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Sample records for non-surgical treatment options

  1. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Taking Control: Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5- ... it. Page 0 Page 2 What is urinary incontinence (UI)? Taking Control (5-minute video) Click on ...

  2. Peyronie’s disease: A contemporary review of non-surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Laurence A.

    2013-01-01

    In this review I discuss the current non-surgical treatment options for Peyronie’s disease (PD), which remains a therapeutic dilemma for the treating physician. This is despite a large array of treatments that have been used since the time of de la Peyronie in the mid-18th century. Part of the problem with finding an effective treatment is the incomplete understanding of the aetiopathophysiology of this scarring disorder. Published articles in peer-reviewed journals were assessed, recognising that most of the reported trials are compromised by being single-centre studies with no placebo control. Various treatment options have emerged, most with limited and unreliable benefit, but a few treatments have shown a consistent, albeit incomplete, response rate. Currently the only scientifically sensible oral agents appear to be pentoxifylline, l-arginine, and possibly the phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. The current intralesional injection treatment options include verapamil and interferon, with a reported benefit in reducing deformity and improving sexual function. Intralesional clostridial collagenase is in the midst of phase-3 trial analysis by the USA Food and Drug Administration. External mechanical traction therapy has recently emerged as a technique to reduce the curvature, recover lost length, and possibly obviate surgery. Currently there is no clear, reliable and effective non-surgical treatment for PD, but it appears that several of the available treatments can reduce the deformity and improve sexual function, and might at least stabilise the disease process. PMID:26558093

  3. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12?months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3?months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy may be improved to help patients manage their symptoms, and potentially delay the need for joint arthroplasty. PMID:26353874

  4. A ten-year study on non-surgical treatment of postoperative bile leakage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Peng; Peng, Shu-You; Peng, Cheng-Hong; Liu, Yin-Bi; Shi, Liu-Bin; Jiang, Xian-Chuan; Shen, Hong-Wei; Xu, Yuan-Liang; Fang, Shu-Bin; Rui, Jing; Xia, Xiang-Hou; Zhao, Guo-Hai

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To summarize systematically our ten-year experience in non-surgical treatment of postoperative bile leakage, and explore its methods and indications. METHODS: The clinical data of 57 patients with postoperative bile leakage treated non-surgically from January 1991 to December 2000 were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: The site of the leakage was mainly the disrupted or damaged fistulous tracts of T tube in 25 patients (43.9%), the fossae of gallbladder in 14 cases (24.6%), the cut surface of liver in 7 cases (12.3%), and it was undetectable in the other 2 cases. Besides bile leakage, the wrong ligation of bile ducts was found in 3 patients, residual stones of the distal bile duct in 5 patients, benign papillary strictures in 3, and biloma resulting from bile collections in 2. The diagnoses were made according to the history of surgery, clinical situation, abdominal paracentesis, ultrasonography, ERCP, PTC, MRI/MRCP, gastroscopy and percutaneous fistulography. All 57 patients were treated non-surgically at the beginning of bile leakage. The non-surgical methods included keeping original drainage unobstructed, percutaneous abdominal paracentesis or drainage, percutaneous transhepatic cholangial/biliary drainage (PTCD/PTBD), endoscopic management, traditional Chinese medicine and so on. Of the 57 patients, 2 patients died, 5 were converted to reoperation later, the other 50 were directly cured by non-surgical methods without any complication. The cure rate of the non-surgery was 82.5% (50/57). CONCLUSION: Many nonoperative methods are available to treat postoperative bile leakage. Non-surgical treatment may serve as the first choice for the treatment of bile leakage for its advantages in higher cure rate, convenience and safety in practice. It is important to choose the specific non-surgical method according to the volume, site of bile leakage and patient's condition. PMID:12378646

  5. Modifiable Prognostic Factors of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Non-Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Hung, Chao-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Chen, Chien-Hung; Kee, Kwong-Ming; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Yen, Yi-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Yen-Yang; Hsu, Hsuan-Chi; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background & aims Current hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) staging systems only use baseline characteristics to predict outcome. We aimed to explore modifiable factors of the prognosis in HCC cases had undergone non-surgical treatment. Methods All HCC cases in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial hospital in southern Taiwan from 2002 to 2012 must met all below criteria: (1) met international diagnostic guidelines, (2) underwent the initial treatments in our hospital (3) treated by non-surgical treatment modalities and (4) survived more than two years, with follow-up time longer than five years. Results A total 698 patients were enrolled: 451 (24.6%, group A) survivied between 2 to 5 years, and 247 (13.5%, group B) had survived > 5 years. Aside from liver function reserve and BCLC stages, four interventional factors: initial treatment modality, outcomes of 1st or 2nd treatment, and anti-viral therapy to chronic viral hepatitis were associated with prognosis. After propensity score matching, multiple logistic regression of 223 well-matched pairs showed that recurrence within one year after 1st treatment (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.35–3.48), incomplete 2nd treatment (2.01, 1.27–3.17) and absence of anti-viral agents (1.68, 1.09–2.59) were independent poor prognostic factors. Conclusion Complete treatment and anti-viral agents to chronic hepatitis were both independent modifiable prognostic factors of HCC patients had undergone non-surgical treatment. Based on these findings, timely treatment to achieve maximal locoregional control and anti-viral treatment should be provided as possible. PMID:26661388

  6. Life Space Assessment in Older Women Undergoing Non-Surgical Treatment for Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Thomas L.; Illston, Jana D.; Markland, Alayne D.; Goode, Patricia S.; Richter, Holly E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Urinary incontinence (UI) impacts all aspects of life activities. This study aims to characterize change in mobility within the community utilizing the Life Space Assessment (LSA) questionnaire in women undergoing non-surgical UI treatment. Design Prospective cohort study, performed from July 2007 to March 2009, which followed women seeking non-surgical UI treatment and assessed their mobility and symptoms using LSA, Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6), and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Estimated Percent Improvement (EPI) and Patient Satisfaction Question (PSQ) were obtained post-treatment. Setting Outpatient tertiary-care clinic. Participants 70 ambulatory, community-dwelling women, aged 65 years or older, seeking non-surgical care for UI. Intervention Multi-component behavioral and/or pharmacologic therapies. Measurements We hypothesized LSA would improve with treatment. Repeated measures analysis with Tukey’s HSD and backwards selection linear regression model were performed. Results LSA score decreased from baseline to 2 months (mean±SD; 63±29 to 56±28, p<0.001) and was sustained at 6 and 12 months (54±28, 54±28). UDI scores improved from 36±23 to 25±24, p<0.001, at 2 months, and improvement persisted at 6 and 12 months (22±22, 21±24). Improvements in UDI and patient perceived improvement in UI were not associated with LSA change. Age, race, and depression impacted LSA, which decreased 1-point for each additional year of age (p=0.004), 6-points for each point higher on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) (p=0.002), and 6-points for African American race (p=0.048). Conclusion Decreased mobility represented by LSA was related to age, depression, and race, but not UI symptom improvement. PMID:25525562

  7. Randomised study of three non?surgical treatments in mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Bing; Sam, Kim; Mok, Wendy YW; Cheung, Man Tat; Fong, Daniel YT; Lam, Jamie CM; Lam, David C L; Yam, Loretta YC

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) may be managed with different treatment options. This study compared the effectiveness of three commonly used non?surgical treatment modalities. Methods Subjects with mild to moderate OSA were randomised to one of three treatment groups for 10?weeks: conservative measures (sleep hygiene) only, continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) in addition to conservative measures or an oral appliance in addition to conservative measures. All overweight subjects were referred to a weight?reduction class. OSA was assessed by polysomnography. Blood pressure was recorded in the morning and evening in the sleep laboratory. Daytime sleepiness was assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Health?related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed with the 36?Item Short?Form Health Survey (SF?36) and Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI). Results 101 subjects with a mean (SEM) apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) of 21.4 (1.1) were randomised to one of the three groups. The severity of sleep?disordered breathing was decreased in the CPAP and oral appliance groups compared with the conservative measures group, and the CPAP group was significantly better than the oral appliance group. Relief from sleepiness was significantly better in the CPAP group. CPAP was also better than the oral appliance or conservative measures in improving the “bodily pain” domain, and better than conservative measures in improving the “physical function” domain of SF?36. Both CPAP and the oral appliance were more effective than conservative measures in improving the SAQLI, although no difference was detected between the CPAP and oral appliance groups. CPAP and the oral appliance significantly lowered the morning diastolic blood pressure compared with baseline values, but there was no difference in the changes in blood pressure between the groups. There was also a linear relationship between the changes in AHI and body weight. Conclusion CPAP produced the best improvement in terms of physiological, symptomatic and HRQOL measures, while the oral appliance was slightly less effective. Weight loss, if achieved, resulted in an improvement in sleep parameters, but weight control alone was not uniformly effective. PMID:17121868

  8. Systemic moxifloxacin vs amoxicillin/metronidazole adjunct to non-surgical treatment in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gurgan, Cem-Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of moxifloxacin compared to amoxicillin and metronidazole, combined with non-surgical treatment in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) in a 6-month follow-up. Material and Methods A total of 39 systemically healthy patients with GAgP were evaluated in this randomized clinical trial. Periodontal parameters were recorded at the baseline during the 1st, 3rd and 6th month. Patients received either 400 mg of moxifloxacin per os once daily or 500 mg of metronidazole and 500 mg amoxicillin per os three times daily for 7 days consecutively. Results No significant differences between groups were found in any parameters at the baseline. Both groups led to a statistically significant decrease in all clinical periodontal parameters compared to the baseline (PI, p<0.001 and GI, PD, BOP, CAL, p<0.01). There were no differences between the 1st and 3rd months or the 3rd and 6th months for clinical parameters in the groups. Also, no intergroup difference was observed in any parameters at any time, except the gingival index at 6th months. Conclusions Systemic administration of moxifloxacin as an adjunct to non-surgical treatment significantly improves clinical outcomes and provides comparable clinical improvement with less adverse events to that of combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole in the treatment of GAgP. Key words: Aggressive periodontitis, amoxicillin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, nonsurgical periodontal debridement. PMID:26034931

  9. Isokinetic muscle assessment after treatment of pectoralis major muscle rupture using surgical or non-surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Anna Maria; da Silva, Antonio Carlos; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; dos Santos Andrade, Marilia

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rupture of the pectoralis major muscle appears to be increasing in athletes. However, the optimal treatment strategy has not yet been established. OBJECTIVES: To compare the isokinetic shoulder performance after surgical treatment to that after non-surgical treatment for pectoralis major muscle rupture. METHODS: We assessed 33 pectoralis major muscle ruptures (18 treated non-surgically and 15 treated surgically). Horizontal abduction and adduction as well as external and internal rotation at 60 and 120 degrees/s were tested in both upper limbs. Peak torque, total work, contralateral deficiency, and the peak torque agonist-to-antagonist ratio were measured. RESULTS: Contralateral muscular deficiency did not differ between the surgical and non-surgical treatment modalities. However, the surgical group presented twice the number of athletes with clinically acceptable contralateral deficiency (<20%) for internal rotators compared to the non-surgical group. The peak torque ratio between the external and internal rotator muscles revealed a similar deficit of the external rotation in both groups and on both sides (surgical, 61.60% and 57.80% and non-surgical, 62.06% and 54.06%, for the dominant and non-dominant sides, respectively). The peak torque ratio revealed that the horizontal adduction muscles on the injured side showed similar weakness in both groups (surgical, 86.27%; non-surgical, 98.61%). CONCLUSIONS: This study included the largest single series of athletes reported to date for this type of injury. A comparative analysis of muscular strength and balance showed no differences between the treatment modalities for pectoralis major muscle rupture. However, the number of significant clinical deficiencies was lower in the surgical group than in the non-surgical group, and both treatment modalities require greater attention to the rehabilitation process, especially for the recovery of muscle strength and balance. PMID:21484052

  10. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  11. Non-Surgical Procedure Is Effective Treatment for Painful Ovarian Varicose Veins

    MedlinePLUS

    ... catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter (SIRspecialists) YouTube RSS Feeds Radiation Safety ... Talking People Are Talking: Know Your Treatment Options! Social Media Connect With SIR Vision to Heal: SIR Blog ...

