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Sample records for non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs

  1. Colitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, S.; Keat, A. C.; Keat, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of acute proctocolitis associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy are presented. The drugs implicated were flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, naproxen and ibuprofen. After resolution of symptoms and signs of proctocolitis three of the four patients were subsequently rechallenged with the implicated drug: in each there was a rapid relapse. PMID:3774712

  2. [Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Valha, P; Zmrhal, J; Feyereisl, J

    2010-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic (lowering an elevated body temperature and relieving pain without impairing consciousness) and, in higher doses, with anti-inflammatory effects (reducing inflammation). As inhibitors of cyclooxygenase NSAIDs given during pregnancy have the potential to cause adverse maternal and fetal effects. Maternal effects include prolongation of pregnancy and labour, whereas constriction of the ductus arteriosus, renal dysfunction and haemostatic abnormalities can occur in the fetus and neonate. As weak acids, NSAIDs are excreted in small amounts into human breast milk with little risk for adverse effects in the suckling infant. PMID:20437842

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Klasinc, Leo; Chong, Delano P.; McGlynn, Sean P.

    2013-08-01

    The electronic structures of eight non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and high-level Green's function (GF) calculations. Our UPS data show that the electronic structure influences the measured biological activity of NSAID, but that it is not the dominating factor. The role of electronic structure needs to be considered in conjunction with other factors like steric properties of the COX active site and orientation of relevant residues in the same site.

  4. Cardiovascular complications of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fosslien, Egil

    2005-01-01

    Coxibs, such as rofecoxib, celecoxib, and valdecoxib, selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the mainly inducible, pro-inflammatory COX isoform. Unlike traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) most coxibs do not significantly inhibit COX-1 and are therefore less toxic to the gastrointestinal tract. Hence, coxibs widely replaced traditional NSAIDs for treatment of arthritis and other painful inflammatory conditions. In many, but not all, clinical studies, coxibs became associated with higher risks of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Several mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of such complications. First, selective inhibition of COX-1 lowers platelet synthesis of thromboxane (TXA(2)), a thrombogenic and atherogenic eicosanoid. Selective inhibition of COX-2 limits endothelial cell synthesis of prostacyclin (PGI(2)), an arachidonic acid product that opposes the effects of thromboxane. In apoE-/- mice, interruption of TXA(2) signaling by deletion of its receptor (TP) limits atherogenesis, whereas interruption of PGI2 signaling by deletion of its receptor (IP) accelerates atherogenesis. This suggests that selective inhibition of COX-2 can disrupt the physiological balance between thromboxane and prostacyclin and thus increase atherosclerosis, thrombogenesis, and the risk of cardiovascular complications. Second, COX inhibition can raise levels of arachidonic acid, which can inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and increase OXPHOS generation of reactive oxygen species. Several NSAIDs, including coxibs and meloxicam, directly uncouple or inhibit OXPHOS. Studies of apoE-/- mice indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an early role in atherogenesis. Third, many NSAIDs exhibit COX-independent properties. For example, in animal models, short-term treatment with celecoxib reduces monocyte chemotaxis by reducing expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. However, long-term treatment results in the

  5. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Raptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Meteyer, Carol U.

    2012-01-01

    The use of analgesia has become standard, and appropriate, practice in avian medicine. As in mammals, pain control in avian patients is usually accomplished with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used singly or in combination for a multimodal approach. Despite their usefulness, widespread use, and relative safety in clinical use, few controlled studies in birds have been conducted on efficacy, safety, and dosing. The guidelines for the use of NSAIDs in raptors and other birds have mainly been empirical. More recently, NSAIDs in free-living raptors have emerged as a major conservation issue with the discovery that diclofenac sodium was responsible for the population crash of three species of Gyps vultures in southern Asia. In this context, residues of veterinary NSAIDs in domestic animals are now considered environmental contaminants that can be significantly toxic to vultures and possibly other avian scavengers. Ironically, the disaster with Asian vultures has led to a considerable body of research on NSAIDs in raptors to the benefit of clinicians who now have scientific information available to help assess dosing, safety, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of NSAIDs in their raptor patients.

  6. Colonic anastomoses and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Slim, K; Joris, J; Beloeil, H

    2016-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) play an important role in the treatment of post-operative pain, particularly in the context of enhanced recovery after colorectal surgery. Several recent articles have suggested that NSAID may have a deleterious effect on colo-colic or colo-rectal anastomoses. The aim of this review is to analyze the evidence based on meta-analyses and cohort studies in the literature. A systematic review of clinical studies identified twelve studies including two meta-analyses and ten comparative cohort studies that included a large number of patients. The data in these studies are heterogeneous, often biased, and do not permit a formal recommendation based on a high level of evidence. The main conclusion of this review is that the balance of benefit vs. risk (analgesic effect/risk of anastomotic disruption) is acceptable; it appears (with a low level of evidence) that a prescription of NSAID for 48h after surgery may be recommended for elective colon surgery. Nevertheless, it is important to respect the specific contra-indications of NSAID and avoid post-operative NSAID use if there are risk factors for anastomotic leakage: advanced age, malnutrition, severe co-morbidities, intra-operative difficulties. PMID:27480526

  7. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: An Overview of Cardiovascular Risks

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Inger L.; van de Laar, Mart A.F.J.; Vonkeman, Harald E.

    2010-01-01

    While aspirin may offer protection, other non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious cardiovascular side effects and complications. This has led to a general "black box" warning for cardiovascular adverse events for NSAIDs. This review explores the different mechanisms underlying the protective effects of aspirin, the NSAID associated renovascular effects causing hypertension, edema and heart failure, the cardiovascular effects causing myocardial infarction and stroke, and the possible deleterious interaction between NSAIDs and aspirin.

  8. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of pain in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ventafridda, V.; Fochi, C.; De Conno, D.; Sganzerla, E.

    1980-01-01

    1 Prostaglandins may precipitate or exacerbate pain and they may be produced by several tumours. 2 Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit prostaglandin synthesis and may also inhibit bone metastases and enhance immune responses. 3 NSAIDs alone or in association with narcotics or psychotropics may not only afford the best pain relief in neoplastic disease, but also modify the progress of the tumour. 4 The effect of NSAIDs on the gastrointestinal tract is generally adverse. PMID:7002189

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    King, Tanya S; Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V; Ferreirós, Nerea; Kynast, Katharina L; Knothe, Claudia; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-09-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated in stages of increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decrease of inflammatory processes and inhibition of disease progression of diabetes and obesity. A recent study suggested that salicylate, the active metabolite of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin), is able to activate AMPK pharmacologically. This observation raised the question whether or not other NSAIDs might also act as AMPK activators and whether this action might contribute to their cyclooxygenase (COX)-independent anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated mouse and human neuronal cells and liver tissue of mice after treatment with various NSAIDs. Our results showed that the non-selective acidic NSAIDs ibuprofen and diclofenac induced AMPK activation similar to aspirin while the COX-2 selective drug etoricoxib and the non-opioid analgesic paracetamol, both drugs have no acidic structure, failed to activate AMPK. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK can be activated by specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, ibuprofen or diclofenac possibly depending on the acidic structure of the drugs. AMPK might therefore contribute to their antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26049010

  10. Dynamic analysis of phospholipid metabolism of mouse macrophages treated with common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haibo; Wu, Xia; Zhao, Lifang; Feng, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Through studying the changes of the total phospholipid components in mouse macrophages under the inflammatory status and the drug intervention status, we found the targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on phospholipids, thus providing the basis for the targets of in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After RAW264.7 cells were pretreated with common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin and ibuprofen) and, respectively, stimulated with KLA for various periods (0.5, 4, 12, 16, and 24 h), the phospholipids were extracted. The dynamic changes of phospholipids in cells under various stimulations were analyzed with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS technique. Through the statistical analysis of Simca-P, we explored the potential targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on phospholipids. Through the dynamic analysis of phospholipids, we found two biomarkers (PC(17:1/18:1), PA(18:0/18:4)) which might be in vitro intervention inflammatory response targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The analysis results show that in anti-inflammatory effects, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit COX, induce the cellular fatty acid desaturation and the changes of phospholipid components, stimulate free fatty acids, activate calcium ion channels of endoplasmic reticulum, and promote cell endocytosis, thus controlling inflammation and activating cells. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can promote endocytosis, alter cell inflammatory response, and activate the process cells, thus realizing the anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26441061

  11. Pain Relief for Acute Urolithiasis: The Case for Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Peter L; Chang, Steven L

    2016-07-01

    Pain from renal colic is often severe and incapacitating. Many patients require emergent hospitalization and aggressive analgesia to relieve such discomfort. For many years, the optimal analgesic strategy has been sought to manage such severe pain. One of the mainstays of therapy for acute renal colic is with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This paper reviews the mechanism by which NSAIDs allow pain relief in renal colic, the evidence for their use in this condition, and the use of NSAIDs combined with other agents in renal colic. PMID:27286841

  12. Inhibition of amyloidogenesis by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their hybrid nitrates

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Isaac T.; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Wang, Huali; Vanni, Michael; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor blood-brain barrier penetration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been blamed for the failure of the selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) R-flurbiprofen in phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). NO-donor NSAIDs (NO-NSAIDs) provide an alternative, gastric-sparing approach to NSAID SALAs, which may improve bioavailability. NSAID analogs were studied for anti-inflammatory activity and for SALA activity in N2a neuronal cells transfected with human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Flurbiprofen (1) analogs were obtained with enhanced anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic properties compared to 1, however, esterification led to elevated Aβ1–42 levels. Hybrid nitrate prodrugs possessed superior anti-inflammatory activity and reduced toxicity relative to the parent NSAIDs, including clinical candidate, CHF5074. Although hybrid nitrates elevated Aβ1–42 at higher concentration, SALA activity was observed at low concentrations (≤ 1 µM): both Aβ1–42 and the ratio of Aβ1–42/Aβ1–40 were lowered. This biphasic SALA activity was attributed to the intact nitrate drug. For several compounds the selective modulation of amyloidogenesis was tested using an immunoprecipitation MALDI-TOF approach. These data support the development of NO-NSAIDs as an alternative approach towards a clinically useful SALA. PMID:21405086

  13. Treatment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Hopkinson, N; Zanelli, G; Prouse, P; Smethurst, P; Gumpel, J M; Levi, A J

    1990-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced small intestinal inflammation may have an adverse effect on the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We therefore assessed small intestinal and joint inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis before and after three to nine months' treatment with sulphasalazine (n = 40) and other second line drugs (n = 20), while keeping the dosage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug at the same level. Sulphasalazine significantly decreased the mean (SD) faecal excretion of 111indium labelled leucocytes from 2.39 (2.22)% to 1.33 (1.13)% (normal less than 1%, p less than 0.01) and improved the joint inflammation as assessed by a variety of parameters. There was no significant correlation between the effects of sulphasalazine treatment on the intestine and the joints. Treatment with other second line drugs had no significant effect on the faecal excretion of 111indium (1.58 (1.04)% and 1.86 (1.51)%, respectively) but improved joint inflammation significantly. The lack of correlation between the intestinal and joint inflammation and their response to treatment suggests that the two are not causally related. PMID:1973396

  14. [The mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Ishii, K; Seto, Y; Shimoda, A; Kadokawa, T

    1987-01-01

    In order to ascertain the mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate which is a diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, the in vitro test for the mechanism of the action were carried out. Etofenamate (3 microM) was hydrolysed to flufenamic acid at a rate of 39.5% and 57.0% of the dose during 30 and 60 min incubation, respectively, when incubated with rat peritoneal macrophages stimulated with starch and bacto peptone in phosphate-buffered saline. PGE2 generation by these cells in MEM medium was dose-relatedly inhibited with etofenamate as well as flufenamic acid at the dosage range of 1 to 30 microM. This suggests that unchanged etofenamate is active, since the highest conversion rate of etofenamate to flufenamic acid was 15% of the dose during the incubation. Etofenamate produced a dose-related inhibition against lipoxygenase prepared from peritoneal polymorphonuclear leucocytes of guinea pigs, and its activity (IC50 = 5.3 X 10(-5) M) was stronger than that of caffeic acid; flufenamic acid was inactive. Inhibitory activity of etofenamate was one-third or less that of flufenamic acid against the hypotonic-hyperthermic lysis of rat erythrocytes and heat-denaturation of bovine serum albumin. From these results, it was suggested that topically applied etofenamate produces its anti-inflammatory action through prostaglandin synthesis inhibition by flufenamic acid produced in the inflammatory tissue and inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by macrophages and lipoxygenase inhibition by unchanged etofenamate. PMID:2883093

  15. Quantitative systematic review of topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R. A.; Tramèr, M. R.; Carroll, D.; Wiffen, P. J.; McQuay, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the effectiveness and safety of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in acute and chronic pain conditions. DESIGN: Quantitative systematic review of randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES: 86 trials involving 10,160 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures of treatment success approximating at least 50% reduction in pain, local and systemic adverse effects. Analysis at 1 week for acute and 2 weeks for chronic conditions with relative benefit and number needed to treat. RESULTS: In acute pain conditions (soft tissue trauma, strains, and sprains) placebo controlled trials had a relative benefit of 1.7 (1.5 to 1.9), the number needed to treat was 3.9 (3.4 to 4.4). With analysis by drug (at least three trials), ketoprofen (number needed to treat 2.6), felbinac (3.0), ibuprofen (3.5), and piroxicam (4.2) had significant efficacy. Benzydamine and indomethacin were no different from placebo. In chronic pain conditions (osteoarthritis, tendinitis) placebo controlled trials had a relative benefit of 2.0 (1.5 to 2.7); the number needed to treat was 3.1 (2.7 to 3.8). Small trials (< 40 treated patients) exaggerated effectiveness of topical non-steroidals by 33% in acute conditions but not in chronic conditions. There was no relation between trial quality and treatment effect. In both acute and chronic pain local and systemic adverse events and withdrawal from the study related to the drug had a low incidence and were no different from placebo. CONCLUSION: Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are effective in relieving pain in acute and chronic conditions. PMID:9487165

  16. Acute gastrointestinal permeability responses to different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Smecuol, E; Bai, J; Sugai, E; Vazquez, H; Niveloni, S; Pedreira, S; Maurino, E; Meddings, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal damage both in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. New anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed in an attempt to improve their gastrointestinal side effect profile. Our objective was to compare the effect on gastrointestinal permeability of acute equieffective doses of four different NSAIDs; three were designed to reduce gastrointestinal mucosal injury.
MATERIALS—Healthy volunteers underwent sugar tests in a randomised fashion, 15 days apart, at: (1) baseline; (2) after two days of 75 mg slow release (microspheres) indomethacin; (3) after two days of 7.5 mg oral meloxicam which preferentially inhibits cyclooxygenase 2; and (4) after two days of 750 mg naproxen. A subgroup of subjects was tested after two days of 200 mg celecoxib. In each test, subjects ingested a solution containing sucrose, lactulose, and mannitol and sucralose, to evaluate gastroduodenal, intestinal, and colonic permeability, respectively.
RESULTS—Gastric permeability was significantly affected by naproxen (p<0.05) but not by slow release indomethacin, meloxicam, or celecoxib. Intestinal permeability was significantly increased by the first three NSAIDs (p<0.05) but not by celecoxib. Abnormal lactulose/mannitol ratios were observed in 42% of meloxicam treatments, in 62% during indomethacin, and in 75% of subjects treated with naproxen. Finally, colonic permeability, as measured by sucralose, was not significantly increased by any of the four drugs.
CONCLUSION—Our study provides evidence that the newly developed NSAIDs reduce gastric mucosal permeability significantly. However, most produced significant alteration of small intestinal permeability. In contrast, our results suggest that celecoxib seems to exhibit the most desirable gastrointestinal side effect profile.


Keywords: permeability; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; celecoxib; meloxican; small intestine

  17. Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs As Gatekeepers Of Colon Carcinoma Highlight New Scenarios Beyond Cyclooxygenases Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) inhibitors (COXibs) can exert chemopreventive and antitumour effects in many human neoplasia. This is particularly true in colon cancer (CC), where the regular assumption of these molecules has been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. Since the late '90s, there has been a progressive increase in experimental evidence, indicating that in CC the antiproliferative effects of NSAIDs and COXibs could be both dependent on and independent of COXs inhibition, and that these effects do not necessarily exclude each other. This review will examine some of these COX-independent cellular pathways, with a focus on those involved in the inhibition of CC cells proliferation through transcription factors crosstalk. PMID:26310524

  18. Pressure-assisted electrokinetic supercharging for the enhancement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Meighan, Michelle M; Dawod, Mohamed; Guijt, Rosanne M; Hayes, Mark A; Breadmore, Michael C

    2011-09-23

    Electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) combines field-amplified sample injection with transient isotachophoresis (tITP) to create a powerful on-line preconcentration technique for capillary electrophoresis. In this work, EKS is enhanced with a positive pressure (pressure-assisted EKS, or PA-EKS) during injection to improve stacking of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Several parameters, including buffer composition and concentration, terminating electrolyte, organic modifier, and injection voltage and injection time of both terminating electrolyte and sample were optimized. Detection limits for seven NSAIDs were determined and an enhancement in sensitivity of almost 50,000-fold was obtained. The PA-EKS method has the potential to be a simple MS compatible preconcentration method to improve the sensitivity of CE. PMID:21855878

  19. The iatrogenic cost of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

    PubMed

    De Pouvourville, G

    1995-04-01

    The secondary gastrointestinal effects associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are well documented in the medical literature. Less addressed is the 'iatrogenic' cost due to the treatment of these secondary effects. Epidemiologic and clinical studies report that the cost of NSAIDs is multiplied by a coefficient that ranges from 1.45 to 3, if the cost of treating the induced gastrointestinal complications is considered. A simple methodology incorporating the direct medical cost of treating complications has been developed to calculate a 'shadow price' of an NSAID, thus reflecting the real cost to the payer of NSAID therapy. The model has been used to compare three NSAIDs on the basis of their relative prices and gastroduodenal toxicity. PMID:7780675

  20. [Appropriate prescription, adherence and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Sostres, Carlos; Lanas, Ángel

    2016-03-18

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most numerous category of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action and therapeutic activities (anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic). Despite having similar efficacy for pain relieve, the different available NSAIDs show variability in its safety profile. The risk of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complications varies depending on the dose of NSAID and also the presence of different risk factors. It is necessary, therefore, an individualized case assessment before establishing the indication of the best NSAID for each patient, taking account of the best gastroprotection strategy. Improved prescription and enhanced treatment adherence are central objectives to reduce NSAID-related complications. A recent consensus of the Spanish Association of Gastroenterology and the Spanish societies of Cardiology and Rheumatology intends to promote the rational use of NSAIDs according to new recent studies. This review provides additional aspects to facilitate the optimal decision-making process in the routine use of these drugs in clinical practice. PMID:26724872

  1. Assessment and prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E; Kim, Mi-Jeong

    2006-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and, in the case of aspirin, for anti-thrombotic actions. The serious gastrointestinal side-effects associated with these drugs are of concern and pose a significant obstacle to their use. This review discusses the pathogenic mechanisms by which the conventional acidic NSAIDs induce gastrointestinal toxicity, with particular emphasis on non-prostaglandin effects. Methods of assessment of NSAID-induced enteropathy are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the use of functional measurement of NSAID-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract. The advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these effects have resulted in the development of a range of novel NSAIDs. Where functional assessment of the effects of NSAIDs has been employed, it appears to be more useful as an indicator of early-stage changes rather than a predictor of the effects of long-term NSAID exposure. Successful pharmaceutical strategies now offer considerable promise for reducing the severity of NSAID damage to the gastrointestinal tract. The utility of intestinal permeability measurements for selection and assessment of these strategies is discussed. PMID:17034651

  2. Nicolau syndrome after intramuscular injection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID).

    PubMed

    Dadaci, Mehmet; Altuntas, Zeynep; Ince, Bilsev; Bilgen, Fatma; Tufekci, Osman; Poyraz, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection that leads to local ischemic necrosis of the skin and adipose tissue. In this paper, we discuss etiologies, risk factors, and treatment options for gluteal Nicolau syndrome referring to patients treated in our hospital. Our study includes 17 women who visited our clinic with symptoms of gluteal necrosis secondary to intramuscular injection. The following variables were taken into account: injection site, drug administered, frequency of injections, the person who administered the injections, needle size, and needle tip color. Magnetic resonance images obtained in the aftermath of intramuscular injection application were carefully analyzed for presence of necrosis, cyst formation and the thickness of the gluteal fat tissue layer. Drugs that had been received in intramuscular injection were exclusively non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Mean patient BMI was 41.8 (all patients were considered as obese), and mean gluteal fat thickness was 54 mm. Standard length of needles (3.8 cm) had been used in procedures. The wounds were treated with primary closure in 11 patients and with local flap therapy in 6 patients. The observed necrosis was a consequence of misplaced gluteal injection, where drugs were injected into the adipose tissue instead of the muscle due to the extreme thickness of the fat layer, on one hand, and the inappropriate length of standard needles, on the other hand. Intramuscular injection should be avoided in obese patients whenever possible: if it is necessary, proper injection technique should be used. PMID:25725145

  3. Interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2008-03-01

    Chronic usage of Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) leads to gastrointestinal toxicity and clinical evidences point the cause to direct interactions between NSAIDs and phospholipid membranes. Also, NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipid vesicles are shown to be safer and therapeutically more effective than unmodified ones. Our initial experiments and simulations on the partitioning of Aspirin and Ibuprofen clearly indicate role played by the drug structure in drug-membrane interactions. Those results motivated systematic molecular dynamics simulations of membranes with NSAIDs of different size, structure and pKa values. Our results suggest high partition coefficients for these NSAIDs in the membrane compared to water and thinning effect on the bilayer. Our small angle neutron scattering and reflectivity studies on DMPC-Ibuprofen systems indicate that the drug affects both ˜5 nm thick bilayer and overall ˜100 nm diameter vesicle, indicating that NSAIDs affect vesicles on various length scales. We will discuss the structural perturbations to membranes due to NSAIDs at clinically relevant molar ratios and their implications on the use of vesicles as delivery vehicles for NSAIDs.

  4. Mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ regulation by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Ana C.; Milton, Flora A.; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Campos, Jéssica C.L.; Bernardes, Amanda; Filgueira, Carly S.; Lindemann, Jan Lammel; Deng, Tuo; Neves, Francisco A.R.; Polikarpov, Igor; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) display anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties by inhibiting cyclooxygenases and blocking prostaglandin production. Previous studies, however, suggested that some NSAIDs also modulate peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs), raising the possibility that such off target effects contribute to the spectrum of clinically relevant NSAID actions. In this study, we set out to understand how peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ/PPARG) interacts with NSAIDs using X-ray crystallography and to relate ligand binding modes to effects on receptor activity. We find that several NSAIDs (sulindac sulfide, diclofenac, indomethacin and ibuprofen) bind PPARγ and modulate PPARγ activity at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Diclofenac acts as a partial agonist and binds to the PPARγ ligand binding pocket (LBP) in typical partial agonist mode, near the β-sheets and helix 3. By contrast, two copies of indomethacin and sulindac sulfide bind the LBP and, in aggregate, these ligands engage in LBP contacts that resemble agonists. Accordingly, both compounds, and ibuprofen, act as strong partial agonists. Assessment of NSAID activities in PPARγ-dependent 3T3-L1 cells reveals that NSAIDs display adipogenic activities and exclusively regulate PPARγ-dependent target genes in a manner that is consistent with their observed binding modes. Further, PPARγ knockdown eliminates indomethacin activities at selected endogenous genes, confirming receptor-dependence of observed effects. We propose that it is important to consider how individual NSAIDs interact with PPARγ to understand their activities, and that it will be interesting to determine whether high dose NSAID therapies result in PPAR activation. PMID:26445566

  5. Delayed contact hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowska, B; Ruëff, F; Przybilla, B

    1999-02-01

    Several non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are available for topical treatment of acute soft tissue trauma or degenerative musculoskeletal disorders; the NSAID bufexamac is mainly used for therapy of chronic inflammatory skin diseases. In order to assess the occurrence of contact allergy to NSAIDs in 371 consecutive patients presenting for diagnosis of presumed contact allergy, patch tests were performed with a standard series and additionally with a series of NSAIDs, comprising acetylsalicylic acid, bufexamac, diclofenac, etofenamate, felbinac, flufenamic acid, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and piroxicam. 17 individuals (4.6%) exhibited delayed hypersensitivity to one of the NSAID preparations: 12 patients (3.2%) had patch test reactions to bufexamac, 2 (0.5%) to etofenamate, 2 (0.5%) to indomethacin, and 1 patient (0.3%) to flufenamic acid. These patch test results corresponded well to the individual history in 11 individuals (including 10 patients with reactions to bufexamac), and in 2 patients the clinical relevance of the reactions was probable. In view of the high frequency of allergic contact reactions to bufexamac, we propose to test this drug particularly in patients with atopic eczema or other chronic eczematous diseases. PMID:10048648

  6. Cobalt(II) complexes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and α-diimines.

    PubMed

    Tsiliou, Sofia; Kefala, Lida-Aikaterini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Perdih, Franc; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Turel, Iztok; Psomas, George

    2016-07-01

    Cobalt(II) complexes with a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diflunisal, flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid and niflumic acid) in the presence of nitrogen-(2,2'-bipyridylamine, 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline) and/or oxygen-donor ligands (methanol) have been synthesized and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The deprotonated NSAID ligands are coordinated to Co(II) ion through their carboxylato groups in diverse binding modes. The crystal structures of complexes [Co(diflunisal-O)2(methanol)4], [Co(niflumato-O)2(methanol)4], [Co(flufenamato-O,O')2(2,2'-bipyridylamine)], [Co(mefenamato-O,O')2(2,2'-bipyridylamine)] and [Co3(flufenamato-O,O')4(flufenamato-O,O,O')2(2,2'-bipyridine)2] have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complexes with serum albumins was studied by fluorescence emission spectroscopy and the albumin-binding constants were determined. The ability of the complexes to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and hydroxyl radicals was investigated and the complexes were more active than the corresponding free drugs. Spectroscopic (UV and fluorescence), electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) and physicochemical (viscosity measurements) techniques were employed in order to study the binding mode of the complexes to calf-thymus (CT) DNA and to calculate the corresponding binding constants; for all complexes, intercalation was suggested as the most possible DNA-binding mode. PMID:26775611

  7. Molecular Basis for Cyclooxygenase Inhibition by the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Walters, Matthew J.; Musee, Joel; Harp, Joel M.; Kiefer, James R.; Oates, John A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-11-15

    Naproxen ((S)-6-methoxy-{alpha}-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid) is a powerful non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is extensively used as a prescription and over-the-counter medication. Naproxen exhibits gastrointestinal toxicity, but its cardiovascular toxicity may be reduced compared with other drugs in its class. Despite the fact that naproxen has been marketed for many years, the molecular basis of its interaction with cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is unknown. We performed a detailed study of naproxen-COX-2 interactions using site-directed mutagenesis, structure-activity analysis, and x-ray crystallography. The results indicate that each of the pendant groups of the naphthyl scaffold are essential for COX inhibition, and only minimal substitutions are tolerated. Mutation of Trp-387 to Phe significantly reduced inhibition by naproxen, a result that appears unique to this inhibitor. Substitution of S or CH2 for the O atom of the p-methoxy group yielded analogs that were not affected by the W387F substitution and that exhibited increased COX-2 selectivity relative to naproxen. Crystallization and x-ray analysis yielded structures of COX-2 complexed to naproxen and its methylthio analog at 1.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The combination of mutagenesis, structure analysis, and x-ray crystallography provided comprehensive information on the unique interactions responsible for naproxen binding to COX-2.

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with adverse psychiatric reactions: five case reports.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H K; Chang, D M

    1999-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are quite prevalent, but there are few reports about possible adverse psychiatric reactions, which may be ignored or underestimated. We describe here five psychiatric outpatients, two with major depressive disorders, one bipolar disorder, one schizophrenic disorder and one anxiety disorder, who were treated with NSAIDs for pain due to rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis or other painful neuromuscular conditions. All five patients developed a moderate to severe depressive state, three patients became obviously paranoid, and four had either thoughts of suicide or an attempt while undergoing co-administration of NSAIDs. The psychiatric symptoms remitted when the NSAIDs were stopped. The depressive and paranoid symptoms returned on seven occasions of re-use or re-challenge with the same or a different type of NSAID in all five patients. When the NSAIDs were stopped again, the patients had another remission of the adverse psychiatric reactions, and eventually recovered to their baseline mental states in clear temporal relationships. The cases presented suggest that NSAIDs can induce or exacerbate idiosyncratic reproducible adverse psychiatric symptoms in certain vulnerable patients, including those with a variety of psychotic or neurotic disorders, and also in elderly persons, but these undesirable side-effects were generally transient and disappeared on withdrawal of the NSAIDs. PMID:10468178

  9. Influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on Drosophila melanogaster longevity

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shevchenko, Oksana; Zemskaya, Nadezhda; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Most age-related diseases and aging itself are associated with chronic inflammation. Thus pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory processes may be effective antiaging strategy. In this study we demonstrated that treatment of Drosophila melanogaster with 10 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs: CAY10404, aspirin, APHS, SC-560, NS-398, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, licofelone) leads to extension of lifespan, delays age-dependent decline of locomotor activity and increases stress resistance. The effect of the lifespan increase was associated with decrease of fecundity. Depending on the concentration, NSAIDs demonstrated both anti- and pro-oxidant properties in Drosophila tissues. However, we failed to identify clear correlation between antioxidant properties of NSAIDs and their pro-longevity effects. The lifespan extending effects of APHS, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, and licofelone were more pronounced in males, valdecoxib and aspirin - in females. We demonstrated that lifespan extension effect of NSAIDs was abolished in flies with defective genes involved in Pkh2-ypk1-lem3-tat2 pathway. PMID:26305987

  10. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indometacin enhances endogenous remyelination.

    PubMed

    Preisner, Anna; Albrecht, Stefanie; Cui, Qiao-Ling; Hucke, Stephanie; Ghelman, Julia; Hartmann, Christine; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Antel, Jack; Klotz, Luisa; Kuhlmann, Tanja

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most frequent demyelinating disease in the CNS that is characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions and axonal loss, the morphological correlate of permanent clinical disability. Remyelination does occur, but is limited especially in chronic disease stages. Despite effective immunomodulatory therapies that reduce the number of relapses the progressive disease phase cannot be prevented. Therefore, promotion of neuroprotective and repair mechanisms, such as remyelination, represents an attractive additional treatment strategy. A number of pathways have been identified that may contribute to impaired remyelination in MS lesions, among them the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here, we demonstrate that indometacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has been also shown to modulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer cells promotes differentiation of primary human and murine oligodendrocytes, myelination of cerebellar slice cultures and remyelination in cuprizone-induced demyelination. Our in vitro experiments using GSK3β inhibitors, luciferase reporter assays and oligodendrocytes expressing a mutant, dominant stable β-catenin indicate that the mechanism of action of indometacin depends on GSK3β activity and β-catenin phosphorylation. Indometacin might represent a promising treatment option to enhance endogenous remyelination in MS patients. PMID:25943886

  11. Influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on Drosophila melanogaster longevity.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shevchenko, Oksana; Zemskaya, Nadezhda; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-08-14

    Most age-related diseases and aging itself are associated with chronic inflammation. Thus pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory processes may be effective antiaging strategy. In this study we demonstrated that treatment of Drosophila melanogaster with 10 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs: CAY10404, aspirin, APHS, SC-560, NS-398, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, licofelone) leads to extension of lifespan, delays age-dependent decline of locomotor activity and increases stress resistance. The effect of the lifespan increase was associated with decrease of fecundity. Depending on the concentration, NSAIDs demonstrated both anti- and pro-oxidant properties in Drosophila tissues. However, we failed to identify clear correlation between antioxidant properties of NSAIDs and their pro-longevity effects. The lifespan extending effects of APHS, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, and licofelone were more pronounced in males, valdecoxib and aspirin - in females. We demonstrated that lifespan extension effect of NSAIDs was abolished in flies with defective genes involved in Pkh2-ypk1-lem3-tat2 pathway. PMID:26305987

  12. Helicobacter pylori-negative, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug: negative idiopathic ulcers in Asia.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Katsunori; Kanno, Takeshi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-01-21

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the stomach, the bacteria infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use had been considered to be the 2 main causes of peptic ulcers. However, there have been recent reports of an increase in the proportion of peptic ulcers without these known risk factors; these are termed idiopathic peptic ulcers. Such trend was firstly indicated in 1990s from some reports in North America. In Asia, numerous studies reported that idiopathic ulcers accounted for a small percentage of all ulcers in the 1990s, but in the 2000s, multiple studies reported that the proportion of idiopathic ulcers had reached 10%-30%, indicating that the incidence of idiopathic ulcers in Asia has also been rising in recent years. While a decline in H. pylori infection rates of general population in Asia is seen as the main reason for the increased incidence of idiopathic ulcers, it is also possible that the absolute number of idiopathic ulcer cases has increased. Advanced age, serious systemic complication, and psychological stress are considered to be the potential risk factors for idiopathic ulcers. Management of idiopathic ulcers is challenging, at present, because there is no effective preventative measure against recurrence in contrast with cases of H. pylori-positive ulcers and NSAIDs-induced ulcers. As it is expected that H. pylori infection rates in Asia will decline further in the future, measures to treat idiopathic ulcers will also likely become more important. PMID:24574744

  13. Gastrointestinal blood loss induced by three different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, A; Hammermaier, A; Nagyiványi, P; Pabst, G; Waitzinger, J

    1995-04-01

    A clinical study was performed on 18 healthy volunteers to compare the gastrointestinal daily blood loss induced by oral intake of three different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, lysine clonixinate (CAS 55837-30-4), ibuprofen (CAS 15687-27-1) and acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2 ASA). For quantitative determination of gastrointestinal blood loss, autologous erythrocytes were radiolabelled in vitro with 51Cr and reinfused at study start. The amount of radioactivity excreted in faeces was measured during a placebo baseline phase of three days, a treatment phase of five days with thrice daily dosing of ASA, ibuprofen or lysine clonixinate and a subsequent wash-out phase of five days. The highest increase of mean daily blood loss over baseline was observed after treatment with ASA (+ 1.66 ml/d versus baseline). Treatment with ibuprofen led to an increase of mean daily blood loss by + 0.52 ml/d. During treatment with lysine clonixinate the mean increase of daily blood loss was +0.32 ml/d versus baseline. In the ibuprofen and lysine clonixinate treatment groups the values of mean daily blood loss decreased during the wash-out phase with respect to the verum phase, whereas the mean daily blood loss during the wash-out phase after treatment with ASA even increased in comparison to the verum phase (mean daily blood loss: +2.07 ml/d versus baseline. PMID:7779148

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs stimulate secretion of non-amyloidogenic precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Avramovich, Yael; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2002-08-30

    Chronic inflammatory processes are associated with the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has been proposed that treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk for AD. Here we report that various NSAIDs, such as the cyclooxygenase inhibitors, nimesulide, ibuprofen and indomethacin, as well as thalidomide (Thal) and its non-teratogenic analogue, supidimide, significantly stimulated the secretion of the non-amyloidogenic alpha-secretase form of the soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP alpha) into the conditioned media of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and PC12 cells. These NSAIDs markedly reduced the levels of the cellular APP holoprotein, further accelerating non-amyloidogenic processes. sAPP alpha release, induced by nimesulide and Thal, was modulated by inhibitors of protein kinase C and Erk mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Furthermore, in results complementary to the inhibitor studies, we show for the first time that NSAIDs can activate the Erk MAP kinase signaling cascade, thus identifying a novel pharmacology mechanism of NSAIDs. Our findings suggest that NSAIDs and Thal might prove useful to favor non-amyloidogenic APP processing by enhancing alpha-secretase activity, thereby reducing the formation of amyloidogenic derivatives, and therefore are of potential therapeutic value in AD. PMID:12070143

  15. Do non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase colonic permeability?

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, A P; Trew, D R; Crump, B J; Nukajam, W S; Foley, J A; Menzies, I S; Creamer, B

    1991-01-01

    Urinary excretion of orally administered lactulose and 51 chromium labelled ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (51Cr-EDTA) was measured in 12 healthy adult subjects and in six patients with ileostomies to assess intestinal permeability. In normal subjects, 24 hour urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA was significantly greater than that of lactulose (mean (SEM) 2.27 (0.15) v 0.50 (0.08)% oral dose; p less than 0.001), but in ileostomy patients recovery of the two markers was the same. In normal subjects, therefore, the difference between the two markers may arise from bacterial break-down of lactulose but not of 51Cr-EDTA in the distal bowel, urinary excretion of lactulose representing small intestinal permeation and that of 51Cr-EDTA representing both small and large intestinal permeation. The markers were then given simultaneously to nine patients receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The 24 hour urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA in the patients was significantly greater than normal (4.64 (1.20) v 2.27 (0.15)% oral dose; p less than 0.01), but that of lactulose was not significantly affected. Moreover, the increase in 51Cr-EDTA recovery was most noticeable in the later urine collections. Both of these findings suggest that NSAIDs may increase colonic permeability. PMID:1899408

  16. Esters of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with cinnamyl alcohol are potent lipoxygenase inhibitors with enhanced anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Theodosis-Nobelos, Panagiotis; Kourti, Malamati; Tziona, Paraskevi; Kourounakis, Panos N; Rekka, Eleni A

    2015-11-15

    Novel esters of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, α-lipoic acid and indol-3-acetic acid with cinnamyl alcohol were synthesised by a straightforward method and at high yields (60-98%). They reduced acute inflammation more than the parent acids and are potent inhibitors of soybean lipoxygenase. Selected structures decreased plasma lipidemic indices in Triton-induced hyperlipidemia to rats. Therefore, the synthesised compounds may add to the current knowledge about agents acting against various inflammatory disorders. PMID:26494261

  17. The impact of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the small intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Fukui, Akifumi; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine has been called as a dark continent of digestive tract and it had been very difficult to diagnose or treat the disease of small intestine. However recent technological development including video capsule endoscopy or balloon-assisted endoscopy has made us to aware the various diseases of small intestine. By using capsule endoscopy, many researchers reported that more than 70% of patients treated continuously with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) exhibit the mucosal damage of small intestine. In some cases, NSAID not only causes mucosal damage but also results in life threatening bleeding from small intestine, which had not been prevented or cured by gastro-protective drug or anti-gastric acid secretion drug administration. Therefore to investigate and identify the effective drug that protects small intestine from mucosal damage is urgently expected. In spite of extensive investigation in clinical field, only a few drugs such as misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue, has been reported as an effective one but is not satisfactory enough to fulfill the requirement of patients who suffer from NSAID-induced mucosal damage of small intestine. And now, extensive study is being performed using several gastro-mucoprotective drugs by many researchers. In this review, we introduce the current clinical situation in small intestinal injury of patients under NSAID treatment, and to summarize the molecular mechanism by which NSAID, including acetyl salicylic acid, cause small intestinal damage. In addition, we present results of clinical trials performed so far, and refer the possible preventive method or treatment in the near future. PMID:24426183

  18. Cyclooxygenase selectivity of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs in humans: ex vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, F; Ferraz, J G; Pereira, R; de Nucci, G; Warner, T D

    2001-08-24

    We have recently described a novel assay to assess ex vivo the activity and selectivity on cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (EC 1.14.99.1) of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) administered to rats [Br. J. Pharmacol. 126 (1999) 1824.]. Here, we have extended these studies to humans. Healthy male volunteers were given orally one of the following drugs (mg) for 5 days: etodolac (200 or 400 b.i.d.), meloxicam (7.5 or 15 q.d.), nimesulide (100 or 200 b.i.d.), nabumetone (500 or 1000 b.i.d.) or naproxen (500 b.i.d.). Blood samples were withdrawn from the volunteers before and up to 24 h after the last dose. Plasma obtained from the blood was tested for its ability to inhibit prostanoid formation in interleukin-1beta-treated A549 cells (cyclooxygenase-2 system) and human washed platelets (cyclooxygenase-1 system). Plasma from etodolac-treated subjects demonstrated a slight selectivity towards the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2. This effect was more prominent in plasma from subjects receiving meloxicam or nimesulide. Plasma from nabumetone-treated subjects showed no or little selectivity towards cyclooxygenase-1 depending on the dose of drug administered, while plasma taken from subjects receiving naproxen was more active at inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 than cyclooxygenase-2. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that this assay can be used to assess ex vivo the relative activity against cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 of NSAIDs consumed by human volunteers. It is to be hoped that data from such systems will aid in our understanding of the relationships between the differential inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 by NSAIDs and their reported efficacies and (gastrointestinal) toxicities. PMID:11525777

  19. The influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M A M; Aronoff, D M

    2016-02-01

    The composition of the gut microbiome with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has not been fully characterized. Drug use within the past 30 days was ascertained in 155 adults, and stool specimens were submitted for analysis. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated in logit models to distinguish the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) by medication class. The type of medication had a greater influence on the gut microbiome than the number of medications. NSAIDs were particularly associated with distinct microbial populations. Four OTUs (Prevotella species, Bacteroides species, family Ruminococcaceae, and Barnesiella species) discriminated aspirin users from those using no medication (AUC = 0.96; 95% CI 0.84-1.00). The microbiome profile of celecoxib users was similar to that of ibuprofen users, with both showing enrichment of Acidaminococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae. Bacteria from families Propionibacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Puniceicoccaceae and Rikenellaceae were more abundant in ibuprofen users than in controls or naproxen users. Bacteroides species and Erysipelotrichaceae species discriminated individuals using NSAIDs plus proton-pump inhibitors from those using NSAIDs alone (AUC = 0.96; 95% CI 0.87-1.00). Bacteroides species and a bacterium of family Ruminococcaceae discriminated individuals using NSAIDs in combination with antidepressants and laxatives from those using NSAIDs alone (AUC = 0.98; 95% CI 0.93-1.00). In conclusion, bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract reflect the combinations of medications that people ingest. The bacterial composition of the gut varied with the type of NSAID ingested. PMID:26482265

  20. Italian survey on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    PubMed Central

    Cardile, Sabrina; Martinelli, Massimo; Barabino, Arrigo; Gandullia, Paolo; Oliva, Salvatore; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Rea, Francesca; de' Angelis, Gian Luigi; Bizzarri, Barbara; Guariso, Graziella; Masci, Enzo; Staiano, Annamaria; Miele, Erasmo; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gastrointestinal complications associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) use in children. METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter study was conducted between January 2005 and January 2013, with the participation of 8 Italian pediatric gastroenterology centers. We collected all the cases of patients who refer to emergency room for suspected gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAIDs consumption, and underwent endoscopic evaluation. Previous medical history, associated risk factors, symptoms and signs at presentation, diagnostic procedures, severity of bleeding and management of gastrointestinal bleeding were collected. In addition, data regarding type of drug used, indication, dose, duration of treatment and prescriber (physician or self-medication) were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients, including 34 males, were enrolled (median age: 7.8 years). Ibuprofen was the most used NSAID [35/51 patients (68.6%)]. Pain was the most frequent indication for NSAIDs use [29/51 patients (56.9%)]. Seven patients had positive family history of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or peptic ulcer, and 12 had associated comorbidities. Twenty-four (47%) out of 51 patients used medication inappropriately. Hematemesis was the most frequent symptom (33.3%). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric lesions in 32/51 (62%) patients, duodenal lesions in 17 (33%) and esophageal lesions in 8 (15%). In 10/51 (19.6%) patients, a diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis was made. Forty-eight (94%) patients underwent medical therapy, with spontaneous bleeding resolution, while in 3/51 (6%) patients, an endoscopic hemostasis was needed. CONCLUSION: The data collected in this study confirms that adverse events with the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract secondary to NSAID use are also common in children PMID:26855547

  1. New insights into the use of currently available non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kay; Patrignani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which act via inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) isozymes, were discovered more than 100 years ago. They remain a key component of the pharmacological management of acute and chronic pain. The COX-1 and COX-2 isozymes have different biological functions; analgesic activity is primarily (although not exclusively) associated with inhibition of COX-2, while different side effects result from the inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. All available NSAIDs, including acetaminophen and aspirin, are associated with potential side effects, particularly gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects, related to their relative selectivity for COX-1 and COX-2. Since all NSAIDs exert their therapeutic activity through inhibition of the COX isozymes, strategies are needed to reduce the risks associated with NSAIDs while achieving sufficient pain relief. A better understanding of the inhibitory activity and COX-1/COX-2 selectivity of an NSAID at therapeutic doses, based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties (eg, inhibitory dose, absorption, plasma versus tissue distribution, and elimination), and the impact on drug tolerability and safety can guide the selection of appropriate NSAIDs for pain management. For example, many NSAIDs with moderate to high selectivity for COX-2 versus COX-1 can be administered at doses that maximize efficacy (~80% inhibition of COX-2) while minimizing COX-1 inhibition and associated side effects, such as gastrointestinal toxicity. Acidic NSAIDs with favorable tissue distribution and short plasma half-lives can additionally be dosed to provide near-constant analgesia while minimizing plasma concentrations to permit recovery of COX-mediated prostaglandin production in the vascular wall and other organs. Each patient's clinical background, including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risk factors, should be taken into account when selecting appropriate NSAIDs. New methods are emerging to assist

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate the vascular responses in aging metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Diaz-Diaz, Eulises; Pavón, Natalia; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging are low-grade systemic inflammatory conditions, and inflammation is a key component of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon the vascular reactivity in aging MS rats. Methods: MS was induced in young male rats by adding 30% sucrose in drinking water over 6, 12, and 18 months. When the treatment was finished, the blood samples were collected, and aortas were dissected out. The expression of COX isoenzymes and PLA2 in the aortas was analyzed using Western blot analysis. The contractile responses of aortic rings to norepinephrine (1 μmol/L) were measured in the presence or absence of different NSAIDs (10 μmol/L for each). Results: Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) in control rats were remained stable during the aging process, whereas serum IL-6 in MS rats were significantly increased at 12 and 18 months. The levels of COX isoenzyme and PLA2 in aortas from control rats increased with the aging, whereas those in aortas from MS rats were irregularly increased with the highest levels at 6 months. Pretreatment with acetylsalicylic acid (a COX-1 preferential inhibitor), indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or meloxicam (a COX-2 preferential inhibitor) decreased NE-induced contractions of aortic rings from MS rats at all the ages, with meloxicam being the most potent. Acetylsalicylic acid also significantly reduced the maximum responses of ACh-induced vasorelaxation of aortic rings from MS rats, but indomethacin and meloxicam had no effect. Conclusion: NSAIDs can directly affect vascular responses in aging MS rats. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on blood vessels may improve the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and MS in the elders. PMID:25263337

  3. Oxidation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with aqueous permanganate.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, Tania; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Triñanes, Sara; Cela, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    Potassium permanganate is a strong oxidant widely used in drinking water treatment, that can react with organic micropollutants. Thus, the oxidation kinetics and transformation route of seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon reaction with potassium permanganate was investigated. A liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) system was used to follow the time course of pharmaceuticals concentrations and for the identification of their by-products. Under strong oxidation conditions (2 mg L(-1) KMnO4, 24 h), only two NSAIDs were significantly degraded: indomethacine and diclofenac. The degradation kinetics of these two drugs was investigated at different concentrations of permanganate, chlorides, phosphates and sample pH by means of a full factorial experimental design. Depending on these factors, half-lives were in the range: 2-270 h for indomethacine and 3-558 h for diclofenac, equivalent to apparent second order constants between 0.65 and 9.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 0.27 and 7.4 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Permanganate concentration was the most significant factor on NSAIDs oxidation kinetics, but the pH also played a significant role in diclofenac reaction, being faster at acidic pH. In the case of indomethacine, the dose of permanganate seemed also to play an autocatalytic effect. The use of an accurate-mass high resolution LC-Q-TOF-MS system permitted the identification of a total of 13 by-products. The transformation path of these drugs consisted mainly of hydroxylations, decarboxylations and oxidation of aromatic double bonds, with ring opening. The software predicted toxicity of these products indicates that they are expected not to be more toxic than the NSAIDs, with the exception of two indomethacine by-products. Reaction in real samples was slower and/or incomplete for both pharmaceuticals, depending on the organic matter content of the sample. However, still all transformation products could be detected for

  4. Amides of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with thiomorpholine can yield hypolipidemic agents with improved anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Theodosis-Nobelos, Panagiotis; Kourti, Malamati; Gavalas, Antonios; Rekka, Eleni A

    2016-02-01

    Novel amides of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), α-lipoic acid and indole-3-acetic acid with thiomorpholine were synthesised by a simple method and at high yields (60-92%). All the NSAID derivatives highly decreased lipidemic indices in the plasma of Triton treated hyperlipidemic rats. The most potent compound was the indomethacin derivative, which decreased total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol by 73%, 80% and 83%, respectively. They reduced acute inflammation equally or more than most parent acids. Hence, it could be concluded that amides of common NSAIDs with thiomorpholine acquire considerable hypolipidemic potency, while they preserve or augment their anti-inflammatory activity, thus addressing significant risk factors for atherogenesis. PMID:26750253

  5. Low-Dose Tramadol and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Combination Therapy Prevents the Transition to Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To determine whether low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy could prevent the transition of acute low back pain to chronic low back pain. Overview of Literature Inadequately treated early low back pain transitions to chronic low back pain occur in approximately 30% of affected individuals. The administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is effective for treatment of low back pain in the early stages. However, the treatment of low back pain that is resistant to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is challenging. Methods Patients who presented with acute low back pain at our hospital were considered for inclusion in this study. After the diagnosis of acute low back pain, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration was started. Forty patients with a visual analog scale score of >5 for low back pain 1 month after treatment were finally enrolled. The first 20 patients were included in a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group, and they continued non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy for 1 month. The next 20 patients were included in a combination group, and they received low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy for 1 month. The incidence of adverse events and the improvement in the visual analog scale score at 2 months after the start of treatment were analyzed. Results No adverse events were observed in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group. In the combination group, administration was discontinued in 2 patients (10%) due to adverse events immediately following the start of tramadol administration. At 2 months, the improvement in the visual analog scale score was greater in the combination group than in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group (p<0.001). Conclusions Low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy might decrease the incidence of adverse events and prevent

  6. Best evidence topic report. Rectal or intravenous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in acute renal colic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline; Gnanasegaram, Dhurga; Maloba, Margaret

    2005-09-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are as effective as IV NSAIDs in the management of acute renal colic. Altogether 179 papers were found using the reported search, of which two represent the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. Rectal NSAIDs are an effective form of analgesia for patients with acute renal colic and have fewer side effects compared with intravenous NSAIDs. PMID:16113190

  7. Open access gastroscopy findings are unrelated to the use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J C; Greenaway, J R; Contractor, B R; Idle, N; Bramble, M G

    1997-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether priority should be given to patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or aspirin when selecting which dyspeptic patients to refer for open access gastroscopy. A total of 8156 patients underwent gastroscopy, all of whom had upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients taking NSAIDs or aspirin showed no significant differences in the frequency of ulcer disease when age-matched groups were compared. Although NSAIDs and aspirin are frequently implicated in gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly, patients referred for investigation of dyspepsia show no increase in major endoscopic pathology. PMID:9463986

  8. Induction of cytochrome P-450 BM-3 (CYP 102) by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    English, N; Hughes, V; Wolf, C R

    1996-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium contains a cytochrome P-450 fatty acid mono-oxygenase which is inducible with barbiturate drugs. We have demonstrated that this enzyme system is inducible with peroxisome proliferators. In mammals, peroxisome proliferators also induce mono-oxygenases in the CYP4A gene family. In this paper we demonstrate that the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen, ketoprofen and indomethacin are potent inducers of fatty acid mono-oxygenase activity as well as of P-450BM-3 protein in B. megaterium. The levels of induction of P-450 protein were 11.8-, 3.9- and 3.0-fold respectively. In addition, we demonstrate that these inducing agents interact with a transcriptional repressor, Bm3R1, which leads to its dissociation from its operator sequence. This provides a rational mechanism for the induction process. This is the first report which demonstrates that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can interact directly with a transcription factor to initiate gene expression, and further substantiates the structure-activity relationships that identify inducers of cytochrome P-450BM-3 and compounds that have the potential to act as peroxisome proliferators and induce CYP4A expression in mammals. PMID:8645218

  9. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the increasing the incidence of colonic anastomosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chengdong; Xiong, Yuanchang; Pan, Xin; Guo, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Qian, Shuwen; Xu, Chang; Yu, De-Hua; Liao, Wan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anastomotic leakage is one of serious complications of colorectal surgery. Research is inconsistent about whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs influence the healing of colorectal anastomoses and increase the incidence of anastomotic leakage. Objective: To study the influence of NSAIDs on the healing of rat colonic anastomoses. Design: This was an animal randomized-control trial. This study was approved by the ethical committee of Yangpu Hospital, Tongji University. Intervention: 90 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 15 rats/group. Trail was performed in C (cotrol group) with no drugs, group M with morphine for analgesia, group F with flurbiprofen axeil, group L with lornoxicam, and group P with parecoxib sodium. Main outcome measures: The main outcomes measures were serological indexes including vascular endothelial growth factor, prostaglandin E2, hydroxyproline, and C reactive protein; histological specimens from the anastomotic stoma tissue including the collagen proportion, and hydroxyproline, cycloxygenase-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor content; physical indicators, including stoma fracture pressure, fracture strength and anastomotic leakage. Results: No significant difference was observed among the indices of each group (P > 0.05). A significant difference occurred after operation (P < 0.05), with the data for groups K and M being dramatically higher than those for group F. Limitation: The study was nonblinded. Conclusion: The postoperative usages of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can decrease the strength of anastomotic tissue, and increase the incidence of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26261490

  10. Postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal anastomotic leakage. NSAIDs and anastomotic leakage.

    PubMed

    Klein, Mads

    2012-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most important and one of the most serious complications after colorectal resections with primary anastomosis. Any factors that contribute to increase the risk of AL should be identified and--if possible--eliminated. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used for treating pain after surgical procedures, among these also colorectal resections. The objective of this Ph.d. thesis was to investigate whether the use of NSAIDs in the postoperative period increases the risk of AL, and investigate the effect on pathophysiological mechanisms. In order to achieve this, the following studies were performed. Study I was a retrospective, case-control study in 75 patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection for colorectal cancer. 33 of these patients received the NSAID diclofenac in the postoperative period; the remaining 42 did not receive any NSAID. There were significantly more ALs among the patients receiving diclofenac (7/33 vs. 1/42, p=0.018). In uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses, diclofenac was the only factor associated with increased AL rate. This study functioned as a hypothesis generating study and laid the ground for the subsequent studies. Study II was an experimental, randomized, case-control study in 32 Wistar rats. The rats had a colonic anastomosis performed and were randomized to diclofenac or placebo treatment. After three days, the rats were sacrificed and the anastomoses were harvested. First, the anastomotic strengths were tested by longitudinal; subsequently, the levels of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the anastomotic tissues were measured. There was no difference among the groups with regard to anastomotic strength, but the animals treated with diclofenac had significantly lower COX-2 levels (median (range) 1.30 (0.42-3.31) ng/mg vs. 2.44 (0.88 - 18.94) ng/mg, p<0.001). This study showed that the used dose of diclofenac was sufficient and relevant, but did not show a

  11. Does administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug determine morphological changes in adrenal cortex: ultrastructural studies

    PubMed Central

    Matysiak, Włodzimierz

    2010-01-01

    Rofecoxib (Vioxx© made by Merck Sharp & Dohme, the USA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which belongs to the group of selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenasis-2, i.e., coxibs. Rofecoxib was first registered in the USA, in May 1999. Since then the drug was received by millions of patients. Drugs of this group were expected to exhibit increased therapeutic action. Additionally, there were expectations concerning possibilities of their application, at least as auxiliary drugs, in neoplastic therpy due to intensifying of apoptosis. In connection with the withdrawal of Vioxx© (rofecoxib) from pharmaceutical market, attempts were made to conduct electron-microscopic evaluation of cortical part of the adrenal gland in preparations obtained from animals under influence of the drug. Every morning animals from the experimental group (15 rats) received rofecoxib (suspension in physiological saline)—non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Vioxx©, Merck Sharp and Dohme, the USA), through an intragastric tube in the dose of 1.25 mg during 8 weeks. In the evaluated material, there was found a greater number of secretory vacuoles and large, containing cholesterol and other lipids as well as generated glucocorticoids, lipid drops in cytoplasm containing prominent endoplasmic reticulum. There were also found cells with cytoplasm of smaller density—especially in apical and basal parts of cells. Mitochondria occasionally demonstrated features of delicate swelling. The observed changes, which occurred on cellular level with application of large doses of the drug, result from mobilization of adaptation mechanisms of the organism. PMID:20721677

  12. Effect of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Jessica; O’Connor, J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Nonspecific and COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) function by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase isoenzymes and effectively reduce pain and inflammation attributed to acute or chronic musculoskeletal pathologies. However, use of NSAIDs as an analgesic is thought to negatively contribute to bone healing. This review strived to provide a thorough unbiased analysis of the current research conducted on animals and humans regarding NSAIDs and their effect on bone healing. Specifically, this review discusses the role of animal models, dosing regiments, and outcome parameters when examining discrepancies about NSAIDS and their effects on bone regeneration. The role of COX-2 in bone regeneration needs to be better defined in order to further elucidate the impact of NSAIDs on bone healing.

  13. [Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate, in experimental animals].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Imazu, C; Ishii, K; Yokoyama, Y; Seto, Y; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities of orally administered etofenamate, the diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, were investigated in experimental animals. Against acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice and ultra-violet light-induced erythema in guinea pigs, etofenamate produced a dose related inhibition at doses of 40--320 mg/kg and 5--20 mg/kg, respectively. In rats, felt-pellet-induced granuloma formation and adjuvant-induced arthritis were significantly inhibited by repeated administration of etofenamate at doses of 20 mg/kg/day for 5 days and 40 mg/kg/day for 21 days, respectively. Etofenamate showed an inhibitory activity on the squeak response caused by flexing and extending the silver nitrate-induced arthritic joint in rats; and it produced a dose related anti-writhing activity at doses of 50--300 mg/kg and 10--80 mg/kg in mice and rats, respectively, in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Etofenamate showed a significant anti-pyretic activity at doses of 0.2 mg/kg or more. These potencies of etofenamate were 0.5 to 1.6 times those of flufenamic acid. In particular, the anti-erythema, anti-arthritis, and anti-pyretic activities of etofenamate were approximately equivalent to or superior to those of flufenamic acid. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate given orally, like other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities in experimental animals. PMID:6983482

  14. Expression of pleiotrophin, an important regulator of cell migration, is inhibited in intestinal epithelial cells by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used drugs for the suppression of inflammation and pain. However, the analgesic properties of NSAIDs are also associated with significant negative side effects, most notably in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Increasingly, evi...

