC and the San Jacinto River (11261) and upstream in the San Jacinto River (11193). While station 11270 had the highest dioxin inventory, and nearby station 11261 had the highest sediment accumulation rates and dioxin fluxes, present-day dioxin fluxes at 11270 are less than average fluxes and inventories for station 11261 are less than average inventories, for all sites. These results support the interpretation that the HSC is influenced by episodic sediment resuspension, erosion and lateral transport processes driven by tides, wind, shipping and dredging, which can cause intermittently high accumulations of dioxins.

  15. A framework for modeling non-steady-state concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds indoors ― I: Emissions from diffusional sources and sorption by interior surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past two decades, more than 20 mass transfer models have been developed for the sources, sinks, and barriers for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs) in the indoor environment. While these models have greatly improved our understanding of VOC and ...

  16. Non-steady state deformation at decaying stresses indicated by microfabrics in peridotites from the Balmuccia complex in the Western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysiak, A. K.; Trepmann, C.

    2010-12-01

    The microfabrics of deformed peridotites from Balmuccia complex in the Western European Alps are investigated by optical and electron microscopic techniques (SEM/EBSD, TEM). The peridotites are mostly lherzolitic with 65-98% olivine, 5-30% orthopyroxene, 1-15% clinopyroxene and 1-2% spinel. Shear zones are 50 µm to 250 µm wide and consist of ultra fine-grained (< 1 µm in diameter) and recrystallized olivine (up to 70 µm in diameter), ortho- and clinopyroxene. Spinel grains within and next to the shear zone are strongly sheared and lengthened. The amount of recrystallized grains decreases with distance to shear zones, which occur in conjugate sets. The recrystallized aggregates outside the shear zones are monomineralic. The strong foliation of the samples is mainly defined by flattened olivine porphyroclasts that are separated by bands of recrystallized olivine grains with same composition compared to the porphyroclasts. Recrystallized grains also occur in transgranular bands of porphyroclasts. The distribution of recrystallized grains suggests that they have overgrown inter- and intragranular cracks and thus indicate a preceding stage with brittle deformation. Grain boundaries of olivine porphyroclasts are sutured and surrounded by recrystallized grains, indicating strain-induced recrystallization. Olivine porphyroclasts are strongly deformed as shown by the abundant presence of intense undulous extinction and crinkly deformation lamellae subparallel (100) which are a few microns wide and show a misorientation angle < 2°. In TEM, the latter features are characterized by straight screw dislocations parallel [001] and low angle tilt boundaries parallel (100), indicating activation of at least two slip systems: (100)[001] and (010)[100] respectively. These features are interpreted to result from an initial glide-controlled deformation at high differential stresses, which are modified by recovery at decaying stresses. Porphyroclasts of ortho- and clinopyroxene show undulous extinction, kink bands parallel (001) and mechanical twins parallel (100). Recrystallized pyroxene show an average grain size of 5-50 µm. Dynamic recrystallization of pyroxene and mechanical twins indicate crystal-plastic deformation at high differential stresses. The microfabrics reflect initial high stress deformation with glide-controlled deformation accompanied by brittle deformation in the low temperature plasticity regime and subsequent deformation and recrystallization by dislocation creep at decaying stresses. From the olivine-spinel geothermometry a temperature of 550-600°C, generally assumed as the temperature of the brittle-plastic transition in peridotite, is estimated. Such a microfabric development with decaying stresses at temperatures close to the brittle-plastic transition is consistent with episodic creep below the seismogenic zone during the seismic cycle. The well-known pseudotachylytes from the Balmuccia peridotite massif provide independent evidence for seismic activity.

  17. A NON-STEADY-STATE DIAGENETIC MODEL FOR CHANGES IN SEDIMENT BIOGEOCHEMISTRY IN RESPONSE TO SEASONALLY HYPOXIC/ANOXIC CONDITIONS BENEATH THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the bottom waters of many freshwater and marine environments are either permanently oxic or anoxic, there is a growing appreciation that in many bodies of water near-bottom conditions seasonally oscillate between these extreme. Although observational databases for these ...

  18. Multi-phase intelligent decision model for reservoir real-time flood control during typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Huang, Chien-Lin; Wei, Chih-Chiang

    2015-03-01

    This study applies an Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and a Real-Time Recurrent Learning Neural Network (RTRLNN) with an optimized reservoir release hydrograph using Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) from historical typhoon events to develop a multi-phase intelligent real-time reservoir operation model for flood control. The flood control process is divided into three stages: (1) before flood (Stage I); (2) before peak flow (Stage II); and (3) after peak flow (Stage III). The models are then constructed with either three phase modules (ANFIS-3P and RTRLNN-3P) or two phase (Stage I + II and Stage III) modules (ANFIS-2P and RTRLNN-2P). The multi-phase modules are developed with consideration of the difference in operational decision mechanisms, decision information, release functions, and targets between each flood control stage to solve the problem of time-consuming computation and difficult system integration of MILP. In addition, the model inputs include the coupled short lead time and total reservoir inflow forecast information that are developed using radar- and satellite-based meteorological monitoring techniques, forecasted typhoon tracks, meteorological image similarity analysis, ANFIS and RTRLNN. This study uses the Tseng-Wen Reservoir basin as the study area, and the model results showed that RTRLNN outperformed ANFIS in the simulated outcomes from the optimized hydrographs. This study also applies the models to Typhoons Kalmaegi and Morakot to compare the simulations to historical operations. From the operation results, the RTRLNN-3P model is better than RTRLNN-2P and historical operations. Further, because the RTRLNN-3P model combines the innovative multi-phase module with monitored and forecasted decision information, the operation can simultaneously, effectively and automatically achieve the dual goals of flood detention at peak flow periods and water supply at the end of a typhoon event.

  19. Marketing orientation in hospitals: findings from a multi-phased research study.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    It is clear from numerous studies conducted over a wide variety of industries that marketing-oriented organizations perform better than those that do not adopt this business philosophy. Recent studies have confirmed this finding in healthcare organizations as well. What is now coming to light is the way in which a marketing orientation does contribute to better performance in hospitals, and the difficulties marketers face in getting recognition of that fact by non-marketers in their organization. This article reports on a multi-phased research study of the implementation of marketing-oriented behaviors in a hospital setting. PMID:19042516

  20. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Heyu; Qu Xiaochao; Liang Jimin; He Xiaowei; Chen Xueli; Yang Da'an; Tian Jie

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  1. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOEpatents

    Apley, Walter J.; Cliff, William C.; Creer, James M.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  2. A statistical approach to the brittle fracture of a multi-phase solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Lua, Y. I.; Belytschko, T.

    1991-01-01

    A stochastic damage model is proposed to quantify the inherent statistical distribution of the fracture toughness of a brittle, multi-phase solid. The model, based on the macrocrack-microcrack interaction, incorporates uncertainties in locations and orientations of microcracks. Due to the high concentration of microcracks near the macro-tip, a higher order analysis based on traction boundary integral equations is formulated first for an arbitrary array of cracks. The effects of uncertainties in locations and orientations of microcracks at a macro-tip are analyzed quantitatively by using the boundary integral equations method in conjunction with the computer simulation of the random microcrack array. The short range interactions resulting from surrounding microcracks closet to the main crack tip are investigated. The effects of microcrack density parameter are also explored in the present study. The validity of the present model is demonstrated by comparing its statistical output with the Neville distribution function, which gives correct fits to sets of experimental data from multi-phase solids.

  3. Simultaneous Inversion for Velocity and Reflector Geometry Using Multi-phase Fresnel Volume Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Li, Xing-wang; Huang, Guo-jiao; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2014-07-01

    Traditional ray tomography methods based on the high frequency assumption are sometimes unable to obtain a high resolution tomographic picture due to a deficient coverage of ray paths in real applications, especially for low velocity anomalous regions. In contrast, finite-frequency ray theory is more suitable for handling real seismic propagation problems because the travel time depends not only on the velocity distribution along a central ray (or traditional geometric ray), but also on the velocity values within a region (referred to as the first Fresnel Volume) which incorporates the central ray. In this study, we develop an algorithm to calculate multi-phase Fresnel Volume finite-frequency rays, and then present an inversion method to simultaneous invert for both velocity and reflector geometry by using these multi-phase Fresnel Volume finite-frequency rays. Using synthetic data examples, we compare the reconstructions of the velocity field and the reflector orientation using the Fresnel Volume ray tomographic methods and the traditional ray tomography approach. Results show that the former is advantageous over the latter, especially when the ray density is relatively low. An additional benefit of the Fresnel Volume finite-frequency ray tomographic method is that it can start with a low frequency to capture the coarse velocity structure, thereby mitigating the local minimum trapping problem, and then be tuned to a high frequency for delineating the fine velocity structure.

  4. A liver registration method for segmented multi-phase CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuyue; Yuan, Rong; Sun, Zhi; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-03-01

    In order to build high quality geometric models for liver containing vascular system, multi-phase CT series used in a computer-aided diagnosis and surgical planning system aims at liver diseases have to be accurately registered. In this paper we model the segmented liver containing vascular system as a complex shape and propose a two-step registration method. Without any tree modeling for vessel this method can carry out a simultaneous registration for both liver tissue and vascular system inside. Firstly a rigid aligning using vessel as feature is applied on the complex shape model while genetic algorithm is used as the optimization method. Secondly we achieve the elastic shape registration by combine the incremental free form deformation (IFFD) with a modified iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. Inspired by the concept of demons method, we propose to calculate a fastest diffusion vector (FDV) for each control point on the IFFD lattice to replace the points correspondence needed in ICP iterations. Under the iterative framework of the modified ICP, the optimal solution of control points' displacement in every IFFD level can be obtained efficiently. The method has been quantitatively evaluated on clinical multi-phase CT series.

  5. Establishment of optimal scan delay for multi-phase computed tomography using bolus-tracking technique in canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Young; Choi, Ho-Jung; Lee, Ki-Ja; Lee, Young-Won

    2015-09-01

    To establish a protocol for a multi-phase computed tomography (CT) of the canine pancreas using the bolus-tracking technique, dynamic scan and multi-phase CT were performed in six normal beagle dogs. The dynamic scan was performed for 60 sec at 1-sec intervals after the injection (4 ml/sec) of a contrast medium, and intervals from aortic enhancement appearance to aortic, pancreatic parenchymal and portal vein peaks were measured. The multi-phase CT with 3 phases was performed three times using a bolus-tracking technique. Scan delays were 0, 15 and 30 in first multi-phase scan; 5, 20 and 35 in second multi-phase scan; and 10, 25 and 40 sec in third multi-phase scan, respectively. Attenuation values and contrast enhancement pattern were analyzed from the aorta, pancreas and portal vein. The intervals from aortic enhancement appearance to aortic, pancreatic parenchymal and portal vein peaks were 3.8 ± 0.7, 8.7 ± 0.9 and 13.3 ± 1.5 sec, respectively. The maximum attenuation values of the aorta, pancreatic parenchyma and portal vein were present at scan sections with no scan delay, a 5-sec delay and a 10-sec delay, respectively. When a multi-phase CT of the canine pancreas is triggered at aortic enhancement appearance using a bolus-tracking technique, the recommended optimal delay times of the arterial and pancreatic parenchymal phases are no scan delay and 5 sec, respectively. PMID:25843155

  6. Engineering functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide nano-biomaterials to passivate the aggressive proliferation of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Premnath, P.; Tan, B.; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of nano silicon in cancer therapy is limited as drug delivery vehicles and markers in imaging, not as manipulative/controlling agents. This is due to limited properties that native states of nano silicon and silicon oxides offers. We introduce nano-functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide biomaterials synthesized via ultrashort pulsed laser synthesis, with tunable properties that possess inherent cancer controlling properties that can passivate the progression of cancer. This nanostructured biomaterial is composed of individual functionalized nanoparticles made of a homogenous hybrid of multiple phases of silicon and silicon oxide in increasing concentration outwards from the core. The chemical properties of the proposed nanostructure such as number of phases, composition of phases and crystal orientation of each functionalized nanoparticle in the three dimensional nanostructure is defined based on precisely tuned ultrashort pulsed laser-material interaction mechanisms. The amorphous rich phased biomaterial shows a 30 fold (95%) reduction in number of cancer cells compared to bulk silicon in 48 hours. Further, the size of the cancer cells reduces by 76% from 24 to 48 hours. This method exposes untapped properties of combination of multiple phases of silicon oxides and its applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26190009

  7. Tensile behavior of TRIP-aided multi-phase steels studied by in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomota, Y. . E-mail: tomota@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp; Tokuda, H.; Adachi, Y.; Wakita, M.; Minakawa, N.; Moriai, A.; Morii, Y.

    2004-12-01

    TRIP-aided multi-phase steels were made by thermo-mechanically controlled process, where the ferrite grain size and the amount of the retained austenite were changed by controlling process conditions. The tensile behavior of four steels was studied by in situ neutron diffraction. It is found that the retained austenite bearing about 1.0 wt% C is plastically harder than the ferrite matrix. The steel with a ferrite grain size of {approx}2.0 {mu}m showed tensile strength of 1.1 GPa and a uniform elongation of 18.4%, in which stress-induced martensitic transformation occurs during plastic deformation but a considerable amount of austenite remains even after the onset of necking. It is concluded that the enhancement of uniform elongation is caused mainly by the work-hardening due to the hard austenite and martensite, where the contribution of the transformation strain is negligible.

  8. Strain rate behaviour of multi-phase and complex-phase steels for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2012-08-01

    A combined study on the mechanical behaviour of multi-phase 800 high yield strength steel (MP800HY) and complex-phase 800 steel (CP800) is carried out under tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001s-1 to 750s-1. Quasi-static (0.001s-1) tests are performed on electromechanical machine, whereas, medium (5s-1 and 25s-1) and high strain rate (250s-1, 500s-1 and 750s-1) experiments are conducted on hydro-pneumatic machine (HPM) and modified Hopkinson bar (MHB) setup respectively. The thermal softening behaviors of the materials are investigated at quasi-static condition and the materials' m-parameters of the existing Johnson-Cook model are imposed in authors' previous work. Thereafter, the predicted flow stress by Johnson-Cook model has been compared with the experimental results.

  9. Particulate multi-phase flowfield analysis for advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction for a 2D advanced solid rocket motor (ASRM) is analyzed using the finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code. The flowfield in the aft dome cavity of the ASRM is examined and its significant impact on the motor operation and performance is demonstrated. Chemical reaction analysis is performed for H2O, O2, H2, O, H, OH, CO, CO2, Cl, Cl2, HCl, and N2. The turbulent dispersion effect is calculated with the Monte Carlo method. Result show that a recirculation zone exists at the entry of the aft-dome cavity. The particle impingement could cause the erosion and damage nozzle wall. Accumulating in the impingement area the particles change the wall shape and affect the motor performance.

  10. Study of the carbon distribution in multi-phase steels using the NanoSIMS 50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, N.; Drillet, J.; Bouaziz, O.; Migeon, H.-N.

    2006-07-01

    An advanced understanding of phase transformation mechanisms and of microstructure/properties relationships in steels requires to investigate the distribution of carbon. The improvement of mechanical properties of these materials led to develop finer microstructures. Thus, the mean size of the constituents (austenite/austenite islands and bainite laths) of the high strength steels is under the micron. The small size combined in some case with low concentration of carbon renders the analysis of these materials difficult. The NanoSIMS 50, which associates high spatial resolution and high sensitivity, seems to be a tool of choice to answer to this new analytical challenge. In this objective, we have explored the potentialities of such an instrument for the qualitative and quantitative study of carbon in multi-phase steels. In particular, a calibration curve was established from reference samples containing martensite and ferrite with a known carbon content.

  11. A method for automatic liver segmentation from multi-phase contrast-enhanced CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Rong; Luo, Ming; Wang, Shaofa; Wang, Luyao; Xie, Qingguo

    2014-03-01

    Liver segmentation is a basic and indispensable function in systems of computer aided liver surgery for volume calculation, operation designing and risk evaluation. Traditional manual segmentation is very time consuming because of the complicated contours of liver and the big amount of images. For increasing the efficiency of the clinical work, in this paper, a fully-automatic method was proposed to segment the liver from multi-phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. As an advanced region growing method, we applied various pre- and post-processing to get better segmentation from the different phases. Fifteen sets of clinical abdomens CT images of five patients were segmented by our algorithm, and the results were acceptable and evaluated by an experienced surgeon. The running-time is about 30 seconds for a single-phase data which includes more than 200 slices.

  12. Ultrasonic tomography for in-process measurements of temperature in a multi-phase medium

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the in-process measurement of internal particulate temperature utilizing ultrasonic tomography techniques to determine the speed of sound through a specimen material. Ultrasonic pulses are transmitted through a material, which can be a multi-phase material, over known flight paths and the ultrasonic pulse transit times through all sectors of the specimen are measured to determine the speed of sound. The speed of sound being a function of temperature, it is possible to establish the correlation between speed of sound and temperature, throughout a cross-section of the material, which correlation is programmed into a computer to provide for a continuous in-process measurement of temperature throughout the specimen.

  13. Ultrasonic tomography for in-process measurements of temperature in a multi-phase medium

    DOEpatents

    Beller, L.S.

    1993-01-26

    A method and apparatus are described for the in-process measurement of internal particulate temperature utilizing ultrasonic tomography techniques to determine the speed of sound through a specimen material. Ultrasonic pulses are transmitted through a material, which can be a multi-phase material, over known flight paths and the ultrasonic pulse transit times through all sectors of the specimen are measured to determine the speed of sound. The speed of sound being a function of temperature, it is possible to establish the correlation between speed of sound and temperature, throughout a cross-section of the material, which correlation is programmed into a computer to provide for a continuous in-process measurement of temperature throughout the specimen.

  14. A Generalized Multi-Phase Framework for Modeling Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet

    2003-01-01

    A generalized multi-phase formulation for cavitation in fluids operating at temperatures elevated relative to their critical temperatures is presented. The thermal effects and the accompanying property variations due to phase change are modeled rigorously. Thermal equilibrium is assumed and fluid thermodynamic properties are specified along the saturation line using the NIST-12 databank. Fundamental changes in the physical characteristics of the cavity when thermal effects become pronounced are identified; the cavity becomes more porous, the interface less distinct, and has increased entrainment when temperature variations are present. Quantitative estimates of temperature and pressure depressions in both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen were computed and compared with experimental data of Hord for hydrofoils. Excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable. Liquid nitrogen cavities were consistently found to be in thermal equilibrium while liquid hydrogen cavities exhibited small, but distinct, non-equilibrium effects.

  15. [A multi-phase flow detector system based on gamma-ray].

    PubMed

    Ma, Min; Wang, Hua-xiang; Hao, Kui-hong

    2010-07-01

    In the present paper, a gamma-ray based on-line detection system was designed for multi-phase flow measurement, where the complicated fluid property of multi-phase flow can be studied by using the principle of ray transmission. The system is made up of three parts, i. e., the sensing unit, the signal conditioning & processing unit and the computer imaging unit. The sensing unit consists of five 241 Am sources with principal energy of 59.5 keV and five sets of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors by using the Geant 4 simulating software toolkits. The sources and detectors are mounted equally at the cross section of pipeline to detect different phase medium simultaneously. This function of the system guarantees the real-time performance of the on-line detecting. In order to improve the accuracy of the probe, a low noise probe circuit was designed, including a low noise charge-sensitive preamplifier, a low noise amplifier, filter circuit and an eliminated zero-poles circuit. Some of the emitted gamma-ray photons from the radiation sources are detected by the sensing element, where the photo energy is transferred into electrical energy by using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. The output of the sensing element is sent to the signal conditioning & processing unit, which is amplified and filtered to be a level-discriminated signal. Finally, the output of the signal conditioning & processing unit is sent to the computer imaging unit, in which the 2D images are reconstructed by using a certain reconstruction algorithm. Under the normal temperature, the system performs the test of energy spectrum and then it has better energy resolution about 4.38% for 241 Am 59.5 keV. The result reveals that our system has higher probe accuracy. Using experimental data, the images are reconstructed with Filter back projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Images of high quality are achieved. PMID:20828018

  16. The Effect of Surface Treated Nanoparticles on Single and Multi-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, D. A.; Aminzadeh, B.; Chung, D.; Zhang, X.; Wung, R.; Huh, C.; Bryant, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Surface treated nanoparticles have been suggested to be an additive to CO2 storage scenarios. This is because 1) the nanoparticles have been shown to freely transport through permeable media, and 2) the nanoparticles can stabilize a CO2 in water foam by adhering to the surface of CO2 bubbles/droplets preventing their coalescence. In terms of storage, The formation of CO2 foam will limit the CO2 mobility which can potentially help limit the CO2 leakage. Here, we will show how nanoparticles in porous media can have many interesting properties in single and multi-phase flow. For multi-phase CO2, we have performed experiments where high pressure liquid CO2 displaces brine and vice versa with and without nanoparticles in the brine. We measure the displacement pattern and in-situ CO2 saturation using CT scanning and measure the pressure drop using pressure transducers. We find that the flow is less preferential and the pressure drop is greater than when nanoparticles are present. This suggest the formation of in-situ foam/emulsion. We also show that on a brine chase, the residual saturation of CO2 is greater in the presence of nanoparticles. In terms of nanoparticle transport, it is observed that nanoparticles accumulate at the front of a brine/octane displacement. We hypothesize that this occurs due to the nanoparticles being size excluded from portions of the pore-space. To determine if this occurs in single phase flow, we have also performed experiments single-phase flow with the nanoparticles and tracer. We find that the nanoparticles arrive roughly 5% faster than the tracer. This also has implications for the positioning of nanoparticles in the pore space and how this can change the effective viscosity of the nanoparticle suspension.

  17. High-resolution simulations of multi-phase flow in magmatic-hydrothermal systems with realistic fluid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Driesner, T.; Matthai, S.; Heinrich, C.

    2002-12-01

    Cl. Dynamic viscosities are currently approximated by the approach of Palliser and McKibbin [4]. The numerical solutions of the governing equations and the equation of state are embedded in our object-oriented C++ code CSP3D4.0 [6]. Comparisons of the numerical solutions carried out with CSP for solute transport with analytical solutions and classical test cases for density dependent flow (i.e., Elder problem [1]) show very good agreement. The numerical solutions carried out with CSP and the established United States Geological Survey code HYDROTHERM [3] for multi-phase flow and energy transport also yield a very good agreement. Fluid inclusion data can be used to constrain the PTX properties of the hydrothermal fluids in numerical solutions. [1] Journal of Fluid Mechanics 27, 609-623 [2] ANU Mathematical Research Report, MRR01-023 [3] USGS Water Investigations Report 94-4045 [4] Transport in Porous Media 33, 155-171 [5] AAPG Bulletin 80, 1763-1779 [6] CSP User's Guide, Dept. of Earth Sciences ETH Zurich

  18. Estimating the importance of multi-phase processing on secondary organic aerosol based on a functional-group resolving volatility basis set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C. J.; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Madronich, S.

    2014-12-01

    Traditional understanding views secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere as continuous gas-phase oxidation of precursors such as isoprene, aromatics or alkanes. Recent research found that these oxidation products are also highly water soluble. It is further understood that the liquid-phase of cloud droplets as well as deliquesced particles could mediate SOA formation through chemistry in the aqueous-phase. While the effect of multi-phase processing has been studied in detailed for specific compounds like glyoxal or methylglyoxal, an integrated approach that considers the large number of individual compounds has been missing due to the complexity involved. In our work we explore the effects of multi-phase processing on secondary organic aerosol from an explicit modeling perspective.Volatility and solubility determine in which phase a given molecule will be found under given atmospheric conditions. Volatility has already been used to simplify the description of SOA formation in the gas-phase in what became known as the Volatility Basis Set approach (VBS). Compounds contributing to SOA formation are grouped by volatility and then treated as a whole. A number of studies extended the VBS by adding a second dimension like oxygen to carbon ratio or the mean oxidation state. In our work we use functional groups as second dimension.Using explicit oxidation chemistry modeling (GECKO-A) we derive SOA yields as well as their composition in terms of functional groups for commonly used precursors. We then investigate the effect of simply partitioning functional-group specific organic mass into cloud droplets and deliquesced aerosol based on their estimated solubility. Finally we apply simple chemistry in the aqueous-phase and relate changes in functional groups to changes in volatility and subsequent changes in partitioning between gas- and aerosol-phase.In our presentation we will explore the sensitivites of the multi-phase system in a box model setting with

  19. Thickness-based adaptive mesh refinement methods for multi-phase flow simulations with thin regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Vigor

    2014-07-15

    In numerical simulations of multi-scale, multi-phase flows, grid refinement is required to resolve regions with small scales. A notable example is liquid-jet atomization and subsequent droplet dynamics. It is essential to characterize the detailed flow physics with variable length scales with high fidelity, in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, two thickness-based mesh refinement schemes are developed based on distance- and topology-oriented criteria for thin regions with confining wall/plane of symmetry and in any situation, respectively. Both techniques are implemented in a general framework with a volume-of-fluid formulation and an adaptive-mesh-refinement capability. The distance-oriented technique compares against a critical value, the ratio of an interfacial cell size to the distance between the mass center of the cell and a reference plane. The topology-oriented technique is developed from digital topology theories to handle more general conditions. The requirement for interfacial mesh refinement can be detected swiftly, without the need of thickness information, equation solving, variable averaging or mesh repairing. The mesh refinement level increases smoothly on demand in thin regions. The schemes have been verified and validated against several benchmark cases to demonstrate their effectiveness and robustness. These include the dynamics of colliding droplets, droplet motions in a microchannel, and atomization of liquid impinging jets. Overall, the thickness-based refinement technique provides highly adaptive meshes for problems with thin regions in an efficient and fully automatic manner.

  20. Energy Dissipation in Multi-phase Infalling Clouds in Galaxy Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S D; Lin, D C

    2004-06-15

    During the epoch of large galaxy formation, thermal instability leads to the formation of a population of cool fragments which are embedded within a background of tenuous hot gas. The hot gas attains a quasi hydrostatic equilibrium. Although the cool clouds are pressure confined by the hot gas, they fall into the galactic potential, subject to drag from the hot gas. The release of gravitational energy due to the infall of the cool clouds is first converted into their kinetic energy which is subsequently dissipated as heat. The cool clouds therefore represent a potentially significant energy source for the background hot gas, depending upon the ratio of thermal energy deposited within the clouds versus the hot gas. In this paper, we show that most of dissipated energy is deposited in to the tenuous hot halo gas, which provides a source of internal energy to replenish its loss in the hot gas through Bremsstrahlung cooling and conduction into the cool clouds. Through this process, the multi-phase structure of the interstellar medium is maintained.

  1. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J. Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a “precise color” MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans. PMID:27231594

  2. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans. PMID:27231594

  3. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  4. A Multi-Phase Based Fluid-Structure-Microfluidic interaction sensor for Aerodynamic Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Christopher; Dutta, Diganta; Bashirzadeh, Yashar; Ahmed, Kareem; Qian, Shizhi

    2014-11-01

    A novel innovative microfluidic shear stress sensor is developed for measuring shear stress through multi-phase fluid-structure-microfluidic interaction. The device is composed of a microfluidic cavity filled with an electrolyte liquid. Inside the cavity, two electrodes make electrochemical velocimetry measurements of the induced convection. The cavity is sealed with a flexible superhydrophobic membrane. The membrane will dynamically stretch and flex as a result of direct shear cross-flow interaction with the seal structure, forming instability wave modes and inducing fluid motion within the microfluidic cavity. The shear stress on the membrane is measured by sensing the induced convection generated by membrane deflections. The advantages of the sensor over current MEMS based shear stress sensor technology are: a simplified design with no moving parts, optimum relationship between size and sensitivity, no gaps such as those created by micromachining sensors in MEMS processes. We present the findings of a feasibility study of the proposed sensor including wind-tunnel tests, microPIV measurements, electrochemical velocimetry, and simulation data results. The study investigates the sensor in the supersonic and subsonic flow regimes. Supported by a NASA SBIR phase 1 contract.

  5. In Vivo Formation of Vacuolated Multi-phase Compartments Lacking Membranes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hermann Broder; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2016-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain membrane-less organelles, including nucleoli and stress granules, that behave like liquid droplets. Such endogenous condensates often have internal substructure, but how this is established in the absence of membrane encapsulation remains unclear. We find that the N- and C-terminal domains of TDP43, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, are capable of driving the formation of sub-structured liquid droplets in vivo. These droplets contain dynamic internal "bubbles" of nucleoplasm, reminiscent of membrane-based multi-vesicular endosomes. A conserved sequence embedded within the intrinsically disordered region (IDR) of TDP43 promotes the formation of these multi-phase assemblies. Disease-causing point mutations in the IDR can change the propensity to form bubbles, protein dynamics within the phase, or phase-environment exchange rates. Our results show that a single IDR-containing protein can nucleate the assembly of compartmentalized liquid droplets approximating the morphological complexity of membrane-bound organelles. PMID:27452472

  6. Rapidity bin multiplicity correlations from a multi-phase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Juan; Chen, Gang; Wu, Yuan-Fang; Ma, Guo-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The central-arbitrary bin and forward-backward bin multiplicity correlation patterns for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 7.7-62.4 GeV are investigated within a multi-phase transport (AMPT) model. An interesting observation is that for sqrt{s_{NN}} < 19.6 GeV Au+Au collisions, these two correlation patterns both have an increase with the pseudorapidity gap, while for sqrt{s_{NN}} > 19.6 GeV Au+Au collisions, they decrease. We mainly discuss the influence of different evolution stages of collision system on the central-arbitrary bin correlations, such as the initial conditions, partonic scatterings, hadronization scheme and hadronic scatterings. Our results show that the central-arbitrary bin multiplicity correlations have different responses to partonic phase and hadronic phase, which can be suggested as a good probe to explore the dynamical evolution mechanism of the hot dense matter in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  7. New systematic methodology for incorporating dynamic heat transfer modelling in multi-phase biochemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arévalo, T; Lizarralde, I; Grau, P; Ayesa, E

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new modelling methodology for dynamically predicting the heat produced or consumed in the transformations of any biological reactor using Hess's law. Starting from a complete description of model components stoichiometry and formation enthalpies, the proposed modelling methodology has integrated successfully the simultaneous calculation of both the conventional mass balances and the enthalpy change of reaction in an expandable multi-phase matrix structure, which facilitates a detailed prediction of the main heat fluxes in the biochemical reactors. The methodology has been implemented in a plant-wide modelling methodology in order to facilitate the dynamic description of mass and heat throughout the plant. After validation with literature data, as illustrative examples of the capability of the methodology, two case studies have been described. In the first one, a predenitrification-nitrification dynamic process has been analysed, with the aim of demonstrating the easy integration of the methodology in any system. In the second case study, the simulation of a thermal model for an ATAD has shown the potential of the proposed methodology for analysing the effect of ventilation and influent characterization. PMID:24852412

  8. An Efficient Implementation of the GMC Micromechanics Model for Multi-Phased Materials with Complex Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient implementation of the generalized method of cells micromechanics model is presented that allows analysis of periodic unidirectional composites characterized by repeating unit cells containing thousands of subcells. The original formulation, given in terms of Hill's strain concentration matrices that relate average subcell strains to the macroscopic strains, is reformulated in terms of the interfacial subcell tractions as the basic unknowns. This is accomplished by expressing the displacement continuity equations in terms of the stresses and then imposing the traction continuity conditions directly. The result is a mixed formulation wherein the unknown interfacial subcell traction components are related to the macroscopic strain components. Because the stress field throughout the repeating unit cell is piece-wise uniform, the imposition of traction continuity conditions directly in the displacement continuity equations, expressed in terms of stresses, substantially reduces the number of unknown subcell traction (and stress) components, and thus the size of the system of equations that must be solved. Further reduction in the size of the system of continuity equations is obtained by separating the normal and shear traction equations in those instances where the individual subcells are, at most, orthotropic. The reformulated version facilitates detailed analysis of the impact of the fiber cross-section geometry and arrangement on the response of multi-phased unidirectional composites with and without evolving damage. Comparison of execution times obtained with the original and reformulated versions of the generalized method of cells demonstrates the new version's efficiency.

  9. Multi-phased screen for the evaluation of topical skin protectants against various chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, T.H.; Hobson, D.W.

    1993-05-13

    A multi-phased screen involving both in vivo and in vitro tests was used to evaluate the efficacy of 108 topical skin protectants (TSPs) against dermal exposure to sulfur mustard (HD), pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (soman or GD), thickened soman (TGD), and 0-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX). Assessment of TSPs in vivo involved the application of chemical agents onto a 0.1 mm thickness of TSP spread on the dorsa of rabbits. For the nerve agents GD, TGD, and VX, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition in lysed red blood cells sampled periodically to 24 hr after dose application was used as an end point. Efficacy against the vesicating agent HD was assessed using the areas of dermal lesions from 1 microns L dosed at multiple sites on rabbits. The in vitro model involved delivery of 8 microns L HD or nerve agent on candidate TSPs applied at 0.015 mL/sq cm on U.S. Army M-8 chemical agent detection paper. The in vitro end point for TSP efficacy evaluation was the time to M-8 paper color change, indicating time to agent penetration. In vitro/in vivo correlations indicated good agreement for HD, GD, and TGD challenges, but not for VX.

  10. Computational Modeling of Multi-Phase/Multi-Species Flows with Applications to Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaz, Homayun K.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate prediction of all physical phenomena in a combustion chamber is essential for better understanding of the system performance. Atomization, evaporation, combustion, chemical kinetics, and turbulence are those processes of great importance that need to be well understood. Processes involving the liquid phase in a combustion chamber will be further complicated under supercritical conditions. More advanced and accurate numerical techniques are required to extend our understanding of the above phenomena. A computer program for multi-species/multi-phase flow was developed for NASA/MSFC in 1992. This code, called Liquid Thrust Chamber Performance (LTCP) program takes an Eulerian- Eulerian approach and is based on the Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) technique with Lax-Friedrichs upwind method. Under the NASA/ASEE SFFP the LTCP code was used to predict the performance characteristics of several engines that were of particular interest to NASA. This code was also successful in a combustion detonation study. Converting the program to the PC platform was accomplished which extends usability and makes it available to a wider range of users. The Eulerian formulation of the liquid phase provides a suitable model that can be extended to include combustion modeling under supercritical conditions. The results have been compared against the ones of other codes and available measured data. The algorithm proved to be robust and efficient for problems with stiff source terms.

  11. A novel multi-phase bioreactor for fermentations to produce organic acids from dairy wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Zhu, H.; Li, Y.; Silva, E.M.