  12. Non-Surgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence: A Review of the Research for Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about what option may be best for you. Understanding Your Condition What is urinary incontinence? Urinary incontinence ... improve or completely end their incontinence with treatment. Understanding Your Choices How is UI treated? There are ...

  13. Treatment Options for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Cielo, Christopher M; Gungor, Anil

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of therapies available for the treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In children with enlarged adenoids or tonsils, adenotonsillectomy (AT) is the preferred treatment, but other surgical options include partial tonsillectomy and lingual tonsillectomy. In specific populations, craniofacial or bariatric surgery may be indicated, and tracheostomy should be reserved for cases where there is no other therapeutic option. Positive airway pressure (PAP) is the most effective non-surgical therapy for OSAS as it can be successfully used in even cases of severe OSAS. Nasal steroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists may be used in the treatment of mild or moderate OSAS. Rapid maxillary expansion and dental appliances may be effective in select populations with dental problems. Other non-surgical therapies, such as positional therapy, supplemental oxygen, and weight loss have not been shown to be effective in most pediatric populations. PMID:26597557

  14. A non-surgical uterine lavage technique in large cats intended for treatment of uterine infection-induced infertility.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T B; Göritz, F; Boardman, W; Strike, T; Strauss, G; Jewgenow, K

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the successful use of a non-surgical, transcervical uterine lavage technique for the treatment of uterine infection-induced infertility in three female large cats. We developed a non-surgical uterine lavage technique, which allowed repeated flushing of the uterine lumen and installation of therapeutic antibiotics. The entire procedure was performed under general anaesthesia (duration of anesthesia ranged from 40 to 70 min). It was successfully applied in a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), a Corbett tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) and an Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis). The tigers were treated only once, whereas the leopard received four uterine treatments, due to re-infection after mating. Decisions to conduct uterine treatments were based on detection of uterine fluid during previous transrectal ultrasound examinations. The catheter was guided into the vagina, with the aid of an endoscope, passing the urethra, and then into the uterus, with the aid of transrectal ultrasonography. Both uterine horns were separately flushed with approximately 300 mL of cell medium M199, followed by an antibiotic infusion. Upon ultrasonographic re-examination, the topical uterine treatments resulted in an apparent decline in the inflammatory and/or degenerative processes. The Corbett tiger had the most severe uterine alterations, in addition to an aseptic pyometra. As a result, she was treated 1 month prior to ovariohysterectomy (in order to reduce the surgical risk). The Sumatran tiger was artificially inseminated twice after hormone-induced estrus, and the Amur leopard expressed a spontaneous estrus and re-initiated mating behaviour. PMID:16530816

  15. Spasmodic Torticollis: Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Options Patient Support Treatment Options Medications Botulinum Toxin Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Selective Denervation Surgery Physical ... Chemodenervation which involves injections using BOTOX®, (a botulinum toxin Type A manufactured by Allergan Inc.), DYSPORTt® (a ...

  16. [Surgical versus non-surgical treatment of unilateral dislocated fractures of the lower mandibular condyle].

    PubMed

    Worsaae, N; Thorn, J J

    1995-06-12

    To compare open versus closed reduction of unilaterally dislocated low subcondylar fractures in adults, 101 consecutive patients were treated either by closed reduction with a median of four weeks of maxillomandibular fixation or by a median of six weeks of maxillomandibular fixation after surgical repositioning and transosseous wiring of the dislocated condylar fragment. No selection of patients was done for either treatment. Fifty-two patients were observed for a median of two years after treatment. Complications such as malocclusion, mandibular asymmetry, impaired masticatory function, and pain located to the affected joint or masticatory muscles were significantly more frequent in patients treated with closed reduction (39%) compared with those treated surgically (4%)(p = 0.005). Neither the degree of dislocation of the proximal fragment, concomitant mandibular fractures, nor the absence of posterior occlusal support seemed to influence the results. PMID:7792975

  17. Early radiographic diagnosis of peri-implantitis enhances the outcome of peri-implantitis treatment: a 5-year retrospective study after non-surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hee-Yung; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Jin-Ah; Kim, Young-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective study evaluated the relationship between the timing of peri-implantitis diagnosis and marginal bone level after a 5-year follow-up of non-surgical peri-implantitis treatment. Methods Thirty-three patients (69 implants) were given peri-implantitis diagnosis in 2008-2009 in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Among them, 31 implants from 16 patients were included in this study. They were treated non-surgically in this hospital, and came for regular maintenance visits for at least 5 years after peri-implantitis treatment. Radiographic marginal bone levels at each interval were measured and statistical analysis was performed. Results Timing of peri-implantitis was one of the significant factors affecting initial bone loss and total bone loss not additional bone after peri-implantitis diagnosis. Patients with cardiovascular disease and diabetic mellitus were positively influenced on both initial bone loss and total bone loss. Patients who needed periodontal treatment after implant placement showed a negative effect on bone loss compared to those who needed periodontal treatment before implant placement during entire periods. Implant location also significantly influenced on amounts of bone loss. Mandibular implants showed less bone loss than maxillary implants. Among surgical factors, combined use of autogenous and xenogenic bone graft materials showed a negative effect on bone loss compared to autogenous bone graft materials. Use of membrane negatively affected on initial bone loss but positively on additional bone loss and total bone loss. Thread exposure showed positive effects on initial bone loss and total bone loss. Conclusions Early peri-implantitis diagnosis led to early non-surgical intervention for peri-implantitis treatment, which resulted in the maintenance of the bone level as well as preservation of the implant. Graphical Abstract PMID:26131368

  18. Hemorrhoids and varicose veins: a review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    MacKay, D

    2001-04-01

    Hemorrhoids and varicose veins are common conditions seen by general practitioners. Both conditions have several treatment modalities for the physician to choose from. Varicose veins are treated with mechanical compression stockings. There are several over-the-counter topical agents available for hemorrhoids. Conservative therapies for both conditions include diet, lifestyle changes, and hydrotherapy which require a high degree of patient compliance to be effective. When conservative hemorrhoid therapy is ineffective, many physicians may choose other non-surgical modalities: injection sclerotherapy, cryotherapy, manual dilation of the anus, infrared photocoagulation, bipolar diathermy, direct current electrocoagulation, or rubber band ligation. Injection sclerotherapy is the non-surgical treatment for primary varicose veins. Non-surgical modalities require physicians to be specially trained, own specialized equipment, and assume associated risks. If a non-surgical approach fails, the patient is often referred to a surgeon. The costly and uncomfortable nature of treatment options often lead a patient to postpone evaluation until aggressive intervention is necessary. Oral dietary supplementation is an attractive addition to the traditional treatment of hemorrhoids and varicose veins. The loss of vascular integrity is associated with the pathogenesis of both hemorrhoids and varicose veins. Several botanical extracts have been shown to improve microcirculation, capillary flow, and vascular tone, and to strengthen the connective tissue of the perivascular amorphous substrate. Oral supplementation with Aesculus hippocastanum, Ruscus aculeatus, Centella asiatica, Hamamelis virginiana, and bioflavonoids may prevent time-consuming, painful, and expensive complications of varicose veins and hemorrhoids. PMID:11302778

  19. ARSENIC TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PPT presentation will provide information on the drinking water treatment options for small utilities to remove arsenic from ground water. The discussion will include information on the EPA BAT listed processes and on some of the newer technologies, such as the iron based ad...

  20. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hägi, Tobias T.; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Material and Methods Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. Results After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. Conclusion The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air-polishing with erythritol prevents from substance-loss and results in a smooth surface with nearly no residual biofilm that promotes the reattachment of PDL fibroblasts. PMID:26121365

  1. Novel operative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, D N J; Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    There are an increasing number of more novel options available for operative intervention. This chapter outlines a series of operative treatment options which are available to the modern clinician to select from once a decision has been made to treat a carious lesion operatively. A series of novel methods of caries removal have been described; including chemomechanical caries removal, air abrasion, sono-abrasion, polymer rotary burs and lasers. There are also novel approaches to ensure complete caries removal and novel approaches for the management of deep caries. A novel question increasingly asked by clinicians is: does all the caries need to be removed? Operative management options here include: therapeutic fissure sealants, ultraconservative caries removal, stepwise excavation and the Hall technique. In conclusion, there is now a growing wealth of evidence that questions the traditional methods of caries removal and restoring the tooth. In parallel, there is a growing movement exploring the merits of therapeutically sealing caries into the tooth. This philosophy is alien to many of today's dentists and, until further randomized controlled trials are carried out in primary care, prudent caution must be exercised with this promising approach. Research is required into techniques which will allow monitoring of sealed caries to detect any rare, but insidious, failures. These novel techniques are an alternative way of managing the later stages of the caries process from a sounder biological basis and have marked potential benefits to patients from treatment, pain and outcome perspectives. PMID:19494685

  2. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  3. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-12-10

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  4. Achalasia: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Volkanovska, Ance; Gigante, Giovanni; Cali, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder, characterized by impaired swallow-induced, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and defective esophageal peristalsis. Unfortunately, there are no etiological therapies for achalasia. Patients present with dysphagia, chest pain and regurgitation of undigested food, often leading to weight loss. The currently available treatments have the common aim of relieving symptoms by decreasing the pressure of the LES. This can be achieved with some medications, by inhibiting the cholinergic innervation (botulinum toxin), by stretching (endoscopic dilation) or cutting (surgery) the LES. Recently, other therapeutic options, including per-oral endoscopic myotomy have been developed and are gaining international consensus. The authors report on the benefits and weaknesses of the different therapies and provide an updated approach to the management of achalasia. PMID:26186641

  5. [Non-surgical treatment in case of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Avila Castañón, Lourdes; Alvidrez, Rafael; Espinola Reyna, Gerardo; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis; del Río Navarro, Blanca

    2003-01-01

    Consequences of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children include reduced performance during day, behaviour problems, diurmal hypersomnia, psychomotor development delay, severe forms of cor pulmonale, systemic hypertension, growing delay and death. This paper describes the clinical case of a 3-year-old girl with perennial symptoms of nasal obstruction characterized by nocturnal snoring, oral breathing, nasal voice, sleep apnea, nasal pruritus and rhinorrhea. Her treatment is also described. PMID:14968987

  6. Treatment Options for Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Tests or procedures that examine the skin ... and is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history can affect the risk of developing colon cancer. ... are taking place in many parts of the country. See the Treatment Options section that follows for ...

  8. Insomnia treatment options for women.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judith R

    2009-12-01

    This article describes the circumstances under which women may develop insomnia and the various treatment options, including hypnotic medication and nonpharmacologic approaches. The efficacy and safety of these treatments are reviewed. The choice of treatment depends on the nature of the insomnia, the stage of a woman's life, the presence of medical or mental health conditions, the availability of treatments, and personal preference. For immediate, short-term relief of acute insomnia, hypnotic medication, especially the nonbenzodiazepines (zolpidem, zopiclone, eszopiclone) are options. For chronic insomnia, insomnia-specific cognitive and behavioral therapies are generally the interventions of choice. PMID:19944303

  9. PTSD: Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also supports off-label use of the SSRI fluoxetine as a first line treatment. The serotonin norepinephrine ... Paroxetine (Paxil) SSRI 20 mg – 60 mg daily Fluoxetine (Prozac) SSRI 20 mg – 60 mg daily Venlafaxine ( ...