  15. Enhanced Loading and Release of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs from Silica-Based Nanoparticle Carriers.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Mostafa; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Sadegh; Khodaverdi, Elham; Hadizadeh, Farzin; Omid Malayeri, Sina

    2016-09-01

    Silica nanoparticles can be potentially considered the carriers of controlled drug systems. In this research, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were used. Diclofenac sodium and piroxicam were loaded on the considered nanosilica using solvent evaporation method. To prove drug encapsulation on the nanosilica and its rate, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and BET were used, and after proving the existence of the drug in the nanosilica matrix and determining the amount of loading, dissolution test was performed in an environment similar to that of stomach and intestine in terms of pH. Drug loading percentage showed that over 90% of drugs were loaded on nanosilica. Dissolution tests in stomach pH environment showed the control samples (drug without SBA-15) released considerable amount of drugs (about 90%) within first 15 min, when it was about 10-20% for the matrixes. Furthermore, release rate of drugs from matrixes has shown slower rate in comparison with control samples. It was indicated nanosilica has the ability of retaining the drugs in acidic pH and prevented their release. Furthermore, the drugs were released in a controlled manner in small intestine, which is the main absorption site. PMID:27062095

  16. Chemopreventive action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the inflammatory pathways in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghanghas, Preety; Jain, Shelly; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, S N

    2016-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are emerging as novel chemopreventive agents against a variety of cancers owing to their capability in blocking the tumor development by cellular proliferation and by promoting apoptosis. Inflammation is principal cause of colon carcinogenesis. A missing link between inflammation and cancer could be the activation of NF-κB, which is a hallmark of inflammatory response, and is commonly detected in malignant tumors. Therefore, targeting pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase enzymes and transcription factors will be profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor growth. In the present study, we have studied the role of various pro-inflammatory enzymes and transcription factors in the development of the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced colorectal cancer and also observed the role of three NSAIDs, viz., Celecoxib, Etoricoxib and Diclofenac. Carcinogenic changes were observed in morphological and histopathological studies, whereas protein regulations of various biomolecules were identified by immunofluorescence analysis. Apoptotic studies was done by TUNEL assay and Hoechst/PI co-staining of the isolated colonocytes. It was found that DMH-treated animals were having an over-expression of pro-inflammatory enzymes, aberrant nuclear localization of activated cell survival transcription factor, NF-κB and suppression of anti-inflammatory transcription factor PPAR-γ, thereby suggesting a marked role of inflammation in the tumor progression. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has significantly reduced the inflammatory potential of the growing neoplasm. PMID:26898448

  17. Muscovite is protective against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Lu, Bin; Fan, Yi-Hong; Zhang, Lu; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Shuo; Meng, Li-Na

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of muscovite in preventing small bowel injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). METHODS: We recruited and screened thirty-two healthy volunteers who were randomly allocated equally into two groups: an NSAID control group, who received 75 mg slow-release diclofenac, twice daily for 14 d; and an NSAID-muscovite group, who received 3 g of muscovite in addition to the 75 mg of slow-release diclofenac, twice daily for 14 d. For gastroprotection, both groups were administered 20 mg/d of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. All eligible subjects underwent video capsule endoscopy (CE) prior to and 14 d after treatment. RESULTS: Thirty subjects (NSAID-muscovite group, n =16; NSAID control group, n =14) finally completed the whole trail. At the baseline CE examination, no statistically significant differences between the two groups have been observed. However, after 14 d of drug treatment, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of subjects with mucosal breaks when comparing the NSAID-muscovite group with the NSAID control group. While 71.4% (10/14) of subjects in the NSAID control group had at least one mucosal break, co-administration of muscovite in the NSAID-muscovite group reduced the rate to 31.3% (5/16) (P = 0.028). Moreover, higher number of mucosal breaks was found in the NSAID control group vs that in the NSAID-muscovite group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Muscovite co-therapy reduced the incidence of small intestinal injury after 14 d of diclofenac administration. PMID:25152605

  18. Intestinal toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with differential cyclooxygenase inhibition selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S; Saini, R Kishore; Sanyal, S Nath

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the gastrointestinal side effects of cycloxygenase (COX) inhibitor with varying selectivity, called the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) viz., non-selective COX-1 & 2 inhibitor--aspirin, prefentially selective COX-2 inhibitor--nimesulide and highly selective COX-2 inhibitor-celecoxib. Treatment with NSAIDs exhibited a decrease in the activity of rat intestinal brush border membrane associated enzymes such as sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase as compared to the control in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The uptake of D-glucose and L-histidine in the everted intestinal sac was found to be decreased. Also the decease of glucose and histidine uptake was found to be dependent on the substrate concentration, temperature and the time interval of incubation. The physical state and composition of brush border membrane was found to be altered as evident in the FTIR spectrum, by appearance of new peaks while disappearance of certain peaks occurred which were characteristics of the control membrane. The changes in wave number as well as peaks height were also noticed. Alterations in protein profile of the membrane were demonstrated using SDS-PAGE analysis where disappearance of few bands and change in the relative intensities of the bands were noticed and correlated with the alterations that have taken place at the molecular level. Histological studies have depicted a marked decrease in the absorption surface area such as the villi height of the intestinal segment. In addition, crypt number also deceased in the treated animals, an indication that such changes also correlate well with the changes in the transport of the end product nutrients. PMID:17970535

  19. Gaultherin, a natural salicylate derivative from Gaultheria yunnanensis: towards a better non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; He, Xiao-Li; Ding, Yi; Du, Guan-Hua

    2006-01-13

    One of the major factors limiting the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is gastrointestinal toxicity. Gaultherin, 2-[(6-O-beta-D-Xylopyranosyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy] benzoic acid methyl ester, a natural salicylate derivative extracted from Gaultheria yunnanensis, has been shown to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and lack gastric ulcerogenic effect compared to aspirin in our primary study. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of gaultherin, which may rely on its active metabolite, and the mechanism responsible for the non-ulcerogenic property. The results showed that gaultherin (200 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the abdominal contractions in the acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of gaultherin was demonstrated in the croton oil-induced ear edema model in mice. The results showed that gaultherin and equimolar dose of aspirin produced comparable inhibitory effects. The study of the metabolism characters of gaultherin in mice and rats indicated that gaultherin could be metabolically converted to salicylate, which produced the pharmacological effects, and provided effective concentrations for an extended period. In vitro metabolism experiment showed that gaultherin was metabolized by beta-glycosidase produced by human intestinal bacteria and esterases in intestine, blood and liver successively to release salicylate finally. The study suggested gaultherin did not cause gastric ulcer for the reason that it released salicylate in intestine slowly, not in stomach and it left the cyclooxygenase-1 unaffected, which was the source of cytoprotective prostaglandins in gastric epithelium. PMID:16375889

  20. Reduction of Breast Cancer Relapses with Perioperative Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: New Findings and a Review

    PubMed Central

    Retsky, Michael; Demicheli, Romano; Hrushesky, William J.M; Forget, Patrice; Kock, Marc De; Gukas, Isaac; Rogers, Rick A; Baum, Michael; Sukhatme, Vikas; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2013-01-01

    To explain a bimodal pattern of hazard of relapse among early stage breast cancer patients identified in multiple databases, we proposed that late relapses result from steady stochastic progressions from single dormant malignant cells to avascular micrometastases and then on to growing deposits. However in order to explain early relapses, we had to postulate that something happens at about the time of surgery to provoke sudden exits from dormant phases to active growth and then to detection. Most relapses in breast cancer are in the early category. Recent data from Forget et al. suggest an unexpected mechanism. They retrospectively studied results from 327 consecutive breast cancer patients comparing various perioperative analgesics and anesthetics in one Belgian hospital and one surgeon. Patients were treated with mastectomy and conventional adjuvant therapy. Relapse hazard updated Sept 2011 are presented. A common Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) analgesic used in surgery produced far superior disease-free survival in the first 5 years after surgery. The expected prominent early relapse events in months 9-18 are reduced 5-fold. If this observation holds up to further scrutiny, it could mean that the simple use of this safe, inexpensive and effective anti-inflammatory agent at surgery might eliminate early relapses. Transient systemic inflammation accompanying surgery could facilitate angiogenesis of dormant micrometastases, proliferation of dormant single cells, and seeding of circulating cancer stem cells (perhaps in part released from bone marrow) resulting in early relapse and could have been effectively blocked by the perioperative anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23992307

  1. [Cardiovascular side effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the light of recent recommendations. Diclofenac is not more dangerous].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Viktor József; Tabák, Gy Ádám; Szabó, Gergely; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Koós, Csaba Géza; Lakatos, Péter

    2015-03-29

    Among their beneficial effects, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may also exert several side effects which depend on the dosage and the type of these medications. The most frequent gastrointestinal side effects usually develop shortly after the beginning of their administration, but others such as cardiovascular interactions (which are present much less frequently than gastrointestinal side effects) can also occur after the beginning of drug administration without a latency period. For a long-term treatment, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are most frequently used in the elderly population where patients typically have high cardiovascular risk and take other medicines, e.g. low dose acetylsalicylic acid that can interact with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; in this aspect diclofenac may cause less side effects. In this review, the authors briefly review cardiovascular side effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the processes which potentially influence them, therapeutic consequences and their interaction with acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:25796279

  2. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and admission to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation: a record linkage case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. M.; McMahon, A. D.; McGilchrist, M. M.; White, G.; Murray, F. E.; McDevitt, D. G.; MacDonald, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the relation between topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. DESIGN--A case-control study with 1103 patients admitted to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation between January 1990 and December 1992 (cases). Two different control groups were used, with six community controls and with two hospital controls for each case. Previous exposure to topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ulcer healing drugs was assessed. STUDY POPULATION--The population of 319,465 people who were resident in Tayside and were registered with a Tayside general practitioner between January 1989 and October 1994. A record linkage database containing all data on hospital events and dispensed drugs between 1989 and 1992 was used for this population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios of exposure in those admitted to hospital compared with controls. RESULTS--Significant unadjusted associations were detected between all three classes of drug and upper gastrointestinal complications. The significant association detected for topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was no longer evident in analyses which adjusted for the confounding effect of concomitant exposure to oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs (odds ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 2.50 with community controls; 1.06; 0.60 to 1.88 with hospital controls). CONCLUSION--In this study topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were not significantly associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation after adjustment for the confounding effects of concomitant use of oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs. PMID:7613317

  3. Coordination Polymers Derived from Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Cell Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mithun; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2016-01-18

    A new series of Mn(II) coordination polymers, namely, [{Mn(L)(H2 O)2 }⋅2 Nap]∞ (CP1), [{Mn(L)(Ibu)2 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP2), [{Mn(L)(Flr)2 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP3), [{Mn(L)(Ind)2 (H2 O)2 }⋅H2 O]∞ (CP4), [{Mn2 (L)2 (μ-Flu)4 (H2 O)}⋅L]∞ (CP5), [{Mn2 (L)2 (μ-Tol)4 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP6) and [{Mn2 (L)2 (μ-Mef)4 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP7) (Nap=naproxen, Ibu=ibuprofen, Flr=flurbiprofen, Ind=indometacin, Flu=flufenamic acid, Tol=tolfenamic acid and Mef=mefenamic acid) derived from various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the organic linker 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (L) have been synthesized with the aim of being used for cell imaging and drug delivery. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) studies revealed that the NSAID molecules were part of the coordination polymeric network either through coordination to the metal center (in the majority of the cases) or through hydrogen bonding. Remarkably, all the Mn(II) coordination polymers were found to be soluble in DMSO, thereby making them particularly suitable for the desired biological applications. Two of the coordination polymers (namely, CP1 and CP3) reported herein, were found to be photoluminescent both in the solid as well as in the solution state. Subsequent experiments (namely, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2 ) assays) established their biocompatibility and anti-inflammatory response. In vitro studies by using a macrophage cell line (i.e., RAW 264.7) revealed that both CP1 and CP3 were excellent cell imaging agents. Finally, biodegradability studies under simulated physiological conditions in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.6 showed that slow and sustained release of the corresponding NSAID was indeed possible from both CP1 and CP3. PMID:26660274

  4. Pharmacology and potential therapeutic applications of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and related nitric oxide-donating drugs

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, J E; Moore, P K

    2002-01-01

    This review examines the biological significance, therapeutic potential and mechanism(s) of action of a range of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAID) and related nitric oxide-releasing donating drugs (NODD). The slow release of nitric oxide (NO) from these compounds leads to subtle changes in the profile of pharmacological activity of the parent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). For example, compared with NSAID, NO-NSAID cause markedly diminished gastrointestinal toxicity and improved anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy. In addition, nitroparacetamol exhibits hepatoprotection as opposed to the hepatotoxic activity of paracetamol. The possibility that NO-NSAID or NODD may be of therapeutic benefit in a wide variety of disease states including pain and inflammation, thrombosis and restenosis, neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, colitis, cancer, urinary incontinence, liver disease, impotence, bronchial asthma and osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:12237248

  5. 2-Hydroxy Arachidonic Acid: A New Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Daniel H.; Fiol-deRoque, Maria A.; Noguera-Salvà, Maria A.; Terés, Silvia; Campana, Federica; Piotto, Stefano; Castro, José A.; Mohaibes, Raheem J.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Busquets, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a family of COX1 and COX2 inhibitors used to reduce the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators. In addition, inflammation often leads to a harmful generation of nitric oxide. Efforts are being done in discovering safer NSAIDs molecules capable of inhibiting the synthesis of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators and nitric oxide to reduce the side effects associated with long term therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings The analogue of arachidonic acid (AA), 2-hydroxy-arachidonic acid (2OAA), was designed to inhibit the activities of COX1 and COX2 and it was predicted to have similar binding energies as AA for the catalytic sites of COX1 and COX2. The interaction of AA and 2OAA with COX1 and COX2 was investigated calculating the free energy of binding and the Fukui function. Toxicity was determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. COX1 and COX2 (PGH2 production) activities were measured in vitro. COX1 and COX2 expression in human macrophage-like U937 cells were carried out by Western blot, immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis. NO production (Griess method) and iNOS (Western blot) were determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. The comparative efficacy of 2OAA, ibuprofen and cortisone in lowering TNF-α serum levels was determined in C57BL6/J mice challenged with LPS. We show that the presence of the –OH group reduces the likelihood of 2OAA being subjected to H* abstraction in COX, without altering significantly the free energy of binding. The 2OAA inhibited COX1 and COX2 activities and the expression of COX2 in human U937 derived macrophages challenged with LPS. In addition, 2OAA inhibited iNOS expression and the production of NO in BV-2 microglial cells. Finally, oral administration of 2OAA decreased the plasma TNF-α levels in vivo. Conclusion/Significance These findings demonstrate the potential of 2OAA as a NSAID. PMID:24015204

  6. Study the antiviral activity of some derivatives of tetracycline and non-steroid anti inflammatory drugs towards dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Rothan, H A; Buckle, M J; Ammar, Y A; Mohammadjavad, P; Shatrah, O; Noorsaadah, A R; Rohana, Y

    2013-12-01

    Various clinical symptoms are caused by dengue virus ranging from mild fever to severe hemorrhagic fever while there is no successful anti-dengue therapeutics available. Among different strategies towards identifying and developing anti-dengue therapeutics, testing anti-dengue properties of known drugs could represent an efficient strategy for which information of its medical approval, toxicity and side effects is readily available. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of some medical compounds towards dengue NS2B-NS3 protease (DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro) as a target to inhibit dengue virus replication. Mefenamic acid, a non-steroid anti inflammatory drug and doxycycline, a derivative antibiotic of tetracycline both showed significant inhibition potential against DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro Ki values 32 ± 2 μM and 55 ± 5 μM respectively. The effective cytotoxic concentrations of 50% (CC50) against Vero cells were evaluated for mefenamic acid (150 ± 5 μM) and doxycycline (125 ± 4 μM). Concentrations lower than CC50 were used to test the inhibition potential of these compounds against DENV2 replication in Vero cells. The results showed significant reduction in viral load after applying mefenamic acid and doxycyline in concentration dependent manner. Mefenamic acid reduced viral RNA at EC50 of 32 ± 4 μM whilst doxycycline EC50 was 40 ± 3 μM. Mefenamic acid showed higher selectivity against dengue virus replication in vitro compared to doxycycline. These findings underline the need for further experimental and clinical studies on these drugs utilizing its anti-dengue and anti-inflammatory activities to attenuate the clinical symptoms of dengue infection. PMID:24522138

  7. Sunlight-driven photocatalytic degradation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug based on TiO₂ quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Umar, Ahmad; Kansal, Sushil Kumar

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the facile synthesis, characterization and solar-light driven photocatalytic degradation of TiO2 quantum dots (QDs). The TiO2 QDs were synthesized by a facile ultrasonic-assisted hydrothermal process and characterized in terms of their structural, morphological, optical and photocatalytic properties. The detailed studies confirmed that the prepared QDs are well-crystalline, grown in high density and exhibiting good optical properties. Further, the prepared QDs were efficiently used as effective photocatalyst for the sun-light driven photocatalytic degradation of ketorolac tromethamine, a well-known non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). To optimize the photocatalytic degradation conditions, various dose-dependent, pH-dependent, and initial drug-concentration dependent experiments were performed. The detailed solar-light driven photocatalytic experiments revealed that ∼99% photodegradation of ketorolac tromethamine drug solution (10 mg L(-1)) was observed with optimized amount of TiO2 QDs and pH (0.5 g L(-1) and 4.4, respectively) under solar-light irradiations. The observed results demonstrate that simply synthesized TiO2 QDs can efficiently be used for the solar-light driven photocatalytic degradation of harmful drugs and chemicals. PMID:26301837

  8. An in vitro biomarker approach for the evaluation of the ecotoxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea; Cogni, Daniele; Riva, Consuelo; Provini, Alfredo

    2009-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently detected pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments. They are the sixth most sold drugs worldwide and are usually found in significant quantities in municipal effluents. The aim of this study was to assess a first screening evaluation of the cytogenotoxicity of three common NSAIDs (diclofenac, ibuprofen and paracetamol) using an in vitro biomarker approach on the haemocytes of the freshwater bivalve zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Genotoxicity was evaluated by SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis) and DNA diffusion assay while cytotoxicity was evaluated by neutral red retention assay (NRRA). The exposure of the haemocytes to increasing concentrations of the three drugs, chosen based on the results of a viability test, revealed high cytogenotoxic potential and allowed the creation of the first toxicity scale for zebra mussel haemocytes (paracetamol

  9. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protect against chondrocyte apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, P; Rachita, C; Aisen, P S; Pasinetti, G M

    2001-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the degradation of cartilage in osteoarthritis is characterized by chondrocyte apoptosis, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved or potential protective measures. In the present study, we used an immortalized chondrocyte cell line to explore the mechanisms of apoptotic chondrocyte cell death. We found that staurosporine-mediated chondrocyte death depended on the concentration and time of incubation, and coincided with increased Bax:Bcl-X mRNA expression, cytochrome C release, and activation of caspase-3. Pre-treatment of the cultures with nimesulide, a preferential cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, or with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, protected the chondrocytes against the staurosporine-mediated nuclear damage and cell death in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-12) to 10(-6) M). Cell protection coincided with inhibition of the staurosporine-mediated induction of caspase-3 activation. Notably, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 (10(-6) M, 24 hr pre-treatment) did not protect the cells against staurosporine-mediated apoptotic death. The data suggest that nimesulide and ibuprofen, in addition to their anti-inflammatory and analgesic benefits, may also have a protective effect in osteoarthritis through the inhibition of apoptosis in chondrocytes. PMID:11296547

  10. Treatment of acute soft tissue trauma with a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (biphenylacetic acid 3% gel).

    PubMed

    Lee, E H; Lee, P Y; Ngai, A T; Chiu, E H

    1991-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be effective in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries. However, taken orally, NSAIDs have a definite incidence of gastro-intestinal toxicity. Since acute soft tissue trauma is normally localised, use of a topical NSAID may eliminate this undesirable side-effect. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a topical NSAID, biphenylacetic acid 3% gel (Traxam) in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Thirty-two patients (22 males and 10 females) with acute soft tissue trauma were enrolled at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, National University Hospital, Singapore from 7 June 1988 to 28 March 1989. Each patient was treated for a period of one week with bipenylacetic acid 3% gel (Traxam), 60 mg three times a day. Statistically significant improvement was found in pain, swelling and functional impairment in all patients assessed at day 3 and day 7 after the injury. The speed of recovery was enhanced. The medication was found to be well tolerated and safe. PMID:1776001

  11. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, prevents indometacin-induced gastric damage via inhibition of neutrophil functions.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Yoshiro; Okamoto, Masayuki; Yokochi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyachi, Atsushi; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2003-02-01

    Nabumetone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works as a prodrug and is extensively metabolized to an active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA). It is well known that neutrophil infiltration and activation are critical in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric injury, and nabumetone shows less incidence of gastrointestinal irritancy. We examined the effects of nabumetone on neutrophil activation and on indometacin-induced gastric damage. In the indometacin-induced gastric mucosal injury, rats were treated with indometacin and then nabumetone or 6MNA was orally administered. Nabumetone prevented gastric damage accompanied by the reduction of neutrophil infiltration into gastric mucosa, but such an effect was not observed with 6MNA. Nabumetone reduced the formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils to 30% of the control level in-vitro, but 6MNA did not. In addition, nabumetone prevented the fMLP-induced migration of neutrophils. Nabumetone did not inhibit O2- generation in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. These results suggest that nabumetone prevents gastric damage induced by the active metabolite, 6MNA, via the suppression of neutrophil activation in gastric mucosa. PMID:12635655

  12. Counter-flow electrokinetic supercharging for the determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water samples.

    PubMed

    Dawod, Mohamed; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Haddad, Paul R

    2009-04-10

    Electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) has been used in the last few years as a powerful tool for separation and on-line preconcentration of different types of analytes. We have developed a valuable modification for EKS system, namely counter-flow EKS (CF-EKS) and applied it for the separation and on-line preconcentration of seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water samples. In CF-EKS, a hydrodynamic counter-flow is applied during electrokinetic injection of the analytes within the EKS system. This counter-flow minimises the introduction of the sample matrix into the capillary, allowing longer injections to be performed. Careful choice of the optimum counter-flow as well as the optimum injection voltage allowed the sensitivity to be enhanced by 11,800-fold, giving limits of detection (LODs) of 10.7-47.0 ng/L for the selected NSAIDs. The developed method was validated and then applied for the determination of the studied NSAIDs in drinking water as well as wastewater samples from Hobart city. PMID:19251261

  13. Exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy and risk of miscarriage: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Kun; Liu, Liyan; Odouli, Roxana

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether prenatal use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with increased risk of miscarriage. Design Population based cohort study. Prenatal use of NSAIDs, aspirin, and paracetamol (acetaminophen) ascertained by in-person interview. Setting Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, a healthcare delivery system, in the San Francisco area of the United States. Participants 1055 pregnant women recruited and interviewed immediately after their positive pregnancy test. Median gestational age at entry to the study was 40 days. Main outcome measures Pregnancy outcomes up to 20 weeks of gestation. Results 53 women (5%) reported prenatal NSAID use around conception or during pregnancy. After adjustment for potential confounders, prenatal NSAID use was associated with an 80% increased risk of miscarriage (adjusted hazard ratio 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.0 to 3.2)). The association was stronger if the initial NSAID use was around the time of conception or if NSAID use lasted more than a week. Prenatal aspirin use was similarly associated with an increased risk of miscarriage. However, prenatal use of paracetamol, pharmacologically different from NSAIDs and aspirin, was not associated with increased risk of miscarriage regardless of timing and duration of use. Conclusion Prenatal use of NSAIDs and aspirin increased the risk of miscarriage. These findings need confirmation in studies designed specifically to examine the apparent association. PMID:12919986

  14. Comprehensive evaluation of imidazole-based polymers for the enrichment of selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Schemeth, Dieter; Kappacher, Christoph; Rainer, Matthias; Thalinger, Ramona; Bonn, Günther K

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the comparison of four manufactured imidazole-based copolymers and two commercially available hydrophilic sorbents for the solid phase extraction (SPE) of selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Different hydrophilic copolymers were obtained by a suspension polymerization using a styrene-based and a methacrylate-based cross-linker and by single step modifications for enhancing the ion-exchange character. SPE protocols were optimized for both non-modified and modified sorbents and applied for the enrichment of selected NSAID using all six copolymers. Comparison and evaluation were carried out by determining recovery rates of standard mixtures at different concentration levels ranging from 0.5mgL(-1) to 10mgL(-1) and by the enrichment of spiked human urine at two concentration levels. In order to gain insight into the complexity of the biological sample and its reduction after solid phase extraction, UHPLC-MS analysis and following database comparison was performed for the three mixed-mode strong anion-exchange sorbents. In order to prove the applicability of the modified imidazole-based polymers for the enrichment of NSAID in surface water, river water or groundwater, solid phase extraction was performed with 10ppb of NSAID which resulted into enhanced enrichment by a hundredfold. PMID:27130106

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of head and neck cancer: A case-control analysis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Claudia; Wilson, Jessica Claire; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2015-11-15

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) have been associated with a reduced risk for certain cancers. We explored the association between use of NSAIDs and the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC). We conducted a case-control analysis in the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) among people below the age of 90 years with incident HNC between 1995 and 2013. Six controls per case were matched on age, sex, calendar time, general practice, and number of years of active history in the CPRD prior to the HNC diagnosis. Other potential confounders including comorbidities and comedication were also evaluated, and we adjusted our final analyses for BMI, smoking and alcohol consumption. Our analyses included 2,745 HNC cases and 16,470 controls. Aspirin or NSAID use overall did not significantly change the HNC risk. However, patients with six or more prescriptions for ibuprofen were at a statistically significantly reduced risk for HNC (adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.37-0.94). The HNC risk tended to decrease with increasing cumulative exposure to ibuprofen, and to be more pronounced for cancer of the larynx. To conclude, in this large population-based observational study we found a decreased risk for HNC associated with regular use of ibuprofen. PMID:25974157

  16. Economic evaluation of gastric ulcer prophylaxis in patients with arthritis receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Knill-Jones, R.; Drummond, M.; Kohli, H.; Davies, L.

    1990-01-01

    This study assesses the economic benefits of misoprostol in the prophylaxis of gastric ulcers larger than 0.3 cm in patients with osteoarthritis receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Independent epidemiological data were obtained for patients in Scotland and the West Midlands. Co-diagnosis of arthritis with gastric ulcer recorded in the routine data was substantially less (4% Scotland, 10% West Midlands) than the 21% found at case review. These data were combined with cost and patient management data in a decision analysis model to explore whether prophylactic use of misoprostol altered substantially the average cost of managing gastric ulcer. Using conservative assumptions and a daily dose of 400 micrograms, cost savings per patient to the National Health Service of 5-8 pounds over a 3-month period are expected in the groups of patients studied, while at the 800 micrograms dose there would be a net cost of 23-25 pounds. Sensitivity analysis showed that under many assumptions misoprostol is expected to be cost saving or cost neutral. PMID:2120690

  17. Metronidazole reduces intestinal inflammation and blood loss in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Hayllar, J; Smethurst, P; Price, A; Gumpel, M J

    1992-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of metronidazole on the gastroduodenal mucosa, intestinal permeability, blood loss, and inflammation in patients on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Thirteen patients were studied before and after 2-12 weeks' treatment with metronidazole 800 mg/day, while maintaining an unchanged NSAID intake. Intestinal inflammation, as assessed by the faecal excretion of indium-111 labelled neutrophils, and blood loss, assessed with chromium-51 labelled red cells, were significantly reduced after treatment (mean (SD) 111In excretion 4.7 (4.7)% v 1.5 (1.3)% (N < 1.0%), p < 0.001, 51Cr red cells loss 2.6 (1.6) ml/day v 0.9 (0.5) ml/day (N < 1.0 ml/day), p < 0.01). Intestinal permeability assessed as the 5 hour urinary excretion ratio of 51CrEDTA/L-rhamnose did not change significantly (0.133 (0.046) v 0.154 (0.064), p > 0.1) and there were no significant changes in the endoscopic or microscopic appearances of the gastroduodenal mucosa. These results suggest that the neutrophil is the main damaging effector cell in NSAID induced enteropathy. The main neutrophil chemo-attractant in this enteropathy may be a metronidazole sensitive microbe. PMID:1427372

  18. Biophysical study of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac with phosphatidylserine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Heinbockel, Lena; Suwalsky, Mario; Garidel, Patrick; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) represent an effective pain treatment option and therefore one of the most sold therapeutic agents worldwide. The study of the molecular interactions responsible for their physiological activity, but also for their side effects, is therefore important. This report presents data on the interaction of the most consumed NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac) with one main phospholipid in eukaryotic cells, dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS). The applied techniques are Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), with which in transmission the gel to liquid crystalline phase transition of the acyl chains in the absence and presence of the NSAID are monitored, supplemented by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data on the phase transition. FTIR in reflection (ATR, attenuated total reflectance) is applied to record the dependence of the interactions of the NSAID with particular functional groups observed in the DMPS spectrum such as the ester carbonyl and phosphate vibrational bands. With Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) a possible intercalation of the NSAID into the DMPS liposomes and with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) the thermodynamics of the interaction are monitored. The data show that the NSAID react in a particular way with this lipid, but in some parameters the three NSAID clearly differ, with which now a clear picture of the interaction processes is possible. PMID:27316371

  19. Treatment of persistent mating-induced endometritis in mares with the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug vedaprofen.

    PubMed

    Rojer, H; Aurich, C

    2010-12-01

    Recently, successful treatment of mares with a history of persistent mating-induced endometritis (PMIE) with dexamethasone has been reported. As systemic treatment of horses with glucocorticoids should be handled with caution, we tested the hypothesis that treatment with the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) vedaprofen, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, may have comparative, positive effects on fertility. Barren mares with a history of repeated PMIE were treated with vedaprofen (n = 8; initially 2 mg/kg bodyweight followed by 1 mg/kg orally twice daily) from 1 day before the first insemination to 1 day after ovulation or left untreated (n = 9). All mares received oxytocin (20 I.E. s.c.) thrice daily. Uterine swabs were collected for bacteriology and cytology. The day after ovulation, fluid accumulation was detected in three control mares and four treated mares (n.s.). The percentage of neutrophils in uterine cytology was significantly increased in comparison to the day before ovulation irrespective of treatment. Pregnancy was confirmed in two of nine mares in the control group and seven of eight mares in the treatment group (p < 0.05). NSAIDs may positively affect fertility in mares with a history of PMIE. PMID:20074320

  20. Removal of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and ketoprofen from water by emulsion liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Dâas, Attef; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the removal of the worldwide non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen (IBP) and ketoprofen (KTP) by emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was carried out. An ELM system is made up of hexane as diluent, Span 80 as the surfactant and sodium carbonate as the inner aqueous solution. Effect of experimental conditions that affect the extraction of IBP such as surfactant concentration, emulsification time, sulfuric acid concentration in external phase, acid type in external phase, internal phase concentration, type of internal phase, stirring speed, volume ratio of internal phase to membrane phase, treatment ratio, IBP initial concentration, diluent type and salt was investigated. The obtained results showed that by appropriate selection of the operational parameters, it was possible to extract nearly all of IBP molecules from the feed solution even in the presence of high concentration of salt. Under optimum operating conditions, the efficiencies of IBP removal from distilled water (99.3 %), natural mineral water (97.3 %) and sea water (94.0 %) were comparable, which shows that the ELM treatment process represents a very interesting advanced separation process for the removal of IBP from complex matrices such as natural and sea waters. Under the optimized experimental conditions, approximately 97.4 % KTP was removed in less than 20 min of contact time. PMID:24037298

  1. [Induction of NAG-1 gene expression in colon cancer cells by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhui; Ouyang, Qin; Tang, Chengwei; Liu, Rui; Huang, Minghui

    2007-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and NAG-1 gene expression effected by Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) on colon cancer cell lines in vitro. The proliferation of colon cancer cells were determined by MTT assay and COX-2 protein expression were detected by Western blot. Total RNA was isolated from three kinds of colon cancer cell lines; the expressions of NAG-1 mRNA in the cells treated with or without NSAIDs were assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Celecoxib, meloxicam and aspirin were able to inhibit the growth of HT-29, SW480 and LS174-T cells in dose-dependent manner. COX-2 protein expressed in HT-29 and LS174-T, but not in SW480 cells. All of colon cancer cells expressed NAG-1 gene and the level of LS174-T was lower than that of the other two cell lines. NAG-1 expression was increased by treatment with some NSAIDs in all three kinds of colon cancer cells. NSAIDs were able to potentially inhibit the growth of colon cell lines. Induction of NAG-1 gene expression by NSAID was not consistent with COX-2 expression. PMID:17899765

  2. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Siril, Prem Felix; Javid, Farideh

    2016-12-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. PMID:27612834

  3. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: The Role of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Usta, M; Urganci, N

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori infection in the aetiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in children. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight patients (82 girls, 106 boys; mean age 8.43 ± 5.24 years), admitted to the paediatric gastroenterology unit because of UGIB and who underwent endoscopic examination, were studied from their medical records, retrospectively. Results: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding was observed in 188 (8.29%) of 2266 patients. The mucosal causes related to the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum were found at the rate of 37%, 58% and 24.5%, respectively with endoscopic examination. The location of bleeding could not be determined in 14.4% of the patients. History of drug intake before admitting to hospital was present in 40 patients (21.3%). When we examined these forty patients, 35% were on acetylsalicylic acid, 47.5% were on ibuprofen and 17.5% were on NSAIDs. Ibuprofen versus acetylsalicylic acid usage was found to be highly significant (p < 0.05) for UGIB. Helicobacter pylori was found in 20.7% of the patients. The relationship between H pylori and UGIB was not found statistically significant (p > 0.05). The relationship between drug intake and presence of H pylori infection was not found significant in our patients (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Ibuprofen and acetylsalicyclic acid intake were found significant in the aetiology of UGIB in children. There was no significant connection with Helicobacter pylori infection in children with UGIB. We did not find a significant relationship with drug intake and H pylori infection. PMID:26360683

  4. The Prescription Pattern of Acetaminophen and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Tae; Heo, Jeong; Woo, Hyun Young; Lim, Won; An, Dae Seong; Han, Jun Hee; Cho, Mong

    2016-10-01

    Analgesics, known to be hepatotoxic drugs, are frequently prescribed to patients with liver cirrhosis who are prone to drug-induced liver injury. No guidelines are available regarding the prescription of analgesics in these patients. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the prescription pattern of most frequently used analgesics in patients with cirrhosis. We assessed the prescription pattern of acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with liver cirrhosis registered in Health Insurance Review Assessment Service database between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. A total of 125,505 patients with liver cirrhosis were registered from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Of that group, 50,798 (40.5%) patients claimed reimbursement for at least one prescription for acetaminophen or NSAIDs during the one year follow-up period. Overall, NSAIDs (82.7%) were more prescribed than acetaminophen (64.5%). NSAIDs were more prescribed than acetaminophen even in decompensated cirrhosis compared with compensated cirrhosis (71.5% vs. 68.8%, P value < 0.001). There was a marked difference in prescription preference between acetaminophen and NSAIDs among physicians. Internists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen than NSAIDs compared to other physicians (50.9% vs. 76.2%, P < 0.001). Gastroenterologists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen over NSAIDs compared to other internists (80.9% vs. 51.2%, P < 0.001). Analgesics were prescribed in 40.5% of patients with cirrhosis. NSAIDs were more frequently prescribed although they should be avoided. The prescription pattern of analgesics were different significantly among physicians in patients with liver cirrhosis. The harmful effects of NSAIDs in patients with cirrhosis should be reminded to all physicians prescribing analgesics. PMID:27550489

  5. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cancer Death in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Veitonmäki, Thea; Murtola, Teemu J.; Talala, Kirsi; Taari, Kimmo; Tammela, Teuvo; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially aspirin, have been associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality. We examined overall cancer mortality and mortality from specific cancer sites among the 80,144 men in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial. Information on prescription drug use was acquired from the national drug reimbursement database. Over-the-counter use information was gathered by a questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by prescription and over-the-counter NSAID use for overall and specific cancer deaths were calculated using Cox regression. During the median follow-up time of 15 years, 7,008 men died from cancer. Men with prescription NSAID use had elevated cancer mortality (HR 2.02 95% CI 1.91–2.15) compared to non-users. The mortality risk was increased for lung, colorectal and pancreas cancer mortality (HR 2.68, 95%CI 2.40–2.99, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.57–2.32 and HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.58–2.37, respectively). The increased risk remained in competing risks regression (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05–1.18). When the usage during the last three years of follow-up was excluded, the effect was reversed (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65–0.73). Cancer mortality was not decreased for prescription or over-the-counter aspirin use. However, in the competing risk regression analysis combined prescription and over-the-counter aspirin use was associated with decreased overall cancer mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70–0.82). Cancer mortality was increased for NSAID users. However, the risk disappeared when the last 3 years were excluded. PMID:27100876

  6. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cancer Death in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Veitonmäki, Thea; Murtola, Teemu J; Talala, Kirsi; Taari, Kimmo; Tammela, Teuvo; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially aspirin, have been associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality. We examined overall cancer mortality and mortality from specific cancer sites among the 80,144 men in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial. Information on prescription drug use was acquired from the national drug reimbursement database. Over-the-counter use information was gathered by a questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by prescription and over-the-counter NSAID use for overall and specific cancer deaths were calculated using Cox regression. During the median follow-up time of 15 years, 7,008 men died from cancer. Men with prescription NSAID use had elevated cancer mortality (HR 2.02 95% CI 1.91-2.15) compared to non-users. The mortality risk was increased for lung, colorectal and pancreas cancer mortality (HR 2.68, 95%CI 2.40-2.99, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.57-2.32 and HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.58-2.37, respectively). The increased risk remained in competing risks regression (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18). When the usage during the last three years of follow-up was excluded, the effect was reversed (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.73). Cancer mortality was not decreased for prescription or over-the-counter aspirin use. However, in the competing risk regression analysis combined prescription and over-the-counter aspirin use was associated with decreased overall cancer mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70-0.82). Cancer mortality was increased for NSAID users. However, the risk disappeared when the last 3 years were excluded. PMID:27100876

  7. The Diamine Oxidase Gene Is Associated with Hypersensitivity Response to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Ayuso, Pedro; Cornejo-García, José A.; Blanca, Miguel; Torres, María J.; Doña, Inmaculada; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Canto, Gabriela; Rondon, Carmen; Campo, Paloma; Laguna, José J.; Fernández, Javier; Martínez, Carmen; García-Martín, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the drugs most frequently involved in hypersensitivity drug reactions. Histamine is released in the allergic response to NSAIDs and is responsible for some of the clinical symptoms. The aim of this study is to analyze clinical association of functional polymorphisms in the genes coding for enzymes involved in histamine homeostasis with hypersensitivity response to NSAIDs. We studied a cohort of 442 unrelated Caucasian patients with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs. Patients who experienced three or more episodes with two or more different NSAIDs were included. If this requirement was not met diagnosis was established by challenge. A total of 414 healthy unrelated controls ethnically matched with patients and from the same geographic area were recruited. Analyses of the SNPs rs17740607, rs2073440, rs1801105, rs2052129, rs10156191, rs1049742 and rs1049793 in the HDC, HNMT and DAO genes were carried out by means of TaqMan assays. The detrimental DAO 16 Met allele (rs10156191), which causes decreased metabolic capacity, is overrepresented among patients with crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with an OR  = 1.7 (95% CI  = 1.3–2.1; Pc  = 0.0003) with a gene-dose effect (P = 0.0001). The association was replicated in two populations from different geographic areas (Pc  = 0.008 and Pc  = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions and implications The DAO polymorphism rs10156191 which causes impaired metabolism of circulating histamine is associated with the clinical response in crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs and could be used as a biomarker of response. PMID:23152756

  8. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician’s understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  9. Effect of different antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the growth of Lactobacillus casei Shirota.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Serna, Alaíde; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) could cause inhibition of the growth of Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) or whether this microorganism is able to use some of them as the sole carbon source, considering that the simultaneous consumption of NSAIDs and a dairy drink fermented with LcS could help to prevent the appearance or improve the healing of gastric ulcers. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), sodium acetylsalicylate (SAS), acetaminophen, sodium naproxen, and sodium ibuprofen were added as the sole carbon source to a basal medium and tested for biodegradation by LcS. The same NSAIDs were added in different concentrations to disks and plated on MRS Agar to test the possible inhibitory effect of these compounds on LcS. Also, the resistance of LcS to 12 different antibiotics was studied on MRS agar. None of the NSAIDs tested could be used by LcS as the sole carbon source at the assayed concentrations. In the case of the disk diffusion method, sodium naproxen showed inhibition zones for the 500-μg disks and sodium ibuprofen was inhibitory for the 250- and 500-μg disks. However, when the macrobroth dilution method was used, the growth of LcS was inhibited by ASA, SAS, acetaminophen, and sodium ibuprofen. This strain showed resistance to the antibiotics sulfamethoxazole with trimethoprim, pefloxacin, and gentamicin. This is the first study on the effect of NSAIDs on probiotic bacteria. The results of the biodegradation test indicate that the simultaneous consumption of NSAIDs and a dairy beverage with LcS is not likely to change the bioavailability of the drugs. PMID:21104082

  10. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician's understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  11. Are altered pharmacokinetics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, H A; Long, A; Nicholson, E; Ward, A; Keir, D

    1998-01-01

    Aims We hypothesised that pharmacokinetic factors might go some way to explaining the risk of major gastrointestinal haemorrhage with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with bleeders exhibiting a reduced clearance of NSAIDs compared with non-bleeders and set out to investigate this. Methods Fifty patients presenting to hospital with acute gastrointestinal bleeding while taking piroxicam, indomethacin, diclofenac or naproxen and age, sex, musculoskeletal disease and drug matched community dwelling controls, up to two for each index case, who had not bled were recruited. Clinical details including duration of therapy were recorded. Bleeders discontinued the implicated NSAID at presentation, controls at least five half-lives before the study. Bleeders were contacted by letter 1 month after discharge and invited to take part and were studied after a median delay of 5 months. Subjects received an oral dose of their respective NSAID and venous blood was sampled, over a period determined by the half-life of the NSAID. Plasma concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results The median length of treatment for the index patients was 1 year (range 2 weeks—28 years) and for the control patients 2 years (1 month—25 years), P<0.0005. There were no significant differences in peak plasma concentration, time to peak plasma concentration or area under the plasma concentration-time curve between bleeders or controls for any of the NSAIDs studied, apart from piroxicam Cmax being lower in bleeders at 2.07 mg l−1 than in controls at 3.21 mg l−1, mean difference (95% CI) −1.14 (−1.83–−0.48), P<0.005. Conclusions The data failed to support the hypothesis that reduced clearance of NSAIDs, which results in higher plasma concentrations, is a risk factor for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. PMID:9578191

  12. Small Mismatches in Fatty Acyl Tail Lengths Can Effect Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Induced Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Anupa; Sarkar, Munna

    2016-06-01

    Biological membranes are made up of a variety of lipids with diverse physicochemical properties. The lipid composition modulates different lipidic parameters, such as hydration, dynamics, lipid packing, curvature strain, etc. Changes in these parameters affect various membrane-mediated processes, such as membrane fusion which is an integral step in many biological processes. Packing defects, which originate either from mismatch in the headgroup region or in the hydrophobic acyl tail region, play a major role in modulating membrane dynamics. In this study, we demonstrate how even a small mismatch in the fatty acyl chain length, achieved by incorporation of low concentrations (up to 30 mol %) of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs), alters several lipidic parameters like packing, dynamics, and headgroup hydration. This in turn affects non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced membrane fusion. Dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, second-derivative absorption spectrophotometry, and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence have been used to elucidate the effect of small mismatch in the tails in DMPC/DPPC mixed vesicles and how it modulates membrane fusion induced by the oxicam NSAIDs, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx). Fusion kinetics was monitored using fluorescence based fusion assays. At low DPPC concentration of 10 mol %, additional fluidization promotes lipid mixing to some extent for Mx, but at higher mol % of DPPC, subsequent increase in rigidity of membrane interior along with increase in headgroup hydration, synergistically inhibits fusion to various extents for the three different drugs, Mx, Px, and Tx. PMID:27153337

  13. Selection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and treatment regimen for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Plahovinsak, Jennifer L; Buccellato, Matthew A; Reid, Frances M; Graham, John S

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in sulfur mustard (HD) injury and HD pathogenesis, suggesting that anti-inflammatory treatments applied as soon as possible following HD injury may reduce tissue damage and accelerate healing. This study used the HD dermal weanling swine model to investigate the efficacy of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin and diclofenac, when applied in combination with the steroid, clobetasol. The therapeutic regimen was also investigated with respect to initiation of treatment post-exposure, frequency and duration. Yorkshire-cross pigs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, corresponding to all combinations of treatment (capsaicin with clobetasol or diclofenac with clobetasol), onset time (1, 2 or 4 h post-exposure), treatment duration (1, 3 or 5 days) and frequency of applications (2, 3 or 4 per day). For each animal, two sites on the ventral abdomen were exposed to 400 μL of neat HD for 8 min to achieve superficial dermal (SD) lesions and two sites were exposed to 400 μL neat HD for 30 min to achieve deep dermal (DD) lesions. Each treatment regimen was tested against a SD and a DD injury. Untreated SD and DD lesion sites served as within-animal controls. Assessments, up to one week post-challenge, included digital photographs, clinical assessments (lesion size measurements and modified Draize scoring), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), reflectance colorimetry and histopathologic evaluations that included an estimate for depth of injury and wound healing parameters. Diclofenac plus clobetasol treatment resulted in significant reductions in lesion contracture and modified Draize scores, increased barrier function (decreased TEWL), and increased healing as determined by histopathology for both SD and DD injury when compared with untreated sites and sites treated with capsaicin plus clobetasol. An increased duration of treatment from 1 to 5 days was most commonly associated with decreased

  14. Distal bowel selectivity in the chemoprevention of experimental colon carcinogenesis by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Roy, H K; Karolski, W J; Ratashak, A

    2001-05-15

    Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chemoprevention of colon cancer has been hindered by their potential gastro-intestinal toxicity. Nabumetone, which is approximately 10 to 36 times safer than conventional NSAIDs, was evaluated in 2 models of experimental colon carcinogenesis. In azoxymethane (AOM)-treated Fisher 344 rats, nabumetone caused dose-dependent inhibition of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), with 750 and 1,500 ppm resulting in 15% and 37% reductions, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, complex ACF were reduced by 48% in the latter group. MIN mice studies confirmed the chemopreventive efficacy of nabumetone, with 900 ppm suppressing approximately half of the intestinal tumors. Interestingly, inhibition of intermediate biomarkers in both models was markedly greater in the distal than the proximal bowel. To mechanistically evaluate this regional selectivity, we assessed cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the uninvolved mucosa and demonstrated a 3- to 4-fold excess in the distal relative to the proximal bowel in both MIN mice and AOM-treated rats. We then investigated another putative NSAID target, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta) and demonstrated up-regulation during AOM-induced colonic tumorigenesis. Furthermore, in pre-neoplastic mucosa, there was a 3-fold excess of PPAR-delta in the distal colon. We demonstrate that nabumetone is an effective protective agent in both experimental models of colon carcinogenesis. The striking distal predilection of nabumetone may be, at least partially, explained by distal bowel over-expression of COX-2 and PPAR-delta. PMID:11304699

  15. Cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: investigation using human peripheral monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Nishida, S; Kitasato, H; Sakata, N; Kawai, S

    2001-12-01

    Since the pharmacological profiles of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might depend on their differing selectivity for cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and 2 (COX-2), we developed a new screening method using human peripheral monocytes. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were separated, and the cells were incubated with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Monocytes without LPS stimulation exclusively expressed COX-1 on Western blotting analysis, whereas LPS stimulation induced COX-2 expression. Unstimulated monocytes (COX-1) and LPS-stimulated monocytes (COX-2) were then used to determinethe COX selectivity of various NSAIDs. The respective mean IC50 values for COX-1 and COX-2 IC50 (microM), and the COX-1/COX-2 ratio of each NSAID were as follows: celecoxib, 82, 6.8, 12; diclofenac, 0.076, 0.026, 2.9; etodolac, > 100, 53, > 1.9; ibuprofen, 12, 80, 0.15; indometacin, 0.0090, 0.31, 0.029; meloxicam, 37, 6.1, 6.1; 6-MNA (the active metabolite of nabumetone), 149, 230, 0.65; NS-398, 125, 5.6, 22; piroxicam, 47, 25, 1.9; rofecoxib, > 100, 25, > 4.0; S-2474, > 100, 8.9, > 11; SC-560, 0.0048, 1.4, 0.0034. The percentage inhibition of COX-1 activity at the IC50 of COX-2 also showed a wide variation among these NSAIDs. The bioassay system using human monocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of various NSAIDs on COX-1 and COX-2 may become a clinically useful screening method. PMID:11804398

  16. Electrokinetic supercharging for on-line preconcentration of seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water samples.

    PubMed

    Dawod, Mohamed; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Haddad, Paul R

    2008-05-01

    The development of new sensitive methods for the analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water samples is of great importance. In this work, seven NSAIDs were separated within 9 min using 15 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 9.2) containing 0.1% (w/v) hexadimethrine bromide (HDMB) and 10% (v/v) methanol. Field-amplified sample injection (FASI) was examined and found to improve the detection limits by 200-fold providing detection limits of 0.6-2.0 microg/L, but these are insufficient for the determination of NSAIDs as environmental pollutants in water samples. To improve the sensitivity further, electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) was examined. The optimum EKS method involved hydrodynamic injection leading electrolyte (100 mM NaCl, 30 s, 50 mbar), electrokinetic injection of the sample (200 s, -10 kV) and finally injection of the terminating electrolyte (100 mM 2-(cyclohexylamino) ethanesulphonic acid, CHES, 40s, 50 mbar). With this method, the sensitivity was improved by 2400-fold giving detection limits of 50-180 ng/L. The developed method was validated and then applied to the analysis of wastewater samples from a local sewage treatment plant. The detection limits were found to increase by approximately 10-fold, however, this is still lower than levels previously found in wastewater samples from European and Mediterranean cities. The proposed method has the advantage of simplicity and achieving sensitivity through high-preconcentration power without the use of off-line chromatographic sample cleanup. PMID:18206157

  17. Toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to Gyps vultures: a new threat from ketoprofen

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Vinny; Wolter, Kerri; Cromarty, Duncan; Diekmann, Maria; Duncan, Neil; Meharg, Andrew A.; Taggart, Mark A.; Venter, Leon; Cuthbert, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Three Gyps vulture species are on the brink of extinction in South Asia owing to the veterinary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac. Carcasses of domesticated ungulates are the main food source for Asia's vultures and birds die from kidney failure after consuming diclofenac-contaminated tissues. Here, we report on the safety testing of the NSAID ketoprofen, which was not reported to cause mortality in clinical treatment of scavenging birds and is rapidly eliminated from livestock tissues. Safety testing was undertaken using captive non-releasable Cape griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres) and wild-caught African white-backed vultures (G. africanus), both previously identified as susceptible to diclofenac and suitable surrogates. Ketoprofen doses ranged from 0.5 to 5 mg kg−1 vulture body weight, based upon recommended veterinary guidelines and maximum levels of exposure for wild vultures (estimated as 1.54 mg kg−1). Doses were administered by oral gavage or through feeding tissues from cattle dosed with ketoprofen at 6 mg kg−1 cattle body weight, before slaughter. Mortalities occurred at dose levels of 1.5 and 5 mg kg−1 vulture body weight (within the range recommended for clinical treatment) with the same clinical signs as observed for diclofenac. Surveys of livestock carcasses in India indicate that toxic levels of residual ketoprofen are already present in vulture food supplies. Consequently, we strongly recommend that ketoprofen is not used for veterinary treatment of livestock in Asia and in other regions of the world where vultures access livestock carcasses. The only alternative to diclofenac that should be promoted as safe for vultures is the NSAID meloxicam. PMID:20007163

  18. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase insulin release from beta cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Zhang, N; Ye, B; Ju, W; Orser, B; Fox, J E M; Wheeler, M B; Wang, Q; Lu, W-Y

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) incidentally induce hypoglycemia, which is often seen in diabetic patients receiving sulphonylureas. NSAIDs influence various ion channel activities, thus they may cause hypoglycemia by affecting ion channel functions in insulin secreting beta cells. This study investigated the effects of the NSAID meclofenamic acid (MFA) on the electrical excitability and the secretion of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. Experimental approach: Using patch clamp techniques and insulin secretion assays, the effects of MFA on the membrane potential and transmembrane current of INS-1 cells, and insulin secretion were studied. Key results: Under perforated patch recordings, MFA induced a rapid depolarization in INS-1 cells bathed in low (2.8mM), but not high (28mM) glucose solutions. MFA, as well as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and flufenamic acid (FFA), excited the cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP). In whole cell recordings, KATP conductance consistently appeared when intracellular ATP was diluted. Intracellular glibenclamide prevented the development of KATP activity, whereas intracellular MFA had no effect. At low glibenclamide concentrations, MFA induced additional inhibition of the KATP current. Live cell Ca2+ imaging displayed that MFA elevated intracellular Ca2+ at low glucose concentrations. Furthermore, MFA dose-dependently increased insulin release under low, but not high, glucose conditions. Conclusions and Implications: MFA blocked KATP through an extracellular mechanism and thus increased insulin secretion. As some NSAIDs synergistically inhibit KATP activity together with sulphonylureas, the risk of NSAID-induced hypoglycemia should be considered when glucose-lowering compounds are administered. PMID:17435793

  19. Toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to Gyps vultures: a new threat from ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Vinny; Wolter, Kerri; Cromarty, Duncan; Diekmann, Maria; Duncan, Neil; Meharg, Andrew A; Taggart, Mark A; Venter, Leon; Cuthbert, Richard

    2010-06-23

    Three Gyps vulture species are on the brink of extinction in South Asia owing to the veterinary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac. Carcasses of domesticated ungulates are the main food source for Asia's vultures and birds die from kidney failure after consuming diclofenac-contaminated tissues. Here, we report on the safety testing of the NSAID ketoprofen, which was not reported to cause mortality in clinical treatment of scavenging birds and is rapidly eliminated from livestock tissues. Safety testing was undertaken using captive non-releasable Cape griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres) and wild-caught African white-backed vultures (G. africanus), both previously identified as susceptible to diclofenac and suitable surrogates. Ketoprofen doses ranged from 0.5 to 5 mg kg(-1) vulture body weight, based upon recommended veterinary guidelines and maximum levels of exposure for wild vultures (estimated as 1.54 mg kg(-1)). Doses were administered by oral gavage or through feeding tissues from cattle dosed with ketoprofen at 6 mg kg(-1) cattle body weight, before slaughter. Mortalities occurred at dose levels of 1.5 and 5 mg kg(-1) vulture body weight (within the range recommended for clinical treatment) with the same clinical signs as observed for diclofenac. Surveys of livestock carcasses in India indicate that toxic levels of residual ketoprofen are already present in vulture food supplies. Consequently, we strongly recommend that ketoprofen is not used for veterinary treatment of livestock in Asia and in other regions of the world where vultures access livestock carcasses. The only alternative to diclofenac that should be promoted as safe for vultures is the NSAID meloxicam. PMID:20007163

  20. Incidence of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shigenao; Inaba, Tomoki; Mizuno, Motowo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kuzume, Toshiaki; Yokota, Hitomi; Fukuda, Yasuyo; Takeda, Kou; Nagano, Hiroshi; Wato, Masaki; Kawai, Kozo

    2008-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a major adverse event of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and co-administration of proton pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists has been established as a means of preventing such an effect. However, the incidence of bleeding associated with NSAID-induced ulcers under conditions where such strong anti-acid agents are used for prevention has yet to be clarified. We aimed to determine the annual incidence of serious upper gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding among Japanese patients in whom NSAIDs were used in our hospital. Before commencing the study, we recommended to all the physicians in our hospital the best method for caring for NSAID users, focusing on the concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors or H2 receptor antagonists. We conducted a cohort study involving 17,270 patients for whom NSAIDs had been newly prescribed. Bleeding from gastric ulcers was observed in 8 of the 17,270 patients using NSAIDs (0.05%). The pooled incidence rate for bleeding was calculated as 2.65 (95% confidence interval, 2.56-2.74) and 1.29 (1.27-1.31) per 1,000 patient years for low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID users, respectively. None of the bleeding ulcer patients required blood transfusion or were in serious condition. In conclusion, gastric ulcer bleeding occurred in low-dose aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID users, but its incidence was low and outcomes were not serious when adequate preventive measures were taken. PMID:18323869

  1. Efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Koes, B.; Scholten, R.; Mens, J.; Bouter, L.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE—To assess the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for low back pain.
DATA SOURCES—Computer aided search of published randomised clinical trials and assessment of the methods of the studies.
STUDY SELECTION—26 randomised clinical trials evaluating NSAIDs for low back pain were identified.
DATA EXTRACTION—Score for quality (maximum = 100 points) of the methods based on four categories: study population; interventions; effect measurement; data presentation and analysis. Determination of success rate per study group and evaluation of different contrasts. Statistical pooling of placebo controlled trials in similar patient groups and using similar outcome measures.
RESULTS—The methods scores of the trials ranged from 27 to 83 points. NSAIDs were compared with placebo treatment in 10 studies. The pooled odds ratio in four trials comparing NSAIDs with placebo after one week was 0.53 (95% confidence intervals 0.32 to 0.89) using the fixed effect model, indicating a significant effect in favour of NSAIDs compared with placebo. In nine studies NSAIDs were compared with other (drug) therapies. Of these, only two studies reported better results of NSAIDs compared with paracetamol with and without dextropropoxyphene. In the other trials NSAIDs were not better than the reference treatment. In 11 studies different NSAIDs were compared, of which seven studies reported no differences in effect.
CONCLUSIONS—There are flaws in the design of most studies. The pooled odds ratio must be interpreted with caution because the trials at issue, including the high quality trials, did not use identical outcome measures. The results of the 26 randomised trials that have been carried out to date, suggest that NSAIDs might be effective for short-term symptomatic relief in patients with uncomplicated low back pain, but are less effective or ineffective in patients with low back pain with sciatica and patients with sciatica with nerve

  2. [Effect of protracted therapy with chondroprotectors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the quality of life in patients with osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Maĭko, O Iu; Bagirova, G G

    2009-01-01

    Dynamics of clinical parameters and quality of life (QL) was evaluated in 281 patients with knee and hip osteoarthrosis (OA) during long-term treatment of different duration. The group was dominated by women (71%) aged 41-65 yr with grade I-III OA according to Kellgren. Patients of groups I and II received only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, nize), those of groups III-IV the same drugs in combination with structum, chondrolon, and zeel T respectively. Clinical parameters were assessed based on VAS at rest and in motion, Leken's indices, and WOMAC, QL from SF-36 questionnaire. Variable clinical course was recorded in patients treated with non-steroidal drugs alone that caused rapid improvement after the very first treatment sessions followed by deterioration of the patients' condition. Addition of structum resulted in marked optimization of clinical and QL parameters within 3 months after the onset of combined therapy. Similar effect was obtained using chondrolon and zeel T, but 2-3 clinical parameters and 3 QL parameters were not significantly different from the initial ones after 12 and 24 months of therapy. It is concluded that structum produced the best therapeutic effect followed by chondrolon and zeel T. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs had no beneficial action whatever in patients with OA. PMID:19514322

  3. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Women: Results from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bavry, Anthony A.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Allison, Matthew; Johnson, Karen C.; Howard, Barbara V.; Hlatky, Mark; Manson, JoAnn E.; Limacher, Marian C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Conclusive data regarding cardiovascular (CV) toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are sparse. We hypothesized that regular NSAID use is associated with increased risk for CV events in post-menopausal women, and that this association is stronger with greater cyclooxygenase (cox)-2 compared with cox-1 inhibition. Methods and Results Post-menopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) were classified as regular users or non-users of non-aspirin NSAIDs. Cox regression examined NSAID use as a time-varying covariate and its association with the primary outcome of total CV disease defined as CV death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Secondary analyses considered the association of selective cox-2 inhibitors (e.g., celecoxib), non-selective agents with cox-2>cox-1 inhibition (e.g., naproxen), and non-selective agents with cox-1>cox-2 inhibition (e.g., ibuprofen) with the primary outcome. Overall, 160,801 participants were available for analysis (mean follow-up 11.2 years). Regular NSAID use at some point in time was reported by 53,142 participants. Regular NSAID use was associated with an increased hazard for CV events versus no NSAID use (HR=1.10[95% CI 1.06–1.15], Pitalic>0.001). Selective cox-2 inhibitors were associated with a modest increased hazard for CV events (HR=1.13[1.04–1.23], P=0.004; celecoxib only HR=1.13[1.01–1.27], P=0.031). Among aspirin users, concomitant selective cox-2 inhibitor use was no longer associated with increased hazard for CV events. There was an increased risk for agents with cox-2>cox-1 inhibition (HR=1.17[1.10–1.24], Pbold>0.001; naproxen only HR=1.22[1.12–1.34], P<0.001). This harmful association remained among concomitant aspirin users. We did not observe a risk elevation for agents with cox-1>cox-2 inhibition (HR=1.01[0.95–1.07], P=0.884; ibuprofen only HR=1.00[0.93–1.07], P=0.996). Conclusions Regular use of selective cox-2 inhibitors and non

  4. Copper(II) complexes with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolfenamic acid: Structure and biological features.

    PubMed

    Tarushi, Alketa; Perontsis, Spyros; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Psomas, George

    2015-08-01

    Copper(II) complexes with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolfenamic acid (Htolf) with the oxygen-donor ligands methanol (MeOH) or N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and/or the nitrogen-donor heterocyclic ligands 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 2,2'-bipyridylamine (bipyam), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or pyridine (py) were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of five novel complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography where tolfenamic acid is deprotonated being in different binding modes. Equimolar quantities of CuCl2, tolf(-1) and bipy led to the formation of [Cu(tolf-O,O')(bipy)Cl] (1), while with a 1:2 Cu(II):tolf ratio, complexes [Cu(tolf-O,O')2(bipy)] (2), [Cu(tolf-O,O')2(bipyam)] · 0.5MeOH (3 0.5MeOH), [Cu(tolf-O,O')(tolf-O)(phen)(MeOH)] (4) and [Cu(tolf-O)2(py)2(MeOH)2] (5) were isolated. The interaction of the complexes with serum albumin proteins was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy with the determined binding constant bearing relative high values. The scavenging ability of the complexes towards 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and hydroxyl radicals was investigated and the in vitro inhibitory activity against soybean lipoxygenase was evaluated and complexes 4 and 5 were the more active compounds among those tested. Spectroscopic (UV), electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) and physicochemical (viscosity measurements) techniques were employed in order to study the binding mode and strength of the complexes to calf-thymus (CT) DNA suggesting intercalation as the most possible mode of binding. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) revealed the ability of the complexes to displace the DNA-bound EB. The biological properties of complexes 1-5 were evaluated in regard to previously reported complex [Cu2(tolf-O,O')4(DMF)2] (6). PMID:25824465

  5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: overall risks and management. Complementary roles for COX-2 inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, C J; Langman, M J S

    2003-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are well recognised as causing peptic ulceration and ulcer complications. However, several critical issues, including the amount of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal disease affected by NSAIDs, their interaction with ancillary risk factors, and how to optimise management in subgroups, remain poorly understood. In this article, strategies for subgroups that take account of non-specific gastrointestinal risks, minimisation of residual risk, and the importance of non-gastrointestinal toxicity are suggested, and areas for research identified. PMID:12631678

  6. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib on the hematological parameters and enzymes of colon and kidney.

    PubMed

    Behal, N; Singh Kanwar, S; Sharma, P; Sanyal, S N

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of a selective COX-2 inhibitor, etoricoxib in rats on the hematological and toxicity parameters in colon and kidney at two different doses of the drug, one within the therapeutic anti-inflammatory range as based on the reported ED50 value (Eto-1) while the other at ten times higher (Eto-2), relative to the toxicity studies which have not been reported so far. The results showed that the control and the drug treated animals achieved similar linear growth rate and also showed no major alterations in the histological parameters in the liver and kidney tissue. The animals treated with lower dose of etoricoxib showed an overall decrease in total leukocytes counts as well as in the number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and eosinophills while the higher dose of the drug produced a highly significant increase in all the cell counts. However, the drug treatment at both the dose level produced significant fall in the activities of alkaline phosphatase, sucrase, lactase and maltase in the kidney but increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase in colon. The treatment of etoricoxib did not produce any change in the nitric oxide and citrulline levels in kidney while an increase was noted in the colonic tissue. It was concluded that etoricoxib is a relatively safe drug at its anti-inflammatory ED50 dose in rats when the hematological parameters and the structural and functional characteristics of kidney and colonic tissues were studied. PMID:19721906

  7. Drug interactions between antihypertensive drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents: a descriptive study using the French Pharmacovigilance database.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jean-Pascal; Sommet, Agnès; Durrieu, Geneviève; Poutrain, Jean-Christophe; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between antihypertensive drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can lead to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Guidelines are available to help prescribers deal with these drug associations, but their implementation is not well evaluated. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of NSAIDs exposure in patients treated with antihypertensive drugs, using the French Pharmacovigilance database, and explore the ADRs related to DDIs between antihypertensive drugs and NSAIDs. Over the 11, 442 notifications of ADRs recorded in this database in patients treated with oral antihypertensive drugs between 2008 and 2010, 517 (4.5 and 95% CI: 4.1-4.9) also included exposure to NSAIDs. These subjects were more frequently women, took more drugs in general, and were younger and less frequently treated with antiplatelet drugs. In 24.2% of them (125 patients), a DDI between NSAIDs and antihypertensive drugs was potentially the cause of the reported ADR. Acute renal failure caused by DDIs between NSAIDs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), or diuretics was the most frequently reported ADR (20.7%). Finally, in the French Pharmacovigilance database, around one-fourth of associations NSAIDs  +  antihypertensive drugs are associated with a 'serious' ADR (mainly acute renal failure), suggesting that this well-known DDI is not enough taken into account by prescribers. PMID:23190210

  8. Interaction between use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selected genetic polymorphisms in ovarian cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Simone P; Gates, Margaret A; DeVivo, Immaculata; Rosner, Bernard A; Tworoger, Shelley S; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Hankinson, Susan E; Cramer, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) may play important role in ovarian cancer. However, epidemiologic data are inconsistent, possibly reflecting inter-individual genetic differences affecting the metabolism of NSAIDs. We examined whether common polymorphisms affecting the metabolism of NSAIDs modify the association between NSAIDs and ovarian cancer risk. We genotyped 1,353 DNA samples from women who developed ovarian cancer and 1,823 samples from matched controls participating in the New England Case-Control study and the Nurses' Health Studies. Conditional logistic regression estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with regular use of NSAIDs and with relevant polymorphisms on ovarian cancer risk. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression estimated the association of NSAID use across stratum of each genotype. Regular use of NSAIDs was not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Multivariable OR (95% CI) associated with use NSAIDs was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.71-1.02). Associations between NSAID use and ovarian cancer risk did not differ significantly across strata of genotypes. None of the studied polymorphisms was associated with ovarian cancer risk. The multivariable ORs (95% CI) associated with CYP2C9 and UGT1A6 variant genotypes were 0.99 (0.90-1.08) and 0.93 (0.82-1.05), respectively. The multivariable ORs (95% CI) associated with PPAR-γ, COX-2 -765G>C, and COX-2 Ex10+837T>C polymorphisms were 1.02 (0.87-1.20), 0.87 (0.75-1.00), and 0.97 (0.87-1.09), respectively. In this relatively large study, we found no convincing evidence supporting an association between NSAIDs use and ovarian cancer risk. Furthermore, data did not suggest interaction between selected polymorphisms and use of NSAIDs in relation to ovarian cancer risk. PMID:21532843

  9. Variability in risk of gastrointestinal complications with individual non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: results of a collaborative meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D.; Lim, L. L.; Garcia Rodriguez, L. A.; Perez Gutthann, S.; Carson, J. L.; Griffin, M.; Savage, R.; Logan, R.; Moride, Y.; Hawkey, C.; Hill, S.; Fries, J. T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the relative risks of serious gastrointestinal complications reported with individual non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. DESIGN--Systematic review of controlled epidemiological studies that found a relation between use of the drugs and admission to hospital for haemorrhage or perforation. SETTING--Hospital and community based case-control and cohort studies. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--(a) Estimated relative risks of gastrointestinal complications with use of individual drugs, exposure to ibuprofen being used as reference; (b) a ranking that best summarised the sequence of relative risks observed in the studies. RESULTS--12 studies met the inclusion criteria. 11 provided comparative data on ibuprofen and other drugs. Ibuprofen ranked lowest or equal lowest for risk in 10 of the 11 studies. Pooled relative risks calculated with exposure to ibuprofen used as reference were all significantly greater than 1.0 (interval of point estimates 1.6 to 9.2). Overall, ibuprofen was associated with the lowest relative risk, followed by diclofenac. Azapropazone, tolmetin, ketoprofen, and piroxicam ranked highest for risk and indomethacin, naproxen, sulindac, and aspirin occupied intermediate positions. Higher doses of ibuprofen were associated with relative risks similar to those with naproxen and indomethacin. CONCLUSIONS--The low risk of serious gastrointestinal complications with ibuprofen seems to be attributable mainly to the low doses of the drug used in clinical practice. In higher doses ibuprofen is associated with a similar risk to other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Use of low risk drugs in low dosage as first line treatment would substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality due to serious gastrointestinal toxicity from these drugs. PMID:8664664

  10. Meta-analysis of short term low dose prednisolone versus placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether short term, oral low dose prednisolone (⩽15 mg daily) is superior to placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Design: Meta-analysis of randomised trials of oral corticosteroids compared with placebo or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Setting: Trials conducted anywhere in the world. Subjects: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Main outcome measures: Joint tenderness, pain, and grip strength. Outcomes measured on different scales were combined by using the standardised effect size (difference in effect divided by SD of the measurements). Results: Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. Prednisolone had a marked effect over placebo on joint tenderness (standardised effect size 1.31; 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.83), pain (1.75; 0.87 to 2.64), and grip strength (0.41; 0.13 to 0.69). Measured in the original units the differences were 12 (6 to 18) tender joints and 22 mm Hg (5 mm Hg to 40 mm Hg) for grip strength. Prednisolone also had a greater effect than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on joint tenderness (0.63; 0.11 to 1.16) and pain (1.25; 0.26 to 2.24), whereas the difference in grip strength was not significant (0.31; −0.02 to 0.64). Measured in the original units the differences were 9 (5 to 12) tender joints and 12 mm Hg (−6 mm Hg to 31 mm Hg). The risk of adverse effects during moderate and long term use seemed acceptable. Conclusion: Prednisolone in low doses (⩽15 mg daily) may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if the disease cannot be controlled by other means. Key messages Prednisolone in low doses—that is, no more than 15 mg daily—is highly effective in patients with rheumatoid arthritis The risk of adverse effects is acceptable in short, moderate, or long term use Oral low dose prednisolone may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if

  11. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cyanobacteria and algae in laboratory strains and in natural algal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Bácsi, István; B-Béres, Viktória; Kókai, Zsuzsanna; Gonda, Sándor; Novák, Zoltán; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Vasas, Gábor

    2016-05-01

    In recent years measurable concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown in the aquatic environment as a result of increasing human consumption. Effects of five frequently used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, diflunisal, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and piroxicam in 0.1 mg ml(-1) concentration) in batch cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus, Microcystis aeruginosa, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii), and eukaryotic algae (Desmodesmus communis, Haematococcus pluvialis, Cryptomonas ovata) were studied. Furthermore, the effects of the same concentrations of NSAIDs were investigated in natural algal assemblages in microcosms. According to the changes of chlorophyll-a content, unicellular cyanobacteria seemed to be more tolerant to NSAIDs than eukaryotic algae in laboratory experiments. Growth of eukaryotic algae was reduced by all drugs, the cryptomonad C. ovata was the most sensitive to NSAIDs, while the flagellated green alga H. pluvialis was more sensitive than the non-motile green alga D. communis. NSAID treatments had weaker impact in the natural assemblages dominated by cyanobacteria than in the ones dominated by eukaryotic algae, confirming the results of laboratory experiments. Diversity and number of functional groups did not change notably in cyanobacteria dominated assemblages, while they decreased significantly in eukaryotic algae dominated ones compared to controls. The results highlight that cyanobacteria (especially unicellular ones) are less sensitive to the studied, mostly hardly degradable NSAIDs, which suggest that their accumulation in water bodies may contribute to the expansion of cyanobacterial mass productions in appropriate environmental circumstances by pushing back eukaryotic algae. Thus, these contaminants require special attention during wastewater treatment and monitoring of surface waters. PMID:26967537

  12. D-Amino Acids Boost the Selectivity and Confer Supramolecular Hydrogels of a Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Du, Xuewen; Shi, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    As systemically used therapeutics for treatmenting acute or chronic pains or inflammations, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) also associate with the adverse gastrointestinal and renal effects and cardiovascular risks. Thus, it is beneficial to develop topical gels that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for the management of local inflammation. In this work, we demonstrate that the covalent conjugation of D-amino acids to naproxen (i.e., an NSAID) not only affords supramolecular hydrogelators for the topical gels, but also unexpectedly and significantly elevates the selectivity towards COX-2 about 20 times at little expense of the activity of naproxen. This work illustrates a previously unexplored approach that employs D-amino acids for the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and exceptional biostability, which offers a new class of molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents. PMID:23136972

  13. The Inhibitory Effect of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) on the Monophenolase and Diphenolase Activities of Mushroom Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuomi; Toriyama, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the monophenolase and diphenolase activity of mushroom tyrosinase. The results showed that diflunisal and indomethacin inhibited both monophenolase and diphenolase activity. For monophenolase activity, the lag time was extended in the presence of diflunisal. In the presence of indomethacin, the lag time did not change. IC50 values of monophenolase activity were estimated to be 0.112 mM (diflunisal) and 1.78 mM (indomethacin). Kinetic studies of monophenolase activity revealed that both diflunisal and indomethacin were non-competitive inhibitors. For diphenolase activity, IC50 values were estimated to be 0.197 mM (diflunisal) and 0.509 mM (indomethacin). Diflunisal and indomethacin were also found to be non-competitive diphenolase inhibitors. PMID:21747720

  14. [Safe prescription recommendations for non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: Consensus document ellaborated by nominated experts of three scientific associations (SER-SEC-AEG)].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel; Benito, Pere; Alonso, Joaquín; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Perez-Aísa, Angeles; Calvet, Xavier; García-Llorente, José Francisco; Gobbo, Milena; Gonzalez-Juanatey, José R

    2014-03-01

    This article outlines key recommendations for the appropriate prescription of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to patients with different musculoskeletal problems. These recommendations are based on current scientific evidence, and takes into consideration gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety issues. The recommendations have been agreed on by experts from three scientific societies (Spanish Society of Rheumatology [SER], Spanish Association of Gastroenterology [AEG] and Spanish Society of Cardiology [SEC]), following a two-round Delphi methodology. Areas that have been taken into account encompass: efficiency, cardiovascular risk, gastrointestinal risk, liver risk, renal risk, inflammatory bowel disease, anemia, post-operative pain, and prevention strategies. We propose a patient management algorithm that summarizes the main aspects of the recommendations. PMID:24529572

  15. Safe prescription recommendations for non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: consensus document ellaborated by nominated experts of three scientific associations (SER-SEC-AEG).