    1993-12-31

    A novel, fibrous bed bioreactor is developed for multi-phase fermentation processes. The microbial cells are immobilized in a spiral-wound, fibrous matrix packed in the bioreactor. This innovative, structured packing design allows good contact between two different moving phases (e.g., gas-liquid or liquid-solid) and has many advantages over conventional immobilized cell bioreactors. Because the reactor bed is not completely filled with the solid matrix, the bioreactor can be operated for a long period without developing problems such as clogging and high pressure drop usually associated with conventional packed bed and membrane bioreactors. This novel bioreactor was studied for its use in several organic acid fermentations. Production of propionate, acetate, and lactate from whey permeate was studied. In all cases studied, use of the fibrous bioreactor resulted in superior reactor performance-indicated by a more than tenfold increase in productivity, reduction or elimination of the requirement for nutrient supplementation to whey permeate, and resistance to contamination-as compared to conventional batch fermentation processes. Also, the reactor maintained high productivity throughout long-term continuous operation. No contamination, degeneration, or clogging problems were experienced during a 10-month period of continuous operation. This new bioreactor is thus suitable for industrial uses to improve fermentation processes which currently use conventional bioreactors.

  12. Modelling multi-phase liquid-sediment scour and resuspension induced by rapid flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) accelerated with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourtakas, G.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A two-phase numerical model using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is applied to two-phase liquid-sediments flows. The absence of a mesh in SPH is ideal for interfacial and highly non-linear flows with changing fragmentation of the interface, mixing and resuspension. The rheology of sediment induced under rapid flows undergoes several states which are only partially described by previous research in SPH. This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the geotechnics, non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows by proposing a model that combines the yielding, shear and suspension layer which are needed to predict accurately the global erosion phenomena, from a hydrodynamics prospective. The numerical SPH scheme is based on the explicit treatment of both phases using Newtonian and the non-Newtonian Bingham-type Herschel-Bulkley-Papanastasiou constitutive model. This is supplemented by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion to predict the onset of yielding of the sediment surface and a concentration suspension model. The multi-phase model has been compared with experimental and 2-D reference numerical models for scour following a dry-bed dam break yielding satisfactory results and improvements over well-known SPH multi-phase models. With 3-D simulations requiring a large number of particles, the code is accelerated with a graphics processing unit (GPU) in the open-source DualSPHysics code. The implementation and optimisation of the code achieved a speed up of x58 over an optimised single thread serial code. A 3-D dam break over a non-cohesive erodible bed simulation with over 4 million particles yields close agreement with experimental scour and water surface profiles.

  13. Advanced Multi-phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1995-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes code, finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), is used to analyze the complicated internal flowfield of the SRM (solid rocket motor) to explore the impacts due to the effects of chemical reaction, particle dynamics, and slag accumulation on the solid rocket motor (SRM). The particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, and agglomeration models are included in present study to obtain a better understanding of the SRM design. Finite rate chemistry model is applied to simulate the chemical reaction effects. Hermsen correlation model is used for the combustion simulation. The evaporation model introduced by Spalding is utilized to include the heat transfer from the particulate phase to the gase phase due to the evaporation of the particles. A correlation of the minimum particle size for breakup expressed in terms of the Al/Al2O3 surface tension and shear force was employed to simulate the breakup of particles. It is assumed that the breakup occurs when the Weber number exceeds 6. A simple L agglomeration model is used to investigate the particle agglomeration. However, due to the large computer memory requirements for the agglomeration model, only 2D cases are tested with the agglomeration model. The VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is employed to simulate the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the turbulent dispersion effect of the particles. The flowfield analysis obtained using the FDNS code in the present research with finite rate chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, agglomeration, and VOG models will provide a design guide for the potential improvement of the SRM including the use of materials and the shape of nozzle geometry such that a better performance of the SRM can be achieved. The simulation of the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity can assist the designer to improve the design of

  14. Surface based cardiac and respiratory motion extraction for pulmonary structures from multi-phase CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Berg, Jens; Barschdorf, Hans; Blaffert, Thomas; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian

    2007-03-01

    During medical imaging and therapeutic interventions, pulmonary structures are in general subject to cardiac and respiratory motion. This motion leads potentially to artefacts and blurring in the resulting image material and to uncertainties during interventions. This paper presents a new automatic approach for surface based motion tracking of pulmonary structures and reports on the results for cardiac and respiratory induced motion. The method applies an active shape approach to ad-hoc generated surface representations of the pulmonary structures for phase to phase surface tracking. Input of the method are multi-phase CT data, either cardiac or respiratory gated. The iso-surface representing the transition between air or lung parenchyma to soft tissue, is triangulated for a selected phase p 0. An active shape procedure is initialised in the image of phase p I using the generated surface in p 0. The used internal energy term penalizes shape deformation as compared to p 0. The process is iterated for all phases p i to p i+1 of the complete cycle. Since the mesh topology is the same for all phases, the vertices of the triangular mesh can be treated as pseudo-landmarks defining tissue trajectories. A dense motion field is interpolated. The motion field was especially designed to estimate the error margins for radiotherapy. In the case of respiratory motion extraction, a validation on ten biphasic thorax CT images (2.5mm slice distance) was performed with expert landmarks placed at vessel bifurcations. The mean error on landmark position was below 2.6mm. We further applied the method to ECG gated images and estimated the influence of the heart beat on lung tissue displacement.

  15. Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1995-03-01

    A Navier-Stokes code, finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), is used to analyze the complicated internal flowfield of the SRM (solid rocket motor) to explore the impacts due to the effects of chemical reaction, particle dynamics, and slag accumulation on the solid rocket motor (SRM). The particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, and agglomeration models are included in present study to obtain a better understanding of the SRM design. Finite rate chemistry model is applied to simulate the chemical reaction effects. Hermsen correlation model is used for the combustion simulation. The evaporation model introduced by Spalding is utilized to include the heat transfer from the particulate phase to the gase phase due to the evaporation of the particles. A correlation of the minimum particle size for breakup expressed in terms of the Al/Al2O3 surface tension and shear force was employed to simulate the breakup of particles. It is assumed that the breakup occurs when the Weber number exceeds 6. A simple L agglomeration model is used to investigate the particle agglomeration. However, due to the large computer memory requirements for the agglomeration model, only 2D cases are tested with the agglomeration model. The VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is employed to simulate the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the turbulent dispersion effect of the particles. The flowfield analysis obtained using the FDNS code in the present research with finite rate chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, agglomeration, and VOG models will provide a design guide for the potential improvement of the SRM including the use of materials and the shape of nozzle geometry such that a better performance of the SRM can be achieved. The simulation of the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity can assist the designer to improve the design of

  16. Microstructure characterization of multi-phase composites and utilization of phase change materials and recycled rubbers in cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshgin, Pania

    2011-12-01

    This research focuses on two important subjects: (1) Characterization of heterogeneous microstructure of multi-phase composites and the effect of microstructural features on effective properties of the material. (2) Utilizations of phase change materials and recycled rubber particles from waste tires to improve thermal properties of insulation materials used in building envelopes. Spatial pattern of multi-phase and multidimensional internal structures of most composite materials are highly random. Quantitative description of the spatial distribution should be developed based on proper statistical models, which characterize the morphological features. For a composite material with multi-phases, the volume fraction of the phases as well as the morphological parameters of the phases have very strong influences on the effective property of the composite. These morphological parameters depend on the microstructure of each phase. This study intends to include the effect of higher order morphological details of the microstructure in the composite models. The higher order statistics, called two-point correlation functions characterize various behaviors of the composite at any two points in a stochastic field. Specifically, correlation functions of mosaic patterns are used in the study for characterizing transport properties of composite materials. One of the most effective methods to improve energy efficiency of buildings is to enhance thermal properties of insulation materials. The idea of using phase change materials and recycled rubber particles such as scrap tires in insulation materials for building envelopes has been studied.

  17. Multi-phase classification by a least-squares support vector machine approach in tomography images of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Faisal; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Image processing of X-ray-computed polychromatic cone-beam micro-tomography (μXCT) data of geological samples mainly involves artefact reduction and phase segmentation. For the former, the main beam-hardening (BH) artefact is removed by applying a best-fit quadratic surface algorithm to a given image data set (reconstructed slice), which minimizes the BH offsets of the attenuation data points from that surface. A Matlab code for this approach is provided in the Appendix. The final BH-corrected image is extracted from the residual data or from the difference between the surface elevation values and the original grey-scale values. For the segmentation, we propose a novel least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM, an algorithm for pixel-based multi-phase classification) approach. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed on BH-corrected and uncorrected samples to show that BH correction is in fact an important prerequisite for accurate multi-phase classification. The combination of the two approaches was thus used to classify successfully three different more or less complex multi-phase rock core samples.

  18. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  19. Deformation and failure of single- and multi-phase silicate liquids: seismic precursors and mechanical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Wassermann, Joachim; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-04-01

    mechanical work tends to concentrate in specific weak regions facilitating dynamical failure of the material through dissipation of the accumulated strain energy. Applying a statistical Global Linearization Method (GLM) in multi-phase silicate liquids samples leads to a maximum likelihood power-law fit of the accelerating rates of released AEs. The calculated α exponent of the famous empirical Failure Forecast Method (FFM) tends to decrease from 2 towards 1 with increasing porosity, suggesting a shift towards an idealized exponential-like acceleration. Single-phase silicate liquids behave more elastically during deformation without much cracking and suddenly releasing their accumulated strain energy at failure, implying less clear trends in monitored AEs. In a predictive prospective, these results support the fact that failure forecasting power is enhanced by the presence of heterogeneities inside a material.

  20. Micro-Ct Imaging of Multi-Phase Flow in Carbonates and Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, M. G.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most important mechanisms that limits the escape of CO2 when injected into the subsurface for the purposes of carbon storage is capillary trapping, where CO2 is stranded as pore-scale droplets (ganglia). Prospective storage sites are aquifers or reservoirs that tend to be at conditions where CO2 will reside as a super-critical phase. In order to fully describe physical mechanisms characterising multi-phase flow during and post CO2 injection, experiments need to be conducted at these elevated aquifer/reservoir conditions - this poses a considerable experimental challenge. A novel experimental apparatus has been developed which uses μCT scanning for the non-invasive imaging of the distribution of CO2 in the pore space of rock with resolutions of 7μm at temperatures and pressures representative of the conditions present in prospective saline aquifer CO2 storage sites. The fluids are kept in chemical equilibrium with one-another and with the rock into which they are injected. This is done to prevent the dissolution of the CO2 in the brine to form carbonic acid, which can then react with the rock, particularly carbonates. By eliminating reaction we study the fundamental mechanisms of capillary trapping for an unchanging pore structure. In this study we present a suite of results from three carbonate and two sandstone rock types, showing that, for both cases the CO2 acts as the non-wetting phase and significant quantities of CO2 is trapped. The carbonate examined represent a wide variety of pore topologies with one rock with a very well connected, high porosity pore space (Mt Gambier), one with a lower porosity, poorly connected pore space (Estaillades) and one with a cemented bead pack type pore space (Ketton). Both sandstones (Doddington and Bentheimer) were high permeability granular quartzites. CO2 was injected into each rock, followed by brine injection. After brine injection the entire length of the rock core was scanned, processed and segmented into

  1. Comparison of optimization algorithms for parameter estimation of multi-phase flow models with application to geological carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinet, Antoine J.; Shoemaker, Christine A.

    2013-04-01

    Optimization of multi-phase transport models is important both for calibrating model parameters to observed data and for analyzing management options. We focus on examples of geological carbon sequestration (GCS) process-based multi-phase models. Realistic GCS models can be very computationally expensive not only due to the spatial distribution of the model but also because of the complex nonlinear multi-phase and multi-component transport equations to be solved. As a result we need to have optimization methods that get accurate answers with relatively few simulations. In this analysis we compare a variety of different types of optimization algorithms to understand the best type of algorithms to use for different types of problems. This includes an analysis of which characteristics of the problem are important in choice of algorithm. The goal of this paper is to evaluate which optimization algorithms are the most efficient in a given situation, taking into account shape of the optimization problem (e.g. uni- or multi-modal) and the number of simulations that can be done. The algorithms compared are the widely used derivative-based PEST optimization algorithm, the derivative-based iTOUGH2, the Kriging response surface algorithm EGO, the heuristics-based DDS (Dynamically Dimensioned Search), and the Radial Basis Function surrogate response surface based global optimization algorithms 'GORBIT' and 'Stochastic RBF'. We calibrate a simple homogeneous model '3hom' and two more realistic models '20layer' and '6het'. The latter takes 2 h per simulation. Using rigorous statistical tests, we show that while the derivative-based algorithms of PEST are efficient on the simple 3hom model, it does poorly in comparison to surrogate optimization methods Stochastic RBF and GORBIT on the more realistic models. We then identify the shapes of the optimization surface of the three models using enumerative simulations and discover that 3hom is smooth and unimodal and the more realistic

  2. Pore-scale Simulation and Imaging of Multi-phase Flow and Transport in Porous Media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawshaw, J.; Welch, N.; Daher, I.; Yang, J.; Shah, S.; Grey, F.; Boek, E.

    2013-12-01

    We combine multi-scale imaging and computer simulation of multi-phase flow and reactive transport in rock samples to enhance our fundamental understanding of long term CO2 storage in rock formations. The imaging techniques include Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), micro-CT and medical CT scanning, with spatial resolutions ranging from sub-micron to mm respectively. First, we report a new sample preparation technique to study micro-porosity in carbonates using CLSM in 3 dimensions. Second, we use micro-CT scanning to generate high resolution 3D pore space images of carbonate and cap rock samples. In addition, we employ micro-CT to image the processes of evaporation in fractures and cap rock degradation due to exposure to CO2 flow. Third, we use medical CT scanning to image spontaneous imbibition in carbonate rock samples. Our imaging studies are complemented by computer simulations of multi-phase flow and transport, using the 3D pore space images obtained from the scanning experiments. We have developed a massively parallel lattice-Boltzmann (LB) code to calculate the single phase flow field in these pore space images. The resulting flow fields are then used to calculate hydrodynamic dispersion using a novel scheme to predict probability distributions for molecular displacements using the LB method and a streamline algorithm, modified for optimal solid boundary conditions. We calculate solute transport on pore-space images of rock cores with increasing degree of heterogeneity: a bead pack, Bentheimer sandstone and Portland carbonate. We observe that for homogeneous rock samples, such as bead packs, the displacement distribution remains Gaussian with time increasing. In the more heterogeneous rocks, on the other hand, the displacement distribution develops a stagnant part. We observe that the fraction of trapped solute increases from the beadpack (0 %) to Bentheimer sandstone (1.5 %) to Portland carbonate (8.1 %), in excellent agreement with PFG

  3. Thermodynamic approach to the stability of multi-phase systems: application to the Y2O3-Fe system.

    PubMed

    Samolyuk, G D; Osetsky, Y N

    2015-08-01

    Oxide-metal systems are important in many practical applications, and they are undergoing extensive study using a wide range of techniques. The most accurate theoretical approaches are based on density functional theory (DFT), which is limited to ~10(2) atoms. Multi-scale approaches, e.g. DFT + Monte Carlo, are often used to model oxide metal systems at the atomic level. These approaches can qualitatively describe the kinetics of some processes but not the overall stability of individual phases. In this article, we propose a thermodynamic approach to study equilibrium in multi-phase systems, which can be sequentially enhanced by considering different defects and microstructures. We estimate the thermodynamic equilibrium by minimization of the free energy of the whole multi-phase system using a limited set of defects and microstructural objects for which the properties are calculated by DFT. As an example, we consider Y2O3 + bcc Fe with vacancies in both the Y2O3 and bcc Fe phases, Y substitutions and O interstitials in Fe, Fe impurities, and antisite defects in Y2O3. The output of these calculations is the thermal equilibrium concentration of all the defects for a particular temperature and composition. The results obtained confirmed the high temperature stability of yttria in iron. Model development toward more accurate calculations is discussed. PMID:26151413

  4. High-Speed Visualization of Evaporation Phenomena from Tungsten Based Electrode in Multi-Phase AC Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Manabu; Hashizume, Taro; Imatsuji, Tomoyuki; Nawata, Yushi; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    A multi-phase AC arc has been developed for applications in various fields of engineering because it possesses unique advantages such as high energy efficiency. However, understanding of fundamental phenomena in the multi-phase AC arc is still insufficient for practical use. Purpose of this study is to investigate electrode erosion mechanism by high-speed visualization of the electrode metal vapor in the arc. Results indicated that the electrode mainly evaporated at anodic period, leading to the arc constriction. Moreover, evaporation of W electrode with 2wt% La2O3 at the anodic period was much higher than that with 2wt% ThO2. This can be explained by different properties of these oxide additives. Evaporation of the oxide additive resulted in the arc constriction, which accelerated the evaporation of W electrode. Therefore, addition of La2O3 with lower melting and boiling point than ThO2 lead to stronger arc constriction, resulting in severer evaporation of W electrode.

  5. A new non-overlapping concept to improve the Hybrid Particle Level Set method in multi-phase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Philip J.; Bai, Wei

    2015-02-01

    A novel non-overlapping concept is augmented to the Hybrid Particle Level Set (HPLS) method to improve its accuracy and suitability for the modelling of multi-phase fluid flows. The concept addresses shortcomings in the reseeding algorithm, which maintains resolution of the surface at runtime. These shortcomings result in the misplacement of newly seeded particles in the opposite signed domain and necessitate a restriction on the distance that a particle can escape without deletion, which reduces the effectiveness of the method. The non-overlapping concept judges the suitability of potential new particles based on information already contained within the particle representation of the surface. By preventing the misplacement of particles it is possible to significantly relax the distance restriction thereby increasing the accuracy of the HPLS method in multi-phase flows. To demonstrate its robustness and efficiency, the concept is examined with a number of challenging test cases, including both level-set-only simulations and two-phase fluid flows.

  6. Uncovering a Salt Giant. Deep-Sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian Events (DREAM) multi-phase drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, Angelo; Aoisi, Vanni; Lofi, Johanna; Hübscher, Christian; deLange, Gert; Flecker, Rachel; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Gorini, Christian; Gvirtzman, Zohar; Krijgsman, Wout; Lugli, Stefano; Makowsky, Yizhaq; Manzi, Vinicio; McGenity, Terry; Panieri, Giuliana; Rabineau, Marina; Roveri, Marco; Sierro, Francisco Javier; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    In May 2013, the DREAM MagellanPlus Workshop was held in Brisighella (Italy). The initiative builds from recent activities by various research groups to identify potential sites to perform deep-sea scientific drilling in the Mediterranean Sea across the deep Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) sedimentary record. In this workshop three generations of scientists were gathered: those who participated in formulation of the deep desiccated model, through DSDP Leg 13 drilling in 1973; those who are actively involved in present-day MSC research; and the next generation (PhD students and young post-docs). The purpose of the workshop was to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the several open questions still existing about the causes, processes, timing and consequences at local and planetary scale of an outstanding case of natural environmental change in the recent Earth history: the Messinian Salinity Crisis in the Mediterranean Sea. The product of the workshop is the identification of the structure of an experimental design of site characterization, riser-less and riser drilling, sampling, measurements, and down-hole analyses that will be the core for at least one compelling and feasible multiple phase drilling proposal. Particular focus has been given to reviewing seismic site survey data available from different research groups at pan-Mediterranean basin scale, to the assessment of additional site survey activity including 3D seismics, and to ways of establishing firm links with oil and gas industry. The scientific community behind the DREAM initiative is willing to proceed with the submission to IODP of a Multi-phase Drilling Project including several drilling proposals addressing specific drilling objectives, all linked to the driving objectives of the MSC drilling and understanding . A series of critical drilling targets were identified to address the still open questions

  7. Multi-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Symposium-Workshop, 3rd, Miami Beach, FL, April 18-20, 1983, Proceedings of Condensed Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    Attempts at analytical predictions of stable operating regimes for multi-phase flows are reported, together with experimental results. The fundamentals and regimes of multi-phase flows are explored, including the behavior of bubbles in liquid flows. Attention is given to incidences of flow pressure drop and heat transfer properties in air-water dispersed flow, during blowdown, and in MHD flows. Mass transfer and phase changes conditions are investigated in turbulent flows, in the cockpit environment, and in the formation of alloys. Consideration is given to boiling and condensation phenomena on surfaces, in pools, and in tubes and fins, and to instabilities and turbulence. Reactor safety is discussed, as are numerical models for multi-phase flow, steam generation and distribution with solar and geothermal heat sources, and characteristics of transients and wave propagation. Fluidized bed flows are examined, together with measurement techniques and the characteristics of suspensions. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  8. A new general methodology for incorporating physico-chemical transformations into multi-phase wastewater treatment process models.

    PubMed

    Lizarralde, I; Fernández-Arévalo, T; Brouckaert, C; Vanrolleghem, P; Ikumi, D S; Ekama, G A; Ayesa, E; Grau, P

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a new general methodology for incorporating physico-chemical and chemical transformations into multi-phase wastewater treatment process models in a systematic and rigorous way under a Plant-Wide modelling (PWM) framework. The methodology presented in this paper requires the selection of the relevant biochemical, chemical and physico-chemical transformations taking place and the definition of the mass transport for the co-existing phases. As an example a mathematical model has been constructed to describe a system for biological COD, nitrogen and phosphorus removal, liquid-gas transfer, precipitation processes, and chemical reactions. The capability of the model has been tested by comparing simulated and experimental results for a nutrient removal system with sludge digestion. Finally, a scenario analysis has been undertaken to show the potential of the obtained mathematical model to study phosphorus recovery. PMID:25746499

  9. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1998-02-10

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  10. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow.

  11. Multi-scale and Multi-phase deformation of crystalline materials

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-12-01

    The MDEF package contains capabilities ofr modeling the deformation of materials at the crystal scale. Primary code capabilities are: xoth "strength" and "equation of state" aspects of material response, post-processing utilities, utilities for comparing results with data from diffraction experiments.

  12. Dynamo saturation in direct simulations of the multi-phase turbulent interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendre, A.; Gressel, O.; Elstner, D.

    2015-12-01

    The ordered magnetic field observed via polarised synchrotron emission in nearby disc galaxies can be explained by a mean-field dynamo operating in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Additionally, vertical-flux initial conditions are potentially able to influence this dynamo via the occurrence of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We aim to study the influence of various initial field configurations on the saturated state of the mean-field dynamo. This is motivated by the observation that different saturation behaviour was previously obtained for different supernova rates. We perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of three-dimensional local boxes of the vertically stratified, turbulent interstellar medium, employing shearing-periodic boundary conditions horizontally. Unlike in our previous work, we also impose a vertical seed magnetic field. We run the simulations until the growth of the magnetic energy becomes negligible. We furthermore perform simulations of equivalent 1D dynamo models, with an algebraic quenching mechanism for the dynamo coefficients. We compare the saturation of the magnetic field in the DNS with the algebraic quenching of a mean-field dynamo. The final magnetic field strength found in the direct simulation is in excellent agreement with a quenched αΩ dynamo. For supernova rates representative of the Milky Way, field losses via a Galactic wind are likely responsible for saturation. We conclude that the relative strength of the turbulent and regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies may depend on the galaxy's star formation rate. We propose that a mean field approach with algebraic quenching may serve as a simple sub-grid scale model for galaxy evolution simulations including a prescribed feedback from magnetic fields.

  13. MULTI-PHASE HIGH TEMPERATURE ALLOYS: EXPLORATION OF LAVES-STRENGTHENED STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Lu, Zhao Ping; Liu, Chain T

    2007-01-01

    Exploratory effort was initiated for the development of Fe-base alloys strengthened by intermetallic Laves phase combined with MC (M: metals) carbide for improved elevated-temperature strength in fossil energy system components such as super-heater tubes and industrial gas turbines. Work in FY 2006 was focused on strengthening of Fe-Cr-Ni base austenitic stainless alloys by Fe2Nb Laves-phase precipitates with/without MC carbides, in combination with the improvement of oxidation resistance via Al-modification to promote alumina scale formation. A series of Fe-Cr-Ni-Nb base austenitic alloys with additions of Mo, Al, Si, C, B, etc. were cast and thermomechanically processed, and then tensile creep-rupture tested at the conditions of 750-850oC/70-170 MPa. The Al-modified alloys strengthened by Laves + MC show superior creep strength to that of conventional type 347 stainless steels, and their creep life-limit reaches up to 500 h at 750 oC/100 MPa. These alloys also show an excellent oxidation resistance from 650-800oC in air and air + 10% water vapor environments due to formation of a protective Al2O3 scale. Microstructural analysis of alloys strengthened by only Laves phase revealed that the Laves phase was effective to pin dislocations when the particle size is less than 0.5 m, but the resultant creep rupture lives were relatively short. The Al-modification was also applied to an advanced carbide-strengthened austenitic stainless steel, and it yielded creep resistance comparable to state-of-the-art austenitic alloys such as NF709, together with protective alumina scale formation. Modification of this alloy composition for its creep strength and oxidation resistance will be pursued in FY2007. Preliminary results suggest that the developed alloys with Al-modification combined with MC carbide strengthening are promising as a new class of high-temperature austenitic stainless steels.

  14. Interface control volume finite element method for modelling multi-phase fluid flow in highly heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abushaikha, Ahmad S.; Blunt, Martin J.; Gosselin, Olivier R.; Pain, Christopher C.; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new control volume finite element method that improves the modelling of multi-phase fluid flow in highly heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, called the Interface Control Volume Finite Element (ICVFE) method. The method drastically decreases the smearing effects in other CVFE methods, while being mass conservative and numerically consistent. The pressure is computed at the interfaces of elements, and the control volumes are constructed around them, instead of at the elements' vertices. This assures that a control volume straddles, at most, two elements, which decreases the fluid smearing between neighbouring elements when large variations in their material properties are present. Lowest order Raviart-Thomas vectorial basis functions are used for the pressure calculation and first-order Courant basis functions are used to compute fluxes. The method is a combination of Mixed Hybrid Finite Element (MHFE) and CVFE methods. Its accuracy and convergence are tested using three dimensional tetrahedron elements to represent heterogeneous reservoirs. Our new approach is shown to be more accurate than current CVFE methods.

  15. A variational approach to multi-phase motion of gas, liquid and solid based on the level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Kensuke

    2009-07-01

    We propose a simple and robust numerical algorithm to deal with multi-phase motion of gas, liquid and solid based on the level set method [S. Osher, J.A. Sethian, Front propagating with curvature-dependent speed: Algorithms based on Hamilton-Jacobi formulation, J. Comput. Phys. 79 (1988) 12; M. Sussman, P. Smereka, S. Osher, A level set approach for capturing solution to incompressible two-phase flow, J. Comput. Phys. 114 (1994) 146; J.A. Sethian, Level Set Methods and Fast Marching Methods, Cambridge University Press, 1999; S. Osher, R. Fedkiw, Level Set Methods and Dynamics Implicit Surface, Applied Mathematical Sciences, vol. 153, Springer, 2003]. In Eulerian framework, to simulate interaction between a moving solid object and an interfacial flow, we need to define at least two functions (level set functions) to distinguish three materials. In such simulations, in general two functions overlap and/or disagree due to numerical errors such as numerical diffusion. In this paper, we resolved the problem using the idea of the active contour model [M. Kass, A. Witkin, D. Terzopoulos, Snakes: active contour models, International Journal of Computer Vision 1 (1988) 321; V. Caselles, R. Kimmel, G. Sapiro, Geodesic active contours, International Journal of Computer Vision 22 (1997) 61; G. Sapiro, Geometric Partial Differential Equations and Image Analysis, Cambridge University Press, 2001; R. Kimmel, Numerical Geometry of Images: Theory, Algorithms, and Applications, Springer-Verlag, 2003] introduced in the field of image processing.

  16. Multi-phase inversion tectonics related to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault activity, Zagros Mountains, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazem Shiroodi, Sadjad; Ghafoori, Mohammad; Faghih, Ali; Ghanadian, Mostafa; Lashkaripour, Gholamreza; Hafezi Moghadas, Naser

    2015-11-01

    Distinctive characteristics of inverted structures make them important criteria for the identification of certain structural styles of folded belts. The interpretation of 3D seismic reflection and well data sheds new light on the structural evolution and age of inverted structures associated to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault within the Persian Gulf Basin and northeastern margin of Afro-Arabian plate. Analysis of thickness variations of growth strata using "T-Z plot" (thickness versus throw plot) method revealed the kinematics of the fault. Obtained results show that the fault has experienced a multi-phase evolutionary history over six different extension and compression deformation events (i.e. positive and negative inversion) between 252.2 and 11.62 Ma. This cyclic activity of the growth fault was resulted from alteration of sedimentary processes during continuous fault slip. The structural development of the study area both during positive and negative inversion geometry styles was ultimately controlled by the relative motion between the Afro-Arabian and Central-Iranian plates.

  17. Transitioning from multi-phase to single-phase microfluidics for long-term culture and treatment of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-09-21

    When compared to methodologies based on low adhesion or hanging drop plates, droplet microfluidics offers several advantages for the formation and culture of multicellular spheroids, such as the potential for higher throughput screening and the use of reduced cell numbers, whilst providing increased stability for plate handling. However, a drawback of the technology is its characteristic compartmentalisation which limits the nutrients available to cells within an emulsion and poses challenges to the exchange of the encapsulated solution, often resulting in short-term cell culture and/or viability issues. The aim of this study was to develop a multi-purpose microfluidic platform that combines the high-throughput characteristics of multi-phase flows with that of ease of perfusion typical of single-phase microfluidics. We developed a versatile system to upscale the formation and long-term culture of multicellular spheroids for testing anticancer treatments, creating an array of fluidically addressable, compact spheroids that could be cultured in either medium or within a gel scaffold. The work provides proof-of-concept results for using this system to test both chemo- and radio-therapeutic protocols using in vitro 3D cancer models. PMID:27477673

  18. High-resolution numerical methods for compressible multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Trangenstein, J.A.

    1993-03-15

    This is the first year in the proposed three-year effort to develop high-resolution numerical methods for multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. The issues being addressed in this research are: Computational efficiency: Field-scale simulation of enhanced oil recovery, whether for energy production or aquifer remediation, is typically highly under-resolved. This is because rock transport properties vary on many scales, and because current numerical methods have low resolution. Effective media properties: Since porous media are formed through complex geologic processes, they involve significant uncertainty and scale-dependence. Given this uncertainty, knowledge of ensemble averages of flow in porous media can be preferable to knowledge of flow in specific realizations of the reservoir. However, current models of effective properties do not represent the observed behavior very well. Relative permeability models present a good example of this problem. In practice, these models seldom provide realistic representations of hysteresis, interfacial tension effects or three-phase flow; there are no models that represent well all three effects simultaneously. Wave propagation: It is common in the petroleum industry to assume that the models have the same well-posedness properties as the physical system. An example of this fallacy is given by the three-phase relative permeability models; they were widely assumed by the petroleum community to produce hyperbolic systems for the Buckley-Leverett equations, but later the mathematics community proved that these models inherently produce local elliptic regions. Since numerical methods must use the models for computations, oscillations that develop could erroneously be attributed to numerical error rather than modeling difficulties. During this year, we have made significant progress on several tasks aimed at addressing these issues.

  19. Preparation and Oxidation of ZrB2/SiC/Zr2Al4C5 Multi-phase Ceramics with Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qilong; Li, Junguo; Ma, Zhiyu; Nie, Ye; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2013-03-01

    The ZrB2/SiC/Zr2Al4C5 multi-phase ceramics were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 1800 °C for 3 min under 20 MPa in an vacuum. Oxidation behavior of multi-phase ceramics were investigated using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) from 20 °C to 1500 °C and muffle furnace in stagnant air at 1200 °C. Samples were analyzed after oxidation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to determine the reaction products and to observe the microstructure. The results showed that the aluminium borate and mullite crystallize on the surface in the samples oxidized. The effect of Zr2Al4C5 content on the oxidation resistance of the ZrB2 ceramics were discussed respectively, and oxidation mechanism was also analysised.

  20. Accurate Multi-Phase Traveltimes in 2-D Layered Media Using a Fast Marching Scheme With Source Grid Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, N.; Sambridge, M.

    2003-12-01

    The accurate prediction of seismic traveltimes in layered media is required in many areas of seismology. In addition to simple refractions and reflections, complex phases comprising numerous transmission and reflection branches may exist; for instance, the so-called ``multiples" frequently identified in marine reflection seismology. We present a grid-based method for the accurate determination of multi-phase traveltimes in layered media of significant complexity. A finite difference eikonal solver known as the Fast Marching Method (FMM) is used to track wavefronts within a layer. FMM is a fast and unconditionally stable upwind scheme that is well suited to complex models, and can be used sequentially to track the multiple refraction and/or reflection branches of virtually any required phase. Although FMM was initially introduced as a first-order scheme, higher order operators can be used. A mixed-order scheme that preferentially uses second-order operators, but reverts to first-order operators when the required upwind traveltimes are unavailable, is one possibility. Despite improved accuracy, this scheme still suffers from first-order convergence due to high wavefront curvature and first-order accuracy in the vicinity of the source. To overcome this problem, we implement local grid refinement about the source. In order to retain stability, the edge of the refined grid conforms to the shape of the wavefront, so that information only flows out of the refined grid, and never back into it. Application of our new scheme to complex velocity media shows that grid refinement typically improves accuracy by an order of magnitude, with only a small increase in computation time ( ˜5%). Significantly, first-order convergence is replaced by near second-order convergence, even in media with velocity contrasts as large as 8:1. In one example, with a velocity grid defined by 257,121 nodes, reflection traveltimes from a strongly undulating interface were calculated with an error of

  1. Structural inheritance during normal fault growth in multi-phase rifts; a case study from the Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli Khani, Hamed; Bell, Rebecca E.; Fossen, Haakon; A-L. Jackson, Christopher; Rotevatn, Atle; Gawthorpe, Robert L.