  10. CHRONIC URTICARIA AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Godse, Kiran Vasant

    2009-01-01

    Chronic urticaria has a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and causes. Still, despite our best efforts no cause may be found in the majority of cases. The treatment options are: Primary prevention in the form of avoidance of aggravating factors; counseling; antihistamines; leukotriene receptor antagonists; prednisolone; sulfasalazine and a host of immunosuppressives like methotrexate, cyclosporine, omalizumab etc. PMID:20101328

  11. [Non surgical management of ectopic pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kdous, Moez

    2006-06-01

    During the past 25 years, the incidence of ectopic pregnancy has progressively increased while the morbidity and mortality have substantialy decreased, and the treatment has progressed from salpingectomy by laparotomy to conservative surgery by laparoscopy and more recently to medical therapy with Methotrexate or expectant management. This therapeutic transition from surgical emergency to non surgical managment has been attributed to early diagnosis through the use of sensitive assays for hCG and the high definition of vaginal ultrasound. By using these sensitive diagnostic tools, we are now able to select those patients who are most likely to respond to expectant or medical managment versus those who are at high risk of rupture and require surgery. We have reviewed the scientific literature on ectopic pregnancy published over the past 20 years, with the aim to assess the value of non surgical managment of etopic pregnancy. Predictor factors of expectant managment are discussed. Medical therapy with methotrexate: results, indications, Unpleasant side effects and complications are detailed. Several protocols are defined and therapeutic supervision is etablished. The authors offred several recommandations for OB/GY wich will optimize the effectivness of non invasive methods for treatment of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17042204

  12. Wastewater treatment plant cogeneration options

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfield, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews municipal sewage cogeneration and digester gas utilization options available to wastewater treatment plants, and will focus on utilizing the digester gas in combustion turbines and engine-generator systems. Defining the digestion and gas generation process is crucial to understanding the best gas utilization system. In municipal wastewater treatment plants biosolids (sludge) reduction is accomplished using aerobic or anaerobic digestion. The basic process of treating sewage solids with digestion is not new and has been practiced as far back as the nineteenth century. High energy usage consumed by aerobic blow systems supplying air to the process and the potential ``free`` energy generated by anaerobic digesters sometimes sways designers to select anaerobic over aerobic digestion. The following areas will be covered in this paper: gas utilization and cogeneration; definition of digestion process; sizing the cogeneration system and reviewing the systems components; emissions requirements and options; and capital, and O and M cost analysis.

  13. The effectiveness of relaxation training in reducing treatment-related symptoms and improving emotional adjustment in acute non-surgical cancer treatment: a meta-analytical review

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer patients often have to deal with severe side effects and psychological distress during cancer treatment, which have a substantial impact on their quality of life. Among psychosocial interventions for reducing treatment-related side effects, relaxation and imagery were most investigated in controlled trials.

  14. Non-surgical and non-chemical attempts to treat echinococcosis: do they work?

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Vuitton, Lucine; Brunetti, Enrico; Vuitton, Dominique Angèle; Koch, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) are chronic, complex and neglected diseases. Their treatment depends on a number of factors related to the lesion, setting and patient. We performed a literature review of curative or palliative non-surgical, non-chemical interventions in CE and AE. In CE, some of these techniques, like radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA), were shelved after initial attempts, while others, such as High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound, appear promising but are still in a pre-clinical phase. In AE, RFA has never been tested, however, radiotherapy or heavy-ion therapies have been attempted in experimental models. Still, application to humans is questionable. In CE, although prospective clinical studies are still lacking, therapeutic, non-surgical drainage techniques, such as PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration) and its derivatives, are now considered a useful option in selected cases. Finally, palliative, non-surgical drainage techniques such as US- or CT-guided percutaneous biliary drainage, centro-parasitic abscesses drainage, or vascular stenting were performed successfully. Recently, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-associated techniques have become increasingly used to manage biliary fistulas in CE and biliary obstructions in AE. Development of pre-clinical animal models would allow testing for AE techniques developed for other indications, e.g. cancer. Prospective trials are required to determine the best use of PAIR, and associated procedures, and the indications and techniques of palliative drainage. PMID:25531730

  15. Zenker's diverticulum: exploring treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bizzotto, A; Iacopini, F; Landi, R; Costamagna, G

    2013-08-01

    Zenker's diverticulum is an acquired sac-like outpouching of the mucosa and submucosa layers located dorsally at the pharyngoesophageal junction through Killian's dehiscence. It is the most common type of oesophageal diverticula with a reported prevalence ranging between 0.01 to 0.11% and typically occurs in middle-aged and elderly patients. Predominant symptoms are dysphagia and regurgitation. Treatment is recommended for symptomatic patients and considering the aetiopathogenesis of the disease demands myotomy of the cricopharyngeal muscle. Myotomy may be pursued through either open surgical or endoscopic techniques. Management of Zenker's diverticulum has dramatically progressed during past decades. Open surgery with cricopharyngeal myotomy has long been the conventional treatment with satisfactory results, but is associated with high complication rates. Since Zenker's diverticulum mainly affects frail elderly patients, less invasive treatments are indicated. In recent years, endoscopic repair of Zenker's diverticulum has been found to be a viable safe and effective alternative to surgery and gained widespread acceptance. Endoscopic stapled diverticulotomy is generally the preferred approach, but flexible endoscopy is a valuable option, particularly for high-risk patients. The literature is mainly based on retrospective case series or comparative case series, and the optimal treatment modality has not yet been established. The choice between the different approaches depends on local expertise and preferences. Based on retrospective literature results, appropriate technique selection dictated by the size of the diverticulum and the patient's conditions is however desirable. PMID:24043908

  16. Novel Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Adam; Hurley, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a devastating condition affecting a substantial portion of the population. The etiologies of FI are wide ranging, as are the treatment options. When conservative measures fail, often surgical intervention is required. As in any area where a wide range of treatment options exist, there is no one perfect solution. Fortunately, novel treatment options for FI are becoming available, namely, posterior tibial nerve stimulation, magnetic anal sphincter, stem cell transplant, pyloric transplantation, and acupuncture. PMID:25320572

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic Syndromes)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  18. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  19. Non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Gwiazda, Jane; Li, Tianjing

    2014-01-01

    Background Convergence insufficiency is a common eye muscle co-ordination problem in which the eyes have a strong tendency to drift outward (exophoria) when reading or doing close work. Symptoms may include eye strain, headaches, double vision, print moving on the page, frequent loss of place when reading, inability to concentrate, and short attention span. Objectives To systematically assess and synthesize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency. Search strategy We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) on 7 October 2010. We manually searched reference lists and optometric journals. Selection criteria We included RCTs examining any form of non-surgical intervention against placebo, no treatment, sham treatment, or each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed eligibility, risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed meta-analyses when appropriate. Main results We included six trials (three in children, three in adults) with a total of 475 participants. We graded four trials at low risk of bias. Evidence from one trial (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism reading glasses was no more effective than placebo reading glasses in improving clinical signs or symptoms in children. Evidence from one trial (graded at high risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism glasses using a progressive addition lens design was more effective than progressive addition lens alone in decreasing symptoms in adults. At three weeks of therapy, the mean difference in Convergence Insufficiency Symptoms Survey (CISS) score was ?10.24 points (95% confidence interval (CI) ?15.45 to ?5.03). Evidence from two trials (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that outpatient (or office-based as used in the US) vision therapy/orthoptics was more effective than home-based convergence exercises (or pencil push-ups as used in the US) in children. At 12 weeks of therapy, the mean difference in change in near point of convergence, positive fusional vergence, and CISS score from baseline was 3.99 cm (95% CI 2.11 to 5.86), 13.13 diopters (95% CI 9.91 to 16.35), and 9.86 points (95% CI 6.70 to 13.02), respectively. In a young adult population, evidence from one trial (graded at low risk of bias) suggests outpatient vision therapy/orthoptics was more effective than home-based convergence exercises in improving positive fusional vergence at near (7.7 diopters, 95% CI 0.82 to 14.58), but not the other outcomes. Evidence from one trial (graded at low risk of bias) comparing four interventions, also suggests that outpatient vision therapy/orthoptics was more effective than home-based computer vision therapy/orthoptics in children. At 12 weeks, the mean difference in change in near point of convergence, positive fusional vergence, and CISS score from baseline was 2.90 cm (95% CI 0.96 to 4.84), 7.70 diopters (95% CI 3.94 to 11.46), and 8.80 points (95% CI 5.26 to 12.34), respectively. Evidence was less consistent for other pair-wise comparisons. Authors’ conclusions Current research suggests that outpatient vision therapy/orthoptics is more effective than home-based convergence exercises or home-based computer vision therapy/orthoptics for children. In adult population, evidence of the effectiveness of various non-surgical interventions is less consistent. PMID:21412896

  20. EVerT2—needling versus non-surgical debridement for the treatment of verrucae: study protocol for a single-centre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Farina; Torgerson, David; Fairhurst, Caroline; Cockayne, Sarah; Bell, Kerry; Cullen, Michelle; Harrison-Blount, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Verrucae are extremely common, and are experienced by most people at some time during their lives. Although most verrucae will spontaneously disappear without treatment, many patients seek treatment, often because they have persisted for many years, are unsightly or painful or prevent them from doing sports or other activities. There are many different treatments available; including the Falknor's needling procedure. To date, there has only been one small trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of this treatment and no health economic analysis has been undertaken. The Effective Verruca Treatments (EVerT2) trial aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the needling procedure for the treatment of verrucae. Methods and analysis This single-centre randomised controlled trial will recruit 58 participants (aged 18?years and over with a plantar verruca) from Salford Podiatry Clinic patient lists and the surrounding area. If the participant presents with multiple verrucae, an ‘index’ verruca (largest and thickest lesion) will be identified and patients will be randomised 1:1 to the intervention group to receive the needling treatment or the control group to have the callus overlying the verruca debrided. The primary outcome is complete clearance of the index verruca at 12?weeks after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include clearance and recurrence of the treated verruca, clearance of all verrucae, number of verrucae remaining, change in size of the index verruca, pain, and participant satisfaction. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the needling versus callus debridement will be carried out from the perspective of health services over a time horizon of 12?weeks. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the University of Salford, Department of Health Sciences Ethical Approval Committee (HSCR15/24) and the University of York, Department of Health Sciences Research Governance Committee (HSRGC/2014/98/B). Findings will be disseminated through publication and conference presentations. Trial registration number ISRCTN16429440. PMID:26603251

  1. Treatment Options for Childhood Astrocytomas

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Craniopharyngioma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... treatment. Some treatments for tumors cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... treatment. Some treatments for tumors cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  4. The Effect of Race on Outcomes of Surgical or Non-surgical Treatment of Patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J.; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Bono, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of the data collected prospectively through the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective Determine the effect that race or ethnicity had on outcomes following spine surgery in the three arms of SPORT. Summary of Background Data There is a dearth of research regarding the effect of race or ethnicity on outcome following treatment for spinal disorders. Methods All participants from the three arms of the SPORT were evaluated in an as-treated analysis with patients categorized as white, black, or other. Baseline and operative characteristics of the groups were compared using the chi-square test and ANOVA. Differences in the changes between baseline and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year time-points in the operative and non-operative treatments were evaluated with a mixed effects longitudinal regression model and differences between racial groups were compared with a multiple degrees of freedom Wald test. Results Included were 2,427 patients (85% white, 8% black, 7% other). Surgery was performed on 67% of white patients, 54% of blacks, and 68% of others. Whites and others were significantly more likely to undergo surgery than blacks (67% and 68% vs 54%, p=0.003). Complications and the risk of additional surgeries were not significantly different between racial groups. Regardless of race, all patients improved more with surgical management than with nonoperative treatment for all outcome measures at all time-points. The average 4-year area- under-the-curve results revealed surgical and non-operative treatment resulted in statistically significant improvement in whites relative to blacks for BP (p<0.001), SF (p<0.001), and ODI (p<0.001). No significant differences were appreciated in treatment effect for primary outcome measures or self-rated progress across racial groups. Conclusion These results illustrate important differences between racial groups in terms of response to spine care. While there were quantitative differences between groups, these findings are not necessarily indications of healthcare disparities. PMID:22842539

  5. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  6. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  9. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Tests or procedures that examine the skin ... and is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. This summary section describes treatments that are ... want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. For some patients, taking part in a ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Kaposi Sarcoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. This summary section describes treatments that are ... want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. For some patients, taking part in a ...