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel; Benito, Pere; Alonso, Joaquín; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Perez-Aísa, Ángeles; Calvet, Xavier; García-Llorente, José Francisco; Gobbo, Milena; Gonzalez-Juanatey, José R

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines key recommendations for the appropriate prescription of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to patients with different musculoskeletal problems. These recommendations are based on current scientific evidence, and takes into consideration gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety issues. The recommendations have been agreed on by experts from three scientific societies (Spanish Society of Rheumatology [SER], Spanish Association of Gastroenterology [AEG] and Spanish Society of Cardiology [SEC]), following a two-round Delphi methodology. Areas that have been taken into account encompass: efficiency, cardiovascular risk, gastrointestinal risk, liver risk, renal risk, inflammatory bowel disease, anemia, post-operative pain, and prevention strategies. We propose a patient management algorithm that summarizes the main aspects of the recommendations. PMID:24462644

  16. The Effects of Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Factors Influencing Drug Adherence in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of knee osteoarthritis patients according to drug adherence; and to find out the factors the affecting those outcomes. We analyzed the drug adherence and clinical outcomes in 1,334 primary knee osteoarthritis patients who took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes of Pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EQ-5D were compared at baseline and 3 weeks’ follow-up between the two groups of adherent group and non-adherent group (1,167 vs. 167 patients). Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors affecting the adherence, and the reasons for the non-adherence were asked. The follow-up clinical outcomes of NRS and KOOS symptom, pain and activity of daily life were significantly higher in the adherence group (P = 0.003, P = 0.048, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003, respectively). The adherence was better in the elderly and in the male group (P = 0.042 and P = 0.034, respectively) and the top reason for no strict adherence was “symptom improved” (21.5%) followed by side effects. In this study, the patients with better adherence to NSAIDs showed better outcomes compared to those with poor adherence. This study can contribute to the patient education for the pharmacological treatment in knee OA patients. PMID:27134504

  17. Concentration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Pelvic Floor Muscles: An Experimental Comparative Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. Materials and Methods We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Results Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Conclusion Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle. PMID:24954342

  18. Apparent tolerance of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Whitehead, M.A.; Gasper, G.; Meteyer, C.U.; Link, W.A.; Taggart, M.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is extremely toxic to Old World Gyps vultures (median lethal dose 0.1?0.2 mg/kg), evoking visceral gout, renal necrosis, and mortality within a few days of exposure. Unintentional secondary poisoning of vultures that fed upon carcasses of diclofenac-treated livestock decimated populations in the Indian subcontinent. Because of the widespread use of diclofenac and other cyclooxygenase-2 inhibiting drugs, a toxicological study was undertaken in turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) as an initial step in examining sensitivity of New World scavenging birds. Two trials were conducted entailing oral gavage of diclofenac at doses ranging from 0.08 to 25 mg/kg body weight. Birds were observed for 7 d, blood samples were collected for plasma chemistry (predose and 12, 24, and 48 h and 7 d postdose), and select individuals were necropsied. Diclofenac failed to evoke overt signs of toxicity, visceral gout, renal necrosis, or elevate plasma uric acid at concentrations greater than 100 times the estimated median lethal dose reported for Gyps vultures. For turkey vultures receiving 8 or 25 mg/kg, the plasma half-life of diclofenac was estimated to be 6 h, and it was apparently cleared after several days as no residues were detectable in liver or kidney at necropsy. Differential sensitivity among avian species is a hallmark of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and despite the tolerance of turkey vultures to diclofenac, additional studies in related scavenging species seem warranted.

  19. A supramolecular topical gel derived from a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, fenoprofen, is capable of treating skin inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Joydeb; Yedoti, Pavani; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2015-02-28

    A new series of bioconjugates derived from a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely fenoprofen, has been synthesised by amidation with various biogenic molecules such as β-alanine, aminocaproic acid and tyramine with the aim of converting the NSAID into a supramolecular gelator for plausible biomedical applications. One such bioconjugate (2) showed gelation ability with methylsalicylate (MS) and 1% menthol in methyl salicylate (MMS) solvents. These gels were characterized by table top rheology, high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and dynamic rheology. Gelator 2 was found to be biostable both in proteolytic enzymes and in blood serum of BALB/c mouse under physiological conditions. It was also found to be biocompatible, as revealed by the methyl thiazolyldiphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 and mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. The anti-inflammatory response (prostaglandin E2 assay, denoted PGE2 assay) of 2 was comparable to that of the parent drug fenoprofen calcium salt. Finally, a topical gel formulation of 2 displayed in vivo self-delivery application in treating imiquimod (IMQ) induced skin inflammation in BALB/c mice. PMID:25554116

  20. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on bone turnover: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos-George; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2013-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used for acute and chronic pain control and treatment of inflammation, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. NSAIDs have been shown to inhibit bone healing in animal studies due to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. However, little evidence exists regarding the effect of NSAID exposure on human bone metabolism. This systematic review summarizes the current literature of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating NSAIDs with bone remodeling-related outcomes in humans. After performing computerized searches in the most widely indexed databases, study selection, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment were conducted in duplicate. The results were controversial regarding the association of NSAID with bone formation or resorption. Increased bone mineral density following NSAID exposure was reported by some studies. Based on the levels of biochemical markers, no effect was seen on bone formation, while some evidence was found for a decreased rate of bone resorption in NSAID patients. Trials investigating the effects of NSAID treatment on bone metabolism outcomes of human patients are limited. Further research is required to confirm or refute the findings of this systematic review. PMID:23016823

  1. Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Are Better than Acetaminophen on Fever Control at Acute Stage of Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Wu, Wen-Tien; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chen, Ing-Ho; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In addition to adequate surgical fixation and an aggressive rehabilitation program, pain relief is one of the most critical factors in the acute stage of fracture treatment. The most common analgesics are nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and Acetaminophen, both of which relieve pain and reduce body temperature. In clinical experiences, they exhibit effective pain control; however, their influence on body temperature remains controversial. This study is aimed at determining the effects of analgesics at the acute stage of traumatic fracture by performing a clinical retrospective study of patients with fractures and a fracture animal model. The retrospective study revealed that, in the acetaminophen group, the mean value of postmedication body temperature (BT) was significantly higher than that of the premedication BT. The change in BT was highly related with the medication rather than other risk factors. Forty eight 12-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, fracture group, fracture-Acetaminophen group, Acetaminophen group, fracture-Arcoxia group, and Arcoxia group. Fracture rats were prepared by breaking their unilateral tibia and fibula. Their inflammation conditions were evaluated by measuring their serum cytokine level and their physiological status was evaluated by estimating their central temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The hepatic adverse effects were assessed by measuring the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (sGOT) and alanine aminotransferase (sGPT). The central temperature in the fracture-Acetaminophen group exceeded that in the groups fed normal saline water or Arcoxia. Accumulated hepatic injury was presented as steadily ascending curves of sGOT and sGPT. Inflammation-related cytokine levels were not higher in the Acetaminophen fracture group and were significantly lower in the fracture-Arcoxia group. Fever appeared to be aggravated by acetaminophen and more related to the elevation of hepatic

  2. Impact and mechanism of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs combined with chemotherapeutic drugs on human lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, WEIYI; CHEN, GANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of indomethacin treatment combined with oxaliplatin treatment on the expression of cluster of differentiation 44 variant 6 (CD44v6), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and survivin in human lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors. The human lung adenocarcinoma (A549)-nude mouse transplanted tumor model was established, and the mice were divided into a control group, an indomethacin treatment group, an oxaliplatin treatment group and an indomethacin-oxaliplatin combination treatment group. The tumor inhibition rate was calculated following sacrificing of the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and fluorescence reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were utilized to detect the protein and messenger (m)RNA expression of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin. The tumor inhibition rates of the indomethacin group, the oxaliplatin group and the combination group were 26.67, 47.70 and 68.88%, respectively. The protein and mRNA expression levels of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin in the transplanted tumors of each treatment group were reduced compared with the control group (P<0.05), and those of the combination group were lower compared with the single-drug treatment groups (P<0.05). Survivin and MMP-2, MMP-2 and CD44v6, and MMP-2 and CD44v6 all exhibited linear positive correlation. The present study provides evidence that the administration of indomethacin alone, or in combination with oxaliplatin, may significantly inhibit the growth of lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors and the expression of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin inside the tumor. The combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with chemotherapeutic drugs may improve the antitumor effects. PMID:27313765

  3. The thermodynamic dissociation constants of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by the least-squares nonlinear regression of multiwavelength spectrophotometric pH-titration data.

    PubMed

    Meloun, Milan; Bordovská, Sylva; Galla, Lubomír

    2007-11-30

    The mixed dissociation constants of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, diclofenac sodium, flurbiprofen and ketoprofen at various ionic strengths I of range 0.003-0.155, and at temperatures of 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C, were determined with the use of two different multiwavelength and multivariate treatments of spectral data, SPECFIT/32 and SQUAD(84) nonlinear regression analyses and INDICES factor analysis. The factor analysis in the INDICES program predicts the correct number of components, and even the presence of minor ones, when the data quality is high and the instrumental error is known. The thermodynamic dissociation constant pK(a)(T) was estimated by nonlinear regression of (pK(a), I) data at 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Goodness-of-fit tests for various regression diagnostics enabled the reliability of the parameter estimates found to be proven. PALLAS, MARVIN, SPARC, ACD/pK(a) and Pharma Algorithms predict pK(a) being based on the structural formulae of drug compounds in agreement with the experimental value. The best agreement seems to be between the ACD/pK(a) program and experimentally found values and with SPARC. PALLAS and MARVIN predicted pK(a,pred) values with larger bias errors in comparison with the experimental value for all four drugs. PMID:17825517

  4. In Vitro Interactions between Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Antifungal Agents against Planktonic and Biofilm Forms of Trichosporon asahii

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Lin; Lu, Xuelian

    2016-01-01

    Increasing drug resistance has brought enormous challenges to the management of Trichosporon spp. infections. The in vitro antifungal activities of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. were recently discovered. In the present study, the in vitro interactions between three NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium) and commonly used antifungal agents (fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and amphotericin B) against planktonic and biofilm cells of T. asahii were evaluated using the checkerboard microdilution method. The spectrophotometric method and the XTT reduction assay were used to generate data on biofilm cells. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and the ΔE model were compared to interpret drug interactions. Using the FICI, the highest percentages of synergistic effects against planktonic cells (86.67%) and biofilm cells (73.33%) were found for amphotericin B/ibuprofen, and caspofungin/ibuprofen showed appreciable percentages (73.33% for planktonic form and 60.00% for biofilm) as well. We did not observe antagonism. The ΔE model gave consistent results with FICI (86.67%). Our findings suggest that amphotericin B/ibuprofen and caspofungin/ibuprofen combinations have potential effects against T. asahii. Further in vivo and animal studies to investigate associated mechanisms need to be conducted. PMID:27275608

  5. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Lakhundi, Sahreena; Iqbal, Junaid; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, Diclofenac, targeting COX have shown promise in the treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Using various NSAIDs, Diclofenac sodium, Indomethacin, and Acetaminophen, here we determined the effects of NSAIDs on the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype. Using amoebicidal assays, the results revealed that Diclofenac sodium, and Indomethacin affected growth of A. castellanii. In contrast, none of the compounds tested had any effect on the viability of A. castellanii. Importantly, all NSAIDs tested abolished A. castellanii encystation. This is a significant finding as the ability of amoebae to transform into the dormant cyst form presents a significant challenge in the successful treatment of infection. The NSAIDs inhibit production of cyclo-oxegenase, which regulates the synthesis of prostaglandins suggesting that cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and prostaglandins play significant role(s) in Acanthamoeba biology. As NSAIDs are routinely used in the clinical practice, these findings may help design improved preventative strategies and/or of therapeutic value to improve prognosis, when used in combination with other anti-amoebic drugs. PMID:27381503

  6. Effects of systemic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nociception during tail ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gelgor, L.; Butkow, N.; Mitchell, D.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of five non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on nociception during ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats. 2. We induced tail ischaemia in conscious rats by applying a tourniquet at the base of the tail until the rats exhibited co-ordinated escape behaviour when we released the tourniquet. 3. We assessed hyperalgesia by measuring the tail flick latency following tail immersion in water at 49 degrees C, before applying and immediately after releasing the tourniquet, and then at 30 min intervals for 2 h. 4. Intraperitoneal injection of NSAIDs prior to applying the tourniquet had no effect on the co-ordinated escape behaviour during ischaemia, nor on tail flick latency in the absence of prior ischaemia. However all the drugs attenuated reperfusion hyperalgesia in a log dose-dependent manner. Doses required to abolish hyperalgesia, were indomethacin 5 mg kg-1, diclofenac sodium 42 mg kg-1, ibuprofen 54 mg kg-1, dipyrone 168 mg kg-1 and paracetamol 170 mg kg-1. 5. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying nociception during ischaemia are not the same as those underlying reperfusion hyperalgesia. Moreover our procedure provides a rapid and more humane method for measuring the antinociceptive potency of NSAIDs. PMID:1559131

  7. An in vitro spectrometric method for determining the partition coefficients of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs into human erythrocyte ghost membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omran, Ahmed A.

    2013-03-01

    Usefulness of second derivative spectrophotometry for determining the partition coefficients (Kps) of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) between human erythrocyte ghost (HEG) membranes and buffer at simulated physiological conditions (pH = 7.4, 37 °C) has been adequately emphasized. In the absorption spectra for each of the investigated NSAIDs, λmax was red-shifted in presence of HEG membranes, indicating that NSAIDs have the nature of metachromasy between lipid bilayer and water. Further quantitative spectral data for calculating Kps could not be obtained from the absorption spectra because of the presence of background signal impacts of HEG lipid bilayers. Second derivative spectra were calculated from absorption spectra and fortunately showed three isosbestic derivative points for each NSAID, indicating without doubt that the background signals were entirely eliminated. From the relation between the derivative intensity change (ΔD) induced by addition of HEG membranes, Kps were calculated and obtained with RSD of below 6%. Fractions of partitioned NSAIDs are in well-harmony with that derived from the experimental values. Moreover, validity of the proposed method was confirmed. Conclusively, the second derivative spectrometry has proven to be a facile, reliable and more expeditious method to obtain in vitro Kps of drugs to HEG without previous separation.

  8. Enantioselective analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in freshwater fish based on microextraction with a supramolecular liquid and chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Carmen; Sicilia, Maria Dolores; Rubio, Soledad

    2015-06-01

    Toxicity of pharmaceuticals to aquatic biota is still largely unknown, and no research on the stereoselective toxicity of chiral drugs to these organisms has been undertaken to date. Because of the lack of analytical methods available for this purpose, this manuscript deals, for the first time, with the enantioselective analysis of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, naproxen and ketoprofen in freshwater fish. The method was based on the microextraction of NSAIDs from fish muscle with a supramolecular liquid made up of inverted hexagonal aggregates of decanoic acid, their enantiomeric separation by liquid chromatography onto a (R)-1-naphthylglycine and 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid stationary phase and quantification by tandem mass spectrometry. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for NSAID enantiomers were in the range 1.7-3.3 ng g(-1). Absolute recoveries were from 97 to 104 %, which indicated the high extraction efficiency of the supramolecular solvent. Extraction equilibrium conditions were reached after 10 min which permitted fast sample treatment. Relative standard deviations for enantiomers in fish muscle were always below 6 %. Isotopically labelled internal standards were used to compensate for matrix interferences. The method in-house validation was carried out with the Oncorhynchus mykiss species, and it was applied to the determination of NSAID enantiomers in different fortified freshwater fish species (Alburnus alburnus, Lepomis gibbosus, Micropterus salmoides, O. mykiss and Cyprinus carpio). PMID:25869485

  9. Expression of acid-sensing ion channels in nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disk is regulated by non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue; Jin, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Qi, Lin; Braun, Frank Karl; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Xu, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are generally used in the treatment of inflammation and pain through cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. Mounting evidence has indicated additional COX-independent targets for NSAIDs including acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) 1a and 3. However, detailed function and mechanism of ASICs still remain largely elusive. In this study, the impact of NSAIDs on ASICs in nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disk was investigated. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated and cultured from protruded disk tissues of 40 patients. It was shown that ASIC1a and ASIC3 were expressed and functional in these cells by analyzing proton-gated currents after ASIC inhibition. We further investigated the neuroprotective capacity of ibuprofen (a COX inhibitor), psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX1, a tarantula toxin specific for homomeric ASIC1a), and amiloride (a classic inhibitor of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC/DEG family to which ASICs belong). PcTX1-containing venom has been shown to be comparable with amiloride in its neuroprotective features in rodent models of ischemia. Taken together, our data showed that amiloride, PcTX1, and ibuprofen decreased ASIC protein expression and thereby exerted protective effects from ASIC inhibition-mediated cell damage. PMID:25079679

  10. Development of high-throughput multi-residue method for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs monitoring in swine muscle by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Castilhos, Tamara S; Barreto, Fabiano; Meneghini, Leonardo; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2016-07-01

    A reliable and simple method for the detection and quantification of residues of 14 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a metamizole metabolite in swine muscle was developed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The samples were extracted with acetonitrile (ACN) in solid-liquid extraction followed by a low-temperature partitioning (LLE-LTP) process at -20 ± 2°C. After evaporation to dryness, the residue was reconstituted with hexane and a mixture of water:acetonitrile (1:1). LC separation was achieved on a reversed-phase (RP18) column with gradient elution using water (phase A) and ACN (phase B) both containing 1 mmol l(-)(1) ammonium acetate (NH4COO) with 0.025% acetic acid. Analysis was carried out on a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode using an electrospray interface in negative and positive mode in a single run. Method validation was performed according to the criteria of Commission Decision No. 2002/657/EC. The matrix effect and linearity were evaluated. Decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), accuracy and repeatability of the method are also reported. The proposed method proved to be simple, easy and adequate for high-throughput analysis and was applied to routine analysis by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply. PMID:27268755

  11. Simultaneous analysis of several non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with normal solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Hirai, T; Matsumoto, S; Kishi, I

    1997-05-01

    A practical and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatographic method using normal solid-phase extraction has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of twelve non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human urine. A urine specimen mixed with acetate buffer pH 5.0 was purified by solid-phase extraction on a Sep-Pak Silica cartridge. The analyte was chromatographed by a reversed-phase Inertsil ODS-2 column using a phosphate buffer-acetonitrile at pH 5.0 as the mobile phase, and the effluent from the column was monitored at 230 or 320 nm. Absolute recoveries were greater than 73% for all of the twelve NSAIDs. The present method enabled simple manipulation and isocratic HPLC with UV analysis as well as high sensitivity of 0.005 microg/ml for naproxen, and 0.05 microg/ml for sulindac, piroxicam, loxoprofen, ketoprofen, felbinac, fenbufen, flurbiprofen, diclofenac, ibuprofen and mefenamic acid as the quantitation limit in human urine using indomethacin as an internal standard. PMID:9188827

  12. Role of carbonyl reducing enzymes in the phase I biotransformation of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug nabumetone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Skarydova, Lucie; Nobilis, Milan; Wsól, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    1. Nabumetone is a clinically used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, its biotransformation includes major active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphtylacetic acid and another three phase I as well as corresponding phase II metabolites which are regarded as inactive. One important biotransformation pathway is carbonyl reduction, which leads to the phase I metabolite, reduced nabumetone. 2. The aim of this study is the determination of the role of a particular human liver subcellular fraction in the nabumetone reduction and the identification of participating carbonyl reducing enzymes along with their stereospecificities. 3. Both subcellular fractions take part in the carbonyl reduction of nabumetone and the reduction is at least in vitro the main biotransformation pathway. The activities of eight cytosolic carbonyl reducing enzymes--CBR1, CBR3, AKR1B1, AKR1B10, AKR1C1-4--toward nabumetone were tested. Except for CBR3, all tested reductases transform nabumetone to its reduced metabolite. AKR1C4 and AKR1C3 have the highest intrinsic clearances. 4. The stereospecificity of the majority of the tested enzymes is shifted to the production of an (+)-enantiomer of reduced nabumetone; only AKR1C1 and AKR1C4 produce predominantly an (-)-enantiomer. This project provides for the first time evidence that seven specific carbonyl reducing enzymes participate in nabumetone metabolism. PMID:23020786

  13. Synthesis, crystal structure and spectroscopy of bioactive Cd(II) polymeric complex of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium: Antiproliferative and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; McArdle, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of Cd(II) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (Dic) leads to the formation of the complex [Cd2(L)41.5(MeOH)2(H2O)]n(L = Dic), 1, which has been isolated and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. Diclofenac sodium and its metal complex 1 have also been evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against the cells of three human cancer cell lines, MCF-7 (breast cancer cell line), T24 (bladder cancer cell line), A-549 (non-small cell lung carcinoma), and a mouse fibroblast L-929 cell line. The results of cytotoxic activity in vitro expressed as IC50 values indicated the diclofenac sodium and cadmium chloride are non active or less active than the metal complex of diclofenac (1). Complex 1 was also found to be a more potent cytotoxic agent against T-24 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines than the prevalent benchmark metallodrug, cisplatin, under the same experimental conditions. The superoxide dismutase activity was measured by Fridovich test which showed that complex 1 shows a low value in comparison with Cu complexes. The binding properties of this complex to biomolecules, bovine or human serum albumin, are presented and evaluated. Antibacterial and growth inhibitory activity is also higher than that of the parent ligand compound.

  14. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods. PMID:24691893

  15. Synthesis, crystal structure and spectroscopy of bioactive Cd(II) polymeric complex of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium: antiproliferative and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; McArdle, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of Cd(II) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (Dic) leads to the formation of the complex [Cd2(L)41.5(MeOH)2(H2O)]n(L = Dic), 1, which has been isolated and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. Diclofenac sodium and its metal complex 1 have also been evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against the cells of three human cancer cell lines, MCF-7 (breast cancer cell line), T24 (bladder cancer cell line), A-549 (non-small cell lung carcinoma), and a mouse fibroblast L-929 cell line. The results of cytotoxic activity in vitro expressed as IC50 values indicated the diclofenac sodium and cadmium chloride are non active or less active than the metal complex of diclofenac (1). Complex 1 was also found to be a more potent cytotoxic agent against T-24 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines than the prevalent benchmark metallodrug, cisplatin, under the same experimental conditions. The superoxide dismutase activity was measured by Fridovich test which showed that complex 1 shows a low value in comparison with Cu complexes. The binding properties of this complex to biomolecules, bovine or human serum albumin, are presented and evaluated. Antibacterial and growth inhibitory activity is also higher than that of the parent ligand compound. PMID:25311520

  16. Structural Mechanism of the Interaction of Alzheimer Disease Aβ Fibrils with the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Sulindac Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Prade, Elke; Bittner, Heiko J; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Lopez Del Amo, Juan Miguel; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Multhaup, Gerd; Hildebrand, Peter W; Reif, Bernd

    2015-11-27

    Alzheimer disease is the most severe neurodegenerative disease worldwide. In the past years, a plethora of small molecules interfering with amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation has been reported. However, their mode of interaction with amyloid fibers is not understood. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known γ-secretase modulators; they influence Aβ populations. It has been suggested that NSAIDs are pleiotrophic and can interact with more than one pathomechanism. Here we present a magic angle spinning solid-state NMR study demonstrating that the NSAID sulindac sulfide interacts specifically with Alzheimer disease Aβ fibrils. We find that sulindac sulfide does not induce drastic architectural changes in the fibrillar structure but intercalates between the two β-strands of the amyloid fibril and binds to hydrophobic cavities, which are found consistently in all analyzed structures. The characteristic Asp(23)-Lys(28) salt bridge is not affected upon interacting with sulindac sulfide. The primary binding site is located in the vicinity of residue Gly(33), a residue involved in Met(35) oxidation. The results presented here will assist the search for pharmacologically active molecules that can potentially be employed as lead structures to guide the design of small molecules for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. PMID:26416887

  17. Optimisation by response surface methodology of microextraction by packed sorbent of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography analysis of dialyzed samples.

    PubMed

    D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Ruggieri, Fabrizio; Carlucci, Maura; Ferrone, Vincenzo; Carlucci, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A procedure based on microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with photodiode array (PDA) detection has been developed for the analysis of seven selected non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human dialysates. The influence on MEPS efficiency of pH of the sample, pH of the washing solvent and methanol content in the hydro-alcoholic elution mixture has been investigated by response surface methodology based on a Box-Behnken design of experiments. Among the above factors, pH of sample is the variable that mostly influences MEPS recovery. UHPLC separation of the NSAIDs was completed within less than 4min under isocratic elution conditions on a Fortis SpeedCore C18 column (150×4.6mm I.D., 2.6μm) using acetonitrile-phosphate buffer as the mobile phase. Calibration curves of the NSAIDs were linear over the concentration range 0.025-15μg/mL, with correlation coefficients≥0.998. Intra- and inter-assay relative standard deviations were <8% and recovery values ranged from 94% to 100% for the quality control samples. The results reveal that the developed MEPS/PDA-UHPLC method exhibits a good accuracy and precision and is well suited for the rapid analysis of human dialysate from patients treated with the selected NSAIDs. PMID:27017570

  18. Metal-organic frameworks@graphene hybrid aerogels for solid-phase extraction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selective enrichment of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Liang, Qionglin; Han, Qiang; Wan, Wei; Ding, Mingyu

    2016-06-20

    Graphene aerogel (GA)-supported metal-organic framework (MOF) particles with a three-dimensional (3D) architecture were fabricated for the first time via a facile template-free "sol-cryo" method. The prepared MOFs@graphene hybrid aerogels exhibit a 3D interconnected macroporous framework of graphene sheets with uniform dispersion of MOF particles. We also report the first attempt at using the hybrid aerogels as adsorbents for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the selective enrichment of proteins. The macroporous skeletons of GA provide both low backpressure and rapid mass transfer in SPE application, thus overcoming the obstacle of high backpressure caused by directly packing submicron or micron sized MOF particles into SPE cartridges. Excellent performances including satisfactory recoveries, high sensitivity and good reproducibility were achieved in the extraction of five NSAIDs. The hybrid aerogels also showed an interesting ability for selective enrichment of ribonuclease A (RNase A) and simultaneous exclusion of cytochrome C (Cyt C) and lysozyme (Lyz), which could be attributed to the electrostatic interactions between proteins and the positively charged coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (CUS) in MIL-101. We believe that this work will promote the application of MOFs in adsorption and separation, and our synthetic strategy could be further extended to develop other graphene-based hybrid aerogels. PMID:27156534

  19. Pollution-induced community tolerance to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in fluvial biofilm communities affected by WWTP effluents.

    PubMed

    Corcoll, Natàlia; Acuña, Vicenç; Barceló, Damià; Casellas, Maria; Guasch, Helena; Huerta, Belinda; Petrovic, Mira; Ponsatí, Lidia; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Sabater, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the tolerance acquired by stream biofilms to two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory-drugs (NSAIDs), ibuprofen and diclofenac. Biofilms came from a stream system receiving the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The response of biofilms from a non-polluted site (upstream the WWTP) was compared to that of others downstream with relevant and decreasing levels of NSAIDs. Experiments performed in the laboratory following the pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) approach determined that both algae and microbial communities from biofilms of the sites exposed at the highest concentrations of ibuprofen and diclofenac acquired tolerance to the mixture of these NSAIDs occurring at the sites. It was also observed that the chronic pollution by the WWTP effluent affected the microbial metabolic profile, as well as the structure of the algal community. The low (at ng L(-1) level) but chronic inputs of pharmaceuticals to the river ecosystem result in tolerant communities of lower diversity and altered microbial metabolism. PMID:25048905

  20. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the pro-carcinogen 1,2 dimethylhydrazine on the rat intestinal membrane structure and function.

    PubMed

    Mittal, N; Kanwar, S Singh; Sanyal, S Nath

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with varying cycloxygenase selectivities on the small intestinal biochemical composition, function and histology during 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) administration. Sprague Dawley male rats were divided into five different groups viz: Group 1 (control, vehicle treated), Group 2 (DMH-treated, 30 mg/kg body weight/week in 1 mM EDTA-saline, subcutaneously), Group 3 (DMH + aspirin-60 mg/kg body weight), Group 4 (DMH + celecoxib-6 mg/kg body weight), Group 5 (DMH + etoricoxib-0.64 mg/kg body weight). After six weeks of treatment, brush border membrane was isolated from the jejunum segment of all the groups and changes in the associated enzymes such as sucrase, lactase, maltase, alkaline phosphatase, membrane lipid composition, fluorescence polarizations of diphenylhexatriene, pyrene excimer formation, histological changes and surface characteristics were studied. The results indicated a significant alteration in the enzyme activity as well as changes in the structure and function of the intestine in the presence of the pro-carcinogen, DMH, which suggests the possible chemopreventive efficacy of NSAIDs against the intestinal cancer. PMID:19160894

  1. Expression of acid-sensing ion channels in nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disk is regulated by non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xue; Jin, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Qi, Lin; Braun, Frank Karl; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are generally used in the treatment of inflammation and pain through cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. Mounting evidence has indicated additional COX-independent targets for NSAIDs including acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) 1a and 3. However, detailed function and mechanism of ASICs still remain largely elusive. In this study, the impact of NSAIDs on ASICs in nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disk was investigated. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated and cultured from protruded disk tissues of 40 patients. It was shown that ASIC1a and ASIC3 were expressed and functional in these cells by analyzing proton-gated currents after ASIC inhibition. We further investigated the neuroprotective capacity of ibuprofen (a COX inhibitor), psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX1, a tarantula toxin specific for homomeric ASIC1a), and amiloride (a classic inhibitor of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC/DEG family to which ASICs belong). PcTX1-containing venom has been shown to be comparable with amiloride in its neuroprotective features in rodent models of ischemia. Taken together, our data showed that amiloride, PcTX1, and ibuprofen decreased ASIC protein expression and thereby exerted protective effects from ASIC inhibition-mediated cell damage. PMID:25079679

  2. Beneficial effect of an omega-6 PUFA-rich diet in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mucosal damage in the murine small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Toshihide; Hokari, Ryota; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Yasutake, Yuichi; Maruta, Koji; Kurihara, Chie; Tomita, Kengo; Komoto, Shunsuke; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Watanabe, Chikako; Usui, Shingo; Nagao, Shigeaki; Miura, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of a fat rich diet on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced mucosal damage in the murine small intestine. METHODS: C57BL6 mice were fed 4 types of diets with or without indomethacin. One group was fed standard laboratory chow. The other groups were fed a fat diet consisting of 8% w/w fat, beef tallow (rich in SFA), fish oil, (rich in omega-3 PUFA), or safflower oil (rich in omega-6 PUFA). Indomethacin (3 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally from day 8 to day 10. On day 11, intestines and adhesions to submucosal microvessels were examined. RESULTS: In the indomethacin-treated groups, mucosal damage was exacerbated by diets containing beef tallow and fish oil, and was accompanied by leukocyte infiltration (P < 0.05). The mucosal damage induced by indomethacin was significantly lower in mice fed the safflower oil diet than in mice fed the beef tallow or fish oil diet (P < 0.05). Indomethacin increased monocyte and platelet migration to the intestinal mucosa, whereas safflower oil significantly decreased monocyte and platelet recruitment (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: A diet rich in SFA and omega-3 PUFA exacerbated NSAID-induced small intestinal damage via increased leukocyte infiltration. Importantly, a diet rich in omega-6-PUFA did not aggravate inflammation as monocyte migration was blocked. PMID:25574090

  3. P-glycoprotein Modulates Morphine Uptake into the CNS: A Role for the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Slosky, Lauren M.; Thompson, Brandon J.; Zhang, Yifeng; Laracuente, Mei-Li; DeMarco, Kristin M.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that peripheral inflammatory pain (PIP), induced by subcutaneous plantar injection of λ-carrageenan, results in increased expression and activity of the ATP-dependent efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that is endogenously expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The result of increased P-gp functional expression was a significant reduction in CNS uptake of morphine and, subsequently, reduced morphine analgesic efficacy. A major concern in the treatment of acute pain/inflammation is the potential for drug-drug interactions resulting from P-gp induction by therapeutic agents co-administered with opioids. Such effects on P-gp activity can profoundly modulate CNS distribution of opioid analgesics and alter analgesic efficacy. In this study, we examined the ability of diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly administered in conjunction with the opioids during pain therapy, to alter BBB transport of morphine via P-gp and whether such changes in P-gp morphine transport could alter morphine analgesic efficacy. Administration of diclofenac reduced paw edema and thermal hyperalgesia in rats subjected to PIP, which is consistent with the known mechanism of action of this NSAID. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in P-gp expression in rat brain microvessels not only following PIP induction but also after diclofenac treatment alone. Additionally, in situ brain perfusion studies showed that both PIP and diclofenac treatment alone increased P-gp efflux activity resulting in decreased morphine brain uptake. Critically, morphine analgesia was significantly reduced in animals pretreated with diclofenac (3 h), as compared to animals administered diclofenac and morphine concurrently. These novel findings suggest that administration of diclofenac and P-gp substrate opioids during pain pharmacotherapy may result in a clinically significant drug-drug interaction. PMID:24520393

  4. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol in self-therapy of various disorders in students of different fields of study.

    PubMed

    Wiliński, Jerzy; Lechowicz, Marta; Kameczura, Tomasz; Głowacki, Mikołaj; Kameczura, Anna; Chrapusta, Anna; Wiliński, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and paracetamol are most commonly the first-line pharmacotherapy in combating different pain and inflammatory disorders and fever. Unfortunately, those drugs might have serious side effects, especially when they are used in an inappropriate way. The aim of the study was to explore various aspects of NSAIDs and paracetamol use in the self-therapy of miscellaneous disorders in young adults. The questionnaire-based survey comprised 250 consecutive students aged 22.1 ± 1.9 years (189 women) of diverse fields of study. The drugs were applied in clinical conditions in which they should be avoided including asthma attack (1.2%), vomiting (2.4%), malaise and depression (3.6%), in autumn and winter as a preventive measure against infections (14.0%), heart-burn (2.0%) and during food poisoning (16.0%). As many as 6.0% of the students claimed that studied medications are ultimately free of adverse reactions. Men more frequently than women used NSAIDs and paracetamol during alcohol consumption (49.2% vs 30.7%, p = 0.009, respectively) but less often were aware that there are maximum doses of medications which should not be exceeded (57.4% vs 76.7%, p = 0.003, respectively). The students of medical-related degree courses (n = 82) compared with individuals of other subjects (n = 168) declared they more often have the custom of always reading medications' leaflets (46.3% vs 31.0%, p = 0.017, respectively). Side effects of medicines were reported by 65 participants - 26.0%. In conclusion, students' knowledge about NSAIDs and paracetamol is low. Participants do not search for information on drug related endangerments, the medication group choice for the given disorder is often inappropriate and the drugs are applied in conditions in which they are contraindicated. PMID:26839243

  5. Analgesic effect of percutaneously absorbed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: an experimental study in a rat acute inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Miho; Shirasaka, Masayoshi; Konno, Shin-ichi; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Background External medication that is absorbed percutaneously may be used to reduce inflammation and relieve pain from acute injuries such as ankle sprains and bruises. The plaster method of percutaneous absorption for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was established in Japan in 1988. However, due to the possibility of a placebo effect, the efficacy of this method remains unclear. This experimental study was conducted to control for the placebo effect and to study the efficacy of the plaster method in relieving pain by using a rat model of inflammation. Methods Male Wistar-Imamichi rats were used. A yeast suspension was injected into the right hind paw to induce inflammation. A sheet (2.0 × 1.75 cm) containing the drug was adhered to the inflamed paw. Five treatment groups were used, and each sheet contained a single drug: loxoprofen sodium (loxoprofen-Na) (2.5 mg); felbinac (1.75 mg); indomethacin (1.75 mg); ketoprofen (0.75 mg); or base only (control, 0 mg). Mechanical pain threshold, expression of c-Fos in the dorsal horn, and amount of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in the inflamed paw were evaluated. Results Pain threshold increased after treatment, and was significantly increased in the loxoprofen-Na group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Amounts of PGE2 were significantly decreased in the loxoprofen-Na and indomethacin groups compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Expression of c-Fos was significantly decreased in the loxoprofen-Na group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion Percutaneously absorbed NSAIDs have an analgesic effect, inhibit expression of c-Fos in the dorsal horn, and reduce PGE2 in inflamed tissue, indicating the efficacy of this method of administration for acute inflammation and localized pain. PMID:18234123

  6. Sub-lethal effects induced by a mixture of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea

    2012-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the sixth top-selling drugs worldwide and are commonly found in freshwater ecosystems in the high ng/l to low μg/l range. Recent studies have investigated both the acute and the chronic toxicity of single NSAIDs on different biological models, but these studies have completely neglected the fact that, in the environment, non-target organisms are exposed to mixtures of drugs that have unforeseeable toxicological behavior. This work investigated the sub-lethal effects induced by a mixture of three common NSAIDs, namely, diclofenac, ibuprofen and paracetamol, on the freshwater bivalve, the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). The mussels were exposed to three different environmental concentrations of the mixture (Low, Mid and High). A multi-biomarker approach was used to highlight cyto-genotoxic effects and the imbalance of the oxidative status of the treated specimens. The Neutral Red Retention Assay (NRRA) was used as a biomarker of cytotoxicity, whereas the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase were measured to assess the role played by the oxidative stress enzymes. In addition, the single cell gel electrophoresis assay, the DNA Diffusion assay and the micronucleus test were used to investigate possible genotoxic effects. According to our NRRA results, each treatment was able to induce a significant cellular stress in bivalves, probably due to the raise of oxidative stress, as indicated by the alteration of enzyme activities measured in treated specimens. Moreover, the mixture induced significant enhancements of DNA fragmentation, which preluded fixed genetic damage, as highlighted by the increase of both apoptotic and micronucleated cells. PMID:21971971

  7. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A; Perkins, James R; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation. PMID:27489545

  8. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A.; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A.; Perkins, James R.; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation. PMID:27489545

  9. The effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug choline magnesium trisalicylate on gastric mucosal cell exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, K G; Hearns, J; Crean, G P

    1984-01-01

    Gastric mucosal cell exfoliation was measured in 10 normal subjects taking choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), aspirin and placebo. Both drugs resulted in significantly elevated rates of exfoliation although the serum salicylate levels achieved with aspirin were lower than those achieved by CMT. Side-effects of tinnitus, nausea and increased faecal blood loss were more common while subjects were taking CMT. PMID:6691886

  10. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and paracetamol use in Queensland and in the whole of Australia

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Tett, Susan E

    2008-01-01

    Background Cross national drug utilization studies can provide information about different influences on physician prescribing. This is important for medicines with issues around safety and quality of use, like non selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ns-NSAIDs) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. To enable comparison of prescription medicine use across different jurisdictions with a range of population sizes, data first need to be compared within Australia to understand whether use in a smaller sub-population may be considered as representative of the total use within Australia. The aim of this study was to compare the utilization of non selective NSAID, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol between Queensland and Australia. Method Dispensing data were obtained for concession beneficiaries for Australia for ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol subsidized by the PBS over the period 1997–2003. The same data were purchased for Queensland. Data were converted to Defined Daily Dose (DDD)/1000 beneficiaries/day (World Health Organization anatomical therapeutic chemical classification, 2005). Results Total NSAID and paracetamol consumption were similar in Australia and Queensland. Ns-NSAID use decreased sharply with the introduction of COX-2 inhibitors (from approximately 80 to 40 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day). Paracetamol was constant (approximately 45 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day). COX-2 inhibitors consumption was initially higher in Queensland than in the whole of Australia. Conclusion Despite initial divergence in celecoxib use between Queensland and Australia, the use of ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol overall, in concession beneficiaries, was comparable in Australia and Queensland. PMID:18816393

  11. Expression of pleiotrophin, an important regulator of cell migration, is inhibited in intestinal epithelial cells by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Desormaux, Alejandra; Freeman, Lisa C; Lillich, James D

    2012-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used drugs for the suppression of inflammation and pain. However, the analgesic properties of NSAIDs are also associated with significant negative side effects, most notably in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Increasingly, evidence indicates that the ulcerogenic properties of some NSAIDs are not exclusively the result of inhibition of cyclooxygenase isoforms in the GI tract, and other mechanisms, including inhibition of cell migration and epithelial restitution, are being explored. Recently, microarray analysis was used to identify potential novel targets of NSAID activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Treated cells exhibited significant reductions in the gene expression of pleiotrophin (PTN), a cytokine and growth factor known to participate in angiogenesis and bone growth. This report aimed to confirm the microarray results reported previously, and to measure protein expression of PTN in intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, we also examined the effects of exogenous PTN on cell migration in the presence and absence of either NSAIDs with variable ulcerogenic potential or PTN-specific siRNA. Our results demonstrated that indomethacin and NS-398, two NSAIDs with ulcerogenic potential significantly decrease both gene and protein expressions of PTN in IEC-6 cells and protein expression in IEC-6-Cdx2 cells. Additionally, cell migration experiments with PTN siRNA showed that PTN is an important mediator of IEC-6 cell migration, and addition of exogenous PTN partially restores the deficits in cell migration caused by treatment with indomethacin and NS-398. Finally, measurement of PTN protein expression in the GI tract of horses treated with phenylbutazone showed that PTN expression is reduced by NSAIDs in vivo. Our results show that PTN is an important mediator of cell migration in IEC-6 cells, and PTN is a potential target through which NSAIDs may inhibit cell migration, epithelial

  12. Effect of increase in orientational order of lipid chains and head group spacing on non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sutapa Mondal; Bansode, Amol S; Sarkar, Munna

    2010-12-21

    Membrane fusion is a key event in many biological processes. The fusion process, both in vivo and in vitro, is induced by different agents which include mainly proteins and peptides. For protein- and peptide-mediated membrane fusion, conformational reorganization serves as a driving force. Small drug molecules do not share this advantage; hence, drug induced membrane fusion occurring in absence of any other fusogenic agent and at physiologically relevant concentration of the drugs is a very rare event. To date, only three drugs, namely, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx), belonging to the oxicam group of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), have been shown by us to induce fusion at very low drug to lipid ratio without the aid of any other fusogenic agent. In our continued effort to understand the interplay of different physical and chemical parameters of both the participating drugs and the membrane on the mechanism of this drug induced membrane fusion, we present here the effect of increase in orientational order of the lipid chains and increase in head group spacing. This is achieved by studying the effect of low concentration cholesterol (<10 mol %) at temperatures above the chain-melting transition. Low concentration cholesterol (<10 mol %), above the gel to fluid transition temperature, is mainly known to increase orientational order of the lipid chains and increase head group spacing. To isolate the effect of these parameters, small unilameller vesicles (SUVs) formed by dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with an average diameter of 50-60 nm were used as simple model membranes. Fluorescence assays were used to probe the time dependence of lipid mixing, content mixing, and leakage and also used to determine the partitioning of the drugs in the membrane bilayer. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the effect of drugs in the presence of cholesterol on the chain-melting temperature which reflects the fluidization

  13. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and its protection by quercetin via a coenzyme Q-like action.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Acuña, Cristian; Lopez-Alarcón, Camilo; Aliaga, Margarita E; Speisky, Hernán

    2012-07-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in the development of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). A major objective of the present study was to investigate whether in vitro the NSAIDs, aspirin, indomethacin, diclofenac, piroxicam and ibuprofen, which feature different chemical structures, are able to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. All NSAIDs were effective inhibitors when added both, directly to mitochondria isolated from rat duodenum epithelium (50 μM) or to Caco-2 cells (250 μM). In the former system, complex I inhibition was concentration-dependent and susceptible to competition and reversion by the addition of coenzyme Q (32.5-520 μM). Based on reports suggesting a potential gastro-protective activity of quercetin, the ability of this flavonoid to protect isolated mitochondria against NSAIDs-induced complex I inhibition was evaluated. Low micromolar concentrations of quercetin (1-20 μM) protected against such inhibition, in a concentration dependent manner. In the case of aspirin, quercetin (5 μM) increased the IC50 by 10-fold. In addition, the present study shows that quercetin (5-10 μM) can behave as a "coenzyme Q-mimetic" molecule, allowing a normal electron flow along the whole electron transporting chain (complexes I, II, III and IV). The exposed findings reveal that complex I inhibition is a common deleterious effect of NSAIDs at the mitochondrial level, and that such effect is, for all tested agents, susceptible to be prevented by quercetin. Data provided here supports the contention that the protective action of quercetin resides on its, here for first time-shown, ability to behave as a coenzyme Q-like molecule. PMID:22652335

  14. Effects of acute exposure to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen on the developing North American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpole.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Skirrow, Rachel C; Brown, Lorraine L Y; van Aggelen, Graham; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-09-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical chemicals can represent constituents of municipal effluent outflows that are dispersed into aquatic receiving environments worldwide. Increasingly, there is concern as to the potential of such bioactive substances to interact with wildlife species at sensitive life stages and affect their biology. Using a combination of DNA microarray, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and quantitative nuclease protection assays, we assessed the ability of sub-lethal and environmentally relevant concentrations of ibuprofen (IBF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent and prevalent environmental contaminant, to function as a disruptor of endocrine-mediated post-embryonic development of the frog. While the LC50 of IBF for pre-metamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles is 41.5 mg/L (95% confidence interval: 32.3-53.5 mg/L), exposure to concentrations in the ppb range elicited molecular responses both in vivo and in organ culture. A nominal concentration of 15 μg/L IBF (actual = 13.7 μg/L) altered the abundance of 26 mRNA transcripts within the liver of exposed pre-metamorphic R. catesbeiana tadpoles within 6 d. IBF-treated animals demonstrated subsequent disruption of thyroid hormone-mediated reprogramming in the liver transcriptome affecting constituents of several metabolic, developmental, and signaling pathways. Cultured tadpole tail fin treated with IBF for 48 h also demonstrated altered mRNA levels at drug concentrations as low as 1.5 μg/L. These observations raise the possibility that IBF may alter the post-embryonic development of anuran species in freshwater environs, where IBF is a persistent or seasonal pollutant. PMID:25111458

  15. Evaluation of biological endpoints in crop plants after exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): implications for phytotoxicological assessment of novel contaminants.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Wiebke; Redshaw, Clare H

    2015-02-01

    Human pharmaceuticals have been detected in the terrestrial environment at µg to mg kg(-1) concentrations. Repeated application of sewage sludge (biosolids) and increasing reclaimed wastewater use for irrigation could lead to accumulation of these novel contaminants in soil systems. Despite this, potential phytotoxicological effects on higher plants have rarely been evaluated. These studies aimed to test effects upon germination, development, growth and physiology of two crop plants, namely radish (Raphanus sativus Spakler 3) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa All Year Around), after exposure to different, but structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) at environmentally relevant concentrations. A range of biological endpoints comprising biomass, length, water content, specific root and shoot length, root to shoot ratio, daily progress of stages of cell elongation and organ emergence (primary root, hypocotyl elongation, cotyledon emergence, cotyledon opening, and no change), as well as photosynthetic measurements were evaluated. Compounds from the fenamic acid class were found to affect R. sativus root endpoints (root length and water content), while ibuprofen affected early root development of L. sativa. In general, phytotoxicological effects on root endpoints demonstrated that impacts upon higher plants are not only compound specific, but also differ between plant species. It was found that the usage of a wide range of biological endpoints (all simple, cost-effective and ecologically relevant) were beneficial in detecting differences in plant responses to NSAID exposure. Due to paucity and discrepancy within the few previously available phytotoxicological studies with pharmaceuticals, it is now essential to allocate time and resources to consider development of suitable chronic toxicity tests, and some suggestions regarding this are presented. PMID:25463873

  16. Transcriptome modification of white blood cells after dietary administration of curcumin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in osteoarthritic affected dogs.

    PubMed

    Colitti, M; Gaspardo, B; Della Pria, A; Scaini, C; Stefanon, Bruno

    2012-06-30

    The dietary effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or curcumin on the gene expression of peripheral white blood cells in osteoarthritis (OA) affected dogs was investigated using a 44K oligo microarray. Two groups of OA dogs and one group of healthy dogs (6 dogs each) were clinically evaluated and blood was sampled before (T0) and after 20days (T20) of dietary administration of NSAID (NSAID group) or curcumin (CURCUMIN group). Differentially expressed genes (P<0.05) in comparison to the control group were identified with MeV software and were functional annotated and monitored for signaling pathways and candidate biomarkers using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). After 20days of treatment, the differentially expressed transcripts significantly (P<0.05) decreased from 475 to 173 in NSAID group and from 498 to 141 in CURCUMIN group. Genes involved in "inflammatory response" and in "connective tissue development and function" dramatically decreased at T20. Other genes, included in "cellular movement", "cellular compromise" and "immune cell trafficking", were differentially expressed at T0 but not at T20 in both groups. Specific molecular targets of CURCUMIN, not observed for NSAID, were the IkB up regulation in the "TNRF1 signaling pathway" and IL18 down regulation in the "role of cytokines in mediating communication between immune cells". The activity of CURCUMIN was also evidenced from the inhibition of macrophages proliferation (HBEGF), related to a strong down regulation of TNFα and to activation of fibrinolysis (SERPINE1). The results would suggest that curcumin offers a complementary antinflammatory support for OA treatment in dogs. PMID:22591841

  17. The role of activated carbon and disinfection on the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Mamais, Daniel; Mpouras, Thanasis; Kokkinidou, Despina; Samaras, Vasilios; Antoniou, Korina; Gioldasi, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are two important groups of emerging pollutants due to their toxicological and chemical characteristics and their persistent detection in the aquatic environment. Wastewater treatment plants are a significant pathway for their transfer to the water courses. It is well evidenced that these chemicals are only partially removed through biological treatment of wastewater and therefore being detected in secondary effluents. This work focuses on the evaluation of the efficiency of two well-established disinfection technologies (chlorination and UV irradiation) along with UV/H2O2 and powdered activated carbon (PAC) to remove these chemicals from biologically treated wastewater. Based on the results it is shown that appreciable removal efficiencies due to chlorination should be expected for most of the target compounds, whereas this was not the case for ibuprofen and ketoprofen. With the exemption of diclofenac and ketoprofen direct UV irradiation did not efficiently removed target compounds for UV doses usually applied for disinfection purposes. The application of advanced UV treatment through the addition of H2O2 although resulted in increased removal of the target compounds is not sufficient at moderate UV and H2O2 doses to achieve satisfactory removal efficiencies. PAC use resulted in sufficient removal of target compounds although high PAC doses were required for some chemicals. Comparison of Freundlich isotherms of this study with those of other studies, derived employing water samples, suggested that the water matrix along with the target compounds concentration range can significantly affect the outcome of the experiments. PMID:24645450

  18. Structural and binding studies of C-terminal half (C-lobe) of lactoferrin protein with COX-2-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Singh, Nagendra; Vikram, Gopalakrishnapillai; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2010-08-15

    Three COX-2-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), etoricoxib, parecoxib, and nimesulide are widely prescribed against inflammatory conditions. However, their long term administration leads to severe conditions of cardiovascular complications and gastric ulceration. In order to minimize these side effects, C-terminal half (C-lobe) of colostrum protein lactoferrin has been indicated to be useful if co-administered with NSAIDs. Lactoferrin is an 80kDa glycoprotein with two similar halves designated as N- and C-lobes. Since NSAID-binding site is located in the C-terminal half of lactoferrin, C-lobe was prepared from lactoferrin by limited proteolysis using proteinase K. The incubation of lactoferrin with serine proteases for extended periods showed that N-lobe was completely digested but C-lobe was resistant for more than 72h indicating its long half life in the animal gut. The solution studies have shown that COX-2-specific NSAIDs bind to C-lobe with binding constants ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-5)M showing significant affinities for sequestering these compounds. In order to understand the mode of binding and sequestering properties, the complexes of C-lobe with all these three compounds, etoricoxib, parecoxib, and nimesulide were prepared and the structures of their complexes with C-lobe were determined at 2.2, 2.9, and 2.7A resolutions, respectively. The analysis of the structures of complexes of C-lobe with NSAIDs clearly show that all the three compounds bind firmly at the same ligand-binding site in the C-lobe revealing the details of the interactions between C-lobe and NSAIDs. The mode of binding of COX-2-specific NSAIDs to C-lobe is similar to that of the binding of COX-2 non-specific NSAIDs to C-lobe. PMID:20515646

  19. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs modulate the physicochemical properties of plasma membrane in experimental colorectal cancer: a fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Vivek; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2011-12-01

    According to "fluid-mosaic model," plasma membrane is a bilayer constituted by phospholipids which regulates the various cellular activities governed by many proteins and enzymes. Any chemical, biochemical, or physical factor has to interact with the bilayer in order to regulate the cellular metabolism where various physicochemical properties of membrane, i.e., polarization, fluidity, electrostatic potential, and phase state may get affected. In this study, we have observed the in vivo effects of a pro-carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) and the two non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); sulindac and celecoxib on various properties of the plasma membrane of colonocytes, i.e., electric potential, fluidity, anisotropy, microviscosity, lateral diffusion, and phase state in the experimentally induced colorectal cancer. A number of fluorescence probes were utilized like membrane fluidity and anisotropy by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, membrane microviscosity by Pyrene, membrane electric potential by merocyanine 540, lateral diffusion by N-NBD-PE, and phase state by Laurdan. It is observed that membrane phospholipids are less densely packed and therefore, the membrane is more fluid in case of carcinogenesis produced by DMH than control. But NSAIDs are effective in reverting back the membrane toward normal state when co-administered with DMH. The membrane becomes less fluid, composed of low electric potential phospholipids whose lateral diffusion is being prohibited and the membrane stays mostly in relative gel phase. It may be stated that sulindac and celecoxib, the two NSAIDs may exert their anti-neoplastic role in colorectal cancer via modifying the physicochemical properties of the membranes. PMID:21725642

  20. Disparate effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on apoptosis in guinea-pig gastric mucous cells: inhibition of basal apoptosis by diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Miranda; Hanson, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce apoptosis in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Similar actions on normal gastric epithelial cells could contribute to NSAID gastropathy. The present work therefore compared the actions of diclofenac, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and the cyclo-oxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, NS-398, on a primary culture of guinea-pig gastric mucous epithelial cells. Cell number was assessed by staining with crystal violet. Apoptotic activity was determined by condensation and fragmentation of nuclei and by assay of caspase-3-like activity. Necrosis was evaluated from release of cellular enzymes. Ibuprofen (250 μM for 24 h) promoted cell loss, and apoptosis, under both basal conditions and when apoptosis was increased by 25 μM N-Hexanoyl-D-sphingosine (C6-ceramide). Diclofenac (250 μM for 24 h) reduced the proportion of apoptotic nuclei from 5.2 to 2.1%, and caused inhibition of caspase-3-like activity, without causing necrosis under basal conditions. No such reduction in apoptotic activity was evident in the presence of 25 μM C6-ceramide. The inhibitory effect of diclofenac on basal caspase-3-like activity was also exhibited by the structurally similar mefenamic and flufenamic acids (1–250 μM), but not by niflumic acid. Inhibition of superoxide production by the cells increased caspase-3-like activity, but the inhibitory action of diclofenac on caspase activity remained. Diclofenac did not affect superoxide production. Diclofenac inhibited caspase-3-like activity in cell homogenates and also inhibited human recombinant caspase-3. In conclusion, NSAIDs vary in their effect on apoptotic activity in a primary culture of guinea-pig gastric mucous epithelial cells, and the inhibitory effect of diclofenac on basal apoptosis could involve an action on caspase activity. PMID:11815376

  1. Activation of the farnesoid-X receptor protects against gastrointestinal injury caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Renga, Barbara; Palladino, Giuseppe; Santucci, Luca; Distrutti, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Low doses of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal damage. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid sensor essential for maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have investigated whether FXR is required for mucosal protection in models of gastrointestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs and if FXR activation has potential in the treatment or prevention of gastrointestinal injury caused by these agents. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH FXR+/+ and FXR−/− mice were given ASA (10 to 100 mg·kg−1) or NSAIDs. Gastric and intestinal mucosal damage assessed by measuring lesion scores. FXR were activated by giving mice natural (chenodeoxycholic acid; CDCA) or synthetic (GW4064) FXR agonists. KEY RESULTS FXR, mRNA and protein, was detected in human and mouse stomach. FXR−/− mice were more prone to develop severe gastric and intestinal injury in response to ASA and NSAIDs and showed a severe reduction in the gastrointestinal expression of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme required for generation of hydrogen sulphide. CSE expression was reduced by ≈50% in wild-type mice challenged with ASA. Treating wild-type mice but not FXR−/− mice with CDCA or GW4064 protected against gastric injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs, by a CSE-dependent and cycloxygenase- and NO-independent, mechanism. FXR activation by GW4064 rescued mice from intestinal injury caused by naproxen. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FXR was essential to maintain gastric and intestinal mucosal barriers. FXR agonists protected against gastric injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs by a CSE-mediated mechanism. PMID:21564085

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of cerebrovascular events in patients with osteoarthritis: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lapi, Francesco; Piccinni, Carlo; Simonetti, Monica; Levi, Miriam; Lora Aprile, Pierangelo; Cricelli, Iacopo; Cricelli, Claudio; Fanelli, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies show that the risk of cardiovascular adverse events for certain traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is similar to that of rofecoxib. While these results are focused on ischemic cardiomyopathy, there is little evidence concerning the risk of ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack and hemorrhagic stroke. Additionally, there is no information on nimesulide and ketoprofen, the most frequently prescribed NSAIDs in Italy, along with diclofenac. This study aims to determine whether the use of NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular events in Italy. We performed a case-control analysis nested in a cohort of patients with osteoarthritis between 2002 and 2011 who were newly treated with NSAIDs. The patients were followed until December 31, 2012. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of cerebrovascular events (index date) associated with current (until 30 days before the index date), recent (31-365 days) and past (>365 days) use of NSAIDs. Within a cohort of 29,722 patients, 1566 cases (1546 matched with controls) were identified (incidence rate = 11.0/1000 person-years). The overall rate of cerebrovascular event was not elevated with current NSAIDs overall when compared with past use. Among individual NSAIDs, diclofenac and ketoprofen were the molecules significantly associated with an increased rate of cerebrovascular events (OR = 1.53; 95 % CI 1.04-2.24; OR = 1.62; 95 % CI 1.02-2.58, respectively). The most frequent event was hemorrhagic stroke following the use of ketoprofen (OR = 2.09; 95 % CI 1.05-4.15). Diclofenac and ketoprofen seemed to increase the risk of cerebrovascular events. These findings might influence the choice of NSAIDs according to patient characteristics. PMID:26271463

  3. Poly(2-aminobenzothiazole)-coated graphene oxide/magnetite nanoparticles composite as an efficient sorbent for determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in urine sample.