    2015-04-01

    In multi-phase rift systems such as the northern North Sea rift, pre-existing basement structures influence the nucleation, growth and linkage of rift-related normal faults. However, our understanding of the degree of physical and kinematic linkage between basement and cover structures is limited, since deep structures are generally poorly imaged on seismic reflection data. In the North Sea Rift, two main phases of rifting are recognized in the Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic-to-Early Cretaceous. Moreover, prior to rifting, the area underwent multiple episodes of deformation during the Ordovician-Devonian Caledonian orogeny and Devonian extension. In this study we investigate the influence of pre-existing structures on the i) evolution of Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous normal fault systems and ii) distribution of strain during reactivation of older structures in the northern North Sea rift. For this purpose we utilize 2D (-9 s TWT) and 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the North Viking Graben, covering the Horda Platform in the east and the East Shetland Basin in the west. We show that low-angle (< 30°) intrabasement reflections extend, in some areas, upward into the Triassic section. West-dipping and east-dipping intrabasement structures are identified in the Horda Platform and East Shetland Basin respectively, while in the Northern Viking Graben area both west and east-dipping structures are mapped. At depth, some of intrabasement structures terminate against high-amplitude reflections in the lower-crust. This study documents dissimilar development of Intrabasement structures in the Horda Platform, Viking Graben and East Shetland Basin. In the Viking Graben and Horda Platform these structures are more developed and in some places cross-cut each other, while in the East Shetland Basin, only two sets of structures have been mapped. We also show that intrabasement structures in the Horda Platform are generally lower angle than

  2. Disentangling the history of complex multi-phased shell beds based on the analysis of 3D point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Djuricic, Ana; Mandic, Oleg; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Shell beds are key features in sedimentary records throughout the Phanerozoic. The interplay between burial rates and population productivity is reflected in distinct degrees of shelliness. Consequently, shell beds may provide informations on various physical processes, which led to the accumulation and preservation of hard parts. Many shell beds pass through a complex history of formation being shaped by more than one factor. In shallow marine settings, the composition of shell beds is often strongly influenced by winnowing, reworking and transport. These processes may cause considerable time averaging and the accumulation of specimens, which have lived thousands of years apart. In the best case, the environment remained stable during that time span and the mixing does not mask the overall composition. A major obstacle for the interpretation of shell beds, however, is the amalgamation of shell beds of several depositional units in a single concentration, as typically for tempestites and tsunamites. Disentangling such mixed assemblages requires deep understanding of the ecological requirements of the taxa involved - which is achievable for geologically young shell beds with living relatives - and a statistic approach to quantify the contribution by the various death assemblages. Furthermore it requires understanding of sedimentary processes potentially involved into their formation. Here we present the first attempt to describe and decipher such a multi-phase shell-bed based on a high resolution digital surface model (1 mm) combined with ortho-photos with a resolution of 0.5 mm per pixel. Documenting the oyster reef requires precisely georeferenced data; owing to high redundancy of the point cloud an accuracy of a few mm was achieved. The shell accumulation covers an area of 400 m2 with thousands of specimens, which were excavated by a three months campaign at Stetten in Lower Austria. Formed in an Early Miocene estuary of the Paratethys Sea it is mainly composed

  3. Multi-Phased, Post-Accident Support of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant - 12246

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Arnaud; Gillet, Philippe; Ytournel, Bertrand; Varet, Thierry; David, Laurent; Prevost, Thierry; Redonnet, Carol; Piot, Gregoire; Jouaville, Stephane; Pagis, Georges

    2012-07-01

    operation results to date. AREVA's response to the Fukushima Dai-Ichi crisis was multi-phased: emergency aid and relief supply was sent within days after the accident; AREVA-Veolia engineering teams designed and implemented a water treatment solution in record time, only 3 months; and AREVA continues to support TEPCO and propose solutions for waste management, soil remediation and decontamination of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi site. Despite the huge challenges, the Actiflo{sup TM}-Rad project has been a success: the water treatment unit started on time and performed as expected. The performance is the result of many key elements: AREVA expertise in radioactive effluents decontamination, Veolia know-how in water treatment equipments in crisis environment, and of course AREVA and Veolia teams' creativity. The project success is also due to AREVA and Veolia teams' reactivity and high level of commitment with engineering teams working 24/7 in Japan, France and Germany. AREVA and Veolia deep knowledge of the Japanese industry ensured that the multi-cultural exchanges were not an issue. Finally the excellent overall project management and execution by TEPCO and other Japanese stakeholders was very efficient. The emergency water treatment was a key step of the roadmap towards restoration from the accident at Fukushima Dai-Ichi that TEPCO designed and keeps executing with success. (authors)

  4. SU-E-T-510: Mathematical Analysis of Approximate Biological Effective Dose (BED) Calculation for Multi-Phase Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kauweloa, K; Gutierrez, A; Bergamo, A; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is growing interest about biological effective dose (BED) and its application in treatment plan evaluation due to its stronger correlation with treatment outcome. An approximate biological effective dose (BEDA) equation was introduced to simplify BED calculations by treatment planning systems in multi-phase treatments. The purpose of this work is to reveal its mathematical properties relative to the true, multi-phase BED (BEDT) equation. Methods: The BEDT equation was derived and used to reveal the mathematical properties of BEDA. MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA) was used to simulate and analyze common and extreme clinical multi-phase cases. In those cases, percent error (Perror) and Bland-Altman analysis were used to study the significance of the inaccuracies of BEDA for different combinations of total doses, numbers of fractions, doses per fractions and α over β values. All the calculations were performed on a voxel-basis in order to study how dose distributions would affect the accuracy of BEDA. Results: When the voxel dose-per-fractions (DPF) delivered by both phases are equal, BEDA and BEDT are equal. In heterogeneous dose distributions, which significantly vary between the phases, there are fewer occurrences of equal DPFs and hence the imprecision of BEDA is greater. It was shown that as the α over β ratio increased the accuracy of BEDA would improve. Examining twenty-four cases, it was shown that the range of DPF ratios for a 3 Perror varied from 0.32 to 7.50Gy, whereas for Perror of 1 the range varied from 0.50 to 2.96Gy. Conclusion: The DPF between the different phases should be equal in order to render BEDA accurate. OARs typically receive heterogeneous dose distributions hence the probability of equal DPFs is low. Consequently, the BEDA equation should only be used for targets or OARs that receive uniform or very similar dose distributions by the different treatment phases.

  5. A graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit for the calculation of three-dimensional (3D) multi-phase biological effective dose (BED) distributions including statistical analyses.

    PubMed

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Niko; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2016-07-01

    A toolkit has been developed for calculating the 3-dimensional biological effective dose (BED) distributions in multi-phase, external beam radiotherapy treatments such as those applied in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and in multi-prescription treatments. This toolkit also provides a wide range of statistical results related to dose and BED distributions. MATLAB 2010a, version 7.10 was used to create this GUI toolkit. The input data consist of the dose distribution matrices, organ contour coordinates, and treatment planning parameters from the treatment planning system (TPS). The toolkit has the capability of calculating the multi-phase BED distributions using different formulas (denoted as true and approximate). Following the calculations of the BED distributions, the dose and BED distributions can be viewed in different projections (e.g. coronal, sagittal and transverse). The different elements of this toolkit are presented and the important steps for the execution of its calculations are illustrated. The toolkit is applied on brain, head & neck and prostate cancer patients, who received primary and boost phases in order to demonstrate its capability in calculating BED distributions, as well as measuring the inaccuracy and imprecision of the approximate BED distributions. Finally, the clinical situations in which the use of the present toolkit would have a significant clinical impact are indicated. PMID:27265044

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-PHASE AND MULTI-COMPONENT FLOW MODEL WITH REACTION IN POROUS MEDIA FOR RISK ASSESSMENT ON SOIL CONTAMINATION DUE TO MINERAL OIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yasuhide; Nishiwaki, Junko; Hara, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Sugai, Yuichi; Komai, Takeshi

    In late years, soil contamination due to mineral oil in vacant lots of oil factory and oil field has become obvious. Measure for soil contamina tion and risk assessment are neces sary for sustainable development of industrial activity. Especially, in addition to contaminated sites, various exposure paths for human body such as well water, soil and farm crop are supposed. So it is very important to comprehend the transport phenomena of contaminated material under the environments of soil and ground water. In this study, mineral oil as c ontaminated material consisting of mu lti-component such as aliphatic and aromatic series was modeled. Then numerical mode l for transport phenomena in surface soil and aquifer was constructed. On the basis of modeling for mineral oil, our numerical model consists of three-phase (oil, water and gas) forty three-component. This numerical model becomes base program for risk assessment system on soil contamination due to mineral oil. Using this numerical model, we carried out some numerical simulation for a laboratory-scale experiment on oil-water multi-phase flow. Relative permeability that dominate flow behavior in multi-phase condition was formulated and the validity of the numerical model developed in this study was considered.

  7. 2.5 Gbps clock data recovery using 1/4th-rate quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase clock generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tontisirin, S.; Tielert, R.

    2006-09-01

    A Gb/s clock and data recovery (CDR) circuit using 1/4th-rate digital quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase voltage-controlled oscillator is presented. With 1/4th-rate clock architecture, the coil-free oscillator can have lower operation frequency providing sufficient low-jitter operation. Moreover, it is an inherent 1-to-4 DEMUX. The skew calibration scheme is applied to reduce phase offset in multi-phase clock generator. The CDR with frequency detector can have small loop bandwidth, wide pull-in range and can operate without the need for a local reference clock. This 1/4th-rate CDR is implemented in standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology. It has an active area of 0.7 mm2 and consumes 100 mW at 1.8 V supply. The CDR has low jitter operation in a wide frequency range from 1-2.25 Gb/s. Measurement of Bit-Error Rate is less than 10-12 for 2.25 Gb/s incoming data 27-1 PRBS, jitter peak-to-peak of 0.7 unit interval (UI) modulation at 10 MHz.

  8. Review on mechanisms and continuum models of multi-phase transport phenomena in porous structures of non-aqueous Li-Air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinliang; Yu, Jong-Sung; Sundén, Bengt

    2015-03-01

    During recent years intensive research activities involving both experimental and modeling approaches have appeared for different aspects of Lithium-air (Li-air) battery. Multi-phase transport phenomena including dissolved oxygen and lithium ions (Li+) in the liquid electrolyte, as well as electrons in the solid materials, are strongly coupled with the porous structures and various reactions, particularly the solid product grown in the porous cathode during battery discharge. Understanding the mechanisms of transport phenomena and accurate evaluation of effective transport properties are significant for improving the battery capacities and design, especially at high rate conditions. In this paper, the transport governing equations commonly used for macroscopic continuum models at porous-average level are outlined and highlighted, with a purpose to provide a general overview of the validity and the limitation of these approaches. The most often used models in the open literature are reviewed and discussed focusing on the effective properties involving tortuosity factors, solid product morphologies, as well as effects on the void space clogging, surface area reduction and passivation. Comments and suggestions are also provided for better understanding of multi-phase transport phenomena and implementation of the detailed models for solid product generation and morphology growth in Li-air battery cathodes.

  9. Reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) simulator Sym.CS: Putting together water-rock interaction, multi-phase and heat flow, composite petrophysics model, and fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, C.; Park, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Castillo, J.

    2009-12-01

    A typical CO2 sequestration scenario involves the use of multiple simulators for addressing multiphase fluid and heat flow, water-rock interaction and mass-transfer, rock mechanics, and other chemical and physical processes. The benefit of such workflow is that each model can be constrained rigorously; however, the drawback is final modeling results may achieve only a limited extent of the theoretically possible capabilities of each model. Furthermore, such an approach in modeling carbon sequestration cannot capture the nonlinearity of the various chemical and physical processes. Hence, the models can only provide guidelines for carbon sequestration processes with large margins of error. As an alternative, a simulator is being constructed by a multi-disciplinary team with the aim of implementing a large array of fundamental phenomenologies, including, but not limited to: water-rock interaction using elemental mass-balance and explicit mass-transfer and reaction coupling methods; multi-phase and heat flow, including super-critical CO2 and oil; fracture mechanics with anisotropic permeabilities; rheological rock mechanics based on incremental stress theory; and a composite petrophysics model capable of describing changing rock composition and properties. The modules representing the processes will be solved using a layered iteration method, with the goal of capturing the nonlinear feedback among all of the processes. The simulator will be constructed using proven optimization and modular, object-oriented, and service-oriented programming methods. Finally, a novel AJAX (asynchronous JavaScript and XML) user interface is being tested to host the simulator that will allow usage through an Internet browser. Currently, the water-rock interaction, composite petrophysics, and multi-phase fluid and heat flow modules are available for integration. Results of the water-rock interaction and petrophysics coupling has been used to model interaction between a CO2-charged water and

  10. Multi-phased uplift of the southern margin of the Central Anatolian plateau, Turkey: A record of tectonic and upper mantle processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildgen, T. F.; Cosentino, D.; Bookhagen, B.; Niedermann, S.; Yıldırım, C.; Echtler, H.; Wittmann, H.; Strecker, M. R.

    2012-02-01

    Uplifted Neogene marine sediments and Quaternary fluvial terraces in the Mut Basin, southern Turkey, reveal a detailed history of surface uplift along the southern margin of the Central Anatolian plateau from the Late Miocene to the present. New surface exposure ages (10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne) of gravels capping fluvial strath terraces located between 28 and 135 m above the Göksu River in the Mut Basin yield ages ranging from ca. 25 to 130 ka, corresponding to an average incision rate of 0.52 to 0.67 mm/yr. Published biostratigraphic data combined with new interpretations of the fossil assemblages from uplifted marine sediments reveal average uplift rates of 0.25 to 0.37 mm/yr since Late Miocene time (starting between 8 and 5.45 Ma), and 0.72 to 0.74 mm/yr after 1.66 to 1.62 Ma. Together with the terrace abandonment ages, the data imply 0.6 to 0.7 mm/yr uplift rates from 1.6 Ma to the present. The different post-Late Miocene and post-1.6 Ma uplift rates can imply increasing uplift rates through time, or multi-phased uplift with slow uplift or subsidence in between. Longitudinal profiles of rivers in the upper catchment of the Mut and Ermenek basins show no apparent lithologic or fault control on some knickpoints that occur at 1.2 to 1.5 km elevation, implying a transient response to a change in uplift rates. Projections of graded upper relict channel segments to the modern outlet, together with constraints from uplifted marine sediments, show that a slower incision/uplift rate of 0.1 to 0.2 mm/yr preceded the 0.7 mm/yr uplift rate. The river morphology and profile projections therefore reflect multi-phased uplift of the plateau margin, rather than steadily increasing uplift rates. Multi-phased uplift can be explained by lithospheric slab break-off and possibly also the arrival of the Eratosthenes Seamount at the collision zone south of Cyprus.

  11. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow and density of fluid in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German; Boucher, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow.

  12. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow and density of fluid in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1998-10-27

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  13. Multi-phase Uplift of the Indo-Burman Ranges and Western Thrust Belt of Minbu Sub-basin (West Myanmar): Constraints from Apatite Fission Track Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Qiu, H.; Mei, L.

    2015-12-01

    The forearc regions in active continental margins are important keys to analysis geodynamic processes such as oceanic crust oblique subduction, mechanism of subduction zone, and sediments recycling. The West Myanmar, interpreted as forearc silver, is the archetype example of such forearc regions subordinate to Sunda arc-trench system, and is widely debated when and how its forearc regions formed. A total of twenty-two samples were obtained from the Indo-Burman Ranges and western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin along Taungup-Prome Road in Southwestern Myanmar (Figure 1), and five sandstone samples of them were performed at Apatite to Zircon, Inc. Three samples (M3, M5, and M11) collected from Eocene flysch and metamorphic core at the Indo-Burman Ranges revealed apatite fission track (AFT) ages ranging from 19 to 9 Ma and 6.5 to 2 Ma. Two samples (M20 and M21) acquired from the western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin yielded AFT ages ranging from 28 to 13.5 Ma and 7.5 to 3.5 Ma. Time-temperature models based on AFT data suggest four major Cenozoic cooling episodes, Late Oligocene, Early to Middle Miocene, Late Miocene, and Pliocene to Pleistocene. The first to third episode, models suggest the metamorphic core of the Indo-Burman Ranges has experienced multi-phase rapidly uplifted during the early construction of the forearc regions. The latest episode, on which this study focused, indicated a fast westward growth of the Palaeogene accretionary wedge and a eastward propagation deformation of folding and thrusting of the western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin. We argued that above multi-phase uplifted and deformation of the forearc regions were results of India/West Burma plate's faster oblique convergence and faster sedimentation along the India/Eurasia suture zone.

  14. Is hepatotropic contrast enhanced MR a more effective method in differential diagnosis of hemangioma than multi-phase CT and unenhanced MR?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cavernous hemangiomas are the most frequent neoplasms of the liver and in routine clinical practice they often need to be differentiated from malignant tumors and other benign focal lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hepatic hemangiomas, showing atypical pattern on US, improves with the use of Gd-BOPTA in comparison with contrast-enhanced multi-phase computed tomography (CT). Methods 178 consecutive patients with ambiguous hepatic masses showing atypical hyperechoic pattern on grey-scale US, underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced multi-phase multi-detector CT and MR (1.5T) with the use of liver-specific contrast medium gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA). After intravenous contrast administration arterial (HAP), venous-portal (PVP), equilibrium phases (EP) both in CT and MR and additionally hepatobiliary phase (HBP) in MR were obtained. 398 lesions have been detected including 99 hemangiomas and 299 other lesions. Results In non-enhanced MDCT examination detection of hemangiomas was characterized by sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 90%, PPV of 71%, NPV of 92% and accuracy of 86%. Non-enhanced MR examination showed sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 99%, PPV of 99%, NPV of 99% and accuracy of 99%. After intravenous administration of contrast medium in MR the mentioned above parameters did not increase significantly. Conclusion Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MR in comparison with unenhanced MRI does not improve diagnostic accuracy in discriminating hemangiomas that show non-specific appearance in ultrasound examination. Unenhanced MR as a method of choice should directly follow US in course of diagnostic algorithm in differentiation of hemangiomas from other liver tumors. PMID:21504593

  15. Semi-brittle behavior of a multi-phase crust and its influence on the tectonics of icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine; Cooper, Reid F.

    2010-05-01

    Our ability to observe and interpret reasonably the tectonics of icy satellites hinges on our understanding of the viscoelastic and plastic rheologies and microstructural evolution of the material comprising their icy outer shells. The morphological diversity observed on the surfaces of the satellites may be due in part to the rheological influence of the various cryominerals that are present in addition to water ice on many of these icy bodies. Our experimental investigation explores the affects of secondary minerals on the phase behavior and physical properties (both plastic and anelastic) of ice at conditions approaching those of the icy satellites. Using uniaxial compression creep experiments (T = 230-250K; P = 0.1 and 50 MPa), we characterize the transient and steady-state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates (made via crystallization of liquid solution) of ice-I and MgSO4•11H2O ("MS11"; meridianiite) and compare them to the deformation behaviors of pure polycrystalline ice-I tested at the same conditions on the same apparatus. The ice/hydrate aggregates display a higher sensitivity to stress than does pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. One significant role that the second phase plays in ductile deformation is to pin grain growth, keeping grain sizes small and deformation within the grain/colony size sensitive creep regime. The mechanical and microstructural observations from this study indicate that the hydrate phase, which is distinctly stronger than pure ice, additionally offers a framework of support that resists ductile deformation at low stresses; the aggregates display at least an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity than do samples of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions up to 6MPa. At higher stresses, however, the hydrate phase promotes semi-brittle flow and cavitation, both of which are forms of strain weakening. Semi-brittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would decrease the depth to the brittle

  16. Tissue microscopic changes and artifacts in multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography in a hospital setting: a fatal case of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Caroline; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Marcheix, Bertrand; Rousseau, Hervé; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel; Dedouit, Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    A 27-year-old man suddenly died in hospital of acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to severe systemic vasculitis. Multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography followed by scientific autopsy of the thoracic and abdominal cavity and histology was performed, illustrating the advantages and drawbacks of such techniques. Imaging enabled us to examine the cranium, as the family refused cerebral dissection. MPMCTA revealed absence of opacification of the left middle cerebral artery. But parenchymal findings of thoracic and abdominal organs were still difficult to interpret after both imaging and macroscopic examination during the autopsy. Microscopic examination provided the definitive diagnosis of cause of death. Analysis revealed systemic vasculitis of the lung complicated by diffuse alveolar, mediastinal, splenic and retroperitoneal lesions. We were unable to determine the type of vasculitis, whether polyarteritis nodosa or microscopic polyangiitis, because of artifactual glomerular collapse. We observed some structural changes in tissue secondary to contrast agent injection, affecting the vascular system and renal parenchyma in particular. Such artifacts must be known in order to avoid misinterpreting them as pathological findings. MPMCTA and conventional autopsy are two complementary techniques showing both their specific advantages and limits which have to be known in order to choose the appropriate technique. One limit of both techniques is the detection of microscopic findings which can only be obtained by additional histological examination. This case report underlines this fact and demonstrates that caution is required in some cases if microscopic analyses are carried out after contrast agent injection. PMID:25085763

  17. AOI 1— COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the “optically thin” approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gas–particulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  18. High-resolution numerical methods for compressible multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. Progress report, September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Trangenstein, J.A.

    1994-03-15

    This is the second year in the proposed three-year effort to develop high-resolution numerical methods for multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. The issues being addressed in this research are: Computational efficiency: Field-scale simulation of enhanced oil recovery, whether for energy production or aquifer remediation, is typically highly under-resolved. This is because rock transport properties vary on many scales, and because current numerical methods have low resolution. Effective media properties: Since porous media are formed through complex geologic processes, they involve significant uncertainty and scale-dependence. Given this uncertainty, knowledge of ensemble averages of flow in porous media can be preferable to knowledge of flow in specific realizations of the reservoir. However, current models of effective properties do not represent the observed behavior very well. Relative permeability models present a good example of this problem. In practice, these models seldom provide realistic representations of hysteresis, interfacial tension effects or three-phase flow; there are no models that represent well all three effects simultaneously.

  19. Investigations in Reducing the Computational Expense of Transient 3D Multi-Phase CO2 Wellbore Leakage Simulations: Time-Series Matching versus Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, D. R.; Pawar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Depleted oil and gas reserves have abandoned wellbore densities up to 10 per square kilometer (Crow, 2010). These locations are considered to have favorable geological structure and properties for CO2 sequestration. To understand the risk of CO2 leakage along these abandoned wellbores requires the simulation of a comprehensive set of realizations encompassing the potential scenarios. The simulations must capture transient, 3D, multi-phase effects (i.e. supercritical, liquid, and gas CO2 phases along with liquid reservoir and aquifer fluids), and include capillary and buoyant flow. Performing a large number of these simulations becomes computationally burdensome. In order to reduce this computational burden, regression approaches have been used to develop computationally efficient reduced order models to try to capture the general trends of the simulations. In these approaches, model inputs and outputs are collected from the transient simulations at each time step. Recognizing that many of the inputs to the regression approach come from time series (i.e. pressures and CO2 saturations) and that all of the outputs are time series (i.e. CO2 and brine flow rates), we develop a time-series matching approach. In this approach, CO2 and brine flow rate time series are estimated given input time series and parameters by averaging the flow rates of the collected simulations weighted by the similarity of their input time series and parameter. Similarity of both time series and parameters is calculated by the Euclidean distance. Euclidean distances are converted to a generalized likelihood metric, and used to weight the flow-rate time-series averages. We present a comparison of this time series matching approach to the MARS algorithm.

  20. Long residence times of rapidly decomposable soil organic matter: application of a multi-phase, multi-component, and vertically resolved model (BAMS1) to soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Maggi, F.; Kleber, M.; Torn, M. S.; Tang, J. Y.; Dwivedi, D.; Guerry, N.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate representation of soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics in Earth system models is critical for future climate prediction, yet large uncertainties exist regarding how, and to what extent, the suite of proposed relevant mechanisms should be included. To investigate how various mechanisms interact to influence SOM storage and dynamics, we developed an SOM reaction network integrated in a one-dimensional, multi-phase, and multi-component reactive transport solver. The model includes representations of bacterial and fungal activity, multiple archetypal polymeric and monomeric carbon substrate groups, aqueous chemistry, aqueous advection and diffusion, gaseous diffusion, and adsorption (and protection) and desorption from the soil mineral phase. The model predictions reasonably matched observed depth-resolved SOM and dissolved organic matter (DOM) stocks and fluxes, lignin content, and fungi to aerobic bacteria ratios. We performed a suite of sensitivity analyses under equilibrium and dynamic conditions to examine the role of dynamic sorption, microbial assimilation rates, and carbon inputs. To our knowledge, observations do not exist to fully test such a complicated model structure or to test the hypotheses used to explain observations of substantial storage of very old SOM below the rooting depth. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that a reasonable combination of sorption parameters, microbial biomass and necromass dynamics, and advective transport can match observations without resorting to an arbitrary depth-dependent decline in SOM turnover rates, as is often done. We conclude that, contrary to assertions derived from existing turnover time based model formulations, observed carbon content and Δ14C vertical profiles are consistent with a representation of SOM consisting of carbon compounds with relatively fast reaction rates, vertical aqueous transport, and dynamic protection on mineral surfaces.

  1. Multi-phase Nature of a Radiation-driven Fountain with Nuclear Starburst in a Low-mass Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Keiichi; Schartmann, Marc; Meijerink, Rowin

    2016-09-01

    The structures and dynamics of molecular, atomic, and ionized gases are studied around a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a small (2× {10}6{M}ȯ ) black hole using three-dimensional (3D) radiation–hydrodynamic simulations. We studied, for the first time, the non-equilibrium chemistry for the X-ray-dominated region in the “radiation-driven fountain” with supernova feedback. A double hollow cone structure is naturally formed without postulating a thick “torus” around a central source. The cone is occupied with an inhomogeneous, diffuse ionized gas and surrounded by a geometrically thick (h/r≳ 1) atomic gas. Dense molecular gases are distributed near the equatorial plane, and energy feedback from supernovae enhances their scale height. Molecular hydrogen exists in a hot phase (>1000 K) as well as in a cold (\\lt 100 {{K}}), dense (\\gt {10}3 {{cm}}-3) phase. The velocity dispersion of H2 in the vertical direction is comparable to the rotational velocity, which is consistent with near-infrared observations of nearby Seyfert galaxies. Using 3D radiation transfer calculations for the dust emission, we find polar emission in the mid-infrared band (12 μm), which is associated with bipolar outflows, as suggested in recent interferometric observations of nearby AGNs. If the viewing angle for the nucleus is larger than 75°, the spectral energy distribution is consistent with that of the Circinus galaxy. The multi-phase interstellar medium observed in optical/infrared and X-ray observations is also discussed.

  2. Initiating the Validation of CCIM Processability for Multi-phase all Ceramic (SYNROC) HLW Form: Plan for Test BFY14CCIM-C

    SciTech Connect

    Vince Maio

    2014-08-01

    This plan covers test BFY14CCIM-C which will be a first–of–its-kind demonstration for the complete non-radioactive surrogate production of multi-phase ceramic (SYNROC) High Level Waste Forms (HLW) using Cold Crucible Induction Melting (CCIM) Technology. The test will occur in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) CCIM Pilot Plant and is tentatively scheduled for the week of September 15, 2014. The purpose of the test is to begin collecting qualitative data for validating the ceramic HLW form processability advantages using CCIM technology- as opposed to existing ceramic–lined Joule Heated Melters (JHM) currently producing BSG HLW forms. The major objectives of BFY14CCIM-C are to complete crystalline melt initiation with a new joule-heated resistive starter ring, sustain inductive melting at temperatures between 1600 to 1700°C for two different relatively high conductive materials representative of the SYNROC ceramic formation inclusive of a HLW surrogate, complete melter tapping and pouring of molten ceramic material in to a preheated 4 inch graphite canister and a similar canister at room temperature. Other goals include assessing the performance of a new crucible specially designed to accommodate the tapping and pouring of pure crystalline forms in contrast to less recalcitrant amorphous glass, assessing the overall operational effectiveness of melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a dedicated power source, and observing the tapped molten flow and subsequent relatively quick crystallization behavior in pans with areas identical to standard HLW disposal canisters. Surrogate waste compositions with ceramic SYNROC forming additives and their measured properties for inductive melting, testing parameters, pre-test conditions and modifications, data collection requirements, and sampling/post-demonstration analysis requirements for the produced forms are provided and defined.

  3. Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2012-04-01

    In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO{sub 3} in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO{sub 3} as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and SiO{sub 2} by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

  4. Fast, multi-phase H2O measurements on board of HALO: Results from the novel HAI instrument during the first field campaigns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Bernhard; Afchine, Armin; Krämer, Martina; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Water vapor is a key species for many questions in atmospheric research [1] [2] but is also a gas species which is complex to handle. A particular challenge is the simultaneous quantification of gas and condensed phase water. This is especially true for measurements on airborne platforms but also for laboratory experiments [3]. On research aircraft, total water measurement (i.e. the sum of gas-phase and ice-phase) is realized by sampling air with an inlet faced into flight direction ('forward' sampling) and subsequent evaporation of the ice crystals in the heated sampling lines. Gas-phase detection is typically realized using inlets facing against flight direction ('backward' sampling) or 'Rosemount' inlets where an air stream is sampled perpendicular to the high speed airflow through the inlet. For both methods it is believed that no ice crystals reach the downstream hygrometer, but the question remains - especially for Rosemount inlets - if some small ice particles or water droplets may have entered the sampling lines. In addition to the question of proper sampling of the water phases, currently no hygrometer exists that measures all phases with the same measurement principle in one instrument. In the rare occasions that multi-phase measurements are realized, gas-and condensed-phase observations rely on different methods and calibration strategies so that precision and accuracy levels are difficult to compare. The novel HAI (Hygrometer for Atmospheric Investigation) realizes a simultaneous multi-phase hygrometer in a unique concept [4]. Water detection with HAI is based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) with a special evaluation method allowing absolute water vapor measurements without any sensor calibration [5]. The HAI instrument contains two independent dual-channel spectrometers, one at 1.4 μm and one at 2.6 μm which allows to cover a very wide water concentration range from 1 to 30 000 ppmv. Both HAI spectrometers couple one light path

  5. Fast, multi-phase H2O measurements on board of HALO: Results from the novel HAI instrument during the first field campaigns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Bernhard; Afchine, Armin; Krämer, Martina; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Water vapor is a key species for many questions in atmospheric research [1] [2] but is also a gas species which is complex to handle. A particular challenge is the simultaneous quantification of gas and condensed phase water. This is especially true for measurements on airborne platforms but also for laboratory experiments [3]. On research aircraft, total water measurement (i.e. the sum of gas-phase and ice-phase) is realized by sampling air with an inlet faced into flight direction ('forward' sampling) and subsequent evaporation of the ice crystals in the heated sampling lines. Gas-phase detection is typically realized using inlets facing against flight direction ('backward' sampling) or 'Rosemount' inlets where an air stream is sampled perpendicular to the high speed airflow through the inlet. For both methods it is believed that no ice crystals reach the downstream hygrometer, but the question remains - especially for Rosemount inlets - if some small ice particles or water droplets may have entered the sampling lines. In addition to the question of proper sampling of the water phases, currently no hygrometer exists that measures all phases with the same measurement principle in one instrument. In the rare occasions that multi-phase measurements are realized, gas-and condensed-phase observations rely on different methods and calibration strategies so that precision and accuracy levels are difficult to compare. The novel HAI (Hygrometer for Atmospheric Investigation) realizes a simultaneous multi-phase hygrometer in a unique concept [4]. Water detection with HAI is based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) with a special evaluation method allowing absolute water vapor measurements without any sensor calibration [5]. The HAI instrument contains two independent dual-channel spectrometers, one at 1.4 μm and one at 2.6 μm which allows to cover a very wide water concentration range from 1 to 30 000 ppmv. Both HAI spectrometers couple one light path

  6. A Mixed-Methods Investigation of Early Childhood Professional Development for Providers and Recipients in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Sandra M.; Rembert, Kellye; Simpson, Amber; Ramey, M. Deanna

    2016-01-01

    This multi-phase mixed-methods study explores provider and recipient perceptions of the current state of early childhood professional development in a southeastern area of the United States. Professional development for the early childhood workforce has been shown to positively influence the quality of early childhood classrooms. This study…

  7. The multi-phase winds of Markarian 231: from the hot, nuclear, ultra-fast wind to the galaxy-scale, molecular outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Carniani, S.; Piconcelli, E.; Zappacosta, L.; Bongiorno, A.; Cicone, C.; Maiolino, R.; Marconi, A.; Menci, N.; Puccetti, S.; Veilleux, S.

    2015-11-01

    Mrk 231 is a nearby ultra-luminous IR galaxy exhibiting a kpc-scale, multi-phase AGN-driven outflow. This galaxy represents the best target to investigate in detail the morphology and energetics of powerful outflows, as well as their still poorly-understood expansion mechanism and impact on the host galaxy. In this work, we present the best sensitivity and angular resolution maps of the molecular disk and outflow of Mrk 231, as traced by CO(2-1) and (3-2) observations obtained with the IRAM/PdBI. In addition, we analyze archival deep Chandra and NuSTAR X-ray observations. We use this unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength data sets to constrain the physical properties of both the molecular disk and outflow, the presence of a highly-ionized ultra-fast nuclear wind, and their connection. The molecular CO(2-1) outflow has a size of 1 kpc, and extends in all directions around the nucleus, being more prominent along the south-west to north-east direction, suggesting a wide-angle biconical geometry. The maximum projected velocity of the outflow is nearly constant out to 1 kpc, thus implying that the density of the outflowing material must decrease from the nucleus outwards as r-2. This suggests that either a large part of the gas leaves the flow during its expansion or that the bulk of the outflow has not yet reached out to 1 kpc, thus implying a limit on its age of 1 Myr. Mapping the mass and energy rates of the molecular outflow yields dot {M} OF = [500-1000] M⊙ yr-1 and Ėkin,OF = [7-10] × 1043 erg s-1. The total kinetic energy of the outflow is Ekin,OF is of the same order of the total energy of the molecular disk, Edisk. Remarkably, our analysis of the X-ray data reveals a nuclear ultra-fast outflow (UFO) with velocity -20 000 km s-1, dot {M}UFO = [0.3-2.1] M⊙ yr-1, and momentum load dot {P}UFO/ dot {P}rad = [0.2-1.6]. We find Ėkin,UFO Ėkin,OF as predicted for outflows undergoing an energy conserving expansion. This suggests that most of the UFO

  8. Using pore-scale imaging and modeling to provide new insights in multi-phase flow, transport and reaction phenomena in porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijeljic, B.; Andrew, M. G.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in X ray imaging techniques made it possible not only to accurately describe solid and fluid(s) distributions in the pore space but also to study dynamics of multi-phase flow and reactive transport in-situ. This has opened up a range of new opportunities to better understand fundamental physics at the pore scale by experiment, and test and validate theoretical models in order to develop predictive tools at the pore scale and use it for upscaling. Firstly, we illustrate this concept by describing a new methodology for predicting non-Fickian transport in millimeter-sized three-dimensional micro-CT images of a beadpack, a sandstone, and a carbonate, representing porous media with an increasing degree of pore-scale complexity. The key strategy is to retain the full information on flow and transport signature of a porous medium by using probability distribution functions (PDFs) of voxel velocities for flow, and both PDFs of particle displacements and PDFs of particle transit times between voxels for transport. For this purpose, direct-simulation flow and transport model is used to analyse the relationship between pore structure, velocity, and the dynamics of the evolving plume. The model predictions for PDFs of particle displacements obtained by the model are in excellent agreement with those measured on similar cores in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A key determinant for non-Fickian transport is the spread in velocity distribution in the pore space. Further, we present micro-CT imaging of capillary trapping of scCO2 at reservoir conditions in a range of carbonates and sandstones having different pore structure and demonstrate that substantial quantities of scCO2 can be trapped in the pore space. Higher residual scCO2 saturations are found in sandstones compared to carbonates. The trapped ganglia exhibit different distribution of size, related to the inherent structure of pore space. Pore structures with large, open pores that are well connected lead

  9. HAI: A novel airborne multi-channel hygrometer for fast multi-phase H2O quantification: Performance of the HAI instrument during the first flights on the German HALO aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Ebert, V.; Kraemer, M.; Afchine, A.