  12. Ultramorphology of the root surface subsequent to hand-ultrasonic simultaneous instrumentation during non-surgical periodontal treatments. An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    D. ASPRIELLO, Simone; PIEMONTESE, Matteo; LEVRINI, Luca; SAURO, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the ultramorphology of the root surfaces induced by mechanical instrumentation performed using conventional curettes or piezoelectric scalers when used single-handedly or with a combined technique. Material and Methods Thirty single-rooted teeth were selected and divided into 3 groups: Group A, instrumentation with curettes; Group B instrumentation with titanium nitride coated periodontal tip mounted in a piezoelectric handpiece; Group C, combined technique with curette/ultrasonic piezoelectric instrumentation. The specimens were processed and analyzed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Differences between the different groups of instrumentation were determined using Pearson’s ? 2 with significance predetermined at ?=0.001. Results Periodontal scaling and root planing performed with curettes, ultrasonic or combined instrumentation induced several morphological changes on the root surface. The curettes produced a compact and thick multilayered smear layer, while the morphology of the root surfaces after ultrasonic scaler treatment appeared irregular with few grooves and a thin smear layer. The combination of curette/ultrasonic instrumentation showed exposed root dentin tubules with a surface morphology characterized by the presence of very few grooves and slender remnants of smear layer which only partially covered the root dentin. In some cases, it was also possible to observe areas with exposed collagen fibrils. Conclusion The curette-ultrasonic simultaneous instrumentation may combine the beneficial effects of each instrument in a single technique creating a root surface relatively free from the physical barrier of smear layer and dentin tubules orifices partial occlusion. PMID:21437474

  13. Treatment Options for Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... signs or symptoms of disease. The pituitary gland hormones control many other glands in the body. Hormones ... A clinical trial of stereotactic radiation surgery . Growth Hormone–Producing Pituitary Tumors Treatment may include the following: ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Pituitary Tumors)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... signs or symptoms of disease. The pituitary gland hormones control many other glands in the body. Hormones ... A clinical trial of stereotactic radiation surgery . Growth Hormone–Producing Pituitary Tumors Treatment may include the following: ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for rhabdomyosarcoma include having the following inherited diseases: Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Pleuropulmonary blastoma . Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). ... past illnesses and treatments will also be taken. X-ray : An x-ray of the organs and ...

  16. Treatment Options for Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for rhabdomyosarcoma include having the following inherited diseases: Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Pleuropulmonary blastoma . Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). ... past illnesses and treatments will also be taken. X-ray : An x-ray of the organs and ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Testicular Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and replacing blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ... body’s blood cells. See Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer for more information. Enlarge Stem cell transplant. (Step 1): Blood is taken from a ...

  19. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternative treatments now available. These alternative treatments include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), percutaneous cryoablation therapy (PCT), photodynamic therapy (PDT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), including stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy. We describe the established alternatives to surgical resection, their advantages and disadvantages, potential complications and efficacy. We then describe the optimal treatment approach for patients with early-stage NSCLC based on tumor operability, size and location. Finally, we discuss future directions and whether any alternative therapies will challenge surgical resection as the treatment of choice for patients with operable early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26380185

  20. Treatment Options for Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

  1. Chronic rhinosinusitis and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the epidemiology and various treatments in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). Evidence for short-term use of systemic corticosteroids has been shown to be favorable in CRSwNP, but still limited in CRSsNP. Topical corticosteroids improve symptom scores in both CRS subgroups. The role of microbes in CRS is still controversial. Culture-directed antibiotics are recommended for CRSsNP with exacerbation. Long-term use of low dosage antibiotics is recommended for CRSsNP for their anti-inflammatory effects. Other emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:23785241

  2. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  3. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  4. Treatment options in otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Ila; Datar, J

    2014-01-01

    Secretary Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the accumulation of mucus in the middle ear and sometimes in the mastoid air cell system. The main etiological factor is alteration in mucociliary system of middle ear secondary to ET malfunction which may be primary or secondary. OME is the cause of concern due to its occurance in paediatric age group, highest at 2 years of age, presenting as impairment of hearing leading to delayed speech and language development, poor academic performance and behavioral problems. In spite of this there are no confirmed guidelines of treatment to overcome. Many treatment options are available medical as well as surgical. Prospective study conducted to evaluate various treatment options revealed that auto inflation of ET is the main stay of treatment. If the ET malfunction is due to any reasons like adenoids, deviated nasal septum, hypertrophied turbinates or any other cause surgical intervention of the same gives 100% results. Medical management gives good results but recurrence is equally common. PMID:24533382

  5. [Options in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a result of insufficient liver function, with grave consequences for the patients. It is primarily caused by disturbed hepatic elimination of the neurotoxin, ammonia (NH3). Aside from dietetic measures, treatment rests on drugs designed to reduce the NH3 burden. The primary options, lactulose and the practically unabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin are suitable to decrease the bacterial NH3 generation in the intestine. Other antibiotics like neomycin at best have a place in acute treatment. L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA) and branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine) aim at supporting the scavenge of NH3 in glutamine; however, the final balance of this pathway is unfavourable. In addition, the constituents of LOLA enhance the capacity of the urea cycle and, ultimately, the elimination of NH3. As the evidence from available studies--is not unequivocal in each case, the current place of LOLA in treatment is that of an option for patients, who do not respond to standard therapy. PMID:26364405

  6. A safe treatment option for esophageal bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Sheraz; Shafique, Muhammad; Kjæstad, Erik; Thorsen, Yngve; Lie, Erik S.; Dahl, Vegard; Bakka, Njål; Røkke, Ola

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bezoar in the esophagus is a rare condition and associated with structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. Endoscopy is the main tool for diagnosis and treatment for bezoar in the esophagus. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we present a case where an endoscopic evacuation of an esophageal bezoar was unsuccessful. We treated the bezoar through a nasogastric tube using a cocktail composed of pancreatic enzymes dissolved in Coca-Cola. DISCUSSION Endoscopy is regarded as the mainstay for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bezoars. However, when this approach fails, other treatment options include dissolution therapy, and surgical exploration and removal of the bezoar. Surgical removal of an esophageal bezoar is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. We advocate that dissolving therapy should be the first choice of treatment when endoscopic evacuation is not possible. CONCLUSION This is the first report describing a successful treatment of an esophageal bezoar with a cocktail of Coca-Cola and pancreatic enzymes. It is an effective, inexpensive, and worldwide available treatment and should be considered when endoscopic evacuation fails. PMID:22609703

  7. Treatment options for polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Ahmed; Elnashar, Abubaker

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women. The clinical manifestation of PCOS varies from a mild menstrual disorder to severe disturbance of reproductive and metabolic functions. Management of women with PCOS depends on the symptoms. These could be ovulatory dysfunction-related infertility, menstrual disorders, or androgen-related symptoms. Weight loss improves the endocrine profile and increases the likelihood of ovulation and pregnancy. Normalization of menstrual cycles and ovulation could occur with modest weight loss as little as 5% of the initial weight. The treatment of obesity includes modifications in lifestyle (diet and exercise) and medical and surgical treatment. In PCOS, anovulation relates to low follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations and the arrest of antral follicle growth in the final stages of maturation. This can be treated with medications such as clomiphene citrate, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, metformin, glucocorticoids, or gonadotropins or surgically by laparoscopic ovarian drilling. In vitro fertilization will remain the last option to achieve pregnancy when others fail. Chronic anovulation over a long period of time is also associated with an increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma, which should be seriously investigated and treated. There are androgenic symptoms that will vary from patient to patient, such as hirsutism, acne, and/or alopecia. These are troublesome presentations to the patients and require adequate treatment. Alternative medicine has been emerging as one of the commonly practiced medicines for different health problems, including PCOS. This review underlines the contribution to the treatment of different symptoms. PMID:21339935

  8. Therapeutic options for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Richard C; Osuntokun, Olawale; Heinloth, Alexandra N; Corya, Sara A

    2010-02-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) presents major challenges for both patients and clinicians. There is no universally accepted definition of TRD, but results from the US National Institute of Mental Health's (NIMH) STAR*D (Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression) programme indicate that after the failure of two treatment trials, the chances of remission decrease significantly. Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for TRD may be considered when optimized (adequate dose and duration) therapy has not produced a successful outcome and a patient is classified as resistant to treatment. Nonpharmacological strategies include psychotherapy (often in conjunction with pharmacotherapy), electroconvulsive therapy and vagus nerve stimulation. The US FDA recently approved vagus nerve stimulation as adjunctive therapy (after four prior treatment failures); however, its benefits are seen only after prolonged (up to 1 year) use. Other nonpharmacological options, such as repetitive transcranial stimulation, deep brain stimulation or psychosurgery, remain experimental and are not widely available. Pharmacological treatments of TRD can be grouped in two main categories: 'switching' or 'combining'. In the first, treatment is switched within and between classes of compounds. The benefits of switching include avoidance of polypharmacy, a narrower range of treatment-emergent adverse events and lower costs. An inherent disadvantage of any switching strategy is that partial treatment responses resulting from the initial treatment might be lost by its discontinuation in favour of another medication trial. Monotherapy switches have also been shown to have limited effectiveness in achieving remission. The advantage of combination strategies is the potential to build upon achieved improvements; they are generally recommended if partial response was achieved with the current treatment trial. Various non-antidepressant augmenting agents, such as lithium and thyroid hormones, are well studied, although not commonly used. There is also evidence of efficacy and increasing use of atypical antipsychotics in combination with antidepressants, for example, olanzapine in combination with fluoxetine (OFC) or augmentation with aripiprazole. The disadvantages of a combination strategy include multiple medications, a broader range of treatment-emergent adverse events and higher costs. Several experimental pharmaceutical treatment alternatives for TRD are also being explored in combination with antidepressants or as monotherapy. These less studied alternative compounds include pindolol, inositol, CNS stimulants, hormones, herbal supplements, omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, folic acid, lamotrigine, modafinil, riluzole and topiramate. In summary, despite an increasing variety of choices for the treatment of TRD, this condition remains universally undefined and represents an area of unmet medical need. There are few known approved pharmacological agents for TRD (aripiprazole and OFC) and overall outcomes remain poor. This might be an indication that depression itself is a heterogeneous condition with a great diversity of pathologies, highlighting the need for careful evaluation of individuals with depressive symptoms who are unresponsive to treatment. Clearly, more research is needed to provide clinicians with better guidance in making those treatment decisions--especially in light of accumulating evidence that the longer patients are unsuccessfully treated, the worse their long-term prognosis tends to be. PMID:20088620

  9. [Health anxiety - increased knowledge and treatment options].