    PubMed

    Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar; Ebrahimzadeh, Homeira

    2016-02-26

    In this study, for the first time, 2-aminobenzothiazole monomer was polymerized on Fe3O4 NPs, graphene oxide/Fe3O4 (GO/Fe3O4) and graphene/Fe3O4 (G/Fe3O4) nanocomposites. The synthesized magnetic nanosorbents were characterized by various techniques. The extraction ability of these nanosorbents including Fe3O4, GO/Fe3O4, G/Fe3O4, Fe3O4@poly(2-aminobenzothiazole) (Fe3O4@PABT), GO/Fe3O4@PABT and G/Fe3O4@PABT were compared for dispersive-micro-solid phase extraction of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The results revealed that GO/Fe3O4@PABT nanocomposite demonstrates higher extraction efficiency for naproxen, diclofenac and ibuprofen as selected model analytes. Following the sorption and elution steps, the model analytes were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography-photo diode array detection. Afterwards, a central composite design methodology combined with desirability function approach was applied to find out the optimal experimental conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection and linear dynamic ranges were achieved in the range of 0.07-0.3μgL(-1) and 0.25-2000μgL(-1), respectively. The percent of extraction recovery was 87.4, 85.5 and 90.5% for naproxen, diclofenac and ibuprofen, respectively. The obtained relative standard deviation (n=5) was 7.2, 5.4 and 6.4% for naproxen, diclofenac and ibuprofen, respectively. Ultimately, this method was employed for urinary monitoring of the target analytes and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:26839179

  4. Occurrence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Tehran source water, municipal and hospital wastewaters, and their ecotoxicological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Akbar; Amini, Mostafa M; Yazdanbakhsh, Ahmad Reza; Rastkari, Noushin; Mohseni-Bandpei, Anoushiravan; Nasseri, Simin; Piroti, Ehsan; Asadi, Anvar

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals are becoming widely distributed in waters and wastewaters and pose a serious threat to public health. The present study aimed to analyze non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in surface waters, drinking water, and wastewater in Tehran, Iran. Thirty-six samples were collected from surface waters, tap water, and influent and effluent of municipal and hospital wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). A solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was used for the determination of pharmaceuticals, namely ibuprofen (IBP), naproxen (NPX), diclofenac (DIC), and indomethacin (IDM). IBP was found in most of the samples and had the highest concentration. The highest concentrations of NSAIDs were found in the municipal WWTP influents and hospital WWTP effluents. In the municipal WWTP influent samples, the concentrations of IBP, NPX, DIC, and IDM were 1.05, 0.43, 0.23, and 0.11 μg/L, respectively. DIC was found only in one river sample. All NSAIDs were detected in tap water samples. However, their concentration was very low and the maximum values for IBP, NPX, DIC, and IDM were 47, 39, 24, and 37 ng/L, respectively, in tap water samples. Results showed that the measured pharmaceuticals were detected in all rivers with low concentrations in nanograms per liter range, except DIC which was found only in one river. Furthermore, this study showed that the aforementioned pharmaceuticals are not completely removed during their passage through WWTPs. A potential environmental risk of selected NSAIDs for the urban wastewater has been discussed. However, given their low measured concentrations, no ecotoxicological effect is suspected to occur. PMID:26553436

  5. Clinically important improvement in the WOMAC and predictor factors for response to non-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in osteoarthritic patients: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were first to detect MCID for WOMAC in a Moroccan population, and second, to identify the best pre-treatment predictors on the change of health after treatment by non-specific, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and to evaluate whether the predictors were dependent on the choice of the response criterion. Methods The study involved 173 patients with osteoarthritis in whom primary care physicians decided to start treatment with non-selective NSAIDs. Assessments at admission and after 6 weeks were conducted. In order to determine the threshold levels associated with a definition of clinically important improvement, the receiver operating characteristic method was used. Three different measures of response to a 6-week NSAIDs treatment were used: one indirect measure (MCID in the total WOMAC score), one direct measure (transition question) and a combination of both criteria. Results Eighty patients (46.3%) reported "a slightly better" general health status compared to that of 6 weeks before NSAIDs treatment. The MCID proportion is a 16.0% reduction in WOMAC. The most stable pre-treatment predictors on the improvement of health after treatment by NSAIDs were the absence of previous knee injury and a high level of education. Conclusions In our data, a 16.0% reduction of the total WOMAC score from baseline was associated with the highest degree of improvement on the transition scale category. This cut-off point had good accuracy, and should be appropriate for use in the interpretation of clinical studies results, as well as in clinical care. PMID:22269793

  6. Molecular modeling and simulation studies of recombinant laccase from Yersinia enterocolitica suggests significant role in the biotransformation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepti; Rawat, Surender; Waseem, Mohd; Gupta, Sunita; Lynn, Andrew; Nitin, Mukesh; Ramchiary, Nirala; Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-01-01

    The YacK gene from Yersinia enterocolitica strain 7, cloned in pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), showed laccase activity when oxidized with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and guaiacol. The recombinant laccase protein was purified and characterized biochemically with a molecular mass of ≈58 KDa on SDS-PAGE and showed positive zymogram with ABTS. The protein was highly robust with optimum pH 9.0 and stable at 70 °C upto 12 h with residual activity of 70%. Kinetic constants, Km values, for ABTS and guaiacol were 675 μM and 2070 μM, respectively, with corresponding Vmax values of 0.125 μmol/ml/min and 6500 μmol/ml/min. It also possess antioxidative property against BSA and Cu(2+)/H2O2 model system. Constant pH MD simulation studies at different protonation states of the system showed ABTS to be most stable at acidic pH, whereas, diclofenac at neutral pH. Interestingly, aspirin drifted out of the binding pocket at acidic and neutral pH, but showed stable binding at alkaline pH. The biotransformation of diclofenac and aspirin by laccase also corroborated the in silico results. This is the first report on biotransformation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) using recombinant laccase from gut bacteria, supported by in silico simulation studies. PMID:26631965

  7. The Effects of Two Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Bromfenac 0.1% and Ketorolac 0.45%, on Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Won; Chung, Byung Hoon; Kim, Eung Kweon; Seo, Kyoung Yul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the additive effects of two types of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), bromfenac 0.1% or ketorolac 0.45%, relative to topical steroid alone in cataract surgery. Materials and Methods A total 91 subjects scheduled to undergo cataract operation were randomized into three groups: Group 1, pre/postoperative bromfenac 0.1%; Group 2, pre/postoperative preservative-free ketorolac 0.45%; and Group 3, postoperative steroid only, as a control. Outcome measures included intraoperative change in pupil size, postoperative anterior chamber inflammation control, change in macular thickness and volume, and ocular surface status after operation. Results Both NSAID groups had smaller intraoperative pupil diameter changes compared to the control group (p<0.05). There was significantly less ocular inflammation 1 week and 1 month postoperatively in both NSAID groups than the control group. The changes in central foveal subfield thickness measured before the operation and at postoperative 1 month were 4.30±4.25, 4.87±6.03, and 12.47±12.24 µm in groups 1 to 3, respectively. In the control group, macular thickness and volume increased more in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), compared to those without DM. In contrast, in both NSAID groups, NSAIDs significantly reduced macular changes in subgroups of patients with or without DM. Although three ocular surface parameters were worse in group 1 than in group 2, these differences were not significant. Conclusion Adding preoperative and postoperative bromfenac 0.1% or ketorolac 0.45% to topical steroid can reduce intraoperative miosis, postoperative inflammation, and macular changes more effectively than postoperative steroid alone. PMID:26446653

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, hormone receptor status, and breast cancer-specific mortality in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Allott, E H; Tse, C-K; Olshan, A F; Carey, L A; Moorman, P G; Troester, M A

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies report a protective association between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer risk, a finding consistent with NSAID-mediated suppression of aromatase-driven estrogen biosynthesis. However, the association between NSAID use and breast cancer-specific mortality is uncertain and it is unknown whether this relationship differs by hormone receptor status. This study comprised 935 invasive breast cancer cases, of which 490 were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, enrolled between 1996 and 2001 in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Self-reported NSAID use in the decade prior to diagnosis was categorized by duration and regularity of use. Differences in tumor size, stage, node, and receptor status by NSAID use were examined using Chi-square tests. Associations between NSAID use and breast cancer-specific mortality were examined using age- and race-adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis. Tumor characteristics did not differ by NSAID use. Increased duration and regularity of NSAID use was associated with reduced breast cancer-specific mortality in women with ER-positive tumors (long-term regular use (≥8 days/month for ≥ 3 years) versus no use; hazard ratio (HR) 0.48; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.98), with a statistically significant trend with increasing duration and regularity (p-trend = 0.036). There was no association for ER-negative cases (HR 1.19; 95 %CI 0.50-2.81; p-trend = 0.891). Long-term, regular NSAID use in the decade prior to breast cancer diagnosis was associated with reduced breast cancer-specific mortality in ER-positive cases. If confirmed, these findings support the hypothesis that potential chemopreventive properties of NSAIDs are mediated, at least in part, through suppression of estrogen biosynthesis. PMID:25151293

  9. Embryo transfer induces a subclinical endometritis in recipient mares which can be prevented by treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Koblischke, P; Kindahl, H; Budik, S; Aurich, J; Palm, F; Walter, I; Kolodziejek, J; Nowotny, N; Hoppen, H-O; Aurich, C

    2008-10-15

    We tested the hypothesis that subclinical endometritis occurs after embryo transfer (ET) in the horse. Recipient mares were treated with meclofenamic acid (M) or flunixin meglumin (F) after ET or were left untreated (n=9 per group). Embryos were re-collected 4 days after transfer. Endometrial biopsies were taken for histology and analysis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by immunohistochemistry and for PCR. Bacteriological swabs were collected from the uterus and lavage fluid of donor and recipient mares. Progesterone and prostaglandin F(2alpha) release was analysed in recipient mares after ET. Four days after ET, four embryos were recovered from group M and three from group F and untreated mares, each. The number of polymorph nuclear neutrophils was reduced in treated mares (p<0.05). Expression of mRNA for inflammatory cytokines did not differ between groups. In group M, expression of endometrial prostaglandin-E-synthase was higher than in group F (p<0.05). Three out of nine control mares underwent preterm luteolysis (p<0.05 vs. treatment groups), prostaglandin release (p<0.05) and the number of COX-2 positive cells (p<0.01) were significantly higher than in treated mares. Only few bacteriological swabs were positive. In conclusion, treatment of embryo recipient mares with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs inhibits the inflammatory response of the endometrium after ET. Meclofenamic acid may have advantages in comparison to flunixin meglumin due to a different influence on prostaglandin synthesis that may not result in inhibition of embryonic mobility. PMID:18657311

  10. Prescription of and Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Gastroprotective Agents in At-Risk Gastrointestinal Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanas, Angel; Polo-Tomás, Mónica; Roncales, Pilar; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Zapardiel, Javier

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) risk factors who take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should also take gastroprotective agents (GPAs). No studies have evaluated adherence and reasons for non-adherence to GPA and NSAID therapies. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, observational, longitudinal study. Patients attending rheumatology/orthopedic clinics who were co-prescribed NSAID plus GPA for at least 15 days and had risk factors for GI complications were followed up by telephone call. Optimal adherence was defined as taking the drug for ≥80% of prescribed days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with non-adherence. RESULTS: Of 1,232 patients interviewed, 192 were excluded because of inaccurate data. Of the remaining 1,040 patients, 74% were prescribed low-dose NSAIDs and 99.8% were prescribed a standard or high-dose GPA. In all, 70% of NSAIDs and 63.1% of GPA prescriptions were short term (<30 days). The majority of patients who were prescribed either an NSAID (92.5%) or GPA (85.9%) started therapy. Optimal adherence to GPA or NSAIDs was reported by 79.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 76.9−82.2%) and 84.1% (95% CI: 81.7−86.3%) of patients, respectively. More adverse events occurred among patients who reported non-optimal adherence than among patients with optimal adherence to GPA (22.1 vs. 1.9%, P<0.0001). As reasons for non-adherence, patients most frequently cited infrequent/low-intensity rheumatic pain (NSAIDs) or forgetfulness (GPAs). Adverse events and short-term treatment were independent factors associated with poor adherence for both NSAIDs and GPAs. History of uncomplicated peptic ulcer and frequent dosing were additional factors associated with non-adherence to NSAIDs. CONCLUSIONS: Most frequent reasons for non-adherence are infrequent/low-intensity rheumatic pain (NSAIDs) or forgetfulness (GPAs). Short-term treatment and adverse events were associated with poor

  11. Prescribing patterns of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in chronic kidney disease patients in the South African private sector.

    PubMed

    Meuwesen, Willem P; du Plessis, Jesslee M; Burger, Johanita R; Lubbe, Martie S; Cockeran, Marike

    2016-08-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used pharmaceutical agents worldwide. NSAIDs are considered nephrotoxic and should therefore be used with caution or be avoided completely in high risk patients, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Objective This study aimed to investigate the prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients in order to generate awareness and improve the outcome of these patients. Setting The study was conducted using medicine claims data in the private health sector of South Africa. Method A descriptive, quantitative study was performed, using retrospective data obtained from a Pharmaceutical Benefit Management company. Data from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2013 were analysed. The study population consisted of all patients with an ICD-10 code for a CKD (N18), in association with a paid claim for an NSAID. Main outcome measure The stratification of NSAID prescribing volume among the CKD population in terms of gender, age, NSAID type, dosage and prescriber type. Results The prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients varied between 26 and 40 % over the 5 year study period. No association between gender and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was found, with p > 0.05 and Cramer's V < 0.1 for each year of the study. The association between age groups and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was statistically significant, but practically weak (p < 0.05; Cramer's V ≥ 0.1). Most NSAID prescriptions (52-63 %) were for patients aged 35-64 years. Diclofenac (34.25 %) was the single most frequently prescribed NSAID, but the COX-2-inhibitors (celecoxib, meloxicam and etoricoxib) were the preferred NSAID class to be prescribed. The majority (61.6 %) of the NSAIDs were prescribed by general medical practitioners in dosages meeting and even exceeding the recommended daily dosage of patients with normal kidney function. Conclusions Even though NSAIDs are

  12. Comparison of three inhaled non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the airway response to sodium metabisulphite and adenosine 5'-monophosphate challenge in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Wisniewski, A.; Pavord, I.; Knox, A.; Tattersfield, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to assess the role of prostaglandins in asthma but their effects on bronchoconstrictor challenges have been inconsistent. The effects of three nebulised nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the airway response to inhaled sodium metabisulphite (MBS) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) were compared in the same asthmatic subjects to see whether contractile prostaglandins were involved in MBS or AMP induced bronchoconstriction. A possible protective effect of the osmolarity or pH of the inhaled solutions was also assessed. METHODS: Two double blind placebo controlled studies were carried out. In study 1, 15 non-aspirin sensitive patients with mild asthma attended on four occasions and inhaled 5 ml of lysine aspirin (L-aspirin) 900 mg, indomethacin 50 mg, sodium salicylate 800 mg, or saline 20 minutes before an inhaled MBS challenge. On four further occasions 14 of the patients inhaled the same solutions followed by an inhaled AMP challenge. In study 2, 10 of the patients attended on four additional occasions and inhaled 5 ml of 0.9%, 3%, 10%, or 9.5% saline with indomethacin 50 mg 20 minutes before an inhaled MBS challenge. RESULTS: In study 1 inhaled lysine aspirin had a similar effect on MBS and AMP induced bronchoconstriction, increasing the provocative dose causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PD20) by 1.29 (95% CI 0.54 to 2.03) and 1.23 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.93) doubling doses, respectively. Indomethacin increased the MBS PD20 and AMP PD20 by 0.64 (95% CI -0.1 to 1.38) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.29 to 1.69) doubling doses, respectively. Sodium salicylate had no significant effect on either challenge. The two solutions causing most inhibition were the most acidic and the most alkaline. In study 2 inhaled 9.5% saline with indomethacin (osmolarity 3005 mOsm/kg) increased the MBS PD20 by 1.1 doubling doses (95% CI 0.2 to 2.0) compared with only 0.09 (95% CI -0.83 to 1.0) and 0.04 (95% CI -0.88 to 0.95) doubling doses

  13. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Use in Primary Health Care Centers in A’Seeb, Muscat: A Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shidhani, Asma; Al-Rawahi, Naama; Al-Rawahi, Abdulhakeem

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess the trend of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in primary health care institutions located in A’Seeb, a province in the capital city of Oman, Muscat. Additionally, we evaluated the relationship between a physician’s years of experience and the number of prescription issued, as well as the presence of risk factors and side effects in the patients who received these prescriptions. Method A clinical audit was conducted in four primary health care centers in the Muscat region over a one-week period in April 2014. The target population included patients aged 18 years or over who attended one of the four health centers and were prescribed NSAIDs. Overall, 272 patients were recruited by systematic random sampling. The data were collected by two methods: direct face-to-face interviews and evaluations of the patient’s electronic medical file. The prescribing doctors were blind to the audit. The collected information included patients demographics, past and current medical history of related comorbidities, NSAID type, dose, duration and indications for use, concomitant warfarin or/and aspirin prescriptions, and co-prescription of gastroprotective agents. Results In total, 15% of patients received an NSAID prescription: females were issued more prescriptions than males. The percentage of patients who received an NSAID prescription across the health centers ranged from 9% to 24%. The main reason for prescribing NSAIDs was musculoskeletal problems. The most frequently prescribed NSAID was ibuprofen. Sixteen percent of patients who received an NSAID prescription had a risk factor related to its use. The mean and median duration of the NSAID prescriptions of all types were 5.6 and 5.0 days, respectively. Physicians with a greater number of years experience prescribed more NSAIDs. Conclusion Our study showed that the number of prescriptions of NSAIDs among various institutes varied, which could reflect the level of awareness

  14. Trends of non-union and prescriptions for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the United States, 1993–2012

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Surgical care and pain management for patients with fractures have evolved over the years. We wanted to ascertain if there were any changes in the incidence of non-unions and, if so, whether the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including COX-2 selective inhibitors, might have an effect. Patients and methods We used the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) to estimate the annual number of patients hospitalized for surgical treatment of a non-union between 1993 and 2012, and calculated age-adjusted rates of non-union. We estimated the prevalence of prescriptions for NSAIDs from 1996 through 2012 using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). The interrupted time-series analysis was used to relate quarterly rates of non-union to changes in prescriptions for NSAIDs between 1996 and 2009. Results The annual estimate of non-unions in the USA declined 30% from 25,634 in 1993 to 17,815 in 2012 (p < 0.001). Specifically, the age-adjusted rate of non-unions decreased by 44% from 8.6 per 105 persons in 1996 to 4.8 per 105 persons in 2012 (p < 0.001). However, there was an 8% increase in the incidence rate of non-unions (p = 0.003) between 2000 and 2004, when certain COX-2 selective inhibitors were on the market and their prescriptions were prevalent at around 6% among those with fractures. A drop in non-union estimates from 22,321 in 2010 to 18,789 in 2011 (p = 0.04) also coincided with a marked decrease in prescriptions for NSAIDs in patients with fractures, from 22% to 14% (p = 0.02). Interpretation Non-unions in the USA declined substantially between 1993 and 2012, but this was interrupted by changes in prescriptions for NSAIDs, with sustained increases between 2000 and 2004 followed by transient decreases in 2005 and 2011. PMID:25761793

  15. The efficacy of duloxetine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids in osteoarthritis: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of duloxetine versus other oral treatments used after failure of acetaminophen for management of patients with osteoarthritis. Methods A systematic literature review of English language articles was performed in PUBMED, EMBASE, MedLine In-Process, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov between January 1985 and March 2013. Randomized controlled trials of duloxetine and all oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids were included if treatment was ≥12 weeks and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC) total score was available. Studies were assessed for quality using the assessment tool from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for single technology appraisal submissions. WOMAC baseline and change from baseline total scores were extracted and standardized. A frequentist meta-analysis, meta-regression, and indirect comparison were performed using the DerSimonian-Laird and Bucher methods. Bayesian analyses with and without adjustment for study-level covariates were performed using noninformative priors. Results Thirty-two publications reported 34 trials (2 publications each reported 2 trials) that met inclusion criteria. The analyses found all treatments except oxycodone (frequentist) and hydromorphone (frequentist and Bayesian) to be more effective than placebo. Indirect comparisons to duloxetine found no significant differences for most of the compounds. Some analyses showed evidence of a difference with duloxetine for etoricoxib (better), tramadol and oxycodone (worse), but without consistent results between analyses. Forest plots revealed positive trends in overall efficacy improvement with baseline scores. Adjusting for baseline, the probability duloxetine is superior to other treatments ranges between 15% to 100%. Limitations of this study include the low number of studies included in the analyses, the inclusion of only English language

  16. Effect of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on prostate cancer incidence and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been postulated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use leads to decreased prostate cancer (PCa) risk. In recent years, NSAIDs’ role in PCa development has been extensively studied; however, there is not yet a definitive answer. Moreover, the epidemiological results for NSAIDs’ effect on PCa-specific mortality have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to examine the controversy. Methods We performed a literature database search and included all published studies conducted in the general population exposed to any NSAID, extracting an odds ratio (OR) or a hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) that compared the incidence of PCa or PCa-specific mortality with non-exposure. We derived a pooled OR or HR using random or fixed effects models, as appropriate. Subgroup analyses were also performed. Results Thirty-nine studies (20 case–control and 19 cohort studies) were included in this analysis. Thirty-one studies were available concerning NSAID use and PCa incidence and eight studies on PCa-specific mortality. Compared to non-use, aspirin use was statistically significantly associated with PCa incidence risk, and the association was slightly stronger for advanced PCa than for total PCa (OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87 to 0.97 for total PCa; OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.89 for advanced PCa). Aspirin use seems also to be associated with a modest reduction in PCa-specific mortality (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.96 for total PCa; OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.71 to 0.92 for advanced PCa). Generally, the pooled effects for any NSAIDs, NA-NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors demonstrated no adverse or beneficial effects on PCa development or PCa-specific mortality, but the results were not consistent. The effect estimates did not vary markedly when stratified by study design and study quality but varied by geographic region. Furthermore, long-term aspirin use (≥4 years) was also significantly associated

  17. Detection and characterization of synthetic steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Indian ayurvedic/herbal products using LC-MS/TOF.

    PubMed

    Savaliya, Akash A; Prasad, Bhagwat; Raijada, Dhara K; Singh, Saranjit

    2009-08-01

    It is claimed that ayurvedic/herbal healthcare products (AHPs) are safe because of their natural origin. However, several reports exist of adulteration of AHPs with synthetic drugs. In this study, a generalized strategy was developed using LC-MS/TOF for the detection and verification of steroidal and anti-inflammatory drugs in 58 AHPs collected from various parts of India. The strategy involved recording of mass spectral information for standard drugs-including ionization mode (ESI/APCI - ve or + ve), mass spectrum, accurate mass, identification of qualifier fragments (two), extracted ion chromatograms (EICs), isotopic pattern and determination of UV max (nm)-through UV-PDA studies. Adulteration was then detected in AHPs primarily through comparison of EICs at accurate m/z for molecular ion peaks and R(T) matching with the standard. It was confirmed by spiking with the standards, and matching mass spectrum, accurate mass, R(T) of qualifier fragments, isotopic pattern and UV spectrum of the standards with the adulterant peaks in AHPs. Dexamethasone and diclofenac were detected as adulterants in ten AHPs whereas one AHP tested positive for piroxicam and another for dexamethasone. All the adulterated products were sold by the healthcare practitioners, while no product marketed by manufacturers or chemist shops had this problem. The study showed that LC-MS/TOF-based screening could be used as a rapid approach to monitor adulteration of steroids and anti-inflammatory drugs in AHPs. PMID:20355217

  18. Effects of Preoperative Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Pain Mitigation and Patients' Shoulder Performance Following Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Alireza; Tabrizi, Ali; Elmi, Asghar; Abedini, Naghi; Mirza Tolouei, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Pain is one of the most important factors adversely affecting clinical outcomes of operated patients. The present study aims at evaluating effects of preoperative COX2 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory inhibitors on pain mitigation and performance of patients with shoulder rotator cuff tear. Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 60 patients suffering from rotator cuff injury candidate for arthroscopic repair. The patients were classified in two parallel and matched groups. One group (case group) was treated using Celecoxib (200mg/12h) started 48 hours before surgery and continued for 10 days after operation. In the control group, the placebo was prescribed in the same way. Postoperative pain, side effects, sleep disturbance, and short-term outcomes were compared between two groups using DASH questionnaire. Results: Postoperative pain in the Celecoxib group significantly decreased in comparison with the control one. The difference was statistically meaningful (P<0.001). Well motion ability was seen in 80% of patients of the Celecoxib group. It was 26.6% in the placebo group since pain inhibited them from exercising more motions. In this regard, there was a statistically meaningful difference between these two groups (P=0.02). Sleep disturbance was meaningfully at higher levels in the placebo group (P=0.001). Following up the patients for three months, it was made clear that performance of the Celecoxib group was better than that of the placebo one. Conclusion: COX2 inhibitors are well efficient in patients' pain management after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery. It results in less life complications, less sleep disturbances, improvement of patients' short-term clinical outcome, and more quick recovery. PMID:25436192

  19. Association of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongmei; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Lin, Yi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; White, Emily; Baron, John A.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Lindor, Noralane M.; Lemire, Mathieu; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ogino, Shuji; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Qu, Conghui; Rosse, Stephanie A.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Gauderman, W. James; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. Prior studies examining a potential differential relationship of aspirin and NSAIDs with colorectal cancer risk according to genetic factors have been limited to analyses of candidate genes or pathways. Objective To comprehensively identify common genetic markers that characterize individuals who may obtain differential benefit from aspirin and/or NSAID chemoprevention, we tested gene by environment (G X E) interactions between regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. Design Case-control study using the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) that enrolled cases of colorectal cancer ascertained between 1976 and 2011 and matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) of colorectal cancer and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using conventional logistic regression analysis and case-only interaction analysis, after adjusting for age, sex, center, the first three principal components to account for population structure, and known colorectal cancer risk factors. For all genome-wide analyses, a two-sided p-value<5.0×10-8, which yields a genome-wide significance level of 0.05, was considered statistically significant. Setting 10 observational studies (5 case-control and 5 cohort studies) that were initiated between 1976 and 2003 across the U.S., Canada, Australia and Germany. Participants 8,634 colorectal cancer cases and 8,553 controls of European descent. Exposures Genome-wide SNP data generated from genome-wide association scans and imputation to HapMap II, as well as information on regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and other colorectal cancer risk factors collected using in-person interviews and/or structured questionnaires. Main Outcomes and Measures

  20. Inhibition of GABAA receptor-mediated current responses by enoxacin (new quinolone) and felbinac (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) in Xenopus oocytes injected with mouse-brain messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, J; Shimokawa, M; Yamamoto, K; Sawada, Y; Asanuma, A; Yanagisawa, K; Iga, T

    1993-07-01

    The convulsant interaction between enoxacin (ENX), a new quinolone antibacterial agent (NQ), and felbinac (FLB), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), in vivo was reproduced as the change of GABA-induced current response in Xenopus oocytes injected with mouse brain mRNA. GABA (10 microM) response was inhibited by ENX in a dose-dependent manner, and IC50 of ENX was 96 microM. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of ENX was 80-fold potentiated in the presence of 10 microM FLB. The GABAA-antagonistic interaction between these two drugs in vitro was considered a possible mechanism of convulsant reaction after concomitant administration of NQs and NSAIDs in vivo. PMID:7691340

  1. COXIBs, CINODs and H₂S-releasing NSAIDs: current perspectives in the development of safer non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, S; Distrutti, E

    2011-01-01

    Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tNSAIDs, are effective medication for prevention of ischemic events and treatment of pain, fever and inflammation. However their use associates with a significant risk to develop gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complications. Low doses of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and effective doses of tNSAIDs associate with a 2-6 fold increase in the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. ASA and tNSAIDs inhibit cyclooxygenases (COXs). The COX exists at least in two isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2. Selective inhibitors of COX-2, the coxibs, spares the gastrointestinal tract while exert anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, coxibs increase the risk of thrombo-embolic events. Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H₂S), are potent vasodilatory agents that maintain mucosal integrity in the gastrointestinal tract. Hybrid molecules generated by coupling a NO or H₂S releasing moiety to ASA or tNSAIDs has resulted into new classes of NSAIDs. These agents, the NO-releasing NSAIDs, or CINOD, and the H₂S releasing NSAIDs are currently investigated as a potential alternative to tNSAIDs and coxibs. Naproxcinod has been the first, and so far the only, CINOD investigated in clinical trials. These studies have shown a slightly improvement in gastrointestinal tolerability in comparison to naproxen in surrogate endpoints (number of gastric and duodenal ulcers) and a significant reduction in the risk of destabilization of blood pressure control in patients with osteoarthosis taking anti-hypertensive medications in comparison to either naproxen and rofecoxib. The lack of outcome studies, however, has precluded the approval of naproxcinod by the Food and Drug Administration leading to a voluntary withdrawn of an application to the EMEA in May 2011. NSAIDs that releases H₂S as a mechanism supporting an intrinsic gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety are being investigated in preclinical models. Either naproxen and diclofenac

  2. Molecular interactions between some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) and bovine (BSA) or human (HSA) serum albumin estimated by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis (FA/CE).

    PubMed

    Ràfols, Clara; Zarza, Sílvia; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs, (naproxen, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen) and bovine (BSA) or human (HSA) serum albumin have been examined by means of two complementary techniques, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and frontal analysis/capillary electrophoresis (FA/CE). It can be concluded that ITC is able to measure with high precision the strongest drug-albumin interactions but the higher order interactions can be better determined by means of FA/CE. Then, the combination of both techniques leads to a complete evaluation of the binding profiles between the selected NSAIDs and both kind of albumin proteins. When BSA is the binding protein, the NSAIDs show a strong primary interaction (binding constants: 1.5 × 10(7), 8 × 10(5) and 2 × 10(6) M(-1) for naproxen, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen, respectively), and also lower affinity interactions of the same order for the three anti-inflammatories (about 1.7 × 10(4) M(-1)). By contrast, when HSA is the binding protein two consecutive interactions can be observed by ITC for naproxen (9 × 10(5) and 7 × 10(4) M(-1)) and flurbiprofen (5 × 10(6) and 6 × 10(4) M(-1)) whereas only one is shown for ibuprofen (9 × 10(5) M(-1)). Measurements by FA/CE show a single interaction for each drug being the ones of naproxen and flurbiprofen the same that those evaluated by ITC as the second interaction events. Then, the ability of both techniques as suitable complementary tools to establish the whole interaction NSAIDs-albumin profile is experimentally demonstrated and allows foreseeing suitable strategies to establish the complete drug-protein binding profile. In addition, for the interactions analyzed by means of ITC, the thermodynamic signature is established and the relative contributions of the enthalpic and entropic terms discussed. PMID:25159405

  3. Population-based analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use among children in four European countries in the SOS project: what size of data platforms and which study designs do we need to assess safety issues?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data on utilization patterns and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in children are scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utilization of NSAIDs among children in four European countries as part of the Safety Of non-Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SOS) project. Methods We used longitudinal patient data from seven databases (GePaRD, IPCI, OSSIFF, Pedianet, PHARMO, SISR, and THIN) to calculate prevalence rates of NSAID use among children (0–18 years of age) from Germany, Italy, Netherlands, and United Kingdom. All databases contained a representative population sample and recorded demographics, diagnoses, and drug prescriptions. Prevalence rates of NSAID use were stratified by age, sex, and calendar time. The person-time of NSAID exposure was calculated by using the duration of the prescription supply. We calculated incidence rates for serious adverse events of interest. For these adverse events of interest, sample size calculations were conducted (alpha = 0.05; 1-beta = 0.8) to determine the amount of NSAID exposure time that would be required for safety studies in children. Results The source population comprised 7.7 million children with a total of 29.6 million person-years of observation. Of those, 1.3 million children were exposed to at least one of 45 NSAIDs during observation time. Overall prevalence rates of NSAID use in children differed across countries, ranging from 4.4 (Italy) to 197 (Germany) per 1000 person-years in 2007. For Germany, United Kingdom, and Italian pediatricians, we observed high rates of NSAID use among children aged one to four years. For all four countries, NSAID use increased with older age categories for children older than 11. In this analysis, only for ibuprofen (the most frequently used NSAID), enough exposure was available to detect a weak association (relative risk of 2) between exposure and asthma exacerbation (the most common serious adverse event of interest

  4. Effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the acyl-CoA synthetase activity toward medium-chain, long-chain and polyunsaturated fatty acids in mitochondria of mouse liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Fumiyo; Kazuhiro, Misumi; Tatsuya, Hasegawa; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Tokuyama, Shogo; Masuyama, Teiichi

    2013-02-01

    Effect of eleven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the acyl-CoA synthetase activities toward octanoic, palmitic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids was evaluated in mouse liver and brain mitochondria. The drugs tested were aspirin, salicylic acid, diflunisal, mefenamic acid, indomethacin, etodolac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, loxoprofen, flurbiprofen. In mouse liver mitochondria, diflunisal and mefenamic acid exhibited the inhibitory activities not only for octanoic acid (IC(50) = 78.7 and 64.7 µM) and but also for palmitic acid (IC(50) = 236.5 and 284.4 µM), respectively. Aspirin was an inhibitor for the activation of octanoic acid only (IC(50) = 411.0 µM). In the brain, mefenamic acid and diflunisal inhibited strongly palmitoyl-CoA formation (IC(50) = 57.3 and 114.0 µM), respectively. The activation of docosahexaenoic acid in brain was sensitive to inhibition by diflunisal and mefenamic acid compared with liver. PMID:22299587

  5. Use of Fixed Dose Combination (FDC) Drugs in India: Central Regulatory Approval and Sales of FDCs Containing Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), Metformin, or Psychotropic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    McGettigan, Patricia; Roderick, Peter; Mahajan, Rushikesh; Kadam, Abhay; Pollock, Allyson M.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2012, an Indian parliamentary committee reported that manufacturing licenses for large numbers of fixed dose combination (FDC) drugs had been issued by state authorities without prior approval of the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) in violation of rules, and considered that some ambiguity until 1 May 2002 about states’ powers might have contributed. To our knowledge, no systematic enquiry has been undertaken to determine if evidence existed to support these findings. We investigated CDSCO approvals for and availability of oral FDC drugs in four therapeutic areas: analgesia (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), diabetes (metformin), depression/anxiety (anti-depressants/benzodiazepines), and psychosis (anti-psychotics). Methods and Findings This was an ecologic study with a time-trend analysis of FDC sales volumes (2007–2012) and a cross-sectional examination of 2011–2012 data to establish the numbers of formulations on the market with and without a record of CDSCO approval (“approved” and “unapproved”), their branded products, and sales volumes. Data from the CDSCO on approved FDC formulations were compared with sales data from PharmaTrac, a database of national drug sales. We determined the proportions of FDC sales volumes (2011–2012) arising from centrally approved and unapproved formulations and from formulations including drugs banned/restricted internationally. We also determined the proportions of centrally approved and unapproved formulations marketed before and after 1 May 2002, when amendments were made to the drug rules. FDC approvals in India, the United Kingdom (UK), and United States of America (US) were compared. For NSAID FDCs, 124 formulations were marketed, of which 34 (27%) were centrally approved and 90 (73%) were unapproved; metformin: 25 formulations, 20 (80%) approved, five (20%) unapproved; anti-depressants/benzodiazepines: 16 formulations, three (19%) approved, 13 (81%) unapproved

  6. Analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in milk using QuEChERS and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry: triple quadrupole versus Q-Orbitrap mass analyzers.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, Antoni; Guo, Lili; Centrich, Francesc; Granados, Mercè

    2016-08-01

    We developed a Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) method for the high throughput determination of 10 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in milk samples using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) with a triple quadrupole (QqQ) instrument and an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The new extraction procedure is highly efficient, and we obtained absolute recoveries in the range 78.1-97.1 % for the extraction and clean-up steps. Chromatographic separation is performed in the gradient mode with a biphenyl column and acidic mobile phases consisting of water and acetonitrile containing formic acid. The chromatographic run time was about 12 min, and NSAID peaks showed a good symmetry factor. For MS/MS detection, we used multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, using ESI in both positive and negative modes. Our method has been validated in compliance with the European Commission Decision 657/2002/EC, and we obtained very satisfactory results in inter-laboratory testing. Furthermore, we explored the use of a hybrid high resolution mass spectrometer, combining a quadrupole and an Orbitrap mass analyzer, for high resolution (HR) MS/MS detection of NSAIDs. We achieved lower NSAID quantification limits with Q-Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS) detection than those achieved with the QqQ instrument; however, its main feature is its very high selectivity, which makes HRMS/MS particularly suitable for confirmatory analysis. PMID:27325465

  7. Bar adsorptive microextraction (BAμE) coated with mixed sorbent phases-Enhanced selectivity for the determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in real matrices in combination with capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S M; Almeida, C; Neng, N R; Nogueira, J M F

    2016-01-01

    The present work proposes the application of bar adsorptive microextraction coated with mixed sorbent phases (n-vinylpyrrolidone and divinylbenzene polymers with strong and weak anion exchangers), combined with liquid desorption followed by capillary electrophoresis with diode array detection (BAμE(PMIX)-LD/CE-DAD) for the determination of trace levels of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs: salicylic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac and naproxen as model compounds) in urine and water matrices. Assays performed on 25mL of water samples spiked at the 80.0μg/L level, yielded average recoveries between 86.6 and 104.% for all the NSAIDs under study using optimized experimental conditions. The proposed analytical methodology demonstrated suitable detection limits (0.3μg/L) and good linear dynamic ranges (2.5-320.0μg/L) with determination coefficients higher than 0.9981. By using the standard addition methodology, the present analytical approach was applied on urine and water samples, where good selectivity and sensitivity were achieved. The proposed method, which operated under the floating sampling technology, proved to be a suitable sorption-based static microextraction alternative for monitoring trace levels of NSAIDs in urine and water samples. The methodology showed to be easy to implement, demonstrating good reproducibility and robustness, allowing the possibility to choose the most selective sorbent, or mixed sorbent phases, according to the compounds of interest. PMID:26638036

  8. A Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs versus Acetaminophen in Symptom Relief for the Common Cold: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trial Studies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Il-Kwon; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Ji, Young-Jung; Hwang, In-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen are widely used for common cold symptom relief. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of acetaminophen and NSAIDs in common cold symptom relief using meta-analysis of randomized controlled trial. Methods We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane, EMBASE, CINAHL, KMbase, KoreaMed, National Assembly Library, and Riss4u for studies released through June 2012. Two authors independently extracted the data. To assess the risk of bias, the Cochrane Collaborations risk of bias tool was used. The Review Manager ver. 5.1 (RevMan) was used for statistics. Results We identified 5 studies. The relative benefit for participants with pain relief was 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96 to 1.05) and I2 = 0%. The existence of the heterogeneity between studies was not important in this study, thus subgroup analysis was not implemented. The relative benefit for participants with rhinorrhea was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.35) and I2 = 0%, which also indicates the existence of heterogeneity was not important. The relative risk of adverse events was 1.14 (95% CI, 0.93 to 1.40), I2 = 0%. There was no apparent asymmetry in the funnel plot. Conclusion There was no difference between NSAIDs and acetaminophen in common cold symptom relief. PMID:23904953

  9. The effects of selected drugs, including chlorpromazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, on polyclonal IgG synthesis and interleukin 1 production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martinez, F; Coleman, J W

    1989-05-01

    We tested a range of drugs for their effects on in vitro polyclonal IgG synthesis by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with the lectin pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The test drugs were selected on the basis of reported disruptive effects on immune function in vivo. IgG production between day 4 and days 7 or 8 of culture was measured by biotin-streptavidin sandwich ELISA. The anti-psychotic agent chlorpromazine (0.55-1.7 microM) enhanced IgG synthesis to approximately double control levels. In contrast, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin, piroxicam, ibuprofen and aspirin inhibited IgG synthesis by up to 50%, with a rank order of potency that reflects their activity as inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase. Phenytoin, procainamide, propylthiouracil, methimazole, D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine all failed to modulate IgG synthesis at non-toxic concentrations. The potentiation and inhibition of IgG synthesis by chlorpromazine and indomethacin, respectively, was observed only when the drug was present during the first 24 h of culture. Neither chlorpromazine nor indomethacin, at non-toxic concentrations, affected PHA- and PWM-stimulated proliferation of PBMC. In addition, chlorpromazine, indomethacin and piroxicam, at concentrations which produced maximal modulation of IgG synthesis, and D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine at 10 microM failed to influence production of interleukin-1-like activity. We conclude that chlorpromazine and NSAIDs, although they exert opposite effects on IgG synthesis, act at an early stage of B cell differentiation that appears to be independent of interleukin 1 synthesis and early proliferative events. PMID:2788047

  10. The effects of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors, methotrexate, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids on cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roubille, Camille; Richer, Vincent; Starnino, Tara; McCourt, Collette; McFarlane, Alexandra; Fleming, Patrick; Siu, Stephanie; Kraft, John; Lynde, Charles; Pope, Janet; Gulliver, Wayne; Keeling, Stephanie; Dutz, Jan; Bessette, Louis; Bissonnette, Robert; Haraoui, Boulos

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review was to determine the association between cardiovascular events (CVEs) and antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA)/psoriasis (Pso). Systematic searches were performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases (1960 to December 2012) and proceedings from major relevant congresses (2010–2012) for controlled studies and randomised trials reporting confirmed CVEs in patients with RA or PsA/Pso treated with antirheumatic drugs. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed on extracted data. Out of 2630 references screened, 34 studies were included: 28 in RA and 6 in PsA/Pso. In RA, a reduced risk of all CVEs was reported with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (relative risk (RR), 0.70; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.90; p=0.005) and methotrexate (RR, 0.72; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.91; p=0.007). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.18; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.38; p=0.04), which may have been specifically related to the effects of rofecoxib. Corticosteroids increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.47; 95% CI 1.34 to 1.60; p<0.001). In PsA/Pso, systemic therapy decreased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 0.75; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.91; p=0.003). In RA, tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and methotrexate are associated with a decreased risk of all CVEs while corticosteroids and NSAIDs are associated with an increased risk. Targeting inflammation with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate may have positive cardiovascular effects in RA. In PsA/Pso, limited evidence suggests that systemic therapies are associated with a decrease in all CVE risk. PMID:25561362

  11. The effects of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors, methotrexate, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids on cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Roubille, Camille; Richer, Vincent; Starnino, Tara; McCourt, Collette; McFarlane, Alexandra; Fleming, Patrick; Siu, Stephanie; Kraft, John; Lynde, Charles; Pope, Janet; Gulliver, Wayne; Keeling, Stephanie; Dutz, Jan; Bessette, Louis; Bissonnette, Robert; Haraoui, Boulos

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review was to determine the association between cardiovascular events (CVEs) and antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA)/psoriasis (Pso). Systematic searches were performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases (1960 to December 2012) and proceedings from major relevant congresses (2010-2012) for controlled studies and randomised trials reporting confirmed CVEs in patients with RA or PsA/Pso treated with antirheumatic drugs. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed on extracted data. Out of 2630 references screened, 34 studies were included: 28 in RA and 6 in PsA/Pso. In RA, a reduced risk of all CVEs was reported with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (relative risk (RR), 0.70; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.90; p=0.005) and methotrexate (RR, 0.72; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.91; p=0.007). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.18; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.38; p=0.04), which may have been specifically related to the effects of rofecoxib. Corticosteroids increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.47; 95% CI 1.34 to 1.60; p<0.001). In PsA/Pso, systemic therapy decreased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 0.75; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.91; p=0.003). In RA, tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and methotrexate are associated with a decreased risk of all CVEs while corticosteroids and NSAIDs are associated with an increased risk. Targeting inflammation with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate may have positive cardiovascular effects in RA. In PsA/Pso, limited evidence suggests that systemic therapies are associated with a decrease in all CVE risk. PMID:25561362

  12. [Mefenamic acid and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in dental practice. A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Künzel, André Rätzer; Haschke, Manuel; Surber, Christian; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2007-01-01

    There are no studies verifying that mefenamic acid is more effective than other NSAID (= non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). However, there are several notions in the literature that this drug is less well-tolerated than other NSAID because over a prolonged period of application more lesions of the upper gastro-intestinal tract are induced as well as occasionally renal insufficiency. Compared to other NSAID the systemic toxicity starts already with relatively low doses above the maximal daily dose. Considering current knowledge there is no reason to prefer mefenamic acid to other NSAID. PMID:17330662

  13. A novel therapeutic approach targeting rheumatoid arthritis by combined administration of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin with reference to pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory enzymes, RANKL and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Farhath; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-03-25

    The present study was designed to assess the combined efficacy of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin against adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats, an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Morin (30 mg/kg b.wt), indomethacin (3 mg/kg b.wt) and combination of morin and indomethacin were administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after adjuvant injection. We have found that the activities/levels of lysosomal acid hydrolases (acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosaminidase and cathepsin-D), glycoproteins (hexose and hexosamine), urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycans), reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, VEGF and PGE2) and paw edema were significantly increased in arthritic rats compared to controls. Whereas, the anti-oxidant status (SOD, CAT, GPx, glutathione, and ceruloplasmin), body weight and bone collagen was found to be decreased. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), RANKL, and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) was found upregulated in the ankle joints of arthritic rats in qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, the increased protein expression of NF-kB p65 and COX-2 was also detected by immunohistochemical analysis. On the other hand, the above said imbalances were regulated back effectively to near normal as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis on combined treatment with morin and indomethacin. Our study indicates that the combination therapy was more effective than either single drug alone in suppressing the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:25698669

  14. Synthesis and mass-spectrometric characterization of human serum albumins modified by covalent binding of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: tolmetin and zomepirac.

    PubMed Central

    Zia-Amirhosseini, P; Ding, A; Burlingame, A L; McDonagh, A F; Benet, L Z

    1995-01-01

    Human serum albumins modified by covalently bound tolmetin or zomepirac were synthesized as models for similar products formed in vivo from acyl glucuronides. Activated esters of both drugs were prepared with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodi-imide, and then allowed to react with human serum albumin. Tryptic digests of both protein products were analysed by HPLC to identify peptides containing covalently bound drugs, and binding sites on albumin were identified by high-performance tandem MS. Three binding sites were common to both products, i.e. lysine-195, -199 and -351. Three further modified residues were identified for the tolmetin-albumin product, i.e. aspartic acid 1, and lysine-524 and -536. PMID:7487878

  15. Improving ex vivo skin permeation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: enhancing extemporaneous transformation of liposomes into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-González, Martha L; Bernad, Rafael; Calpena, Ana C; Domènech, Oscar; Montero, M T; Hernández-Borrell, Jordi

    2014-01-30

    Transdermal delivery of active principles is a versatile method widely used in medicine. The main drawback for the transdermal route, however, is the low efficiency achieved in the absorption of many drugs, mostly due to the complexity of the skin barrier. To improve drug delivery through the skin, we prepared and characterized liposomes loaded with ibuprofen and designed pharmaceutical formulations based on the extemporaneous addition of penetration enhancer (PE) surfactants. Afterwards, permeation and release studies were carried out. According to the permeation studies, the ibuprofen liposomal formulation supplemented with PEs exhibited similar therapeutic effects, but at lower doses (20%) comparing with a commercial formulation used as a reference. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the effect caused by PEs on the adsorption mechanism of liposomal formulations onto the skin. Non-fused liposomes, bilayers and multilayered lipid structures were observed. The transformation of vesicles into planar structures is proposed as a possible rationale for explaining the lower doses required when a liposome formulation is supplemented with surfactant PEs. PMID:24361268

  16. Orofacial cold hyperalgesia due to infraorbital nerve constriction injury in rats: reversal by endothelin receptor antagonists but not non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Souza, Gloria Emilia Petto; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2006-07-01

    The susceptibility of changes in responsiveness to noxious cold stimulation of rats submitted to chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CION) or carrageenan to drug inhibition was compared. Nocifensive responses were measured as total time rats engaged in bilateral facial grooming with both forepaws over the first 2 min following tetrafluoroethane spray application to the snout. Carrageenan (50 microg, s.c. into upper lip) caused short-lived ipsilateral cold hyperalgesia (peak at 3 h: vehicle 8.4+/-1.3, carrageenan 21.2+/-3.0 s) which was markedly suppressed by i.p. indomethacin (4 mg/kg), celecoxib (10mg/kg) or s.c. dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), endothelin ET(A) or ET(B) receptor antagonists (BQ-123 and BQ-788, respectively; 10 nmol/lip). CION caused ipsilateral cold hyperalgesia between Days 2 and 12, which peaked on Days 4 (sham 15.3+/-1.8, CION 32.4+/-5.3s) to 6. Established peak CION-induced cold hyperalgesia was unaffected by indomethacin and celecoxib, whereas dexamethasone, BQ-123, BQ-788, and i.v. injections of selective antagonists of ET(A) (atrasentan, 3-10 mg/kg) or ET(B) (A-192621, 5-20 mg/kg) receptors caused significant inhibitions lasting 1-2.5h (peaks approximately 65-90%). Bosentan (dual ET(A)/ET(B) receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.v.) abolished CION-induced cold hyperalgesia for up to 6h. Thus, once established, CION-induced orofacial hyperalgesia to cold stimuli appears to lack an inflammatory component, but is alleviated by endothelin ET(A) and/or ET(B) receptor antagonists. If this CION injury model bears predictive value to trigeminal neuralgia (i.e., paroxysmal orofacial pain triggered by various stimuli), endothelin receptors might constitute new targets for treatment of this disorder. PMID:16563629

  17. Pomegranate seed oil nanoemulsions improve the photostability and in vivo antinociceptive effect of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luana Mota; Sari, Marcel Henrique Marcondes; Cervi, Verônica Ferrari; Gehrcke, Mailine; Barbieri, Allanna Valentini; Zborowski, Vanessa Angonesi; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Cruz, Letícia

    2016-08-01

    The combination of pomegranate seed oil and ketoprofen in nanoemulsions aiming to improve the antinociceptive effect was evaluated according to the writhing test and Complete Freud's Adjuvant induced paw inflammation in mice. The formulations showed adequate characteristics and improved ketoprofen's photostability against UVC radiation exposure. The dialysis bag technique showed that 100% of the drug was released from the nanoemulsions after 3h and the oil amount had no influence on the releasing. Furthermore, time- and dose-response curves were obtained to determine the antinociceptive effect of the formulations. In the post-test, the nanoemulsion containing ketoprofen significantly reduced abdominal constrictions in time-response curve, showing effect up to 12h while the free ketoprofen showed effect up to 3h. In addition, the blank nanoemulsion presented a reduction of abdominal constriction up to 1h of pre-treatment. Regarding the dose-response curve, the free ketoprofen presents effect at 0.5mg/Kg dose and nanoemulsion at 1.0mg/Kg dose. Time- and dose-response curves were performed to determine the antinociceptive effect in inflammatory pain. After the evaluation of mechanical allodynia testing at the Von Frey Hair, the free ketoprofen showed effect up to 6h while nanoemulsions presented effect up to 10h. Moreover, acute toxicity was performed with ALT and AST activity evaluations and urea levels. After 7 days of treatment, no toxic effects for nanoemulsions were found. In conclusion, ketoprofen-loaded pomegranate seed oil nanoemulsions presented adequate characteristics and a high antinociceptive activity in the animal models tested. PMID:27088191

  18. Development of a simple method for simultaneous determination of nine subclasses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in milk and dairy products by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tao; Zhu, Ai-Ling; Zhou, Yue-Ning; Hu, Ting; Yue, Zhen-Feng; Chen, Dong-Dong; Wang, Guo-Min; Kang, Jian; Fan, Chun-lin; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Hai-Yang

    2013-08-15

    A multi-residue analysis method for simultaneous determination of nine subclasses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in milk and dairy products by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) has been established. The sample was initially extracted and deproteinized with ascorbic acid buffer (0.01M, pH 3) and acetonitrile-ethyl acetate mixture, followed by centrifugation and evaporation, then reconstituted with acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid (1+1, v/v). After removal of lipid material by n-hexane, the sample was analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS with electro-spray ionization (ESI) interface in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) mode. The range of limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.03-0.30μg/kg and 0.10-1.00μg/kg, respectively. The recoveries in milk, milk powder, yogurt, processed cheese and milk beverage ranged from 61.7% to 117%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 17.9% at three spiked levels (1, 10 and 100 times of the LOQ). Matrix effects were also investigated and it was determined the signals of the analytes were suppressed from 9.4% to 76.6% in processed cheese. The proposed method was also applied to incurred sample analysis. The results proved that this method was suitable for the simultaneous determination of nine subclasses of NSAIDs residues in milk and dairy products. PMID:23845391

  19. Postscreening follow-up of the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial on putative prostate cancer risk factors: vitamin and mineral use, male pattern baldness, pubertal development and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Sami; Määttänen, Liisa; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-08-01

    Objective The etiology of prostate cancer (PCa) is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the association between PCa risk and the indicators of endogenous androgen production at puberty, male pattern baldness, over-the-counter use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin supplement use. Materials and methods Participants in the third round of the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial were sent a survey on possible PCa risk factors and 11,795 out of 12,740 (93%) men returned the questionnaire. PCa cases were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Results During the median follow-up of 6.6 years, 757 PCa cases were diagnosed and 21 men died from PCa. Compared to earlier onset, puberty onset after 15 years of age was associated with a borderline significant decrease in PCa risk [hazard ratio (HR) 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75-1.00] but not with PCa mortality. Weekly use of ibuprofen was associated with an increased risk of PCa overall (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.08-1.91) and with metastatic PCa (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.12-1.99) compared to less frequent use. No statistically significant association was found between vitamin use and PCa. Conclusions This study suggests that the timing of initiation of endogenous androgen production at puberty may have importance for later PCa development. Current use of over-the-counter ibuprofen is associated with an increased risk of PCa. There was no evidence of any protective effects of vitamin use on PCa risk. PMID:26927237

  20. Determination of widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water samples by in situ derivatization, continuous hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Es'haghi, Z

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an analytical procedure which allows the quantification of pharmaceuticals in water at the ng L(-1) level. Hence, it is reported research on the application of a rapid, inexpensive and simple continuous hollow fiber liquid-phase micro extraction (CHF-LPME) for the pre-concentration and determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (IBP), naproxen (NAP), and ketoprofen (KEP), in wastewater. In this method, a 2.50 cm end sealed piece of a polypropylene hollow fiber was immersed into the organic solvent, octanol, for 30 s. After solvent impregnation with the pores of the fiber, the excess amounts of solvent were removed from inside the fiber, and 4.0 microL of octanol, as the acceptor phase, was injected into the fiber carefully. The fiber was settled using a microsyringe into a 10.0 mL glass test tube, and 20.00 mL of the aqueous solution (the donor phase), was circulated by a pump around it. After analyte extraction for an optimized period of time (20 min), 2 microL of the organic solvent was withdrawn into the microsyringe and injected into the GC-FID for further analysis. Finally, based on the optimized analytical conditions, the method was linear in the range of 2.5-500 ng L(-1). The limits of detection were 1-2 ng L(-1). Repeatability of this method on an intra-day scale was 3.4-10.2% (RSD%). NSAIDs have been detected in several municipal wastewater samples, and the concentration range was 9.0-19.0 ng L(-1). PMID:19393370

  1. Sol-gel-derived magnetic SiO2/TiO2 nanocomposite reinforced hollow fiber-solid phase microextraction for enrichment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from human hair prior to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Esmaeili-Shahri, Effat

    2014-10-01

    Hollow fiber-solid phase micro-extraction (HF-SPME) technique containing sol-gel-derived Fe3O4/SiO2/TiO2 core-double shell nanocomposite as a novel high efficiency sorbent, coupled with high performance liquid chromatography was used to extraction and determination of six non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; acetylsalicylic acid, naproxen, piroxicam, diclofenac, indomethacin and mefenamic acid, in hair samples. First, magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions (where the ratio of Fe(II) to Fe(III) is 1:2 and a non-oxidizing environment), in alkaline medium to produce magnetite particles. Subsequently, surface of Fe3O4-NPs was modified with SiO2 and TiO2 using layer-by-layer chemical technique. A core-shell structure of Fe3O4/SiO2/TiO2 composite was prepared by coating magnetite core particles with silica and titania layers. In the proposed method, NSAIDs were extracted by the synthesized nanocomposite and analyzed by HPLC. The parameters affecting the efficiency of magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs) assisted HF-SPME were investigated and optimized. The method validation was included and satisfying results with high pre-concentration factors (405 up to 2450) were obtained. It owes large surface area and porosity of the nano-adsorbent. Under the optimal conditions, the method detection limits (S/N=3) were in the range of 0.01-0.10μgml(-1) and the limits of quantification (S/N=10) between 0.04 and 0.30μgml(-1). Relative standard deviations were 3.09-6.61%. Eventually, the method was successfully applied to human hair after administration of NSAIDs. PMID:25464107

  2. Translocation of Heme Oxygenase-1 to Mitochondria Is a Novel Cytoprotective Mechanism against Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug-induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, and Gastric Mucosal Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Bindu, Samik; Pal, Chinmay; Dey, Sumanta; Goyal, Manish; Alam, Athar; Iqbal, Mohd. Shameel; Dutta, Shubham; Sarkar, Souvik; Kumar, Rahul; Maity, Pallab; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of action of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS)-mediated apoptotic tissue injury was investigated. MOS-mediated gastric mucosal apoptosis and injury were introduced in rat by indomethacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Here, we report that HO-1 was not only induced but also translocated to mitochondria during gastric mucosal injury to favor repair mechanisms. Furthermore, mitochondrial translocation of HO-1 resulted in the prevention of MOS and mitochondrial pathology as evident from the restoration of the complex I-driven mitochondrial respiratory control ratio and transmembrane potential. Mitochondrial translocation of HO-1 also resulted in time-dependent inhibition of apoptosis. We searched for the plausible mechanisms responsible for HO-1 induction and mitochondrial localization. Free heme, the substrate for HO-1, was increased inside mitochondria during gastric injury, and mitochondrial entry of HO-1 decreased intramitochondrial free heme content, suggesting that a purpose of mitochondrial translocation of HO-1 is to detoxify accumulated heme. Heme may activate nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 to induce HO-1 through reactive oxygen species generation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies indicated nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 and its binding to HO-1 promoter to induce HO-1 expression during gastric injury. Inhibition of HO-1 by zinc protoporphyrin aggravated the mucosal injury and delayed healing. Zinc protoporphyrin further reduced the respiratory control ratio and transmembrane potential and enhanced MOS and apoptosis. In contrast, induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin reduced MOS, corrected mitochondrial dysfunctions, and prevented apoptosis and gastric injury. Thus, induction and mitochondrial localization of HO-1 are a novel cytoprotective mechanism against MOS-mediated apoptotic tissue injury. PMID:21908612

  3. The proinflammatory function of lymphocytes in non-immune inflammation: effect of steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed Central

    Leme, J. G.; Bechara, G. H.; Sudo, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    Leucopenia rendered rats unresponsive to various inflammatory stimuli. The intensity of the inflammatory response in such animals was restored by i.v. administration of suspensions of lymphocytes, but not of granulocytes. This restorative effect was blocked by both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Utilizing carrageenin to induce inflammatory responses in the rat's paw, the effect of these drugs on lymphocytes was observed in two circumstances. First, following incubation of the cells with the drugs in concentrations not exceeding the peak plasma levels estimated for these substances in man or laboratory animals; the effect of the drugs seemed selective, since anti-histamine and anti-serotonin agents, as well as amethopterin, were devoid of action. Second, when lymphocytes were collected from rats previously treated with the various anti-inflammatory agents, injected 6-hourly during periods of 18 and 36 h, respectively, for steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory substances. The total amounts given were lower than those required to produce consistent anti-inflammatory effects in normal animals, when the drug was given as a single dose before injection of the irritant. It is concluded that the pro-inflammatory function of lymphocytes in non-immune inflammation can be blocked by steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:607989

  4. The PanAM study: a multi-center, double-blinded, randomized, non-inferiority study of paracetamol versus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in treating acute musculoskeletal trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute musculoskeletal trauma, including strains, sprains or contusions, occur frequently. Pain management is a crucial component of treatment. However, there is no convincing evidence which drug is superior in managing pain in these patients. The aim of the PanAM Study is to compare analgesic efficacy of three strategies of pain management: paracetamol, diclofenac, or a combination of both in patients with acute musculoskeletal trauma. Methods/design The PanAM Study is a multi-center, double blind randomized controlled trial with non-inferiority design. Included are adult patients presenting to an academic, urban Emergency Department or to a General Practice with acute, blunt, traumatic limb injury. In total, 547 patients will be included using a predefined list of exclusion criteria, to be allocated by randomization to treatment with paracetamol + placebo diclofenac, diclofenac + placebo paracetamol or paracetamol + diclofenac. The hypothesis is that paracetamol will not be inferior to treatment with diclofenac, or the combination of both. Primary outcome will be between-group differences in decrease in pain, measured with Numerical Rating Scales at baseline and at 90 minutes after study drug administration. Secondary outcomes are Numerical Rating Scales at 30 and 60 minutes and measured frequently during three consecutive days after discharge; occurrence of adverse effects; patient satisfaction and an analysis of quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Recruitment started July 2013 and is expected to last a year. Discussion With this multi-center randomized clinical trial we will investigate whether treatment with paracetamol alone is not inferior to diclofenac alone or a combination of both drugs in adult patients with acute musculoskeletal trauma. The main relevance of the trial is to demonstrate the benefits and risks of three commonly used treatment regimens for musculoskeletal trauma. Data that lead to the prevention of severe Non-Steroidal

  5. Enhancement of antinociception by coadminstration of minocycline and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in naïve mice and murine models of LPS-induced thermal hyperalgesia and monoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Minocycline and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin, have anti-inflammatory activities and are both used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. However, there are no reports on whether coadministration of these drugs could potentiate each other's activities in alleviating pain and weight bearing deficits during arthritis. Methods LPS was injected to BALB/c mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) to induce thermal hyperalgesia. The hot plate test was used to study thermal nociception in naïve BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice with LPS-induced thermal hyperalgesia and to evaluate antinociceptive effects of drugs administered i.p. Monoarthritis was induced by injection of LPS intra-articularly into the right hind (RH) limb ankle joint of C57BL/6 mice. Weight bearing changes and the effect of i.p. drug administration were analyzed in freely moving mice using the video-based CatWalk gait analysis system. Results In naïve mice indomethacin (5 to 50 mg/kg) had no significant activity, minocycline (25 to 100 mg/kg) produced hyperalgesia to thermal nociception, however, coadministration of minocycline 50 mg/kg with indomethacin 5 or 10 mg/kg produced significant antinociceptive effects in the hot plate test. A selective inhibitor of COX-1, FR122047 (10 mg/kg) and a selective COX-2 inhibitor, CAY10404 (10 mg/kg) had no significant antinociceptive activities to thermal nociception in naïve mice, however, coadministration of minocycline, with CAY10404 but not FR122047 produced significant antinociceptive effects. In mice with LPS-induced hyperalgesia vehicle, indomethacin (10 mg/kg) or minocycline (50 mg/kg) did not produce significant changes, however, coadministration of minocycline plus indomethacin resulted in antinociceptive activity. LPS-induced RH limb monoarthritis resulted in weight bearing (RH/left hind (LH) limb paw pressure ratios) and RH/LH print area ratios deficits. Treatment with indomethacin (1 mg/kg) or minocycline (50 mg

  6. The attitudes of owners and veterinary professionals in the United Kingdom to the risk of adverse events associated with using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat dogs with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy; Dean, Rachel S

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed by veterinary surgeons for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis, and affected dogs may receive these drugs for long periods of time. Whilst short term administration of NSAIDs to dogs is linked to adverse events such as gastrointestinal haemorrhage and renal injury, reports of adverse events associated with their long-term administration are limited in the veterinary literature. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes towards the long term use of NSAIDs for canine osteoarthritis held by three groups who manage osteoarthritic dogs in the United Kingdom: dog owners, veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses. A qualitative methodology was adopted, using semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Thematic analysis of these data identified three themes: awareness of potential risks; recognition of adverse events; and influence of risk perception on the use of NSAIDs. Awareness of, and concern about, the risk of adverse events associated with NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis was high in all groups, with veterinary surgeons being one of a variety of information sources used by owners to acquire this knowledge. Veterinary surgeons described difficulty in recognising, managing and avoiding adverse events associated with NSAIDs. When adverse events occurred, a wide range of management approaches were adopted ranging from a brief drug respite to permanent cessation of administration of any NSAIDs to that dog. Commonly employed approaches to minimise risk included dose reduction and screening blood tests. This study describes a high level of concern about the risks associated with long term NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis and highlights a diverse range of strategies employed to minimise these risks. The evidence base for these strategies is poor, and this may present a risk to animal welfare if the affected dogs are not receiving adequate analgesia. In order to

  7. [Urticaria--angioedema induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics].