    2014-12-01

    Common gas phase H2O measurements on fast airborne platforms e.g. using backward facing or "Rosemount"-inlets can lead to a high risk of ice and droplets contamination. In addition, currently no single hygrometer exists that allows a simultaneous, high-speed measurement of all phases (gas, liquid, ice) with the same detection principle. In the rare occasions multi-phase measurements are realized, gas-and condensed-phase observations rely on different methods, instruments and calibration strategies so that precision and accuracy levels are quite difficult to quantify. This is effectively avoided by the novel TDLAS instrument, HAI, Hygrometer for Atmospheric Investigation, which allows a simultaneous, high speed, multi-phase detection without any sensor calibration in a unique "2+2" channel concept. Hai combines two independent wavelength channels, at 1.4 µm and at 2.6 µm, for a wide dynamic range from 1 to 30 000 ppmv, with a simultaneous closed path (extractive) and open path detection. Thus, "Total", i.e. gas-phase plus condensed-phase water is measured by sampling via a forward facing inlet into "closed-path" extractive cells. A selective, sampling-free, high speed gas phase detection is realized via a dual-wavelength "open-path" cell placed outside of the aircraft fuselage. All channels can be sampled with 120 Hz (measurement cycle time Dt=1.6 ms) allowing an unprecedented spatial resolution of 30 cm at 900 km/h. The evaluation of the individual multi-channel raw-data is done post flight, without any channel interdependencies, in calibration-free mode, thus allowing fast, accurate and precise multi-phase water detection in flight. The performance could be shown in more than 200 net flights hours in three scientific flight campaigns (TACTS, ESMVal, ML-CIRRUS) on the new German HALO aircraft. In addition the level of the accuracy of the calibration free evaluation was evaluated at the German national primary water vapor standard.

  10. Performance of simultaneous high temporal resolution quantitative perfusion imaging of bladder tumors and conventional multi-phase urography using a novel free-breathing continuously acquired radial compressed-sensing MRI sequence☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nainesh; Ream, Justin M.; Zhang, Hoi Cheung; Block, Kai Tobias; Chandarana, Hersh; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of high temporal resolution quantitative perfusion imaging of bladder tumors performed simultaneously with conventional multi-phase MR urography (MRU) using a novel free-breathing continuously acquired radial MRI sequence with compressed-sensing reconstruction. Methods: 22 patients with bladder lesions underwent MRU using GRASP (Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel) acquisition. Multi-phase contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic GRASP was performed during free-breathing (1.4 × 1.4 × 3.0 mm3 voxel size; 3:44 min acquisition). Two dynamic datasets were retrospectively reconstructed by combining different numbers of sequentially acquired spokes into each dynamic frame: 110 spokes per frame for 25-s temporal resolution (serving as conventional MRU for clinical interpretation) and 8 spokes per frame for 1.7-s resolution. Using 1.7-s resolution images, ROIs were placed within bladder lesions and normal bladder wall, a femoral artery arterial input function was generated, and the Generalized Kinetic Model was applied. Results Biopsy/cystectomy demonstrated 16 bladder tumors (13 stage ≥ T2, 3 stage ≤ T1) and 6 benign lesions. All lesions were well visualized using 25-s clinical multi-phase images. Using 1.7-s resolution images, Ktrans was significantly higher in tumors (0.38 ± 0.24) than normal bladder (0.12 ± 0.02 = 8, p b 0.001) or benign lesions (0.15 ± 0.04, p = 0.033). Ratio between Ktrans of lesions and normal bladder was nearly double for tumors than benign lesions (4.3 ± 3.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.6), and Ktrans was nearly double in stage ≥ T2 than stage ≤ T1 tumors (0.44 ± 0.24 vs. 0.24 ± 0.24), although these did not approach significance (p = 0.180–0.209), possibly related to small sample size. Conclusion GRASP allows simultaneous quantitative high temporal resolution perfusion of bladder lesions during clinical MRU examinations using only one contrast injection and without additional scan time. PMID:26740058

  11. A high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for multi-dimensional, multi-frequency, and multi-phase pulsed measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, F. H.; Stepanov, V.; Takahashi, S.

    2014-07-15

    We describe instrumentation for a high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) spectroscopy. The instrumentation is operated in the frequency range of 107−120 GHz and 215−240 GHz and in the magnetic field range of 0−12.1 T. The spectrometer consisting of a high-frequency high-power solid-state source, a quasioptical system, a phase-sensitive detection system, a cryogenic-free superconducting magnet, and a {sup 4}He cryostat enables multi-frequency continuous-wave EPR spectroscopy as well as pulsed EPR measurements with a few hundred nanosecond pulses. Here we discuss the details of the design and the pulsed EPR sensitivity of the instrumentation. We also present performance of the instrumentation in unique experiments including PELDOR spectroscopy to probe correlations in an insulating electronic spin system and application of dynamical decoupling techniques to extend spin coherence of electron spins in an insulating solid-state system.

  12. Long residence times of rapidly decomposable soil organic matter: application of a multi-phase, multi-component, and vertically-resolved model (TOUGHREACTv1) to soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Maggi, F. M.; Kleber, M.; Torn, M. S.; Tang, J. Y.; Dwivedi, D.; Guerry, N.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate representation of soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics in Earth System Models is critical for future climate prediction, yet large uncertainties exist regarding how, and to what extent, the suite of proposed relevant mechanisms should be included. To investigate how various mechanisms interact to influence SOM storage and dynamics, we developed a SOM reaction network integrated in a one-dimensional, multi-phase, and multi-component reactive transport solver. The model includes representations of bacterial and fungal activity, multiple archetypal polymeric and monomeric carbon substrate groups, aqueous chemistry, aqueous advection and diffusion, gaseous diffusion, and adsorption (and protection) and desorption from the soil mineral phase. The model predictions reasonably matched observed depth-resolved SOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) stocks in grassland ecosystems as well as lignin content and fungi to aerobic bacteria ratios. We performed a suite of sensitivity analyses under equilibrium and dynamic conditions to examine the role of dynamic sorption, microbial assimilation rates, and carbon inputs. To our knowledge, observations do not exist to fully test such a complicated model structure or to test the hypotheses used to explain observations of substantial storage of very old SOM below the rooting depth. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that a reasonable combination of sorption parameters, microbial biomass and necromass dynamics, and advective transport can match observations without resorting to an arbitrary depth-dependent decline in SOM turnover rates, as is often done. We conclude that, contrary to assertions derived from existing turnover time based model formulations, observed carbon content and δ14C vertical profiles are consistent with a representation of SOM dynamics consisting of (1) carbon compounds without designated intrinsic turnover times, (2) vertical aqueous transport, and (3) dynamic protection on mineral surfaces.

  13. Temporal variability of the non-steady contribution from glaciers to water discharge in western Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, Astrid; Mayer, Christoph

    2009-10-01

    SummaryA long series of negative glacier mass balance years during the last decades influenced the run-off characteristics of glacierized catchments in the Austrian Alps. For balanced conditions, run-off from catchments containing glaciers shows increased values for warm and dry periods, but the annual sum generally equals the total basin precipitation. In contrast, the recent series of negative glacier mass balances reduced the storage volume of the glaciers, providing additional water in the rivers for many years. The existing Austrian Glacier Inventories allowed the determination of very accurate glacier volume changes between 1969 and 1998. These data were used to calculate the excess discharge for two catchment basins in western Austria (one unaffected by hydro power management, one with hydropower management) for the time period between the inventories which then was compared to the accumulated river run-off from the individual basins. The inter-annual distribution of the total excess could be determined by using existing mass balance series from several glaciers in the different basins as scaling functions. In addition, a degree-day approach was used to provide information about the role of above-average glacial melt water on a monthly basis. Considering different gauging stations along the rivers, it was found that the amount of excess discharge during the entire period was in the range of 1.5-9% of the total discharge, depending on the relative degree of glacier coverage (4-40%). For summer months only, this fraction increases to 3-12%. In individual months, however, the relative importance of excess melt can reach more than 25% in a highly glacier covered catchment (40%), but it can also contribute up to 20% for catchments with a glacier coverage of 8-15%.

  14. Evolutions of nonsteady state magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Weigang; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The full evolutions of collisionless non-steady-state magnetic reconnection are studied with full kinetic particle-in-cell simulations. There are different stages of reconnection: the onset or early growing stage when the out-of-plane electric field (Ey) structure is a monopole at the X-point, the bipolar stage when the Ey structure is bipolar and the outer electron diffusion region (EDR) is being elongated over time, and the possible final steady-state stage when E{sub y} is uniform in the reconnection plane. We find the change of reconnection rate is not empowered or dependent on the length of the EDR. During the early growing stage, the EDR is elongated while the reconnection rate is growing. During the later stage, the reconnection rate may significantly decrease but the length of the inner EDR is largely stable. The results indicate that reconnection is not controlled by the downstream physics, but rather by the availability of plasma inflows from upstream. The physical mechanism of the EDR elongation is studied. The Hall current induced by the quadrupole magnetic field (B{sub y}) is discovered to play an important role in this process. The condition of forming an extended electron super-Alfvenic outflow jet structure in nature is discussed. The jet structure could be elongated during the bipolar stage, and remains stable during steady state. The sufficiency of the electron inflow is crucial for the elongation. Open boundary conditions are applied in the outflow direction.

  15. Transient and Steady-State Kinematic Response to Erosional Forcing in an Orogenic Wedge: Sandbox Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Teyssier, C.; Annia, F.; Take, A.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of orogens is highly affected by surface processes that control mass distribution. Transportation and redistribution of mass at the Earth's surface modifies the gravitational load and alters the stress field and kinematics within orogens. We explore the role of asymmetric erosion, indenter dip angle, and flux steady/non-steady state in determining the patterns of deformation and exhumation in doubly-sided orogenic wedges. In our analogue model, shortening of the orogen is driven by rigid indenters, represented by Plexiglas wedged blocks (35 and 70 degrees) that deform a non-cohesive dry Coulomb material (walnut shells) representing crustal material. Three end-member erosional scenarios are considered. In the first case, erosion is not applied, and thus the doubly-sided orogenic wedge evolves without restraints (non-steady state). In the second case, erosion is concentrated solely on the indenters side of the orogen (retrowedge), and in the third case, erosion is focused on the flank opposite to the indenter side (prowedge). In the last two cases, steady-state conditions were present in the middle stages of shortening. Strain and exhumation were calculated using displacement fields from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV analysis). In the three cases, the model deforms as a combination of lateral compaction and localization of strain in shear bands. In the early stages of deformation, a "pop-up" structure develops, bounded by a fore-shear on the front and a back-shear toward the indenter. As deformation continues, a new fore-shear develops, and the previous one remains inactive and is passively pushed up the wedge. In the case of no erosion, the old fore-shears rotate slightly toward the indenter, and the shear bands evolve to steeply dipping structures. In the case of retrowedge erosion, the old fore-shears back rotate toward the indenter, and the shear bands evolve to shallowly dipping structures. In the case of prowedge erosion, old fore

  16. An Uncertainty Quantification System for Tabular Equations of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John; Robinson, Allen; Debusschere, Bert; Mattsson, Ann; Drake, Richard; Rider, William

    2013-06-01

    Providing analysts with information regarding the accuracy of computational models is key for enabling predictive design and engineering. Uncertainty in material models can make significant contributions to the overall uncertainty in calculations. As a first step toward tackling this large problem, we present an uncertainty quantification system for tabular equations of state (EOS). First a posterior distribution of EOS model parameters is inferred using Bayes rule and a set of experimental and computational data. EOS tables are generated for parameter states sampled from the posterior distribution. A new unstructured triangular table format allows for capturing multi-phase model behavior. A principal component analysis then reduces this set of tables to a mean table and most significant perturbations. This final set of tables is provided to hydrocodes for performing simulations using standard non-intrusive uncertainty propagation methods. A multi-phase aluminum model is used to demonstrate the system. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  18. Simulation of Inviscid Compressible Multi-Phase Flow with Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelleners, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Condensation of vapours in rapid expansions of compressible gases is investigated. In the case of high temperature gradients the condensation will start at conditions well away from thermodynamic equilibrium of the fluid. In those cases homogeneous condensation is dominant over heterogeneous condensation. The present work is concerned with development of a simulation tool for computation of high speed compressible flows with homogeneous condensation. The resulting ow solver should preferably be accurate and robust to be used for simulation of industrial flows in general geometries.

  19. Cryogenic Homogenization and Sampling of Heterogeneous Multi-Phase Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Glenn M.; Ideker, Virgene D.; Siegwarth, James D.

    1999-09-21

    An apparatus and process for producing a homogeneous analytical sample from a heterogeneous feedstock by: providing the mixed feedstock, reducing the temperature of the feedstock to a temperature below a critical temperature, reducing the size of the feedstock components, blending the reduced size feedstock to form a homogeneous mixture; and obtaining a representative sample of the homogeneous mixture. The size reduction and blending steps are performed at temperatures below the critical temperature in order to retain organic compounds in the form of solvents, oils, or liquids that may be adsorbed onto or absorbed into the solid components of the mixture, while also improving the efficiency of the size reduction. Preferably, the critical temperature is less than 77K (-196 C). Further, with the process of this invention the representative sample maybe maintained below the critical temperature until being analyzed.

  20. Multi-phase halogen chemistry in the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommariva, R.; von Glasow, R.

    2012-04-01

    We used a one-dimensional model to simulate the chemical evolution of air masses in the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean (Cape Verde region), with a focus on halogen chemistry. The model results were compared to the observations of inorganic halogen (particularly chlorine and bromine) species made in this region. The model could reproduce the measurements of chlorine species, especially under unpolluted conditions, but it overestimated sea-salt chloride and bromine species. Agrement with the measurements could be improved by taking into account the reactivity with aldehydes and the effects of DMS and Saharan dust on aerosol pH; an hypothetical HOX -> X- aqueous-phase reaction could also improve the agreement with measured Cl2 and HOCl, particularly under semi-polluted conditions. The results showed that halogen levels and speciation are very sensitive to cloud processing, although the model could not reproduce the observations under cloudy conditions. The model results were used to calculate the impact of the observed levels of halogens: Cl accounted for 5.4 - 11.6% of total methane sinks and halogens (mostly bromine and iodine) accounted for 35 - 40% of total ozone destruction.

  1. Crustal Viscosity Structure Estimated from Multi-Phase Mixing Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinevar, W. J.; Behn, M. D.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of lower crustal viscosity are typically constrained by analyses of isostatic rebound, post seismic creep, and laboratory-derived flow laws for crustal rocks and minerals. Here we follow a new approach for calculating the viscosity structure of the lower continental crust. We use Perple_X to calculate mineral assemblages for different crustal compositions. Effective viscosity is then calculated using the rheologic mixing model of Huet et al. (2014) incorporating flow laws for each mineral phase. Calculations are performed along geotherms appropriate for the Basin and Range, Tibetan Plateau, Colorado Plateau, and the San Andreas Fault. To assess the role of crustal composition on viscosity, we examined two compositional gradients extending from an upper crust with ~67 wt% SiO2 to a lower crust that is either: (i) basaltic with ~53 wt% SiO2 (Rudnick and Gao, 2003), or (ii) andesitic with ~64% SiO2 (Hacker et al., 2011). In all cases, the middle continental crust has a viscosity that is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that inferred for wet quartz, a common proxy for mid-crustal viscosities. An andesitic lower crust results in viscosities of 1020-1021 Pa-s and 1021-1022 Pa-s for hotter and colder crustal geotherms, respectively. A mafic lower crust predicts viscosities that are an order of magnitude higher for the same geotherm. In all cases, the viscosity calculated from the mixing model decreases less with depth compared to single-phase estimates. Lastly, for anhydrous conditions in which alpha quartz is stable, we find that there is a strong correlation between Vp/Vs and bulk viscosity; in contrast, little to no correlation exists for hydrous conditions.

  2. Dynamic remapping decisions in multi-phase parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, D. M.; Reynolds, P. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of any given mapping of workload to processors in a parallel system is dependent on the stochastic behavior of the workload. Program behavior is often characterized by a sequence of phases, with phase changes occurring unpredictably. During a phase, the behavior is fairly stable, but may become quite different during the next phase. Thus a workload assignment generated for one phase may hinder performance during the next phase. We consider the problem of deciding whether to remap a paralled computation in the face of uncertainty in remapping's utility. Fundamentally, it is necessary to balance the expected remapping performance gain against the delay cost of remapping. This paper treats this problem formally by constructing a probabilistic model of a computation with at most two phases. We use stochastic dynamic programming to show that the remapping decision policy which minimizes the expected running time of the computation has an extremely simple structure: the optimal decision at any step is followed by comparing the probability of remapping gain against a threshold. This theoretical result stresses the importance of detecting a phase change, and assessing the possibility of gain from remapping. We also empirically study the sensitivity of optimal performance to imprecise decision threshold. Under a wide range of model parameter values, we find nearly optimal performance if remapping is chosen simply when the gain probability is high. These results strongly suggest that except in extreme cases, the remapping decision problem is essentially that of dynamically determining whether gain can be achieved by remapping after a phase change; precise quantification of the decision model parameters is not necessary.

  3. A Study of Multi-Phase Guided Remedial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, YuLung

    2014-01-01

    In Taiwan, courses in the current online learning environment enroll at least 40-100 students, and it is difficult for teachers to manage the learning situation of each student. The proposed system treats learning portfolio, knowledge structure, and ability indicator of students as the key points of learning situations. The system integrates the…

  4. Stochastic Rotation Dynamics simulations of wetting multi-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Brinkmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Multi-color Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRDmc) has been introduced by Inoue et al. [1,2] as a particle based simulation method to study the flow of emulsion droplets in non-wetting microchannels. In this work, we extend the multi-color method to also account for different wetting conditions. This is achieved by assigning the color information not only to fluid particles but also to virtual wall particles that are required to enforce proper no-slip boundary conditions. To extend the scope of the original SRDmc algorithm to e.g. immiscible two-phase flow with viscosity contrast we implement an angular momentum conserving scheme (SRD+mc). We perform extensive benchmark simulations to show that a mono-phase SRDmc fluid exhibits bulk properties identical to a standard SRD fluid and that SRDmc fluids are applicable to a wide range of immiscible two-phase flows. To quantify the adhesion of a SRD+mc fluid in contact to the walls we measure the apparent contact angle from sessile droplets in mechanical equilibrium. For a further verification of our wettability implementation we compare the dewetting of a liquid film from a wetting stripe to experimental and numerical studies of interfacial morphologies on chemically structured surfaces.

  5. Multi-Phase Modeling of Rainbird Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Moss, Nicholas; Sampson, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model to simulate the water injected from a rainbird nozzle used in the sound suppression system during launch. The simulations help determine the projectile motion for different water flow rates employed at the pad, as it is critical to know if water will splash on the first-stage rocket engine during liftoff.

  6. Computer aided design of multi-phase switched reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, N. K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive computer-aided design (CAD) procedure of multiphase switched reluctance motor (SRM) is presented. Better approach for calculation of the outer dimensions, phase inductance, flux linkage and losses, and also a different concept for calculating the average torque of the motor are incorporated in the CAD program. The average torque is calculated based on the most effective 15° (for 8/6 SRM) of the static torque profile of the motor. A sample design of a 5hp SRM is presented in detail and the design is validated by conducting a two-dimensional finite element analysis of the motor.

  7. Cryogenic homogenization and sampling of heterogeneous multi-phase feedstock

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Glenn Michael; Ideker, Virgene Linda; Siegwarth, James David

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and process for producing a homogeneous analytical sample from a heterogenous feedstock by: providing the mixed feedstock, reducing the temperature of the feedstock to a temperature below a critical temperature, reducing the size of the feedstock components, blending the reduced size feedstock to form a homogeneous mixture; and obtaining a representative sample of the homogeneous mixture. The size reduction and blending steps are performed at temperatures below the critical temperature in order to retain organic compounds in the form of solvents, oils, or liquids that may be adsorbed onto or absorbed into the solid components of the mixture, while also improving the efficiency of the size reduction. Preferably, the critical temperature is less than 77 K (-196.degree. C.). Further, with the process of this invention the representative sample may be maintained below the critical temperature until being analyzed.

  8. Are upwind techniques in multi-phase flow models necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.-H.; Boettcher, N.; Wang, W.; Kolditz, O.

    2011-09-10

    Two alternatives of primary variables are compared for two-phase flow in heterogeneous media by solving fully established benchmarks. The first combination utilizes pressure of the wetting fluid and saturation of the non-wetting fluid as primary variables, while the second employs capillary pressure of the wetting fluid and pressure of the non-wetting fluid. While the standard Galerkin finite element method (SGFEM) is known to fail in the physical reproduction of two-phase flow in heterogeneous media (unless employing a fully upwind correction), the second scheme with capillary pressure as a primary variable without applying an upwind technique produces correct physical fluid behaviour in heterogeneous media, as observed from experiments.

  9. Effects of aging in catastrophe on the steady state and dynamics of a microtubule population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemseena, V.; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2015-05-01

    Several independent observations have suggested that the catastrophe transition in microtubules is not a first-order process, as is usually assumed. Recent in vitro observations by Gardner et al. [M. K. Gardner et al., Cell 147, 1092 (2011), 10.1016/j.cell.2011.10.037] showed that microtubule catastrophe takes place via multiple steps and the frequency increases with the age of the filament. Here we investigate, via numerical simulations and mathematical calculations, some of the consequences of the age dependence of catastrophe on the dynamics of microtubules as a function of the aging rate, for two different models of aging: exponential growth, but saturating asymptotically, and purely linear growth. The boundary demarcating the steady-state and non-steady-state regimes in the dynamics is derived analytically in both cases. Numerical simulations, supported by analytical calculations in the linear model, show that aging leads to nonexponential length distributions in steady state. More importantly, oscillations ensue in microtubule length and velocity. The regularity of oscillations, as characterized by the negative dip in the autocorrelation function, is reduced by increasing the frequency of rescue events. Our study shows that the age dependence of catastrophe could function as an intrinsic mechanism to generate oscillatory dynamics in a microtubule population, distinct from hitherto identified ones.

  10. Time-Resolved Single-State Measurements of the Electronic Structure of Isochoric Heated Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2004-10-22

    Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) Cu. Single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution is used in conjunction with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated Cu foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.1-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.07-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. Valence band photoemission spectra showing the changing occupancy of the Cu 3d level with heating are presented. These are the first picosecond x-ray laser time-resolved photoemission spectra of laser-heated ultra-thin Cu foil showing changes in electronic structure. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials.

  11. A mathematical model of pan evaporation under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wee Ho; Roderick, Michael L.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of changing climate, global pan evaporation records have shown a spatially-averaged trend of ∼ -2 to ∼ -3 mm a-2 over the past 30-50 years. This global phenomenon has motivated the development of the "PenPan" model (Rotstayn et al., 2006). However, the original PenPan model has yet to receive an independent experimental evaluation. Hence, we constructed an instrumented US Class A pan at Canberra Airport (Australia) and monitored it over a three-year period (2007-2010) to uncover the physics of pan evaporation under non-steady state conditions. The experimental investigations of pan evaporation enabled theoretical formulation and parameterisation of the aerodynamic function considering the wind, properties of air and (with or without) the bird guard effect. The energy balance investigation allowed for detailed formulation of the short- and long-wave radiation associated with the albedos and the emissivities of the pan water surface and the pan wall. Here, we synthesise and generalise those earlier works to develop a new model called the "PenPan-V2" model for application under steady state conditions (i.e., uses a monthly time step). Two versions (PenPan-V2C and PenPan-V2S) are tested using pan evaporation data available across the Australian continent. Both versions outperformed the original PenPan model with better representation of both the evaporation rate and the underlying physics of a US Class A pan. The results show the improved solar geometry related calculations (e.g., albedo, area) for the pan system led to a clear improvement in representing the seasonal cycle of pan evaporation. For general applications, the PenPan-V2S is simpler and suited for applications including an evaluation of long-term trends in pan evaporation.

  12. Calibration and validation of a modified steady-state model of crop response to saline water irrigation under conditions of transient root zone salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinten, A. J. A.; Frenkel, H.; Shalhevet, J.; Elston, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    In many situations where annual crops are irrigated with saline water, root zone salinity does not reach a steady state. Use of a steady-state description of root zone salinity may then seriously overestimate the calculated leaching requirements of the crop. A steady-state semi-emphirical model of crop response to irrigation with saline water has been calibrated using data from a number of field experiments. Predictions of yield deficit resulting from irrigation with saline water have been made for each of these experiments, using both the original model and a modified version which allows for the non-steady-state salinity conditions occurring in the experiments. Comparison with experimental data shows a clear superiority of the modified version in most cases studied. Where the original model is superior or equally good, it is likely that steady-state conditions are being approached. Where root zone salinity data were available and applicable, the modified model predicted root zone salinity much better. Approaches for distinguishing errors in calibration from intrinsic errors in the model assumptions are discussed.

  13. Coronal Hole Boundaries as Source Regions of a Steady Slow Solar Wind: Global Modeling of Charge State Composition and Sun-to-Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, R.; Landi, E.; van der Holst, B.; Lepri, S. T.; Manchester, W.; Frazin, R. A.; Nuevo, F.; Vásquez, A. M.; Sokolov, I.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    We combine the results from a global MHD model of the solar atmosphere with a charge state evolution code in order to predict the large-scale variation of charge state composition in the fast and slow solar wind during solar minimum. The model captures the well-known increase in charge state ratios C+6/ C+5 and O+7/O+6 in the slow wind, inline with Ulysses observations. We present a theoretical picture explaining the formation of these increases, which are related to regions of higher electron density and temperature near the boundaries of coronal holes. We verify the existence of these regions using a 3D tomographic reconstruction of the lower corona. This work establishes that a steady slow wind flowing along open magnetic field lines can carry high charge states without invoking reconnection with closed field regions. This subset of slow wind can play a role explaining the properties of the non-steady slow wind, and complement dynamic models of slow solar wind formation.

  14. Automated Generation of Tabular Equations of State with Uncertainty Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John H.; Robinson, Allen C.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Mattsson, Ann E.

    2015-06-01

    As computational science pushes toward higher fidelity prediction, understanding the uncertainty associated with closure models, such as the equation of state (EOS), has become a key focus. Traditional EOS development often involves a fair amount of art, where expert modelers may appear as magicians, providing what is felt to be the closest possible representation of the truth. Automation of the development process gives a means by which one may demystify the art of EOS, while simultaneously obtaining uncertainty information in a manner that is both quantifiable and reproducible. We describe our progress on the implementation of such a system to provide tabular EOS tables with uncertainty information to hydrocodes. Key challenges include encoding the artistic expert opinion into an algorithmic form and preserving the analytic models and uncertainty information in a manner that is both accurate and computationally efficient. Results are demonstrated on a multi-phase aluminum model. *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. State of the States 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education Finance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Presenters at the State of the States Roundtable session at the 2014 National Education Finance Conference in Louisville were invited to submit their papers for publication. These papers address the following topics: (1) State issues affecting P-12 and/or higher education funding; (2) Funding priorities/trends for P-12 and/or higher education; (3)…

  16. State of the States 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education Finance, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Presenters at the State of the States Roundtable session at the 2014 National Education Finance Conference in Louisville were invited to submit their papers for publication. These papers address the following topics: (1) State issues affecting P-12 and/or higher education funding; (2) Funding priorities/trends for P-12 and/or higher education; (3)…

  17. State Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Janita

    1992-01-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 100 state government documents from 45 states published in 1991 that address a wide range of topics, including historical and cultural issues; health and social issues, including education, crime, and homelessness; the environment; and the economy. A list of contributors is included. (two references) (MES)

  18. Analysis of carrier transport and band tail states in p-type tin monoxide thin-film transistors by temperature dependent characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Kong, Xi; Yang, Jia; Li, Yunpeng; Wilson, Joshua; Liu, Jie; Xin, Qian; Wang, Qingpu; Song, Aimin

    2016-06-01

    Tin monoxide (SnO) has drawn much attention in recent years due to its high hole mobility, transparency, and potential for mass production. However, due to its metastable nature, the deposited film often contains multi-phases such as metallic tin and tin dioxide, which may degrade its electrical properties. Here, we presented the temperature dependent characteristics of p-type SnO thin-film transistors. The hole transport mechanism is dominated by band conduction at high temperatures and variable-range hopping at low temperatures. The maximum activation energy was found to be 308 meV, which denotes a bandgap of around 0.6 eV. The density of states was found to be 1.12 × 1021 cm-3 eV-1 at VG = -80 V, and 6.75 × 1020 cm-3 eV-1 at VG = 0 V, respectively.

  19. Fate and Impact of Contaminants in Sediments of the NE United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholtz Ten Brink, M. R.; Butman, B.; Bothner, M.; Poppe, L.; Murray, R. W.; Varekamp, J.; Thomas, E.; Mecray, E. L.; Harris, C. K.; Signell, R.

    2002-12-01

    Estuaries and coastal sediments may be the ultimate sink for particle-reactive contaminants and excess nutrients.Their distribution in these sediments of the northeastern United States is a function of the location and magnitude of contaminant sources, which are correlated with population distribution and the history of land use, and of the dynamic physical and geochemical processes that occur in the sediments and on the sea floor. New York Bight, Long Island Sound, Massachusetts Bay, and the coastal regions of the Gulf of Maine have heterogeneous geology and bathymetry, variable currents, and each encompasses areas of both increasing and decreasing human impact. Chemical and geophysical mapping indicates that contaminants introduced into the environment during the past 250 years of population growth and industrial activity are present in muddy deposits up to 2 m thick, and are dispersed with fine-grained sediment throughout the region. Lower concentrations of regulated contaminants (e.g., metals such as Hg, Pb, and Cu) in the most recently deposited sediments verify the effectiveness of source reduction. Decreases in sediment metal concentrations, however, are not always accompanied by a decrease in sewage tracers and nutrient loading because of continuous population growth. Bottom currents focus and remobilize sediments periodically, creating complex patterns of habitat and sedimentation, large gradients in contaminant distributions, and non-steady state geochemical conditions. Results from analysis of over 200 sediment cores in coastal waters of the Northeast identify areas where contaminated sediments have accumulated in the last few centuries. Benthic populations in some of these areas have been impacted by local substrate changes, toxicity, hypoxia, and anoxia. The existing contaminant pool is often mobile. A multi-disciplinary approach, including predictive models that include changing sources and physical, chemical, and biological transport processes, is

  20. A New Wide-Range Equation of State for Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John H.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a new wide-range equation of state (EOS) for xenon. Three different prior EOS models predicted significant variations in behavior along the high pressure Hugoniot from an initial liquid state at 163.5 K and 2.97 g/cm3, which is near the triple point. Experimental measurements on Sandia's Z machine as well as density functional theory based molecular dynamics calculations both invalidate the prior EOS models in the pressure range from 200 to 840 GPa. The reason behind these EOS model disagreements is found to lie in the contribution from the thermal electronic models. A new EOS, based upon the standard separation of the Helmholtz free energy into ionic and electronic components, is constructed by combining the successful parts of prior models with a semi-empirical electronic model. Both the fluid and fcc solid phases are combined in a wide-range, multi-phase table. The new EOS is tabulated on a fine temperature and density grid, to preserve phase boundary information, and is available as table number 5191 in the LANL SESAME database. Improvements over prior EOS models are found not only along the Hugoniot, but also along the melting curve and in the region of the liquid-vapor critical point. *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Workfare States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Jamie

    This book discusses the evolution of workfare policies in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Chapter 1 defines the term "workfare" and examines the concepts of transnationalizing workfare and workfarist labor regulation. Chapter 2 establishes workfare's theoretical context and explores the relationship between welfare arrangements…

  2. State Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Janita

    1994-01-01

    Annotates 100 items published in 1993 by state governments. Subject areas include health and health care, environment, conservation, business, economic issues, reevaluation of the educational system, government reorganization, crime and justice, families and child care, minority issues, and local history. (KRN)

  3. State Treasure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2013-01-01

    When a music teacher is named Teacher of the Year for an entire state, one just know a special story awaits. The narrative of Heidi Welch, director of music at Hillsboro-Deering High School in New Hampshire, does not disappoint. Welch, who grew up in abject poverty and was often homeless, developed her love of music through memorizing and singing…

  4. Influence of non steady gravity on natural convection during micro-gravity solidification of semiconductors. I - Time scale analysis. II - Implications for crystal growth experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, P. R.; Motakef, S.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of temporal variations in the magnitude of gravity on natural convection during unidirectional solidification of semiconductors. It is shown that the response time to step changes in g at low Rayleigh numbers is controlled by the momentum diffusive time scale. At higher Rayleigh numbers, the response time to increases in g is reduced because of inertial effects. The degree of perturbation of flow fields by transients in the gravitational acceleration on the Space Shuttle and the Space Station is determined. The analysis is used to derive the requirements for crystal growth experiments conducted on low duration low-g vehicles. Also, the effectiveness of sounding rockets and KC-135 aircraft for microgravity experiments is examined.

  5. State of the States 2016: Arts Education State Policy Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The "State of the States 2016" summarizes state policies for arts education identified in statute or administrative code for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information is based on a comprehensive search of state education statute and codes on each state's relevant websites. Complete results from this review are available in…

  6. Variable Density Flow Modeling for Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Sminchak

    2011-09-30

    The Arches Province in the Midwestern U.S. has been identified as a major area for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage applications because of the intersection of Mt. Simon sandstone reservoir thickness and permeability. To better understand large-scale CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure requirements in the Arches Province, variable density scoping level modeling was completed. Three main tasks were completed for the variable density modeling: Single-phase, variable density groundwater flow modeling; Scoping level multi-phase simulations; and Preliminary basin-scale multi-phase simulations. The variable density modeling task was successful in evaluating appropriate input data for the Arches Province numerical simulations. Data from the geocellular model developed earlier in the project were translated into preliminary numerical models. These models were calibrated to observed conditions in the Mt. Simon, suggesting a suitable geologic depiction of the system. The initial models were used to assess boundary conditions, calibrate to reservoir conditions, examine grid dimensions, evaluate upscaling items, and develop regional storage field scenarios. The task also provided practical information on items related to CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province such as pressure buildup estimates, well spacing limitations, and injection field arrangements. The Arches Simulation project is a three-year effort and part of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program on innovative and advanced technologies and protocols for monitoring/verification/accounting (MVA), simulation, and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic formations. The overall objective of the project is to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure along the Arches Province of the Midwestern U.S.