    PubMed

    Davidsdottir, Soley Drofn; Sveinsson, Olafur Arni

    2010-12-01

    Patients with hypochondriasis are preoccupied with the fear or belief that they have a serious, undiagnosed disease. This concern derives from misinterpretations of benign physical sensations, and persists despite appropriate reassurance to the contrary. They have, on average, disproportionately high rates of visits to physicians, specialty consultations, laboratory tests, and surgical procedures, as well as high health care costs. Despite this extensive medical attention, they find their care unsatisfactory, which is understandable, as convincing alternative explanations to their ailments are repeatedly delayed. Physicians, in turn, may feel discouraged and frustrated in relation to these individuals where their best efforts to help often prove ineffective or are even rejected. Recent scientific studies have shown that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are effective treatment options for health anxiety as demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:21149871

  10. Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Using Triangular Titanium Implants vs. Non-Surgical Management: Six-Month Outcomes from a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Whang, Peter; Polly, David; Frank, Clay; Lockstadt, Harry; Glaser, John; Limoni, Robert; Sembrano, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is a prevalent, underdiagnosed cause of lower back pain. SI joint fusion can relieve pain and improve quality of life in patients who have failed nonoperative care. To date, no study has concurrently compared surgical and non-surgical treatments for chronic SI joint dysfunction. Methods We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial of 148 subjects with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis or sacroiliac joint disruptions who were assigned to either minimally invasive SI joint fusion with triangular titanium implants (N=102) or non-surgical management (NSM, n=46). SI joint pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) were collected at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment commencement. Six-month success rates, defined as the proportion of treated subjects with a 20-mm improvement in SI joint pain in the absence of severe device-related or neurologic SI joint-related adverse events or surgical revision, were compared using Bayesian methods. Results Subjects (mean age 51, 70% women) were highly debilitated at baseline (mean SI joint VAS pain score 82, mean ODI score 62). Six-month follow-up was obtained in 97.3%. By 6 months, success rates were 81.4% in the surgical group vs. 23.9% in the NSM group (difference of 56.6%, 95% posterior credible interval 41.4-70.0%, posterior probability of superiority >0.999). Clinically important (?15 point) ODI improvement at 6 months occurred in 75% of surgery subjects vs. 27.3% of NSM subjects. At six months, quality of life improved more in the surgery group and satisfaction rates were high. The mean number of adverse events in the first six months was slightly higher in the surgical group compared to the non-surgical group (1.3 vs. 1.0 events per subject, p=0.1857). Conclusions Six-month follow-up from this level 1 study showed that minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular titanium implants was more effective than non-surgical management in relieving pain, improving function and improving quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis or SI joint disruptions. Clinical relevance Minimally invasive SI joint fusion is an acceptable option for patients with chronic SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis and sacroiliac joint disruptions unresponsive to non-surgical treatments. PMID:25785242

  11. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation. PMID:26297204

  12. Treatment options for advanced keratoconus: A review.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack S; van Dijk, Korine; Melles, Gerrit R J

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, the mainstay of treatment for advanced keratoconus (KC) has been either penetrating or deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (PK or DALK, respectively). The success of both operations, however, has been somewhat tempered by potential difficulties and complications, both intraoperatively and postoperatively. These include suture and wound-healing problems, progression of disease in the recipient rim, allograft reaction, and persistent irregular astigmatism. Taken together, these have been the inspiration for an ongoing search for less troublesome therapeutic alternatives. These include ultraviolet crosslinking and intracorneal ring segments, both of which were originally constrained in their indication exclusively to eyes with mild to moderate disease. More recently, Bowman layer transplantation has been introduced for reversing corneal ectasia in eyes with advanced KC, re-enabling comfortable contact lens wear and permitting PK and DALK to be postponed or avoided entirely. We offer a summary of the current and emerging treatment options for advanced KC, aiming to provide the corneal specialist useful information in selecting the optimal therapy for individual patients. PMID:26077628

  13. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  15. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  17. College Student Receptiveness to Various Alcohol Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epler, Amee J.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Loomis, Tiffany B.; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Heavy episodic drinking remains a significant problem on college campuses. Although most interventions for college students are behavioral, pharmacological treatments, such as naltrexone, could provide additional options. Participants: The authors evaluated receptivity to various alcohol treatment options in a general population of…

  18. Treatment Option Overview (AIDS Related-Lymphoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Key Points AIDS-related lymphoma is ...

  19. Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Key Points AIDS-related lymphoma is ...

  20. Treatment Options for Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Professional Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Key Points Extragonadal germ cell tumors form ...

  2. Understanding Bone Marrow Transplantation as a Treatment Option

    MedlinePLUS

    ... icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Understanding Transplantation as a Treatment Option When you are diagnosed with a ... Transplant Talking with Your Doctor Diseases Treatable with a Bone Marrow Transplant or Cord Blood Transplant A ...

  3. What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Publications What treatment options are available for male infertility? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... deliver a live-born infant, in most cases, infertility has no other outward symptoms. The evaluation of ...

  4. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Cancer.gov

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... followed by surgery. Bone and Cartilage Tumors Extraskeletal chondrosarcoma Treatment of extraskeletal chondrosarcoma may include the following: ... when possible, chemotherapy , and radiation therapy . Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma Treatment of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma may include the ...

  6. Treatment Options for Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... followed by surgery. Bone and Cartilage Tumors Extraskeletal chondrosarcoma Treatment of extraskeletal chondrosarcoma may include the following: ... when possible, chemotherapy , and radiation therapy . Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma Treatment of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma may include the ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Primary Refractory/Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children and Adolescents Primary refractory Hodgkin lymphoma is lymphoma that continues ... treated with an adult treatment regimen . Children and adolescents may have treatment-related side effects that appear ...

  8. Treatment Options for Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Primary Refractory/Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children and Adolescents Primary refractory Hodgkin lymphoma is lymphoma that continues ... treated with an adult treatment regimen . Children and adolescents may have treatment-related side effects that appear ...

  9. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. This summary section describes treatments that are ... want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. For some patients, taking part in a ...

  10. Treatment options expanding for advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John A

    2015-05-01

    Immunotherapies and BRAF and MEK inhibitors have dramatically improved outcomes in advanced melanoma. The availability of these novel approaches has necessitated changes to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). The NCCN Guidelines feature algorithms that aid clinicians in selecting initial therapy, which now includes anti-programmed death protein receptor-1 PD-1 inhibitors among the recommended systemic therapy options for patients with metastatic or unresectable disease. PMID:25995427

  11. Non-pharmacological and non-surgical interventions for tremor: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Rory J; Kini, Manohar U

    2011-08-01

    Tremor is a frequent disabling consequence of many neurological conditions. We performed a search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library to identify all primary research studies published up to November 2010 which investigated non-pharmacological and non-surgical treatments for tremor in humans. Neuromuscular physiotherapy, strength training and functional electrical stimulation show promise in their applicability and adaptability. Limb cooling may not be feasible for continuous management, but may be appropriate for specific tasks. Tremor-suppressing orthoses based on viscous materials, weighted splints and vibration therapies need further evaluation especially in the domiciliary setting and applied to improving personal activities of daily living. The evidence base for many rehabilitation interventions in tremor is poor. Future research should focus on high quality randomized controlled trials of non-pharmacological and non-surgical interventions which show promise. PMID:21632272

  12. Alcohol use disorder: pathophysiology, effects, and pharmacologic options for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wackernah, Robin C; Minnick, Matthew J; Clapp, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) continue to be a concerning health issue worldwide. Harmful alcohol use leads to 2.5 million deaths annually worldwide. Multiple options exist for the management of dependence on alcohol, not all of which are approved by drug-regulating agencies. Current practice in treating AUD does not reflect the diversity of pharmacologic options that have potential to provide benefit, and guidance for clinicians is limited. Few medications are approved for treatment of AUD, and these have exhibited small and/or inconsistent effects in broad patient populations with diverse drinking patterns. The need for continued research into the treatment of this disease is evident in order to provide patients with more specific and effective options. This review describes the neurobiological mechanisms of AUD that are amenable to treatment and drug therapies that target pathophysiological conditions of AUD to reduce drinking. In addition, current literature on pharmacologic (both approved and non-approved) treatment options for AUD offered in the United States and elsewhere are reviewed. The aim is to inform clinicians regarding the options for alcohol abuse treatment, keeping in mind that not all treatments are completely successful in reducing craving or heavy drinking or increasing abstinence. PMID:24648792

  13. Acute intermittent porphyria: Diagnostic dilemma and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Mohan Deep; Hazarika, Nita; Saraswat, Namita; Sood, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) presents with diverse group of symptoms making its early diagnosis difficult. Delaying diagnosis and treatment of AIP can be fatal or can cause long term or permanent neurological damage. We present here a case report of AIP where the diagnosis was missed. The diversity of symptoms and details concerning the treatment options for AIP are discussed. PMID:26330726

  14. Treatment Options for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... local and regional agencies that have information on finances, getting to and from treatment, receiving care at ... Please credit the National Cancer Institute as the source. Any graphics may be owned by the artist ...

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDQ summary on Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment . Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major risk factor for ... be at risk. Infection of the cervix with human papillomavirus (HPV) is almost always the cause of cervical ...

  20. Treatment Options for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be indolent or aggressive. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma grows and spreads at different ... according to whether the cancer is indolent or aggressive and whether affected lymph nodes are next to ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bourneville disease). Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; Gardner syndrome). Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal ... illnesses and treatments will also be taken. Chest x-ray : An x-ray of the organs and ...

  2. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bourneville disease). Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; Gardner syndrome). Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal ... illnesses and treatments will also be taken. Chest x-ray : An x-ray of the organs and ...

  3. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood vessel in the chest. Other drug therapy Arsenic trioxide and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) are ... Intrathecal chemotherapy . All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood vessel in the chest. Other drug therapy Arsenic trioxide and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) are ... Intrathecal chemotherapy . All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ...

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  6. Non-Surgical Interventions for Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    P?aszewski, Maciej; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis remain highly controversial. Despite the publication of numerous reviews no explicit methodological evaluation of papers labeled as, or having a layout of, a systematic review, addressing this subject matter, is available. Objectives Analysis and comparison of the content, methodology, and evidence-base from systematic reviews regarding non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. Design Systematic overview of systematic reviews. Methods Articles meeting the minimal criteria for a systematic review, regarding any non-surgical intervention for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, with any outcomes measured, were included. Multiple general and systematic review specific databases, guideline registries, reference lists and websites of institutions were searched. The AMSTAR tool was used to critically appraise the methodology, and the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and the Joanna Briggs Institute’s hierarchies were applied to analyze the levels of evidence from included reviews. Results From 469 citations, twenty one papers were included for analysis. Five reviews assessed the effectiveness of scoliosis-specific exercise treatments, four assessed manual therapies, five evaluated bracing, four assessed different combinations of interventions, and one evaluated usual physical activity. Two reviews addressed the adverse effects of bracing. Two papers were high quality Cochrane reviews, Three were of moderate, and the remaining sixteen were of low or very low methodological quality. The level of evidence of these reviews ranged from 1 or 1+ to 4, and in some reviews, due to their low methodological quality and/or poor reporting, this could not be established. Conclusions Higher quality reviews indicate that generally there is insufficient evidence to make a judgment on whether non-surgical interventions in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are effective. Papers labeled as systematic reviews need to be considered in terms of their methodological rigor; otherwise they may be mistakenly regarded as high quality sources of evidence. Protocol registry number CRD42013003538, PROSPERO PMID:25353954