    PubMed

    Díez Gómez, M L; Alvarez Cuesta, E; Hinojosa Macías, M; García Cañadillas, F; Alcover Sánchez, R

    1984-01-01

    Forty-two adult patients had been evaluated with a history of Urticaria and Angioedema (U-AE) associated with ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). None developed attacks of bronchospasm. None had chronic urticaria. The same reaction was repeated in 36 individuals on at least two different occasions following administration of these drugs. Based on patients'history we distinguished three groups: Group A: twenty-three patients who had presented U-AE with the administration of pyrazolone drugs. Thereafter, sixteen of them had taken aspirin without adverse reactions. Group B: Nine patients in whom aspirin caused U-AE, after three of them had taken pyrazolone drugs without intolerance. The remaining six had not taken analgesic drugs since the last reaction. Group C: Ten patients who had developed U-AE with aspirin as well as with pyrazolone drugs. The objective of our study was the following: 1) to observe tolerance level of these patients to other NSAID different from those which had produced the first reactions. 2) To test to see if the patients who had suffered U-AE by noramidopyrine and aminophenazone tolerated other pyrazolone drugs like sulfinpyrazone and phenylbutazone. 3) To see if reactions are produced with tartrazine in patients who had presented U-AE with pyrazolone drugs, given that this colouring (tartrazine) is a pyrazolone derivative. Skin test (prick and intracutaneous test) with noramidopyrine, phenylbutazone and noramidopyrine metasulphonate MG, were carried out on the patients in group A, group C and 30 normal controls. In all the groups oral challenge tests were performed with progressive doses of naproxen, indomethacin, paracetamol, ciclofenac, mefenamic acid, piroxicam and phenylbutazone. Oral challenge tests were accomplished with aspirin in group A and with propiphenazone in group B. Oral challenge tests with sulfinpyrazone and tartrazine were also performed on various patients in group A and group C. The interval between

  8. A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs versus Acetaminophen in the Treatment of Episodic Tension-type Headache: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeo Jung; Kim, Ju Heon; Hwang, In Hong; Kim, Mi Ra

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen are widely used in the treatment of tension headache. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of single doses of acetaminophen and NSAIDs using meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trial studies. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane, KMbase, KoreaMed, RiCH, National Assembly Library, Riss4u, and DBPIA for studies released through 27th July 2010. Two authors independently extracted the data. To assess the risk of bias, the Cochrane Collaborations risk of bias tool was used. Review Manager 5.0 was used for statistics. Results We identified 6 studies. The relative benefit of the NSAIDs group compared to the acetaminophen group for participants with at least 50% pain relief was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99 to 1.39; I2 = 85%). We did subgroup analysis based on allocation concealment versus non-allocation concealment, and low-dose NSAIDs versus high-dose NSAIDs. The relative benefit of the low-dose NSAIDs subgroup to the acetaminophen group was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.91 to 1.06; I2 = 0%). However, the heterogeneity of other subgroup analysis was not settled. The relative risk for using rescue medication of the NSAIDs group compared to the acetaminophen group was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.64 to 1.12; I2 = 47%). The relative risk for adverse events was 1.31(95% CI, 0.96 to 1.80; I2 = 0%). Conclusion In this meta-analysis, there was no difference between low-dose NSAIDs and acetaminophen in the efficacy of the treatment for tension type headache. The results suggested that high-dose NSAIDs have more effect but also have more adverse events. The balance of benefit and harm needs to be considered when using high-dose NSAIDs for tension headache. PMID:23115700

  9. Online eluent-switching technique coupled anion-exchange liquid chromatography–ion trap tandem mass spectrometry for analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pig serum.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai Chun; Lin, Jyh Shiun; Cheng, Cheanyeh

    2015-11-27

    A novel method for online extraction, pH-gradient separation, and analysis of nine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was developed by coupling online eluent-switching technique to single anion-exchange chromatographic column/ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) and used for monitoring NSAIDs residues in pig serum. A neutral eluent and a pH-gradient eluent were used for extraction and separation of NSAIDs, respectively. Each of nine NSAIDs has an MS precursor ion of either [M−H]− or [M−Na]−. The extracted ion chromatogram for a specific product ion of each NSAID was used for its quantitative analysis. The dynamic linear ranges of calibration curves were all 0–200 ng mL−1 (R2 > 0.9950). The analysis accuracies estimated by spiking standard concentrations at 20, 100, and 200 ng mL−1 were 80.5–99.9%. The corresponding intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD%) were 2.5–14.5% and 2.9–15.2%, respectively. The limit of detection/limit of quantitation of NSAIDs were 1.3/4.3, 0.5/1.6, 0.2/0.5, 2.5/8.2, 1.5/4.9, 0.6/2.1, 0.6/2.0, 0.5/1.7, and 0.6/2.1 ng mL−1 for carprofen, diclofenac, flunixin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, meclofenamic acid sodium, mefenamic acid, niflumic acid, and tolfenamic acid, respectively. After 1 h injection of a dose containing 2 mg kg−1 weight pig of flunixin and tolfenamic acid to the pigs, a residue amount of 3480 ± 36 ng mL−1 and 431 ± 13 ng mL−1, respectively, was reached for the incurred pig serum specimens and both residues were reduced to about 20 ng mL−1 at the time of 24 h. PMID:26601710

  10. Safety and efficacy of long-term esomeprazole 20 mg in Japanese patients with a history of peptic ulcer receiving daily non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are an effective and common treatment for chronic pain disorders, but long-term use is associated with risk of potentially life-threatening gastrointestinal adverse events (AEs). The proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole has been found to be effective for gastroprotection in NSAID users, but few long-term studies have been conducted in Japan. Methods This was an open-label, multicentre, single-arm, prospective 1-year study of treatment with esomeprazole (20 mg once daily) in Japanese patients (aged ≥20 years) with endoscopic evidence of previous peptic ulcer and receiving daily oral NSAID therapy (at a stable dose) for a chronic condition. Eligibility was not dictated by type of oral NSAID. The primary objective was to determine long-term safety and tolerability of esomeprazole. Efficacy for prevention of peptic ulcers was also determined (Kaplan-Meier method). All statistical analyses were descriptive. Results A total of 130 patients (73.1% women, mean age 62.1 years, 43.8% Helicobacter pylori-positive) received treatment with esomeprazole in addition to long-term NSAID therapy (most commonly for rheumatoid arthritis [n=42] and osteoarthritis [n=34]). Loxoprofen, meloxicam and diclofenac were the most commonly used NSAIDs; cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 selective agents were used by 16.2% of patients (n=21). Long-term compliance with esomeprazole (capsule counts) was >75% for the majority of patients. Although 16.9% of patients (n=22) experienced AEs judged to be possibly related to treatment with esomeprazole, they were mostly mild and transient. The most commonly reported possibly treatment-related AEs were abnormal hepatic function, headache, increased γ-glutamyltransferase levels and muscle spasms (2 patients each). Overall, 95.9% (95% confidence interval: 92.3, 99.4) of patients remained ulcer free at 1 year. Conclusion Long-term treatment with esomeprazole (20 mg once daily) is well tolerated and

  11. Does non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) ibuprofen induce antioxidant stress and endocrine disruption in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Bebianno, Maria João

    2012-03-01

    Ibuprofen (IBU) is one of the most sold over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and widely detected in the aquatic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the information regarding IBU effects in biota is still sparse. The goal of this study was to assess IBU potential effect as oxidative stress and endocrine disruption inducer in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis applying a battery of biomarkers. Over two weeks of exposure to IBU (250 ngL(-1)), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), phase II glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were determined in the digestive gland and alkali-labile phosphates (ALP) were carried out in sex-differentiated mussels' gonads. The results confirm a transitory induction of antioxidant activities responses concomitant to lipid peroxide formation outline and an increase of ALP levels over time, particularly in exposed males which may lead to mussels' reproductive fitness impairment highlighting a higher impact of IBU as an endocrine disruptor than as a short-term reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generator. PMID:22301165

  12. Metabolomic analysis of glycerophospholipid signatures of inflammation treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced-RAW264.7 cells using (1)H NMR and U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Cao, Han; Zhao, Lifang; Song, Jianao; She, Yuqi; Feng, Yifan

    2016-08-15

    Non-destructive proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy and highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS) coupled to data processing methods were applied to analyze the metabolic profiling changes of glycerophospholipids (GPLs) in RAW264.7 cells from inflammation to prognosis. Analysis of (1)H NMR was shown that the models were grouped successfully, illustrating that all of them had significant differences. Based on the highly simple, accurate, non-targeted and non-destructively advantages of (1)H NMR, it could be used as a new screening tool of anti-inflammatory drugs in the metabolic profiling of GPLs. 58 GPLs were identified by U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS, and 19 components were firstly identified in this study compared with our previous results. In addition, ten potential biomarkers were proved, of which phosphatidylcholine (PC) (16:0/18:1) and (18:0/18:1) changed consistently in three drug-induced groups and might be the important biomarkers. Compared with (1)H NMR, U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS showed higher sensitivity and specificity and was more suitable for the determination of biomarkers apart from the deficiency of time-consuming sample preparation steps and unambiguous metabolite identification. Therefore, it is feasible to analyze the changes of GPLs during inflammation by combining (1)H NMR spectroscopy with U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS. The metabolic profiling of GPLs provides valuable evidence for inflammation diagnosis and prognosis, and might unravel the mechanisms involved in inflammation progression. PMID:27371817

  13. Inhibition of Human Transthyretin Aggregation by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Compounds: A Structural and Thermodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo O.; Braga, Carolina A.; Polikarpov, Igor; Ventura, Salvador; Lima, Luis Mauricio T. R.; Foguel, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a homotetrameric protein that circulates in plasma and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) whose aggregation into amyloid fibrils has been associated with at least two different amyloid diseases: senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) and familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP). In SSA aggregates are composed of WT-TTR, while in FAP more than 100 already-described variants have been found in deposits. Until now, TTR-related diseases have been untreatable, although a new drug called Tafamidis has been approved only in Europe to specifically treat V30M patients. Thus, new strategies are still necessary to treat FAP caused by other variants of TTR. TTR has two channels in the dimer interface that bind to the hormone thyroxin and that have been used to accommodate anti-amyloidogenic compounds. These compounds stabilize the tetramers, rendering TTR less amyloidogenic. Here, we investigated the effects of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds—sulindac (SUL), indomethacin (IND) and lumiracoxib (LUM)—as tetramer stabilizers and aggregation inhibitors. WT-TTR and the very aggressive TTR variant L55P were used as models. These compounds were able to stabilize TTR against high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), increasing the ΔGf by several kcal. They were also effective in inhibiting WT-TTR and L55P acid- or HHP-induced aggregation; in particular, LUM and IND were very effective, inhibiting almost 100% of the aggregation of both proteins under certain conditions. The species formed when aggregation was performed in the presence of these compounds were much less toxic to cells in culture. The crystal structures of WT-TTR bound to the three compounds were solved at high resolution, allowing the identification of the relevant protein:drug interactions. We discuss here the ligand-binding features of LUM, IND and SUL to TTR, emphasizing the critical interactions that render the protein more stable and less amyloidogenic. PMID:23466880

  14. [Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of a trans-cutaneous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent, etofenamate gel].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Yokoyama, Y; Motoyoshi, S; Seto, Y; Ishii, K; Imazu, C; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of topically applied etofenamate gel (5% etofenamate) were investigated in experimental animals. Etofenamate gel showed a dose related inhibition against vascular permeability caused by histamine in mice and ultra violet light-induced erythema in guinea pigs at doses of 10--100 mg/site and 25--200 (ED50 = 26.6) mg/site, respectively. The erythema was not inhibited with its topical application of 100 mg/site to the skin distant from the erythema. Granuloma formation, caused by felt-pellet implantation, was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by repeated application of etofenamate gel (10--100 mg/site/day). Etofenamate gel inhibited the pain-like responses in both the arthritic joint and the edematous hind paw of rats with 50--200 mg/joint and 100 mg/paw, respectively. In these tests, the vehicle gel did not show any significant activity. The potency of etofenamate gel was stronger than that of adrenal-extracts ointment (Mobilat) and approximately comparable to indomethacin ointment (1% indomethacin) in a weight basis of formulations. Topical application of etofenamate (0.5--2 mg/ear) resulted in a dose related decrease of contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone in mice, and its activity was nearly equipotent to flufenamic acid and about one-fourth that of indomethacin. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate gel, applied topically to the inflamed tissue, showed a certain inhibitory activity against acute and subacute-chronic inflammation and inflammatory pain-like responses. PMID:7173741

  15. [Non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents. Stereoisomers of 2-(-4-biphenylyl)-3-oxybutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, A; Scapini, G; Burnelli, S; Andreani, A

    1977-05-01

    The synthesis, diastereoisomeric separation, attribution to erythro and threo series, and resolution of the enantiomers of 2-(4-biphenylyl)-3-oxybutyric acid are described. The four isomers were tested for anti-inflammatory activity: the preliminary results are interesting, particular those for the (--) erythro enantiomer. PMID:862887

  16. Non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Razeghinejad, M R; Pro, M J; Katz, L J

    2011-01-01

    Numerous systemically used drugs are involved in drug-induced glaucoma. Most reported cases of non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma are closed-angle glaucoma (CAG). Indeed, many routinely used drugs that have sympathomimetic or parasympatholytic properties can cause pupillary block CAG in individuals with narrow iridocorneal angle. The resulting acute glaucoma occurs much more commonly unilaterally and only rarely bilaterally. CAG secondary to sulfa drugs is a bilateral non-pupillary block type and is due to forward movement of iris–lens diaphragm, which occurs in individuals with narrow or open iridocorneal angle. A few agents, including antineoplastics, may induce open-angle glaucoma. In conclusion, the majority of cases with glaucoma secondary to non-steroidal medications are of the pupillary block closed-angle type and preventable if the at-risk patients are recognized and treated prophylactically. PMID:21637303

  17. Phospholipid metabolism in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients: effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Smith, D M; Gonzales, H; Johnson, J A; Franson, R C; Turner, R A

    1989-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity were measured in the peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) from ten patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on treatment with various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). AA metabolism and PLA2 activity were measured both initially and after treatment with either placebo or Clotrimazole, a broad spectrum anti-mycotic agent, as a possible anti-rheumatic drug. AA metabolism was also measured in PMNL from ten patients with active RA untreated with any NSAIA and ten normal volunteers. Using 3H-AA prelabeled cells, we show that there was a significantly higher (P less than 0.025) production of 3H-LTB4 in response to stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187 in untreated RA patients than in normal volunteers (mean +/- S.D.:4.8 +/- 1.6% and 3.1 +/- 1.0%, respectively). The production of 3H-LTB4 by PMNL from patients on NSAIAs was less elevated (mean +/- S.D.:4.1 +/- 1.5%) and was not significantly different from normal controls. Concurrently we examined PLA2 activity in PMNL-sonicates from ten of our study patients using autoclaved [14C]oleate-labeled E. coli biomembranes as an exogenous substrate. Using linear regression analysis, we demonstrate a significant correlation between in vitro PLA2 activity and the release of 3H-AA from the cellular phospholipids (deacylation) in response to A23187 stimulation (r = -0.526, P less than 0.025). We also demonstrate significant correlations between the overall clinical state of the RA patient, as evaluated by a modified rheumatoid activity index (MRAI), and both the release of 3H-AA from the cellular phospholipids and its production of total [3H]eicosanoids (r = -0.557, P less than 0.025 and r = 0.644, P less than 0.005, respectively). This data suggests that: PLA2 activity may, in part, account for the higher generation of LTB4 by RA PMNL; NSAIAs may be capable of modulating this abnormality; and Clotrimazole may affect the

  18. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hörl, Walter H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the isoenzymes COX-1 and COX-2 of cyclooxygenase (COX). Renal side effects (e.g., kidney function, fluid and urinary electrolyte excretion) vary with the extent of COX-2-COX-1 selectivity and the administered dose of these compounds. While young healthy subjects will rarely experience adverse renal effects with the use of NSAIDs, elderly patients and those with co-morbibity (e.g., congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis or chronic kidney disease) and drug combinations (e.g., renin-angiotensin blockers, diuretics plus NSAIDs) may develop acute renal failure. This review summarizes our present knowledge how traditional NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors may affect the kidney under various experimental and clinical conditions, and how these drugs may influence renal inflammation, water transport, sodium and potassium balance and how renal dysfunction or hypertension may result.

  19. The new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Scherbel, A L; Wilke, W S

    1981-10-01

    Most physicians regard to newer short-acting anti-inflammatory drugs as a substitute for aspirin because they are less toxic. Although these drugs cannot induce remissions of rheumatoid arthritis, they do afford symptomatic relief and exert both a moderate algesic and anti-inflammatory effect in conditions like osteoarthritis, gout, pseudogout, and a variety of musculoskeletal syndromes. The many adverse reactions and toxic effects associated with these drugs are probably related to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthetase, which in turn reduces the biosynthesis of prostaglandins in widespread areas of the body. Thus limited in number, these compounds cannot play an effective role in the body's defense mechanisms. Researchers postulate that this failure accounts for the gastrointestinal and renal lesions--as well as other, as yet unexplained toxic manifestations--noted in patients taking these drugs. For safety's sake, the newer anti-inflammatory drugs should be used with large doses of aspirin, other agents that inhibit prostaglandin synthetase, or drugs that are potentially nephro-toxic. PMID:6974117

  20. Simultaneous trace determination of acidic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in purified water, tap water, juice, soda and energy drink by hollow fiber-based liquid-phase microextraction and ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haojie; Du, Zhenxia; Ji, Yu; Mei, Mei

    2013-05-15

    In this study, a two-phase hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) coupling with ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for determination of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs)-salicylic acid, ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac in real water samples. The influencing parameters of HF-LPME sample preparation method, such as organic solvents (acceptor phase), pH of sample solution (donor phase), extraction time, stirring speed, extraction temperature and ionic strength were systematically optimized. Through the developed determination method, high enrichment factors (195-346) were achieved for the four drugs. The instrumental calibration curves of salicylic acid, naproxen, diclofenac, and ibuprofen show good linear relations (R>0.998) in the concentration range of 1-500, 5-2500, 10-5000 and 5-2500 μg L(-1), respectively. The average recoveries of the four drugs in the low, medium and high spiked concentration levels (20-200, 50-500 and 100-1000 μg L(-1)) were between 98-115% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values were less than 12% (n=6). Limits of detection (LOD) of salicylic acid, naproxen, diclofenac, and ibuprofen in water were 0.5, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.25 μg L(-1), respectively. The determination method has been applied for the real samples (purified water, tap water, juice, soda and energy drinks), and the results show that salicylic acid was detected in tap water and soda, the concentrations were 2.85 μg L(-1) and 61.22 μg L(-1) separately, the RSD values were less than 9% (n=6). Salicylic acid and diclofenac were detected in energy drink, the concentrations were 44.62 μg L(-1) and 8.31 μg L(-1), the RSD values were less than 11% (n=6). PMID:23618157

  1. The Effects of Topical Sesame (Sesamum indicum) Oil on Pain Severity and Amount of Received Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients With Upper or Lower Extremities Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli Shamloo, Marzieh Beigom; Nasiri, Morteza; Dabirian, Aazam; Bakhtiyari, Ali; Mojab, Faraz; Alavi Majd, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most patients with trauma experience different levels of pain. Due to side effects as well as economic burden of drugs used for pain relief after trauma commonly, it is important to use low-cost methods independently or combined with drugs to alleviate pain. Objectives: Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of topical sesame oil on pain severity and frequency of received NSAIDs of patients with trauma. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical trial study was conducted on 150 patients with upper or lower extremities trauma in Dezful Ganjavian Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran, in 2014. Data was collected by a researcher-made questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Patients were divided into two groups of control (n = 75) and intervention (n = 75) randomly. In the intervention group, patients applied topical sesame oil beside the routine cares, while in the control group patients just received routine cares. Severity of pain and frequency of received NSAIDs was assessed in the first, third, seventh and tenth days after the intervention in the both groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS19 software using descriptive and analytic (Chi-square and independent sample t-test) statistical methods. Results: Based on student sample t-test, there was a significant difference between intervention and control groups regarding the pain severity in the first (P = 0.06), third (P = 0.001), seventh (P = 0.001) and tenth (P = 0.001) days after the intervention. Besides, the frequency of received NSAIDs in the intervention group and the control group showed significant difference in four days after the intervention (for four days P = 0.001). Conclusions: Topical application of sesame oil could reduce pain severity and frequency of received NSAIDs in patients with upper or lower extremities trauma. Therefore, it is recommended to use this oil in complementary medicine for pain relief due to low cost, easy usage and lack of adverse effects. PMID:26161326

  2. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect. PMID:9403784

  3. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of intragastric pH and implications for famotidine dosing in the prophylaxis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastropathy—a proof of concept analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Jeffery D.; Holt, Robert J.; Jung, Donald; Tidmarsh, George F.; Grahn, Amy Y.; Ball, Julie; Peura, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Famotidine given at a dose of 80 mg/day is effective in preventing NSAID-induced gastropathy. The aim of this proof of concept study was to compare twice a day (BID) vs 3-times a day (TID) administration of this total dose of famotidine on intragastric pH in healthy volunteers. Research design and methods Two analyses were undertaken: (1) a 13 subject controlled cross-over 24-h intragastric pH evaluation of the BID and TID administration of 80 mg/day of famotidine, as well as measures for drug accumulation over 5 days (EudraCT, number 2006-002930-39); and (2) a pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model which predicted steady-state famotidine plasma concentrations and pH of the two regimens. Results For the cross-over study, gastric pH was above 3.5 for a mean of 20 min longer for TID dosing compared to BID dosing on Day 1. On Day 5, the mean time above this threshold was higher with the BID regimen by ∼25 min. For pH 4, subjects’ gastric pH was above this pH value for a mean of 25 min longer for TID dosing compared to BID dosing on Day 1. For Day 5, the pH was above 4 for ∼45 min longer with the TID regimen as compared with the BID regimen. The mean 24-h gastric pH values when taken in the upright position trended higher for the TID dosing period compared to the BID regimen on Day 1. The steady-state simulation model indicated that, following TID dosing, intragastric pH will be above 3 for 24 h vs 16 h for the BID regimen. There was no evidence for plasma accumulation of famotidine with TID dosing as compared to BID dosing from either analysis. Conclusion The data indicate that overall more time is spent above the acidic threshold pH values when 80 mg/day of famotidine is administered TID vs BID. Key limitations included small study size with a short duration and lack of a baseline examination, but was compensated for by the cross-over and PK/PD modeling design. Although most of the comparisons in this proof of concept study

  4. Is carprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic, safe for use in Pekin ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carprofen (Rymadyl) is a common systemic analgesic used to relieve chronic pain states in dogs, such as osteoarthritis. There is no comparable drug recommended to treat pain, such as that originating from bill trimming procedures, in ducks. The aim of this study was to evaluate if carprofen could be...

  5. Cause for concern in the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications in the community -a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medications are a common cause of reported adverse drug side-effects. This study describes the prevalence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) use (other than low-dose aspirin) and the presence of co-existing relative contraindications to NSAID use and chronic conditions in a representative population sample. Methods Data were analysed from 3,206 adults attending first follow-up of the North West Adelaide Health Study (NWAHS) in 2004 - 2006, a longitudinal representative population study. Medications were brought into study clinic visits by participants. Clinical assessment included measured blood pressure, kidney function, serum cholesterol, blood glucose. Questionnaires assessed demographics, lifestyle risk factors, physician-diagnosed chronic conditions. Data were weighted to census measures by region, age group, gender, and probability of selection in the household, to provide population representative estimates. Pearson's Chi-square tests determined significant differences in proportions. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine associations of socio-demographic characteristics with use of NSAIDs. Results Of 3,175 participants, 357 (11.2%), and 16% of those aged > 55 years, reported using either non-specific NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors, other than low-dose aspirin. Among people using NSAIDs, 60.8% had hypertension, 30.8% had Stage 3 or higher chronic kidney disease, 17.2% had a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 20.7% had a > 15% 10-year CVD risk. The prevalence of NSAID use among people with hypertension was 16%, with kidney disease 15.9%, and a history of CVD 20.0%. Among people taking diuretics, 24.1% were also taking NSAIDs, and of those taking medications for gastro-esophageal reflux, 24.7% were on NSAIDs. Prescription-only COX-2 inhibitors, but not other NSAIDs, were used more by people > 75 years than by 35-54 year olds (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.0, 6.7), and also were more commonly used by

  6. Innovative combination of QuEChERS extraction with on-line solid-phase extract purification and pre-concentration, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their metabolites in sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Rossini, D; Ciofi, L; Ancillotti, C; Checchini, L; Bruzzoniti, M C; Rivoira, L; Fibbi, D; Orlandini, S; Del Bubba, M

    2016-09-01

    For the first time QuEChERS extraction of sewage sludge was combined with the automatic solid-phase pre-concentration and purification of the extract (following indicated as SPE) and LC-MS/MS analysis, for the determination of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), diclofenac (DIC), fenbufen (FEN), flurbiprofen (FLU), ketoprofen (KET), ibuprofen (IBU) and naproxen (NAP), and their metabolites salicylic acid (SAL), 4'-hydroxydiclofenac (4'-HYDIC), 1-hydroxyibuprofen (1-HYIBU), 2-hydroxyibuprofen (2-HYIBU), 3-hydroxyibuprofen (3-HYIBU) and o-desmethylnaproxen (O-DMNAP). Various commercial pellicular stationary phases (i.e. silica gel functionalized with octadecyl, biphenyl, phenylhexyl and pentafluorophenyl groups) were preliminarily investigated for the resolution of target analytes and different sorbent phases (i.e. octyl or octadecyl functionalized silica gel and a polymeric phase functionalized with N-benzylpyrrolidone groups) were tested for the SPE phase. The optimized method involves the QuEChERS extraction of 1 g of freeze-dried sludge with 15 mL of water/acetonitrile 1/2 (v/v), the SPE of the extract with the N-benzylpyrrolidone polymeric phase and the water/acetonitrile gradient elution on the pentafluorophenyl stationary phase at room temperature. Matrix effect was always suppressive and in most cases low, being it ≤20% for ASA, DIC, FLU, KET, IBU, 1-HYIBU, 2-HYIBU, 3-HYIBU, NAP and O-DMNAP, and included in the range of 35-47% for the other analytes. Recoveries were evaluated at three spiking levels, evidencing almost quantitative values for HYIBUs and O-DMNAP; for ASA, SAL and KET the recoveries were included in between 50 and 76%, whereas for the other compounds they ranged from 36% to 55%. The proposed method showed better analytical performances than those so far published, being suitable for target compound determination in real samples from tens of pg g(-1) to ng g(-1) of freeze-dried sludge, with a total analysis

  7. [The experience with the topical application of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of otitis media].

    PubMed

    Razvozzhaev, A A; Starodumova, T A; Nemstsveridze, E Ia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the topically applied otinum ear drops. The authors present the results of the combined treatment of acute catarrhal otitis in the children with the use of choline salicilate (otinum). The study included 50 patients randomized into two identical groups. The children of group 1 received systemic therapy supplemented by the topical application of otinum, those in group 2 were prescribed a 3% alcoholic solution of boric acid. The study has demonstrated a significantly more pronounced positive dynamics of clinical conditions in the patients of group 1 compared with those of the control group. The total duration of therapy in the first group was 37.5% shorter than in the second. The results of the study confirmed the strong anti-inflammatory and analgesic action of choline salicilate. The pain was relieved within 7 minutes on the average after the application of this agent. It is concluded that otinum can be recommended for the introduction into combined therapy of acute catarrhal otitis media as an efficacious anti-inflammatory and analgetic drug. PMID:22810643

  8. [Effects of lysine clonixinate on platelet function. Comparison with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents].

    PubMed

    Kramer, E H; Sassetti, B; Kaminker, A J; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Di Girolamo, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of action of non steroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consists of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. This explains many of the pharmacological effects and adverse events observed in medical practice. Administration of NSAIDs to patients with hemostatic disorders or perioperative conditions entails the risk of bleeding due to inhibition of platelet function. This study deals with platelet changes induced by lysine clonixinate vs diclofenac, ibuprofen and aspirin in classical tests such as platelet count, platelet factor 3 (PF3) activity and platelet aggregation with various inductors and more recent procedures such as P-selectin measurement by flow cytometry. Unlike control drugs, lysine clonixinate did not induce changes in platelet count or function when administered to healthy volunteers at the commonly used therapeutic doses. PMID:11474878

  9. Assessment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and analgesic pharmaceuticals in seawaters of North of Portugal: occurrence and environmental risk.

    PubMed

    Lolić, Aleksandar; Paíga, Paula; Santos, Lúcia H M L M; Ramos, Sandra; Correia, Manuela; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of seven pharmaceuticals and two metabolites belonging to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics therapeutic classes was studied in seawaters. A total of 101 samples covering fourteen beaches and five cities were evaluated in order to assess the spatial distribution of pharmaceuticals among north Portuguese coast. Seawaters were selected in order to embrace different bathing water quality (excellent, good and sufficient). Acetaminophen, ketoprofen and the metabolite hydroxyibuprofen were detected in all the seawater samples at maximum concentrations of 584, 89.7 and 287 ng L(-1), respectively. Carboxyibuprofen had the highest seawater concentration (1227 ng L(-1)). The temporal distribution of the selected pharmaceuticals during the bathing season showed that, in general, higher concentrations were detected in August and September. The environmental risk posed by the pharmaceuticals detected in seawaters towards different trophic levels (fish, daphnids and algae) was also assessed. Only diclofenac showed hazard quotients above one for fish, representing a potential risk for aquatic organisms. These results were observed in seawaters classified as excellent bathing water. Additional data is needed in order to support the identification and prioritization of risks posed by pharmaceuticals in marine environment. PMID:25481252

  10. Non-competitive inhibition of GABAA responses by a new class of quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories in dissociated frog sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Akaike, N.

    1992-01-01

    1. The interaction of a new class of quinolone antimicrobials (new quinolones) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) with the GABAA receptor-Cl- channel complex was investigated in frog sensory neurones by use of the internal perfusion and 'concentration clamp' techniques. 2. The new quinolones and the NSAIDs (both 10(-6)-10(-5) M) had little effect on the GABA-induced chloride current (ICI) when applied separately. At a concentration of 10(-4) M the new quinolones, and to a lesser degree the NSAIDs, produced some suppression of the GABA response. 3. The co-administration of new quinolones and some NSAIDs (10(-6)-10(-14) M) resulted in a marked suppression of the GABA response. The size of this inhibition was dependent on the concentration of either the new quinolone or the NSAID tested. The inhibitory potency of new quinolones in combination with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) was in rank order norfloxacin (NFLX) much greater than enoxacin (ENX) greater than ciprofloxancin (CPFX) much greater than ofloxacin (OFLX), and that of NSAIDs in combination with ENX was BPAA much greater than indomethacin = ketoprofen greater than naproxen greater than ibuprofen greater than pranoprofen. Diclofenac, piroxicam and acetaminophen did not affect GABA responses in the presence of ENX. 4. In the presence of ENX or BPAA, there was a small shift to the right of the concentration-response curve for GABA without any effect on the maximum response. However, the co-administration of these drugs suppressed the maximum of the GABA concentration-response curve, indicating a non-competitive inhibition, for which no voltage-dependency was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1317734

  11. Non-competitive inhibition of GABAA responses by a new class of quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories in dissociated frog sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, T; Shirasaki, T; Akaike, N

    1992-01-01

    1. The interaction of a new class of quinolone antimicrobials (new quinolones) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) with the GABAA receptor-Cl- channel complex was investigated in frog sensory neurones by use of the internal perfusion and 'concentration clamp' techniques. 2. The new quinolones and the NSAIDs (both 10(-6)-10(-5) M) had little effect on the GABA-induced chloride current (ICI) when applied separately. At a concentration of 10(-4) M the new quinolones, and to a lesser degree the NSAIDs, produced some suppression of the GABA response. 3. The co-administration of new quinolones and some NSAIDs (10(-6)-10(-14) M) resulted in a marked suppression of the GABA response. The size of this inhibition was dependent on the concentration of either the new quinolone or the NSAID tested. The inhibitory potency of new quinolones in combination with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) was in rank order norfloxacin (NFLX) much greater than enoxacin (ENX) greater than ciprofloxancin (CPFX) much greater than ofloxacin (OFLX), and that of NSAIDs in combination with ENX was BPAA much greater than indomethacin = ketoprofen greater than naproxen greater than ibuprofen greater than pranoprofen. Diclofenac, piroxicam and acetaminophen did not affect GABA responses in the presence of ENX. 4. In the presence of ENX or BPAA, there was a small shift to the right of the concentration-response curve for GABA without any effect on the maximum response. However, the co-administration of these drugs suppressed the maximum of the GABA concentration-response curve, indicating a non-competitive inhibition, for which no voltage-dependency was observed.5. Simultaneous administration of ENX and BPAA also suppressed pentobarbitone (PB)-gated Icl. On the other hand, both PB and phenobarbitone reversed the inhibition of GABA-induced Ic, by coadministration of ENX and BPAA.6. The effect on GABAA responses of co-administration of new quinolones and NSAIDs was not via an interaction with

  12. UV-induced erythema model: a tool in dermatopharmacology for testing the topical activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in man.

    PubMed

    Torrent, J; Izquierdo, I; Barbanoj, M J; Moreno, J; Lauroba, J; Jané, F

    1988-05-01

    UV-induced erythema is a well known inflammatory model applied both in animal and human skin to test the activity of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds in a great variety of pharmaceutical formulations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory efficacy of piroxicam in two different topical formulations (cream 0.5, 1 and 1.5% and gel 1%) as compared to three non-steroidal compounds, benzydamine, etofenamate and indomethacin (cream 5%), on erythema induced after UV-injury on the back of 5 healthy subjects. The results showed that piroxicam in cream formulation, indomethacin cream and etofenamate gel have a similar effect, decreasing the erythema size 7 h after irradiation. However, benzydamine cream and piroxicam gel showed no effect with this method. We may conclude that this model is adequate and precise for selecting the most appropriate galenic dosage form for an active compound in terms of its clinical efficacy when topically administered. PMID:3398651

  13. Pharmacology of an extract of salai guggal ex-Boswellia serrata, a new non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, G B; Atal, C K

    1986-06-01

    Pharmacological evaluation of alcoholic extract of salai guggal (AESG) has been carried out in experimental animals. AESG displayed marked anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced oedema in rats and mice and dextran oedema in rats. It was equally effective in adrenalectomised rats. In formaldehyde and adjuvant arthritis, AESG produced prominent anti-arthritic activity but no significant effect was observed in cotton pellet-induced granuloma test. It inhibited inflammation induced increase in serum transaminase levels and leucocyte counts but lacked any analgesic or anti-pyretic effects. The gestation period or parturition time in pregnant rats or onset time of castor oil-induced diarrhoea was unaffected by AESG and no significant effect was seen on cardiovascular, respiratory and central nervous system functions. No ulcerogenic effects were found in the rat stomach. The oral and intraperitoneal LD50 was greater than 2 g/Kg in mice and rats. PMID:3751752

  14. Pharmacological Evaluation and Preparation of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Containing an N-Acyl Hydrazone Subunit

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Thais Regina Ferreira; Chelucci, Rafael Consolin; Pires, Maria Elisa Lopes; Dutra, Luiz Antonio; Barbieri, Karina Pereira; Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Trossini, Gustavo Henrique Goulart; Chung, Man Chin; dos Santos, Jean Leandro

    2014-01-01

    A series of anti-inflammatory derivatives containing an N-acyl hydrazone subunit (4a–e) were synthesized and characterized. Docking studies were performed that suggest that compounds 4a–e bind to cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 isoforms, but with higher affinity for COX-2. The compounds display similar anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, although compound 4c is the most effective compound for inhibiting rat paw edema, with a reduction in the extent of inflammation of 35.9% and 52.8% at 2 and 4 h, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity of N-acyl hydrazone derivatives was inferior to their respective parent drugs, except for compound 4c after 5 h. Ulcerogenic studies revealed that compounds 4a–e are less gastrotoxic than the respective parent drug. Compounds 4b–e demonstrated mucosal damage comparable to celecoxib. The in vivo analgesic activities of the compounds are higher than the respective parent drug for compounds 4a–b and 4d–e. Compound 4a was more active than dipyrone in reducing acetic-acid-induced abdominal constrictions. Our results indicate that compounds 4a–e are anti-inflammatory and analgesic compounds with reduced gastrotoxicity compared to their respective parent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24714090

  15. Gastrointestinal and Cardiovascular Risk of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saeed, Abdulwahed

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) confer a gastrointestinal (GI) side effect profile and concerns regarding adverse cardiovascular effects have emerged associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. NSAIDs are highly effective in treating pain and inflammation, but it is well recognized that these agents are associated with substantial gastrointestinal toxicity. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors may also reduce the risk for gastrointestinal events, although they may increase cardiovascular adverse events. The selection of an appropriate analgesic or anti-inflammatory agent with or without gastroprotective therapy should be individualized. PMID:22253945

  16. [Anti-edema activity of a trans-cutaneous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent, etofenamate gel, in rats].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Yokoyama, Y; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Local anti-inflammatory activity of etofenamate gel (5% etofenamate) was investigated in rats. Etofenamate gel (5--50 mg/paw) produced a dose related inhibition in the hind paw edema caused by carrageenin with a topical application to the inflamed paw, and its ED50-value was 33.0 mg/paw. A weak but significant inhibiton was seen with an application of 50 mg/paw to the non-inflamed paw, but not with 10 mg/paw. Anti-edema activity of oral etofenamate (ED50 = 8.49 mg/kg) was comparable to flufenamic acid. Against the hind paw edema caused by a mixture of kaolin and carrageenin, etofenamate gel showed a significant therapeutic activity with repeated application of 10--50 mg/paw to the inflamed paw, but not with 10 mg/paw to the non-inflamed paw. Etofenamate gel (50 mg/paw/day), applied topically to the inflamed hind paw of adjuvant rats, showed a significant therapeutic activity. The potency of oral etofenamate (4--8 mg/kg/day) in adjuvant rats was comparable to flufenamic acid. No gastrointestinal ulcer was produced by a topical application of etofenamate gel (up to 1,000 mg/rat) to the clipped skin, though oral etofenamate (40 mg/kg) produced the ulcer. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate gel, applied to the skin of rats, showed local anti-edema activity approximately comparable to oral etofenamate, and the ratio of ulcerogenic effective to anti-edema dose of etofenamate gel was larger than that of oral etofenamate. PMID:7173740

  17. The Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Leonard H.; Rooney, Theodore W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical pharmacology of the new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help practitioners decide which to use and how to administer them. Indications for and effects of NSAIDs are described. (MT)

  18. Sulphonamides as anti-inflammatory agents: old drugs for new therapeutic strategies in neutrophilic inflammation?

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Scirocco, M C; Balbi, A; Bevilacqua, M; Dallegri, F

    1995-03-01

    1. It is well known that neutrophils act as mediators of tissue injury in a variety of inflammatory diseases. Their histotoxic activity is presently thought to involve proteinases and oxidants, primarily hypochlorous acid (HOCl). This oxidant is also capable of inactivating the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (alpha 1-antitrypsin), thereby favouring digestion of the connective matrix. 2. In the present work, we found that sulphanilamide and some sulphanilamide-related anti-inflammatory drugs such as dapsone, nimesulide and sulphapyridine reduce the availability of HOCl in the extracellular microenvironment of activated neutrophils and prevent the inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by these cells in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of each drug to prevent alpha 1-antitrypsin from inactivation by neutrophils correlates significantly with its capacity to reduce the recovery of HOCl from neutrophils. Five other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were completely ineffective. 3. Therefore, sulphanilamide-related drugs, i.e. dapsone, nimesulide and sulphapyridine, have the potential to reduce the bioavailability of neutrophil-derived HOCl and, in turn, to favour the alpha 1-antitrypsin-dependent control of neutrophil elastolytic activity. These drugs appear as a well-defined group of agents which are particularly prone to attenuate neutrophil histotoxicity. They can also be viewed as a previously unrecognized starting point for the development of new compounds in order to plan rational therapeutic strategies for controlling tissue injury during neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:7736703

  19. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  20. Anti-inflammatory drug delivery from hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sei K; Jelacic, Sandra; Maier, Ronald V; Stayton, Patrick S; Hoffman, Allan S

    2004-01-01

    Two different types of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels were synthesized by crosslinking HA with divinyl sulfone (DVS) and poly(ethylene glycol)-divinyl sulfone (VS-PEG-VS). Vitamin E succinate (VES), an anti-inflammatory drug, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model of anti-inflammatory protein drugs, were loaded into the gels and their release kinetics were measured in vitro. VES and BSA released with a burst from both HA hydrogels during the first few hours, and release continued gradually for several days. The rate of release from HA-VS-PEG-VS-HA hydrogels was faster than that from HA-DVS-HA hydrogels, presumably due to the lower crosslink density in the former. The anti-inflammatory action of released VES was tested by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on HA hydrogels with and without VES in the gel. The number of cells adhering on HA hydrogels was very low compared to that on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), which might be one of the important advantages of using HA hydrogels for implant coatings or tissue engineering applications. ELISA test results showed that the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentration was very low in the supernatant of the wells containing the HA hydrogel with VES in contact with the activated macrophages compared to that without VES. This is probably the effect of the released VES reducing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha. HA hydrogels containing anti-inflammatory drugs may have potential for use in tissue engineering and also as biocompatible coatings of implants. PMID:15503629

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Drug Design Using a Molecular Hybridization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Melo, Thais Regina Ferreira; Vizioli, Ednir Oliveira; dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Chung, Man Chin

    2011-01-01

    The design of new drugs with better physiochemical properties, adequate absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, effective pharmacologic potency and lacking toxicity remains is a challenge. Inflammation is the initial trigger of several different diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, cancer; and disorders such as obesity and sexual dysfunction. Although inflammation is not the direct cause of these disorders, inflammatory processes often increase related pain and suffering. New anti-inflammatory drugs developed using molecular hybridization techniques to obtain multiple-ligand drugs can act at one or multiple targets, allowing for synergic action and minimizing toxicity. This work is a review of new anti-inflammatory drugs developed using the molecular modification approach.

  2. Mechanisms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Umar, Asad; Steele, Vernon E; Menter, David G; Hawk, Ernest T

    2016-02-01

    Various clinical and epidemiologic studies show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COXIBs) help prevent cancer. Since eicosanoid metabolism is the main inhibitory targets of these drugs the resulting molecular and biological impact is generally accepted. As our knowledge base and technology progress we are learning that additional targets may be involved. This review attempts to summarize these new developments in the field. PMID:26970125

  3. Anti-inflammatory drugs and experimental bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, P K

    1986-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (chronic hypersecretion) and chronic bronchiolitis (small airways disease) are two conditions associated with cigarette smoking: both contribute to airflow obstruction in man, the latter associated with progressive deterioration in lung function. Mucous metaplasia and hyperplasia are characteristic histological changes. Experimentally, cigarette smoke given daily for two weeks, induces similar histological changes in the airways of specific pathogen-free rats, providing a suitable animal model for study: an early proliferation of basal cells, accompanied by mucous metaplasia of surface epithelial serous cells is followed by proliferation of newly formed mucous cells. There is also a significant increase in epithelial thickness due to cell hypertrophy without stratification or prior ulceration. Experimentally, secretory cell hyperplasia is inhibited completely or to varying degrees by prophylactic administration (intraperitoneal injection) of either indomethacin, flurbiprofen, dexamethasone, prednisolone, hydrocortisone (each at 2 or 4 mg/kg body weight) or a mucolytic drug, N-acetylcysteine(Nac), given orally as a 1% solution of the drinking water. Nac also inhibits the associated mucus-hypersecretion. It takes between 21 and 84 days, depending on airway level, for the increase in secretory cell number to return to control values (ie recover). Indomethacin and flurbiprofen (4 mg/kg, by ip injection) shorten recovery to between 4 and 9 days in intrapulmonary airways but have no effect on recovery time in the rat trachea. Nac is effective in 6 of 7 airway levels which showed cigarette smoke-induced mucous cell hyperplasia. In conclusion, in the rat, the response to cigarette smoke is one of mucous cell metaplasia and both basal and mucous cell proliferation. Cigarette smoke-induced mucous cell hyperplasia can be inhibited when selected drugs are given concurrently with the cigarette smoke: indomethacin, fluriprofen and Nac are also therapeutic

  4. Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Østensen, Monika; Khamashta, Munther; Lockshin, Michael; Parke, Ann; Brucato, Antonio; Carp, Howard; Doria, Andrea; Rai, Raj; Meroni, Pierluigi; Cetin, Irene; Derksen, Ronald; Branch, Ware; Motta, Mario; Gordon, Caroline; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Spinillo, Arsenio; Friedman, Deborah; Cimaz, Rolando; Czeizel, Andrew; Piette, Jean Charles; Cervera, Ricard; Levy, Roger A; Clementi, Maurizio; De Carolis, Sara; Petri, Michelle; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Faden, David; Valesini, Guido; Tincani, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases in women of childbearing years may necessitate drug treatment during a pregnancy, to control maternal disease activity and to ensure a successful pregnancy outcome. This survey is based on a consensus workshop of international experts discussing effects of anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and biological drugs during pregnancy and lactation. In addition, effects of these drugs on male and female fertility and possible long-term effects on infants exposed to drugs antenatally are discussed where data were available. Recommendations for drug treatment during pregnancy and lactation are given. PMID:16712713

  5. Novel nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Boutsen, Y; Esselinckx, W

    1999-01-01

    The authors first briefly review how the concept of COX-2 selectivity was brought to light, then tested against the known gastrotoxicity ranking of currently used NSAIDs, from the old classics to the most recent. One truly selective COX-2 agent--celecoxib--is now being marketed in an ever increasing number of countries. So far it seems to keep its main promises, i.e. high--albeit not total--safety regarding gastrointestinal adverse effects, and undisturbed platelet function. Association with warfarin drugs seems to raise no problems, but one should still be wary of possible renal side-effects. Efficacy, at least as assessed in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid patients, appears satisfactory. However, treatment of intense inflammatory crises, such as gout or ankylosing spondylitis, has not been assessed, as yet. Another COX-2 agent--rofecoxib--is on the brink of being released. Its even more potent COX-2 selectivity raises new issues. What about some COX-1 activity that several authors detected in rheumatic synovitis? On the other hand, in particular circumstances, organs such as the stomach, the kidney and small blood vessels, seem to have their homeostasis partly controlled by COX-2 mechanisms also. These questions should be answered soon, whilst clinical experience with the COX-2 agent builds up. PMID:10692773

  6. Clinical Management of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hypersensitivity diseases caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are relatively common in the population. This article summarizes the present understanding on the various allergic and nonallergic clinical pictures produced through hypersensitivity to these drugs using the pathogenic classification of hypersensitivity reactions recently proposed by the Nomenclature Committee of the World Allergy Organization to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of patients with these conditions. PMID:23283307

  7. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Conjugated Silicon Quantum Dots: Their Cytotoxicity and Biological Effect

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) have great potential for biomedical applications, including their use as biological fluorescent markers and carriers for drug delivery systems. Biologically inert Si-QDs are less toxic than conventional cadmium-based QDs, and can modify the surface of the Si-QD with covalent bond. We synthesized water-soluble alminoprofen-conjugated Si-QDs (Ap-Si). Alminoprofen is a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used as an analgesic for rheumatism. Our results showed that the “silicon drug” is less toxic than the control Si-QD and the original drug. These phenomena indicate that the condensed surface integration of ligand/receptor-type drugs might reduce the adverse interaction between the cells and drug molecules. In addition, the medicinal effect of the Si-QDs (i.e., the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme) was maintained compared to that of the original drug. The same drug effect is related to the integration ratio of original drugs, which might control the binding interaction between COX-2 and the silicon drug. We conclude that drug conjugation with biocompatible Si-QDs is a potential method for functional pharmaceutical drug development. PMID:23306154

  8. Multiple cutaneous sensitization to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, M A; Revenga, F

    1996-01-01

    The use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is widespread (particularly in countries bordering the Mediterranean). Compared to their wide use, the incidence of published adverse cutaneous effects appears minimal, although they are increasing. Most of them are a form of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Multiple sensitization and/or cross-reactions are rarely reported. Interestingly, our patient presented ACD with diclofenac and etofenamate (both from different chemical groups) and, furthermore, patch tests were positive with bencydamine and indomethacin (both indolacetic acid derivatives), piroxicam and fepradinol. We think that our results could not be explained due to cross-reactivity, and that multiple sensitization was more likely. PMID:8864624

  9. Use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D; Nicholson, A; Church, D B; Pearson, M R

    1996-09-01

    Responses (486) were collared from a survey of 5054 Australian veterinarians on their use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats. Almost all respondents used glucocorticoids (usually prednisolone) to treat allergic, pruritic dermatoses in dogs, while two-thirds also gave fatty acid supplements and one-half used antihistamines. Almost 60% of respondents initially injected a glucocorticoid (frequently a long-acting preparation) when treating inflammatory skin diseases in dogs. More than 90% of respondents used glucocorticoids to treat immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia or thrombocytopenia, and about one-third also gave cytotoxic drugs. Administration of prednisolone on alternate days was generally favoured for long-term enteral steroid therapy. Phenylbutazone was the most preferred treatment for painful or inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders of dogs, but aspirin and pentosan polysulphate were also used widely. Regarding the use of analgesics drugs generally, both narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were used more widely in dogs than in cats, but alpha-2 agonists were used similarly in both species. The most commonly used narcotic analgesics were pethidine and buprenorphine in both species, while the NSAIDs used most often were flunixin and dipyrone in dogs and ketoprofen in cats. More than 80% of respondents generally used analgesic drugs with potentially painful surgical procedures, with doses given usually before anaesthetic recovery. Analgesic use rates varied with the condition, ranging from 94% for patients with acute severe trauma, through 60% for cruciate ligament repair and 29% for perineal herniorrahphy, to about 5% for ovariohysterectomy and dog castration. The three clinical signs most frequently nominated as indicators of pain in dogs and cats were (in descending order) vocalisation, response to handling or palpating the affected area, and mental depression. Other items mentioned frequently were

  10. Actions and toxicity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simon, L S

    1996-05-01

    Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) continues to be an important therapeutic intervention throughout the world for patients with pain and inflammation. The six major classes of NSAIDs (including the salicylates) bear the common property of inhibiting cyclooxygenase, the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic endoperoxides from arachidonic acid to yield prostaglandins. Anecdotal evidence has accumulated that the nonacetylated salicylates are as efficacious as the other NSAIDs, but there have been few controlled trials demonstrating that they are reasonable anti-inflammatory agents. This paper discusses the newest of the available clinical observations that nonacetylated salicylates are as efficacious as one of the newer NSAIDs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Because the nonacetylated salicylates are weak prostaglandin inhibitors, several other non-prostaglandin mediated mechanisms of action for the NSAIDs have been postulated and are described in this paper. In addition to papers describing NSAID effects on cartilage, this year several interesting papers described further effects of tenidap, a novel NSAID presently in development. Other papers reviewed attempts to develop NSAIDs with less severe gastrointestinal effects. Some reports discuss the use of topical NSAIDs, which are not clearly better than oral preparations. Data are also reviewed demonstrating that misoprostol effectively decreased significant poor gastrointestinal outcomes in patients who were treated with this NSAID for 6 months. New treatment regimens for decreasing misoprostol-induced toxicity are also reviewed. Finally, the effects of NSAID prophylaxis in preventing heterotopic bone formation in patients with osteoarthritis who undergo hip replacement surgery are noted. PMID:8796974

  11. [Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and risk of cardiovascular events. Literature review and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Zito, Giovanni Battista; Pedretti, Roberto Franco; Belisarii, Franceso Iachini; Putortí, Giuseppe; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2014-09-01

    Non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are largely used for treatment of acute and chronic pain, even for long periods of time (months or years). While it is known that their use is frequently associated with gastrointestinal damage, including major bleedings from peptic ulcer, the risk of cardiovascular events related to NSAID has received much less attention. However, there is a large body of evidence showing that NSAIDs (both "traditional", such as diclofenac or indobufen, and selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, COX-2) are associated with a significant increase of risk of cardiovascular events, both fatal and nonfatal. Consequently, several options have been proposed for the treatment of pain, including the use of analgesic drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as the opiates. Of interest, the Italian Drug Agency (AIFA) published a few years ago a warning (Nota 66) on the careful prescription of NSAIDs in patients with overt heart disease, such as coronary artery disease and heart failure. Aim of this paper is to present the current status of knowledge on the proper use of NSAIDs and other analgesic drugs in the management of acute and chronic pain. PMID:26058269

  12. Effects of anti-inflammatory drugs in primary kidney cell culture of a freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Ribas, João Luiz Coelho; da Silva, Cesar A; de Andrade, Lucas; Galvan, Gabrieli Limberger; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Trindade, Edvaldo S; Zampronio, Aleksander R; de Assis, Helena C Silva

    2014-09-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. This study aimed to evaluate toxic effects of some representative drugs of this pharmaceutical group on primary culture of monocytic lineage of Hoplias malabaricus anterior kidney. The effects of diclofenac, acetaminophen and ibuprofen in cell viability, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO production and genotoxicity were evaluated. Cytometry analysis CD11b(+) cells showed 71.5% of stem cells, 19.5% of macrophages and 9% of monocytes. Cell viability was lower in the ficoll compared to percoll separation. LPS-induced NO production by these cells was blocked after treatment with dexamethasone and NG-Methyl-L-Arginine (L-NMMA). Exposure of the cells to diclofenac (0.2-200 ng/mL), acetaminophen (0.025-250 ng/mL) ibuprofen (10-1000 ng/mL) reduced basal NO production and inhibited LPS-induced NO production at all concentrations after 24 h of exposure. Genotoxicity occurred at the highest concentration of diclofenac and at the intermediary concentration of acetaminophen. Genotoxicity was also observed by ibuprofen. In summary, the pharmaceuticals influenced NO production and caused DNA damage in monocytic cells suggesting that these drugs can induce immunosuppression and genotoxicity in fish. PMID:25038277

  13. Risk of stroke associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Bavry, Anthony A

    2014-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), both cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective and nonselective agents, have been associated with the increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The majority of studies have focused on myocardial infarction as the primary cardiovascular outcome. However, the association between NSAIDs and the risk of stroke events is not as clear, although an understanding of this association is important since stroke continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Various factors may contribute to an association between NSAIDs and stroke, including hypertension and thrombosis. Additionally, the risk may vary with different NSAID types. In this review, we discuss the relevant literature assessing the possible association between NSAID use and stroke events, along with the potential mechanisms and the possible directions for future study. PMID:24421643

  14. Pharmaceutical aspects of anti-inflammatory TNF-blocking drugs.

    PubMed

    Jinesh, Sandhya

    2015-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a key regulator of inflammatory processes in several immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Inactivating TNF has been found to be a plausible approach in treating these conditions. Two major strategies have been adopted by scientists to inactivate TNF: one is to use monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to TNF, and the other is to use fusion proteins that bind to TNF, both inactivate TNF and help to prevent TNF-mediated inflammatory processes. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are biological products that selectively bind to specific antigen molecules, and fusion proteins are soluble receptors that bind to TNF. These types of drugs are generally known as biologics and there has been an explosion in the development and testing of biologics since the 1994 US approval and launch of abciximab, a mAb that binds to GPIIb/IIIa on platelets. Anti-TNF drugs that are currently approved by FDA for treating inflammatory conditions include adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, golimumab, infliximab and etanercept. Since these agents are complex protein molecules, the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of these drugs are different from small-molecule anti-inflammatory agents. This review focuses on the pharmaceutical aspects of these drugs such as mechanism of action, adverse effects, pharmacokinetics and drug interactions. An effort was also taken to compare the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties of these drugs, with the available data at this time. PMID:25687751

  15. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using anti-inflammatory drugs and classical DMARDs.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, E; Scarpa, R

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease typically characterized by arthritis and psoriasis variably associated with other extra-articular manifestations. PsA has been considered a milder and less disabling disease compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), even if some studies showed that PsA had joint erosions and damage. In addition, about 20-40% of PsA patients have axial skeleton involvement that may lead to functional limitation and deformity. The treatment of PsA ranged from initial treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to one or more disease-modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs) for the suppression of inflammation in patients with recalcitrant peripheral joint disease. In clinical practice, the most widely used DMARDs are methotrexate (level of evidence B), sulfasalazine (level of evidence A), leflunomide (level of evidence A), and ciclosporin (level of evidence B). However, the efficacy of these agents in inhibiting joint erosions has not been assessed in controlled studies. Finally, the effectiveness of DMARDs in treating enthesitis and dactylitis is controversial. The present paper revised the evidence-based results on treatment with "conventional" therapy for PsA. The revision was based on all the subsets of the diseases, namely the various manifestations of the articular involvement (peripheral, axial, enthesitis, dactylitis) as well as the skin and nail involvement. PMID:22690387

  16. In vitro interactions between anidulafungin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biofilms of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Carrieri, Antonio; Carone, Addolorata; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Franchini, Carlo; Corbo, Filomena; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for many biomaterial-related infections; they give rise to infective pathologies typically associated with biofilm formation. We recently reported that the echinocandin anidulafungin (ANF) showed a strong in vitro activity against both planktonic and biofilms cells. Herein, we report the antifungal activities of ANF alone and in association with some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against nine Candida strain biofilms: four Candida albicans, two Candida glabrata and three Candida guilliermondii. The activity of ANF was assessed using an in vitro microbiological model relevant for clinical practice. ANF proved oneself to be active against biofilms cells, and a clear-cut synergism was found against Candida species biofilms when ANF was used in combination with three NSAIDs: aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen. The positive synergism against Candida spp. of ANF in association with aspirin or the other NSAIDs proved to be a very effective antifungal treatment (FICI<0.5). These results may provide the starting point for new combination therapies of ANF with NSAIDs against Candida biofilm pathologies. PMID:26833243

  17. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management. PMID:25851460

  18. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Sanford H

    2011-01-01

    Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less frequent. These complications can be life-threatening in at-risk populations such as older adults, who are common users of long-term oral systemic NSAID therapy. Topical NSAID formulations deliver effective doses of analgesics directly to the affected joints, thereby limiting systemic exposure and potentially the risk of systemic adverse events, such as gastropathy and serious cardiovascular events. There are currently two topical NSAIDs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for osteoarthritis-associated pain, as well as for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. This review discusses the relative safety, and the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risks of chronic oral or systemic NSAID therapy and topical NSAID formulations in patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:21753867

  19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and bladder cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Castelao, J E; Yuan, J-M; Gago-Dominguez, M; Yu, M C; Ross, R K

    2000-01-01

    Inclusion of phenacetin among ‘proven’ human carcinogens by the IARC in 1987, raised concerns about the carcinogenic potential of acetaminophen, its major metabolite. Acetaminophen has been implicated as a possible causal agent in the development of cancer of the renal pelvis. The bladder and renal pelvis, which derive from the same embryological structure, share the same transitional type of epithelium. Past studies have been inconclusive on the possible relationship among these analgesics and bladder cancer but no large, highly detailed study of this association has been conducted. A population-based case–control study conducted in Los Angeles, California, involved 1514 incident bladder cancer cases and an equal number of controls who were matched to the index cases by sex, date of birth (within 5 years) and race. Detailed information on medication use and prior medical conditions was collected through in-person interviews. Regular use of analgesics was not associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in either men or women. In fact, compared with non- or irregular users, regular analgesic users were at a decreased risk of bladder cancer overall (odds ratio (OR) = 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.68–0.96). However, there were clear differences in both the direction and strength of the associations between the different formulation classes of analgesics and bladder cancer risk. Intake of phenacetin was positively related to bladder cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner while intake of its major metabolite in humans, acetaminophen, was unrelated to risk. Intake of all classes of NSAIDs, except pyrazolon derivatives, were negatively associated with bladder cancer risk, with suggestive evidence that the protective effect varies in strength by subcategories of formulation. Acetic acids seemed to exhibit the strongest protective effect, whereas aspirin/other salicylic acids and oxicam showed the weakest protection. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755416

  20. [Use of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in aggravated and decompensated arthroses].

    PubMed

    Chlud, K

    1999-01-01

    Pain in osteoarthritis of the big weight bearing joints is either derived from periarticular ligaments, tendons, fascias, muscles, bursae--periarthropathy as sign of decompensation or from the reactive synovitis with or without effusion. NSAIDs (ibuprofen, diclofenac, indometacin, some salicylates, etofenamate and piroxicam) have demonstrated relevant advantages of the percutaneous route over the systemic one in soft tissue rheumatism. NSAIDs, mentioned above, locally administered as cream, gel or spray, quickly penetrate through the corneal layer of the skin and the site of application, reach highly effective concentrations in subcutis, fascias, tendons, ligaments and muscles, less in joint-capsule and -fluid indicating direct penetration. The blood levels of topical NSAIDs are extremely low with no systemic side effects, especially no gastric toxicity; however, local skin irritation is observed (1 to 2%). In contrast to this, systemic (oral) NSAIDs lead primarily via high blood levels to a lower concentration--only one tenth--in periarticular soft tissues with a high incidence of side effects. In conclusion the percutaneous application of certain NSAIDs has become a well established therapeutic regimen in painful osteoarthritis and in all other inflammatory degenerative and posttraumatic alterations of soft tissue structure. PMID:10637963

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the reduction of human alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R S; Szeto, B; Chauncey, H H; Goldhaber, P

    1983-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and indomethacin are inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis and reduce bone resorption in tissue culture stimulated by preparations obtained from human gingival tissue. In a retrospective study, we attempted to determine whether ASA or ASA plus indomethacin exert a bone resorption inhibiting effect on human alveolar bone. Dental radiographs of 75 patients with a history of arthritis and long-term ingestion (greater than 5 years) of ASA were compared with dental radiographs of 75 healthy male volunteers from the VA Dental Longitudinal Study (DLS). Proximal bone loss was measured using a Schei Ruler graded on a 10-point scale. The data indicated that the ASA population presented with significantly fewer sites of 10% or greater mesial and distal bone loss than the healthy control population (P less than 0.05). Mean percentage bone loss for the entire dentition was also lower in the ASA group, although the difference was not statistically significant. As there is no evidence to suggest that inhibition of alveolar bone loss is a natural concomitant of the arthritic process, we conclude that the inhibition of bone loss found in this study was due to the chronic ingestion of ASA or ASA and indomethacin. PMID:6573339

  2. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Carcinogenesis of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Compare, Debora; Nardone, Olga; Nardone, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    It is estimated that underlying infections and inflammatory responses are linked to 15–20% of all deaths from cancer worldwide. Inflammation is a physiologic process in response to tissue damage resulting from microbial pathogen infection, chemical irritation, and/or wounding. Tissues injured throughout the recruitment of inflammatory cells such as macrophages and neutrophils, generate a great amount of growth factors, cytokines, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that may cause DNA damage that in turn predisposes to the transformation from chronic inflammation to neoplasia. Cyclooxygenase (COX), playing a key role in cell homeostasis, angiogenesis and tumourigenesis, may represent the link between inflammation and cancer. Currently COX is becoming a pharmacological target for cancer prevention and treatment.

  3. Effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on microvascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Slater, C; House, S D

    1993-03-01

    Techniques of intravital microscopy were used to assess the effect of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin and ibuprofen, on the microcirculation. Hemodynamics in venules of the rat mesentery were studied in terms of vessel diameter, red blood cell velocity, and leukocyte-endothelium interactions: leukocyte-endothelium adhesion (LEA), white blood cell (WBC) marginating flux, and WBC velocity. Measurements were made during (1) control conditions (topical suffusion with ringer-gelatin drip), (2) topically suffused indomethacin or ibuprofen, (3) an induced inflammatory response (suffusion with the chemoattractant N-Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine (FMLP)), and (4) concomitant suffusion with FMLP and NSAID. Short term topical suffusion (90 sec) with indomethacin and ibuprofen had little or no effect on control hemodynamics. Five-minute suffusions with indomethacin (5 x 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-4) M) significantly increased LEA while ibuprofen (5 x 10(-3) M) significantly decreased LEA. Topical suffusion with the chemotactic agent FMLP induced inflammation and significantly increased LEA in venules. Treatment with indomethacin during induced inflammation had no effect on the inflammatory reaction in terms of the microvascular hemodynamics measured in this study. Treatment with ibuprofen during induced inflammation significantly reduced LEA and increased red blood cell velocity. In conclusion, although both of the NSAIDs studied here are known to block the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism, the actions of indomethacin and ibuprofen on the inflammatory process are very different with an important effect of ibuprofen being to decrease LEA. PMID:8361400

  4. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX)-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children. PMID:20525116

  5. Therapeutic potential of a non-steroidal bifunctional anti-inflammatory and anti-cholinergic agent against skin injury induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-10-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 h post-SM exposure. After 96 h, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermal–epidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. - Highlights: • Bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH4338) tested on SM exposed mouse skin • The prodrug NDH4338 was designed to target COX2 and acetylcholinesterase. • The application of NDH4338 improved cutaneous wound repair after SM induced injury. • NDH4338 treatment demonstrated a reduction in COX2 expression on SM injured skin. • Changes of skin repair

  6. Fetal exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and spontaneous abortions

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Sharon; Koren, Gideon; Lunenfeld, Eitan; Bilenko, Natalya; Ratzon, Ronit; Levy, Amalia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous abortion is the most common complication of pregnancy. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used during pregnancy. Published data are inconsistent regarding the risk of spontaneous abortion following exposure to NSAIDs. Methods: We performed a historical cohort study involving all women who conceived between January 2003 and December 2009 and who were admitted for delivery or spontaneous abortion at Soroka Medical Center, Clalit Health Services, Israel. A computerized database of medication dispensation was linked with 2 computerized databases containing information on births and spontaneous abortions. We constructed time-varying Cox regression models and adjusted for maternal age, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, obesity, hypercoagulation or inflammatory conditions, recurrent miscarriage, in vitro fertilization of the current pregnancy, intrauterine contraceptive device, ethnic background, tobacco use and year of admission. Results: The cohort included 65 457 women who conceived during the study period; of these, 58 949 (90.1%) were admitted for a birth and 6508 (9.9%) for spontaneous abortion. A total of 4495 (6.9%) pregnant women were exposed to NSAIDs during the study period. Exposure to NSAIDs was not an independent risk factor for spontaneous abortion (nonselective cyclooxygenase [COX] inhibitors: adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99–1.22; selective COX-2 inhibitors: adjusted HR 1.43, 95% CI 0.79–2.59). There was no increased risk for specific NSAID drugs, except for a significantly increased risk with exposure to indomethacin (adjusted HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.70–4.69). We found no dose–response effect. Interpretation: We found no increased risk of spontaneous abortion following exposure to NSAIDs. Further research is needed to assess the risk following exposure to selective COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:24491470

  7. Drug Targets for Cardiovascular-Safe Anti-Inflammatory: In Silico Rational Drug Studies.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Sajad; Sahrawat, Tammanna R; Ray, Monalisa; Dash, Swagatika; Kar, Dattatreya; Singh, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in memory consolidation and synaptic activity, the most fundamental functions of the brain. It converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide H2. In contrast, if over-expressed, it causes inflammation in response to cytokine, pro-inflammatory molecule, and growth factor. Anti-inflammatory agents, by allosteric or competitive inhibition of COX-2, alleviate the symptoms of inflammation. Coxib family drugs, particularly celecoxib, are the most famous anti-inflammatory agents available in the market showing significant inhibitory effect on COX-2 activity. Due to high cardiovascular risk of this drug group, recent researches are focused on the investigation of new safer drugs for anti-inflammatory diseases. Natural compounds, particularly, phytochemicals are found to be good candidates for drug designing and discovery. In the present study, we performed in silico studies to quantitatively scrutinize the molecular interaction of curcumin and its structural analogs with COX-2, COX-1, FXa and integrin αIIbβIII to investigate their therapeutic potential as a cardiovascular-safe anti-inflammatory medicine (CVSAIM). The results of both ADMET and docking study indicated that out of all the 39 compounds studied, caffeic acid had remarkable interaction with proteins involved in inflammatory response. It was also found to inhibit the proteins that are involved in thrombosis, thereby, having the potential to be developed as therapeutic agent. PMID:27258084

  8. Drug Targets for Cardiovascular-Safe Anti-Inflammatory: In Silico Rational Drug Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Sajad; Sahrawat, Tammanna R.; Ray, Monalisa; Dash, Swagatika; Kar, Dattatreya; Singh, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in memory consolidation and synaptic activity, the most fundamental functions of the brain. It converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide H2. In contrast, if over-expressed, it causes inflammation in response to cytokine, pro-inflammatory molecule, and growth factor. Anti-inflammatory agents, by allosteric or competitive inhibition of COX-2, alleviate the symptoms of inflammation. Coxib family drugs, particularly celecoxib, are the most famous anti-inflammatory agents available in the market showing significant inhibitory effect on COX-2 activity. Due to high cardiovascular risk of this drug group, recent researches are focused on the investigation of new safer drugs for anti-inflammatory diseases. Natural compounds, particularly, phytochemicals are found to be good candidates for drug designing and discovery. In the present study, we performed in silico studies to quantitatively scrutinize the molecular interaction of curcumin and its structural analogs with COX-2, COX-1, FXa and integrin αIIbβIII to investigate their therapeutic potential as a cardiovascular-safe anti-inflammatory medicine (CVSAIM). The results of both ADMET and docking study indicated that out of all the 39 compounds studied, caffeic acid had remarkable interaction with proteins involved in inflammatory response. It was also found to inhibit the proteins that are involved in thrombosis, thereby, having the potential to be developed as therapeutic agent. PMID:27258084

  9. Therapeutic Potential of a Non-Steroidal Bifunctional Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cholinergic Agent against Skin Injury Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 hr post-SM exposure. After 96 hr, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermalepidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. PMID:25127551

  10. Rose geranium essential oil as a source of new and safe anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boukhatem, Mohamed Nadjib; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Ferhat, Mohamed Amine; Saidi, Fairouz; Mekarnia, Maamar

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the available anti-inflammatory drugs exert an extensive variety of side effects, the search for new anti-inflammatory agents has been a priority of pharmaceutical industries. Aims The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of rose geranium (RGEO). Methods The chemical composition of the RGEO was investigated by gas chromatography. The major components were citronellol (29.13%), geraniol (12.62%), and citronellyl formate (8.06%). In the carrageenan-induced paw edema, five different groups were established and RGEO was administered orally in three different doses. Results RGEO (100 mg/kg) was able to significantly reduce the paw edema with a comparable effect to that observed with diclofenac, the positive control. In addition, RGEO showed a potent anti-inflammatory activity by topical treatment in the method of croton oil-induced ear edema. When the dose was 5 or 10 µl of RGEO per ear, the inflammation was reduced by 73 and 88%, respectively. This is the first report to demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory activity of Algerian RGEO. In addition, histological analysis confirmed that RGEO inhibited the inflammatory responses in the skin. Conclusion Our results indicate that RGEO may have significant potential for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs with improved safety profile. PMID:24103319

  11. Use of anti-inflammatory drugs and lower esophageal sphincter relaxing drugs and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fortuny, Joan; Johnson, Christine; Bohlke, Kari; Chow, Wong-Ho; Hart, Gene; Kucera, Gena; Mujumdar, Urvi; Ownby, Dennis; Wells, Karen; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims The incidence of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma has increased in western countries in recent decades for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether use of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxing drugs was related to an increased risk of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and whether use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a reduced risk of esophageal and gastric cancers. Methods We examined these associations using administrative databases in a case-control study in two integrated health care delivery systems. Cases were incident esophageal adenocarcinomas (n= 163) and squamous cell carcinomas (n= 114), and gastric cardia (n= 176) and non-cardia adenocarcinomas (n= 320), diagnosed between 1980 and 2002 in one health system and between 1993 and 2002 in the other. Matched controls (n= 3996) were selected. Complete prescription information was available for the study period. Results Prescription of corticosteroids was associated with a decreased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR= 0.6, 95% CI= 0.4-0.9), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI= 0.2-0.6) and gastric non-cardia carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI=0.3-0.6). Ever use of pharmacy-purchased aspirin was associated with 30-60% decreased risks of the studied cancers. As a group, LES-relaxing drugs showed little evidence of association with increased risk of any esophageal or gastric cancer. Conclusions Corticosteroid and aspirin use were associated with significantly decreased risks of esophageal and gastric cancer. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxing drugs as a group did not affect these risks, although we had limited power to assess individual drugs. The possibility that corticosteroids and aspirin may reduce esophageal cancer risk warrants further consideration. PMID:17644046

  12. Non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs as guest of dendronized polymeric nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mathias; Alvarado, Nancy; Alegría, Luz; Saldías, César; Fuentes, Irma; Menares, Pamela; Gargallo, Ligia; Leiva, Angel; Radić, Deodato

    2016-05-01

    The study of dendronized polymeric nanocomposites like poly(diethylaminoethyl methacrylamide) (PEAM), poly(acryloil tris nitrile/(methylester)) (PATCN) and dendronized poly(ɛ-caprolactone) as carriers of different non- steroidal antiinflamatory drugs like ibuprofen (IBU), ketoprofen (KTP), naproxen (NPX) and indomethacin (IMTh) are reported.