  7. State of the States, 2012: Arts Education State Policy Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arts Education Partnership (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "State of the States 2012" summarizes state policies for arts education identified in statute or code for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information is based primarily on results from the AEP Arts Education State Policy Survey conducted in 2010-11, and updated in April 2012.

  8. United States.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Karen

    2008-10-01

    The 'Green House' effect; the rise of community care; and suicide awareness Baltimore: When he took a parttime job in a nursing home, Harvard-trained physician Bill Thomas realised that the biggest problems residents faced were not their illnesses but 'loneliness, helplessness and boredom'. He went on to found the Eden Alternative, 'a movement to de-institutionalise nursing homes', and has since revolutionised older people's residential care around Baltimore, replacing nursing homes with clusters of small homes, each for up to ten residents. Called 'Green Houses', Dr Thomas now has a $10 million (£5.6 million) grant to replace more than 100 nursing homes in all 50 US states with these small dwellings. Last month he began teaching an experimental class at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's Erickson School on Aging, Management and Policy: 'Aging 100: You Say You Want a Revolution'. Classes will be broadcast on YouTube. PMID:27316081

  9. Glass transition and phase state of organic compounds: dependency on molecular properties and implications for secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Koop, Thomas; Bookhold, Johannes; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-11-21

    Recently, it has been proposed that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere can exist in an amorphous semi-solid or solid (i.e. glassy) state. In this perspective, we analyse and discuss the formation and properties of amorphous semi-solids and glasses from organic liquids. Based on a systematic survey of a wide range of organic compounds, we present estimates for the glass forming properties of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In particular we investigate the dependence of the glass transition temperature T(g) upon various molecular properties such as the compounds' melting temperature, their molar mass, and their atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O:C ratios). Also the effects of mixing different compounds and the effects of hygroscopic water uptake depending on ambient relative humidity are investigated. In addition to the effects of temperature, we suggest that molar mass and water content are much more important than the O:C ratio for characterizing whether an organic aerosol particle is in a liquid, semi-solid, or glassy state. Moreover, we show how the viscosity in liquid, semi-solid and glassy states affect the diffusivity of those molecules constituting the organic matrix as well as that of guest molecules such as water or oxidants, and we discuss the implications for atmospheric multi-phase processes. Finally, we assess the current state of knowledge and the level of scientific understanding, and we propose avenues for future studies to resolve existing uncertainties. PMID:21993380

  10. Investigation of parameter estimation and impact of injection rate on relative permeability measurements for supercritical CO2 and water by unsteady-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) is a promising option for mitigating climate changes. To predict the behavior of injected CO2 in a deep reservoir, relative permeability of supercritical CO2 and water of the reservoir rock is one of the most fundamental and influential properties. For determining the relative permeability, we employed the unsteady state method, in which the relative permeability is determined based on history matching of transient monitoring data with a multi-phase flow model. The unsteady-state method is relatively simple and short, but obviously its accuracy strongly depends on the flow model assumed in the history matching. In this study, we conducted relative permeability measurements of supercritical CO2-water system for Berea sandstone with the unsteady-state method under a reservoir condition at a 1km depth (P= 9.5MPa, T = 44˚C). Automatic history matching was performed with an inversion simulator iTOUGH2/ECO2N for multi-phase flow system of supercritical CO2, NaCl, and water. A sensitivity analysis of relative permeability parameters for CO2 and water was carried out to better understand the uniqueness and the uncertainty of the optimum solution estimated by the history matching. Among the parameters of the Corey-type curve employed in this study, while the end-point permeability could be optimized in a limited range, the other parameters were correlated and their combinations were not unique. However it was found that any combination of these parameters results in nearly identical shapes of the curve in the range of CO2 saturation in this study (0 to 60%). The optimally estimated curve from the unsteady-method was well comparable with those from the steady-state method acquired in the previous studies. Our experiment also focuses on the impact of injection rate on the estimates of relative permeability, as it is known that the injection rate could have a significant effect on fluid distribution such as viscous fingering with

  11. K-12 Science Standards, State by State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Lawrence S.

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes a study evaluating state standards in science. The treatment of evolution, which varies tremendously in quality from state to state, is discussed at length. In some states--Arizona for example--evolution is completely ignored in the life sciences. Highlights local political battles. Describes good evolution curricula in Connecticut,…

  12. Evaluation of multi-phase heat transfer and droplet evaporation in petroleum cracking flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C.Q.

    1996-04-01

    A computer code ICRKFLO was used to simulate the multiphase reacting flow of fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactors. The simulation provided a fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics and heat transfer processes in an FCC riser reactor, critical to the development of a new high performance unit. The code was able to make predictions that are in good agreement with available pilot-scale test data. Computational results indicate that the heat transfer and droplet evaporation processes have a significant impact on the performance of a pilot-scale FCC unit. The impact could become even greater on scale-up units.

  13. Supervising and Controlling Unmanned Systems: A Multi-Phase Study with Subject Matter Experts

    PubMed Central

    Porat, Talya; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Rottem-Hovev, Michal; Silbiger, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation in the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) in civil and military operations has presented a multitude of human factors challenges; from how to bridge the gap between demand and availability of trained operators, to how to organize and present data in meaningful ways. Utilizing the Design Research Methodology (DRM), a series of closely related studies with subject matter experts (SMEs) demonstrate how the focus of research gradually shifted from “how many systems can a single operator control” to “how to distribute missions among operators and systems in an efficient way”. The first set of studies aimed to explore the modal number, i.e., how many systems can a single operator supervise and control. It was found that an experienced operator can supervise up to 15 UASs efficiently using moderate levels of automation, and control (mission and payload management) up to three systems. Once this limit was reached, a single operator's performance was compared to a team controlling the same number of systems. In general, teams led to better performances. Hence, shifting design efforts toward developing tools that support teamwork environments of multiple operators with multiple UASs (MOMU). In MOMU settings, when the tasks are similar or when areas of interest overlap, one operator seems to have an advantage over a team who needs to collaborate and coordinate. However, in all other cases, a team was advantageous over a single operator. Other findings and implications, as well as future directions for research are discussed. PMID:27252662

  14. Stratigraphy and multi-phase tectonic history of the Chukchi Borderland from MCS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, I.; Coakley, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Chukchi Edges project was designed to establish the relationship between the Chukchi Shelf and Borderland and indirectly test theories of opening for the Canada Basin. During this cruise, ~5300 km of 2D multi-channel seismic profiles and other geophysical measurements (swath bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sonobuoy refraction seismic) were collected from the RV Marcus G. Langseth across the transition between the Chukchi Shelf and Chukchi Borderland. These profiles reveal extended basins separated by faulted high-standing blocks. Basin stratigraphy can be subdivided on the basis of gross stratal geometry, reflection terminations and inferred unconformities. The wedge-shaped synrift sequences terminate against the basement highs and/or major faults, burying the basement topography. The inferred postrift seismic units are more nearly tabular, but thicken locally due to compaction of underlying synrift sediments. Reflection character is dominated by alternating high and low amplitude continuous reflectors which may be consistent with pelagic or turbidite sediments. Chaotic units are also observed, which may indicate mass-flow deposits. The truncated sediments over the basement highs of the Chukchi Shelf, Chukchi Plateau and Northwind Ridge suggest major erosion due both to glacial planation and earlier erosional events perhaps associated with basement uplift prior to or during rifting and extension. It is believed that the bulk of the synrift sediments are Mesozoic in age. Certainly Cenozoic sediments are also preserved in these basins, but the position of the boundary is uncertain. Locally, continuous reflectors are observed underlying the rift basin fill. These older units, of very uncertain age, would, if sampled, provide constraint on the history and affinities of the Chukchi Borderland. In addition to the extensional basins, a number of small symmetric basins are observed on the flanks of the Chukchi Plateau. These basins may be transtensional and argue for a 2nd phase of tectonism, which overprinted the obvious extensional fabric of the Borderland. This is supported by the observation of uplifted postrift sediments on the flanks of some of the intermedial basement highs.

  15. A Model of the Turbulent Electric Dynamo in Multi-Phase Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyeva, Svetlana; Mareev, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Many terrestrial and astrophysical phenomena witness the conversion of kinetic energy into electric energy (the energy of the quasi-stationary electric field) in conducting media, which is natural to treat as manifestations of electric dynamo by analogy with well-known theory of magnetic dynamo. Such phenomena include thunderstorms and lightning in the Earth's atmosphere and atmospheres of other planets, electric activity caused by dust storms in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres, snow storms, electrical discharges occurring in technological setups, connected with intense mixing of aerosol particles like in the milling industry. We have developed a model of the large-scale turbulent electric dynamo in a weakly conducting medium, containing two heavy-particle components. We have distinguished two main classes of charging mechanisms (inductive and non-inductive) in accordance with the dependence or independence of the electric charge, transferred during a particle collision, on the electric field intensity and considered the simplified models which demonstrate the possibility of dynamo realization and its specific peculiarities for these mechanisms. Dynamo (the large-scale electric field growth) appears due to the charge separation between the colliding and rebounding particles. This process is may be greatly intensified by the turbulent mixing of particles with different masses and, consequently, different inertia. The particle charge fluctuations themselves (small-scale dynamo), however, do not automatically mean growth of the large-scale electric field without a large-scale asymmetry. Such an asymmetry arises due to the dependence of the transferred charge magnitude on the electric field intensity in the case of the inductive mechanism of charge separation, or due to the gravity and convection for non-inductive mechanisms. We have found that in the case of the inductive mechanism the large-scale dynamo occurs if the medium conductivity is small enough while the electrification process determined by the turbulence intensity and particles sizes is strong enough. The electric field strength grows exponentially. For the non-inductive mechanism we have found the conditions when the electric field strength grows but linearly in time. Our results show that turbulent electric dynamo could play a substantial role in the electrification processes for different mechanisms of charge generation and separation. Thunderstorms and lightning are the most frequent and spectacular manifestations of electric dynamo in the atmosphere, but turbulent electric dynamo may also be the reason of electric discharges occurring in dust and snow storms or even in technological setups with intense mixing of small particles.

  16. The influence of surface microchemistry in protective film formation on multi-phase magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray-Munro, J. E.; Luan, B.; Huntington, L.

    2008-02-01

    The high strength:weight ratio of magnesium alloys makes them an ideal metal for automotive and aerospace applications where weight reduction is of significant concern. Unfortunately, magnesium alloys are highly susceptible to corrosion particularly in salt-spray conditions. This has limited their use in the automotive and aerospace industries, where exposure to harsh service conditions is unavoidable. The simplest way to avoid corrosion is to coat the magnesium-based substrate by a process such as electroless plating, which is a low-cost, non line of sight process. Magnesium is classified as a difficult to plate metal due to its high reactivity. This means that in the presence of air magnesium very quickly forms a passive oxide layer that must be removed prior to plating. Furthermore, high aluminium content alloys are especially difficult to plate due to the formation of intermetallic species at the grain boundaries, resulting in a non-uniform surface potential across the substrate and thereby further complicating the plating process. The objective of this study is to understand how the magnesium alloy microstructure influences the surface chemistry of the alloy during both pretreatment and immersion copper coating of the substrate. A combination of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and scanning Auger microscopy has been used to study the surface chemistry at the various stages of the coating process. Our results indicate that the surface chemistry of the alloy is different on the aluminum rich β phase of the material compared to the magnesium matrix which leads to preferential deposition of the metal on the aluminum rich phase of the alloy.

  17. Non-Invasive Characterization Of A Flowing Multi-Phase Fluid Using Ultrasonic Interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2005-11-01

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  18. CFD of mixing of multi-phase flow in a bioreactor using population balance model.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jayati; Shekhawat, Lalita Kanwar; Loomba, Varun; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-05-01

    Mixing in bioreactors is known to be crucial for achieving efficient mass and heat transfer, both of which thereby impact not only growth of cells but also product quality. In a typical bioreactor, the rate of transport of oxygen from air is the limiting factor. While higher impeller speeds can enhance mixing, they can also cause severe cell damage. Hence, it is crucial to understand the hydrodynamics in a bioreactor to achieve optimal performance. This article presents a novel approach involving use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model the hydrodynamics of an aerated stirred bioreactor for production of a monoclonal antibody therapeutic via mammalian cell culture. This is achieved by estimating the volume averaged mass transfer coefficient (kL a) under varying conditions of the process parameters. The process parameters that have been examined include the impeller rotational speed and the flow rate of the incoming gas through the sparger inlet. To undermine the two-phase flow and turbulence, an Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model and k-ε turbulence model have been used, respectively. These have further been coupled with population balance model to incorporate the various interphase interactions that lead to coalescence and breakage of bubbles. We have successfully demonstrated the utility of CFD as a tool to predict size distribution of bubbles as a function of process parameters and an efficient approach for obtaining optimized mixing conditions in the reactor. The proposed approach is significantly time and resource efficient when compared to the hit and trial, all experimental approach that is presently used. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:613-628, 2016. PMID:26850863

  19. MULTI-PHASE Cr-BASED ALLOYS FOR AGGRESSIVE HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, MP

    2001-08-24

    Attractive high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation/hot corrosion resistance have been achieved in a new family of Cr{sub 2}Ta-reinforced Cr alloys. However, inadequate room-temperature toughness remains a key challenge, with the best Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta alloys exhibiting only modest toughness in the range of 12-14 MPa m{sup 1/2}. The addition of MgO has been shown to significantly improve the room-temperature mechanical properties of unalloyed Cr and was investigated as a means for improving the room-temperature mechanical properties of the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta alloys. Microstructural analysis of a series of Cr and Cr-6MgO base alloys was used to investigate the proposed ductilization mechanism of nitrogen gettering by a MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase, which forms during consolidation of Cr and MgO powders. Nitride and related impurity precipitates have been linked to reduced ductility in Cr at room-temperature. Surprisingly, nitride (and carbide) impurity precipitates were found i n hot-pressed Cr-6 MgO base alloys despite room-temperature tensile ductility of 5%. These precipitates were found adjacent to MgO/MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles and were somewhat more blunt than those observed in unalloyed Cr. The addition of TiO{sub 2} to unalloyed Cr resulted in similar morphological changes to the nitride and carbide impurity precipitates; however, the TiO{sub 2} dispersed alloy was brittle at room-temperature. Why MgO dispersions are effective in ductilizing Cr, but others such as TiO{sub 2} are not, is not clear and is the subject of ongoing study. Efforts to introduce the effect in Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta-MgO alloys were not successful, and it was concluded that significant modification of the Cr matrix phase in the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta alloys by macroalloying is necessary to improve room-temperature mechanical properties. Preliminary attempts at macroalloying with Fe were quite successful and resulted in an increase in room-temperature toughness to 18-20 MPa m{sup 1/2} in Cr-C r{sub 2}Ta + Fe alloys.

  20. A multi-phase telepsychiatry programme in Michigan: organizational factors affecting utilization and user perceptions.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Pamela; Kuwahara, Emily

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, telepsychiatry services in Michigan have been developed by LifeWays, a Medicaid-managed behavioural health-care organization. The project had four phases, involving the introduction of telepsychiatry services between a rural and an urban clinic, to a crisis intervention centre, to a youth detention centre and to patients' homes. The role of organizational issues in the success of the programme was examined through patient interviews, provider interviews, patient and provider pre- and post-project focus groups, and service documents. Utilization data were obtained from activity logs and patient charts. During the study, 297 clients received 578 teleconsultations. Almost 97% of the telepsychiatry visits were scheduled. Telemedicine usage varied between the four project phases. The reasons for its variation in use included provider roles, existing organizational strategic goals and resources, the inherent organizational culture and quirks, and leadership and managerial factors. The major difficulties stemmed from the providers and the organization itself. There is tremendous potential for telepsychiatry and the ways in which organizational variables can be managed to influence the success of telepsychiatry programmes deserve further study. PMID:15494082

  1. Monitoring Soil Moisture in a Coal Mining Area with Multi-Phase Landsat Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, J. L.; Xian, T.; Yang, J.; Chen, L.; Yang, X. T.

    2016-06-01

    The coal development zone of Northern Shaanxi, China is one of the eight largest coal mines in the world, also the national energy and chemical bases. However, the coal mining leads to ground surface deformation and previous studies show that in collapse fissure zone soil water losses almost 50% compared with non-fissure zone. The main objective of this study is to develop a retrieval model that is reliable and sensitive to soil moisture in the whole coal mining zone of Northern Shaanxi based upon the soil sample parameters collected from in situ site investigation, spectral data gathered simultaneously and the images of Landsat7 ETM. The model uses different phases of Landsat data to retrieve soil moisture and analyze the patterns of spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture caused by ground deformation in the coal mining areas. The study indicated that band4 of Landsat7 ETM is the most sensitive band for soil moisture retrieval using the spectrum method. The quadratic model developed by remote sensing reflectance (Rrs4) (corresponding to the band4) is the best pattern with the correlation coefficient of 0.858 between the observed and the estimated soil moisture. Two-phase Landsat7 ETM data of 2002 and 2009 and one phase Landsat8 OLI data of 2015 for the study area were selected to retrieve soil moisture information. The result showed that the mean relative error was 35.16% and the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) was 0.58%. The changes of the spatial distribution of inversed soil moisture revealed that the trend of soil moisture contents of the study area was in general being gradually reduced from 2002 to 2015. The study results can serve as the baseline for monitoring environmental impacts on soil moisture in the regions due to coal mining.

  2. Multi-phase evolution of gnammas (weathering pits) in a Holocene deglacial granite landscape, Minnesota (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dominguez-Villar, D.; Jennings, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    The morphometry of 85 gnammas (weathering pits) from Big Stone County in western Minnesota allows the assessment of the relative ages of the gnamma population. The ratio between maximum and minimum depths is independent of the initial size of the cavity and only depends on the weathering evolution. Therefore, the distribution of depth ratios can be used to assess the gnamma population age and the history of weathering. The asymmetrical distribution of depth ratios measured in Big Stone County forms three distinct populations. When these sets are analyzed independently, the correlation (r2) between maximum and minimum depths is greater than 0-95. Each single population has a normal distribution of depth ratios and the average depth ratios (??-value) for each population are ??1 = 1.60 ?? 0-05, ??2 = 2.09 + 0.04 and ??3 = 2.42 ?? 0.08. The initiation of gnamma formation followed the exhumation of the granite in the region. This granite was till and saprolite covered upon retreat of the ice from the Last Glacial Maximum. Nearby outcrops are striated, but the study site remained buried until it was exhumed by paleofloods issuing from a proglacial lake. These Holocene-aged gnammas in western Minnesota were compared with gnammas of other ages from around the world. Our new results are in accordance with the hypothesis that ??-values represent the evolution of gnammas with time under temperate- to cold-climate dynamics. Phases of the formation of new gnammas may result from changes in weathering processes related to climate changes. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Phase-Field Method for Simulating Fluid-Structure Interactions in Multi-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoning; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    We investigate two-phase flow instabilities by numerical simulations of fluid structure interactions in two-phase flow. The first case is a flexible pipe conveying two fluids, which exhibits self-sustained oscillations at high Reynolds number and tension related parameter. Well-defined two-phase flow patterns, i.e., slug flow and bubbly flow, are observed. The second case is external two-phase cross flow past a circular cylinder, which induces a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability due to density stratification. We solve the Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the structure equation in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) framework. For the fluid solver, a spectral/hp element method is employed for spatial discretization and backward differentiation for time discretization. For the structure solver, a Galerkin method is used in Lagrangian coordinates for spatial discretization and the Newmark- β scheme for time discretization.

  4. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 5 Multi-Phase Extraction And Product Recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  5. Assessing Incremental Value of Biomarkers with Multi-phase Nested case-control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian M.; Zheng, Yingye; Chibnik, Lori B.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Cai, Tianxi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurate risk prediction models are needed to identify different risk groups for individualized prevention and treatment strategies. In the Nurses’ Health Study, to examine the effects of several biomarkers and genetic markers on the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a three-phase nested case-control (NCC) design was conducted, in which two sequential NCC subcohorts were formed with one nested within the other, and one set of new markers measured on each of the subcohorts. One objective of the study is to evaluate clinical values of novel biomarkers in improving upon existing risk models because of potential cost associated with assaying biomarkers. In this paper, we develop robust statistical procedures for constructing risk prediction models for RA and estimating the incremental value (IncV) of new markers based on three-phase NCC studies. Our method also takes into account possible time-varying effects of biomarkers in risk modeling, which allows us to more robustly assess the biomarker utility and address the question of whether a marker is better suited for short-term or long-term risk prediction. The proposed procedures are shown to perform well in finite samples via simulation studies. PMID:26195245

  6. Fast high-resolution prediction of multi-phase flow in fractured formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Finsterle, Stefan; Zhang, Yingqi

    2016-02-01

    The success of a thermal water flood for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) depends on a detailed representation of the geometrical and hydraulic properties of the fracture network, which induces discrete, channelized flow behavior. The resulting high-resolution model is typically computationally very demanding. Here, we use the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Mapping Method to reconstruct high-resolution solutions based on efficient low-resolution solutions. The method requires training a reduced order model (ROM) using high- and low-resolution solutions determined for a relatively short simulation time. For a cyclic EOR operation, the oil production rate and the heterogeneous structure of the oil saturation are accurately reproduced even after 105 cycles, reducing the computational cost by at least 85%. The method described is general and can be potentially utilized with any multiphase flow model.

  7. A multi-phase, micro-dispersion reactor for the continuous production of methane gas hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Taboada Serrano, Patricia L; Ulrich, Shannon M; Szymcek, Phillip; McCallum, Scott; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Tsouris, Costas

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-jet hydrate reactor originally developed to generate a CO2 hydrate stream has been modified to continuously produce CH4 hydrate. The reactor has been tested in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS), a 72-L pressure vessel available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During experiments, the reactor was submerged in water inside the SPS and received water from the surrounding through a submersible pump and CH4 externally through a gas booster pump. Thermodynamic conditions in the hydrate stability regime were employed in the experiments. The reactor produced a continuous stream of CH4 hydrate, and based on pressure values and amount of gas injected, the conversion of gas to hydrate was estimated. A conversion of up to 70% was achieved using this reactor.

  8. A Multi-Phased Sampling Effort to Characterize a University TRIGA Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.E.; Holm, R.L.

    2006-07-01

    A radiological characterization project was conducted at the University of Illinois (University) TRIGA research nuclear reactor in July 2005 as part of the long-term facility decommissioning project. The characterization effort included multiple survey and sampling techniques designed to assess both contamination of the reactor building and equipment and activation of reactor components and the reactor bio-shield. Radiation measurements included alpha and beta surface contamination measurements, gamma dose rate measurements, and gross gamma radiation measurements. Modeling was conducted based on the field measurements to predict concentrations of activation products in reactor components that were not directly sampled. The sampling effort included collecting removable contamination swipes, concrete samples from the reactor room floor and bio-shield, soil samples from below and around the perimeter of the reactor building, graphite samples from graphite moderator, and metal samples from reactor components. Concrete samples were obtained using an innovative technology that allowed for quick sample collection and analysis. Concrete, soil, graphite, and metal samples were analyzed on-site using liquid scintillation counters and gamma spectroscopy. Additional samples were sent off-site for analysis. (authors)

  9. Supervising and Controlling Unmanned Systems: A Multi-Phase Study with Subject Matter Experts.

    PubMed

    Porat, Talya; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Rottem-Hovev, Michal; Silbiger, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation in the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) in civil and military operations has presented a multitude of human factors challenges; from how to bridge the gap between demand and availability of trained operators, to how to organize and present data in meaningful ways. Utilizing the Design Research Methodology (DRM), a series of closely related studies with subject matter experts (SMEs) demonstrate how the focus of research gradually shifted from "how many systems can a single operator control" to "how to distribute missions among operators and systems in an efficient way". The first set of studies aimed to explore the modal number, i.e., how many systems can a single operator supervise and control. It was found that an experienced operator can supervise up to 15 UASs efficiently using moderate levels of automation, and control (mission and payload management) up to three systems. Once this limit was reached, a single operator's performance was compared to a team controlling the same number of systems. In general, teams led to better performances. Hence, shifting design efforts toward developing tools that support teamwork environments of multiple operators with multiple UASs (MOMU). In MOMU settings, when the tasks are similar or when areas of interest overlap, one operator seems to have an advantage over a team who needs to collaborate and coordinate. However, in all other cases, a team was advantageous over a single operator. Other findings and implications, as well as future directions for research are discussed. PMID:27252662

  10. Significance of chamber pressure to complex multi-phase physics in jet engine fuel injection processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Rainer; Oefelein, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Injection processes in jet engines at chamber pressures in excess of the thermodynamic critical pressure of the liquid fuel are not well understood. Under some conditions, a distinct two-phase interface may not exist anymore which eliminates the presence of classical spray atomization phenomena. A comprehensive model for jet engine fuel injections is derived to quantify the conditions under which the interfacial dynamics transition to diffusion-dominated mixing processes without surface tension. At certain conditions, the model shows two-phase interfaces with substantially increased thicknesses and distinctively reduced mean free paths in comparison to ambient pressure conditions. Then, the underlying assumptions of a distinct two-phase interface do not apply anymore and the interface along with its surface tension is shown to deteriorate as it broadens substantially. As a consequence of this physical complexity, the conceptual view of spray atomization and evaporation as an appropriate model for jet engine injection processes is, contrary to conventional wisdom, questionable at certain operating conditions. Instead, a Large Eddy Simulation using a dense-fluid approximation is applied which takes the complex thermo-physics of real-fluid behavior into account.

  11. Multi-dimensional modeling of pressurization and expulsion of multi-phase hydrogen propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A multidimensional computational model of the pressurization process in a slush hydrogen propellant storage tank was developed and its accuracy evaluated by comparison to experimental data measured for a 5 ft diameter spherical tank. The fluid mechanic, thermodynamic, and heat transfer processes within the ullage are represented by a finite-volume model. the heat and mass fluxes at the ullage boundary were computed in auxiliary analyses and specified as input to the finite-volume model. the model was shown to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. A parameter study was undertaken to examine the dependence of the pressurization process on initial ullage temperature distribution and pressurant mass flow rate. It is shown that for a given heat flux rate at the ullage boundary, the pressurization process is nearly independent of initial temperature distribution. The mass flow rate study revealed decreasing pressurant mass requirements with increasing pressurant mass flow rate. Further, significant differences were identified between the ullage temperature and velocity fields predicted for pressurization of slush and those predicted for pressurization of liquid hydrogen. A simplified model of the pressurization process was constructed in search of a dimensionless characterization of the pressurization process. It is shown that the relationship derived from this simplified model collapses all of the pressure history data generated during this study into a single curve.

  12. Automatic LV volume measurement in low dose multi-phase CT by shape tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Berg, Jens; Begemann, Philipp; Stahmer, Felix; Adam, Gerhard; Lorenz, Cristian

    2006-03-01

    Functional assessment of cardiac ventricular function requires time consuming manual interaction. Some automated methods have been presented that predominantly used cardiac magnet resonance images. Here, an automatic shape tracking approach is followed to estimate left ventricular blood volume from multi-slice computed tomography image series acquired with retrospective ECG-gating. A deformable surface model method was chosen that utilized both shape and local appearance priors to determine the endocardial surface and to follow its motion through the cardiac cycle. Functional parameters like the ejection fraction could be calculated from the estimated shape deformation. A clinical validation was performed in a porcine model with 60 examinations on eight subjects. The functional parameters showed a good correlation with those determined by clinical experts using a commercially available semi-automatic short axes delineation tool. The correlation coefficient for the ejection fraction (EF) was 0.89. One quarter of these acquisitions were done with a low dose protocol. All of these degraded images could be processed well. Their correlation slightly decreases when compared to the normal dose cases (EF: 0.87 versus 0.88).

  13. Percolation phase diagrams for multi-phase models built on the overlapping sphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The overlapping sphere (OS) percolation model gives a two-phase microstructure (matrix plus inclusions) that is useful for testing composite material ideas and other applications, as well as serving as a paradigm of overlapping object percolation and phase transitions. Real materials often have more than two phases, so it is of interest to extend the applicability of the OS model. A flexible variant of the OS model can be constructed by randomly assigning the spheres different phase labels, according to a uniform probability distribution, as they are inserted one by one into the matrix. The resulting three or more phase models can have different amounts of percolating and non-percolating phases, depending on the volume fraction of each phase and the total OS volume fraction. A three-dimensional digital image approach is used to approximately map out the percolation phase diagram of such models, explicitly up to four phases (one matrix plus three spherical inclusion phases) and implicitly for N > 4 phases. For the three phase model, it was found that a single OS sub-phase has a percolation threshold that ranges from about a volume fraction of 0.16, when the matrix volume fraction is about 0.01, to about 0.30, at a matrix volume fraction of about 0.7. The approximate analytical dependence of this sub-phase percolation threshold on the defining model parameters serves to guide the building of the percolation phase diagram for the N-phase model, and is used to determine the maximum value of N(N = 6) at which all N phases can be simultaneously percolated.

  14. Optical and electrical investigations of graphene oxide flakes in multi-phases samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hyun; Campidelli, Stephane; Scalia, Giusy

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an oxidized form of graphene which can be dispersed in aqueous solutions, unlike bare graphene, thanks to its hydrophilic functional groups. Due to the extremely anisotropic shape, graphene can form liquid crystal (LC) phases according to Onsager's theory. Using GO with large polydispersity in flake lateral dimension and large areas, up to thousands of square micrometers, a separation in multiple phases can be observed. The segregation has certain stability in time suggesting a difference in the physical properties of the portions. Since biphase segregation of GO flakes, similarly to what observed in carbon nanotubes, is expected to originate from differences in the characteristics of the building blocks, it can be expected to find different physical properties in the suspensions within each of the different portions. We present here experimental investigations of the properties of GO within each volume evaluating the optical and electrical behavior to assess the characteristics of the flakes and elucidate the formation of the multiple phases. Fnr.

  15. High stability of faceted nanotubes and fullerenes of multi-phase layered phosphorus: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jie; Zhu, Zhen; Tomanek, David

    2015-03-01

    We present a paradigm in constructing very stable, faceted nanotube and fullerene structures by laterally joining nanoribbons or patches of different planar phosphorene phases. Our ab initio density functional calculations indicate that these phases may form very stable, non-planar joints. Unlike fullerenes and nanotubes obtained by deforming a single-phase planar monolayer at substantial energy penalty, we find faceted fullerenes and nanotubes to be nearly as stable as the planar single-phase monolayers. The resulting rich variety of polymorphs allows to tune the electronic properties of phosphorene nanotubes (PNTs) and fullerenes not only by the chiral index, but also by the combination of different phosphorene phases. In selected PNTs, a metal-insulator transition may be induced by strain or changing the number of walls. Supported by the National Science Foundation Cooperative Agreement #EEC-0832785, titled ``NSEC: Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing.''

  16. Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electrochemical Performance Using Multi-Phase Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane

    2015-09-30

    This work explored the use of oxide heterostructures for enhancing the catalytic and degradation properties of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode electrodes. We focused on heterostructures of Ruddlesden-Popper and perovskite phases. Building on previous work showing enhancement of the Ruddlesden-Popper (La,Sr)2CoO4 / perovskite (La,Sr)CoO3 heterostructure compared to pure (La,Sr)CoO3 we explored the application of related heterostructures of Ruddlesden-Popper phases on perovskite (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3. Our approaches included thin-film electrodes, physical and electrochemical characterization, elementary reaction kinetics modeling, and ab initio simulations. We demonstrated that Sr segregation to surfaces is likely playing a critical role in the performance of (La,Sr)CoO3 and (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 and that modification of this Sr segregation may be the mechanism by which Ruddlesden-Popper coatings enhance performances. We determined that (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 could be enhanced in thin films by about 10× by forming a heterostructure simultaneously with (La,Sr)2CoO4 and (La,Sr)CoO3. We hope that future work will develop this heterostructure for use as a bulk porous electrode.

  17. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    foldover in magnified images was eliminated by exciting limited regions with orthogonal pi/2 and pi pulses. Off-midline regions were imaged by tandemly offsetting the phase-encoding and excitation. Artifacts due to non-steady-state conditions were demonstrated. The approach to steady state was defined by operators and vectors, and any repeated series of RF pulses was proven to produce a steady-state. The vector difference between the magnetization and its steady state value is relatively constant during the approach. The repetition time relative to T_1 is the main determinant of approach rate, and off-resonant RF pulses incoherent with the magnetization produce a more rapid approach than on-resonant pulses.

  18. Present State-of-the-Art and Future Developments in COMPRES Synchrotron-Based Multi-Anvil Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. L.; Chen, H.; Vaughan, M. T.; Weidner, D. J.; Baldwin, K. J.; Huebsch, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the properties and behaviors of materials and multi-phase aggregates under conditions of high pressure and temperature are vital to unraveling the mysteries that lie beneath the surface of the planet. Advances in in situ experimental techniques utilizing synchrotron radiation at these extreme conditions have helped to provide answers to many fundamental questions that were previously unattainable. In particular, the Multi-Anvil apparatus has proven to be an invaluable tool for studying the morphological characteristics and physical properties of materials under extreme conditions as a function of pressure, temperature, stress, strain, and time. Moreover, the science is still continuing to evolve, and we have begun to step outside the realm of the static into the study of dynamic processes and their real-time responses to changes in the aforementioned variables, and even to the frequency and rate of these changes. This presentation will discuss the evolution and present state of the art in synchrotron-based multi-anvil techniques at the COMPRES-funded X17MAC Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and will also present future projections of developing techniques that will redefine the future of multi-anvil research not only at this facility, but also as we look forward to the impending move to our new home at beamline 6BM-B at the Advanced Photon Source.

  19. The State of State English Standards, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotsky, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    The importance of state academic standards soared in January 2002 with passage of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Not only does that milestone law require all states to have demanding academic standards in place and to demonstrate steady student progress toward academic proficiency as set forth in those standards, it also links states'…

  20. State of the States in Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddock, David; Hemp, Richard; Rizzolo, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    This is the latest edition of the "State of the States in Developmental Disabilities" study--a thorough and the only one of its kind investigation on public spending, revenues, and programmatic trends of intellectual and developmental programs and services within the United States since 1977. Directed by leading researcher, Dr. David Braddock, the…

  1. Dance Teacher Licensure: State by State Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koff, Susan, Comp.; Richard, Byron, Comp.