  7. Treatment options for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ciafaloni, Emma; Moxley, Richard T

    2008-03-01

    The main goal in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is to maintain ambulation for as long as possible and to anticipate and manage the associated complications, such as joint contractures, scoliosis, cardiomyopathy, respiratory insufficiency, and weight gain. Cognitive and behavioral symptoms occur in about one third of patients, and it is important to recognize and manage them promptly, developing an individualized plan at school and at home to maximize the patient's cognitive abilities. In the late phase of the disease, palliative care is of paramount importance. Corticosteroid therapy (prednisone and deflazacort) is the only effective pharmacologic treatment for DMD. Daily prednisone treatment increases muscle strength and function, improves pulmonary function, and significantly slows the progression of weakness. Deflazacort has a similar effect on muscle strength, but it is not available in the United States. Treatment with corticosteroid should be offered to all patients with DMD, but the beneficial effects and potential adverse effects should be fully discussed before treatment begins. The optimal dose of prednisone is 0.75 mg/kg per day, up to a maximum of 40 mg/d. If adverse effects occur, a decrease in dosage is appropriate. Monitoring of muscle function and adverse effects by a neurologist or neuromuscular specialist is strongly recommended. Physical and occupational therapists should be involved early in the treatment of patients with DMD to develop a program that includes heel cord stretching and exercise. In the later phases, these therapists can recommend adaptive equipment and maximize independence. Orthopedic consultation is important in monitoring and managing scoliosis and joint contractures in the nonambulatory phase of the disease. Pulmonary evaluation for ventilatory care is important; pulmonary consultation is essential when vital capacity declines. The use of assistive cough devices, nasal bilevel positive airway pressure, and tracheostomy must be discussed with patients and their families. For all patients with DMD, particularly those receiving prednisone, consultation with a dietitian is very helpful to control weight and maintain a healthy diet. PMID:18334131

  8. Kidney cancer: current and novel treatment options.

    PubMed

    Jonasch, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Antiangiogenic therapies remain the standard of care in the front-line setting for renal cell carcinoma, although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) blockade is not sufficient, and many patients do not respond to such treatment. With a host of approved agents, questions arise as to how best to use them in both initial and secondary treatments. Optimal sequences are currently being tested in various clinical trials. Because approximately 20% of patients exhibiting primary resistance to these anti-VEGF therapies, new therapies are needed. Novel therapies such as MET and AXL inhibitors as well as checkpoint antibodies hold promise for the future. PMID:25995429

  9. 26 CFR 1.1504-4 - Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other...1.1504-4 Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other...regarding the circumstances in which warrants, options, obligations convertible into...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1504-4 - Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other...1.1504-4 Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other...regarding the circumstances in which warrants, options, obligations convertible into...

  11. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  12. Treatment Options by Stage (Testicular Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and replacing blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ... body’s blood cells. See Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer for more information. Enlarge Stem cell transplant. (Step 1): Blood is taken from a ...

  13. Ethics panel: HIV treatment options not available to all.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    A 44-member panel including physicians, medical ethicists, and AIDS advocacy group members, sponsored by the State of New York, charged that many people in the State are not being given all available anti-HIV treatment options. Some doctors would advise against certain treatments because they felt some people would not adhere to the regimen. These people include immigrants, prisoners, disabled and homeless. The panel recommended that medical providers learn about current treatments and help patients adhere to them. PMID:11367186

  14. Perinatal depression: treatment options and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Pearlstein, Teri

    2008-07-01

    The treatment of depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period raises unique concerns about safety for the developing fetus and the infant. An increasing number of studies suggest adverse effects from untreated stress, anxiety and depression as well as adverse effects from antidepressant and other psychotropic medications. Even when studies suggest a lack of short-term adverse effects with some medications, the paucity of systematic longitudinal follow-up studies investigating the development of children exposed to medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes apprehension. This review's objective is to highlight what is currently known about the negative effects of untreated disease and exposure to psychotropic medication, the treatment dilemmas confronting women with perinatal depression and issues that future studies should address so that a woman with perinatal depression can make an optimally informed decision. PMID:18592032

  15. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure completion of adequate therapy will be necessary to exploit fully the potential of the newer regimens to eliminate tuberculosis. PMID:22287857

  16. Acquired hemophilia A: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Janbain, Maissaa; Leissinger, Cindy A; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare autoimmune disorder caused by an autoantibody (inhibitor) to factor VIII (FVIII) that interferes with its coagulant function and predisposes to severe, potentially life-threatening hemorrhage. Disease management focuses on controlling bleeding, primarily with the use of bypassing therapy and recombinant porcine FVIII, and permanently eradicating the autoantibody using various immunosuppressants. Treatment challenges include delayed diagnosis, difficulty achieving hemostasis and durable remissions, and complications associated with the use of hemostatic and immunosuppressive therapy in a primarily older patient population. PMID:26056504

  17. Acquired hemophilia A: emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Janbain, Maissaa; Leissinger, Cindy A; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare autoimmune disorder caused by an autoantibody (inhibitor) to factor VIII (FVIII) that interferes with its coagulant function and predisposes to severe, potentially life-threatening hemorrhage. Disease management focuses on controlling bleeding, primarily with the use of bypassing therapy and recombinant porcine FVIII, and permanently eradicating the autoantibody using various immunosuppressants. Treatment challenges include delayed diagnosis, difficulty achieving hemostasis and durable remissions, and complications associated with the use of hemostatic and immunosuppressive therapy in a primarily older patient population. PMID:26056504

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  19. Treatment options in Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    PubMed

    Randerath, Winfried J

    2010-12-01

    About half of the patients suffering from heart failure present with sleep-disordered breathing. In most cases obstructive and central breathing disturbances (including Cheyne-Stokes respiration [CSR]) coexist. CSR is defined by a waxing and waning pattern of the tidal volume. While its pathophysiology has not been elucidated completely, increased ventilatory sensitivity for CO(2) and therefore an imbalance of the respiratory drive and effort, a chronic hyperventilatory state, and changes of the apnoeic threshold are considered to play a relevant role. However, CSR in heart failure impairs survival and quality of life of the patients and is therefore a major challenge of respiratory sleep medicine. If CSR persists despite optimal medical and interventional therapy of the underlying cardiac disorder, oxygen supply, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and bilevel pressure are often trialled. However, there is insufficient evidence to recommend oxygen or bilevel treatment. CPAP has proven to improve left ventricular function. In addition, retrospective analyses suggested a reduction of mortality under CPAP in heart failure patients with CSR. However, these findings could not be reproduced in the prospective controlled CanPAP trial. More recently, adaptive servoventilation (ASV) has been introduced for treatment of CSR or coexisting sleep-related breathing disorders. ASV devices aim at counterbalancing the ventilatory overshoot and undershoot by applying variable pressure support with higher tidal volume (TV) during hypoventilation and reduced TV during hyperventilation. ASV has proven to be superior to CPAP but the long-term efficacy and the influences on cardiac parameters and survival are still under investigation. PMID:20713506

  20. Pretibial myxedema: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Fatourechi, Vahab

    2005-01-01

    Pretibial myxedema or localized myxedema or thyroid dermopathy is an autoimmune manifestation of Graves' disease. It also occasionally occurs in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Lesions of thyroid dermopathy are usually asymptomatic and have only cosmetic importance. Advanced forms of dermopathy are associated with elephantiasis or thyroid acropachy. Almost all cases of thyroid dermopathy are associated with relatively severe ophthalmopathy. Usually ophthalmopathy appears first and dermopathy much later. All patients with localized myxedema have high serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies, indicating the severity of the autoimmune condition. Occurrence of thyroid dermopathy in areas other than pretibial skin indicates a systemic process. Similar to Graves' ophthalmopathy, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors in the connective tissue may be the antigen responsible for the immune process. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms are involved in the stimulation of fibroblasts and the production of large amounts of glycosaminoglycans. Localization in the pretibial area relates to mechanical factors and dependent position. Diagnosis of thyroid dermopathy is based on signs and typical pretibial skin lesions in association with a history of Graves' hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy. In some cases, skin biopsy is needed for confirmation. The lesions are usually mild and are overshadowed by more symptomatic ophthalmopathy. Most cases of thyroid dermopathy do not require any therapy. In mildly severe symptomatic cases and when there is cosmetic concern, topical corticosteroids applied under occlusive dressing are beneficial. In more severe cases, systemic immunomodulation may be necessary; however, conclusive evidence for long-term efficacy of these modalities is lacking. When significant edema and elephantiasis are present, local compressive therapy may have added benefit. In mild cases that do not require treatment, 50% of patients achieve complete remission after several years. Severe cases that receive topical corticosteroids or other therapies do not have a better outcome than untreated milder cases. Current treatment modalities for thyroid dermopathy and acropachy are at best palliative. Better and safer means of immunomodulation are needed. PMID:16252929

  1. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Haley J.; Pogue, Jason M.; Kaye, Keith S.; LaPlante, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of currently available treatment options for infections due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is an emerging and serious global public health threat. Carbapenems have been used as the “last-line” treatment for infections caused by resistant Enterobacteriaceae, including those producing extended spectrum ß-lactamases. However, Enterobacteriaceae that produce carbapenemases, which are enzymes that deactivate carbapenems and most other ß-lactam antibiotics, have emerged and are increasingly being reported worldwide. Despite this increasing burden, the most optimal treatment for CRE infections is largely unknown. For the few remaining available treatment options, there are limited efficacy data to support their role in therapy. Nevertheless, current treatment options include the use of older agents, such as polymyxins, fosfomycin, and aminoglycosides, which have been rarely used due to efficacy and/or toxicity concerns. Optimization of dosing regimens and combination therapy are additional treatment strategies being explored. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections are associated with poor outcomes and high mortality. Continued research is critically needed to determine the most appropriate treatment. PMID:26125030

  2. Naegleria fowleri: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  3. Update on Treatment Options for Gonococcal Infections.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Jason W; Mahoney, Monica V; Mandal, Sana; Lawrence, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in the United States has grown over the past decade. The most recent data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that reported cases have increased by almost 10% over the last 5 years. In conjunction with this rise, the presence of multidrug-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae has also emerged. The 2015 CDC guidelines recommend dual therapy with intramuscular ceftriaxone and oral azithromycin as first-line treatment, although components of this regimen are met with a high level of resistance. Although ceftriaxone resistance has not yet been reported in the United States, it is only a matter of time before such isolates are detected, thus ushering in a new era of difficult-to-manage uncomplicated gonococcal infection. The potential public health crisis and patient-associated sequelae (e.g., pelvic inflammatory disease, epididymitis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection) linked with untreatable gonorrhea are cause for great concern. To try to stem this tide, a number of new agents targeted against N. gonorrhoeae are being investigated in clinical trials. In this article, we review the various agents, both currently available and under clinical investigation, and provide recommendations for the management of gonococcal infections. PMID:26343813

  4. [Diagnosis and treatment options in vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Strupp, M; Dieterich, M; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T

    2015-10-01

    The key to diagnosing vertigo and balance disorders is systematic analysis of case history with clinical examination of the vestibular, oculomotor, and cerebral systems in particular. Important criteria for differentiating between the various vertigo syndromes are 1) the time course of symptoms, 2) the type of symptoms, 3) modulating factors, and 4) associated symptoms. For clinical examination of the vestibular system, six important tests are available: assessment of spontaneous nystagmus, head impulse test, dynamic visual acuity, subjective visual verticality, positioning manoeuvre, and the Romberg test/gait analysis with eyes open and closed. On the basis of five clinical signs (vertical divergence, central fixation nystagmus, gaze-evoked nystagmus, saccades, normal head impulse test), the clinical examination is able to differentiate between acute central and peripheral vestibular syndromes with a sensitivity and specificity of over 90%. The most relevant laboratory examinations are caloric irrigation and the video head-impulse test for canal function and the vestibular evoked myogenic potentials for otolith function. Finally, treatment is based upon four therapeutic principles: physiotherapy, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and in rare cases, surgery. PMID:26440631

  5. Current treatment options in smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Crain, Dominique; Bhat, Abid

    2010-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for premature mortality. Many common and serious diseases, including coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, stroke, and cancer, are strongly linked to cigarette smoking. Smoking cessation is difficult due to nicotine addiction and withdrawal symptoms. Comprehensive programs for tobacco control can substantially reduce the frequency of tobacco use. Physicians can improve screening and increase cessation rates by asking patients about tobacco use at every office visit. The spectrum of available smoking cessation interventions ranges from simple advice to intensive behavioral support and pharmacological treatment. Medications currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for smoking cessation include nicotine replacement therapy (patch, gum, lozenge, inhaler, and nasal spray), bupropion, and varenicline. Nortriptyline and clonidine have been used in patients who do not tolerate first-line agents. New drug therapies, such as nicotine vaccines, are being developed. The US Public Health Service Guideline, published in 2008, recommends a combination of behavioral support and pharmacologic therapy. In summary, smoking cessation should be based on a patient's coexisting medical conditions, level of smoking, compliance, previous experience with cessation agents, and the cost of therapy. PMID:20469625