  13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration in children with history of wheeze

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Kendra; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Question A child in my clinic who recently sprained his ankle is experiencing pain and having trouble bearing weight on the affected leg. His mother has been giving him acetaminophen, as she was told never to use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) because of his pharmacologically controlled asthma. Is asthma in children a contraindication to giving NSAIDs? Is NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) a real entity? Answer Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are effective analgesic and antipyretic medications. While described in adults with some predisposing conditions, NERD has not been clearly described in a large number of children. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be recommended to children with known wheeze who do not have a history of NERD reaction. PMID:27521389

  14. Repositioning drugs for inflammatory disease – fishing for new anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Christopher J.; Wicker, Sophie M.; Chien, An-Tzu; Tromp, Alisha; Lawrence, Lisa M.; Sun, Xueying; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is an important and appropriate host response to infection or injury. However, dysregulation of this response, with resulting persistent or inappropriate inflammation, underlies a broad range of pathological processes, from inflammatory dermatoses to type 2 diabetes and cancer. As such, identifying new drugs to suppress inflammation is an area of intense interest. Despite notable successes, there still exists an unmet need for new effective therapeutic approaches to treat inflammation. Traditional drug discovery, including structure-based drug design, have largely fallen short of satisfying this unmet need. With faster development times and reduced safety and pharmacokinetic uncertainty, drug repositioning – the process of finding new uses for existing drugs – is emerging as an alternative strategy to traditional drug design that promises an improved risk-reward trade-off. Using a zebrafish in vivo neutrophil migration assay, we undertook a drug repositioning screen to identify unknown anti-inflammatory activities for known drugs. By interrogating a library of 1280 approved drugs for their ability to suppress the recruitment of neutrophils to tail fin injury, we identified a number of drugs with significant anti-inflammatory activity that have not previously been characterized as general anti-inflammatories. Importantly, we reveal that the ten most potent repositioned drugs from our zebrafish screen displayed conserved anti-inflammatory activity in a mouse model of skin inflammation (atopic dermatitis). This study provides compelling evidence that exploiting the zebrafish as an in vivo drug repositioning platform holds promise as a strategy to reveal new anti-inflammatory activities for existing drugs. PMID:25038060

  15. Structural investigation of chitosan-based microspheres with some anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreve, Simina; Kacso, Iren; Popa, Adriana; Raita, Oana; Dragan, Felicia; Bende, A.; Borodi, Gh.; Bratu, I.

    2011-06-01

    The use of chitosan as an excipient in oral formulations, as a drug delivery vehicle for ulcerogenic anti-inflammatory drugs and as base in polyelectrolyte complex systems, to prepare solid release systems as sponges was investigated. The preparation by double emulsification of chitosan hydrogels carrying diclofenac, acetyl-salycilic acid and hydrocortisone acetate as anti-inflammatory drugs is reported. The concentration of anti-inflammatory drug in the chitosan hydrogel generating the sponges was 0.08 mmol. Chitosan-drug loaded sponges with anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared by freeze-drying at -60 °C and 0.009 atm. Structural investigations of the solid formulations were done by Fourier-transformed infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry. The results indicated that the drug molecules are forming temporary chelates in chitosan hydrogels and sponges. Electron paramagnetic resonance demonstrates the presence of free radicals in a wide range and the antioxidant activity for chitosan-drug supramolecular cross-linked assemblies.

  16. Effects of salicylates and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Brandt, K D; Palmoski, M J

    1984-07-13

    According to in vivo experimental data, salicylates and several other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents suppress proteoglycan biosynthesis in normal and degenerating articular cartilage. Therapeutic levels of aspirin in vivo had a similar adverse effect on degenerating cartilage, as noted in two canine models of osteoarthritis and cartilage atrophy. Because the effective daily antirheumatic dose of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is lower than that of salicylates, these drugs may have less negative effects on degenerating articular cartilage. However, clinical significance cannot be extrapolated from these experimental data. PMID:6465163

  17. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    PubMed Central

    SORIANO-HERNANDEZ, ALEJANDRO D.; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; MARTINEZ-FIERRO, MARGARITA L.; VALDEZ-VELAZQUEZ, LAURA L.; ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ, FRANCISCO; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; GUZMAN-ESQUIVEL, JOSE; RODRIGUEZ-SANCHEZ, IRAM P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; DELGADO-ENCISO, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC in vitro and in vivo. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, dexamethasone, meclofenamic acid, flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid were tested in UCC HeLa, VIPA, INBL and SiHa cell lines. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was evaluated in vitro. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid presented with slight to moderate toxicity (10–40% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM) in certain cell lines, while meclofenamic acid exhibited significant cytotoxicity in all essayed cell lines (50–90% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM). The meclofenamic acid was tested in murine models (immunodeficient and immunocompetent) of UCC, which manifested a significant reduction in tumor growth and increased mouse survival. It was demonstrated that of the evaluated anti-inflammatory drugs, meclofenamic acid was the most cytotoxic, with a significant antitumor effect in murine models. Subsequent studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of this drug. PMID:26622892

  18. Neutrophilia and an Anti-Inflammatory Drug as Markers of Inflammation in Delayed Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lucille L.; And Others

    This study reexamined the concept that delayed muscle soreness (DMS) is a form of inflammatory pain. This was accomplished by having 32 male volunteers perform exercise known to induce DMS and then assess the total and differential white blood cell changes. In addition, an anti-inflammatory drug, idomethacin, was administered to determine whether…

  19. Acetylsalicylic-acid-containing drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, M; Smith, R E

    1997-01-01

    A large number of drugs containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are available by prescription and over the counter in Canada. The possibility of serious side effects and drug interactions is therefore high. The authors have compiled a comprehensive list of products containing these drugs from information supplied by pharmaceutical databases, independent marketing researchers and Health Canada's Drug Directorate. Physicians should ensure that additional ASA-containing drugs or NSAIDs are not inadvertently taken by patients, especially those receiving oral anticoagulant therapy or those with a qualitative platelet defect. Patients at risk should be cautioned to check with their physician before taking any new medication, even over-the-counter products. PMID:9099173

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  1. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  2. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  3. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  4. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  5. β-Amino acid and amino-alcohol conjugation of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) imparts hydrogelation displaying remarkable biostability, biocompatibility, and anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Joydeb; Das, Mahua Rani; Deb, Jolly; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2013-08-13

    A well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely, naproxen (Np), was conjugated with β-alanine and various combinations of amino alcohols and l-alanine. Quite a few bioconjugates, thus synthesized, were capable of gelling pure water, NaCl solution (0.9 wt %), and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.4). The hydrogels were characterized by rheology and electron microscopy. Hydrogelation was probed by FT-IR and temperature-variable (1)H NMR studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) of a nonhydrogelator and a hydrogelator in the series established a useful structure-property (gelation) correlation. MTT assay of the hydrogelators in the mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line showed excellent biocompatibility. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) assay of the hydrogelators revealed their anti-inflammatory response, which was comparable to that of the parent NSAID naproxen sodium (Ns). PMID:23859562

  6. Anti-inflammatory drugs interacting with Zn (II) metal ion based on thiocyanate and azide ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, DFT calculations and antibacterial assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tabrizi, Leila; Hadizade, Morteza; Sabzalian, Mohammad R.; Chermahini, Alireza Najafi; Rezapour, Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    Zinc (II) complexes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) naproxen (nap) and ibuprofen (ibu) were synthesized in the presence of nitrogen donor ligands (thiocyanate or azide). The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopes. The binding modes of the ligands in complexes were established by means of molecular modeling of the complexes, and calculation of their IR, NMR and absorption spectra at DFT (TDDFT)/B3LYP level were studied. The experimental and calculated data verified monodentate binding through the carboxylic oxygen atoms of anti-inflammatory drugs in the zinc complexes. The calculated 1H, FT-IR and UV-Vis data are in better agreement with the experimental results, and confirm the predicted tetrahedral structures for the Zn (II) complexes. In addition to DFT calculations of complexes, natural bond orbital (NBO) was performed at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Biological studies showed the antibacterial activity of zinc complexes against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains.

  7. Development of a rapid, multi-class method for the confirmatory analysis of anti-inflammatory drugs in bovine milk using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malone, E M; Dowling, G; Elliott, C T; Kennedy, D G; Regan, L

    2009-11-13

    A rapid liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous identification, confirmation and quantitation of seven licensed anti-inflammatory drugs (AIDs) in bovine milk. The method was validated in accordance with the criteria defined in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Two classes of AIDs were investigated, corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The developed method is capable of detecting and confirming dexamethasone (DXM), betamethasone (BTM), prednisolone (PRED), tolfenamic acid (TLF), 5-hydroxy flunixin (5-OH-FLU), meloxicam (MLX) and 4-methyl amino antipyrine (4-MAA) at their associated maximum residue limits (MRLs). These compounds represent all the corticosteroids and NSAIDs licensed for use in bovine animals producing milk for human consumption. These compounds have never been analysed before in the same method and also 4-methyl amino antipyrine has never been analysed with the other licensed NSAIDs. The method can be considered rapid as permits the analysis of up to 30 samples in one day. Milk samples are extracted with acetonitrile; sodium chloride is added to aid partition of the milk and acetonitrile mixture. The acetonitrile extract is then subjected to liquid-liquid purification by the addition of hexane. The purified extract is finally evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in a water/acetonitrile mixture and determination is carried out by LC-MS/MS. Decision limit (CCalpha) values and detection capability (CCbeta) values have been established for each compound. PMID:19467664

  8. The patterns of toxicity and management of acute nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) overdose

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Laura J; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic actions. They are commonly taken in overdose in many areas of the world. The majority of patients with acute NSAID overdose will remain asymptomatic or develop minor self-limiting gastrointestinal symptoms. However, serious clinical sequelae have been reported in patients with acute NSAID overdose and these include convulsions, metabolic acidosis, coma and acute renal failure. There appear to be some differences between the NSAIDs in terms of the relative risk of these complications; in particular mefenamic acid is most commonly associated with convulsions. The management of these serious clinical features is largely supportive and there are no specific antidotes for acute NSAID toxicity. PMID:27147851

  9. [Helicobacter pylori, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and gastroduodenal changes].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A V

    1995-09-01

    The author discusses the possible interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) which may play an important role in the unleashing of gastroduodenal lesions. To our knowledge, AINEs have no influence on the prevalence of infection by Hp and the latter does not seem to influence the development and intensity of the lesions caused by NSAIDs. PMID:7484272

  10. Intra-Articular Tibiofemoral Injection of a Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug has no Detrimental Effects on Joint Mechanics in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Riggin, Corinne N.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Kuntz, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Administration of intra-articular medications, including corticosteroids and analgesics, is common clinical practice for knee pathology and dysfunction. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are another category of medication commonly prescribed for their analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of injectable NSAIDs in the treatment of intra-articular pathology and postoperative analgesia.1–3 However, little data exist regarding the safety of intra-articular injection, despite the increase in its application.4 Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intra-articular NSAID injection on articular cartilage, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and joint function in the rat. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into either saline (SAL) or ketorolac (NSAID) tibiofemoral single injection treatment groups. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 7, 28, and 84 days post-injection for histological and mechanical analyses. Additionally, a subset of animals underwent longitudinal ambulatory evaluation to determine joint functional properties. We hypothesized that intra-articular ketorolac injection would result in no detrimental mechanical, histological, or functional changes. No differences were reported between the NSAID and SAL groups in any of the parameters measured at any time point, demonstrating the potential safety of intra-articular NSAID administration. Therefore, NSAID injection could be further considered for clinical application in humans. PMID:24981310

  11. Adverse drug interactions with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Recognition, management and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A G; Seideman, P; Day, R O

    1993-02-01

    The prevalence and incidence of adverse drug interactions involving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remains unknown. To identify those proposed drug interactions of greatest clinical significance, it is appropriate to focus on interactions between commonly used and/or commonly coprescribed drugs, interactions for which there are numerous well documented case reports in reputable journals, interactions validated by well designed in vivo human studies and those affecting high-risk drugs and/or high-risk patients. While most interactions between NSAIDs and other drugs are pharmacokinetic, NSAID-related pharmacodynamic interactions may be considerably more important in the clinical context, and prescriber ignorance is likely to be a major determinant of many adverse drug interactions. Prescribing NSAIDs is relatively contraindicated for patients on oral anticoagulants due to the risk of haemorrhage, and for patients taking high-dose methotrexate due to the dangers of bone marrow toxicity, renal failure and hepatic dysfunction. Combination NSAID therapy cannot be justified as toxicity may be increased without any improvement in efficacy. Where lithium or anti-hypertensives are coprescribed with NSAIDs, close monitoring is mandatory for lithium toxicity and hypertension, respectively, and aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) or sulindac are preferred. Phenytoin or oral hypoglycaemic agents may be administered with NSAIDs other than pyrazoles and salicylates provided that patients are monitored carefully at the initiation and cessation of NSAID treatment. Digoxin, aminoglycosides and probenecid may be coprescribed with NSAIDs, but close monitoring is required, particularly for high-risk patients such as the elderly. Indomethacin and triamterene should be avoided due to the risk of renal failure. High dose aspirin should be replaced by naproxen in patients on valproic acid (sodium valproate) and care is required when corticosteroids are administered to patients

  12. Deep Tissue Massage and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Low Back Pain: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kocur, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether chronic low back pain therapy with deep tissue massage (DTM) gives similar results to combined therapy consisting of DTM and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Design. Prospective controlled randomized single blinded trial. Settings. Ambulatory care of rehabilitation. Participants. 59 patients, age 51.8 ± 9.0 years, with chronic low back pain. Interventions. 2 weeks of DTM in the treatment group (TG) versus 2 weeks of DTM combined with NSAID in the control group (CG). Main Outcome Measures. Visual analogue scale, Oswestry disability index (ODI), and Roland-Morris questionnaire (RM). Results. In both the TG and the CG, a significant pain reduction and function improvement were observed. VAS decreased from 58.3 ± 18.2 to 42.2 ± 21.1 (TG) and from 51.8 ± 18.8 to 30.6 ± 21.9 (CG). RM value decreased from 9.8 ± 5.1 to 6.4 ± 4.4 (TG), and from 9.3 ± 5.5 to 6.1 ± 4.6 (CG). ODI value decreased from 29.2 ± 17.3 to 21.4 ± 15.1 (TG) and from 21.4 ± 9.4 to 16.6 ± 9.4 (CG). All pre-post-treatment differences were significant; however, there was no significant difference between the TG and the CG. Conclusion. DTM had a positive effect on reducing pain in patients with chronic low back pain. Concurrent use of DTM and NSAID contributed to low back pain reduction in a similar degree that the DTM did. PMID:24707200

  13. Binary graft modification of polypropylene for anti-inflammatory drug-device combo products.

    PubMed

    Melendez-Ortiz, Hector Ivan; Díaz-Rodríguez, Patricia; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel; Bucio, Emilio

    2014-04-01

    Temperature- and pH-responsive copolymers were γ-ray grafted onto polypropylene (PP) to provide its surface with capability to load and to control the release of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with the aim of being useful as component of drug-eluting medical devices. Poly(N,N'-dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA) or poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) were grafted onto PP films via a direct method, and then poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted applying a preirradiation method. The binary graft copolymers showed hemocompatibility and certain capability to adsorb albumin. (PP-g-DMAEMA)-g-NIPAAm exhibited higher affinity for ibuprofen and, particularly, diclofenac than (PP-g-4VP)-g-NIPAAm. Sustained release was observed under physiological conditions. Cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of NSAID-eluting (PP-g-DMAEMA)-g-NIPAAm films were evaluated on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. First, dose dependence of anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity of ibuprofen and diclofenac on RAW 264.7 cells were investigated to elucidate the ranges of drug concentration that the graft copolymers should provide. Optimal concentrations of diclofenac and ibuprofen at which they reduce inflammation while maintaining cell viability were determined to be 200 μg/mL and above 400 μg/mL in culture medium. Sequential grafting of DMAEMA and NIPAAm made PP surface to exhibit remarkably high affinity to diclofenac, being able to load and to regulate drug release fulfilling in vitro requirements to avoid inflammatory response. PMID:24615379

  14. Effects of anti-inflammatory agents and some other drugs on prostaglandin biotransport.

    PubMed

    Bito, L Z; Salvador, E V

    1976-08-01

    The inhibitory effects of drugs on prostaglandin biotransport were studied by measuring the concentrative accumulation of 3H by rabbit choroid plexuses, segments of anterior uvea and kidney cortex slices after incubation in tissue culture medium containing 3H-prostaglandin F2 alpha. After 10 minutes of incubation in the absence of an inhibitor, the choroid plexus showed a tissue/medium 3H accumulation ratio of 14 +/- 0.7; after 30 minutes of incubation, the anterior uvea and the kidney cortex slices showed accumulation ratios of 6.4 +/- 0.5 and 5.6 +/- 0.1, respectively. The I50 values for inhibition of 3H accumulation by indomethacin were 10, 8 and 12 muM for the three tissues, respectively. Some related drugs-oxyphenbutazone, D-naproxen, l-naproxen, ibuprofen, phenylbutazone and pirprofen-were also found to be effective inhibitors of 3H accumulation (I50 for anterior uvea, 6-28 muM) whereas aspirin, dexamethasone phosphate and penicillin had an inhibitory effect only at much higher concentrations (I50 0.1-2.0 mM). Papaverine, fursemide and probenecid were approximately as effective as the anti-inflammatory organic acids (I50 0.01-0.1 mM), whereas bromcresol green was at least 10-fold more effective. Diphenhydramine and the nonacidic prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors, phenelzine and paracetamol, showed little (I50 greater than 1 mM) or no inhibitory effect. The inhibition of this transport system by some drugs, most notably nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory organic acids, and consequent alterations in the distribution and disposition of prostaglandins must be taken into account in the development of new anti-inflammatory agents and in the interpretation of the mechansim of action and side effects of such drugs. PMID:948038

  15. [Role of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes. From athero-inflammation to athero-thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Altman, Raúl; Scazziota, Alejandra

    2003-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality and the most severe manifestation of atherosclerosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of atheroma formation and the causes of atheroma accidents have allowed the development of new therapeutic measures for reducing thrombotic events after a coronary episode. Treating the thrombosis after plaque rupture is useful, but a late measure once coronary flow is disturbed. Therefore, treatment at an earlier stage, which we call athero-inflammation, a central event in atheroma progression leading to atherothrombosis, seems wise. There is evidence of an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of atheroma rupture in acute coronary events. Earlier studies of anti-inflammatory medication have not demonstrated a reduction in thrombotic complications after an acute coronary episode. However, there are pathophysiological arguments and clinical findings that suggest that it would be advisable to include anti-inflammatory medications, especially those that inhibit preferentially COX-2, in the therapeutic arsenal for this pathology. We postulated that blocking athero-inflammation could prevent thrombosis. A pilot study was carried out in 120 patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation in which 60 patients were treated with meloxicam, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor. All patients received heparin and aspirin. During the stay in the coronary care unit, as well as after 90 days, meloxicam lowered composite outcomes (myocardial infarction, death and revascularization procedures) compared with the control group. These results and available pathophysiological and clinical evidence support the hypothesis of potential benefits of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with preferential inhibitory activity on COX-2 in patients with acute coronary syndromes. More trials are needed to confirm their preventive effect. PMID:12549993

  16. Transcriptomic effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug Ibuprofen in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam.

    PubMed

    Maria, Vera L; Amorim, Mónica J B; Bebianno, Maria João; Dondero, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The transcriptomic effects of Ibuprofen (IBU) in the digestive gland tissue of Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam. specimens exposed at low environmental concentrations (250 ng L(-1)) are presented. Using a 1.7 K feature cDNA microarray along with linear models and empirical Bayes statistical methods 225 differentially expressed genes were identified in mussels treated with IBU across a 15-day period. Transcriptional dynamics were typical of an adaptive response with a peak of gene expression change at day-7 (177 features, representing about 11% of sequences available for analysis) and an almost full recovery at the end of the exposure period. Functional genomics by means of Gene Ontology term analysis unraveled typical mussel stress responses i.e. aminoglycan (chitin) metabolic processes but also more specific effects such as the regulation of NF-κB transcription factor activity. PMID:27209120

  17. Multiple Colon Ulcers with Typical Small Intestinal Lesions Induced by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Momoko; Ando, Takayuki; Hamashima, Takeru; Yoshita, Hiroki; Nanjo, Sohachi; Mihara, Hiroshi; Fujinami, Haruka; Kajiura, Shinya; Nishikawa, Jun; Miura, Yoshiaki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of NSAID-induced colon ulcers is difficult when the distribution or endoscopic findings are not typical. An 83-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for hemorrhagic diarrhea. Colonoscopy showed multiple ulcers in the entire colon, particularly longitudinal ulcers in the transverse colon. These were unusual for NSAID-induced colopathy, although she had been on meloxicam. However, capsule endoscopy revealed multiple scars and erosions, characteristic of NSAIDs users. The final diagnosis was NSAID-induced enteropathy, and all lesions were in remission after meloxicam discontinuation. We herein emphasize the value of an endoscopic assessment of the entire digestive tract in the diagnosis of NSAID-induced mucosal lesions. PMID:26278290

  18. Management of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sung, J J

    2001-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have superseded Helicobacter pylori infection as the most important cause of peptic ulcer bleeding. Eradication of H. pylori in NSAID users will not affect ulcer healing. In high-risk patients with a history of ulcer bleeding, curing H. pylori infection alone without acid suppression has substantially reduced the risk of rebleeding caused by low-dose aspirin but not nonaspirin NSAIDs. In a study comparing the safety profile of misoprostol in combination with NSAID against nabumetone in high-risk patients with a history of ulcer bleeding, both strategies were unable to confer significant protection against the risk of rebleeding. PMID:11165993

  19. Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: The Importance of Drug, Delivery, and Therapeutic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain associated with a variety of indications, including arthritic conditions, but their usefulness is often limited by dose-dependent adverse events (AEs), such as gastrointestinal disturbances, cardiovascular events, and renal toxicity. The risk of such effects could be reduced by the use of topical formulations, which offer the potential to deliver analgesic concentrations locally, at the site of inflammation, while minimizing systemic concentrations. The topical preparations currently approved in the United States are diclofenac sodium 1.5% topical solution (containing dimethyl sulfoxide as a penetration enhancer), diclofenac sodium gel 1%, and a diclofenac hydroxyethylpyrrolidine 1.3% patch. Each of these topical NSAIDs provide drug delivery to subcutaneous tissues for the management of pain associated with osteoarthritis or soft-tissue injuries. Furthermore, these formulations are not significantly associated with the systemic AEs associated with oral NSAIDs; the most common AEs associated with topical formulations are local skin reactions, which are usually mild and self-limiting. Other topical NSAID preparations approved in the European Union include ibuprofen creams and gels, ketoprofen gel, felbinac gel and cutaneous foam, and piroxicam gel. Meta-analyses have confirmed the efficacy and safety of these preparations. However, it is important to recognize that pharmacokinetic absorption from topical formulations can vary markedly, even between different formulations of the same drug, depending on the agent, the underlying disorder, and the site of application. It is therefore essential to consider the patient, the drug, and the drug delivery mechanism when selecting a topical NSAID preparation. PMID:22367354

  20. Triblock polymeric micelles as carriers for anti-inflammatory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Krassimira; Petrov, Petar; Pencheva, Ivanka; Konstantinov, Spiro

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the properties of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(n-butyl acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO-PnBA-PAA) polymeric micelles as carriers for anti-inflammatory drugs (prednisolone and budesonide). The micelles comprising a hydrophobic PnBA core and a PEO/PAA corona showed average diameter less than 40 nm. The size of the drug-loaded micelles did not change during eight hours into media that mimic physiological fluids indicating high colloidal stability. The calculation of Flory-Huggins parameter showed greater compatibility between budesonide and micellar core suggesting its location in the micellar core, whereas prednisolone was located also into the interface layer. This observation correlated further with slower release of budesonide, especially in acid medium (pH = 1.2). The inclusion of budesonide into micelles showed significant protective effect against the cytotoxic damage induced by the co-cultivation of differentiated human EOL-1 and HT-29 cells. This study revealed the capacity of PEO-PnBA-PAA terpolymer as carrier of nanosized micelles suitable for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25539075

  1. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the cellular membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Célia; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Ferreira, Helena; Lima, José L F C; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Reis, Salette

    2008-08-01

    In this work, fluorescence measurements were performed using the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) to evaluate the effects of the interaction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs--NSAIDs (meloxicam, lornoxicam, and nimesulide) with several membrane systems (liposomes with and without cholesterol, mouse splenocytes, mouse macrophages cell line--J774, human leukemia monocyte cell line--THP-1, and human granulocytes and mononuclear cells). DPH fluorescence quenching studies revealed that the NSAIDs studied were able to efficiently quench the probe located in membrane hydrocarbon region. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements were also made to investigate the effects on membrane fluidity resulting from the interaction between the drugs and membrane systems. All the anti-inflammatory drugs studied show an increase in the membrane fluidity in a concentration dependent manner. Results obtained provide an insight into NSAIDs capacity to be inserted in lipid bilayers and alter the lipid dynamics. The induced changes in lipid dynamics may modulate the activity of inflammatory enzymes or may be related with deleterious topical action of NSAIDs on gastric phospholipid fluidity. PMID:17990311

  2. Anti-inflammatory drug incorporation into polymeric nano-hybrids for local controlled release.

    PubMed

    Sammartino, G; Marenzi, G; Tammaro, L; Bolognese, A; Calignano, A; Costantino, U; Califano, L; Mastrangelo, F; Tetè, S; Vittoria, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the formulation, preparation and characterization of new polymeric composite materials containing a nano-hybrid to be used for the controlled molecular delivery of an anti-inflammatory molecule, Diclofenac. The nano-hybrid consists of a layer of double hydroxide of an Mg-Al hydrotalcite type, in which we replaced the chloride anions present in the host galleries with Diclofenac anions by a simple ion-exchange reaction. Different amounts of the hybrid material were incorporated in polycaprolactone and processed as films of 0.15 mm thickness. The composite materials were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetry and for their mechanical properties, and showed properties even better than those for the pristine polymer. The release process of the anti-inflammatory molecules was very interesting and promising for tuneable drug delivery. It consists of two stages: a first stage, very rapid as a burst in which a small fraction of the drug is released, and of a second stage that is much slower, extending for longer and longer periods. The parameters influencing the drug release were individuated and discussed. PMID:16848988

  3. Risk Factors of Drug Interaction between Warfarin and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Practical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Hee; Kim, Ah Jeong; Son, In Ja; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Bong; Ahn, Hyuk

    2010-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to interact with the oral anticoagulant warfarin and can cause a serious bleeding complication. In this study, we evaluated the risk factors for international normalized ratio (INR) increase, which is a surrogate marker of bleeding, after addition of an NSAID in a total of 98 patients who used warfarin. Patient age, sex, body mass index, maintenance warfarin dose, baseline INR, coadministered medications, underlying diseases, and liver and kidney functions were evaluated for possible risk factors with INR increase ≥15.0% as the primary end-point. Of the 98 patients, 39 (39.8%) showed an INR elevation of ≥15.0% after adding a NSAID to warfarin therapy. Multivariate analysis showed that high maintenance dose (>40 mg/week) of warfarin (P=0.001), the presence of coadministered medications (P=0.024), the use of meloxicam (P=0.025) and low baseline INR value (P=0.03) were the risk factors for INR increase in respect to NSAID-warfarin interaction. In conclusion, special caution is required when an NSAID is administered to warfarin users if patients are taking warfarin >40 mg/week and other medications interacting with warfarin. PMID:20191029

  4. Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil as a potent anti-inflammatory and antifungal drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boukhatem, Mohamed Nadjib; Ferhat, Mohamed Amine; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Saidi, Fairouz; Kebir, Hadjer Tchoketch

    2014-01-01

    Background Volatile oils obtained from lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf, Poaceae family] are used in traditional medicine as remedies for the treatment of various diseases. Aims In the present study, lemon grass essential oil (LGEO) was evaluated for its in vivo topical and oral anti-inflammatory effects, and for its in vitro antifungal activity using both liquid and vapor phases. Methods The chemical profile of LGEO as determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed two major components: geranial (42.2%), and neral (31.5%). The antifungal activity of LGEO was evaluated against several pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi using disc diffusion and vapor diffusion methods. Results LGEO exhibited promising antifungal effect against Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and Aspergillus niger, with different inhibition zone diameters (IZDs) (35–90 mm). IZD increased with increasing oil volume. Significantly, higher anti-Candida activity was observed in the vapor phase. For the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effect, LGEO (10 mg/kg, administered orally) significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema with a similar effect to that observed for oral diclofenac (50 mg/kg), which was used as the positive control. Oral administration of LGEO showed dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, topical application of LGEO in vivo resulted in a potent anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by using the mouse model of croton oil-induced ear edema. To our knowledge, this is the first such report to be published. The topical application of LGEO at doses of 5 and 10 µL/ear significantly reduced acute ear edema induced by croton oil in 62.5 and 75% of the mice, respectively. In addition, histological analysis clearly confirmed that LGEO inhibits the skin inflammatory response in animal models. Conclusion Results of the present study indicate that LGEO has a noteworthy potential for the development of drugs for the treatment of

  5. Influence of Anti-inflammatory Drugs on the Rheological Properties of Synovial Fluid and Its Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Liang, Jing; Colby, Ralph H.

    2006-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid, the synovial fluid model, and plasma protein solutions indicate that the fluids are rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. While HCQ has no effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions, it inhibits/suppresses the observed rheopexy of the synovial fluid model and plasma protein solutions. In contrast, D-penicillamine has a complex, time dependent effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions,---reducing the zero shear rate viscosity of a 3 mg/mL NaHA (in phosphate buffered saline) by ca. 40% after 44 days. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  6. Clinical implications of prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in oral health care--a review.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Ravleen; Yashoda Devi, B K; Rakesh, N; Reddy, Sujatha S; Patil, Deepa Jatti

    2015-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including both the traditional nonselective NSAIDs and the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, are widely used for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. They are routinely prescribed in dental practice for the management of pain and swelling. Their use in treating acute dental pain and chronic orofacial pain, as adjuncts to the treatment of periodontal disease, and to minimize edema following surgical procedures is well documented. However, long-term utilization of nonselective NSAIDs could increase the risk of gastrointestinal symptoms, ranging from mild (e.g., dyspepsia, nausea, or vomiting) to serious gastric problems (e.g., gastric bleeding or perforation). Therefore, selective COX-2 inhibitors have been developed with fewer GI side effects but the recently identified cardiovascular adverse reactions limit their routine use in dental practice. Another major concern for oral physicians is NSAID-induced mucosal lesions and prolongation of bleeding time during invasive dental procedures. This article reviews therapeutic and analgesic uses of NSAIDs in dentistry. The various issues surrounding NSAID-induced adverse reactions and their implications in dentistry are also discussed. PMID:25617120

  7. Rheology-sensitive response of zeolite-supported anti-inflammatory drug systems.

    PubMed

    Pasquino, R; Di Domenico, M; Izzo, F; Gaudino, D; Vanzanella, V; Grizzuti, N; de Gennaro, B

    2016-10-01

    Drug release from inorganic supports is a challenge for the scientific community for various reasons, related to the low costs of the systems and the possibility of easily regulating the drug release. In the present work, surface-modified zeolite particles are used as carriers for non steroidal antiflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The release of the drug has been studied in a solution that simulates the intestinal fluid as well as in a gel-like system, based on a surfactant and a binding salt. In the solution case, the quantity of drug released has been tracked via spectrophotometric assay. Release in the gel has been monitored by rheological methods. The molecular conformation of the NSAIDs is fundamental for the interaction with the zeolite surface, whose modified surface has a strong binding energy. It has been proven that the main mechanism for the drug release is anion exchange. It has been found that the NSAIDs, used in their sodic form, can act as binding salts by themselves in the gel-like system, thus changing the viscoelastic response of the overall solution. Drug release kinetics in the solution compare quantitatively well with the released drug in the gel-like fluid, as measured by rheometry. PMID:27479877

  8. PMMA/polysaccharides nanofilm loaded with adenosine deaminase inhibitor for targeted anti-inflammatory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Redolfi Riva, Eugenio; Desii, Andrea; Sartini, Stefania; La Motta, Concettina; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-10-29

    A novel drug delivery vector, a free-standing polymeric ultrathin film (nanofilm) composed of PMMA and a polysaccharides multilayer, is presented. Chitosan and sodium alginate are alternatively deposited by spin-assisted LbL assembly onto a plasma-treated PMMA thin film. Hydrophobic anti-inflammatory drugs, an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (APP) and its fluorescent dansyl derivate (APP-Dns), are encapsulated inside the LbL multilayer using a simple casting deposition procedure. The resulting drug loaded nanofilm can be suspended in water upon dissolution of a PVA sacrificial layer. Morphological characterization of the nanofilm shows that PMMA/LbL nanofilms possess nanometric thickness (<200 nm) and very low surface roughness (1-2 nm for drug loaded nanofilms and <1 nm for blank nanofilm). Drug loaded films exhibit a diffusion controlled release mechanism following the Korsmayer-Peppas release model, confirmed by the fit of release data with a characteristic power law. Drug release is impaired through the PMMA layer, which acts effectively as a barrier for drug transport. This ultrathin polymer film can find application as a nanopatch for targeted inflammatory drug delivery to treat localized pathologies as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24073802

  9. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  10. Ionic liquid-based dynamic liquid-phase microextraction: application to the determination of anti-inflammatory drugs in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Marta; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2008-08-15

    Dynamic liquid-phase microextraction (dLPME) using an ionic liquid as acceptor phase is proposed for the determination of six non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human urine samples for the first time. The extraction is carried out in a simple and automatic flow configuration. The chemical affinity between the extractant (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) and the analytes permits a selective isolation of the drugs from the sample matrix allowing also their preconcentration. The whole analytical method has been optimized taking into account all the chemical, physical and hydrodynamic variables. The proposed method is a valuable alternative for the analysis of these drugs in urine within the concentration range 0.1-10 microg mL(-1), allowing their determination at therapeutic and toxic levels. Limits of detection were in the range from 38 ng mL(-1) (indomethacin) to 70 ng mL(-1) (naproxen). The repeatability of the proposed method expressed as RSD (n=5) varied between 2.1% (flurbiprofen) and 3.8% (tolmetin). PMID:18632109

  11. Toxicology of frequently encountered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Safdar A; McLean, Mary Kay

    2012-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds extensively used in both human and veterinary medicine for their antipyretic, anti-inflammation, and analgesic properties. NSAIDs consist of a wide range of pharmacologically active agents with different chemical structures, with similar therapeutic and adverse effects. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center received 22,206 NSAID incidents in dogs and cats (3% of total cases; dogs [15,823] and cats [1244]) during 2005 to 2010. This is roughly equivalent to 4% NSAID incidents reported in humans. The most common NSAID involved was ibuprofen, followed by aspirin, naproxen, deracoxib, meloxicam, diclofenac, piroxicam, indomethacin, nabumetone, and etodolac. This article provides a brief overview of classification, mechanism of action, pharmacologic and toxicologic properties, and treatment information involving frequently encountered human and veterinary NSAIDs in dogs and cats. PMID:22381180

  12. Unilateral conjunctival chemosis as a unique symptom of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug intolerance.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, V; de Frutos, C; de Barrio, M; Barranco, R; Herrero, T; Tornero, P

    2007-01-01

    Patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) intolerance usually have cutanous-mucosal or/and respiratory symptoms. We report the case of a patient who developed several episodes of left-eye conjunctivitis, manifested as conjunctival chemosis, with no other symptoms, after taking metamizole and other unidentified NSAIDs. We performed both a single blind placebo-controlled oral challenge test and conjunctival challenge test with different NSAIDs. The single blind placebo-controlled oral challenge was positive to ketoprofen and diclofenac. The conjunctival challenge with diclofenac and flurbiprofen was negative. The patient tolerated celecoxib and nabumetone. We believe this to be an exceptional case of NSAID intolerance as conjunctival chemosis has not hitherto been included in any of the classic types of pseudoallergic reactions. PMID:17323868

  13. Statins, glucocorticoids, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: their influence on implant healing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jia-Hui; Bashutski, Jill D; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-10-01

    This article aimed at exploring the effects of common systemic medications used in the United States and their effects on periimplant bone healing. An electronic search for articles evaluating the influence of systemic medications on periimplant bone healing was conducted using the PubMed (MEDLINE) database. Statins, when administered locally or systemically, were found to increase bone formation and density. A reduction in bone turnover and bone-to-implant contact was observed in animal models examining the effect of glucocorticoids on periimplant bone healing. Continued use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) during or after implant placement was associated with reduced bone-to-implant contact, bone area, and bone density. Evidence seems to suggest that statins improve implant osseointegration. However, glucocorticoids and NSAIDs showed conflicting results. Therefore, more randomized clinical trials are needed to validate the effect of glucocorticoids and NSAIDs on periimplant bone healing. PMID:22968569

  14. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use and Endurance During Running in Male Long-Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Eduardo; Pinto, Ronei S.; Cadore, Eduardo L.; Kruel, Luiz F.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The effect of ibuprofen on pain tolerance during exercise is controversial, and its effects on endurance performance have been poorly investigated. Objective: To investigate the effect of prophylactic administration of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen on the time until the self-report of fatigue (tlim) in runners with exercise-induced muscle damage. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty healthy male long-distance runners (age = 18.8 ± 0.4 years, maximal oxygen consumption = 55.5 ± 5.9 mL·kg−1·min−1). Intervention(s): Participants were assigned to 2 groups (ibuprofen group = 10, placebo group = 10) to perform tlim trials (speed corresponded to their previously determined secondventilatory thresholds) 48 hours before and 48 hours after the induction of a lower limb muscle-damage protocol (isokinetic dynamometry). One hour before the second tlim trial, the ibuprofen group received 1.2 g ibuprofen, and the placebo group received lactose orally. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time until self-reported fatigue, heart rate, respiratory quotient, oxygen consumption, and perceived exertion were recorded during each tlim test. Results: Both groups reported increases in muscle pain in the knee extensors and flexors 48 hours after the muscle-damage protocol. We observed a reduction in the endurance performance of both groups (P < .01) but no difference between groups (P = .55). Conclusions: Ibuprofen did not reduce the effect of muscle damage and pain on performance. Prophylactic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not have an ergogenic effect on running performance after exercise-induced muscle damage in male long-distance runners. PMID:25622243

  15. Anti-inflammatory properties of cryptolepine.

    PubMed

    Olajide, Olumayokun A; Ajayi, Abayomi M; Wright, Colin W

    2009-10-01

    Cryptolepine is the major alkaloid of the West African shrub, Cryptolepis sanguinolenta. Cryptolepine has been shown to inhibit nitric oxide production, and DNA binding of Nuclear Factor-kappa B following inflammatory stimuli in vitro. In order to validate the anti-inflammatory property of this compound in vivo, we investigated its effects on a number of animal models of inflammation. Cryptolepine (10-40 mg/kg i.p.) produced significant dose-dependent inhibition of the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, and carrageenan-induced pleurisy in rats. These effects were compared with those of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (10 mg/kg). At doses of 10-40 mg/kg i.p., cryptolepine inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability in mice in a dose-related fashion. Oral administration of up to 40 mg/kg of the compound for four consecutive days did not induce gastric lesion formation in rats. Analgesic activity was also exhibited by cryptolepine through a dose-related (10-40 mg/kg i.p.) inhibition of writhing induced by i.p. administration of acetic acid in mice. The results of this study reveal that cryptolepine possesses in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:19288476

  16. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in species of veterinary interest.

    PubMed

    Lees, P; Landoni, M F; Giraudel, J; Toutain, P L

    2004-12-01

    This review summarises selected aspects of the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It is not intended to be comprehensive, in that it covers neither minor species nor several important aspects of NSAID PD. The limited objective of the review is to summarise those aspects of NSAID PK and PD, which are important to an understanding of PK-PD integration and PK-PD modelling (the subject of the next review in this issue). The general features of NSAID PK are: usually good bioavailability from oral, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration routes (but with delayed absorption in horses and ruminants after oral dosing), a high degree of binding to plasma protein, low volumes of distribution, limited excretion of administered dose as parent drug in urine, marked inter-species differences in clearance and elimination half-life and ready penetration into and slow clearance from acute inflammatory exudate. The therapeutic effects of NSAIDs are exerted both locally (at peripheral inflammatory sites) and centrally. There is widespread acceptance that the principal mechanism of action (both PD and toxicodynamics) of NSAIDs at the molecular level comprises inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme in the arachidonic acid cascade, which generates inflammatory mediators of the prostaglandin group. However, NSAIDs possess also many other actions at the molecular level. Two isoforms of COX have been identified. Inhibition of COX-1 is likely to account for most of the side-effects of NSAIDs (gastrointestinal irritation, renotoxicity and inhibition of blood clotting) but a minor contribution also to some of the therapeutic effects (analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions) cannot be excluded. Inhibition of COX-2 accounts for most and possibly all of the therapeutic effects of NSAIDs. Consequently, there has been an intensive search to identify and develop drugs with selectivity for inhibition of COX-2. Whole blood in

  17. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sensitizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis to endogenous and exogenous antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Pingle, Maneesh; Brickner, Steven J.; Shah, Nilesh; Roberts, Julia; Rundell, Mark; Bracken, W. Clay; Warrier, Thulasi; Somersan, Selin; Venugopal, Aditya; Darby, Crystal; Jiang, Xiuju; Warren, J. David; Fernandez, Joseph; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Cunningham-Bussel, Amy; Rath, Poonam; Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Deng, Haiteng; Realubit, Ronald; Glickman, J. Fraser; Nathan, Carl F.

    2012-01-01

    Existing drugs are slow to eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients and have failed to control tuberculosis globally. One reason may be that host conditions impair Mtb’s replication, reducing its sensitivity to most antiinfectives. We devised a high-throughput screen for compounds that kill Mtb when its replication has been halted by reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs), acid, hypoxia, and a fatty acid carbon source. At concentrations routinely achieved in human blood, oxyphenbutazone (OPB), an inexpensive anti-inflammatory drug, was selectively mycobactericidal to nonreplicating (NR) Mtb. Its cidal activity depended on mild acid and was augmented by RNIs and fatty acid. Acid and RNIs fostered OPB’s 4-hydroxylation. The resultant 4-butyl-4-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione (4-OH-OPB) killed both replicating and NR Mtb, including Mtb resistant to standard drugs. 4-OH-OPB depleted flavins and formed covalent adducts with N-acetyl-cysteine and mycothiol. 4-OH-OPB killed Mtb synergistically with oxidants and several antituberculosis drugs. Thus, conditions that block Mtb’s replication modify OPB and enhance its cidal action. Modified OPB kills both replicating and NR Mtb and sensitizes both to host-derived and medicinal antimycobacterial agents. PMID:23012453

  18. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are rich source of gene modulators for prevention and treatment of cancer. In recent days, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a new target of diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural...

  19. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Treatment of Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eduardo Büchele; Farah, Michel Eid; Bottós, Juliana Mantovani; Bom Aggio, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are an important class of drugs in medicine and ophthalmology. Several NSAIDs have been commercially available for many years: diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, ketorolac and suprofen. The purpose of this chapter is to review the clinical use of earlier and newer pharmacologic agents of the NSAID class. NSAIDs may have a modulating effect on ocular inflammation and pain through the prevention of prostaglandin synthesis via cyclooxygenase inhibition. Newer-generation NSAIDs have emerged in recent years for the treatment of ocular pain and inflammation. Nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% is a new topical NSAID prodrug that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of pain and inflammation after cataract surgery. Preliminary data suggest nepafenac may also provide unique efficacy in the posterior segment, since its corneal permeability characteristics are superior to those of other NSAIDs. Nevanac, diclofenac, ketorolac and bromfenac are some notable NSAID candidates which should be investigated intravitreally or topically for retinal pharmacotherapy. In addition, for intraocular surgery, NSAIDs can help to prevent intraoperative miosis, reduce ocular pain, decrease postoperative inflammation and prevent cystoid macular edema. Retinal, choroidal and vitreous diseases may be the target of future nepafenac studies, either as monotherapy or as combination treatments. PMID:26502088

  20. Mechanisms, prevention and clinical implications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, John L

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the latest developments in understanding the pathogenesis, detection and treatment of small intestinal damage and bleeding caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). With improvements in the detection of NSAID-induced damage in the small intestine, it is now clear that this injury and the associated bleeding occurs more frequently than that occurring in the stomach and duodenum, and can also be regarded as more dangerous. However, there are no proven-effective therapies for NSAID-enteropathy, and detection remains a challenge, particularly because of the poor correlation between tissue injury and symptoms. Moreover, recent studies suggest that commonly used drugs for protecting the upper gastrointestinal tract (i.e., proton pump inhibitors) can significantly worsen NSAID-induced damage in the small intestine. The pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy is complex, but studies in animal models are shedding light on the key factors that contribute to ulceration and bleeding, and are providing clues to the development of effective therapies and prevention strategies. Novel NSAIDs that do not cause small intestinal damage in animal models offer hope for a solution to this serious adverse effect of one of the most widely used classes of drugs. PMID:23569332

  1. Toxicity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. An overview of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Carson, J L; Willett, L R

    1993-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used throughout the world. This paper reviews the epidemiological data linking NSAID administration with gastrointestinal, hepatic, renal, haematological, and hypersensitivity reactions. Meta-analysis has demonstrated that NSAIDs are associated with serious upper gastrointestinal disorders, with a relative risk of 2.7 in patients receiving NSAIDs compared with subjects not receiving NSAIDs. An increase in the dose and duration of NSAIDs and age > 60 are associated with an increase in the risk of upper gastrointestinal toxicity. The current data strongly support a causal relationship between NSAIDs and gastrointestinal disorders. Case-control studies have demonstrated an association between some NSAIDs and neutropenia, with a relative risk of between 3 and 9 in patients treated with NSAIDs compared with nonusers of these drugs. NSAIDs have also been linked with hypersensitivity reactions, although the incidence of such reactions is very low. However, there are inconsistent data on the potential associations between NSAIDs and renal disease, and there are no epidemiological studies linking NSAIDs with acute liver disease. Overall, the incidence of serious adverse reactions associated with NSAIDs is low, and this class of drugs can be regarded as being reasonably safe. PMID:7506183

  2. Hypersensitivity to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Cross-Intolerance Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres-Jaén, M J; Canto, G; Padilla-España, L; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used worldwide and are responsible for several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. The 2 major groups of DHRs to NSAIDs are those induced by immunological mechanisms (selective reactions) and those where inflammatory mediators are released through activation of the prostaglandin-leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance). In the present review, we focus on cross-intolerance reactions, which are the most frequent DHRs and are becoming a topic of major interest in children and adolescents. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the drugs that most frequently cause DHRs in children; other NSAIDs are responsible for reactions in adolescents. In vivo and in vitro tests are of limited diagnostic value, with some exceptions for the less common selective reactions. In cross-intolerance, the clinical history and controlled administration are in many instances the only way to establish a diagnosis and look for alternatives. The clinical history is diagnostic when consistent symptoms occur repeatedly after exposure to NSAIDs with different chemical structures. Cutaneous and respiratory symptoms often co-occur in young children. The natural history of these reactions in children is unknown, and some patients can develop tolerance over time. Atopy remains a major risk factor for cross-intolerant reactions. The increasing interest in hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with improvements in patient phenotyping and the information provided by pharmacogenetics will improve our understanding and management of these reactions in the near future. PMID:26310040

  3. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Selective Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Pérez-Alzate, D; Pérez-Sánchez, N; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres, M J; Canto, G; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used throughout the world to treat pain and inflammation; however, they can trigger several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. Although most such reactions occur through activation of the leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance), a significant number of DHRs to NSAIDs are due to immunological mechanisms (selective reactions [SRs]). SRs are thought to be induced by specific IgE antibodies or by T cells. In this manuscript, we focus on SRs, which are of great concern in children and adolescents and comprise a heterogeneous set of clinical pictures ranging from mild entities such as urticaria/angioedema to potentially life-threatening conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the most frequent elicitors of IgE-mediated SRs, although pyrazolones have also been implicated. T cell-mediated reactions are infrequent in children but have been associated with ibuprofen, naproxen, and dipyrone. In this review, we analyze the available literature on SRs in children and adolescents, with emphasis on epidemiological data, mechanisms, and drugs involved, as well as on diagnostic procedures. PMID:26817135

  4. Interactions Between Sirolimus and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: Competitive Binding for Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Khodaei, Arash; Bolandnazar, Soheila; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hasani, Leila; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was investigating the effects of three anti-inflammatory drugs, on Sirolimus protein biding. The binding site of Sirolimus on human serum albumin (HSA) was also determined. Methods: Six different concentrations of Sirolimus were separately exposed to HSA at pH 7.4 and 37°C. Ultrafiltration method was used for separating free drug; then free drug concentrations were measured by HPLC. Finally, Sirolimus protein binding parameters was calculated using Scatchard plots. The same processes were conducted in the presence of NSAIDs at lower concentration of albumin and different pH conditions. To characterize the binding site of Sirolimus on albumin, the free concentration of warfarin sodium and Diazepam, site I and II specific probes, bound to albumin were measured upon the addition of increasing Sirolimus concentrations. Results: Based on the obtained results presence of Diclofenac, Piroxicam and Naproxen, could significantly decrease the percentage of Sirolimus protein binding. The Binding reduction was the most in the presence of Piroxicam. Sirolimus-NSAIDs interactions were increased in higher pH values and also in lower albumin concentrations. Probe displacement study showed that Sirolimus may mainly bind to site I on albumin molecule. Conclusion: More considerations in co-administration of NSAIDs and Sirolimus is recommended. PMID:27478785

  5. Extractive spectrophotometric determination of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using methylene blue.

    PubMed

    El-Kommos, Michael E; Mohamed, Niveen A; Hakiem, Ahmed F Abdel

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, and accurate extractive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of seven nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)--namely diclofenac sodium, ibuprofen, indomethacin, ketoprofen, ketorolac tromethamine, mefenamic acid, and naproxen-in pure forms as well as their pharmaceutical dosage forms (tablets, capsules, effervescent granules, syrups, oral drops, ampules, eye drops, gels, and suppositories). The method depends on the formation of an intensely colored ion-pair complex between the acidic drug and methylene blue in alkaline medium. The complex is stable and extractable into methylene chloride. All parameters were optimized. Beer-Lambert's law was obeyed in concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 9 microg/mL. Statistical analysis of the calibration data was carried out, and correlation coefficients were in the range from 0.9996 to 0.9998. The developed method was fully validated according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines, and complied with U.S. Pharmacopeia guidelines. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of the investigated drugs in their pharmaceutical formulations, and good recoveries were obtained. The results obtained were compared with those of reported and official methods, and no significant differences were found with t- and F-tests. Interference effects of some compounds usually present in combination with NSAIDs were studied, and the tolerance limits of these compounds were determined. PMID:24000745

  6. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antihypertensives: how do they relate?

    PubMed

    Khatchadourian, Zovinar Der; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; de Leeuw, Reny

    2014-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely available as over-the-counter medications, despite their numerous side effects and drug interactions. The aim of this article is to increase awareness of the hypertensive potential of NSAIDs and their interference with antihypertensives. Patients with hypertension appear to be more susceptible than normotensive individuals to the blood pressure-increasing effect of NSAIDs. Most studies have found that short-term use of NSAIDs does not pose a major risk for hypertension or increase in cardiovascular disease in healthy individuals. The calcium channel blockers and β-blockers seem to be least affected by the concomitant use of NSAIDs. A dentist must weigh the benefits and disadvantages of using NSAIDs in patients taking antihypertensive drugs. For those who may be at greater risk, such as patients with hypertension and the elderly, careful selection of the class of NSAID and close monitoring are appropriate measures, especially if long-term use is anticipated. PMID:24755117

  7. Controlled tetra-Fc sialylation of IVIg results in a drug candidate with consistent enhanced anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Nathaniel; Schwab, Inessa; Ortiz, Daniel; Bhatnagar, Naveen; Lansing, Jonathan C.; Medeiros, Amy; Tyler, Steven; Mekala, Divya; Cochran, Edward; Sarvaiya, Hetal; Garofalo, Kevin; Meccariello, Robin; Meador, James W.; Rutitzky, Laura; Schultes, Birgit C.; Ling, Leona; Avery, William; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Manning, Anthony M.; Kaundinya, Ganesh V.; Bosques, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the beneficial therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in inflammatory diseases, consistent therapeutic efficacy and potency remain major limitations for patients and physicians using IVIg. These limitations have stimulated a desire to generate therapeutic alternatives that could leverage the broad mechanisms of action of IVIg while improving therapeutic consistency and potency. The identification of the important anti-inflammatory role of fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) sialylation has presented an opportunity to develop more potent Ig therapies. However, translating this concept to potent anti-inflammatory therapeutics has been hampered by the difficulty of generating suitable sialylated products for clinical use. Therefore, we set out to develop the first, to our knowledge, robust and scalable process for generating a well-qualified sialylated IVIg drug candidate with maximum Fc sialylation devoid of unwanted alterations to the IVIg mixture. Here, we describe a controlled enzymatic, scalable process to produce a tetra-Fc–sialylated (s4-IVIg) IVIg drug candidate and its qualification across a wide panel of analytic assays, including physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution, and in vivo animal models of inflammation. Our in vivo characterization of this drug candidate revealed consistent, enhanced anti-inflammatory activity up to 10-fold higher than IVIg across different animal models. To our knowledge, this candidate represents the first s4-IVIg suitable for clinical use; it is also a valuable therapeutic alternative with more consistent and potent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25733881

  8. Profile and mechanisms of gastrointestinal and other side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    PubMed

    Rainsford, K D

    1999-12-13

    The popular view that all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins has been challenged by the discovery that they also affect a wide variety of cellular processes that are important for their therapeutic actions and side effects. Although recognition of the differential activities of new and established NSAIDs on the activities of the cyclooxygenases (COXs) affecting production of inflammatory prostaglandins (from COX-2) and those that are physiologically important (from COX-1) may have significance for the prostaglandin components of the underlying inflammatory and physiologic processes, there are important features of their chemical structures that determine the various cellular and biochemical actions of these agents. Several established NSAIDs have low propensity to cause gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration and bleeding that may relate to these drugs having unique pharmacokinetic characteristics (pro-drugs, protein binding, etc). They also have weak effects on the production of GI mucosal prostaglandins and have specific physicochemical characteristics such that they cause minimal damage to mucosal membranes or effects on nonprostaglandin-related cellular mechanisms important in mucosal defenses. Some of the new COX-2-selective drugs with methyl or amino-sulfonyl moieties have relatively high pKa values and other properties that are similar to established NSAIDs with low GI ulcerogenicity. These physicochemical properties may contribute to the low irritancy of the new COX-2-selective drugs quite apart from their sparing of COX-1 in the GI mucosa. With concerns that some established NSAIDs may accelerate cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis (OA), interest is now focusing on whether the COX-2-selective drugs may have a lower potential for this adverse effect by avoiding the inhibitory effects on cartilage proteoglycan metabolism seen with such drugs as indomethacin and the salicylates. Meloxicam appears to

  9. Use of Aspirin, Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs, and Acetaminophen (Paracetamol), and Risk of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, nonaspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women (1991–2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95 540 participants during the follow-up. During 1 321 280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02–6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11–3.96) respectively for PsA. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs. PMID:24691893

  10. Ethanesulfohydroxamic acid ester prodrugs of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): synthesis, nitric oxide and nitroxyl release, cyclooxygenase inhibition, anti-inflammatory, and ulcerogenicity index studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhangjian; Velázquez, Carlos A; Abdellatif, Khaled R A; Chowdhury, Morshed A; Reisz, Julie A; DuMond, Jenna F; King, S Bruce; Knaus, Edward E

    2011-03-10

    The carboxylic acid group of the anti-inflammatory (AI) drugs indo-methacin, (S)-naproxen and ibuprofen was covalently linked via a two-carbon ethyl spacer to a sulfohydroxamic acid moiety (CH(2)CH(2)SO(2)NHOH) to furnish a group of hybrid ester prodrugs that release nitric oxide (NO) and nitroxyl (HNO). Biological data acquired for this hitherto unknown class of ethanesulfohydroxamic acid ester prodrugs showed (i) all compounds exhibited superior NO, but similar HNO, release properties relative to arylsulfohydroxamic acids, (ii) the (S)-naproxen and ibuprofen prodrug esters are more potent AI agents than their parent NSAID, (iii) the indomethacin prodrug ester, in contrast to indomethacin which is highly ulcerogenic, showed no visible stomach lesions [ulcer index (UI) = 0 for a 80 μmol/kg oral dose] while retaining potent AI activity, and iv) that the indomethacin prodrug ester, unlike indomethacin which is an ulcerogenic selective COX-1 inhibitor, is a selective COX-2 inhibitor (COX-2 selectivity index = 184) devoid of ulcerogenicity that is attributed to its high COX-2 SI and/or ability to release cytoprotective NO. PMID:21280601

  11. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs into the eye.

    PubMed

    Nabili, Marjan; Patel, Hetal; Mahesh, Sankaranarayana P; Liu, Ji; Geist, Craig; Zderic, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Delivery of sufficient amounts of therapeutic drugs into the eye is often a challenging task. In this study, ultrasound application (frequencies of 400 KHz to 1 MHz, intensities of 0.3-1.0 W/cm(2) and exposure duration of 5 min) was investigated to overcome the barrier properties of cornea, which is a typical route for topical administration of ophthalmic drugs. Permeability of ophthalmic drugs, tobramycin and dexamethasone and sodium fluorescein, a drug-mimicking compound, was studied in ultrasound- and sham-treated rabbit corneas in vitro using a standard diffusion cell setup. Light microscopy observations were used to determine ultrasound-induced structural changes in the cornea. For tobramycin, an increase in permeability for ultrasound- and sham-treated corneas was not statistically significant. Increase of 46%-126% and 32%-109% in corneal permeability was observed for sodium fluorescein and dexamethasone, respectively, with statistical significance (p < 0.05) achieved at all treatment parameter combinations (compared with sham treatments) except for 1-MHz ultrasound applications for dexamethasone experiments. This permeability increase was highest at 400 kHz and appeared to be higher at higher intensities applied. Histologic analysis showed structural changes that were limited to epithelial layers of cornea. In summary, ultrasound application provided enhancement of drug delivery, increasing the permeability of the cornea for the anti-inflammatory ocular drug dexamethasone. Future investigations are needed to determine the effectiveness and safety of this application in in vivo long-term survival studies. PMID:23415283

  12. Regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation by anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Lapponi, María José; Carestia, Agostina; Landoni, Verónica Inés; Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Schattner, Mirta

    2013-06-01

    The formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is a newly described phenomenon that increases the bacteria-killing ability and the inflammatory response of neutrophils. Because NET generation occurs in an inflammatory microenvironment, we examined its regulation by anti-inflammatory drugs. Treatment of neutrophils with dexamethasone had no effect, but acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment prevented NET formation. NETosis was also abrogated by the presence of BAY 11-7082 [(E)-3-[4-methylphenylsulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile] and Ro 106-9920 [6-(phenylsulfinyl)tetrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazine], two structurally unrelated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitors. The decrease in NET formation mediated by ASA, BAY-11-7082, and Ro 106-9920 was correlated with a significant reduction in the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 subunit, indicating that the activation of this transcription factor is a relevant signaling pathway involved in the generation of DNA traps. The inhibitory effect of these drugs was also observed when NET generation was induced under acidic or hyperthermic conditions, two stress signals of the inflammatory microenvironment. In a mouse peritonitis model, while pretreatment of animals with ASA or BAY 11-7082 resulted in a marked suppression of NET formation along with increased bacteremia, dexamethasone had no effect. Our results show that NETs have an important role in the local control of infection and that ASA and NF-κB blockade could be useful therapies to avoid undesired effect of persistent neutrophil activation. PMID:23536315

  13. An Overview Of The Physiology And Pharmacology Of Aspirin And Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, I present an overview of the actions and effects of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although athletic trainers cannot prescribe or dispense prescription medications, they should be as aware of their effects as they are of other methods of injury treatment. To set the discussion in proper perspective, the inflammatory process and its mediators are reviewed briefly. The eicosanoids are a family of very active chemicals, which include: the prostaglandins, thromboxane, and the leukotrienes. They affect inflammation as well as numerous other body processes. Ingesting aspirin and NSAIDs blocks the production of prostaglandins and thromboxane, resulting in desired and undesired effects. The NSAIDs were developed to have the same action as aspirin, but with fewer adverse side effects. Many NSAIDs are currently available, and the decision as to which agent to use depends upon various factors. Surprisingly, recent studies suggest that some NSAIDs may hinder the healing process. Although not a NSAID, acetaminophen has many important clinical uses. Armed with an understanding of how these drugs act, and their potentially harmful aspects, the athletic trainer can assist the team physician in designing an aspirin- or NSAID-therapy regimen. PMID:16558240

  14. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-12-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  15. The present status of anti-inflammatory agents in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1988-01-01

    Many classes of drugs exert anti-inflammatory activity through mechanisms which affect all or part of the inflammatory process. Some of these agents are beneficial in the practice of dermatology, while others, such as penicillamine, mast cell blockers and serotonin antagonists, find little or no application. Corticosteroids, for example, are nonspecific in their anti-inflammatory effects and remain a mainstay of therapy, despite their side effect profile. Other drugs, such as the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents or gold, can be used in the treatment of diseases associated with rheumatic or autoimmune states. Moreover, antihistamines play an important role in the control of itching, but are mainly indicated in controlling non-dermatological allergic sequelae. Interestingly, chloroquine and dapsone, which were originally developed for use in malaria prophylaxis and leprosy, respectively, have value in treating a wide range of dermatological conditions via mechanisms which include the inhibition of P-450 isoenzymes. In diseases characterised by disturbed cornification (e.g. psoriasis pustulosa), retinoids are of particular value. These drugs are thought to act by inhibition of collagenases, proteases and granulocyte migration. Undoubtedly, further investigation of drug classes such as oxygen radical controllers and immunomodulators will clarify their mechanisms and establish their therapeutic usefulness among the anti-inflammatory agents now available for dermatological use. PMID:3076131

  16. Topical Anti-inflammatory Activity of New Hybrid Molecules of Terpenes and Synthetic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Delporte, Carla; Valenzuela-Barra, Gabriela; Silva, Ximena; Cádiz, Solange; Bustamante, Fernanda; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess changes in the activity of anti-inflammatory terpenes from Chilean medicinal plants after the formation of derivatives incorporating synthetic anti-inflammatory agents. Ten new hybrid molecules were synthesized combining terpenes (ferruginol (1), imbricatolic acid (2) and oleanolic acid (3)) with ibuprofen (4) or naproxen (5). The topical anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was assessed in mice by the arachidonic acid (AA) and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) induced ear edema assays. Basal cytotoxicity was determined towards human lung fibroblasts, gastric epithelial cells and hepatocytes. At 1.4 µmol/mouse, a strong anti-inflammatory effect in the TPA assay was observed for oleanoyl ibuprofenate 12 (79.9%) and oleanoyl ibuprofenate methyl ester 15 (80.0%). In the AA assay, the best activity was observed for 12 at 3.2 µmol/mouse, with 56.8% reduction of inflammation, in the same range as nimesulide (48.9%). All the terpenyl-synthetic anti-inflammatory hybrids showed better effects in the TPA assay, with best activity for 6, 12 and 15. The cytotoxicity of the compounds 8 and 10 with a free COOH, was higher than that of 2. The derivatives from 3 were less toxic than the triterpene. Several of the new compounds presented better anti-inflammatory effect and lower cytotoxicity than the parent terpenes. PMID:26096431

  17. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug reduces neutrophil and macrophage accumulation but does not improve tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marsolais, David; Côté, Claude H; Frenette, Jérôme

    2003-07-01

    Whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a beneficial effect on tendon regeneration is still a matter of debate. Given that inflammatory cells are thought to induce nonspecific damage following an injury, we tested the hypothesis that a 3-day treatment with diclofenac would protect tendons from inflammatory cell injury and would promote healing. Neutrophil and ED1(+) macrophage concentrations were determined in the paratenon and the core of the rat Achilles tendon following collagenase-induced injury. Hydroxyproline content, edema, and mechanical properties were also evaluated at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post-trauma. Collagenase injections induced a 70% decrease in the ultimate rupture point at Day 3. Diclofenac treatments (1 mg/kg bid) selectively decreased the accumulation of neutrophils and ED1(+) macrophages by 59% and 35%, respectively, in the paratenon, where blood vessels are numerous, but did not reduce the accumulation of neutrophils and ED1(+) macrophages in the core of the tendon. Edema was significantly reduced on Day 3 but persisted during the remodeling phase in the diclofenac-treated group only. The inhibition of leukocyte accumulation by diclofenac did not translate into a reduction of tissue damage or a promotion of tissue healing, because the mechanical properties of injured Achilles tendons were identical in placebo and diclofenac-treated groups. These results indicate that diclofenac reduced both edema and the accumulation of inflammatory cells within the paratenon but provided no biochemical or functional benefits for the Achilles tendon. PMID:12861039

  18. Anti-inflammatory drug (BW755C) inhibits airway hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, L.M.; Aizawa, H.; O'Byrne, P.M.; Bethel, R.A.; Walters, E.H.; Holtzman, M.J.; Nadel, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    To follow up a previous observation that airway hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone is linked to airway inflammation, the authors investigated the effect of BW755C, an anti-inflammatory drug, on ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness in dogs. Airway responsiveness was assessed with dose-response curves of acetylcholine aerosol versus pulmonary resistance in two sets of experiments. In one set (placebo treatment), five dogs were given only saline solution treatment and were studied before treatment or ozone exposure and then after treatment both before and after ozone (3.0 ppm, 2 hours); in another set (BW755C treatment), the same dogs were studied before BW755C treatment or ozone and then after treatment (10 mg/kg intravenously) both before and after ozone. When the dogs were given no BW755C treatment, ozone induced a marked increase in airway responsiveness to acetylcholine. When the dogs were given BW755C, responsiveness was no different during treatment than before treatment but, more importantly, responsiveness did not increase significantly after ozone. The authors conclude that BW755C markedly inhibits ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in dogs, probably by inhibiting the formation of oxygenation products of arachidonic acid.