    This paper presents state-by-state requirements for dance teacher licensure in the following states: Arizona, Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Each listing includes information on address, telephone number, e-mail and/or Web site, and…

  2. Talent: A State's Resource, A State's Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, J. Ned, Ed.

    The development of provisions for gifted and talented students at the state level was the subject of a conference attended by State directors of programs for the gifted. Presented in the report are conference addresses on quality in education, the differentiated educational process, the role and responsibility of the State department of education…

  3. Probabilistic remote state preparation by W states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Ming; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2004-02-01

    In this paper we consider a scheme for probabilistic remote state preparation of a general qubit by using W states. The scheme consists of the sender, Alice and two remote receivers Bob and Carol. Alice performs a projective measurement on her qubit in the basis spanned by the state she wants to prepare and its orthocomplement. This allows either Bob or Carol to reconstruct the state with finite success probability. It is shown that for some special ensembles of qubits, the remote state preparation scheme requires only two classical bits, unlike the case in the scheme of quantum teleportation where three classical bits are needed.

  4. California State University, Sacramento

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlotta, Lori E.

    2009-01-01

    California State University, Sacramento, commonly referred to as "Sacramento State," is a booming metropolitan university located on 300 acres in the state capital of California. The university, the seventh largest in the California State University system, enrolls a multicultural student body of approximately 29,000 students. At Sacramento State,…

  5. State Appropriations: Drought Warning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ream, James A.

    1981-01-01

    After two decades of increase, state funding for higher education is drying up because of inflation and declining state revenues due to recession. States need to reemphasize the importance of higher education. Political action may be the way to reverse the downward trend in state financing of higher education. (MLW)

  6. State Issues Digest, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

    This digest is designed to provide campus leaders with an up-to-date, "bird's eye" view of key issues affecting state colleges and universities. The American Association of State Colleges and Universities conducted is annual State Issues Survey of the Council of State Representatives in 2002 and received 44 responses from 61 college and university…

  7. State energy information networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, J.; Ettinger, G.; Wrabel, M.

    1984-06-01

    In November 1983, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) initiated a study under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) State Programs Branch to examine state energy information networks. Goal was to help DOE decide how best to allocate resources to assist states in acquiring information related to state energy programs and policies.

  8. The Pennsylvania State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Philip J.; Dowhower, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1855 as the Farmer's High School, the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) began as a small college in Centre County providing agricultural education to young men from regional farm families. Penn State became a land-grant university in 1863 following passage of the Morrill Act. Today, Penn State enrolls more than 83,000 students…

  9. Doorway states and billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Villafane, J. A.; Mendez-Sanchez, R. A.; Flores, J.; Mateos, J. L.; Novaro, O.; Seligman, T. H.

    2010-12-23

    Whenever a distinct state is immersed in a sea of complicated and dense states, the strength of the distinct state, which we refer to as a doorway, is distributed in their neighboring states. We analyze this mechanism for 2-D billiards with different geometries. One of them is symmetric and integrable, another is symmetric but chaotic, and the third has a capricious form. The fact that the doorway-state mechanism is valid for such highly diverse cases, proves that it is robust.

  10. Product-State Approximations to Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Harrow, Aram W.

    2016-02-01

    We show that for any many-body quantum state there exists an unentangled quantum state such that most of the two-body reduced density matrices are close to those of the original state. This is a statement about the monogamy of entanglement, which cannot be shared without limit in the same way as classical correlation. Our main application is to Hamiltonians that are sums of two-body terms. For such Hamiltonians we show that there exist product states with energy that is close to the ground-state energy whenever the interaction graph of the Hamiltonian has high degree. This proves the validity of mean-field theory and gives an explicitly bounded approximation error. If we allow states that are entangled within small clusters of systems but product across clusters then good approximations exist when the Hamiltonian satisfies one or more of the following properties: (1) high degree, (2) small expansion, or (3) a ground state where the blocks in the partition have sublinear entanglement. Previously this was known only in the case of small expansion or in the regime where the entanglement was close to zero. Our approximations allow an extensive error in energy, which is the scale considered by the quantum PCP (probabilistically checkable proof) and NLTS (no low-energy trivial-state) conjectures. Thus our results put restrictions on the possible Hamiltonians that could be used for a possible proof of the qPCP or NLTS conjectures. By contrast the classical PCP constructions are often based on constraint graphs with high degree. Likewise we show that the parallel repetition that is possible with classical constraint satisfaction problems cannot also be possible for quantum Hamiltonians, unless qPCP is false. The main technical tool behind our results is a collection of new classical and quantum de Finetti theorems which do not make any symmetry assumptions on the underlying states.

  11. Groundwater recharge simulation under the steady-state and transient climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdniakov, S.; Lykhina, N.

    2010-03-01

    Groundwater recharge simulation under the steady-state and transient climate conditions Diffusive groundwater recharge is a vertical water flux through the water table, i.e. through the boundary between the unsaturated and saturated zones. This flux features temporal and spatial changes due to variations in the climatic conditions, landscape the state of vegetation, and the spatial variability of vadoze zone characteristics. In a changing climate the non-steady state series of climatic characteristics will affect on the groundwater recharge.. A well-tested approach to calculating water flux through the vadoze zone is the application of Richard’s equations for a heterogeneous one-domain porosity continuum with specially formulated atmospheric boundary conditions at the ground surface. In this approach the climatic parameters are reflected in upper boundary conditions, while the recharge series is the flux through the low boundary. In this work developed by authors code Surfbal that simulates water cycle at surface of topsoil to take into account the various condition of precipitation transformation at the surface in different seasons under different vegetation cover including snow accumulation in winter and melting in spring is used to generate upper boundary condition at surface of topsoil for world-wide known Hydrus-1D code (Simunek et al, 2008). To estimate the proposal climate change effect we performed Surfbal and Hydrus simulation using the steady state climatic condition and transient condition due to global warming on example of Moscow region, Russia. The following scenario of climate change in 21 century in Moscow region was selected: the annual temperature will increase on 4C during 100 year and annual precipitation will increase on 10% (Solomon et al, 2007). Within the year the maximum increasing of temperature and precipitation falls on winter time, while in middle of summer temperature will remain almost the same as observed now and monthly

  12. State-Chart Autocoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Kenneth; Watney, Garth; Murray, Alexander; Benowitz, Edward

    2007-01-01

    A computer program translates Unified Modeling Language (UML) representations of state charts into source code in the C, C++, and Python computing languages. ( State charts signifies graphical descriptions of states and state transitions of a spacecraft or other complex system.) The UML representations constituting the input to this program are generated by using a UML-compliant graphical design program to draw the state charts. The generated source code is consistent with the "quantum programming" approach, which is so named because it involves discrete states and state transitions that have features in common with states and state transitions in quantum mechanics. Quantum programming enables efficient implementation of state charts, suitable for real-time embedded flight software. In addition to source code, the autocoder program generates a graphical-user-interface (GUI) program that, in turn, generates a display of state transitions in response to events triggered by the user. The GUI program is wrapped around, and can be used to exercise the state-chart behavior of, the generated source code. Once the expected state-chart behavior is confirmed, the generated source code can be augmented with a software interface to the rest of the software with which the source code is required to interact.

  13. State Analysis Database Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert; Bennett, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The State Analysis Database Tool software establishes a productive environment for collaboration among software and system engineers engaged in the development of complex interacting systems. The tool embodies State Analysis, a model-based system engineering methodology founded on a state-based control architecture (see figure). A state represents a momentary condition of an evolving system, and a model may describe how a state evolves and is affected by other states. The State Analysis methodology is a process for capturing system and software requirements in the form of explicit models and states, and defining goal-based operational plans consistent with the models. Requirements, models, and operational concerns have traditionally been documented in a variety of system engineering artifacts that address different aspects of a mission s lifecycle. In State Analysis, requirements, models, and operations information are State Analysis artifacts that are consistent and stored in a State Analysis Database. The tool includes a back-end database, a multi-platform front-end client, and Web-based administrative functions. The tool is structured to prompt an engineer to follow the State Analysis methodology, to encourage state discovery and model description, and to make software requirements and operations plans consistent with model descriptions.

  14. State Health Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... per 100,000 Women by Race/Ethnicity Featured Data Collections Medicaid Policy Action Trends For 15 years, the ... formally collaborated on this project since 2014. This data collection pulls together state by state information on select ...

  15. The State Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Patrick M.; Jonsen, Richard W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews higher education consumer protection activities currently undertaken by the states, with suggestions about others that should be implemented and the role that state coordinating agencies can play in them. (Editor/JT)

  16. States of Matter

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA scientists and engineers utilize the basic principles of the states of matter on a daily basis. The states and properties of matter are very important to the design and construction of NASA sp...

  17. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed. PMID:15810684

  18. State Taxes in 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodley, Joanne H.

    This report describes tax revenues in fiscal year 1967 and tax legislation enacted during the calendar year 1967, for all 50 States. The amount and percent of the total for major sources of tax revenue during fiscal 1967 are listed by State as are the amount per capita and percent change in the States' total tax revenues from 1966 to 1967. Major…

  19. Model State Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen

    Models of state involvement in training child care providers are briefly discussed and the employers' role in training is explored. Six criteria for states that are taken as models are identified, and four are described. Various state activities are described for each criterion. It is noted that little is known about employer and other private…

  20. State Standards and Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the United States various individuals and groups have tried to subvert science education by removing or weakening the treatment of evolution in state science-education standards. Most states' science-education standards support the teaching of evolution, but many in the general public and some policymakers want science classrooms to…

  1. One State, Two State, Red State, Blue State: Education Funding Accounts for Outcome Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meece, Darrell

    2008-01-01

    Using publically available data, states coded as "blue" based upon results from the 2004 presidential election were significantly higher in education funding than were states coded as "red." Students in blue states scored significantly higher on outcome measures of math and reading in grades four and eight in 2004 and 2007 than did students in red…

  2. Changing State Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that state virtual or digital libraries are evolving into websites that are loaded with free resources, subscription databases, and instructional tools. In this article, the author explores these evolving libraries based on the following questions: (1) How user-friendly are the state digital libraries?; (2) How do state digital…

  3. [California State Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rea, Jay W.

    The first paper on the California State Archives treats the administrative status, legal basis of the archives program, and organization of the archives program. The problem areas in this States' archival program are discussed at length. The second paper gives a crude sketch of the legal and administrative history of the California State Archives,…

  4. Quantum state sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Andrew M.; Symul, Thomas; Bowen, Warwick P.; Sanders, Barry C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-05-01

    We demonstrate a multipartite protocol that utilizes entanglement to securely distribute and reconstruct a quantum state. A secret quantum state is encoded into a tripartite entangled state and distributed to three players. By collaborating together, a majority of the players can reconstruct the state, whilst the remaining player obtains nothing. This (2,3) threshold quantum state sharing scheme is characterized in terms of fidelity (F), signal transfer (T) and reconstruction noise (V). We demonstrate a fidelity averaged over all reconstruction permutations of 0.73 +/- 0.04, a level achievable only using quantum resources.

  5. Tripartite quantum state sharing.

    PubMed

    Lance, Andrew M; Symul, Thomas; Bowen, Warwick P; Sanders, Barry C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-04-30

    We demonstrate a multipartite protocol to securely distribute and reconstruct a quantum state. A secret quantum state is encoded into a tripartite entangled state and distributed to three players. By collaborating, any two of the three players can reconstruct the state, while individual players obtain nothing. We characterize this (2,3) threshold quantum state sharing scheme in terms of fidelity, signal transfer, and reconstruction noise. We demonstrate a fidelity averaged over all reconstruction permutations of 0.73+/-0.04, a level achievable only using quantum resources. PMID:15169193

  6. Tripartite Quantum State Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Andrew M.; Symul, Thomas; Bowen, Warwick P.; Sanders, Barry C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate a multipartite protocol to securely distribute and reconstruct a quantum state. A secret quantum state is encoded into a tripartite entangled state and distributed to three players. By collaborating, any two of the three players can reconstruct the state, while individual players obtain nothing. We characterize this (2,3) threshold quantum state sharing scheme in terms of fidelity, signal transfer, and reconstruction noise. We demonstrate a fidelity averaged over all reconstruction permutations of 0.73±0.04, a level achievable only using quantum resources.

  7. State energy overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This publication presents an overview of selected energy-related data for the United States, for each State, and for the District of Columbia. Included are the quantities of energy produced and consumed, estimates of fuel reserves, and the value of nonrenewable fuels produced by type. Also provided for each State are selected demographic and energy-related information that have been ranked and expressed as a percent of the national total. This overview provides a ready reference and a quick access to selected State energy information and State rankings for various socioeconomics and energy items.

  8. Fault Tolerant State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Taft, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    State machines are commonly used to control sequential logic in FPGAs and ASKS. An errant state machine can cause considerable damage to the device it is controlling. For example in space applications, the FPGA might be controlling Pyros, which when fired at the wrong time will cause a mission failure. Even a well designed state machine can be subject to random errors us a result of SEUs from the radiation environment in space. There are various ways to encode the states of a state machine, and the type of encoding makes a large difference in the susceptibility of the state machine to radiation. In this paper we compare 4 methods of state machine encoding and find which method gives the best fault tolerance, as well as determining the resources needed for each method.

  9. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5

  10. Arkansas: The State of the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoppmeyer, Martin W.

    In a poor state such as Arkansas, progress is often a slow and painful process. Particularly in the area of teacher salaries, school funding plans are often thwarted by budget shortfalls. Court decisions and efforts to stabilize and equalize school funding and local property taxes have led to political battles over taxation. Constitutional…

  11. The State of State Science Standards, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Lawrence S.; Goodenough, Ursula; Lynch, John; Schwartz, Martha; Schwartz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This report examines K-12 science standards for fifty states and the District of Columbia, as well as the science assessment framework of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The reviewers' aim is to evaluate them for their intrinsic clarity, completeness, and scientific correctness. Their earlier evaluations, as well as those…

  12. The State of State Science Standards, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Until now, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) has focused everyone's attention on reading and math--and on whether schools are making "adequate yearly progress" in those two core subjects. Although some states incorporate additional subjects into their own accountability systems, reading and math have dominated most discussions of state…

  13. The State of State MATH Standards, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, David; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Parker,Thomas; Quirk, William; Schmid, Wilfried; Wilson, W. Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Two decades after the United States was diagnosed as "a nation at risk," academic standards for our primary and secondary schools are more important than ever?and their quality matters enormously. In 1983, as nearly every American knows, the National Commission on Excellence in Education declared that "The educational foundations of our society…

  14. Educational Decentralization: Weak State or Strong State?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinn, Noel; Street, Susan

    1986-01-01

    A government is a complex system of competing factions that adopts a decentralization policy when the dominant group sees current government structures or procedures as an obstacle to the realization of group interests. Case studies of educational decentralization in Peru, Chile, and Mexico demonstrate that the "state" tends to share power only…

  15. Quantum State Engineering Via Coherent-State Superpositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janszky, Jozsef; Adam, P.; Szabo, S.; Domokos, P.

    1996-01-01

    The quantum interference between the two parts of the optical Schrodinger-cat state makes possible to construct a wide class of quantum states via discrete superpositions of coherent states. Even a small number of coherent states can approximate the given quantum states at a high accuracy when the distance between the coherent states is optimized, e. g. nearly perfect Fock state can be constructed by discrete superpositions of n + 1 coherent states lying in the vicinity of the vacuum state.

  16. Oxidation State 10 Exists.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoyu S; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-07-25

    In a recent paper, Wang et al. found an iridium-containing compound with a formal oxidation state of 9. This is the highest oxidation state ever found in a stable compound. To learn if this is the highest chemical oxidation state possible, Kohn-Sham density functional theory was used to study various compounds, including PdO4 (2+) , PtO4 (2+) , PtO3 F2 (2+) , PtO4 OH(+) , PtO5 , and PtO4 SH(+) , in which the metal has an oxidation state of 10. It was found that PtO4 (2+) has a metastable state that is kinetically stable with a barrier height for decomposition of 31 kcal mol(-1) and a calculated lifetime of 0.9 years. All other compounds studied would readily decompose to lower oxidation states. PMID:27273799

  17. New squeezed landau states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragone, C.

    1993-01-01

    We introduce a new set of squeezed states through the coupled two-mode squeezed operator. It is shown that their behavior is simpler than the correlated coherent states introduced by Dodonov, Kurmyshev, and Man'ko in order to quantum mechanically describe the Landau system, i.e., a planar charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. We compare results for both sets of squeezed states.

  18. State Energy Overview 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    Data are presented for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Included are the quantities of energy produced and consumed, estimates of fuel reserves, the value of nonrenewable fuels produced by type, energy expenditures, and consumer prices. Also provided for each state are selected demographic and energy-related data that have been ranked and expressed as a percent of the national total. This overview provides a ready reference and a quick access to selected state energy information and state rankings for various socioeconomic and energy items. Methodology is detailed; a glossary is provided.

  19. Optimally Squeezed Spin States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Alberto

    2004-03-01

    We consider optimally spin-squeezed states that maximize the sensitivity of the Ramsey spectroscopy, and for which the signal to noise ratio scales as the number of particles N. Using the variational principle we prove that these states are eigensolutions of the Hamiltonian H(λ)=λ S_z^2-S_x, and that, for large N, the states become equivalent to the quadrature squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. We present numerical results that illustrate the validity of the equivalence. We also present results of spin squeezing via atom-field interactions within the context of the Tavis-Cummings model. An ensemble of N two-level atoms interacts with a quantized cavity field. For all the atoms initially in their ground states, it is shown that spin squeezing of both the atoms and the field can be achieved provided the initial state of the cavity field has coherence between number states differing by 2. Most of the discussion is restricted to the case of a cavity field initially in a coherent state, but initial squeezed states for the field are also discussed. An analytic solution is found that is valid in the limit that the number of atoms is much greater than unity. References: A. G. Rojo, Phys. Rev A, 68, 013807 (2003); Claudiu Genes, P. R. Berman, and A. G. Rojo Phys. Rev. A 68, 043809 (2003).

  20. State Librarianship: Modular Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Jane; Powell, Anne

    This modular curriculum on state librarianship is designed to be used as a basis for a full-length library science course, instructional segments of several courses, continuing education courses, or workshops. The 20 curriculum modules cover the many facets of state libraries and their activities--history, functions, social and political…

  1. Bidirectional Quantum States Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jia-Yin; Bai, Ming-qiang; Mo, Zhi-Wen

    2016-05-01

    With the help of the shared entanglement and LOCC, multidirectional quantum states sharing is considered. We first put forward a protocol for implementing four-party bidirectional states sharing (BQSS) by using eight-qubit cluster state as quantum channel. In order to extend BQSS, we generalize this protocol from four sharers to multi-sharers utilizing two multi-qubit GHZ-type states as channel, and propose two multi-party BQSS schemes. On the other hand, we generalize the three schemes from two senders to multi-senders with multi GHZ-type states of multi-qubit as quantum channel, and give a multidirectional quantum states sharing protocol. In our schemes, all receivers can reconstruct the original unknown single-qubit state if and only if all sharers can cooperate. Only Pauli operations, Bell-state measurement and single-qubit measurement are used in our schemes, so these schemes are easily realized in physical experiment and their successful probabilities are all one.

  2. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  3. Solid-state configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Two prototype solid-state phased array systems concepts developed for the solar power satellite (SPS) are described. In both concepts, the beam was centered on the rectenna by means of phase conjugation of a pilot signal emanating from the ground. Also discussed are results of solid state studies.

  4. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  5. Centennial State Libraries, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Kathleen D., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of 12 consecutive issues of the monthly "Centennial State Libraries" newsletter, of the Colorado Department of Education, State Library and Adult Education Office. The issues cover the year 1998. Each issue of the newsletter--except the August issue which is an Annual Report--includes some or all of the following sections:…

  6. Kansas State Inservice Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KASCO Record, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The first paper (by Jim Jarrett) in this monograph on the Kansas State Inservice Plan offers an overview of one facet of staff development plans, i.e., peer coaching and its effectiveness in teacher inservice education. The next paper (by Dan Neuenswander) reviews the Kansas State Department of Education Inservice Plan, defining inservice and/or…

  7. Qubit state discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Deconinck, Matthieu E.

    2010-06-15

    We show how one can solve the problem of discriminating between qubit states. We use the quantum state discrimination duality theorem and the Bloch sphere representation of qubits, which allows for an easy geometric and analytical representation of the optimal guessing strategies.

  8. The State Regulatory Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Brenda N.

    1998-01-01

    A national survey of 31 college business officers at state and land-grant colleges and universities finds that, although several states have given greater management flexibility to colleges and universities, many campuses operate in a highly regulated mode, with layers of external, and frequently internal, rules. Most difficult business officers…

  9. Healthcare. State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report projects education requirements linked to forecasted job growth in healthcare by state and the District of Columbia from 2010 through 2020. It complements a larger national report which projects educational demand for healthcare for the same time period. The national report shows that with or without Obamacare, the United States will…

  10. State and local governments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The Virginia Space Grant Consortium approach to a close working relation to state and local governments is presented as a model for consideration. State government relations are especially important in that this is a primary resource in securing matching funds. Avenues for establishing these relationships are listed and discussed.

  11. Education and Fragile States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Jackie

    2007-01-01

    Within the fragile states agendas and policies of development agencies and organisations education is of concern; education is a social service sector in which the impacts of state fragility are significant, in terms of access and quality of provision for children, working conditions and support for teachers, good governance and legitimacy for the…

  12. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a state routing agency,'' defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  13. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a ``state routing agency,`` defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  14. State Workforce Policy Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public/Private Ventures, Philadelphia, PA.

    Surging demand for workers, growing income inequality, and passage of welfare reforms have made work force development one of the United States' key national concerns. Public/Private Ventures has been working with various states to design work force development strategies that seek to address the concerns of many work force development specialists…

  15. Grid State Estimation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-09

    This software code is designed to track generator state variables in real time using the Ensemble Kalman Filter method with the aid of PMU measurements. This code can also be used to calibrate dynamic model parameters by augmenting parameters in the state variable vector.

  16. Quantum State Magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsen, Nils; Hosten, Onur; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The standard quantum limit (SQL) for quantum metrology has been surpassed by as much as a factor of 100 using entangled states. However, in order to utilize these states, highly engineered, low-noise state readout is required. Here we present a new method to bypass this requirement in a wide variety of physical systems. We implement the protocol experimentally in a system using the clock states of 5 ×105 87 Rb atoms. Through a nonlinear, optical cavity-mediated interaction we generate spin squeezed states. A small microwave rotation followed by an additional optical cavity interaction stage allow us to exploit the full sensitivity of the squeezed states with a fluorescence detection system. Though the technical noise floor of our fluorescence detection is 15dB above the SQL, we show metrology at 8dB below the SQL. This is the first time squeezed states prepared in a cavity are read out by fluorescence imaging. The method described can be used in any system with a suitable nonlinear interaction.

  17. Correlations in Werner States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shun-Long; Li, Nan

    2008-02-01

    Werner states are paradigmatic examples of quantum states and play an innovative role in quantum information theory. In investigating the correlating capability of Werner states, we find the curious phenomenon that quantum correlations, as quantified by the entanglement of formation, may exceed the total correlations, as measured by the quantum mutual information. Consequently, though the entanglement of formation is so widely used in quantifying entanglement, it cannot be interpreted as a consistent measure of quantum correlations per se if we accept the folklore that total correlations are measured (or rather upper bounded) by the quantum mutual information.

  18. Negative-ion states

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    In this brief review, we discuss some of the properties of atomic and molecular negative ions and their excited states. Experiments involving photon reactions with negative ions and polar dissociation are summarized. 116 references, 14 figures.

  19. Multipartite secure state distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Duer, W.; Briegel, H.-J.; Calsamiglia, J.

    2005-04-01

    We introduce the distribution of a secret multipartite entangled state in a real-world scenario as a quantum primitive. We show that in the presence of noisy quantum channels (and noisy control operations), any state chosen from the set of two-colorable graph states (Calderbank-Shor-Steane codewords) can be created with high fidelity while it remains unknown to all parties. This is accomplished by either blind multipartite entanglement purification, which we introduce in this paper, or by multipartite entanglement purification of enlarged states, which offers advantages over an alternative scheme based on standard channel purification and teleportation. The parties are thus provided with a secret resource of their choice for distributed secure applications.

  20. State Air Quality Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollution Engineering, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This article presents in tabular form the air quality standards for sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, photochemicals, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. (CS)

  1. Noninvasive Metallic State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Ken-Ichiro; Takane, Yositake

    Topological insulator is a newly established exotic state of matter that has been intensively discussed in the field of condensed-matter nanophysics since the last couple of years. Though it is undistinguishable from ordinary band insulators in the bulk, in the sense it has a gapped spectrum with its Fermi energy lying in that gap, on the surface (if the sample has a surface) it exhibits a "protected" gapless state, i.e., it behaves like a metal on its surface. The central issue that has been discussed so far was on the existence of such a metallic surface state protected by the topological non-triviality of the (gapped) bulk spectrum. Here, in this article we attempt to quantify the remaining question, "why does such a protected gapless state appear only on the surface?" in the language of the surface Dirac theory.

  2. NetState

    SciTech Connect

    Durgin, Nancy; Mai, Yuqing; Hutchins, James

    2005-09-01

    NetState is a distributed network monitoring system. It uses passive sensors to develop status information on a target network. Two major features provided by NetState are version and port tracking. Version tracking maintains information about software and operating systems versions. Port tracking identifies information about active TOP and UDP ports. Multiple NetState sniffers can be deployed, one at each entry point of the target network. The sniffers monitor network traffic, then send the information to the NetState server. The information is stored in centralized database which can then be accessed via standard SQL database queries or this web-based GUI, for further analysis and display.

  3. The state of concordance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastin, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    What is the computational power of a quantum computer that is restricted to transitioning from one effectively classical state to another via gates which act on only a few qudits at a time? A plausible answer is that such a machine is no more powerful than a classical computer, but this turns out to be surprisingly difficult to prove. The difficulty is that the effectively classical states referenced are concordant states, which are classical up to the choice of local classical basis, and determining the next local basis in which the state of the computer looks classical appears to be a hard problem. The recent paper by Cable and Browne (2015 New J. Phys. 17 113049), describes powerful new techniques for addressing this fundamental question and provides some partial answers.

  4. Stats of the States

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjusted death rates from malignant neoplasms. Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease Mortality by State, 2013 - Number of deaths and age-adjusted death rates from various lung diseases including asthma, chronic bronchitis, ...

  5. NetState

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-09-01

    NetState is a distributed network monitoring system. It uses passive sensors to develop status information on a target network. Two major features provided by NetState are version and port tracking. Version tracking maintains information about software and operating systems versions. Port tracking identifies information about active TOP and UDP ports. Multiple NetState sniffers can be deployed, one at each entry point of the target network. The sniffers monitor network traffic, then send the information tomore » the NetState server. The information is stored in centralized database which can then be accessed via standard SQL database queries or this web-based GUI, for further analysis and display.« less

  6. [Twilight states in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Kharchevnikov, G M; Boldyrev, A I

    1980-01-01

    A total of 82 epileptic patients with twilight states were studied. Such conditions were more frequently encountered in epilepsy due to neuroinfections and brain trauma. Twilight states, as a rule, appear after several years from the onset of the disease, when it was not treated or inadequately treated and indicate an unfavorable development of the epileptic process. It is desirable that twilight states be classified as developing rapidly and with a retarded course. In rapidly developing epileptic disorders the epileptic focus on EEG was more frequently seen in the temporal areas, while in protractd disorders it was seen in the subcortical and stem brain structures. Pneumoencephalography revealed pronounced scarry and cystoadhesive lesions. Twilight states should be differentiated with temporal psychomotor attacks by certain clinical signs. PMID:6774534

  7. State v. Federal Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calpin, Joseph L.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a learning activity in which students compare their state constitution's bill of rights with the federal Bill of Rights. Provides a chart for identifying comparisons of enumerated rights. Includes background information and explains objectives and procedures. (CH)

  8. Coma / Vegetative State

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a profound or deep state of unconsciousness (consciousness being the awareness of the self and the ... 13-15 – mild brain injury, or loss of consciousness for fewer than 20 minutes 15 – full consciousness ...

  9. Stable coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipfel, Antonia; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the stability under time evolution of complexifier coherent states (CCS) in one-dimensional mechanical systems. A system of coherent states is called stable if it evolves into another coherent state. It turns out that a system can only possess stable CCS if the classical evolution of the variable z =e-i Lχ Cq for a given complexifier C depends only on z itself and not on its complex conjugate. This condition is very restrictive in general so that only a few systems exist that obey this condition. However, it is possible to access a wider class of models that in principle may allow for stable coherent states associated with certain regions in the phase space by introducing action-angle coordinates.

  10. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  11. Ground State Spin Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James; Faccin, Mauro; Biamonte, Jacob

    2013-03-01

    Designing and optimizing cost functions and energy landscapes is a problem encountered in many fields of science and engineering. These landscapes and cost functions can be embedded and annealed in experimentally controllable spin Hamiltonians. Using an approach based on group theory and symmetries, we examine the embedding of Boolean logic gates into the ground-state subspace of such spin systems. We describe parameterized families of diagonal Hamiltonians and symmetry operations which preserve the ground-state subspace encoding the truth tables of Boolean formulas. The ground-state embeddings of adder circuits are used to illustrate how gates are combined and simplified using symmetry. Our work is relevant for experimental demonstrations of ground-state embeddings found in both classical optimization as well as adiabatic quantum optimization.

  12. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  13. Iowa State Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue of the "Goldfinch" focuses on the Iowa state fair. The magazine begins with a map of the fair as it looks today. The article explains that the first Iowa state fair was held in 1854. After traveling from town to town for several years, the fair settled in the capital city of Des Moines in 1878. Eight years later, in 1886, the first fair…

  14. State Online College Job Market: Ranking the States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony; Jayasundera, Tamara; Repnikov, Dmitri; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    "State Online College Job Market: Ranking the States" analyzes the online college labor market on a state-by-state basis. We examine the geographic distribution of online job ads for college graduates within industries and occupational clusters, and compare the relative strength of the online college labor market across states. We…

  15. Intranets and Extranets at State Libraries in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolt, Nancy M.

    This paper is an analysis of Intranets and Extranets at selected state libraries in the United States. The paper does not review World Wide Web sites designed for use by the general public; rather, it focuses on Web sites designed and delivered by the state library to a targeted audience, typically state government employees, state library…

  16. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  17. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  18. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  19. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  20. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust...

  1. Superpowers and client states

    SciTech Connect

    Efrat, M.; Bercovitch, J.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the world the two superpowers often conduct their global conflict by proxy, taking different sides in regional disputes. An important question of international relations is where the balance of power lies in the superpower client state relationship-how far are the interests of the superpower subordinated to those of the client state or vice versa. Taking the two case studies of the US-Israel relationship and the Soviet-Syrian relationship, this book explores the perceptions by each side of the relationship and the reality. It goes on to make general conclusions about superpower-client state relationships. Contents: Introduction; In Search of a Theoretical Framework; Client-States in Superpower Perception; Superpowers in Client States' Perception; The Case of US-Israel Relations; Israel in US Perspective; The USA in Israeli Perspective; Flows of US Civilian and Military Resources to Israel; The Case of Soviet-Syrian Relations; Syria in Soviet Perspective; The USSR in Syrian Perspective; Flows of Soviet Civilian and Military Resources to Syria; Comparative Analysis and Conclusions; Overview of the two cases studies and conclusions.

  2. Parametric State Space Structuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardo, Gianfranco; Tilgner, Marco

    1997-01-01

    Structured approaches based on Kronecker operators for the description and solution of the infinitesimal generator of a continuous-time Markov chains are receiving increasing interest. However, their main advantage, a substantial reduction in the memory requirements during the numerical solution, comes at a price. Methods based on the "potential state space" allocate a probability vector that might be much larger than actually needed. Methods based on the "actual state space", instead, have an additional logarithmic overhead. We present an approach that realizes the advantages of both methods with none of their disadvantages, by partitioning the local state spaces of each submodel. We apply our results to a model of software rendezvous, and show how they reduce memory requirements while, at the same time, improving the efficiency of the computation.

  3. Pfaffian States: Quantum Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2009-09-14

    The Pfaffian determinant is sometimes used to multiply the Laughlin's wave function at the half filled Landau level. The square of the Pfaffian gives the ordinary determinant. We find that the Pfaffian wave function leads to four times larger energies and two times faster time. By the same logic, the Pfaffian breaks the supersymmetry of the Dirac equation. By using the spin properties and the Landau levels, we correctly interpret the state with 5/2 filling. The quantum numbers which represent the state vectors are now products of n (Landau level quantum number), l(orbital angular momentum quantum number and the spin, s |n, l, s>. In a circuit, the noise measures the resistivity and hence the charge. The Pfaffian velocity is different from that of the single-particle states and hence it has important consequences in the measurement of the charge of the quasiparticles.

  4. The Association between State Attachment Security and State Mindfulness

    PubMed Central

    Pepping, Christopher A.; Davis, Penelope J.; O’Donovan, Analise

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that attachment and mindfulness are related, though the nature of this association is unclear. Here we present two studies examining whether there is a causal relationship between state attachment and state mindfulness. Study 1 investigated the effects of experimentally increasing state mindfulness on state attachment security. State mindfulness was successfully enhanced, but this led to no change in state attachment security. Study 2 investigated the effects of experimentally enhancing state attachment security on state mindfulness. State attachment security was successfully enhanced, but this did not lead to any change in state mindfulness. These findings suggest that there is not a direct, immediate causal relationship between state attachment and state mindfulness as a result of brief experimental manipulations. Future research should examine these associations in longer term interventions. PMID:25786134

  5. Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boards Representing the 70 medical boards of the United States and its territories. The Federation of State ... the 70 medical and osteopathic boards of the United States and its territories. Since its founding, the ...

  6. Concepts, states, and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Karl Erich

    2000-05-01

    Mathematical System Theory is extended to Conceptual System Theory using Formal Concept Analysis (Wille 1982). States are defined as formal concepts and `points of time' are generalized to `time granules,' interpreted as `pieces' of time needed for the realization of measurements. As a generalization of classical time systems we define conceptual time systems, their state spaces and phase spaces. Time dependent relations among the parts of a conceptual time system are introduced in `relational conceptual time systems.' Applications in psychology and industry, including `conceptual films' are mentioned.