  6. Birdshot uveitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Menezo, Victor; Taylor, Simon RJ

    2014-01-01

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy is a relatively uncommon subtype of idiopathic posterior uveitis with distinct clinical characteristics and a strong genetic association with the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-A29 allele. The diagnosis remains clinical and is based on the presence of typical clinical features, including multiple, distinctive, hypopigmented choroidal lesions throughout the fundus. The long-term visual prognosis of this disorder, however, remains guarded – central visual acuity can be preserved until late in the disease and it is not uncommon for patients to receive inadequate immunosuppressive treatment, leading to a poor long-term outcome in which peripheral retinal damage eventually leads to visual deterioration. Birdshot chorioretinopathy has proven a particularly attractive area of study within the field of uveitis, as it is a relatively easily defined disease with an associated human leukocyte antigen haplotype. Despite this, however, the immune mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis remain unclear, and some patients continue to lose retinal function despite therapy with corticosteroids and conventional immunosuppressive agents. Laboratory research continues to investigate the underlying mechanisms of disease, and clinical research is now being driven to improve the phenotyping and monitoring of this condition as, in the era of so-called personalized medicine, it is becoming increasingly important to identify patients at risk of visual loss early so that they can be treated more aggressively with targeted therapies such as the newer biological agents. This approach requires the formation of collaborative groups, as the relative rarity of the condition makes it difficult for one center to accumulate enough patients for worthwhile studies. Nevertheless, results obtained with newer therapies, such as biological agents directed against particular cytokines or cell-surface receptors, demonstrate ever improving control of the inflammation in refractory cases, providing hope that the outlook for visual function in this condition can only improve. PMID:24379650

  7. Hypercalcemia of malignancy and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Sternlicht, Hillel; Glezerman, Ilya G

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy affects up to one in five cancer patients during the course of their disease. It is associated with both liquid malignancies, commonly multiple myeloma, leukemia, and non-Hodgkins lymphoma and solid cancers, particularly breast and renal carcinomas as well as squamous cell carcinomas of any organ. The clinical manifestations of hypercalcemia are generally constitutional in nature and not specific to the inciting malignancy. Such physical manifestations can range from malaise to lethargy and confusion. Constipation and anorexia are common. Acute kidney injury is likely the most frequently encountered manifestation of end organ damage. Symptomatology is closely linked to both the absolute elevation of serum calcium levels and the rapidity of calcium rise. The majority of cases are humoral in etiology and related to parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Approximately 20% of cases are the result of direct bone metastasis with extra-renal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) and ectopic parathyroid hormone production likely accounting for less than 1% of cases. The diagnosis of hypercalcemia of malignancy is confirmed either by an elevated PTHrP or by an evidence of bone metastasis in the appropriate clinical setting. Treatment is predicated on the patient’s symptoms and absolute serum calcium level. Interventions are aimed at lowering the serum calcium concentration by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing urinary calcium excretion, the former accomplished via bisphosphonate therapy and the latter with aggressive hydration. Novel therapies for refractory disease include denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B ligand, and the calcimimetic cinacalcet. Finally, anti-PTHrP antibodies have been successfully deployed in animal models of disease. Despite the efficacy of the above therapies, hypercalcemia of malignancy portends an ominous prognosis, indicating advanced and often refractory cancer with survival on the order of months. PMID:26675713

  8. Update on treatment options for spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ulu-Kilic, A; Karakas, A; Erdem, H; Turker, T; Inal, A S; Ak, O; Turan, H; Kazak, E; Inan, A; Duygu, F; Demiraslan, H; Kader, C; Sener, A; Dayan, S; Deveci, O; Tekin, R; Saltoglu, N; Ayd?n, M; Horasan, E S; Gul, H C; Ceylan, B; Kadanal?, A; Karabay, O; Karagoz, G; Kayabas, U; Turhan, V; Engin, D; Gulsun, S; Elald?, N; Alabay, S

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of antibiotic regimens and optimal duration of therapy in complicated and uncomplicated forms of spinal brucellosis. This is a multicentre, retrospective and comparative study involving a total of 293 patients with spinal brucellosis from 19 health institutions. Comparison of complicated and uncomplicated spinal brucellosis was statistically analysed. Complicated spinal brucellosis was diagnosed in 78 (26.6%) of our patients. Clinical presentation was found to be significantly more acute, with fever and weight loss, in patients in the complicated group. They had significantly higher leukocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C-reactive protein levels, and lower haemoglobulin levels. The involvement of the thoracic spine was significantly more frequent in complicated cases. Spondylodiscitis was complicated, with paravertebral abscess in 38 (13.0%), prevertebral abscess in 13 (4.4%), epidural abscess in 30 (10.2%), psoas abscess in 10 (3.4%) and radiculitis in 8 (2.7%) patients. The five major combination regimens were: doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and gentamicin 5 mg/kg; doxycycline 200 mg/day and rifampicin 600 mg/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; and doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1 g/day. There were no significant therapeutic differences between these antibiotic groups; the results were similar regarding the complicated and uncomplicated groups. Patients were mostly treated with doxycycline and rifampicin with or without an aminoglycoside. In the former subgroup, complicated cases received antibiotics for a longer duration than uncomplicated cases. Early recognition of complicated cases is critical in preventing devastating complications. Antimicrobial treatment should be prolonged in complicated spinal brucellosis in particular. PMID:24118178

  9. www.yalecancercenter.org Treatment Options for Liver

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Treatment Options for Liver Cancer Guest Expert: Wasif Saif, MD Associate for this evenings show is liver cancer. Could you start off by telling us what liver cancer is? Saif This is a great time to talk about liver cancer because after the last two decades we are now able to develop new drugs

  10. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration – an Appraisal of the Current Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    CINTEZA, Dragos; PERSINARU, Iulia; MACIUCEANU ZARNESCU, Bogdan Mircea; IONESCU, Dan; LASCAR, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades significant progress was made in the understanding of the physiopathology of the peripheral nerve regeneration. Although the evolution of therapy is not as spectacular, a series of new treatment solutions were developed. The gold standard in therapy remains the use of autografts. We present the current concepts and therapeutic options available. PMID:26225155

  11. Non-surgical stem cell delivery strategies and in vivo cell tracking to injured myocardium.

    PubMed

    van der Spoel, Tycho I G; Lee, Joe Chun-Tsu; Vrijsen, Krijn; Sluijter, Joost P G; Cramer, Maarten Jan M; Doevendans, Pieter A; van Belle, Eric; Chamuleau, Steven A J

    2011-03-01

    Heart failure is a major economic and public health problem. Despite the recent advances in drug therapy and coronary revascularization, the lost cardiomyocytes due to necrosis and apoptosis are not replaced by new myocardial tissue. Cell therapy is an interesting therapeutic option as it potentially improves contractility and restores regional ventricular function. Early clinical data demonstrated that cell transplantation, mainly delivered through non-surgical methods, is safe and feasible. However, several important issues need to be elucidated. This includes, next to determining the best cell type, the optimal delivery strategy, the biodistribution and the survival of implanted stem cells after transplantation. In this view, pre-clinical animal experiments are indispensable. Reporter genes, magnetic or radioactive labeling of stem cells have been developed to observe the fate and the distribution of transplanted cells using non-invasive imaging techniques. Several studies have demonstrated that these direct and non-direct labeling techniques may become an important tool in cell therapy. Integration of cell delivery and cell tracking will probably be a key for the success of cell therapy in patients. This review will provide a comprehensive overview on the various cell tracking and non-surgical cell delivery techniques, which are highly important in view of experimental and clinical studies. PMID:20577813

  12. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  13. Lack of tolerable treatment options for patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie; Eramo, Anna; Francois, Clement; Duffy, Ruth; Legacy, Susan N; Offord, Steve J; Krasa, Holly B; Johnston, Stephen S; Guiraud-Diawara, Alice; Kamat, Siddhesh A; Rohman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Atypical antipsychotics (AAs), an effective treatment for schizophrenia, have a range of pharmacologic properties leading to differences in tolerability as well as heterogeneity in treatment response. Individual patient characteristics must be considered when making treatment choices, especially from an adverse event (AE) or tolerability perspective. Despite the availability of numerous AAs, after appraising patient characteristics at the time of treatment selection, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options. Patients and methods AE risk factors, defined as having either a prior history of an AE or a risk factor for that AE, were determined for Medicaid-insured and Commercially insured patients using database analysis. Patients receiving AA treatment between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 defined the index date of first observed AA prescription during this period. Nine AAs were evaluated for association with AE risk factors as informed by drug prescribing information from the different manufacturers and published meta-analyses. The proportion of patients with pre-index AE risk factors prescribed an AA associated with that risk factor was then determined. Results A high proportion of patients (>80%) were prescribed an AA associated with extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia despite experiencing extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia prior to AA treatment initiation. Similar trends were observed among patients with diabetes (>60%) and obesity (>40%). From the nine treatment options available, the number of optimal choices for individual patient segments were limited based on their prior history, including those with cardiometabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities (four); experiencing prolactin elevation-related problems (seven); needing to avoid excessive sedation (four); or at risk of extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia (two). Options were then further restricted among patients in more than one segment when multiple pre-index AE risk factors were combined. Conclusion When combining patient risk profile with antipsychotic AE profile, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options for individual patients, despite the availability of many AAs, suggesting a need for additional treatment options with better tolerability and without compromising efficacy. PMID:26719694

  14. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  15. Association of Preexisting Symptoms with Treatment Decisions among Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zeliadt, Steven B.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Potosky, Arnold L.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Blough, David K.; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hamilton, Ann S.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Penson, David F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The choice between surgical versus non-surgical treatment options is a fundamental decision for men with local stage prostate cancer because of differences in risks of genitourinary side effects among available treatments. Objectives We assessed whether preexisting genitourinary symptoms at the time of diagnosis influenced men’s preferences for surgery versus other management options. Methods We recruited 593 patients with newly diagnosed local stage prostate cancer prior to initiating treatment from an integrated health care system, an academic urology center, and community urology clinics. Using logistic regression we compared whether men had a preference for non-surgical options or only preferred surgery. Results Nearly 60% indicated they were considering non-surgical options. Age and clinical characteristics but not preexisting genitourinary symptoms influenced the decision between preferences for surgical or non-surgical options. A total of 62% of men reported side effects as a main factor in their treatment decision. Men with more aggressive tumor types were less likely to consider side effects, however, men who reported poor ability to have an erection were more likely to consider side effects (p<0.001). Conclusion Sexual dysfunction at time of diagnosis, but not other genitourinary symptoms, is associated with men considering treatment-related side effects when considering surgery versus other options. Men who are not experiencing sexual dysfunction at diagnosis may discount the risks of side effects in the decision making process. PMID:20119493

  16. Parents’ Online Portrayals of Pediatric Treatment and Research Options

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Rebecca; Henderson, Gail E.; Churchill, Larry R.; King, Nancy M. P.; Rothschild, Barbra B.; Lohser, Sara; Davis, Arlene M.