  19. Prediction of the efficacy of cutaneously applied nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from a lipophilic vehicle.

    PubMed

    Wenkers, B P; Lippold, B C

    2000-03-01

    The maximum cutaneous fluxes of 12 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), determined in a preceding study from the lipophilic vehicle light mineral oil in vivo on 24 healthy volunteers, were related to data concerning their intrinsic activities. From the multiplication of the relative intrinsic activities with the relative maximum fluxes, both related to indometacin (CAS 53-86-1) as standard, the percutaneous activities result as parameters for the prediction of the efficacy of cutaneous preparations with NSAIDs. According to the results of the calculations, the percutaneous activities of ibuprofen (CAS 15687-27-1) and nabumetone (CAS 42924-53-8) from lipophilic vehicles are remarkable because of their very high maximum fluxes. NSAIDs with still high percutaneous activities are ketoprofen (CAS 22071-15-4), naproxen (CAS 22204-53-1), piroxicam (CAS 36322-90-4) and diclofenac (CAS 15307-86-5). In contrast, the systemically highly effective NSAIDs indometacin and acemetacin (CAS 53164-05-9) show rather low percutaneous activities, when applied in lipophilic vehicles. Especially nabumeton and also tenoxicam (CAS 59804-37-4), both not yet commercially used cutaneously, can be recommended for lipophilic skin preparations. PMID:10758781

  20. Periconceptional Over-the-Counter Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Exposure and Risk for Spontaneous Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Aldridge, Tiara; Baird, Donna D.; Funk, Michele Jonsson; Savitz, David A.; Hartmann, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exposure during the early first-trimester and risk for spontaneous abortion (gestation prior to 20 weeks) in a prospective cohort. Methods Women were enrolled in the Right from the Start study (2004–2010). Exposure data regarding over-the-counter NSAID use from the last menstrual period through the 6th week of pregnancy were obtained from intake and first-trimester interviews. Pregnancy outcomes were self-reported and verified by medical records. Gestational age was determined from last menstrual period. Stage of development prior to loss was determined from study ultrasound. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the association between NSAID exposure and pregnancy outcome, taking into account candidate confounders. Results Among 2,780 pregnancies, 367 women (13%) experienced an spontaneous abortion. NSAID exposure was reported by 1,185 (43%) women. NSAID exposure was not associated with spontaneous abortion risk in unadjusted models (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82, 1.24) or models adjusted for maternal age (adjusted [aHR] = 1.00, 95% CI 0.81, 1.23). Conclusions Our findings suggest that use of non-prescription over-the-counter NSAIDs in early pregnancy does not put women at increased risk of spontaneous abortion. PMID:22914399

  1. Innovative sampling and extraction methods for the determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Shivani; Di Carro, Marina; Magi, Emanuele

    2015-03-15

    Two different innovative approaches were used for the determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water: stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and passive sampling, followed by electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. SBSE was developed by comparing EG-Silicone and PDMS stir bars and optimizing main parameters to attain high preconcentration. Quantitative analysis was carried out by mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode and multiple reaction monitoring. The SBSE-LC-MS/MS method provided satisfactory figures of merit with LOD (7.5-71 ng L(-1)) and LOQ (22.5-213 ng L(-1)). The developed method was successfully applied to real samples collected from river water and wastewater effluents. The obtained results showed the presence of all analytes at trace levels, in a wide range of concentrations. The passive sampling approach was carried out by using Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS); samplers were deployed for 15 days in river and tap water, allowing to detect analytes at ultra-trace levels. Time-Weighted Average concentration of NSAIDs in river water was estimated in the range 0.33-0.46 ng L(-1), using the sampling rates previously obtained by means of a simple calibration system. PMID:25434009

  2. The anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin alters nanoclustering in synthetic and cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Plowman, Sarah J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Hancock, John F

    2010-11-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin exhibits diverse biological effects, many of which have no clear molecular mechanism. Membrane-bound receptors and enzymes are sensitive to their phospholipid microenvironment. Amphipathic indomethacin could therefore potentially modulate cell signaling by changing membrane properties. Here we examined the effect of indomethacin on membrane lateral heterogeneity. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of cells expressing lipid-anchored probes revealed that treatment of BHK cells with therapeutic levels of indomethacin enhances cholesterol-dependent nanoclustering, but not cholesterol-independent nanoclustering. Immuno-electron microscopy and quantitative spatial mapping of intact plasma membrane sheets similarly showed a selective effect of indomethacin on promoting cholesterol-dependent, but not cholesterol-independent, nanoclustering. To further evaluate the biophysical effects of indomethacin, we measured fluorescence polarization of the phase-sensitive probe Laurdan and FRET between phase-partitioning probes in model bilayers. Therapeutic levels of indomethacin enhanced phase separation in DPPC/DOPC/Chol (1:1:1) and DPPC/Chol membranes in a temperature-dependent manner, but had minimal effect on the phase behavior of pure DOPC at any temperature. Taken together, the imaging results on intact epithelial cells and the biophysical assays of model membranes suggest that indomethacin can enhance phase separation and stabilize cholesterol-dependent nanoclusters in biological membranes. These effects on membrane lateral heterogeneity may have significant consequences for cell signaling cascades that are assembled on the plasma membrane. PMID:20826816

  3. The Anti-inflammatory Drug Indomethacin Alters Nanoclustering in Synthetic and Cell Plasma Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Plowman, Sarah J.; Lichtenberger, Lenard M.; Hancock, John F.

    2010-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin exhibits diverse biological effects, many of which have no clear molecular mechanism. Membrane-bound receptors and enzymes are sensitive to their phospholipid microenvironment. Amphipathic indomethacin could therefore potentially modulate cell signaling by changing membrane properties. Here we examined the effect of indomethacin on membrane lateral heterogeneity. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of cells expressing lipid-anchored probes revealed that treatment of BHK cells with therapeutic levels of indomethacin enhances cholesterol-dependent nanoclustering, but not cholesterol-independent nanoclustering. Immuno-electron microscopy and quantitative spatial mapping of intact plasma membrane sheets similarly showed a selective effect of indomethacin on promoting cholesterol-dependent, but not cholesterol-independent, nanoclustering. To further evaluate the biophysical effects of indomethacin, we measured fluorescence polarization of the phase-sensitive probe Laurdan and FRET between phase-partitioning probes in model bilayers. Therapeutic levels of indomethacin enhanced phase seperation in DPPC/DOPC/Chol (1:1:1) and DPPC/Chol membranes in a temperature-dependent manner, but had minimal effect on the phase behavior of pure DOPC at any temperature. Taken together, the imaging results on intact epithelial cells and the biophysical assays of model membranes suggest that indomethacin can enhance phase separation and stabilize cholesterol-dependent nanoclusters in biological membranes. These effects on membrane lateral heterogeneity may have significant consequences for cell signaling cascades that are assembled on the plasma membrane. PMID:20826816

  4. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of osteoarthritis in long-term care patients

    PubMed Central

    Argoff, Charles E; Gloth, F Michael

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is common in patients ≥65 years of age. Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often prescribed for osteoarthritis pain, they pose age-related cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal risks. Two topical NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG) and diclofenac sodium 1.5% in 45.5% dimethylsulfoxide solution (D-DMSO), are approved in the US for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Topical NSAIDs have shown efficacy and safety in knee (DSG, D-DMSO) and hand (DSG) osteoarthritis. Analyses of data from randomized controlled trials of DSG in hand and knee osteoarthritis demonstrate significant improvement of pain and function in both younger patients (<65 years) and older patients (≥65 years) and suggest good safety and tolerability. However, long-term safety data in older patients are limited. Topical NSAIDs can ease medication administration and help address barriers to pain management in older patients, such as taking multiple medications and inability to swallow, and are a valuable option for long-term care providers. PMID:22076115

  5. Do Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Affect Bone Healing? A Critical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pountos, Ippokratis; Georgouli, Theodora; Calori, Giorgio M.; Giannoudis, Peter V.

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play an essential part in our approach to control pain in the posttraumatic setting. Over the last decades, several studies suggested that NSAIDs interfere with bone healing while others contradict these findings. Although their analgesic potency is well proven, clinicians remain puzzled over the potential safety issues. We have systematically reviewed the available literature, analyzing and presenting the available in vitro animal and clinical studies on this field. Our comprehensive review reveals the great diversity of the presented data in all groups of studies. Animal and in vitro studies present so conflicting data that even studies with identical parameters have opposing results. Basic science research defining the exact mechanism with which NSAIDs could interfere with bone cells and also the conduction of well-randomized prospective clinical trials are warranted. In the absence of robust clinical or scientific evidence, clinicians should treat NSAIDs as a risk factor for bone healing impairment, and their administration should be avoided in high-risk patients. PMID:22272177

  6. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect bone healing? A critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pountos, Ippokratis; Georgouli, Theodora; Calori, Giorgio M; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play an essential part in our approach to control pain in the posttraumatic setting. Over the last decades, several studies suggested that NSAIDs interfere with bone healing while others contradict these findings. Although their analgesic potency is well proven, clinicians remain puzzled over the potential safety issues. We have systematically reviewed the available literature, analyzing and presenting the available in vitro animal and clinical studies on this field. Our comprehensive review reveals the great diversity of the presented data in all groups of studies. Animal and in vitro studies present so conflicting data that even studies with identical parameters have opposing results. Basic science research defining the exact mechanism with which NSAIDs could interfere with bone cells and also the conduction of well-randomized prospective clinical trials are warranted. In the absence of robust clinical or scientific evidence, clinicians should treat NSAIDs as a risk factor for bone healing impairment, and their administration should be avoided in high-risk patients. PMID:22272177

  7. Adverse respiratory reactions to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ronald A

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset condition that manifests as asthma, rhinosinusitis/nasal polyps, and sensitivity to aspirin and other cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-inhibitor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). There is no cross-sensitivity to highly selective COX-2 inhibitors. AERD is chronic and does not improve with avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors. The diagnosis of AERD is made through provocative challenge testing. Following a positive aspirin challenge, patients can be desensitized to aspirin and NSAIDs. The desensitized state can be maintained indefinitely with continued daily administration. After desensitization, there is an approximately 48-hour refractory period to adverse effects from aspirin. The pathogenesis of AERD remains unknown, but these patients have been shown to have multiple abnormalities in arachidonic acid metabolism and in cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptors. AERD patients can take up to 650 mg of acetaminophen for analgesic or antipyretic relief. Patients can also use weak COX-1 inhibitors, such as sodium salicylate or choline magnesium trisalicylate. Treatment of AERD patients with antileukotriene medications has been helpful but not preferential when compared with non-AERD patients. An alternative treatment for many AERD patients is aspirin desensitization. This is particularly effective in reducing upper-airway mucosal congestion, nasal polyp formation, and systemic steroids. PMID:14680616

  8. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy and the initiation of lactation.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Melanie; Paech, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, which are available as "over-the counter" medications in most countries, are widely used by both pregnant and lactating women. They are popular non-opioid analgesics for the treatment of pain after vaginal and operative delivery. In addition, NSAIDs are used for tocolysis in premature labor, and low-dose aspirin has a role in the prevention of preeclampsia and recurrent miscarriage in antiphospholipid syndrome. NSAIDs and aspirin may affect fertility and increase the risk of early pregnancy loss. In the second trimester their use is considered reasonably safe, but has been associated with fetal cryptorchism. In the third trimester, NSAIDs and aspirin are usually avoided because of significant fetal risks such as renal injury, oligohydramnios, constriction of the ductus arteriosus (with potential for persistent pulmonary hypertension in the newborn), necrotizing enterocolitis, and intracranial hemorrhage. Maternal administration or ingestion of most NSAIDs results in low infant exposure via breastmilk, such that both cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are generally considered safe, and preferable to aspirin, when breastfeeding. PMID:23558845

  9. Fractals and self-organized criticality in anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act through inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis, a catalytic activity possessed by two distinct cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) isozymes encoded by separate genes. The discovery of COX-2 launched a new era in NSAID pharmacology, resulting in the synthesis, marketing, and widespread use of COX-2 selective inhibitors. Extensive structural studies of the biology of prostaglandin synthesis and inhibition have explained some of the differences between COX-1 and COX-2 functionality, but others are still unexplained. Notably these include molecular differences that cause COX-1 inhibitors to produce a slight decrease, and COX-2 inhibitors to induce a significant increase, in heart attacks and strokes. These differences were unexpected because of the 60% overall COX-1 and COX-2 sequence similarity and the 1-2 conservation of catalytic sites. Hydropathic analysis shows important bicyclic differences between COX-1 and COX-2 on a large scale outside the catalytic pocket. These differences involve much stronger amphiphilic interactions in COX-2 than in COX-1, and may explain the selective antiplatelet effectiveness of COX-2. Success of the non-Euclidean structural analysis is the result of using the new Brazilian hydropathicity scale based on self-organized criticality (SOC) of universal protein modules.

  10. Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced ulcer: looking to the future.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano

    2009-06-01

    The great challenge for those attempting to develop safer NSAIDs is shifting from a focus on GI toxicity to the increasingly more appreciated cardiovascular toxicity. At present, coxib shows an unmatched GI safety and appears to be a rational choice for patients at a low cardiovascular risk who have had serious GI events. In these patients, however, a cost-effective alternative is the use of tNSAIDs associated with comedication with a low-cost PPI or PN400. Because it seems prudent to avoid coxibs in patients who have cardiovascular disease or who are at risk for it, naproxcinod will be an appealing alternative to coxibs and tNSAIDs. However, because naproxcinod carries a significant risk of GI bleeding, a comedication therapy with a PPI inhibitor will be required if these patients also present risk factors for GI events. Although the development of H2S-releasing anti-inflammatory drugs is in its infancy, the preclinical data available thus far provide cause for optimism. The quest for the development of NSAIDs devoid of cardiovascular toxicity and that spare the gastric mucosa to the same extent as that of a coxib, however, is still open. PMID:19446261

  11. Inhibition of islet amyloid polypeptide aggregation and associated cytotoxicity by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jessica S; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) constitute an important pharmacotherapeutic class that, over the past decade, have expanded in application to a panoply of medical conditions. They have been tested for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's to reduce inflammation and also in the attempt to abrogate amyloid deposition. However, the use of NSAIDs as aggregation inhibitors has not been extensively studied in pancreatic amyloid deposition. Pancreatic amyloidosis involves the misfolding of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) and contributes to the progression of type-2 diabetes in humans and felines. To ascertain their antiamyloidogenic activity, several NSAIDs were tested using fluorometric thioflavin-T assays, circular dichroism, photo-induced cross-linking assays, and cell culture. Celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, niflumic acid, nimesulide, phenylbutazone, piroxicam, sulindac, and tenoxicam reduced fibrillization at a molar ratio of 1:10. The circular dichroism spectra of diclofenac, piroxicam, and sulindac showed characteristic spectral signatures found in predominantly α-helical structures. The oligomerization of human IAPP was abrogated with diclofenac and sulindac at a molar ratio of 1:5. The cytotoxic effects of pre-incubated human IAPP on cultured INS-1 cells were noticeably reduced in the presence of diclofenac, meloxicam, phenylbutazone, sulindac, and tenoxicam at a molar ratio of 1:10. Our results demonstrate that NSAIDs can provide chemical scaffolds to generate new and promising antiamyloidogenic agents that can be used alone or as a coadjuvant therapy. PMID:26524404

  12. Skin permeating nanogel for the cutaneous co-delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Punit; Desai, Pinaki; Patel, Apurva; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective drug delivery system for the simultaneous topical delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs, spantide II (SP) and ketoprofen (KP). To achieve this primary goal we have developed a skin permeating nanogel system (SPN) containing surface modified polymeric bilayered nanoparticles along with a gelling agent. Poly-(lactide-co-glycolic acid) and chitosan were used to prepare bilayered nanoparticles (NPS) and the surface was modified with oleic acid (NPSO). Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and Carbopol with the desired viscosity were utilized to prepare the nanogels. The nanogel system was further investigated for in vitro skin permeation, drug release and stability studies. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and psoriatic plaque like model were used to assess the effectiveness of SPN. Dispersion of NPSO in HPMC (SPN) produced a stable and uniform dispersion. In vitro permeation studies revealed increase in deposition of SP for the SP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in the epidermis and dermis by 8.5 and 9.5 folds, respectively than SP-gel. Further, the deposition of KP for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in epidermis and dermis was 9.75 and 11.55 folds higher, respectively than KP-gel. Similarly the amount of KP permeated for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN was increased by 9.92 folds than KP-gel. The ear thickness in ACD model and the expression of IL-17 and IL-23; PASI score and TEWL values in psoriatic plaque like model were significantly less (p<0.001) for SPN compared to control gel. Our results suggest that SP+KP-SPN have significant potential for the percutaneous delivery of SP and KP to the deeper skin layers for treatment of various skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:22118820

  13. Skin permeating nanogel for the cutaneous co-delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit P; Desai, Pinaki R; Patel, Apurva R; Singh, Mandip S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective drug delivery system for the simultaneous topical delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs, spantide II (SP) and ketoprofen (KP). To achieve this primary goal, we have developed a skin permeating nanogel system (SPN) containing surface modified polymeric bilayered nanoparticles along with a gelling agent. Poly-(lactide-co-glycolic acid) and chitosan were used to prepare bilayered nanoparticles (NPS) and the surface was modified with oleic acid (NPSO). Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and Carbopol with the desired viscosity were utilized to prepare the nanogels. The nanogel system was further investigated for in vitro skin permeation, drug release and stability studies. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and psoriatic plaque like model were used to assess the effectiveness of SPN. Dispersion of NPSO in HPMC (SPN) produced a stable and uniform dispersion. In vitro permeation studies revealed increase in deposition of SP for the SP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in the epidermis and dermis by 8.5 and 9.5 folds, respectively than SP-gel. Further, the deposition of KP for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in epidermis and dermis was 9.75 and 11.55 folds higher, respectively than KP-gel. Similarly the amount of KP permeated for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN was increased by 9.92 folds than KP-gel. The ear thickness in ACD model and the expression of IL-17 and IL-23; PASI score and TEWL values in psoriatic plaque like model were significantly less (p < 0.001) for SPN compared to control gel. Our results suggest that SP+KP-SPN have significant potential for the percutaneous delivery of SP and KP to the deeper skin layers for treatment of various skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:22118820

  14. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal distension-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Baskın, Veysel; Bilge, S. Sırrı; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Güzel, Hasan; İlkaya, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs effectiveness in colorectal distension (CRD)-induced visceral pain model. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague–Dawley (250–300 g) rats were anesthetized with ketamine (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) and chlorpromazine (25 mg/kg, i.p.). Two bipolar Teflon-coated Ni/Cr wire electrodes (80-M diameter) were placed in the abdominal external oblique muscle for the recording of electromyography. Jugular vein catheter was placed for the administration of drugs. CRD method was applied to evaluate of visceral pain. All drugs (paracetamol, meloxicam, metamizole, and dexketoprofen) administered intravenously. Results: Paracetamol 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg did not change the visceromotor response (VMR) when compare with the control group. Meloxicam 2 and 4 mg/kg showed no effect but at doses of 6 mg/kg meloxicam significantly ([51.9 ± 6.4%] [P < 0.001]) decreased VMR compared with the control group. Metamizole 200 mg/kg did not change responses but dose of 400 and 600 mg/kg metamizole reduced VMR. Dexketoprofen 2 and 4 mg/kg did not cause a change in VMR but 6 mg/kg dose significantly reduced response compared with the control group ([43.9 ± 3.9%, 36.8 ± 2.8%, 34.8 ± 2.5%, 42.1 ± 4.8%, 40.7 ± 3.5%, 36.4 ± 2.7%, and 26.1 ± 2.2%]; from 10 min to 70 min, respectively, [P < 0.05]). Conclusion: Metamizole, dexketoprofen and meloxicam show antinociceptive effect with different duration of action on CRD-induced visceral pain model. This condition can be explained due to different chemical structures and different mechanisms which play a role in modulation of pain. PMID:27114637

  15. Opioid-sparing effects of perioperative paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in children

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan; St John-Green, Celia; Walker, Suellen M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Perioperative pain in children can be effectively managed with systemic opioids, but addition of paracetamol or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce opioid requirements and potentially improve analgesia and/or reduce adverse effects. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to identify trials evaluating postoperative opioid requirements in children and comparing NSAID and/or paracetamol with placebo. Studies were stratified according to design: continuous availability of intravenous opioid (PCA/NCA) vs intermittent ‘as needed’ bolus; and single vs multiple dose paracetamol/NSAIDs. Primary outcome data were extracted, and the percentage decrease in mean opioid consumption was calculated for statistically significant reductions compared with placebo. Secondary outcomes included differences in pain intensity, adverse effects (sedation, respiratory depression, postoperative nausea and vomiting, pruritus, urinary retention, bleeding), and patient/parent satisfaction. Results Thirty-one randomized controlled studies, with 48 active treatment arms compared with placebo, were included. Significant opioid sparing was reported in 38 of 48 active treatment arms, across 21 of the 31 studies. Benefit was most consistently reported when multiple doses of study drug were administered, and 24 h PCA or NCA opioid requirements were assessed. The proportion of positive studies was less with paracetamol, but was influenced by dose and route of administration. Despite availability of opioid for titration, a reduction in pain intensity by NSAIDs and/or paracetamol was reported in 16 of 29 studies. Evidence for clinically significant reductions in opioid-related adverse effects was less robust. Conclusion This systematic review supports addition of NSAIDs and/or paracetamol to systemic opioid for perioperative pain management in children. PMID:23570544

  16. Ibuprofen-arginine generates nitric oxide and has enhanced anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Clara; Di Paola, Rosanna; Perrotta, Cristiana; Mazzon, Emanuela; Cattaneo, Dario; Trabucchi, Emilio; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Clementi, Emilio

    2009-10-01

    Ibuprofen, a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug chemically related to fenoprofen and naproxen, has moderate but definite anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic properties, with considerably less gastrointestinal adverse effect than other drugs in the same family. Currently available in the market are preparations in which bioavailability of ibuprofen is increased by salification with various salts. We have investigated the pharmacological properties of one such salt, ibuprofen-arginine, of biological interest because l-arginine acts as substrate of the nitric oxide (NO) synthesising enzymes. Using epithelial HeLa cells expressing the endothelial NO synthase we show that ibuprofen-arginine releases NO and that this NO protects against the cytotoxic apoptogenic effects of staurosporine. We also found that ibuprofen-arginine is endowed with enhanced anti-inflammatory effects with respect to ibuprofen, as shown by reduced hind paw oedema, neutrophil infiltration and chondrocyte apoptosis in collagen-induced mouse arthritis, a model of chronic inflammation. NO has pleiotropic beneficial effects that may contribute to limit inflammation and anti-inflammatory compounds able to release NO display higher efficacy than the parent drugs in defined clinical settings. Our results open the possibility that NO generation contributes to the enhanced anti-inflammatory effects of ibuprofen-arginine vs. ibuprofen, suggesting co-administration of anti-inflammatory drugs and arginine as an additional way to exploit the beneficial effects of NO. PMID:19539763

  17. Urinary PGE-M levels are associated with risk of colorectal adenomas and chemopreventive response to anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Bezawada, Navya; Song, Mingyang; Wu, Kana; Mehta, Raaj S; Milne, Ginger L; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T

    2014-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes colorectal carcinogenesis. Overall, systemic PGE2 production can be assessed by measuring its major metabolite, PGE-M, in urine. We examined the potential role of PGE-M as a biomarker for colorectal adenoma risk and chemopreventive response to anti-inflammatory drugs. We conducted a prospective case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study. Among women who previously provided a urine sample, we identified 420 cases diagnosed with colorectal adenoma during follow-up and matched them to 420 endoscopy-negative controls. We measured urinary PGE-M using an LC/MS assay. Compared with women in the lowest quartile of urinary PGE-M, women in the highest quartile had a multivariate OR of 1.40 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-2.14) for any adenoma; 0.91 (95% CI, 0.48-1.72) for low-risk adenoma (solitary adenoma <1 cm in greatest diameter with tubular/unspecified histology); and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.04-2.67) for high-risk adenoma (adenoma ≥1 cm in greatest diameter and/or tubulovillous, villous or high-grade dysplasia histology or multiple adenomas of any size or histology). Regular use of anti-inflammatory drugs (≥2 standard tablets of aspirin/NSAIDs per week) was associated with a significant reduction in adenoma risk (multivariate OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43-0.87) in women with high baseline PGE-M (quartiles 2-4), but not low PGE-M (quartile 1).Urinary PGE-M is associated with an increased risk of high-risk adenoma. Anti-inflammatory drugs seem to reduce adenoma risk among women with high, but not low PGE-M. Urinary PGE-M may serve as a biomarker to define subsets of the population who may obtain differential chemopreventive benefit from anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24824037

  18. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alter vasa recta diameter via pericytes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Lydon, Teresa; Crawford, Carol; Wildman, Scott S; Peppiatt-Wildman, Claire M

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown that vasa recta pericytes are known to dilate vasa recta capillaries in the presence of PGE2 and contract vasa recta capillaries when endogenous production of PGE2 is inhibited by the nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin. In the present study, we used a live rat kidney slice model to build on these initial observations and provide novel data that demonstrate that nonselective, cyclooxygenase-1-selective, and cyclooxygenase -2-selective NSAIDs act via medullary pericytes to elicit a reduction of vasa recta diameter. Real-time images of in situ vasa recta were recorded, and vasa recta diameters at pericyte and nonpericyte sites were measured offline. PGE2 and epoprostenol (a prostacyclin analog) evoked dilation of vasa recta specifically at pericyte sites, and PGE2 significantly attenuated pericyte-mediated constriction of vasa recta evoked by both endothelin-1 and ANG II. NSAIDs (indomethacin > SC-560 > celecoxib > meloxicam) evoked significantly greater constriction of vasa recta capillaries at pericyte sites than at nonpericyte sites, and indomethacin significantly attenuated the pericyte-mediated vasodilation of vasa recta evoked by PGE2, epoprostenol, bradykinin, and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-penicillamine. Moreover, a reduction in PGE2 was measured using an enzyme immune assay after superfusion of kidney slices with indomethacin. In addition, immunohistochemical techniques were used to demonstrate the population of EP receptors in the medulla. Collectively, these data demonstrate that pericytes are sensitive to changes in PGE2 concentration and may serve as the primary mechanism underlying NSAID-associated renal injury and/or further compound-associated tubular damage. PMID:26202223

  19. Degradation of the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen by electro-peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Yujue; Yuan, Shi; Li, Zhaoxin; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2014-10-15

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) treatment of the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen aqueous solution was investigated in this study. The E-peroxone process combined conventional ozonation with electrolysis processes, and used a carbon-polytetrafluorethylene cathode to electrochemically generate H2O2 from O2 in the sparged ozone generator effluent (O2 and O3 mixture). The in-situ generated H2O2 then reacted with the sparged O3 to produce aqueous •OH, which can in turn oxidize pollutants effectively in the bulk solution. The E-peroxone process overcomes several intrinsic limitations of conventional ozonation and electrolysis processes for pollutant degradation such as the selective oxidation with O3 and mass transfer limitations of pollutants to the electrodes, and thus significantly enhanced both ibuprofen degradation and total organic carbon (TOC) mineralization. Results show that ibuprofen could be completely degraded much more rapidly in the E-peroxone process (e.g., 5-15 min under all tested reaction conditions) than in ozonation (≥30 min) and electrolysis (several hours) processes. In addition, thanks to the powerful and non-selective oxidation capacity of •OH, toxic intermediates formed during ibuprofen degradation could be completely mineralized in the E-peroxone process. The E-peroxone effluent (2 h) thus exhibited much lower toxicity (5% inhibition of bioluminescence of Vibrio fisheri) than the ozonation and electrolysis effluents (22% and 88% inhibition, respectively). The results of this study indicate that the E-peroxone process may provide a promising technology for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment. PMID:24981746

  20. Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug-Exacerbated Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Dennis K; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA)-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized by upper airway congestion due to eosinophilic inflammation of the nasal and sinus membranes and nasal polyposis, associated with increased leukotriene production that is further accentuated by ASA or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ingestion. It occurs in 5% to 10% of subjects with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and in 15% to 40% of those with nasal polyposis. Although AERD with CRS is usually associated with asthma, this is not always the case. The eosinophilic airway inflammation and symptoms precede clinical reactions to ASA or other NSAIDs, but ultimately affected subjects experience worsening of symptoms with ingestion of ASA/NSAIDs. The endotypic mechanism for this worsening is related to a chronic increase in leukotriene and a decrease in prostaglandin production, particularly prostaglandin E2, that is further aggravated by the inhibition of cycloxgenase I. IgE does not likely play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease although nasal and sinus staphylococcal infection increases local IgE level and may increase total IgE and specific IgE levels. Genetic studies suggest that multiple genes may be involved, but the genetic abnormalities may differ in affected subjects from different ethnicities and candidate genes have not been confirmed in multiple studies. Genome-wide association studies have not been revealing. The phenotype is recognized by the mucosal inflammation and worsening of symptoms acutely with ASA/NSAID. There is clinical improvement with ASA desensitization followed by regular ingestion of ASA or other NSAIDs. Further understanding of this unique phenotype and endotype of CRS will likely improve the understanding of other eosinophilic airway diseases. PMID:27393773

  1. The association of Helicobacter pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Gómez, Sergio; Montaño-Loza, Aldo; Vázquez-Ballesteros, Edgar; de Jesús Villalobos, José; Valdovinos-Andraca, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 10% of the world population. Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) are the principal factors associated with PUD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a cohort of patients with PUD and determine the association between H pylori infection and NSAID use. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The medical charts of patients with endoscopic diagnosis of PUD were retrospectively reviewed from September 2002 to August 2003. Patients were divided into three groups according to ulcer etiology: H pylori infection (group 1); NSAID use (group 2); and combined H pylori infection and NSAID use (group 3). RESULTS: One hundred two patients were evaluated: 36 men (35.3%) and 66 women (64.7%). Forty patients had H pylori infection, 43 had used NSAIDs and 15 had combined H pylori infection and NSAID use; four patients with ulcers secondary to malignancy were excluded. The frequency of women was significantly higher in group 2 (P=0.01). The mean age of patients in group 1 was significantly lower than in the other two groups (P=0.003). PUD developed earlier in group 3 than in group 2 (5.0±4.7 months versus 1.4±2.1 months, respectively, P=0.018). Thirty-two patients (32.7%) had bleeding peptic ulcer. Group 2 had a higher risk of bleeding peptic ulcer than the other two groups (P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The development of PUD was observed earlier in the combined H pylori and NSAID group than in patients with only NSAID use. This suggests a synergic effect between the two risks factors in the development of PUD. PMID:16609757

  2. A Novel Nanoparticle Drug Delivery System: The Anti-inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Is Enhanced When Encapsulated in Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongmei; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Xiang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yuelong; Zhang, Shuangyin; Liu, Cunren; Barnes, Stephen; Grizzle, William; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2010-01-01

    Monocyte-derived myeloid cells play vital roles in inflammation-related autoimmune/inflammatory diseases and cancers. Here, we report that exosomes can deliver anti-inflammatory agents, such as curcumin, to activated myeloid cells in vivo. This technology provides a means for anti-inflammatory drugs, such as curcumin, to target the inflammatory cells as well as to overcome unwanted off-target effects that limit their utility. Using exosomes as a delivery vehicle, we provide evidence that curcumin delivered by exosomes is more stable and more highly concentrated in the blood. We show that the target specificity is determined by exosomes, and the improvement of curcumin activity is achieved by directing curcumin to inflammatory cells associated with therapeutic, but not toxic, effects. Furthermore, we validate the therapeutic relevance of this technique in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic shock mouse model. We further show that exosomes, but not lipid alone, are required for the enhanced anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin. The specificity of using exosomes as a drug carrier creates opportunities for treatments of many inflammation-related diseases without significant side effects due to innocent bystander or off-target effects. PMID:20571541

  3. Novel 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazoles as anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Durgashivaprasad, Ega; Mathew, Geetha; Sebastian, Sarine; Reddy, S.A Manohar; Mudgal, Jayesh; Nampurath, Gopalan Kutty

    2014-01-01

    Objective: 1,3,4-oxadiazole ring is a versatile moiety with a wide range of pharmacological properties. The present work deals with the synthesis and evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of two novel 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazoles (OSD and OPD). Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema was employed as an acute model of inflammation. For evaluating sub-acute anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced inflammation in rat air pouch was employed. Complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats was used as a model of chronic inflammation. To evaluate in vitro anti-inflammatory activity, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells were used. Results: OSD (100 mg/kg) reduced carrageen-induced paw edema by 60%, and OPD (100 mg/kg) produced a modest 32.5% reduction. OSD also reduced leukocyte influx and myeloperoxidase in carrageenan-induced rat air pouch model. In complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis model, both OSD and OPD (200 mg/kg for 14 days) reduced paw edema and NO levels. In LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, OSD and OPD inhibited formation of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, with OPD showing a better activity in comparison to OSD. Conclusions: OSD was the better of the two compounds in in vivo models of inflammation. The o-phenol substitution at position 2 of oxadiazole ring in OSD may be responsible for its better in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. The ability of the compounds to inhibit LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediator release suggests an anti-inflammatory mechanism targeting LPS-TLR4-NF-κB signalling pathway, which needs to be explored in detail. The disparate efficacy in vitro and in vivo also requires in-depth evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of these novel oxadiazoles. PMID:25298582

  4. Maximizing the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use for postoperative dental pain: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for postoperative dental pain. An evidence-based approach is used to evaluate the clinical studies to date on the safe use of these drugs in dental patients. No drugs are without adverse effects or are perfectly safe, but their safe use in clinical practice would entail maximizing the therapeutic efficacy and minimizing the adverse effects. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence for the safe use of NSAIDs in postoperative dental pain. PMID:12866802

  5. Preventive Efficacy and Safety of Rebamipide in Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Mucosal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Soo-Heon; Cho, Chul-Soo; Lee, Soo Teik; Yoo, Wan-Hee; Kim, Sung Kook; Kang, Young Mo; Rew, Jong Sun; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Won; Lee, Don-Haeng

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The use of proton pump inhibitors or misoprostol is known to prevent the gastrointestinal complications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rebamipide is known to increase the mucosal generation of prostaglandins and to eliminate free oxygen radicals, thus enhancing the protective function of the gastric mucosa. However, it is unknown whether rebamipide plays a role in preventing NSAID-induced gastropathy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rebamipide compared to misoprostol in preventing NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications in patients requiring continuous NSAID treatment. Methods We studied 479 patients who required continuous NSAID treatment. The patients were randomly assigned to groups that received 100 mg of rebamipide three times per day or 200 μg of misoprostol three times per day for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint of the analysis was the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers, as determined by endoscopy after 12 weeks of therapy. Results Of the 479 patients in the study, 242 received rebamipide, and 237 received misoprostol. Ultimately, 44 patients (18.6%) withdrew from the misoprostol group and 25 patients (10.3%) withdrew from the rebamipide group. There was a significant difference in withdrawal rate between the two groups (p=0.0103). The per protocol analysis set was not valid because of the dropout rate of the misoprostol group; thus, the intention to treat (ITT) analysis set is the main set for the efficacy analysis in this study. After 12 weeks, the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (20.3% vs 21.9%, p=0.6497) according to ITT analysis. In addition, the therapeutic failure rate was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (13.6% vs 13.1%, p=0.8580). The total severity score of the gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly lower in the rebamipide group than in the misoprostol group (p=0.0002). The amount of antacid used was

  6. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and the Risk of Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Natalia; Nguyen, Theresa; Ramsey, David; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been suggested to protect against esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). This study examined the effect of NSAIDs on the risk of developing Barett’s esophagus (BE), the precursor lesion to EAC. Methods We conducted a case-control study among eligible patients scheduled for either elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or recruited from primary care clinics to undergo a study EGD. We compared 323 patients with BE (296 nondysplastic and 27 dysplastic) with 2 separate control groups: 1347 patients from the elective EGD group ("endoscopy controls") and 502 patients from the primary care group ("primary care controls") with no endoscopic or histopathologic BE. Use of aspirin products and 23 nonaspirin NSAIDs was ascertained from detailed, self-reported questionnaires. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multivariable logistic-regression models. Results There were no significant differences in self-reported NSAID use between all BE cases and all controls (58.2% vs. 54.6%, P=0.33); this was seen for aspirin products (43.0% vs. 37.4%, P=0.08) and nonaspirin NSAIDs (7.7% vs. 8.9%, P=0.46). These findings persisted in the multivariable model for any NSAIDs (adjusted OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.28), aspirin (adjusted OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.90–1.51), and nonaspirin NSAIDs (adjusted OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.55–1.39). Use of a combination of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs was reported in 7.4% cases and 8.3% controls, and a non-significant inverse association with BE was seen (adjusted OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.44–1.11). There was no significant association between BE and daily NSAID use (adjusted OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.78–1.37). Similar findings were observed for comparisons involving nondysplastic or dysplastic BE cases, and endoscopy or primary care control groups separately or combined. Conclusion The use of NSAIDs was not associated with a reduced risk of BE. It is likely that the protective

  7. Use of Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increases Risk for Diverticulitis and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Liu, Yan L.; Huang, Edward S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, have been implicated in diverticular complications. We examined the influence of aspirin and NSAID use on risk of diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding in a large prospective cohort. METHODS We studied 47,210 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohort who were 40–75 years old at baseline, in 1986. We assessed use of aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and other risk factors biennially. We identified men with diverticulitis or diverticular bleeding based on responses to biennial and supplemental questionnaires. RESULTS We documented 939 cases of diverticulitis and 256 cases of diverticular bleeding during a 22-year period of follow-up. After adjustment for risk factors, men who used aspirin regularly (≥2 times per week) had a multivariable relative risk (RR) of 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.47) for diverticulitis and RR of 1.70 (95% CI, 1.21–2.39) for diverticular bleeding, compared with non-users of aspirin and NSAIDs. Use of aspirin at intermediate doses (2–5.9 standard, 325 mg, tablets per week) and frequency (4–6 days per week) were associated with the highest risk of bleeding (multivariable RR=2.32; 95% CI, 1.34–4.02, and multivariable RR=3.13; 95% CI, 1.82–5.38, respectively). Regular users of non-aspirin NSAIDs also had an increased risk of diverticulitis (multivariable RR=1.72; 95% CI, 1.40–2.11) and diverticular bleeding (multivariable RR=1.74; 95% CI, 1.15–2.64), compared with men who denied use of these medications. CONCLUSIONS Regular use of aspirin or NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk for diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding. Patients at risk of diverticular complications should carefully consider the potential risks and benefits of using these medications. PMID:21320500

  8. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and the Risk for Anastomotic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hakkarainen, Timo W.; Steele, Scott R.; Bastaworous, Amir; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Farrokhi, Ellen; Farjah, Farhood; Florence, Michael; Helton, Scott; Horton, Marc; Pietro, Michael; Varghese, Thomas K.; Flum, David R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have many physiologic effects and are being used more commonly to treat postoperative pain, but recent small studies have suggested that NSAIDs may impair anastomotic healing in the gastrointestinal tract. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the relationship between postoperative NSAID administration and anastomotic complications. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of 13 082 patients undergoing bariatric or colorectal surgery at 47 hospitals in Washington State from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2010, using data from the Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program linked to the Washington State Comprehensive Abstract Reporting System. EXPOSURE NSAID administration beginning within 24 hours after surgery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used multivariate logistic regression modeling to assess the risk for anastomotic complications (reoperation, rescue stoma, revision of an anastomosis, and percutaneous drainage of an abscess) through 90 days after bariatric and colorectal surgery involving anastomoses. RESULTS Of the 13 082 patients (mean [SD] age, 58.1 [15.8] years; 60.7% women), 3158 (24.1%) received NSAIDs. The overall 90-day rate of anastomotic leaks was 4.3% for all patients (151 patients [4.8%] in the NSAID group and 417 patients [4.2%] in the non-NSAID group; P = .16). After risk adjustment, NSAIDs were associated with a 24% increased risk for anastomotic leak (odds ratio, 1.24 [95% CI, 1.01–1.56]; P = .04). This association was isolated to nonelective colorectal surgery, for which the leak rate was 12.3% in the NSAID group and 8.3% in the non-NSAID group (odds ratio, 1.70 [95% CI, 1.11–2.68]; P = .01). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Postoperative NSAIDs were associated with a significantly increased risk for anastomotic complications among patients undergoing nonelective colorectal resection. To determine the role of NSAIDs in colorectal surgery, future evaluations should consider

  9. Activation of the bile acid receptor GPBAR1 protects against gastrointestinal injury caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea; Bruno, Angela; Renga, Barbara; Distrutti, Eleonora; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low doses of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. GPBAR1 is a bile acid receptor expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we have investigated whether GPBAR1 was required for mucosal protection in models of gastrointestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs. Experimental Approch GPBAR1+/+ and GPBAR1−/− mice were given ASA (10–50 mg.kg−1) or naproxen. Gastric and intestinal mucosal damage was assessed by measuring lesion scores. Key Results Expression of GPBAR1, mRNA and protein, was detected in mouse stomach. Mice lacking GPBAR1 were more sensitive to gastric and intestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs and exhibited a markedly reduced expression of cystathionine-γ-liase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and endothelial NOS enzymes required for generation of H2S and NO, in the stomach. Treating GPBAR1+/+ mice with two GPBAR1 agonists, ciprofloxacin and betulinic acid, rescued mice from gastric injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs. The protective effect of these agents was lost in GPBAR1−/− mice. Inhibition of CSE by DL-propargylglycine completely reversed protection afforded by ciprofloxacin in wild type mice, whereas treating mice with an H2S donor restored the protective effects of ciprofloxacin in GPBAR1−/− mice. Deletion of GPBAR1 altered the morphology of the small intestine and increased sensitivity to injury caused by naproxen. Conclusion and Implications GPBAR1 is essential to maintain gastric and intestinal mucosal integrity. GPBAR1 agonists protect against gastrointestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs by a COX-independent mechanism. PMID:22881598

  10. A Degenerative/Proinflammatory Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture: An Ex Vivo Model for Anti-inflammatory Drug and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Graciosa Q; Boldt, Antje; Nagl, Ines; Pereira, Catarina Leite; Benz, Karin; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Ignatius, Anita; Barbosa, Mário A; Gonçalves, Raquel M; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Resolution of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration-associated inflammation is a prerequisite for tissue regeneration and could possibly be achieved by strategies ranging from pharmacological to cell-based therapies. In this study, a proinflammatory disc organ culture model was established. Bovine caudal disc punches were needle punctured and additionally stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/mL) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β, 10-100 ng/mL) for 48 h. Two intradiscal therapeutic approaches were tested: (i) a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac (Df) and (ii) human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) embedded in an albumin/hyaluronan hydrogel. IL-1β-treated disc organ cultures showed a statistically significant upregulation of proinflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-8, prostaglandin E2 [PGE2]) and metalloproteases (MMP1, MMP3) expression, while extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (collagen II, aggrecan) were significantly downregulated. The injection of the anti-inflammatory drug, Df, was able to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs and surprisingly increase ECM protein levels. These results point the intradiscal application of anti-inflammatory drugs as promising therapeutics for disc degeneration. In parallel, the immunomodulatory role of MSCs on this model was also evaluated. Although a slight downregulation of IL-6 and IL-8 expression could be found, the variability among the five donors tested was high, suggesting that the beneficial effect of these cells on disc degeneration needs to be further evaluated. The proinflammatory/degenerative IVD organ culture model established can be considered a suitable approach for testing novel therapeutic drugs, thus reducing the number of animals in in vivo experimentation. Moreover, this model can be used to address the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate inflammation in the IVD and their implications in tissue degeneration. PMID:26565141

  11. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of some naturally occurring O- and N-prenyl secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Epifano, Francesco; Genovese, Salvatore; Fiorito, Serena; della Loggia, Roberto; Tubaro, Aurelia; Sosa, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    A series of O- and N-prenyl secondary metabolites of insect, fungal, and plant origin have been evaluated for their topical anti-inflammatory activity using the Croton oil ear test in mice as a model of acute inflammation. Some of the tested compounds revealed an effect (ID50 = 0.31 divided by 0.56 micromol/cm2) comparable with that of the reference non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (ID50 = 0.23 micromol/cm2). PMID:24660470

  12. Soluble epoxide hydrolase as an anti-inflammatory target of the thrombolytic stroke drug SMTP-7.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Eriko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Shirafuji, Takumi; Hasumi, Keiji

    2014-12-26

    Although ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, only a small fraction of patients benefit from the current thrombolytic therapy due to a risk of cerebral hemorrhage caused by inflammation. Thus, the development of a new strategy to combat inflammation during thrombolysis is an urgent demand. The small molecule thrombolytic SMTP-7 effectively treats ischemic stroke in several animal models with reducing cerebral hemorrhage. Here we revealed that SMTP-7 targeted soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to suppress inflammation. SMTP-7 inhibited both of the two sEH enzyme activities: epoxide hydrolase (which inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxy-fatty acids) and lipid phosphate phosphatase. SMTP-7 suppressed epoxy-fatty acid hydrolysis in HepG2 cells in culture, implicating the sEH inhibition in the anti-inflammatory mechanism. The sEH inhibition by SMTP-7 was independent of its thrombolytic activity. The simultaneous targeting of thrombolysis and sEH by a single molecule is a promising strategy to revolutionize the current stroke therapy. PMID:25361765

  13. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase as an Anti-inflammatory Target of the Thrombolytic Stroke Drug SMTP-7*

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Eriko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Shirafuji, Takumi; Hasumi, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Although ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, only a small fraction of patients benefit from the current thrombolytic therapy due to a risk of cerebral hemorrhage caused by inflammation. Thus, the development of a new strategy to combat inflammation during thrombolysis is an urgent demand. The small molecule thrombolytic SMTP-7 effectively treats ischemic stroke in several animal models with reducing cerebral hemorrhage. Here we revealed that SMTP-7 targeted soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to suppress inflammation. SMTP-7 inhibited both of the two sEH enzyme activities: epoxide hydrolase (which inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxy-fatty acids) and lipid phosphate phosphatase. SMTP-7 suppressed epoxy-fatty acid hydrolysis in HepG2 cells in culture, implicating the sEH inhibition in the anti-inflammatory mechanism. The sEH inhibition by SMTP-7 was independent of its thrombolytic activity. The simultaneous targeting of thrombolysis and sEH by a single molecule is a promising strategy to revolutionize the current stroke therapy. PMID:25361765

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of D-002: an active product isolated from beeswax.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, D; Molina, V; Valdés, S; Arruzazabala, M L; Más, R; Magraner, J

    1998-10-01

    D-002 is a natural mixture of high molecular weight alcohols isolated and purified from beeswax, which contains triacontanol among its main components. This study was undertaken to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of D-002 administered by the oral route in two animal models commonly used in the pharmacological screening of anti-inflammatory drugs. D-002 administered orally to rats (100 and 200 mg/kg) produced a mild but significant reduction of exudate volume in carrageenan-induced pleuritic inflammation that was accompanied by a marked and significant decrease of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels in the exudate. D-002 (25, 50 and 200 mg/kg) also significantly diminished the granuloma weight in the cotton pellet granuloma in rats. In both cases, D-002 was less effective than indomethacin, which was used as an established anti-inflammatory reference drug. On the other hand, D-002 administered from 25-1000 mg/kg did not induce erosions or gastromucosal lesions in rats, which differs from results usually obtained with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. These results indicate that D-002 is a mild anti-inflammatory agent without any ulcerogenic effect associated. The results suggest that these effects are probably not mediated through an inhibition of cyclooxygenase, but a reduction in LTB4 levels induced by D-002 could explain these results. PMID:9849648

  15. LPS-Induced Lung Inflammation in Marmoset Monkeys – An Acute Model for Anti-Inflammatory Drug Testing

    PubMed Central

    Seehase, Sophie; Lauenstein, Hans-Dieter; Schlumbohm, Christina; Switalla, Simone; Neuhaus, Vanessa; Förster, Christine; Fieguth, Hans-Gerd; Pfennig, Olaf; Fuchs, Eberhard; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Bleyer, Martina; Hohlfeld, Jens M.; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    Increasing incidence and substantial morbidity and mortality of respiratory diseases requires the development of new human-specific anti-inflammatory and disease-modifying therapeutics. Therefore, new predictive animal models that closely reflect human lung pathology are needed. In the current study, a tiered acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation model was established in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) to reflect crucial features of inflammatory lung diseases. Firstly, in an ex vivo approach marmoset and, for the purposes of comparison, human precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor roflumilast. Pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β) were measured. The corticosteroid dexamethasone was used as treatment control. Secondly, in an in vivo approach marmosets were pre-treated with roflumilast or dexamethasone and unilaterally challenged with LPS. Ipsilateral bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was conducted 18 hours after LPS challenge. BAL fluid was processed and analyzed for neutrophils, TNF-α, and MIP-1β. TNF-α release in marmoset PCLS correlated significantly with human PCLS. Roflumilast treatment significantly reduced TNF-α secretion ex vivo in both species, with comparable half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50). LPS instillation into marmoset lungs caused a profound inflammation as shown by neutrophilic influx and increased TNF-α and MIP-1β levels in BAL fluid. This inflammatory response was significantly suppressed by roflumilast and dexamethasone. The close similarity of marmoset and human lungs regarding LPS-induced inflammation and the significant anti-inflammatory effect of approved pharmaceuticals assess the suitability of marmoset monkeys to serve as a promising model for studying anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22952743

  16. Inhibitory effect of quinolone antimicrobial and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on a medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, F; Hiasa, M; Kawai, Y; Igarashi, K; Fukui, M

    2001-08-01

    The inhibitory effects of quinolone antimicrobial agents and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on purified mouse liver mitochondrial medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase catalyzing the first reaction of glycine conjugation were examined, using hexanoic acid as a substrate. Enoxacin, ofloxacin, nalidixic acid, diflunisal, salicylic acid, 2-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and 2-hydroxydodecanoic acid, which do not act as substrates, were potent inhibitors. Diflunisal, nalidixic acid, salicylic acid, 2-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and 2-hydroxydodecanoic acid inhibited competitively this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase with K(i) values of 0.6, 12.4, 19.6, 13.4, and 15.0 microM, respectively. Enoxacin and ofloxacin inhibited this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase in a mixed-type manner with K(i) values of 23.7 and 38.2 microM, respectively. Felbinac, which is a substrate, inhibited the activity of this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase for hexanoic acid (IC50 = 25 microM). The concomitant presence of enoxacin and felbinac strongly inhibited this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase. These findings indicate that medium chain acyl-CoA synthetases may be influenced by quinolone antimicrobial and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:11434910

  17. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor drugs as potential novel anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution agents

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, AE; Haslett, C; Rossi, AG

    2009-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKi) drugs such as R-roscovitine have emerged as potential anti-inflammatory, pharmacological agents that can influence the resolution of inflammation. Usually, once an inciting inflammatory stimulus has been eliminated, resolution proceeds by prompt, safe removal of dominant inflammatory cells. This is accomplished by programmed cell death (apoptosis) of prominent effector, inflammatory cells typified by the neutrophil. Apoptosis of neutrophils ensures that toxic neutrophil granule contents are securely packaged in apoptotic bodies and expedites phagocytosis by professional phagocytes such as macrophages. A panel of CDKi drugs have been shown to promote neutrophil apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and the archetypal CDKi drug, R-roscovitine, overrides the anti-apoptotic effects of powerful survival factors [including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)]. Inflammatory cell longevity and survival signalling is integral to the inflammatory process and any putative anti-inflammatory agent must unravel a complex web of redundancy in order to be effective. CDKi drugs have also been demonstrated to have significant effects on other cell types including lymphocytes and fibroblasts indicating that they may have pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, pro-resolution activity. In keeping with this, CDKi drugs like R-roscovitine have been reported to be efficacious in resolving established animal models of neutrophil-dominant and lymphocyte-driven inflammation. However, the mechanism of action behind these powerful effects has not yet been fully elucidated. CDKs play an integral role in the regulation of the cell cycle but are also recognized as participants in processes such as apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Neutrophils have functional CDKs, are transcriptionally active and demonstrate augmented apoptosis in response to CDKi drugs, while lymphocyte proliferation

  18. Discovery of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and anticancer drug enhancing reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem cell generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Shun; Lopez, Claudia G; Rana, Tariq M

    2011-10-01

    Recent breakthroughs in creating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide alternative means to obtain embryonic stem-like cells without destroying embryos by introducing four reprogramming factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, and Klf4/c-Myc or Nanog/Lin28) into somatic cells. iPSCs are versatile tools for investigating early developmental processes and could become sources of tissues or cells for regenerative therapies. Here, for the first time, we describe a strategy to analyze genomics datasets of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and embryonic stem cells to identify genes constituting barriers to iPSC reprogramming. We further show that computational chemical biology combined with genomics analysis can be used to identify small molecules regulating reprogramming. Specific downregulation by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of several key MEF-specific genes encoding proteins with catalytic or regulatory functions, including WISP1, PRRX1, HMGA2, NFIX, PRKG2, COX2, and TGFβ3, greatly increased reprogramming efficiency. Based on this rationale, we screened only 17 small molecules in reprogramming assays and discovered that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Nabumetone and the anticancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen can generate iPSCs without Sox2. Nabumetone could also produce iPSCs in the absence of c-Myc or Sox2 without compromising self-renewal and pluripotency of derived iPSCs. In summary, we report a new concept of combining genomics and computational chemical biology to identify new drugs useful for iPSC generation. This hypothesis-driven approach provides an alternative to shot-gun screening and accelerates understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying iPSC induction. PMID:21898684

  19. Single-walled carbon nanohorns as drug carriers: adsorption of prednisolone and anti-inflammatory effects on arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Maki; Tahara, Yoshio; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Murakami, Tatsuya; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Iijima, Sumio; Waga, Iwao; Yudasaka, Masako

    2011-11-01

    Prednisolone (PSL), an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid drug, was adsorbed on oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns (oxSWNHs) in ethanol-water solvent. The quantity of adsorbed PSL on the oxSWNHs was 0.35-0.54 g/g depending on the sizes and numbers of holes on the oxSWNHs. PSL was adsorbed on both the outside and the inside of the oxSWNHs, and released quickly in a couple of hours and slowly within about one day from the respective places. The released quantity in culture medium strongly depended on the concentration of the PSL-oxSWNH complexes, suggesting that PSL adsorbing on oxSWNHs and PSL in the culture medium were in concentration equilibrium. The local injection of PSL-oxSWNHs into the tarsal joint of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) slightly retarded the progression of the arthritis compared with controls. By histological analysis of the ankle joint, the anti-inflammatory effect of PSL-oxSWNHs was also observed.

  20. Traumeel – an emerging option to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of acute musculoskeletal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are on the rise. First-line management of such injuries usually employs the RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) approach to limit excessive inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also commonly used to limit inflammation and to control pain. Traumeel®, a preparation with bioregulatory effects is also used to treat the symptoms associated with acute musculoskeletal injuries, including pain and swelling. Traumeel is a fixed combination of biological and mineral extracts, which aims to apply stimuli to multiple targets to restore normal functioning of regulatory mechanisms. This paper presents the accumulating evidence of Traumeel’s action on the inflammatory process, and of its efficacy and tolerability in randomized trials, as well as observational and surveillance studies for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Traumeel has shown comparable effectiveness to NSAIDs in terms of reducing symptoms of inflammation, accelerating recovery, and improving mobility, with a favorable safety profile. While continued research and development is ongoing to broaden the clinical evidence of Traumeel in acute musculoskeletal injury and to further establish its benefits, current information suggests that Traumeel may be considered as an anti-inflammatory agent that is at least as effective and appears to be better tolerated than NSAIDs. PMID:21556350

  1. The clinically approved drugs dasatinib and bosutinib induce anti-inflammatory macrophages by inhibiting the salt-inducible kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ozanne, James; Prescott, Alan R.; Clark, Kristopher

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages switch to an anti-inflammatory, ‘regulatory’-like phenotype characterized by the production of high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to promote the resolution of inflammation. A potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases would be to administer drugs that could induce the formation of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages at sites of inflammation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the clinically approved cancer drugs bosutinib and dasatinib induce several hallmark features of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with bosutinib or dasatinib elevates the production of IL-10 while suppressing the production of IL-6, IL-12p40 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Moreover, macrophages treated with bosutinib or dasatinib express higher levels of markers of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages including LIGHT, SPHK1 and arginase 1. Bosutinib and dasatinib were originally developed as inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinases Bcr-Abl and Src but we show that, surprisingly, the effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on macrophage polarization are the result of the inhibition of the salt-inducible kinases. Consistent with the present finding, bosutinib and dasatinib induce the dephosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 3 (CRTC3) and its nuclear translocation where it induces a cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene transcription programme including that of IL-10. Importantly, these effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on IL-10 gene expression are lost in macrophages expressing a drug-resistant mutant of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2). In conclusion, our study identifies the salt-inducible kinases as major targets of bosutinib and dasatinib that mediate the effects of these drugs on the innate immune system and provides novel mechanistic insights into the anti-inflammatory

  2. [Differential action of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs on human gallbladder cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase].