  7. Quantum chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, David; Aubourg, Lucile

    2016-02-01

    We study a theoretical model of closed quasi-hermitian chain of spins which exhibits quantum analogues of chimera states, i.e. long life classical states for which a part of an oscillator chain presents an ordered dynamics whereas another part presents a disordered dynamics. For the quantum analogue, the chimera behaviour deals with the entanglement between the spins of the chain. We discuss the entanglement properties, quantum chaos, quantum disorder and semi-classical similarity of our quantum chimera system. The quantum chimera concept is novel and induces new perspectives concerning the entanglement of multipartite systems.

  8. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  9. Perceiving mental states.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This paper argues that our awareness of the mental states of other agents is often perceptual in character. It draws partly on recent experimental findings concerning perception of animacy and intentionality. But it also emphasizes the unencapsulated nature of perception generally, and argues that concepts (including mental-state concepts) can be bound into the contents of conscious perception. One of the main arguments used in support of this conclusion draws on recent work concerning the nature and contents of working memory. PMID:25935565

  10. State summaries: Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krukowski, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, Oklahoma mines produced both industrial minerals and coal. No metals were mined in the state. Based on value, leading industrial minerals include crushed stone followed by cement, construction sand and gravel, industrial sand and gravel, iodine and gypsum. The Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODOM) reported that more than 343 mine operators produced nonfuel minerals from 405 mines in the state. However, 530 mining permitted sites were on file. The Oklahoma Miner Training Institute (OMTI) held 239 classes for 33,768 classroom hours of instruction, in which 84 coal miners and 4,587 metal/nonmetal miners were trained.

  11. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  12. Excited Charm States

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.

    1994-12-31

    Characteristics of mass spectra and decays of orbitally excited charm mesons and baryons, expected on the basis of quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry, are briefly described. The difficulties associated with measurements on these excited states are discussed. The accuracy and reliability of currently available experimental information is examined. The reasons, for the widely accepted spin-parity assignments to the observed excited mesons and baryons, are stated. Finally, the experimental data, with the accepted spin-parity assignments, is compared with expectations based on quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry.

  13. See Your State From Space!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    Each of the 50 States in the United States is beautiful in its own way. That beauty can be seen from a unique perspective using satellite images taken from high above the Earth. These State images were created from multiple satellite images stitched together into one seamless image for each State. Names of major cities, administrative boundaries, and State flags have been added.

  14. Report on State Virtual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    Nearly all Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states have a state-sponsored virtual school, and the remaining states are either planning or beginning initial implementation. Just 12 years ago, none of the 50 states used the Web to provide courses to middle grades or high school students. By 2000, several SREB states, including Florida,…

  15. Multi-phase Temporal Seismic Imaging of a Slope Stability Mitigation Project at Newby Island Sanitary Landfill, San Jose, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treece, B. J.; Catchings, R.; Reed, D.; Goldman, M.

    2014-12-01

    Without slope stability mitigation, liquefaction-induced settlement in bay mud and Pleistocene alluvial deposits may lead to the collapse of levee walls surrounding sanitary landfills that are located adjacent to the San Francisco Bay. To analyze the effectiveness of a slope stability mitigation project involving deep soil mixing at Newby Island Sanitary Landfill in San Jose, California, we acquired P- and S-wave seismic surveys along a transect through the mitigated region during, and two years after, completion of the mitigation project. Deep soil mixing involves the injection of a cement slurry in augered holes, resulting in groups of soil-cement columns (elements) that are intended to increase the strength and rigidity of the subsurface materials. For our seismic investigations, we used accelerated-weight-drop (AWD) and hammer impacts to generate P- and S-wave seismic sources, respectively, at 57 geophone locations, spaced 5 m apart. The resulting seismic data were recorded using 40-Hz, vertical-component (P-wave) and 4.5-Hz, horizontal-component (S-wave) sensors. Initially, we developed tomographic refraction (velocity) images along a progressive transition from a yet-to-be-mitigated area into a more recently mitigated area, located along the base of a steep slope composed of compacted landfill. The initial survey revealed an increase in seismic velocity in the treated area, seismic velocity increases with curing time for soil-cement elements, and a high-velocity zone beneath the active injection zone. The influence of the mitigation was most apparent from increases in Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratios. To assess the long-term effects of the mitigation project, an identical, follow-up survey was acquired in July 2014, 23 months after the initial survey. We present a comparative analysis of the tomographic images from the two surveys, variations in Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratios over time, and a comparison of in situ, time-varying seismic parameters with laboratory-based observations of curing times as a function of cement density. We also compare S-wave velocities with cone penetrometer testing (CPT) data, acquired prior to the mitigation project, to infer changes in the subsurface over time.

  16. Rifting to India-Asia Reactivation: Multi-phase Structural Evolution of the Barmer Basin, Rajasthan, northwest India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. J.; Bladon, A.; Clarke, S.; Najman, Y.; Copley, A.; Kloppenburg, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Barmer Basin, situated within the West Indian Rift System, is an intra-cratonic rift basin produced during Gondwana break-up. Despite being a prominent oil and gas province, the structural evolution and context of the rift within northwest India remains poorly understood. Substantial subsurface datasets acquired during hydrocarbon exploration provide an unrivalled tool to investigate the tectonic evolution of the Barmer Basin rift and northwest India during India-Asia collision. Here we present a structural analysis using seismic datasets to investigate Barmer Basin evolution and place findings within the context of northwest India development. Present day rift structural architectures result from superposition of two non-coaxial extensional events; an early mid-Cretaceous rift-oblique event (NW-SE), followed by a main Paleocene rifting phase (NE-SW). Three phases of fault reactivation follow rifting: A transpressive, Late Paleocene inversion along localised E-W and NNE-SSW-trending faults; a widespread Late Paleocene-Early Eocene inversion and Late Miocene-Present Day transpressive strike-slip faulting along NW-SE-trending faults and isolated inversion structures. A major Late Eocene-Miocene unconformity in the basin is also identified, approximately coeval with those identified within the Himalayan foreland basin, suggesting a common cause related to India-Asia collision, and calling into question previous explanations that are not compatible with spatial extension of the unconformity beyond the foreland basin. Although, relatively poorly age constrained, extensional and compressional events within the Barmer Basin can be correlated with regional tectonic processes including the fragmentation of Gondwana, the rapid migration of the Greater Indian continent, to subsequent collision with Asia. New insights into the Barmer Basin development have important implications not only for ongoing hydrocarbon exploration but the temporal evolution of northwest India.

  17. Methods, systems and apparatus for optimization of third harmonic current injection in a multi-phase machine

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel

    2012-10-02

    Methods, system and apparatus are provided for increasing voltage utilization in a five-phase vector controlled machine drive system that employs third harmonic current injection to increase torque and power output by a five-phase machine. To do so, a fundamental current angle of a fundamental current vector is optimized for each particular torque-speed of operating point of the five-phase machine.

  18. Analysis of multi-phase transport phenomena with catalyst reactions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Munir Ahmed; Sundén, Bengt; Yuan, Jinliang

    2011-10-01

    A review is presented for two-phase modeling approaches to study various transport processes and reactions in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells along with some experimental work. It has been noted that water management is still one of the least accurate modeled phenomena. The lackness in complete descriptive models for water management inside PEM fuel cells can be attributed to the complexity of the phenomena, lack of empirical or measured data and non-availability of apt governing equations. Another discrepancy found in present models is the proper validation of the numerical work as it has been observed that mere comparison with V-I curve can sometimes lead to misguided conclusions. Additionally, keeping in mind the multi-scale nature of a PEM fuel cell, application of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has also been reviewed in this work and it was noticed that LB methods offer bright perspective at meso-scale by incorporating details of local structure. Furthermore, a brief description of the catalyst layer models is also presented with some technological developments at nano-scale to improve the physio- and electro-chemical properties. A test case for a 2D PEM cathode is also simulated for different operating voltages to predict the water saturation effects.

  19. Design and Initial Results of a Multi-Phase Randomized Trial of Ceftriaxone in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, James D.; Shefner, Jeremy M.; Conwit, Robin; Schoenfeld, David; Keroack, Myles; Felsenstein, Donna; Krivickas, Lisa; David, William S.; Vriesendorp, Francine; Pestronk, Alan; Caress, James B.; Katz, Jonathan; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Pascuzzi, Robert; Glass, Jonathan; Rezania, Kourosh; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Greenblatt, David J.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ceftriaxone increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter, EAAT2, which might protect from glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. A trial using a novel three stage nonstop design, incorporating Phases I-III, tested ceftriaxone in ALS. Stage 1 determined the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in subjects with ALS. Stage 2 evaluated safety and tolerability for 20-weeks. Analysis of the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety was used to determine the ceftriaxone dosage for Stage 3 efficacy testing. Methods In Stage 1, 66 subjects at ten clinical sites were enrolled and randomized equally into three study groups receiving intravenous placebo, ceftriaxone 2 grams daily or ceftriaxone 4 grams daily divided BID. Participants provided serum and cerebrospinal fluid for pharmacokinetic analysis on study day 7. Participants continued their assigned treatment in Stage 2. The Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) reviewed the data after the last participants completed 20 weeks on study drug. Results Stage 1 analysis revealed linear pharmacokinetics, and CSF trough levels for both dosage levels exceeding the pre-specified target trough level of 1 µM (0.55 µg/mL). Tolerability (Stages 1 and 2) results showed that ceftriaxone at dosages up to 4 grams/day was well tolerated at 20 weeks. Biliary adverse events were more common with ceftriaxone but not dose-dependent and improved with ursodeoxycholic (ursodiol) therapy. Conclusions The goals of Stages 1 and 2 of the ceftriaxone trial were successfully achieved. Based on the pre-specified decision rules, the DSMB recommended the use of ceftriaxone 4 g/d (divided BID) for Stage 3, which recently closed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00349622. PMID:23613806

  20. A New and General Formulation of the Parametric HFGMC Micromechanical Method for Three-Dimensional Multi-Phase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Ali, Rami; Aboudi, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The recent two-dimensional (2-D) parametric formulation of the high fidelity generalized method of cells (HFGMC) reported by the authors is generalized for the micromechanical analysis of three-dimensional (3-D) multiphase composites with periodic microstructure. Arbitrary hexahedral subcell geometry is developed to discretize a triply periodic repeating unit-cell (RUC). Linear parametric-geometric mapping is employed to transform the arbitrary hexahedral subcell shapes from the physical space to an auxiliary orthogonal shape, where a complete quadratic displacement expansion is performed. Previously in the 2-D case, additional three equations are needed in the form of average moments of equilibrium as a result of the inclusion of the bilinear terms. However, the present 3-D parametric HFGMC formulation eliminates the need for such additional equations. This is achieved by expressing the coefficients of the full quadratic polynomial expansion of the subcell in terms of the side or face average-displacement vectors. The 2-D parametric and orthogonal HFGMC are special cases of the present 3-D formulation. The continuity of displacements and tractions, as well as the equilibrium equations, are imposed in the average (integral) sense as in the original HFGMC formulation. Each of the six sides (faces) of a subcell has an independent average displacement micro-variable vector which forms an energy-conjugate pair with the transformed average-traction vector. This allows generating symmetric stiffness matrices along with internal resisting vectors for the subcells which enhances the computational efficiency. The established new parametric 3-D HFGMC equations are formulated and solution implementations are addressed. Several applications for triply periodic 3-D composites are presented to demonstrate the general capability and varsity of the present parametric HFGMC method for refined micromechanical analysis by generating the spatial distributions of local stress fields. These applications include triply periodic composites with inclusions in the form of a cavity, spherical inclusion, ellipsoidal inclusion, discontinuous aligned short fiber. A 3-D repeating unit-cell for foam material composite is simulated.

  1. A stochastic damage model for the rupture prediction of a multi-phase solid. I - Parametric studies. II - Statistical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lua, Yuan J.; Liu, Wing K.; Belytschko, Ted

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic damage model for predicting the rupture of a brittle multiphase material is developed, based on the microcrack-macrocrack interaction. The model, which incorporates uncertainties in locations, orientations, and numbers of microcracks, characterizes damage by microcracking and fracture by macrocracking. A parametric study is carried out to investigate the change of the stress intensity at the macrocrack tip by the configuration of microcracks. The inherent statistical distribution of the fracture toughness arising from the intrinsic random nature of microcracks is explored using a statistical approach. For this purpose, a computer simulation model is introduced, which incorporates a statistical characterization of geometrical parameters of a random microcrack array.

  2. Simulating a multi-phase tephra fall event: inversion modelling for the 1707 Hoei eruption of Mount Fuji, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, Christina; Mannen, Kazutaka; Connor, Laura; Bonadonna, Costanza; Connor, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Fuji Volcano last erupted in ad 1707 depositing approximately 40 mm of tephra in the area that is now central Tokyo. New high-resolution data describe 17 eruptive phases occurring over a period of 16 days (Miyaji et al., J Volcanol Geotherm Res 207(3-4):113-129, 2011). Inversion techniques were used in order to best replicate geological data and eyewitness accounts, and to estimate eruption source parameters. Inversion results based on data from individual eruptive phases suggest a total erupted mass of 2.09 × 1012 kg. Comparatively, results based on a single data set describing the entire eruption sequence suggest a total mass of 1.69 × 1012 kg. Values for total erupted mass determined by inversion were compared to those calculated using various curve fitting approaches. An exponential (two-segment) method, taking into account missing distal data, was found to be most compatible with inversion results, giving an erupted mass of 2.52 × 1012 kg when combining individual phases and 1.59 × 1012 kg when utilising a single data set describing the Hoei sequence. Similarly, a Weibull fitting method determined a total erupted mass of 1.54 × 1012 kg for the single data set and compared favourably with inversion results when enough data were available. Partitioning extended eruption scenarios into multiple phases and including detailed geological data close to the eruption source, more accurately replicated the observed deposit by taking into account subtleties such as lobes deposited during transient increases in eruption rate and variations in wind velocity or direction throughout the eruption.

  3. Broad [C II] Line Wings as Tracer of Molecular and Multi-phase Outflows in Infrared Bright Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, A. W.; Christopher, N.; Sturm, E.; Veilleux, S.; Contursi, A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Fischer, J.; Davies, R.; Verma, A.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Sternberg, A.; Tacconi, L.; Burtscher, L.; Poglitsch, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report a tentative correlation between the outflow characteristics derived from OH absorption at 119 μm and [C ii] emission at 158 μm in a sample of 22 local and bright ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). For this sample, we investigate whether [C ii] broad wings are a good tracer of molecular outflows, and how the two tracers are connected. Fourteen objects in our sample have a broad wing component as traced by [C ii], and all of these also show OH119 absorption indicative of an outflow (in one case an inflow). The other eight cases, where no broad [C ii] component was found, are predominantly objects with no OH outflow or a low-velocity (≤100 km s‑1) OH outflow. The FWHM of the broad [C ii] component shows a trend with the OH119 blueshifted velocity, although with significant scatter. Moreover, and despite large uncertainties, the outflow masses derived from OH and broad [C ii] show a 1:1 relation. The main conclusion is therefore that broad [C ii] wings can be used to trace molecular outflows. This may be particularly relevant at high redshift, where the usual tracers of molecular gas (like low-J CO lines) become hard to observe. Additionally, observations of blueshifted Na i D λλ 5890, 5896 absorption are available for 10 of our sources. Outflow velocities of Na i D show a trend with OH velocity and broad [C ii] FWHM. These observations suggest that the atomic and molecular gas phases of the outflow are connected.

  4. A Diffuse Interface Method with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Simulation of Incompressible Multi-Phase Flows with Moving Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yi; Spelt, Peter D. M.; Ding, Hang

    2010-11-01

    Diffuse Interface (DI) methods are employed widely for the numerical simulation of two-phase flows, even with moving contact lines. In a DI method, the interface thickness should be as thin as possible to simulate spreading phenomena under realistic flow conditions, so a fine grid is required, beyond the reach of current methods that employ a uniform grid. Here we have integrated a DI method based on a uniform mesh, to a block-based adaptive mesh refinement method, so that only the regions near the interface are resolved by a fine mesh. The performance of the present method is tested by simulations including drop deformation in shear flow, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and drop spreading on a flat surface, et al. The results show that the present method can give accurate results with much smaller computational cost, compared to the original DI method based on a uniform mesh. Based on the present method, simulation of drop spreading is carried out with Cahn number of 0.001 and the contact line region is well resolved. The flow field near the contact line, the contact line speed as well as the apparent contact angle are investigated in detail and compared with previous analytical work.

  5. Multi-phase saturation experiments on the Oldoinyo Lengai natrocarbonatite lavas: derived from a sodic-potassic calciocarbonatite through fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidendorfer, D.; Schmidt, M. W.; Mattsson, H. B.

    2015-12-01

    Typical natrocarbonatite eruption temperatures are 490-595°C and are at least 200-300°C lower than temperatures for any suitable silicic liquid that could be conjugate across a miscibility gap. In particular, the 2007 Oldoinyo Lengai (OL) eruption delivered a mix of nephelinitic and carbonatite melts, supporting the commonly accepted supposition that carbonatites are conjugate to spatially associated peralkaline nephelinites. We constrain possible parental melt compositions of the natrocarbonatites by saturation with calcite, apatite, cpx, wollastonite, nepheline, combeite or nyerereite (at 1 kbar, 650-1200°C, fast-quench cold-seal vessels); all occurring in the silicate or carbonatite rocks of OL The results show that the natrocarbonatite is highly undersaturated in calcite and apatite. At 1200°C, calcite saturation results in decreasing Na2O+K2O from initially 41.5 to 10.3 wt% while the CaCO3-component is increased to 80 wt%. In the complex system, there is no thermal (nyerereite-fairchildite) maximum, hence fractionation of calcite+apatite may proceed from a parent melt with 15 wt% alkali and 70% Ca-component to the observed OL natrocarbonatites. The observed melt inclusions in phenocrysts in the nephelinites at Keramasi (Guzmics et al. 2012, CMP) would serve as ideal parents, these melt compositions correspond to 1050oC. The modelled liquid line of descent along the calcite surface requires a total fractionation of ~48% calcite and ~9 wt% apatite. SiO2 solubility only increases from 0.2-2.9 wt% at 750-1200°C, leaving little leeway for reaction with silicates. A peritectic reaction among the above silicates conserving the Si-content in the carbonatite could not be identified. At >950°C cpx yields, through peritectic melting, an immiscible peralkaline silicate melt + extensive wollastonite (as observed in OL cumulates). This experimental silicate melt resembles the unusual silicate ash compositions from the 2007 eruption. The natrocarbonatite lavas from OL are not conjugate liquids to spatially associated nephelinite or phonolite melt. Saturation of the carbonatite with the minerals saturated in these silicate melts at the time of immiscibility yields a Na-K-rich calciocarbonatite parent, while the observed natrocarbonatite would be several hundred degrees above its liquidus.

  6. Analysis of the Tensile Behavior of 12 pct Mn Multi-phase ( α + γ) TWIP + TRIP Steel by Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwon; Woo, Wanchuck; de Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-05-01

    The tensile behavior of intercritically annealed Fe-12 pctMn-0.3 pctC-2 pctAl and Fe-12 pctMn-0.3 pctC-3 pctAl steel was studied by means of in situ neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis. The in situ neutron diffraction measurements showed that the ferrite had a much higher yield strength and lower work hardening rate as compared to the austenite. The strain hardening of the austenite was controlled by deformation twinning and strain-induced transformation, occurring in succession. This TWIP + TRIP effect acted as an effective plasticity-enhancing mechanism which increased the work hardening rate.

  7. Applications of Jet Ejectors for efficient refrigeration and modelling of Multi Phase Multi Fluid flow in Ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, D.

    2015-09-01

    The uses of ejector for efficient refrigeration are manifold - it has been used, among other applications, in the VCRS to reduce the compression ratio, in the combined ejector absorption cycle to enhance the refrigeration capacity and in the ejector absorber cycle to obtain lower evaporator pressures, higher absorber pressures and pre-absorption of the refrigerant in the ejector. Hence, modeling of flow which may be two phase two fluid as in ejector absorber cycle or two phase single fluid as in VCRS in an ejector assumes utmost importance. However, much work has not been done in this field. The primary objective of the present work is to discuss about the role of ejectors in various refrigeration systems and to model the two phase two fluid flow in the nozzle and the diffuser of an ejector under suitable assumptions. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy have been solved to find the different flow properties like pressure, temperature and velocity of the two phases as function of the length in the diffuser. Different cases pertaining to different flows have been taken care of by appreciating what type of phenomena can actually occur at the interface of the two phases. Higher pressure rise was obtained for a given diffuser length with higher diffuser angles, smaller droplet diameter, higher inlet velocity of the gaseous phase and higher drag coefficients. Among other results, it was also seen that the two phases reached thermal equilibrium faster with higher diffuser angle, smaller droplet diameter and higher heat transfer coefficient.

  8. Simulation of three-dimensional multi-phase flow characteristics in the deswirl section of the CDIF MHD power train

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1994-06-01

    A three-dimensional, two-phase, turbulent flow computer code was used to predict flow characteristics of seed particles and coal gas in the deswirl section of the CDIF MHD power train system. Seed material which has a great effect on the overall performance of the MHD system is injected in the deswirl against the swirling coal gas flow coming from the first stage combustor. While testing the MHD system, excessive seed material (70% more than theoretical value) was required to achieve design operating conditions. Calculations show that the swirling coal gas flow turns a 90 degree angle to minimize the swirl motion before entering a second stage combustor and many seed particles are too slow to react to the flow turning and deposit on the walls of the deswirl section. Some seed material deposited on the walls is covered by slag layer and removed from the gas flow. The reduction of seed material in the gas flow decreases MHD power generation significantly. A computational experiment was conducted and its results show that seed injection on the wall can be minimized by simply changing the seed injection and an optimum location was identified. If seed is injected from the location of choice, the seed deposition is reduced by a factor of 10 compared to the original case.

  9. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modifiedmore » to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.« less

  10. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modified to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.

  11. The Generation of Hot Galactic Halos: Multi-Phase Simulations including Collision-Induced Shock Heating, and Comparisons with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, Nathan C.; Lamb, Susan A.

    2001-09-01

    The presence of hot halos around some colliding and supposed merging galaxies, as detected in X-rays, suggests that galaxy interactions may be responsible for the production of significant amounts of hot-phase interstellar gas in some systems. Possible mechanisms for producing this hot material are large-scale shock heating due to the collision itself, as well as the subsequent supernova explosions and intense stellar winds from the massive stars that are formed in collision-induced starbursts. We are using numerical simulations of galaxy collisions and mergers to explore the possible contribution of these various physical mechanisms. These simulations are compared with observations of real systems. Here we report on results from the application of a new N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation code that has been constructed to allow the representation of multiple phases in the interstellar medium (Hearn et al, in preparation). This simulation code has been used to explore the generation of hot interstellar gas due to the large-scale shock heating that occurs during the collision and merger of two gas-rich disk galaxies. This current study allows us to place limits on the effect of the collision itself (as opposed to the results of subsequent star formation) on the generation of hot halos. We compare our numerical results to the extensive observations of the collisional merging system Arp 220 and, in particular, with our recent Chandra observations of its extended X-ray halo (McDowell et al, in preparation).

  12. Location of multi-phase volcanic events from a temporary dense seismic array at White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Lokmer, Ivan; Thun, Johannes; Salichon, Jerome; Fournier, Nico; Fry, Bill

    2016-04-01

    The August 2012 to October 2013 White Island eruption sequence included an increase in gas flux and RSAM seismic tremor beginning in late 2011. Prior to this unrest, a small swarm of 25 events was observed on 19-21 August 2011. The events were captured on a temporary dense seismic array including 12 broadband sensors that were deployed between June and November 2011. Each event comprised coupled earthquakes having distinct high frequency (HF = >1 s), long-period (LP = 2-4 s) and very long period (VLP = 10-30 s) pulses. For each coupled HF, LP and VLP event, we compute the source locations, origin times and related uncertainties by application of standard arrival time locations for the HF events and waveform back-projection for the LP and VLP events. Preliminary results suggest that the events are centred beneath active vent at depths generally less than 2 km. The HF earthquakes have diffuse locations (<2 km), while LP events are constrained to generally shallower source depths (< 1km) and VLP events have slightly deeper source locations (1 to 2 km). The arrival-time locations have been constrained using a realistic shallow velocity model while the waveform back-projection locations have been constrained by thorough synthetic testing. Emergent onsets for LP and VLP sources make an analysis of the absolute origin times problematic but waveform matching of VLP to LP components suggests relative time variations of less than a second or two. We will discuss the location and relative timing for the three event types in context with possible hydrothermal and magmatic processes at White Island volcano.

  13. Micro-CT imaging of reservoir condition CO2 during multi-phase flow in natural rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, M. G.; Bijeljic, B.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Micron-resolution X-ray microtomography has allowed researchers to examine the processes controlling fluid flow behaviour at the pore scale, offering the promise of a transformation in our understanding of flow and transport in porous media. Until recently wettability has only been directly accessible in extremely simplified systems. A new method is presented for the measurement of the contact angle and capillary pressure of multiple immiscible fluids at the pore scale at reservoir conditions in the scCO2-brine-carbonate system. Contact angle is found by resampling the micro-CT data onto planes orthogonal to the contact lines, allowing for vectors to be traced along the grain surface and the scCO2 - brine interface. A distribution of contact angles ranging from 35o to 55o is observed. This distribution can be understood as the result of contact angle hysteresis and surface heterogeneity on a range of length scales. Ganglion capillary pressure for each ganglion was found by measuring the curvature of the CO2-brine interface, while the pore structure was parameterised using distance maps of the pore-space. The formation of the residual clusters by snap-off was examined by comparing the ganglion capillary pressure to local pore topography. The capillary pressure was found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the largest restriction (throat) surrounding the ganglion, which validates the imbibition mechanisms used in pore-network modelling. The potential mobilization of residual ganglia was assessed using a new formulation of both the capillary and Bond numbers, rigorously based on a balance of pore-scale forces, with the majority of ganglia remobilized at Ncmacro around 1. By the use of synchrotron tomography it is possible to create high quality 4D images of dynamic processes involving the flow of multiple fluid phases. We show how the drainage process take place as a series of discreet Haines jumps. Two different types of Haines jumps were seen, one where CO2 moves into a pore and remains connected with the rest of the CO2 and one where it immediately snaps off, forming a disconnected ganglion in the filled region. We also observe the change in capillary pressure associated with a Haines jump, showing that the capillary pressure reduction during the event can cause snap-off far away from the Haines jump.

  14. Location capability of a sparse regional network (RSTN) using a multi-phase earthquake location algorithm (REGLOC)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) was deployed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether data recorded by a regional network could be used to detect and accurately locate seismic events that might be clandestine nuclear tests. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the location capability of the RSTN. A major part of this project was the development of the location algorithm REGLOC and application of Basian a prior statistics for determining the accuracy of the location estimates. REGLOC utilizes all identifiable phases, including backazimuth, in the location. Ninty-four events, distributed throughout the network area, detected by both the RSTN and located by local networks were used in the study. The location capability of the RSTN was evaluated by estimating the location accuracy, error ellipse accuracy, and the percentage of events that could be located, as a function of magnitude. The location accuracy was verified by comparing the RSTN results for the 94 events with published locations based on data from the local networks. The error ellipse accuracy was evaluated by determining whether the error ellipse includes the actual location. The percentage of events located was assessed by combining detection capability with location capability to determine the percentage of events that could be located within the study area. Events were located with both an average crustal model for the entire region, and with regional velocity models along with station corrections obtained from master events. Most events with a magnitude <3.0 can only be located with arrivals from one station. Their average location errors are 453 and 414 km for the average- and regional-velocity model locations, respectively. Single station locations are very unreliable because they depend on accurate backazimuth estimates, and backazimuth proved to be a very unreliable computation.

  15. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos G.; Boucher, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit.

  16. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1997-06-24

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

  17. State Skill Standards: Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Frederick; Reed, Loretta; Jensen, Capra; Robison, Gary; Taylor, Susan; Pavesich, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide skill standards for all content areas in career and technical education. The standards in this document are for photography programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program.…

  18. Designing State Aid Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Bo; Bradbury, Katharine

    2009-01-01

    This paper designs a new equalization-aid formula based on fiscal gaps of local communities. When states are in transition to a new local aid formula, the issue of whether and how to hold existing aid harmless poses a challenge. The authors show that some previous studies and the formulas derived from them give differential weights to existing and…

  19. GIARDIASIS IN WASHINGTON STATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to determine the potential for transmission of giardiasis through approved drinking water supplies in Washington State. The project consisted of five studies: the first was conducted during trapping seasons (1976-1979) and resulted in examining of 656 beaver sto...

  20. State Archaeological Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, William B., Ed.

    The focus of this conference was on programs and experiences in public archaeological education in the Plains states and immediate neighbors. The contents lists the following papers: (1) "Introduction to the Symposium" (William B. Butler); (2) "Archaeological Educational Programs in Colorado" (Kevin D. Black); (3) "Statewide Archaeological…

  1. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  2. Mississippi: State Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This brief is one in a series highlighting state policies, regulations, practices, laws, or other tools intended to create the necessary conditions for school and/or district turnaround. Each brief includes an overview of the relevant turnaround tool, its development process, its impact, and lessons learned that could assist other education…

  3. Florida: State Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This brief is one in a series highlighting state policies, regulations, practices, laws, or other tools intended to create the necessary conditions for school and/or district turnaround. Each brief includes an overview of the relevant turnaround tool, its development process, its impact, and lessons learned that could assist other education…

  4. Arizona State University. Exemplars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegner, Gregory R.

    This report discusses how the Arizona Board of Regents, which has governing authority over the state's three public universities, dealt with the inability of the universities to respond to new societal needs in a timely manner; a major impediment was felt to be tenure. After a series of meetings of administrators and faculty leaders, the Board…

  5. States of Emergency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Caroline E.

    2012-01-01

    Given the stakes and the current economic climate, U.S. higher education officials across the country are stepping up their advocacy efforts, making their voices louder and more persistent than ever. They are vying for the attention of states struggling with increased demands for limited revenues, most choosing to divert dollars from higher…

  6. GENIE final state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  7. Reform Through State Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scambio, Elena J.; Graber, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    Concluding that the Jersey City Public Schools were educationally bankrupt and in total disarray, the New Jersey State Department of Education took over the district in October 1989 and completely reorganized its central office by reassigning, demoting, or terminating 117 administrators. The newly decentralized system features four school clusters…

  8. What State Tests Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Glenn W.

    What the Illinois Goal Assessment Program (IGAP) test actually tests and the consequences of these tests for funding decisions were studied with a random sample of 100 school districts in the Cook County suburbs of Chicago. Eighth-grade IGAP scores for reading were obtained from the state report card, a document prepared by each school district…

  9. Keystone State of Confusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    When high school seniors begin searching for the best school to fit their higher education goals, they may need a road map, tour guide and interpreter to help them sort through Pennsylvania's higher education universe. For sure there are seemingly endless choices--public, private, large, small, urban and rural. The Keystone State boasts nearly 200…

  10. State Skill Standards: Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  11. The Kent State Coverup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelner, Joseph; Munves, James

    A definitive account of the May 4, 1970 Kent State shootings and the trial that followed is presented by the lawyer who served as chief counsel for the 13 victims. Part One, "The Long Road to the Cleveland Courthouse," provides all the information on the victims, the shootings, and preparation for the trial. Part Two, "At Last, Our Day in Court,"…

  12. West Texas State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ed D.

    1988-01-01

    Threats in the external environment, the arrival of a planning-oriented new president, and new regional reaccreditation criteria prompted West Texas State University to undertake a successful strategic planning venture. Leadership must focus strategic planning in a manner that recognizes the decentralized and collegial elements present in higher…

  13. 75 FR 31465 - United States, State of Illinois, State of Colorado, and State of Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ....C. 1391(c). II. Defendants and the Proposed Transaction 4. Defendant AMC is a Delaware corporation with its headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri. It is the holding company of AMC Entertainment, Inc... in the United States. 5. Defendant Kerasotes is a Delaware corporation with its principal place...

  14. The State of Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    2001-01-01

    All 50 states are moving toward accountability systems that involve setting clear standards of learning, assessing student progress on those standards, and providing a variety of incentives and sanctions for performance. Many educators remain profoundly ambivalent; however, they recognize opportunities for positive change but worry that a narrow…

  15. Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Rebecca A.; Ketcham, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) is located in Corvallis, a community of 53,000 people situated in the heart of the Willamette Valley between Portland and Eugene. Approximately 15,700 undergraduate and 3,400 graduate students, including 2,600 U.S. students of color and 950 international students, are currently enrolled at OSU across 11 academic…

  16. Emotional state and efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovchinnikova, O. V.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of emotional states-negative and positive- on work performance. Data cover intensity of emotional arousal, personality characteristics of person involved, typological features of person's nervous system, emotional stability of person, and past experience of person. Particular attention was given to emotional stress effects on efficiency, given modern working conditions.

  17. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  18. Indians of Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Maps, photographs, and illustrations are included in this introductory history of Indians in Washington state. The tribal groups of the area are classified by geographic and cultural region as Coastal, Puget Sound, and Plateau tribes, and the majority of the resource booklet provides information about the history and culture of each group.…

  19. Protein states and proteinquakes.

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, A; Berendzen, J; Bowne, S F; Frauenfelder, H; Iben, I E; Sauke, T B; Shyamsunder, E; Young, R D

    1985-01-01

    After photodissociation of carbon monoxide bound to myoglobin, the protein relaxes to the deoxy equilibrium structure in a quake-like motion. Investigation of the proteinquake and of related intramolecular equilibrium motions shows that states and motions have a hierarchical glass-like structure. PMID:3860839

  20. Solid-State Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  1. States Address Academic Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2005-01-01

    State and local officials are slowly untangling complicated webs of accountability, testing, and graduation policies, hoping to give thousands of students displaced by Hurricane Katrina a better handle on their academic standing. While officials in Texas, Tennessee, and Alabama offered some guidance to such students, school leaders in…

  2. Energy States of Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenberg, J. Leland

    1970-01-01

    Discusses molecular spectroscopy arising from transitions within rotational, vibrational, and electronic energy states. Using quantum mechanical formuli, the author describes how these spectroscopic methods can be used to determine internuclear distances, bond energies, bond angles, dipole moments, and other details. Concludes with a selected…

  3. State Skill Standards: Metalworking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for metalworking programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any…

  4. Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-03-30

    The article discusses solid state lighting technologies. This topic was covered in two previous ASHRAE Journal columns (2010). This article covers advancements in technologies and the associated efficacies. The life-cycle, energy savings and market potential of these technologies are addressed as well.