    PubMed

    Franchi, A; Di Girolamo, G; Farina, M; de los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Gimeno, M A

    2000-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is a non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent (NSAID) with only few adverse effects. This characteristic has prompted us to suggest that its administration, at levels equivalent to those found in human plasma following therapeutic doses, slightly inhibits cyclooxygenase I (COX I). Three experiments were performed. Experiment 1: to study the in vitro effect of LC at concentrations of 4 and 6 micrograms/ml, comparable with those found in plasma following an oral therapeutic dose of 125 mg. Gallbladder tissue segments were incubated with 0.25 microCi of 14C-arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto PGF1 alpha) was measured. LC did not affect basal production of any of the 3 prostaglandins (PGs) but at 6 micrograms/ml slightly reduced the levels of 5-hidroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE). Experiment 2: LC was administered preoperatively to 6 patients by continuous perfusion, to achieve a steady-state concentration between 4 and 6 micrograms/ml. Gallbladder segments from the 6 treated and another 6 control patients were incubated in 14C-arachidonic acid. Gallbladder segments treated with LC did not show a decreased production of any of the three PGs whereas 5-HETE released to the medium was significantly lower. Experiment 3: 18 patients received an i.v. bolus of LC 100 mg (n1 = 6) or LC 200 mg (n2 = 6) or indomethacin (INDO) 50 mg (n3 = 6). Unlike the administration of INDO bolus, LC in the above doses did not inhibit PG synthesis. Both NSAIDs showed different effects when the production of 5-HETE synthesis was assessed. Treatment with INDO did not alter the production of 5-HETE while LC elicited significant inhibition. The three studies conducted, namely in vitro and in vivo continuous perfusion and i.v. bolus, revealed that LC had no effect on prostaglandin synthesis while reducing significantly the levels of 5-HETE. PMID:11188896

  3. Computational drug repositioning for peripheral arterial disease: prediction of anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang-Hui; Annex, Brian H.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results from atherosclerosis that leads to blocked arteries and reduced blood flow, most commonly in the arteries of the legs. PAD clinical trials to induce angiogenesis to improve blood flow conducted in the last decade have not succeeded. We have recently constructed PADPIN, protein-protein interaction network (PIN) of PAD, and here we combine it with the drug-target relations to identify potential drug targets for PAD. Specifically, the proteins in the PADPIN were classified as belonging to the angiome, immunome, and arteriome, characterizing the processes of angiogenesis, immune response/inflammation, and arteriogenesis, respectively. Using the network-based approach we predict the candidate drugs for repositioning that have potential applications to PAD. By compiling the drug information in two drug databases DrugBank and PharmGKB, we predict FDA-approved drugs whose targets are the proteins annotated as anti-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory, respectively. Examples of pro-angiogenic drugs are carvedilol and urokinase. Examples of anti-inflammatory drugs are ACE inhibitors and maraviroc. This is the first computational drug repositioning study for PAD. PMID:26379552

  4. Supramolecular interactions of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in nanochannels of molecular containers: a spectroscopic, thermogravimetric and microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Maity, Banibrata; Chatterjee, Aninda; Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Seth, Debabrata

    2014-11-10

    Supramolecular host-guest complexation between the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (IMC) and molecular containers were investigated. The weakly fluorescent drug molecule becomes highly fluorescent on complexation with different molecular containers, and time-resolved fluorescence emission spectroscopy reveals that the lifetime components of IMC significantly increase in the presence of molecular containers, compared with the lifetimes in neat water. The respective solid host-guest complexes were synthesised and characterised by Fourier transform infrared and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. Microscopy techniques were used to analyse modifications of the surface morphology, owing to the formation of supramolecular complexes. The effect of the molecular container on the optical properties of IMC has also been investigated to determine the effect of nanochannels of different size and structure. PMID:25146319

  5. Endogenous migration modulators as parent compounds for the development of novel cardiovascular and anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Poller, Wolfgang; Rother, Madlen; Skurk, Carsten; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Development of novel cell migration modulators for anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular therapy is a complex task since any modulator will necessarily interfere with a balanced system of physiological regulators directing proper positioning of diverse immune cell types within the body. Whereas this shall serve efficient pathogen elimination, lack of proper control over these processes may result in counterproductive chronic inflammation and progressive tissue injury instead of healing. Prediction of the therapeutic potential or side effects of any migration modulator is not possible based on theoretical considerations alone but needs to be experimentally evaluated in preclinical disease models and by clinical studies. Here, we briefly summarize basic mechanism of cell migration, and groups of synthetic drugs currently in use for migration modulation. We then discuss one fundamental problem encountered with single-target approaches that arises from the complexity of any inflammation, with multiple interacting and often redundant factors being involved. This issue is likely to arise for any class of therapeutic agent (small molecules, peptides, antibodies, regulatory RNAs) addressing a single gene or protein. Against this background of studies on synthetic migration modulators addressing single targets, we then discuss the potential of endogenous proteins as therapeutic migration modulators, or as parent compounds for the development of mimetic drugs. Regulatory proteins of this type commonly address multiple receptors and signalling pathways and act upon the immune response in a phase-specific manner. Based on recent evidence, we suggest investigation of such endogenous migration modulators as novel starting points for anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular drug development. PMID:22035209

  6. [Drug-related psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    2012-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common genetic disorder that may be initiated (drug-induced psoriasis) or exacerbated (drug-triggered psoriasis) by some drug intakes. Beta-blockers, lithium, some antimelarial drugs, non steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and tetracyclines are recognized to influence the clinical course of psoriasis. Other drugs are likely or possibly involved in this process. PMID:22611830

  7. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  8. Fatal necrotising fasciitis associated with intramuscular injection of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after uncomplicated endoscopic polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Orlando, A; Marrone, C; Nicoli, N; Tamburello, G; Rizzo, A; Pagliaro, L; Cottone, M; D'Amico, G

    2007-03-01

    Necrotising fasciitis is a life-threatening infection of the superficial muscle fascia and the adjacent deep layer of subcutaneous tissue that is often fatal. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) three days after an uncomplicated endoscopic polypectomy because of necrotising fasciitis of left tight, buttock and retroperitoneal space and septic shock. Six hours after the polypectomy she was given an intramuscular injection of ketorolac in the left tight because of moderate low abdominal pain. Twelve and 24h later she was treated with another two intramuscular injection of diclofenac in the left tight for severe pains in the left hip joint region. The shock was unresponsive to any treatment and the fasciitis extended to the whole body even after surgical specific treatment and the patient died in four days. This is the first report of a necrotising fasciitis following intramuscular administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after an endoscopic procedure. PMID:17052758

  9. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide rescues alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor from oxidative inactivation by phagocytosing neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Bevilacqua, M

    1992-01-01

    When neutrophils are recruited to tissue sites and exposed to phagocytosable targets, they release oxidants which may be responsible for the local inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). Consequently, A1PI becomes incapable of inhibiting the proteolytic activity of elastase, released at the same time by neutrophils as a result of leakage from phagocytic vacuoles. In the present paper we show that phagocytosing neutrophils inactivate A1PI via a process inhibitable by chemical agents known to interfere with the hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-generating myeloperoxidase pathway. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide (NMS), which is able to efficiently limit the extracellular availability of HOCl in the neutrophil surroundings, was found to prevent the inactivation of A1PI by neutrophils. The results provide evidence for a possible way to control neutrophil elastase activity by rescuing its natural inhibitor (A1PI) at inflamed tissue sites during infectious and noninfectious processes. PMID:1579712

  10. Optimization and pharmacological validation of a leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae for the rapid in vivo bioactivity analysis of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Maldonado, María Lorena; Siverio-Mota, Dany; Vicet-Muro, Liliana; Wilches-Arizábala, Isabel María; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as an attractive model for in vivo drug discovery. In this study, we explore the suitability of zebrafish larvae to rapidly evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of natural products (NPs) and medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. First, we optimized a zebrafish assay for leukocyte migration. Inflammation was induced in four days post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish larvae by tail transection and co-incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), resulting in a robust recruitment of leukocytes to the zone of injury. Migrating zebrafish leukocytes were detected in situ by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining, and anti-inflammatory activity was semi-quantitatively scored using a standardized scale of relative leukocyte migration (RLM). Pharmacological validation of this optimized assay was performed with a panel of anti-inflammatory drugs, demonstrating a concentration-responsive inhibition of leukocyte migration for both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs and NSAIDs). Subsequently, we evaluated the bioactivity of structurally diverse NPs with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Finally, we further used this zebrafish-based assay to quantify the anti-inflammatory activity in the aqueous and methanolic extracts of several medicinal plants. Our results indicate the suitability of this LPS-enhanced leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae as a front-line screening platform in NP discovery, including for the bioassay-guided isolation of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites from complex NP extracts. PMID:24124487

  11. Optimization and Pharmacological Validation of a Leukocyte Migration Assay in Zebrafish Larvae for the Rapid In Vivo Bioactivity Analysis of Anti-Inflammatory Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Vicet-Muro, Liliana; Wilches-Arizábala, Isabel María; Esguerra, Camila V.; de Witte, Peter A. M.; Crawford, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as an attractive model for in vivo drug discovery. In this study, we explore the suitability of zebrafish larvae to rapidly evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of natural products (NPs) and medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. First, we optimized a zebrafish assay for leukocyte migration. Inflammation was induced in four days post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish larvae by tail transection and co-incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), resulting in a robust recruitment of leukocytes to the zone of injury. Migrating zebrafish leukocytes were detected in situ by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining, and anti-inflammatory activity was semi-quantitatively scored using a standardized scale of relative leukocyte migration (RLM). Pharmacological validation of this optimized assay was performed with a panel of anti-inflammatory drugs, demonstrating a concentration-responsive inhibition of leukocyte migration for both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs and NSAIDs). Subsequently, we evaluated the bioactivity of structurally diverse NPs with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Finally, we further used this zebrafish-based assay to quantify the anti-inflammatory activity in the aqueous and methanolic extracts of several medicinal plants. Our results indicate the suitability of this LPS-enhanced leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae as a front-line screening platform in NP discovery, including for the bioassay-guided isolation of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites from complex NP extracts. PMID:24124487

  12. [Efficiency of famotidin in prophylaxis of NSAIDs-induced gastropathy: result of multicenter research ZASLON-1 (protection of gastric mucosa from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Drozdov, V N; Kim, V A

    2009-01-01

    This article presents results of the first Russian randomized study of NSAID-gastropaty prevention at patients receiving NSAIDS. Results of clinical and endoscopic monitoring of two groups of patients: 1st - 108 patients with AA or RA treated with diclofenac and famotidin and 2nd--116 patients with AA or RA receiving diclofenac treatment only. It was shown that combined use of diclofenac and famotidin reduces to 2.6 times frequency and significantly reduces severity of painful dyspepsia symptoms and antipain manifestations reduces more than twice frequency of erosive-ulcerous lesions of gastric mucosa and duodenum. PMID:19552017

  13. FTIR studies on differential intermolecular association in crystalline and amorphous states of structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Aditya M; Chakraborti, Asit K; Bansal, Arvind K

    2008-01-01

    Information on molecular interactions critically impacts the physical stability and "stabilization" strategy for the amorphous state of pharmaceuticals. The present study was designed to understand the differences in intermolecular interactions in amorphous and crystalline phases in a series of structurally related compounds--celecoxib (CLB), valdecoxib (VLB), rofecoxib (RFB), and etoricoxib (ETB). FTIR spectra of the compounds in their crystalline and amorphous phase were obtained. Interaction patterns in respective crystalline states were obtained from single crystal data. The intermolecular interaction patterns varied between the crystalline and amorphous phase of CLB, VLB, and ETB, while no variation was observed for RFB. Comparison of four crystalline phases though revealed significantly variations, the interactions were remarkably similar in the amorphous state, possibly as a result of constraints of crystal packing ceasing to exist. Conversion of crystalline state to amorphous state led to weakening of some interactions while others got strengthened. The differences in intermolecular interactions could successfully explain the differences in thermodynamic properties studied previously (Kaushal, A. M.; Bansal, A. K. Thermodynamic behavior of glassy state of structurally related compounds. PMID:19434918

  14. Photosensitizing properties of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, the major metabolite of the phototoxic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Canudas, N; Zamora, D; Villamizar, J E; Fuentes, J; Castelli, C; Taddei, A

    2005-08-01

    The photobiological properties of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNAA) were studied using a variety of in vitro phototoxicity assays: photohemolysis, photoperoxidation of linoleic acid, photosensitized degradation of histidine and thymine and the Candida phototoxicity test. 6-MNAA was phototoxic in vitro. 6-MNAA reduced nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) when irradiated with lambda > or = 300 nm in deoxygenated aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.4). NBT can be reduced by reaction with the excited state of 6-MNAA subject to interference with molecular oxygen. The photohemolysis rate was inhibited by the presence of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), sodium azide (NaN3) and reduced glutathione (GSH). Photoperoxidation of linoleic acid and photosensitized degradation of histidine and thymine were significantly inhibited by sodium azide and reduced glutathione. 6-MNAA was phototoxic to C. albicans, C. lipolytica and C. tropicalis. A mechanism involving singlet oxygen, radicals, and electron transfer reactions is suggested for the observed phototoxicity. PMID:16124404

  15. Label-free optical biosensor for detection and quantification of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in milk without any sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Rau, Sabrina; Hilbig, Urs; Gauglitz, Günter

    2014-05-01

    A label-free optical biosensor for detection and quantification of diclofenac in bovine milk has been developed. This was achieved by using reflectometric interference spectroscopy as detection method. In a first step, the immunosensor was developed and optimised in buffer concerning sensitivity, selectivity, stability and reproducibility. By comparing recovery rates—not only the good intra- but also the good inter-chip—reproducibility could be proven. Consequently, the assay was transferred in the more complex matrix milk. By utilising an optimised surface modification and evaluation method, matrix effects could successfully be prevented or circumvented. As a result, the developed immunosensor does not need sample pretreatment at all. By obtaining a limit of detection of 0.112 μg L(−1) (0.108 μg kg(−1)), the capability of the developed biosensor is comparable or better than those of standard detection methods. Moreover, the presented biosensor reaches the range of the maximum residue limit (0.1 μg kg(−1)) set by the European Union. Thus, for the first time, diclofenac was successfully quantified at relevant levels in milk by using an optical biosensor. PMID:24658575

  16. Selective adsorption mechanisms of antilipidemic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug residues on functionalized silica-based porous materials in a mixed solute.

    PubMed

    Suriyanon, Nakorn; Permrungruang, Jutima; Kaosaiphun, Jidanan; Wongrueng, Aunnop; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit; Punyapalakul, Patiparn

    2015-10-01

    The selective adsorption mechanisms of naproxen (NAP), acetaminophen (ACT), and clofibric acid (CFA) on silica-based porous materials were examined by single and mixed-batch adsorption. Effects of the types and densities of surface functional groups on adsorption capacities were determined, including the role of hydrophobic and hydrophilic dissolved organic matters (DOMs). Hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS), superparamagnetic HMS (HMS-SP) and SBA-15 were functionalized and applied as adsorbents. Compared with powdered activated carbon (PAC), amine-functionalized HMS had a better adsorption capacity for CFA, but PAC possessed a higher adsorption capacity for the other pharmaceuticals than HMS and its two derivatives. In contrast to PAC, the adsorption capacity of the mesoporous silicas varied with the solution pH, being highest at pH 5. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding were found to be the main mechanisms. Increase in grafted amine group density on silica surfaces can enhance the CFA adsorption capacity. Further, hydrophilic DOM can decrease CFA adsorption capacities on amino-grafted adsorbents by adsorption site competition, while hydrophobic DOM can interfere with CFA adsorption by the interaction between hydrophobic DOM and CFA. Finally, in a competitive adsorption study, the adsorption capacity of hydrophilic adsorbents for acidic pharmaceuticals varied with their pKa values. PMID:26025186

  17. The substituent effect from the perspective of local hyper-softness. An example applied on normeloxicam, meloxicam and 4-meloxicam: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Normeloxicam, meloxicam and 4-meloxicam were analyzed from the perspective of the conceptual density functional theory perspective to determine the substituent effect exerted by the methyl group that is located at the thiazole ring. This analysis was performed in absence and presence of water. The position of the methyl group suggests that differences that have been experimentally reported in a previous paper can be mainly attributable to electronic effects exerted by the substituent aforementioned group. Finally, the use of total electronic densities is encouraged in future calculations instead of densities of frontier molecular orbitals to obtain more accurate results.

  18. Reactive oxygen species induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs enhance the effects of photodynamic therapy in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Matsui, Hirofumi; Hirayama, Aki; Indo, Hiroko P.; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is useful for the treatment of cancer because it is minimally invasive for patients. Certain porphyrin compounds and their derivatives have been used as the photosensitizer because they accumulate specifically in cancerous tissues. However, the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clarified. We previously reported that a proton-coupled folate transporter, HCP1, transported porphyrins and that regulation of the protein was associated with cancer-specific reactive oxygen species from mitochondria (mitROS). Therefore, over-generation of mitROS could increase HCP1 expression and the effect of photodynamic therapy. We investigated whether pretreatment with indomethacin influenced photodynamic therapy by using a rat normal gastric mucosal cell line, RGM1, its cancer-like mutated cell line, RGK1, and a manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)-overexpressing RGK cell line, RGK-MnSOD. Indomethacin promotes the generation of cellular mitROS by inhibiting the electron transport chain, and MnSOD scavenges the mitROS. We elucidated that indomethacin enhanced cancer-specific mitROS generation and increased HCP1 expression. Furthermore, RGK1 cells showed higher cellular incorporation of hematoporphyrin and better therapeutic effect with indomethacin treatment whereas RGK-MnSOD cells did not show a difference. Thus, we concluded that indomethacin improved the effect of photodynamic therapy by inducing increased mitROS generation in cancer cells. PMID:27257342

  19. Administration of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen increases macrophage concentrations but reduces necrosis during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, E. V.; Tidball, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that ibuprofen administration during modified muscle use reduces muscle necrosis and invasion by select myeloid cell populations. METHODS: Rats were subjected to hindlimb unloading for 10 days, after which they experienced muscle reloading by normal weight-bearing to induce muscle inflammation and necrosis. Some animals received ibuprofen by intraperitoneal injection 8 h prior to the onset of muscle reloading, and then again at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Other animals received buffer injection at 8 h prior to reloading and then ibuprofen at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Control animals received buffer only at each time point. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis was used to assess the presence of necrotic muscle fibers, total inflammatory infiltrate, neutrophils, ED1+ macrophages and ED2+ macrophages at 24 h following the onset of reloading. RESULT: Administration of ibuprofen beginning 8 h prior to reloading caused significant reduction in the concentration of necrotic fibers, but increased the concentration of inflammatory cells in muscle. The increase in inflammatory cells was attributable to a 2.6-fold increase in the concentration of ED2+ macrophages. Animals treated with ibuprofen 8 h following the onset of reloading showed no decrease in muscle necrosis or increase in ED2+ macrophage concentrations. CONCLUSION: Administration of ibuprofen prior to increased muscle loading reduces muscle damage, but increases the concentration of macrophages that express the ED2 antigen. The increase in ED2+ macrophage concentration and decrease in necrosis may be mechanistically related because ED2+ macrophages have been associated with muscle regeneration and repair.

  20. Synthetic Zeolites as Controlled-Release Delivery Systems for Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Khodaverdi, Elham; Soleimani, Hossein Ali; Mohammadpour, Fatemeh; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2016-06-01

    Scientists have always been trying to use artificial zeolites to make modified-release drug delivery systems in the gastrointestinal tract. An ideal carrier should have the capability to release the drug in the intestine, which is the main area of absorption. Zeolites are mineral aluminosilicate compounds with regular structure and huge porosity, which are available in natural and artificial forms. In this study, soaking, filtration and solvent evaporation methods were used to load the drugs after activation of the zeolites. Weight measurement, spectroscopy FTIR, thermogravimetry and scanning electronic microscope were used to determine drug loading on the systems. Finally, consideration of drug release was made in a simulated gastric fluid and a simulated intestinal fluid for all matrixes (zeolites containing drugs) and drugs without zeolites. Diclofenac sodium (D) and piroxicam (P) were used as the drug models, and zeolites X and Y as the carriers. Drug loading percentage showed that over 90% of drugs were loaded on zeolites. Dissolution tests in stomach pH environment showed that the control samples (drug without zeolite) released considerable amount of drugs (about 90%) within first 15 min when it was about 10-20% for the matrixes. These results are favorable as NSAIDs irritate the stomach wall and it is ideal not to release much drugs in the stomach. Furthermore, release rate of drugs from matrixes has shown slower rate in comparison with control samples in intestine pH environment. PMID:26705687

  1. Non-Steroid Anti-Infflamatory Drugs in Municipal Wastewater and Surface Waters/ Niesteroidowe Leki Przeciwzaplane W Ściekach Mieskich I Wodach Powierzchniowych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płuciennik-Koropczuk, Ewelina

    2014-09-01

    Increased production and consumption of drugs influences the pollution pharmaceuticals. Recent years have seen a significant increase in the consumption of non-prescription medicines, among which, are a large group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Research conducted in Poland and abroad showed the presence of NSAIDs, both in treated wastewater in surface waters and drinking waters. One of the most frequently detected drugs in the environment is diclofenac, belongs to NSAID. Its concentration in surface waters range from 9 to 3363 ng/L. Traditional wastewater treatment plants are not specialized enough in removing the pharmaceuticals and their metabolites, and with purified wastewater are introduced into surface waters. Diclofenac concentrations in treated wastewater range from 0.29 to 2.5 μg/L, the average removal efficiency is about 40%. Wzrost produkcji i spożycia leków wpływa na zanieczyszczenie środowiska farmaceutykami. W ostatnich latach zaobserwowano zdecydowany wzrost spożycia leków dostępnych bez recepty, wśród których znaczną grupę stanowią niesteroidowe leki przeciwzapalne (NLPZ). Badania prowadzone na świecie i w Polsce wykazały obecność niesteroidowych leków przeciwzapalnych zarówno w ściekach oczyszczonych, w wodach powierzchniowych oraz w wodach pitnych. Jednym z najczęściej wykrywanych leków w środowisku jest diklofenak należący NLPZ. Jego stężenia w wodach powierzchniowych wynoszą od 9 do 3633 ng/dm3. Tradycyjne układy technologiczne oczyszczania nie eliminują zupełnie farmaceutyków i ich metabolitów i wraz ze ściekami oczyszczonymi są one wprowadzane do wód powierzchniowych. Stężenia diklofenaku w ściekach oczyszczonych wynoszą od 0,29 do 2,5 μg/dm3, a średnia skuteczność usuwania jest na poziomie ok 40%. Należy zaznaczyć, że dane te nie odzwierciedlają stanu rzeczywistego, gdyż badania są prowadzone wyrywkowo. W 2013 r. Komisja Europejska w dyrektywie Parlamentu Europejskiego i

  2. The Evolving Role of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Colon Cancer Prevention: A Cause for Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Tsioulias, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a serious yet preventable disease. The low acceptance and cost of colonoscopy as a screening method for CRC make chemoprevention an important option. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), not currently recommended for CRC prevention, have the potential to evolve into the agents of choice for this indication. Here, we discuss the promise and challenge of NSAIDs for this chemopreventive application. Multiple epidemiologic studies, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of sporadic colorectal polyp recurrence, RCTs in patients with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, and pooled analyses of cardiovascular-prevention RCTs linked to cancer outcomes have firmly established the ability of conventional NSAIDs to prevent CRC. NSAIDs, however, are seriously limited by their toxicity, which can become cumulative with their long-term administration for chemoprevention, whereas drug interactions in vulnerable elderly patients compound their safety. Newer, chemically modified NSAIDs offer the hope of enhanced efficacy and safety. Recent work also indicates that targeting earlier stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, such as the lower complexity aberrant crypt foci, is a promising approach that may only require relatively short use of chemopreventive agents. Drug combination approaches exemplified by sulindac plus difluoromethylornithine appear very efficacious. Identification of those at risk or most likely to benefit from a given intervention using predictive biomarkers may usher in personalized chemoprevention. Agents that offer simultaneous chemoprevention of diseases in addition to CRC, e.g., cardiovascular and/or neurodegenerative diseases, may have a much greater potential for a broad clinical application. PMID:25589413

  3. Modulating the Innate Immune Response to Influenza A Virus: Potential Therapeutic Use of Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Irene; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Infection by influenza A viruses (IAV) is frequently characterized by robust inflammation that is usually more pronounced in the case of avian influenza. It is becoming clearer that the morbidity and pathogenesis caused by IAV are consequences of this inflammatory response, with several components of the innate immune system acting as the main players. It has been postulated that using a therapeutic approach to limit the innate immune response in combination with antiviral drugs has the potential to diminish symptoms and tissue damage caused by IAV infection. Indeed, some anti-inflammatory agents have been shown to be effective in animal models in reducing IAV pathology as a proof of principle. The main challenge in developing such therapies is to selectively modulate signaling pathways that contribute to lung injury while maintaining the ability of the host cells to mount an antiviral response to control virus replication. However, the dissection of those pathways is very complex given the numerous components regulated by the same factors (i.e., NF kappa B transcription factors) and the large number of players involved in this regulation, some of which may be undescribed or unknown. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current knowledge regarding the innate immune responses associated with tissue damage by IAV infection, the understanding of which is essential for the development of effective immunomodulatory drugs. Furthermore, we summarize the recent advances on the development and evaluation of such drugs as well as the lessons learned from those studies. PMID:26257731

  4. Modulating the Innate Immune Response to Influenza A Virus: Potential Therapeutic Use of Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Irene; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Infection by influenza A viruses (IAV) is frequently characterized by robust inflammation that is usually more pronounced in the case of avian influenza. It is becoming clearer that the morbidity and pathogenesis caused by IAV are consequences of this inflammatory response, with several components of the innate immune system acting as the main players. It has been postulated that using a therapeutic approach to limit the innate immune response in combination with antiviral drugs has the potential to diminish symptoms and tissue damage caused by IAV infection. Indeed, some anti-inflammatory agents have been shown to be effective in animal models in reducing IAV pathology as a proof of principle. The main challenge in developing such therapies is to selectively modulate signaling pathways that contribute to lung injury while maintaining the ability of the host cells to mount an antiviral response to control virus replication. However, the dissection of those pathways is very complex given the numerous components regulated by the same factors (i.e., NF kappa B transcription factors) and the large number of players involved in this regulation, some of which may be undescribed or unknown. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current knowledge regarding the innate immune responses associated with tissue damage by IAV infection, the understanding of which is essential for the development of effective immunomodulatory drugs. Furthermore, we summarize the recent advances on the development and evaluation of such drugs as well as the lessons learned from those studies. PMID:26257731

  5. Birth outcome in women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, and pharmacoepidemiological aspects of anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz

    2011-12-01

    The clinical epidemiological studies included in this thesis fall into three parts. The first part includes studies on birth outcome in women with ulcerative colitis. The second part includes pharmacoepidemiological studies on birth outcome after anti-inflammatory drug therapy in pregnancy, including patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The third part (and the latest publications) includes birth outcome in women with Crohn's disease; and the methods of cohort establishment in these studies are developed and improved due to the knowledge gathered from conducting the earlier studies. The birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis are examined in a nationwide, Danish, cohort of women based on data from the Danish National Hospital Discharge Registry and the Danish Medical Birth Registry, and within a Hungarian case-control data set. Our data suggest: 1) Significantly increased risk of preterm birth when women give birth 0-6 months after establishment of the diagnosis. It is considered whether the increased risk may be influenced by disease activity around the time of establishing the diagnosis. 2) No increased risk of giving birth to children with low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation or congenital abnormalities (evaluated overall). 3) Significantly increased risk of some selected congenital abnormalities (limb deficiencies, obstructive urinary and multiple congenital abnormalities). No other studies have examined the risk of selected congenital abnormalities in children born by women with ulcerative colitis. The pharmacoepidemiological studies on birth outcomes after use of anti-inflammatory drug therapy in pregnancy, including women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are based on data from the Hungarian case-control data set, a countywide Danish prescription Database, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Registry, the Danish Medical Birth Registry, and review of selected medical records. After exposure to sulfasalazine

  6. Bentonite-induced rat paw oedema as a tool for simultaneous testing of prophylactic and therapeutic effects of anti-inflammatory and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Marek, J

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of screening simultaneously the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a single dose of anti-inflammatory drugs was further tested. Bentonite oedema was induced in the left paw (0.05 ml of 5% bentonite gel subcutaneously). After the measurement of its size in the 23rd h, the rats were given the test drugs (i.m. or p.o.) and 1 h thereafter, bentonite oedema was induced in the right paw. Some of the drugs suppressed the oedema both prophylactically and therapeutically (steroidal and some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sodium aurothiomalate etc.), some others suppressed it only prophylactically (some derivatives of pyrazolone etc.) and some of the remaining drugs tested had no effect at all on the oedema after a single administration. Advantages and limitations of this method are discussed. PMID:7220586

  7. Effects of nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) on melanoma cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Huiwen; Mollica, Molly Y.; Lee, Shin Hee; Wang, Lei; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-10-15

    A new class of nitric oxide (NO•)-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) were developed in recent years and have shown promising potential as NSAID substitutes due to their gentle nature on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Since nitric oxide plays a role in regulation of cell adhesion, we assessed the potential use of NONO-NSAIDs as anti-metastasis drugs. In this regard, we compared the effects of NONO-aspirin and a novel NONO-naproxen to those exerted by their respective parent NSAIDs on avidities of human melanoma M624 cells. Both NONO-NSAIDs, but not the corresponding parent NSAIDs, reduced M624 adhesion on vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by 20–30% and fibronectin by 25–44% under fluid flow conditions and static conditions, respectively. Only NONO-naproxen reduced (∼ 56%) the activity of β1 integrin, which binds to α4 integrin to form very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), the ligand of VCAM-1. These results indicate that the diazeniumdiolate (NO•)-donor moiety is critical for reducing the adhesion between VLA-4 and its ligands, while the NSAID moiety can impact the regulation mechanism of melanoma cell adhesion. -- Highlights: ► NONO-naproxen, a novel nitric oxide-releasing NSAID, was synthesized. ► NONO-NSAIDs, but not their parent NSAIDs, reduced melanoma adhesion. ► NONO-naproxen, but not NONO-aspirin and NSAIDs, reduced activity of β1 integrin.

  8. Degradation of anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen by electro-oxidation: comparison of electro-Fenton and anodic oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ling; Oturan, Nihal; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen in tap water has been studied using electro-Fenton (EF) and anodic oxidation (AO) processes with platinium (Pt) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes and carbon felt cathode. Fast degradation of the parent drug molecule and its degradation intermediates leading to complete mineralization was achieved by BDD/carbon felt, Pt/carbon felt, and AO with BDD anode. The obtained results showed that oxidative degradation rate of ketoprofen and mineralization of its aqueous solution increased by increasing applied current. Degradation kinetics fitted well to a pseudo-first-order reaction. Absolute rate constant of the oxidation of ketoprofen by electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals was determined to be (2.8 ± 0.1) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by using competition kinetic method. Several reaction intermediates such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, pyrogallol, catechol, benzophenone, benzoic acid, and hydroquinone were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses. The formation, identification, and evolution of short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids like formic, acetic, oxalic, glycolic, and glyoxylic acids were monitored with ion exclusion chromatography. Based on the identified aromatic/cyclic intermediates and carboxylic acids as end products before mineralization, a plausible mineralization pathway was proposed. The evolution of the toxicity during treatments was also monitored using Microtox method, showing a faster detoxification with higher applied current values. PMID:24756667

  9. Effects of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) on Melanoma Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huiwen; Mollica, Molly Y.; Lee, Shinhee; Wang, Lei; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-01-01

    A new class of nitric oxide (NO•)-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) were developed in recent years and have shown promising potential as NSAID substitutes due to their gentle nature on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Since nitric oxide plays a role in regulation of cell adhesion, we assessed the potential use of NONO-NSAIDs as anti-metastasis drugs. In this regard, we compared the effects of NONO-aspirin and a novel NONO-naproxen, to those exerted by their respective parent NSAIDs on avidities of human melanoma M624 cells. Both NONO-NSAIDs, but not the corresponding parent NSAIDs, reduced M624 adhesion on vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by 20-30% and fibronectin by 25-44% under fluid flow conditions and static conditions, respectively. Only NONO-naproxen reduced (~56%) the activity of β1 integrin, which binds to α4 integrin to form very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), the ligand of VCAM-1. These results indicate that the diazeniumdiolate (NO•)-donor moiety is critical for reducing the adhesion between VLA-4 and its ligands, while the NSAID moiety can impact the regulation mechanism of melanoma cell adhesion. PMID:22889880

  10. Provocation tests with the offending nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with urticaria/angioedema reactions.

    PubMed

    Zisa, Giuliana; Riccobono, Francesca; Bommarito, Luisa; D'Antonio, Cristian; Calamari, Ambra Marianna; Poppa, Mariangela; Moschella, Maria Adele; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The provocation test (PT) with the suspected drug represents the gold standard in the diagnosis of non-IgE hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Nevertheless, there is no consensus regarding the clinical management of suspected NSAID-sensitive patients. This study assessed if a PT with the suspected drug is a reliable and safe proceeding to confirm NSAID hypersensitivity in patients with a clinical history of urticaria/angioedema (Urt/AE). It also analyzed different patient characteristics (such as gender, age, atopy, dermographism, time interval between the last drug reaction, and number of previous NSAID reactions) in relation to PT positivity. One hundred fifty-nine patients with Urt/AE apparently related to assumption of one or more NSAIDs underwent PT with the suspected drugs. Moreover, to distinguish single/multiple NSAID reactivity in patients who did not tolerate the offending NSAID, another strong cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor PT was performed. PT was negative in 142/159 patients (89.31%), ruling out a diagnosis of NSAIDs hypersensitivity; 17/159 patients (10.69%) experienced a reaction of Urt/AE during the PT: 8 patients were diagnosed as single reactors to NSAIDs and 4 as multiple reactors to NSAIDs. Those with a history of multiple NSAID reactions and male patients were both more likely to have a positive PT. Our results suggest that in all patients with history of NSAID cutaneous reactions, the NSAID hypersensitivity should be confirmed by an oral PT and that the diagnostic proceeding can safely start with the offending NSAID. PMID:23026184

  11. Impact of discontinuing non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs on long-term recurrence in colonic diverticular bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Aoki, Tomonori; Shimbo, Takuro; Sekine, Katsunori; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Akiyama, Junichi; Yanase, Mikio; Mizokami, Masashi; Uemura, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of discontinuing non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on recurrence in long-term follow-up patients with colonic diverticular bleeding (CDB). METHODS: A cohort of 132 patients hospitalized for CDB examined by colonoscopy was prospectively enrolled. Comorbidities, lifestyle, and medications (NSAIDs, low-dose aspirin, antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, acetaminophen, and corticosteroids) were assessed. After discharge, patients were requested to visit the hospital on scheduled days during the follow-up period. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate recurrence. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 15 mo. The probability of recurrence at 1, 6, 12, and 24 mo was 3.1%, 19%, 27%, and 38%, respectively. Of the 41 NSAID users on admission, 26 (63%) discontinued NSAID use at discharge. Many of the patients who could discontinue NSAIDs were intermittent users, and could be switched to alternative therapies, such as acetaminophen or an antiinflammatory analgesic plaster. The probability of recurrence at 12 mo was 9.4% in discontinuing NSAID users compared with 77% in continuing users (P < 0.01, log-rank test). The hazard ratio for recurrence in the discontinuing NSAIDs users was 0.06 after adjusting for age > 70 years, right-sided diverticula, history of hypertension, and hemodialysis. No patients developed cerebrocardiovascular events during follow-up. CONCLUSION: There is a substantial recurrence rate after discharge among patients hospitalized for diverticular bleeding. Discontinuation of NSAIDs is an effective preventive measure against recurrence. This study provides new information on risk reduction strategies for diverticular bleeding. PMID:25632204

  12. Evaluation of synthetic zeolites as oral delivery vehicle for anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Khodaverdi, Elham; Honarmandi, Reza; Alibolandi, Mona; Baygi, Roxana Rafatpanah; Hadizadeh, Farzin; Zohuri, Gholamhossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): In this research, zeolite X and zeolite Y were used as vehicle to prepare intestine targeted oral delivery systems of indomethacin and ibuprofen. Materials and Methods: A soaking procedure was implemented to encapsulate indomethacin or ibuprofen within synthetic zeolites. Gravimetric methods and IR spectra of prepared formulations were used to assess drug loading efficiencies into zeolite structures. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was also utilized to determine morphologies changes in synthetic zeolites after drug loading. At the next stage, dissolution studies were used to predict the in vivo performance of prepared formulations at HCl 0.1 N and PBS pH 6.5 as simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestine fluid (SIF), respectively. Results: Drug loadings of prepared formulations was determined between 24-26 % w/w. Dissolution tests at SGF were shown that zeolites could retain acidic model drugs in their porous structures and can be able to limit their release into the stomach. On the other hand, all prepared formulations completely released model drugs during 3 hr in simulated intestine fluid. Conclusion: Obtained results indicated zeolites could potentially be able to release indomethacin and ibuprofen in a sustained and controlled manner and reduced adverse effects commonly accompanying oral administrations of NSAIDs. PMID:24967062

  13. Effect of anti-inflammatory drugs in phosphatidylcholine membranes: A fluorescence and calorimetric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lúcio, M.; Nunes, C.; Gaspar, D.; Gołębska, K.; Wisniewski, M.; Lima, J. L. F. C.; Brezesinski, G.; Reis, S.

    2009-03-01

    NSAIDs are the most prescribed drugs for inflammation, and their use is associated with severe gastrointestinal toxicity. This work focuses on the interaction of NSAIDs with membranes, specifically, on their ability to affect the lipid dynamic properties, since this may explain the compromising effects on the integrity of gastric barrier. Studies covered the assessment of drug-membrane/water partition coefficient and location by derivative spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching techniques and effects on membrane biophysics by DSC. Results indicate that the NSAIDs studied have membrane destabilizing effects, which could be transposed to similar effects in the stomach's phospholipid layer justifying their toxicity.

  14. Selected mucolytic, anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular drugs change the ability of neutrophils to form extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Zawrotniak, Marcin; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of host defense against infections that combat pathogens using two major mechanisms, the phagocytosis or the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The netosis (NET formation) exerts additional, unfavorable effects on the fitness of host cells and is also involved at the sites of lung infection, increasing the mucus viscosity and in the circulatory system where it can influence the intravascular clot formation. Although molecular mechanisms underlying the netosis are still incompletely understood, a role of NADPH oxidase that activates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the initiation of NETs has been well documented. Since several commonly used drugs can affects the netosis, our current study was aimed to determine the effects of selected mucolytic, anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular drugs on NET formation, with a special emphasis on ROS production and NADPH oxidase activity. The treatment of neutrophils with N-acetylcysteine, ketoprofen and ethamsylate reduced the production of ROS by these cells in a dose-dependent manner. NET formation was also modulated by selected drugs. N-acetylcysteine inhibited the netosis but in the presence of H2O2 this neutrophil ability was restored, indicating that N-acetylcysteine may influence the NET formation by modulating ROS productivity. The administration of ethamsylate led to a significant reduction in NET formation and this effect was not restored by H2O2 or S. aureus, suggesting the unexpected additional side effects of this drug. Ketoprofen seemed to promote ROS-independent NET release, simultaneously inhibiting ROS production. The results, obtained in this study strongly suggest that the therapeutic strategies applied in many neutrophil-mediated diseases should take into account the NET-associated effects. PMID:26291043

  15. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of Eupatilin, a lipophilic flavonoid from mountain wormwood ( Artemisia umbelliformis Lam.).

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Anna; Ponti, Cristina; Pollastro, Federica; Del Favero, Giorgia; Della Loggia, Roberto; Tubaro, Aurelia; Appendino, Giovanni; Sosa, Silvio

    2009-09-01

    Eupatilin (5,7-dihydroxy-3',4',6-trimethoxyflavone) is the major lipophilic flavonoid from Artemisia umbelliformis Lam. and Artemisia genipi Weber, two mountain wormwoods used for the production of the celebrated alpine liqueur genepy. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of eupatilin was investigated using the inhibition of the Croton-oil-induced dermatitis in the mouse ear as the end point. The oedematous response and the leukocyte infiltration were evaluated up to 48 h after the induction of phlogosis, comparing eupatilin with hydrocortisone and indomethacin as representatives of steroid and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, respectively. At maximum development, eupatilin significantly reduced edema in a dose-dependent manner (ID(50) = 0.28 micromol/cm(2)), showing an anti-inflammatory potency comparable to that of indomethacin (ID(50) = 0.26 micromol/cm(2)) and only 1 order of magnitude lower than that of hydrocortisone (ID(50) = 0.03 micromol/cm(2)). Within 48 h, eupatilin (0.30 micromol/cm(2)) caused a global inhibition of the oedematous response (42%) higher than that of an equimolar dose of indomethacin (18%) and fully comparable to that of 0.03 micromol/cm(2) of hydrocortisone (55%). Moreover, the effect of eupatilin on the granulocytes infiltrate (32% inhibition) was similar to that of indomethacin (35% inhibition) and comparable to that of hydrocortisone (42% reduction), as confirmed by histological analysis. When our results are taken together, they show that eupatilin is endowed with potent in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity, qualitatively similar to that of hydrocortisone and intermediate in terms of potency between those of steroid and non-steroid drugs. PMID:19663482

  16. Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Treatment Strategies of Gastrointestinal Diaphragm Disease Associated with Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Zhi; Sun, Gang; Cai, Feng-Chun; Yang, Yun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. To demonstrate the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug- (NSAID-) induced diaphragm disease (DD). Methods. A literature search between January 1973 and August 2015 was undertaken. The clinical data of patients with NSAID-induced DD were recorded and analyzed. Results. 159 patients were included. The ratio of male to female was 1 : 2.3; the mean age was 65 ± 11 years. The most common clinical manifestations were gastrointestinal bleeding and obstruction. 121 (84%) patients took traditional NSAIDs. The durations of NSAIDs use ranged from 2 to 300 months. A majority (59.7%) of DD were seen in the small bowel, were seen secondly in the colon (30.2%), and were mainly located in the ileum (57.9%) and right colon (91.7%), respectively. 80% of patients had multiple diaphragms. 41.5% of small bowel DD were diagnosed preoperatively by capsule endoscopy and/or double-balloon enteroscopy, 52.1% at laparotomy. Nearly 75% of patients underwent surgery, endoscopic balloon dilation was performed in 22 patients, and NSAIDs were withdrawn in 53 patients. Conclusions. NSAID-induced DD is relatively rare. The small bowel is most commonly involved. Preoperative diagnosis of small bowel DD is relatively difficult. Discontinuation of the NSAIDs is recommended, surgical resection is the main treatment presently, and endoscopic balloon dilation should be considered as an alternative therapy. PMID:27118967

  17. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe–Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe–Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic–aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  18. Conformational investigation in solution of a fluorinated anti-inflammatory drug by NMR spectroscopy in weakly ordering media.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Aroulanda, Christie; Merlet, Denis; Celebre, Giorgio; De Luca, Giuseppina

    2014-07-31

    The structural and conformational elucidation of flexible bioactive molecules in solution is currently a crucial goal for the scientific community, but it is rarely achievable by available techniques. The anti-inflammatory drug diflunisal is presented here as a model case for supporting the efficiency of NMR spectroscopy combined with the use of weakly ordering media as a promising methodology for the conformational investigation of small bioactive molecules. Starting from NMR anisotropic data (40 independent dipolar couplings), a quite accurate description of its torsional distribution around the inter-ring C-C bond was found, characterized by a pair of two couples of conformers. According to the relative configuration of the carboxylic group and the fluorine atom in the ortho position to the inter-ring C-C bond, the more stable couple of conformers are defined as "trans" type conformers (F opposite to the carboxylic group) whereas the less stable couple are "cis" type conformers (F and carboxylic group on the same side). In order to study the influence of fluorine nuclei on the structure and conformational distribution, the same analytical strategy has been applied to investigate the phenylsalicylic acid, its nonfluorinated analogue. PMID:24999747

  19. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe-Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe-Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic-aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  20. Effect of N-Phenylanthranilic Acid Scaffold Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs on the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition.

    PubMed

    Tatematsu, Yohei; Hayashi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Ryo; Fujita, Haruhi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ohkura, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a known side effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In the present study, the effects of N-phenylanthranilic acid (NPA) scaffold NSAIDs on rat liver mitochondria were examined. Mefenamic acid (MEF, 200 µM) induced mitochondrial swelling, which was inorganic phosphate (Pi)-dependent and suppressed by cyclosporin A (CsA, 2.5 µM), similar to calcium-induced swelling. Mitochondrial swelling was also observed following the addition of 200 µM flufenamic acid (FLU), meclofenamic acid (MCL), and tolfenamic acid (TOL). Less swelling was observed with the addition of 200 µM diclofenac (DIC) or NPA. Diphenylamine (DPA)-induced swelling occurred in a Pi-independent manner and was not sensitive to CsA. The mechanism by which DPA interacted with the mitochondrial inner membrane differed from those of the other NPA scaffold NSAIDs. The addition of 50 µM MEF, MCL, TOL, and FLU had uncoupling effects in mitochondrial inner membrane. These NSAIDs dose-dependently obstructed electron transport in the respiratory chain. NSAIDs are known to have various dynamic structures, and the solvation free energies (dGWs: an index of stereo-hydrophobicity) of the conformers obtained were determined using a molecular orbital analysis. The relationship between the dynamic structures and swelling induced by NPA scaffold NSAIDs was also examined. PMID:26830486

  1. Site-specific effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug lysine clonixinate on rat brain opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ortí, E; Coirini, H; Pico, J C

    1999-04-01

    In addition to effects in the periphery through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, several lines of evidence suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act in the central nervous system. The possibility that the central action of NSAIDs involves regulation of opioid receptors was investigated by quantitative autoradiography of mu, delta, and kappa sites in rat brain slices. Increased (p < 0.05) labeling of mu receptors was observed in thalamic nuclei, gyrus dentate, and layers of the parietal cortex of rats treated for 10 days with lysine clonixinate. Labeling of delta receptors was lower in the lateral septum, and kappa sites decreased in thalamic nuclei. These effects were not mediated through direct interaction with opioid-binding sites, since receptor-binding assays using rat brain membranes confirmed that clonixinate up to 1 x 10(-4) mol/l does not inhibit mu, delta, and kappa receptor specific binding. Central effects of NSAIDs might, therefore, involve interaction with the opioid receptor system through indirect mechanisms. PMID:10077738

  2. Repositioning of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid as a potential anti-inflammatory agent: in silico and pharmaceutical formulation study.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Mohammed A; Shehata, Tamer M; Mohamed, Maged E

    2014-12-18

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) is a well-known plant auxin which is widely used in plant tissue culture experiments as well as a weed killer and a herbicide. In this study, 2,4-D was rediscovered as a new anti-inflammatory agent through an in silico molecular modeling and docking studies along with drug formulation and in vivo anti-inflammatory inspection. The molecular modeling and docking studies indicated high affinity of 2,4-D toward COX-2 enzyme in a way similar to Ibuprofen, suggesting a higher anti-inflammatory activity. Molecular docking by both MOE 2013.08 and Leadit 2.1.2 revealed excellent binding pattern compared to some of well-known non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. 2,4-D was formulated in different gel bases. In vitro drug release experiments were used to examine the best 2,4-D formula for in vivo studies. In vivo carrageenan-induced hind paw edema inflammatory model in rats was used to test the in silico finding. 2,4-D showed potential in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and significantly reduced the concentration of prostaglandin E2 in hind paw tissues in a way similar to Ibuprofen. These results may open the door to introduce a new anti-inflammatory molecule; especially that 2,4-D is a well-investigated regarding its toxicity and side effect. PMID:25245006

  3. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide inhibits neutrophil adherence to and migration across monolayers of cytokine-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dapino, P; Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophil migration through the microvascular endothelium represents a fundamental event for the cell accumulation at sites of tissue injury. Owing to their capacity to modify the structural and functional characteristics of endothelial cells, inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) play a pivotal role in directing circulating neutrophils away from the bloodstream to the interstitial tissue. In order to study neutrophil transendothelial migration, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluence on the polycarbonate filter of two-compartment migration chambers. Pretreatment of the endothelial cell monolayers with TNF alpha for 4 h resulted in rapid migration of approximately 50% of subsequently added neutrophils across the layers. In contrast, < 10% of added neutrophils penetrated untreated endothelial monolayers. Using TNF alpha-treated endothelium, neutrophil transmigration was inhibited by the methane sulfonanilide anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. Moreover, neutrophil adherence to TNF alpha-treated endothelial monolayers, cultured in microtiter wells, was markedly reduced by nimesulide. A linear correlation between the drug-dependent inhibition of neutrophil transmigration and neutrophil adherence was found. Finally, nimesulide did not interfere with the TNF alpha ability to convert resting endothelium into a pro-adhesive and pro-locomotory cell layer. The data suggest that nimesulide reduces neutrophil transendothelial migration primarily by limiting the cell anchorage to the TNF alpha-activated endothelium. Therefore, the drug has the potential to down-regulate neutrophil extravasation and, in turn, the burden of neutrophil oxidants and proteases leading to tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:7824814

  4. Effects of intrathecal or intracerebroventricular administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on a C-fiber reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, D; Paeile, C; Willer, J C; Le Bars, D

    1997-06-01

    A C-fiber reflex elicited by electrical stimulation within the territory of the sural nerve was recorded from the ipsilateral biceps femoris muscle in anesthetized rats. The temporal evolution of the response was studied using a constant stimulus intensity (3 times threshold), and recruitment curves were built by varying the stimulus intensity from 0 to 7 times threshold. The intrathecal (i.t.) but not i.c.v. administration of aspirin, indomethacin, ketoprofen and lysine clonixinate resulted in dose-dependent depressions of the C-fiber reflex. In contrast, saline was ineffective. Regardless of the route of administration, the drugs never produced disturbances in heart rate and/or acid-base equilibrium. When a constant level of stimulation was used, 500 microg of aspirin i.t. induced a blockade of the reflex immediately after the injection, followed by a partial recovery. Indomethacin produced a stable depression, which reached 80 to 90% with an i.t. dose of 500 microg. Ketoprofen and lysine clonixinate produced a more stable effect; the highest doses (500 microg) produced a steady-state depression of approximately 50% for approximately 30 min. When the recruitment curves were built with a range of nociceptive stimulus intensities, all of the drugs except for indomethacin produced a dose-dependent decrease in the slopes and the areas under the recruitment curves without major modifications in the thresholds; indomethacin also induced a significant dose-related increase in the threshold. The orders of potency for both stimulation paradigms with the i.t. route were the same, namely aspirin > indomethacin > lysine clonixinate > or = ketoprofen. It is concluded that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs elicit significant antinociceptive effects at a spinal level, which do not depend on the existence of a hyperalgesic or inflammatory state. Such effects were not seen after injections within the lateral ventricle. PMID:9190874

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) to lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and 15-epi-LXA₄. However, it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE₂, TXB₂ and leukotriene B₄ (LTB₄) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE₂, but increased LTB₄, LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE₂, and TXB₂. The increments in LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE₂ and TXB₂ suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  6. Novel uses for anti-platelet agents as anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pitchford, S C

    2007-01-01

    An alteration in the character and function of platelets is manifested in patients with inflammatory diseases, and these alterations have been dissociated from the well-characterized involvement of platelets in thrombosis and haemostasis. Recent evidence reveals platelet activation is sometimes critical in the development of inflammation. The mechanisms by which platelets participate in inflammation are diverse, and offer numerous opportunities for future drug intervention. There is now acceptance that platelets act as innate inflammatory cells in immune responses, with roles as sentinel cells undergoing surveillance, responding to microbial invasion, orchestrating leukocyte recruitment, and migrating through tissue, causing damage and influencing repair processes in chronic disease. Some of these processes are targeted by drugs that are being developed to target platelet participation in atherosclerosis. The actions of platelets therefore influence the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases in various body compartments, encompassing parasitic and bacterial infection, allergic inflammation (especially asthma and rhinitis), and non-atopic inflammatory conditions, for example, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and atherosclerosis. This review will first discuss the evidence for platelet activation in these various inflammatory diseases, and secondly discuss the mechanisms by which this pathogenesis occurs and the various anti-platelet agents which have been developed to combat platelet activation in atherosclerosis and their potential future use for the treatment of other inflammatory diseases. PMID:17603547

  7. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  8. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  9. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen. PMID:27312831

  10. Molecular Targets of Dietary Polyphenols with Anti-inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2005-01-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary polyphenols have anti-inflammatory activity. Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have long been used to combat inflammation. Recently, cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been developed and recommended for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). However, two COX inhibitors have been withdrawn from the market due to unexpected side effects. Because conventional therapeutic and surgical approaches have not been able to fully control the incidence and outcome of many inflammatory diseases, there is an urgent need to find safer compounds and to develop mechanism-based approaches for the management of these diseases. Polyphenols are found in many dietary plant products, including fruits, vegetables, beverages, herbs, and spices. Several of these compounds have been found to inhibit the inflammation process as well as tumorigenesis in experimental animals; they can also exhibit potent biological properties. In addition, epidemiological studies have indicated that populations who consume foods rich in specific polyphenols have lower incidences of inflammatory disease. This paper provides an overview of the research approaches that can be used to unravel the biology and health effects of polyphenols. Polyphenols have diverse biological effects, however, this review will focus on some of the pivotal molecular targets that directly affect the inflammation process. PMID:16259055

  11. Prevention of trauma-induced cochlear fibrosis using intracochlear application of anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative drugs.

    PubMed

    Jia, H; François, F; Bourien, J; Eybalin, M; Lloyd, R V; Van De Water, T R; Puel, J-L; Venail, F

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear fibrosis is a common finding following cochlear implantation. Evidence suggests that cochlear fibrosis could be triggered by inflammation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT). In this study, we investigate the mechanisms of cochlear fibrosis and the risk/benefit ratio of local administration of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone (DEX) and antimitotic drug aracytine (Ara-C). Cochlear fibrosis was evaluated in cochlear fibrosis models of rat cochlear slices in vitro and in KLH-induced immune labyrinthitis and platinum wire cochlear implantation-induced fibrosis in vivo. Cochleae were invaded with tissue containing fibroblastic cells expressing α-SMA (alpha smooth muscle actin), which along with collagen I, fibronectin, and laminin in the extracellular matrix, suggests the involvement of a fibrotic process triggered by EMT in vitro and in vivo. After perilymphatic injection of an adenoviral vector expressing GFP in vivo, we demonstrated that the fibroblastic cells derived from the mesothelial cells of the scalae tympani and vestibuli. Activation of inflammatory and EMT pathways was further assessed by ELISA analysis of the expression of IL-1β and TGF-β1. Both markers were elevated in vitro and in vivo, and DEX and Ara-C were able to reduce IL-1β and TGF-β1 production. After 5days of culture in vitro, quantification of calcein-positive cells revealed that Ara-C was 30-fold more efficient in preventing fibrosis, and provoked less sensory hair cell loss, than DEX. In KLH-induced immune labyrinthitis and platinum wire-implanted models, Ara-C was more efficient in preventing proliferation of fibrosis with less side effects on hair cells and neurons than DEX. In conclusion, DEX and Ara-C both prevent fibrosis in the cochlea. Analysis of the risk/benefit ratio favors the use of Ara-C for preventing cochlear fibrosis. PMID:26718602

  12. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of pain due to soft tissue injury: diclofenac epolamine topical patch

    PubMed Central

    Lionberger, David R; Brennan, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review published clinical data on diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP) in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries, such as strains, sprains, and contusions. Review of published literature on topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac, and DETP in patients with acute soft tissue injuries was included. Relevant literature was identified on MEDLINE using the search terms topical NSAIDs, diclofenac, diclofenac epolamine, acute pain, sports injury, soft tissue injury, strain, sprain, and contusion, and from citations in retrieved articles covering the years 1978–2008. Review of published, randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses shows that topical NSAIDs are significantly more effective than placebo in relieving acute pain; the pooled average relative benefit was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.5–1.9). In a limited number of comparisons, topical and oral NSAIDs provided comparable pain relief, but the use of topical agents produced lower plasma drug concentrations and fewer systemic adverse events (AEs). The physical–chemical properties of diclofenac epolamine make it well suited for topical use. In patients with acute soft tissue injuries treated with DETP, clinical data report an analgesic benefit within hours of the first application, and significant pain relief relative to placebo within 3 days. Moreover, DETP displayed tolerability comparable with placebo; the most common AEs were pruritus and other application site reactions. Review of published literature suggests that DETP is generally safe and well tolerated, clinically efficacious, and a rational treatment option for patients experiencing acute pain associated with strains, sprains, and contusions, and other localized painful conditions. PMID:21197326

  13. Usage patterns of ‘over-the-counter’ vs. prescription-strength nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in France

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Mai; Salvo, Francesco; Pariente, Antoine; Abouelfath, Abdelilah; Lassalle, Regis; Droz, Cecile; Blin, Patrick; Moore, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Aims Most risks of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are pharmacological, dose and duration dependent. Usage patterns of prescription-only (POM) or ‘over-the-counter (OTC)’ NSAIDs may influence risks, but are not commonly described. Methods The Echantillon Généraliste de Bénéficiaires database, the permanent 1/97 representative sample from the French national healthcare insurance systems, was queried over 2009–2010 to identify usage patterns, concomitant chronic diseases and cardiovascular medication in OTC and POM NSAID users. Results Over 2 years, 229 477 of 526 108 patients had at least one NSAID dispensation; 44 484 patients (19%) were dispensed only OTC NSAIDs (93% ibuprofen) and 121 208 (53%) only POM NSAIDs. The OTC users were younger (39.9 vs. 47.4 years old) and more often female (57 vs. 53%); 69% of OTC users and 49% of POM users had only one dispensation. A mean of 14.6 defined daily doses (DDD) were dispensed over 2 years for OTC vs. 53 for POM; 93% OTC vs. 60% POM patients bought ≤ 30 DDD over 2 years, and 1.5 vs. 12% bought ≥ 90 DDD. Chronic comorbidities were found in 19% of OTC users vs. 28% of POM users; 24 vs. 37% had at least one dispensation of a cardiovascular drug over the 2 years. Conclusions Most of the use of NSAIDs appears to be short term, especially for OTC-type NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen. The validity of risk estimates for NSAIDs extrapolated from clinical trials or from observational studies not including OTC-type usage may need to be revised. PMID:24102791

  14. Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors use in Australia and Nova Scotia (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Sketris, Ingrid; Cooke, Charmaine; Tett, Susan

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors were marketed aggressively and their rapid uptake caused safety concerns and budgetary challenges in Canada and Australia. The objectives of this study were to compare and contrast COX-2 inhibitors and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ns-NSAID) use in Nova Scotia (Canada) and Australia and to identify lessons learned from the two jurisdictions. METHODS Ns-NSAID and COX-2 inhibitor Australian prescription data (concession beneficiaries) were downloaded from the Medicare Australia website (2001–2006). Similar Pharmacare data were obtained for Nova Scotia (seniors and those receiving Community services). Defined daily doses per 1000 beneficiaries day−1 were calculated. COX-2 inhibitors/all NSAIDs ratios were calculated for Australia and Nova Scotia. Ns-NSAIDs were divided into low, moderate and high risk for gastrointestinal side-effects and the proportions of use in each group were determined. Which drugs accounted for 90% of use was also calculated. RESULTS Overall NSAID use was different in Australia and Nova Scotia. However, ns-NSAID use was similar. COX-2 inhibitor dispensing was higher in Australia. The percentage of COX-2 inhibitor prescriptions over the total NSAID use was different in the two countries. High-risk NSAID use was much higher in Australia. Low-risk NSAID prescribing increased in Nova Scotia over time. The low-risk/high-risk ratio was constant throughout over the period in Australia and increased in Nova Scotia. CONCLUSIONS There are significant differences in Australia and Nova Scotia in use of NSAIDs, mainly due to COX-2 prescribing. Nova Scotia has a higher proportion of low-risk NSAID use. Interventions to provide physicians with information on relative benefits and risks of prescribing specific NSAIDs are needed, including determining their impact. PMID:19660008

  15. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for exercise-induced muscle damage: implications for skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2012-12-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is a common condition resulting from a bout of vigorous exercise, particularly if the individual is unaccustomed to performance of the given movement. Symptoms of EIMD include delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and a loss of physical function. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed post-exercise to alleviate these symptoms and restore normal physical function. Of potential concern for those who use NSAIDs to treat EIMD is the possibility that they may impair the adaptive response to exercise. Specifically, there is emerging evidence that the action of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes, and COX-2 in particular, are important and even necessary to achieve maximal skeletal muscle hypertrophy in response to functional overload. Given that NSAIDs exert their actions by blocking COX and thus suppressing prostaglandin production, a theoretical rationale exists whereby these drugs may have detrimental effects on muscle regeneration and supercompensation. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to extensively review the literature and evaluate the effects of NSAIDs on muscle growth and development. Based on current evidence, there is little reason to believe that the occasional use of NSAIDs will negatively affect muscle growth, although the efficacy for their use in alleviating inflammatory symptoms remains questionable. Evidence on the hypertrophic effects of the chronic use of NSAIDs is less clear. In those who are untrained, it does not appear that regular NSAID use will impede growth in the short term, and at least one study indicates that it may in fact have a positive impact. Given their reported impairment of satellite cell activity, however, longer-term NSAID use may well be detrimental, particularly in those who possess greater growth potential. PMID:23013520

  16. Cyclomaltoheptaose mixed esters of anti-inflammatory drugs and short-chain fatty acids and study of their enzymatic hydrolysis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Ren, Yong; Hua, Weiyi

    2009-03-10

    In an effort to enhance the drug-loading capacity of cyclomaltoheptaose (beta-cyclodextrin, betaCD) and to combine the function of anti-inflammatory drugs with short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), ternary esters incorporating seven copies of an anti-inflammatory drug and 14 copies of a SCFA onto a beta-cyclodextrin core were designed and prepared. Acetic, propionic, or butyric esters were introduced at secondary OH groups, and ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, or felbinac was attached to primary OH groups through ester bonds. Heptakis[2,3-di-O-butanoyl-6-O-2-(biphenyl-4-yl)-ethanoyl]-cyclomaltoheptaose was very stable in aqueous and esterase solution. It was hydrolyzed by alpha-amylase (4 units/mL) with t(1/2) value of 18h. The total released amount of biphenyl acetic acid was 38% after 24h when the esterase was added after the alpha-amylase hydrolysis. The present results suggest that these nine betaCD conjugates may release the anti-inflammatory drug in the colonic contents. PMID:19185291

  17. Designing Anti-inflammatory Drugs from Parasitic Worms: A Synthetic Small Molecule Analogue of the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62 Prevents Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing evidence that parasitic worms may protect humans from developing allergic and autoimmune diseases and the continuing identification of defined helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, to date no new anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed from these organisms. We have approached this matter in a novel manner by synthesizing a library of drug-like small molecules based upon phosphorylcholine, the active moiety of the anti-inflammatory Acanthocheilonema viteae product, ES-62, which as an immunogenic protein is unsuitable for use as a drug. Following preliminary in vitro screening for inhibitory effects on relevant macrophage cytokine responses, a sulfone-containing phosphorylcholine analogue (11a) was selected for testing in an in vivo model of inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Testing revealed that 11a was as effective as ES-62 in protecting DBA/1 mice from developing CIA and mirrored its mechanism of action in downregulating the TLR/IL-1R transducer, MyD88. 11a is thus a novel prototype for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:24228757

  18. Full factorial design optimization of anti-inflammatory drug release by PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres.

    PubMed

    Azouz, L'Hachemi; Dahmoune, Farid; Rezgui, Farouk; G'Sell, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A biodegradable triblock poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer was successfully synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone, and was characterized by intrinsic viscosimetry, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Copolymer microparticles loaded with ibuprofen were prepared by an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation process. They were carefully weighted and characterized through their zeta potential. In this work, 4 selected process parameters (shaking speed X1, time of contact X2, poly(vinyl alcohol) concentration X3, and ibuprofen concentration X4) were adjusted at 2 different values. For each of the 16 experimental conditions, repeated twice, the drug encapsulation efficiency of the microspheres was determined, according to the following definition: EE (X1, X2, X3, X4)=mass of encapsulated ibuprofen/total weight of ibuprofen. A "full factorial design method" was applied to analyze the results statistically according to a polynomial fit and to determine the optimal conditions for the microencapsulation of the ibuprofen through an accurate statistical protocol. The microparticles obtained exhibit a spherical shape as shown by electron microscopy. PMID:26478328

  19. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and upper and lower gastrointestinal mucosal damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    NSAIDs are among the most commonly used drugs worldwide and their beneficial therapeutic properties are thoroughly accepted. However, they are also associated with gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events. NSAIDs can damage the whole GI tract including a wide spectrum of lesions. About 1 to 2% of NSAID users experienced a serious GI complication during treatment. The relative risk of upper GI complications among NSAID users depends on the presence of different risk factors, including older age (>65 years), history of complicated peptic ulcer, and concomitant aspirin or anticoagulant use, in addition to the type and dose of NSAID. Some authors recently reported a decreasing trend in hospitalizations due to upper GI complications and a significant increase in those from the lower GI tract, causing the rates of these two types of GI complications to converge. NSAID-induced enteropathy has gained much attention in the last few years and an increasing number of reports have been published on this issue. Current evidence suggests that NSAIDs increase the risk of lower GI bleeding and perforation to a similar extent as that seen in the upper GI tract. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors have the same beneficial effects as nonselective NSAIDs but with less GI toxicity in the upper GI tract and probably in the lower GI tract. Overall, mortality due to these complications has also decreased, but the in-hospital case fatality for upper and lower GI complication events has remained constant despite the new therapeutic and prevention strategies. PMID:24267289

  20. Experimental Anti-Inflammatory Drug Semapimod Inhibits TLR Signaling by Targeting the TLR Chaperone gp96.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Grishin, Anatoly V; Ford, Henri R

    2016-06-15

    Semapimod, a tetravalent guanylhydrazone, suppresses inflammatory cytokine production and has potential in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The mechanism of action of Semapimod is not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that in rat IEC-6 intestinal epithelioid cells, Semapimod inhibits activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB and induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by TLR ligands, but not by IL-1β or stresses. Semapimod inhibits TLR4 signaling (IC50 ≈0.3 μmol) and acts by desensitizing cells to LPS; it fails to block responses to LPS concentrations of ≥5 μg/ml. Inhibition of TLR signaling by Semapimod is almost instantaneous: the drug is effective when applied simultaneously with LPS. Semapimod blocks cell-surface recruitment of the MyD88 adapter, one of the earliest events in TLR signaling. gp96, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized chaperone of the HSP90 family critically involved in the biogenesis of TLRs, was identified as a target of Semapimod using ATP-desthiobiotin pulldown and mass spectroscopy. Semapimod inhibits ATP-binding and ATPase activities of gp96 in vitro (IC50 ≈0.2-0.4 μmol). On prolonged exposure, Semapimod causes accumulation of TLR4 and TLR9 in perinuclear space, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum retention, an anticipated consequence of impaired gp96 chaperone function. Our data indicate that Semapimod desensitizes TLR signaling via its effect on the TLR chaperone gp96. Fast inhibition by Semapimod is consistent with gp96 participating in high-affinity sensing of TLR ligands in addition to its role as a TLR chaperone. PMID:27194788

  1. Comparative anti-inflammatory effects of anti-arthritic herbal medicines and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joshua J; Samad, Mohammed A; Kim, Kye S; Bae, Soochan

    2014-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), such as ibuprofen, are widely used over-the-counter drugs to treat arthritis, but they are often associated with side effects. Herbal medicines have been used to treat various diseases such as arthritis, but the scientific profiles are not well understood. In this study, we examined, in comparison with ibuprofen, the inhibitory effects on various inflammatory markers of the most commonly used herbal medicines to treat arthritis, boswellia (Boswellia sapindales), licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), guggul (Commiphora wightii), and neem (Azadirachta indica). To elicit inflammatory response, we exposed mouse myoblast C2C12 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), which are cytokines activated during an inflammatory response, were determined. The optimal non-toxic concentration was determined by exposing different concentrations of drugs (from 0.01 to 10 mg/mL). Cell death measurement revealed that the drug concentrations lower than 0.05 mg/mL were non-toxic concentrations for each drug, and these doses were used for the main experiments. We found that neem and licorice showed robust anti-inflammatory responses compared with ibuprofen. However, boswellia and guggul did not demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory responses. We concluded that neem and licorice are more effective than ibuprofen in suppressing LPS-induced inflammation in C2C12 cells. PMID:25918809

  2. Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (-COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic -OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities with

  3. Safe full-dose one-step nabumetone challenge in patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Goldberg, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    Aspirin and all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a chemically heterogeneous group of compounds that share the ability to inhibit the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). This inhibitory effect, especially of COX-1, is suggested as the mechanism underlying NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reactions. In this study, we evaluated the safety and convenience of a single full-dose challenge with nabumetone, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in patients with hypersensitivity to nonselective NSAIDs (ns-NSAIDs). Twenty-four subjects with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to at least two different ns-NSAIDs on two different occasions were enrolled in the study. The patients were otherwise healthy and did not suffer from NSAID- or aspirin-induced asthma or urticaria. All subjects were orally challenged by a single full dose (1000 mg) of nabumetone, monitored closely in the hospital for the next 4 hours and contacted by telephone the next morning and 3-12 months afterward. Twenty-two patients tolerated nabumetone without any reaction during and after the challenge. One patient had a single urticarial lesion and one patient reported mild pruritus without objective signs, both of which resolved spontaneously. Thirteen patients, including the patient who responded with pruritus to the challenge, used nabumetone on several occasions during the follow-up period without any adverse reaction. Our study shows that in patients with a history of aspirin- and ns-NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reaction, a rapid one-step challenge with nabumetone was well tolerated. These initial data support the possibility that a single full dose of nabumetone can be tried as a safe alternative in most patients with a hypersensitivity reaction to ns-NSAIDs. PMID:12974196

  4. Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (–COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic –OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities

  5. Characteristics and clinical outcome of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ya-Li; Tian, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen-Ge; Cheng, Dan-Ying; Yang, Yan-Fang; Gao, Hong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinicopathological characteristics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code for acute kidney injury (AKI) (584.5 or 584.9) and for acute liver injury (ALI) (570.0 or 573.3) from January 2004 to December 2013. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of AKI and ALI and to quantify NSAID administration. RESULTS: Seven of 59 patients (11.8%) were identified with acute hepato-nephrotoxicity induced by NSAIDs. Five patients (71.4%) received over the recommended NSAIDs dose. Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere AKI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), a high prevalence of alcohol use (71.4%) and positive hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers (85.7%). Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere ALI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), increased extracellular volume depletion (71.4%), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor combined use (57.1%). Acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubulointerstitial disease were apparent in three out of six (42.9%) kidney biopsy patients, respectively. Acute hepatitis was found in four out of six (66.7%) liver biopsy patients. Overall complete recovery occurred in four patients within a mean of 118.25 ± 55.42 d. CONCLUSION: The injury typically occurred after an overdose of NSAIDs. The risk factors include age older than 60 years, alcohol use, positive HBV markers, extracellular volume depletion and RAAS inhibitor combined use.