  5. GENIE final state interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  6. Zooming into market states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetalova, Desislava; Schäfer, Rudi; Guhr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the daily stock data of the Nasdaq Composite index in the 22 year period 1992-2013 and identify market states as clusters of correlation matrices with similar correlation structures. We investigate the stability of the correlation structure of each state by estimating the statistical fluctuations of true correlations due to their non-stationarity. Our study is based on a random matrix approach recently introduced to model the non-stationarity of correlations by an ensemble of random matrices. This approach reduces the complexity of the correlated market to two parameters, one of which measures the fluctuations of the correlations and can be determined directly from the empirical return distributions. This parameter characterizes the stability of the correlation structure of each market state as well as the dynamics of the correlation structure in the whole observation period. We find clear indications for correlation fluctuations within market states. The analysis reveals an intriguing relationship between average correlation and correlation fluctuations. The strongest fluctuations occur during periods of high average correlation which is the case particularly in times of crisis.

  7. Create Your State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Kris; Melvin, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Students are often encouraged to work together with their classmates, sometimes with other classes, occasionally with kids at other schools, but rarely with kids across the country. In this article the authors describe the Create Your State project, a collaborative nationwide project inspired by the Texas Chair Project wherein the artist, Damien…

  8. Administering Our State Library Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFrane, Gerard

    1970-01-01

    A satire on the application of scientific management principles to a state library agency. Covers relationships of the state librarian to staff, the profession, and state and federal governments. (Author/JS)

  9. Toward Effective State Legislative Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrey, John N.

    1982-01-01

    State legislative programs for community colleges are especially necessary in states where the colleges have no local tax base. The roles of the Washington State Board for Community College Education and the Joint Legislative Committee are described. (MSE)

  10. Quantumness of spin-1 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, Fabian; Braun, D.; Giraud, O.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate quantumness of spin-1 states, defined as the Hilbert-Schmidt distance to the convex hull of spin coherent states. We derive its analytic expression in the case of pure states as a function of the smallest eigenvalue of the Bloch matrix and give explicitly the closest classical state for an arbitrary pure state. Numerical evidence is given that the exact formula for pure states provides an upper bound on the quantumness of mixed states. Due to the connection between quantumness and entanglement we obtain new insights into the geometry of symmetric entangled states.

  11. Historical Influence of Soil and Water Management on Carbon Erosion and Burial in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundquist, E. T.; Visser Ackerman, K.; Stallard, R. F.; Bliss, N. B.

    2012-04-01

    begin with estimates of the carbon content of soils at erosional and depositional sites. Rates of soil carbon production, erosion, degradation, transport, and burial are constrained by both sediment and carbon mass balances coupled to representations of landscape soil-carbon dynamics. We calculate rates of carbon burial in aquatic environments from estimates of composition and deposition rates of autochthonous and allochthonous sediment. We find that cumulative amounts of carbon affected by historical erosion and deposition are comparable to amounts of cumulative soil carbon depletion estimated in previous studies that have not considered erosion and deposition. Our historical sediment budget scenarios imply a large historical transient of eroded and redeposited terrestrial sediments. An improved understanding of non-steady-state carbon dynamics in these sediments and in their incipient soils is needed to estimate the net effect of erosion and deposition on the historical and present-day exchange of carbon between the land and the atmosphere. The transient sediment pulse and accompanying biogeochemical and ecological responses have broad implications for management of water and ecosystems.

  12. THE STATE TOBACCO ACTIVITIES TRACKING AND EVALUATION (STATE) SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System is an electronic data warehouse containing up-to-date and historical state-level data on tobacco use prevention and control. The STATE System is designed to integrate many data sources to provide comprehensive su...

  13. Quantum State Transfer Using the Four-Ion Cluste State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianfei; Ge, Baojun; Wang, Dongxin

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that a four-ion cluster state can be used to realize the quantum state transfer in the ion-trap systems. The scheme does not involve Bell-state measurement and is insensitive to both the initial motional state and heating.

  14. 7 CFR 1220.615 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... State and United States include the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  15. Implementing the Common Core State Standards: State Spotlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    As of the 2012-2013 school year, over 20 states have formally moved to the Common Core State Standards being used as the learning expectations for all students across the state, and the remainder will be doing so in the 2014-2015 school year. This document highlights state initiatives that are supporting Common Core implementation in the following…

  16. Cortical State and Attention

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kenneth D.; Thiele, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Preface The brain continuously adapts its processing machinery to behavioural demands. To achieve this it rapidly modulates the operating mode of cortical circuits, controlling the way information is transformed and routed. This article will focus on two experimental approaches by which the control of cortical information processing has been investigated: the study of state-dependent cortical processing in rodents, and attention in the primate visual system. Both processes involve a modulation of low-frequency activity fluctuations and spiking correlation, and are mediated by common receptor systems. We suggest that selective attention involves processes similar to state change, operating at a local columnar level to enhance the representation of otherwise nonsalient features while suppressing internally generated activity patterns. PMID:21829219

  17. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  18. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    PubMed Central

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security. PMID:27184813

  19. In the states.

    PubMed

    1994-02-25

    In Minnesota, the Hennepin County Medical Center will be the second State hospital to offer abortions and the eighth provider of the service. Approximately 25 residents from the University of Minnesota will receive abortion training at the Center each year. In legislative action taken during January and February 1994, an Alabama Judiciary Committee supported the requirement that a parent giving consent for a daughter's abortion present a picture identification and the patient's birth certificate. Other states considering parental notification rules are Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Virginia. In Arizona, a legislative committee approved a bill requiring one-parent notification 48 hours before a minor's abortion and approved requirement of a notice to be posted in abortion clinics warning that termination of a first pregnancy increases the risk of breast cancer. Committees in Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, and Kansas considered ways to limit the number of children born in families receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children either by limiting benefits at a 2-child level or by providing financial incentives to mothers who accept the use of a long-acting contraceptive. Committees considered changes in state funding in Missouri (to allow abortion funding in cases of medical necessity, rape, or incest), New Mexico (a prohibition of the use of state funds for most abortions was tabled), and Utah (to allow state funding in cases of rape or incest). In Hawaii, a ban on most post-20-week abortions died. This bill would also have required biased counseling and a physician-reporting requirement. Indiana rejected a prohibition against blocking abortion clinics and mandatory 24-hour delay and biased counseling requirements. In Utah, a committee is considering prohibiting the delivery of mandatory information via the telephone and requiring that abortion-seekers be offered an ultrasound prior to the procedure. California is seeking to criminalize participation in an

  20. Superposition State Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkatnathan, Arun; Voth, Gregory A

    2005-01-01

    The ergodic sampling of rough energy landscapes is crucial for understanding phenomena like protein folding, peptide aggregation, polymer dynamics, and the glass transition. These rough energy landscapes are characterized by the presence of many local minima separated by high energy barriers, where Molecular Dynamics (MD) fails to satisfy ergodicity. To enhance ergodic behavior, we have developed the Superposition State Molecular Dynamics (SSMD) method, which uses a superposition of energy states to obtain an effective potential for the MD simulation. In turn, the dynamics on this effective potential can be used to sample the configurational free energy of the real potential. The effectiveness of the SSMD method for a one-dimensional rough potential energy landscape is presented as a test case. PMID:26641113

  1. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  2. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    PubMed

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security. PMID:27184813

  3. Cutting state identification

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, B.S.; Minis, I.; Rokni, M.

    1997-12-31

    Cutting states associated with the orthogonal cutting of stiff cylinders are identified through an analysis of the singular values of a Toeplitz matrix of third order cumulants of acceleration measurements. The ratio of the two pairs of largest singular values is shown to differentiate between light cutting, medium cutting, pre-chatter and chatter states. Sequences of cutting experiments were performed in which either depth of cut or turning frequency was varied. Two sequences of experiments with variable turning frequency and five with variable depth of cut, 42 cutting experiments in all, provided a database for the calculation of third order cumulants. Ratios of singular values of cumulant matrices find application in the analysis of control of orthogonal cutting.

  4. Solid State Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaver, David C.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 May - 31 July 1996. The topics covered are Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and Analog Device Technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional Support provided by the Army, DARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA, and NIST.

  5. Solid State Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaver, David C.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 May-31 July 1995. The topics covered are: Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and analog device technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional Support provided by the Army, ARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA and NIST.

  6. Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, T.; Carnes, K.; Needham, V.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has fabricated the niobium resonators and some other linac components required for the superconducting accel/decel linac now in operation at Kansas State University. Several staff members from KSU spent a substantial period of time at ANL during FY 1985 in order to learn the technology, and they return occasionally to assemble and test the resonators. There is a continuing interchange of technical information between ANL and KSU related to linac operations, tuning, and resonator maintenance.

  7. United States crustal thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allenby, R. J.; Schnetzler, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The thickness of the crust, the thickness of the basal (intermediate or lower) crustal layer, and the average velocity at the top of the mantle have been mapped using all available deep-penetrating seismic-refraction profiles in the conterminous United States and surrounding border areas. These profiles are indexed to their literature data sources. The more significant long wavelength anomalies on the three maps are briefly discussed and analyzed. An attempt to use Bouguer gravity to validate mantle structure was inconclusive.

  8. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  9. Solid state research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhorter, Alan L.

    1995-02-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 May through 31 July 1994. The topics covered are Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and Analog Device Technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional support provided by the Army, ARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA, and NIST.

  10. Solid state research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, David C.

    1994-11-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 August through 31 October 1994. The topics covered are Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and Analog Device Technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional support provided by the Army, ARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA, and NIST.

  11. United States earthquakes, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    The report contains information for eartthquakes in the 50 states and Puerto Rico and the area near their shorelines. The data consist of earthquake locations (date, time, geographic coordinates, depth, and magnitudes), intensities, macroseismic information, and isoseismal and seismicity maps. Also, included are sections detailing the activity of seismic networks operated by universities and other government agencies and a list of results form strong-motion seismograph records.

  12. Models of multiquark states

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The success of simple constituent quark models in single-hardon physics and their failure in multiquark physics is discussed, emphasizing the relation between meson and baryon spectra, hidden color and the color matrix, breakup decay modes, coupled channels, and hadron-hadron interactions via flipping and tunneling of flux tubes. Model-independent predictions for possible multiquark bound states are considered and the most promising candidates suggested. A quark approach to baryon-baryon interactions is discussed.

  13. JWL Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-15

    The JWL equation of state (EOS) is frequently used for the products (and sometimes reactants) of a high explosive (HE). Here we review and systematically derive important properties. The JWL EOS is of the Mie-Grueneisen form with a constant Grueneisen coefficient and a constants specific heat. It is thermodynamically consistent to specify the temperature at a reference state. However, increasing the reference state temperature restricts the EOS domain in the (V, e)-plane of phase space. The restrictions are due to the conditions that P ≥ 0, T ≥ 0, and the isothermal bulk modulus is positive. Typically, this limits the low temperature regime in expansion. The domain restrictions can result in the P-T equilibrium EOS of a partly burned HE failing to have a solution in some cases. For application to HE, the heat of detonation is discussed. Example JWL parameters for an HE, both products and reactions, are used to illustrate the restrictions on the domain of the EOS.

  14. Orbital State Uncertainty Realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwood, J.; Poore, A. B.

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental to the success of the space situational awareness (SSA) mission is the rigorous inclusion of uncertainty in the space surveillance network. The *proper characterization of uncertainty* in the orbital state of a space object is a common requirement to many SSA functions including tracking and data association, resolution of uncorrelated tracks (UCTs), conjunction analysis and probability of collision, sensor resource management, and anomaly detection. While tracking environments, such as air and missile defense, make extensive use of Gaussian and local linearity assumptions within algorithms for uncertainty management, space surveillance is inherently different due to long time gaps between updates, high misdetection rates, nonlinear and non-conservative dynamics, and non-Gaussian phenomena. The latter implies that "covariance realism" is not always sufficient. SSA also requires "uncertainty realism"; the proper characterization of both the state and covariance and all non-zero higher-order cumulants. In other words, a proper characterization of a space object's full state *probability density function (PDF)* is required. In order to provide a more statistically rigorous treatment of uncertainty in the space surveillance tracking environment and to better support the aforementioned SSA functions, a new class of multivariate PDFs are formulated which more accurately characterize the uncertainty of a space object's state or orbit. The new distribution contains a parameter set controlling the higher-order cumulants which gives the level sets a distinctive "banana" or "boomerang" shape and degenerates to a Gaussian in a suitable limit. Using the new class of PDFs within the general Bayesian nonlinear filter, the resulting filter prediction step (i.e., uncertainty propagation) is shown to have the *same computational cost as the traditional unscented Kalman filter* with the former able to maintain a proper characterization of the uncertainty for up to *ten

  15. The State and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Richard M.

    Although the federal influence on higher education is important, throughout the United States' history the state role in higher education has been a vital and changing one, and not always uniform. In 1976, two-thirds of the institutional revenue coming from government came from the states, making the state issue an important one. One of the most…

  16. Common Core State Standards 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) represent the first time that nearly every state has set common expectations for what students should know and be able to do. In the past, each state set its own standards, and the results varied widely. And while states collectively developed these common standards, decisions about the curriculum and…

  17. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes, 36,000 miles of streams, and…

  18. State Energy Program Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs

    1999-03-17

    The State Energy Program Operations Manual is a reference tool for the states and the program officials at the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs and Regional Support Offices as well as State Energy Offices. The Manual contains information needed to apply for and administer the State Energy Program, including program history, application rules and requirements, and program administration and monitoring requirements.

  19. A search for equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient search algorithm is described for the location of equilibrium states in a search set of states which differ from one another only by the choice of pure phases. The algorithm has three important characteristics: (1) it ignores states which have little prospect for being an improved approximation to the true equilibrium state; (2) it avoids states which lead to singular iteration equations; (3) it furnishes a search history which can provide clues to alternative search paths.

  20. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Tax Incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

    2009-10-01

    As a policy tool, state tax incentives can be structured to help states meet clean energy goals. Policymakers often use state tax incentives in concert with state and federal policies to support renewable energy deployment or reduce market barriers. This analysis used case studies of four states to assess the contributions of state tax incentives to the development of renewable energy markets. State tax incentives that are appropriately paired with complementary state and federal policies generally provide viable mechanisms to support renewable energy deployment. However, challenges to successful implementation of state tax incentives include serving project owners with limited state tax liability, assessing appropriate incentive levels, and differentiating levels of incentives for technologies with different costs. Additionally, state tax incentives may result in moderately higher federal tax burdens. These challenges notwithstanding, state tax incentives that consider certain policy design characteristics can support renewable energy markets and state clean energy goals.The scale of their impact though is directly related to the degree to which they support the renewable energy markets for targeted sectors and technologies. This report highlights important policy design considerations for policymakers using state tax incentives to meet clean energy goals.

  1. Semiclassical framed BPS states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory W.; Royston, Andrew B.; Van den Bleeken, Dieter

    2016-07-01

    We provide a semiclassical description of framed BPS states in four-dimensional {N}=2 super Yang-Mills theories probed by 't Hooft defects, in terms of a supersymmetric quantum mechanics on the moduli space of singular monopoles. Framed BPS states, like their ordinary counterparts in the theory without defects, are associated with the L 2 kernel of certain Dirac operators on moduli space, or equivalently with the L 2 cohomology of related Dolbeault operators. The Dirac/Dolbeault operators depend on two Cartan-valued Higgs vevs. We conjecture a map between these vevs and the Seiberg-Witten special coordinates, consistent with a one-loop analysis and checked in examples. The map incorporates all perturbative and nonperturbative corrections that are relevant for the semiclassical construction of BPS states, over a suitably defined weak coupling regime of the Coulomb branch. We use this map to translate wall crossing formulae and the no-exotics theorem to statements about the Dirac/Dolbeault operators. The no-exotics theorem, concerning the absence of nontrivial SU(2) R representations in the BPS spectrum, implies that the kernel of the Dirac operator is chiral, and further translates into a statement that all L 2 cohomology of the Dolbeault operator is concentrated in the middle degree. Wall crossing formulae lead to detailed predictions for where the Dirac operators fail to be Fredholm and how their kernels jump. We explore these predictions in nontrivial examples. This paper explains the background and arguments behind the results announced in the short note [1].

  2. Solid state thermal engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, C.M.

    1981-01-27

    An improved solid state thermal engine utilizes as a drive member a braided belt fabricated from a memory alloy such as nickel-titanium and nickel-titanium ternary alloys, copper-zinc and copper-zinc ternary alloys, and the like. The braided belt is mounted on a set of pulleys to provide passage through a hot zone where the belt contracts and develops tension, and through a cold zone where it relaxes and stretches. Since more energy is delivered by contraction than is required for relaxation, positive work output results with an efficiency of between onefifth and one-third of the carnot cycle.

  3. Solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Solid State Device research program is directed toward developing innovative devices for space remote and in-situ sensing, and for data processing. Innovative devices can result from the standard structures in innovative materials such as low and high temperature superconductors, strained layer superlattices, or diamond films. Innovative devices can also result from innovative structures achieved using electron tunneling or nanolithography in standard materials. A final step is to use both innovative structures and innovative materials. A new area of emphasis is the miniaturization of sensors and instruments molded by using the techniques of electronic device fabrication to micromachine silicon into micromechanical and electromechanical sensors and actuators.

  4. Paraboson coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, R.; Stoilova, N. I.; Van der Jeugt, J.

    2010-02-15

    It is known that the defining relations of the orthosymplectic Lie superalgebra osp(1 | 2n) are equivalent to the defining (triple) relations of n pairs of paraboson operators b{sub i}{sup {+-}.} In particular, the 'parabosons of order p' correspond to a unitary irreducible (infinite-dimensional) lowest weight representation V(p) of osp(1 | 2n). Recently we constructed these representations V(p) giving the explicit actions of the osp(1 | 2n) generators. We apply these results for the n = 2 case in order to obtain 'coherent state' representations of the paraboson operators.

  5. Generalized states in SFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Giaccari, S.

    2013-12-01

    The search for analytic solutions in open string fields theory à la Witten often meets with singular expressions, which need an adequate mathematical formalism to be interpreted. In this paper we discuss this problem and propose a way to resolve the related ambiguities. Our claim is that a correct interpretation requires a formalism similar to distribution theory in functional analysis. To this end we concretely construct a locally convex space of test string states together with the dual space of functionals. We show that the above suspicious expressions can be identified with well defined elements of the dual.

  6. State v. Olivas.

    PubMed

    1993-08-12

    The Supreme Court of Washington upheld the constitutionality of a state law requiring DNA testing of persons convicted of violent crimes or sex offenses in order to establish a DNA data bank for use in future prosecution of recidivist acts. The court allowed "the drawing of blood without a search warrant, probable cause or individualized suspicion." The court reasoned that it was preferable "to balance the general privacy right of persons to be free from unjustified governmental intrusion against the 'special needs beyond normal law enforcement' of the government" rather than "to balance the limited privacy rights of convicted persons against a compelling governmental interest." PMID:12041122

  7. Strongly correlated surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Victor A.

    Everything has an edge. However trivial, this phrase has dominated theoretical condensed matter in the past half a decade. Prior to that, questions involving the edge considered to be more of an engineering problem rather than a one of fundamental science: it seemed self-evident that every edge is different. However, recent advances proved that many surface properties enjoy a certain universality, and moreover, are 'topologically' protected. In this thesis I discuss a selected range of problems that bring together topological properties of surface states and strong interactions. Strong interactions alone can lead to a wide spectrum of emergent phenomena: from high temperature superconductivity to unconventional magnetic ordering; interactions can change the properties of particles, from heavy electrons to fractional charges. It is a unique challenge to bring these two topics together. The thesis begins by describing a family of methods and models with interactions so high that electrons effectively disappear as particles and new bound states arise. By invoking the AdS/CFT correspondence we can mimic the physical systems of interest as living on the surface of a higher dimensional universe with a black hole. In a specific example we investigate the properties of the surface states and find helical spin structure of emerged particles. The thesis proceeds from helical particles on the surface of black hole to a surface of samarium hexaboride: an f-electron material with localized magnetic moments at every site. Interactions between electrons in the bulk lead to insulating behavior, but the surfaces found to be conducting. This observation motivated an extensive research: weather the origin of conduction is of a topological nature. Among our main results, we confirm theoretically the topological properties of SmB6; introduce a new framework to address similar questions for this type of insulators, called Kondo insulators. Most notably we introduce the idea of Kondo

  8. Supersolid State of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2005-04-01

    We prove that the necessary condition for a solid to be also a superfluid is to have zero-point vacancies, or interstitial atoms, or both, as an integral part of the ground state. As a consequence, in the absence of symmetry between vacancies and interstitials, superfluidity has a zero probability to occur in commensurate solids which break continuous translation symmetry. We discuss recent 4He experiments by Kim and Chan in the context of this theorem, question its bulk supersolid interpretation, and offer an alternative explanation in terms of superfluid interfaces.

  9. Flordia State University

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Frawley, A.; Myers, E.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne fabricated the niobium resonators and some auxiliary devices for the superconducting-linac energy booster built at Florida State University. Personnel from FSU came to ANL to assemble and test the resonators. The main resonator fabrication work for FSU was completed during 1986, but we continue to interact with personnel concerning ongoing refinements in the technology. Topics in which we were most recently involved are (1) a change in the method of cooling the FSU resonators and (2) the transfer of information about fast tuner upgrades. During the past year there was very little interaction.

  10. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  11. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  12. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  13. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  14. Differentiating among penal states.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    This review article assesses Loïc Wacquant's contribution to debates on penality, focusing on his most recent book, Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity (Wacquant 2009), while setting its argument in the context of his earlier Prisons of Poverty (1999). In particular, it draws on both historical and comparative methods to question whether Wacquant's conception of 'the penal state' is adequately differentiated for the purposes of building the explanatory account he proposes; about whether 'neo-liberalism' has, materially, the global influence which he ascribes to it; and about whether, therefore, the process of penal Americanization which he asserts in his recent writings is credible. PMID:21138432

  15. GLSEN's State of the States: How One Seattle Educator Gets an "A" in a Failing State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaught, Sabina Elena

    2005-01-01

    The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network's (GLSEN) report "State of the States: A policy analysis of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) safer schools issues" presents a thorough and comprehensive analysis of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. State grading is based on five categories, which include the existence and…

  16. Solid state heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, J.S.

    1981-12-15

    A compact solid state turbine heat engine can be devised by pairing the nitinol elements. Each element is characterized by being in thermal contact with at least one hot water and one cold water bath and mechanically coupled to at least one driven pulley and driver pulley. A second nitinol element is similarly configured with a driver pulley, driven pulley, hot and cold water bath. The driver pulley associated with the first nitinol element is mechanically coupled to the driven pulley of the second nitinol element. Similarly, the driver pulley of the second nitinol element is mechanically coupled to the driven pulley of the first nitinol element. The paired nitinol elements form a compound solid state turbine engine wherein each nitinol element lies in a single plane and wherein the engine may be combined with a plurality of such pairs for increased power output. The nitinol elements may also incorporate a snubber to limit the strain on the element and the engine may further incorporate a variable radius pulley to increase the efficiency of mechanical conversion.

  17. Whitner v. State.

    PubMed

    1997-11-19

    The Supreme Court of South Carolina held that a viable fetus is a child within the meaning of the state's child endangerment statute. The court defined a viable fetus as one that is capable of independent life apart from the mother. In this case, the mother had ingested crack cocaine during the third trimester of her pregnancy and was convicted of criminal child neglect by a lower court. Her petition for post-conviction relief was granted by the lower court. On appeal, the Supreme Court of South Carolina reversed the lower court's decision, rejecting, as without merit, the mother's arguments that her conviction had violated both her due process rights, and her right to privacy under the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The court ruled that the state had a compelling interest to ensure the life and health of a viable fetus. Two justices dissented, one on the grounds that the term "child" in the child endangerment statute did not apply to fetuses, and one on the grounds that the statute does not regulate the conduct of a woman toward her unborn child. PMID:11995718

  18. Electronic energy states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    One-electron wave functions are reviewed and approximate solutions of two-electron systems are given in terms of these one-electron functions. The symmetry effects associated with electron spin are reviewed and the effects of electron exchange on energy levels of the two-electron system are given. The coupling of electronic orbital and spin angular momentum is considered next and the Lande interval rule for Russell-Saunders or LS coupling is derived. The configurations possible for various multi-electron LS couplings are enumerated (examples from the first two rows of the periodic table are given), and the meaning of the spectroscopic nomenclature is discussed, particularly with respect to the degeneracies of the electron states involved. Next the nomenclature, symmetries, and degeneracies for electron states of diatomic molecules are discussed, and some examples for N2, O2, and NO are presented. The electronic partition functions and derivative thermodynamic properties are expressed in terms of these energies and degeneracies, and examples are given for some of the simple gas species encountered in the earth's atmosphere.

  19. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2006-05-01

    Quantum information theory is at the frontiers of physics, mathematics and information science, offering a variety of solutions that are impossible using classical theory. This book provides an introduction to the key concepts used in processing quantum information and reveals that quantum mechanics is a generalisation of classical probability theory. After a gentle introduction to the necessary mathematics the authors describe the geometry of quantum state spaces. Focusing on finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, they discuss the statistical distance measures and entropies used in quantum theory. The final part of the book is devoted to quantum entanglement - a non-intuitive phenomenon discovered by Schrödinger, which has become a key resource for quantum computation. This richly-illustrated book is useful to a broad audience of graduates and researchers interested in quantum information theory. Exercises follow each chapter, with hints and answers supplied. The first book to focus on the geometry of quantum states Stresses the similarities and differences between classical and quantum theory Uses a non-technical style and numerous figures to make the book accessible to non-specialists

  20. [Mixed states and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fakra, E; Belzeaux, R; Pringuey, D; Cermolacce, M; Corréard, N; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Because of their compilation of contrasted symptoms and their variable clinical presentation, mixed episodes have been withdrawn from the DSM. However, mixed states question not only the bonds between depression and mania, but also the distinction between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Indeed, doubts about the dichotomy introduced by Kraepelin between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia is as old as the nosolgy itself, as attest the later works of this author revealing his hesitations on his own classification. But findings here reviewed issued from recent technical advances, particularly in the imaging and genetic fields, offer a better understanding of the boundaries between these two disorders. Yet, when confronted to an acute episode, clinicians may find it challenging to distinguish a mixed state from a schizophrenic relapse. Indeed, there is no pathognomonic manifestation allowing to retain a diagnosis with confidence. The physician will therefore have to identify a pattern of signs, which will orient his assessment with no certainty. Thus, negative rather than affective or psychotic symptomatology appears to be useful in discriminating schizophrenia (or schizoaffective) disorders from mixed mania. However, a conclusion during this acute stage appears in definitive a formal exercise, first because the final diagnosis will only be ascertained once the symptoms are amended, and second because, according to our classifications, a mood episode, including mania and mixed mania, can be observed without ruling out the diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:24359851

  1. State Energy Alternatives: Alternative Energy Resources by State

    DOE Data Explorer

    This U.S. map provides state by state information on incentives and laws related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. Discover what's available in each state for innovation grants, infrastructure grants, and production grants and who to contact. Find out how many alternative refueling stations are available in each state and where they are. Tennessee, for example, in 2009, has 114 alternative refueling stations: 36 biodiesel, 1 electrical, 29 ethanol, 4 natural gas, and 44 propane. There are also 5 Truck Stop Electrification (TSE) sites in Tennessee. Users can also find out from this map interface the contacts for Clean Cities in a state, information about renewable energy projects and activities in each state, fuel prices across a state, and biomass potential resources and current production in each state.

  2. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, Sandra; Jennifer, Gangi

    2015-12-17

    This December 2015 report, the sixth in a series, provides a comprehensive analysis of state activities supporting fuel cell and hydrogen technology, profiles of leading states, and a catalog of recent installations, policies, funding, and deployments around the country.

  3. States that are far from being stabilizer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, David; Bengtsson, Ingemar; Blanchfield, Kate; Bui Dang, Hoan

    2015-08-01

    Stabilizer states are eigenvectors of maximal commuting sets of operators in a finite Heisenberg group. States that are far from being stabilizer states include magic states in quantum computation, MUB-balanced states, and SIC vectors. In prime dimensions the latter two fall under the umbrella of minimum uncertainty states (MUSs) in the sense of Wootters and Sussman. We study the correlation between two ways in which the notion of ‘far from being a stabilizer state’ can be quantified. Two theorems valid for all prime dimensions are given, as well as detailed results for low dimensions. In dimension 7 we identify the MUB-balanced states as being antipodal to the SIC vectors within the set of MUS, in a sense that we make definite. In dimension 4 we show that the states that come closest to being MUS with respect to all of the six stabilizer MUBs are the fiducial vectors for Alltop MUBs.

  4. Quantum signatures of chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, V. M.; Omelchenko, I.; Zakharova, A.; Schöll, E.; Brandes, T.

    2015-12-01

    Chimera states are complex spatiotemporal patterns in networks of identical oscillators, characterized by the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized dynamics. Here we propose to extend the phenomenon of chimera states to the quantum regime, and uncover intriguing quantum signatures of these states. We calculate the quantum fluctuations about semiclassical trajectories and demonstrate that chimera states in the quantum regime can be characterized by bosonic squeezing, weighted quantum correlations, and measures of mutual information. Our findings reveal the relation of chimera states to quantum information theory, and give promising directions for experimental realization of chimera states in quantum systems.

  5. The State "of" State U.S. History Standards 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Sheldon M.; Stern, Jeremy A.

    2011-01-01

    This study is the Thomas B. Fordham Institute's first review of the quality of state U.S. history standards since 2003. Key findings include: (1) A majority of states' standards are mediocre-to-awful. The average grade across "all" states is barely a D. In twenty-eight jurisdictions--a majority of states--the history standards earn Ds or below.…

  6. Distilling one-qubit magic states into Toffoli states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastin, Bryan

    2013-03-01

    For certain quantum architectures and algorithms, most of the required resources are consumed during the distillation of one-qubit magic states for use in performing Toffoli gates. I show that the overhead for magic-state distillation can be reduced by merging distillation with the implementation of Toffoli gates. The resulting routine distills eight one-qubit magic states directly to a Toffoli state, which can be used without further magic to perform a Toffoli gate.

  7. NAEP 1994 Reading State Report for Hawaii. Trial State Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assessment of Educational Progress, Princeton, NJ.

    In 1990, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) included a Trial State Assessment (TSA); for the first time in NAEP's history, voluntary state-by-state assessments were made. In 1994, TSA was expanded to include non-public school students. The 1994 reading assessment considered students' proficiency in situations that involved…

  8. State Action: Judicial Perpetuation of the State/Private Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoun, Frederick G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The "state action" concept broadens the Fourteenth Amendment to restrict certain objectionable private activity. In an effort to clarify the requirement of state action as it has been interpreted and applied by the Supreme Court, the author examines the various state action theories as they have been applied to activate Fourteenth Amendment…

  9. States of Consciousness and State-Specific Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tart, Charles T.

    1972-01-01

    Proposes the development of state-specific sciences" to overcome the problems of scientifically studying altered states of consciousness induced by drugs or meditation from the paradigm of the ordinary consciousness state. The requirements of good observation, public nature of the observation, logical theorizing, and testing of theories by…

  10. An Overview of the 2015 State of the States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Spencer C.; Hartman, William

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015 a large group of scholars, researchers, and practitioners interested in P-20 finance issues gathered in St. Louis, Missouri, for the National Education Finance Academy's annual conference, on February 25-27, 2015 to discuss, among multiple topics, the state of P-20 finance in all 50 states. There were 35 states represented in the…

  11. Toward State Tax Reform: Lessons from State Tax Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Therese J.; Rio, Jessica E.

    This paper reviews recent state tax-commission recommendations in selected states and identifies critical factors for the success of state tax-reform commissions. The paper focuses on factors linked to the process of forming a commission and generating the necessary consensus to enact tough reforms. It describes and compares comprehensive studies…

  12. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America

    SciTech Connect

    2011-06-15

    This 2011 report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, provides an update of fuel cell and hydrogen activity in the 50 states and District of Columbia. State activities reported include new policies and funding, recent and planned fuel cell and hydrogen installations, and recent activities by state industries and universities.

  13. Evaluating State Principal Evaluation Plans across the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Edward J.; Hollingworth, Liz; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Recent federal legislation has created strong incentives for states to adopt principal evaluation systems, many of which include new measures of principal effectiveness such as estimates of student growth and changes in school climate. Yet, there has been little research on principal evaluation systems and no state-by-state analysis of the…

  14. Governors' Top Education Issues: State of the States 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Education issues were again at the forefront when the leaders of 42 states and the District of Columbia outlined their priorities in their 2014 State of the State addresses. Governors outlined their plans for increasing the quality and availability of education--from preschool through postsecondary--to spur economic growth and enhance the quality…

  15. Education in the States. Volume I: State Education Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC.

    This report represents the beginning of an effort by chief state school officers to compile information systematically on the states' educational programs and to report that information regularly to the public and their policymakers. This year, the report emphasizes demographic and fiscal background information bearing on the states' education…

  16. STATE SOIL GEOGRAPHIC (STATSGO) DATA BASE FOR THECOTERNIMOUS UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    USSOILS is an Arc 7.0 coverage containing hydrology-relevant information for 10,498 map units covering the entire conterminous United States. The coverage was compiled from individual State coverages contained in the October 1994 State Soil Geographic (STATSGO) Data Base produce...

  17. States' Progress and Challenges in Implementing Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kober, Nancy; Rentmer, Diane Stark

    2011-01-01

    Most states are participating in the initiative led by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers to develop and adopt voluntary common core state standards that will outline what elementary and secondary school students are expected to learn in English language arts and mathematics. Implementing these…

  18. State School Board Members and the State Education Policy System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, Gerald R.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the contrast between the clear legal mandate for State boards of education to determine education for the State on the one hand, and their peculiarly ill-defined and tenuous role in the State policy system on the other. (JF)

  19. State Homeschool Policies: A Patchwork of Provisions. 50-State Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixom, Micah Ann

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of federal homeschooling guidelines, states regulate homeschooling through a patchwork of provisions. Homeschooling policies vary widely from one state to the next and families' homeschooling experiences will likely be very different depending on where they live. For example, some states have little or no homeschooling…

  20. Anxiety States In Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Peter C.

    1978-01-01

    The up-to-date prevention and management of anxiety states in childhood is discussed with particular reference to the different presentations of anxiety and the ways in which preventive measures may be used. Anxiety creating developmental lag, mimicking other conditions, and appearing in very specific forms is mentioned. Techniques for handling are introduced together with some suggestions on the responsibility of the family doctor in this whole area of psychological medicine. In this article, the child is seen as part of a family setting; the effect of disturbances in the family constellation resulting in anxiety for the child is described. Some suggestions for ways in which the physician may be involved in patient and parent education are put forward. PMID:21301539