    2012-01-01

    Parents of seriously ill children face difficult decisions when standard therapies are limited or ineffective. In their search for information, they may turn to websites created by other parents facing similar experiences. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of 21 websites created by families with children affected by cancer or genetic disease, two serious conditions with a range of treatment and clinical trial options. Our research questions address how parent authors portray serious pediatric illness, available options, parties to decision making, and sources of influence. In addition, we examine what these sites reveal about family vulnerability to various risks, particularly the risk of misunderstanding the distinction between standard treatment and research and the risk of overestimating the likely benefits of research participation, as well as whether vulnerability varies by type of condition. Our results demonstrate typically favorable views on research, but with inadequate distinctions between research and treatment and a complex set of trade-offs in consideration of research risks and potential benefits. While portraits of vulnerability emerge for both parents and children, so do portraits of strength and resilience. As a result, parents describe frustration with both under- and over-protection from research participation. Our discussion of these findings clarifies the potential for parent-authored websites to inform and influence families considering research and treatment options for their seriously ill children. PMID:19754237

  17. Treatment options for active removal of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, G J J; De Laet, K; Wijn, R P W F; Wijn, P F F

    2012-04-01

    This study provides an update on the technological aspects of the methods for active removal of renal stones. Currently, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureteroscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) are the available options. Findings are based upon recent literature from the PubMed database and the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. ESWL remains the option of choice for stones with diameter ? 20 mm due to its low invasive character, whereas PCNL is the standard for stones with diameter > 20 mm because of its high stone-free rates. Although ESWL treatment has become more patient friendly, its efficacy has not improved. On the other hand, URS has gained renewed interest due to new technological developments and improved treatment methods. PMID:22384986

  18. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Endovascular Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Raghuram; Scott, Paul M.; Robinson, Graham J.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2011-02-15

    Carotid stump syndrome is one of the recognised causes of recurrent ipsilateral cerebrovascular events after occlusion of the internal carotid artery. It is believed that microemboli arising from the stump of the occluded internal carotid artery or the ipsilateral external carotid artery can pass into the middle cerebral artery circulation as a result of patent external carotid-internal carotid anastomotic channels. Different pathophysiologic causes of this syndrome and endovascular options for treatment are discussed.

  19. Helping Women Understand Treatment Options for Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Parks, Diane M; Levine, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) is a common and progressive medical condition in postmenopausal women. The REVIVE (REal Women's VIews of Treatment Options for Menopausal Vaginal ChangEs) survey assessed knowledge about VVA and its impact in 3,046 postmenopausal U.S. women, and recorded women's attitudes about their interactions with health care providers and about available treatments. REVIVE identified poor disease awareness and understanding among women, failure of health care professionals to evaluate women for VVA signs and symptoms, low treatment rates and concerns about the safety and efficacy of available therapies. Strategies to address these needs include proactive screening, education for women and clinicians about VVA and recommendations for treatment and follow-up. PMID:26264795

  20. Options and opportunities for clinical management and treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Udita; Gupta, Madhu; Dube, Devyani; Vyas, Suresh P

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a complex, multifactorial disease that appears to be influenced by immune-mediated components. For many years the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been discordant; the clinical picture suggested that the psoriasis was secondary to abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, but later the role of the T cell was revealed. A variety of treatment options range from topical agents (e.g., coal tar, dithranol, and emollients for milder forms) to systemic agents (i.e., methotrexate or cyclosporin), and phototherapy. Recently, biologics have been added to this list that target particular steps in the immune or inflammatory pathways. Various nanocarriers (e.g., liposomes, niosomes, and microemulsions) have been successfully exploited for the delivery of several antipsoriatic drugs. This review provides insight into various psoriasis treatment strategies-from conventional to novel-currently in use or in development as well as the novel targets that have been explored and/or investigated for anti-psoriatic therapy. The pathogenesis of psoriasis and some of the topical, systemic biological, and novel approaches currently in use or in development are reviewed here. The pros and cons of each treatment strategy are presented, as are some of the animal models used to study features reminiscent of psoriasis. This information can be used to better the understanding of treatment options for this disease. PMID:23510110

  1. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate–guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has yet to be proven in clinical trials. PMID:25733916

  2. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has yet to be proven in clinical trials. PMID:25733916

  3. Clinical outcomes in surgical and non-surgical management of hepatic portal venous gas

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Soo-Kyung; Park, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is a rare condition, with poor prognosis and a mortality rate of up to 75%. Indications for surgical and non-surgical management of HPVG including associated complications and mortality remain to be clarified. Methods From January 2008 to December 2014, 18 patients with HPVG diagnosed through abdominal computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively identified. Clinical symptoms, laboratory data, underlying diseases, treatment, and mortality rate were analyzed. Patients were classified into 2 groups: surgical management recommended (SR, n=10) and conservative management (CM, n=8). The SR group was further subdivided into patients who underwent surgical management (SM-SR, n=5) and those who were managed conservatively (NS-SR, n=5). Results Conditions underlying HPVG included mesenteric ischemia (38.9%), intestinal obstruction (22.2%), enteritis (22.2%), duodenal ulcer perforation (5.6%), necrotizing pancreatitis (5.6%), and diverticulitis (5.6%). In terms of mortality, 2 patients (40%) died in the SM-SR group, 1 (12.5%) in the CM group, and 100% in the NS-SR group. Higher scores from Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II predicted the mortality rates of the NS-SR and CM groups. Conclusions Identification of HPVG requires careful consideration for surgical management. If surgical management is indicated, prompt laparotomy should be performed. However, even in the non-surgical management condition, aggressive laparotomy can improve survival rates for patients with high APACHE II scores. PMID:26693238

  4. Current and emerging treatment options for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Patricia Rusa; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Lim, Li-Anne; Miyamoto, Cristina; Blanco, Paula L; Odashiro, Macanori; Maloney, Shawn; De Souza, Dominique F; Burnier, Miguel N

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in adults, with a 10-year cumulative metastatic rate of 34%. The most common site of metastasis is the liver (95%). Unfortunately, the current treatment of metastatic UM is limited by the lack of effective systemic therapy. Options for the management of the primary intraocular tumor include radical surgery as well as conservative treatments in order to preserve visual acuity. For metastatic disease, several approaches have been described with no standard method. Nevertheless, median survival after liver metastasis is poor, being around 4–6 months, with a 1-year survival of 10%–15%. In this review, the authors summarize current and promising new treatments for UM. PMID:24003303

  5. Radiofrequency ablation for treatment of hypersplenism: A feasible therapeutic option

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Guilherme Lopes P; Bernardes, Joao Paulo G; Rovella, Marcello S; Andrade, Raphael G; Viana, Publio Cesar C; Herman, Paulo; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with hypersplenism secondary to portal hypertension due to hepato-splenic schistosomiasis, which was accompanied by severe and refractory thrombocytopenia. We performed spleen ablation and measured the total spleen and ablated volumes with contrast-enhanced computed tomography and volumetry. No major complications occurred, thrombocytopenia was resolved, and platelet levels remained stable, which allowed for early treatment of the patient’s underlying disease. Previous work has shown that splenic radiofrequency ablation is an attractive alternative treatment for hypersplenism induced by liver cirrhosis. We aimed to contribute to the currently sparse literature evaluating the role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the management of hypersplenism. We conclude that splenic RFA appears to be a viable and promising option for the treatment of hypersplenism. PMID:26034376

  6. Is deep brain stimulation a treatment option for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder with high rates of morbidity, comorbidity and mortality, which in a subset of patients (21%) takes on a chronic course. Since an evidence based treatment for AN is scarce, it is crucial to investigate new treatment options, preferably focused on influencing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of AN. The objective of the present paper was to review the evidence for possible neurobiological correlates of AN, and to hypothesize about potential targets for Deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for chronic, therapy-refractory AN. One avenue for exploring new treatment options based on the neurobiological correlates of AN, is the search for symptomatologic and neurobiologic parallels between AN and other compulsivity- or reward-related disorders. As in other compulsive disorders, the fronto-striatal circuitry, in particular the insula, the ventral striatum (VS) and the prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal, parietal and anterior cingulate cortices, are likely to be implicated in the neuropathogenesis of AN. In this paper we will review the few available cases in which DBS has been performed in patients with AN (either as primary diagnosis or as comorbid condition). Given the overlap in symptomatology and neurocircuitry between reward-related disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and AN, and the established efficacy of accumbal DBS in OCD, we hypothesize that DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and other areas associated with reward, e.g. the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), might be an effective treatment for patients with chronic, treatment refractory AN, providing not only weight restoration, but also significant and sustained improvement in AN core symptoms and associated comorbidities and complications. Possible targets for DBS in AN are the ACC, the ventral anterior limb of the capsula interna (vALIC) and the VS. We suggest conducting larger efficacy studies that also explore the functional effects of DBS in AN. PMID:24175936

  7. Treatment options for vasomotor symptoms in menopause: focus on desvenlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Umland, Elena M; Falconieri, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), including hot flashes and night sweats, occur in as many as 68.5% of women as a result of menopause. While the median duration of these symptoms is 4 years, approximately 10% of women continue to experience VMS as many as 12 years after their final menstrual period. As such, VMS have a significant impact on the quality of life and overall physical health of women experiencing VMS, leading to their pursuance of treatment to alleviate these symptoms. Management of VMS includes lifestyle modifications, some herbal and vitamin supplements, hormonal therapies including estrogen and tibolone, and nonhormonal therapies including clonidine, gabapentin, and some of the serotonin and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The latter agents, including desvenlafaxine, have been the focus of increased research as more is discovered about the roles of serotonin and norepinephrine in the thermoregulatory control system. This review will include an overview of VMS as they relate to menopause. It will discuss the risk factors for VMS as well as the proposed pathophysiology behind their occurrence. The variety of treatment options for VMS will be discussed. Focus will be given to the role of desvenlafaxine as a treatment option for VMS management. PMID:22870045

  8. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Abolfazli, Nader; Jabali, Sahar; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an important role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and radiographic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]). Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05). Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels. PMID:25973148

  9. Interventional treatment for cluster headache: a review of the options.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Todd D

    2002-02-01

    There is no more severe pain than that sustained by a cluster headache sufferer. Surgical treatment of cluster headache should only be considered after a patient has exhausted all medical options or when a patient's medical history precludes the use of typical cluster abortive and preventive medications. Once a cluster patient is deemed a medical failure only those who have strictly side-fixed headaches should be considered for surgery. Other criteria for cluster surgery include pain localizing to the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, a psychologically stable individual, and absence of addictive personality traits. To understand the rationale behind the surgical treatment strategies for cluster, one must have a general understanding of the anatomy of cluster pathogenesis. The most frequently used surgical techniques for cluster are directed toward the sensory trigeminal nerve and the cranial parasympathetic system. PMID:11749879

  10. Pulmonary hypertension 2015: current definitions, terminology, and novel treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common phenomenon that may occur as a consequence of various diseases (e.g., heart failure, chronic lung diseases, and pulmonary embolism), as a distinct disease of the small pulmonary arterioles, or a combination of both. Independently from the origin, PH has important impact on patient´s symptoms and life expectancy. The establishment of an exact diagnosis and classification, as well as the understanding of the hemodynamic interrelations, provides the basis for often challenging treatment decisions. Recently, the 5th World Symposium on PH took place in Nice, France, where important standards and definitions were specified. Furthermore, the results of recent phase III trials have led to the approval of new targeted therapies. The most relevant developments including the rating of novel treatment options are summarized in this article. PMID:25479818

  11. Non-Surgical Management of Cord Compression in Tuberculosis: A Series of Surprises

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanganagouda Shivanagouda; Mohite, Sheetal; Varma, Raghuprasad; Bhojraj, Shekhar Y; Nene, Abhay Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose We present a series of 50 patients with tuberculous cord compression who were offered systematic non-surgical treatment, and thereby, the author proposes that clinico-radiological soft tissue cord compression is not an emergency indication for surgery. Overview of Literature Spinal cord compression whether clinical or radiological has usually been believed to be an indication for emergency surgery in spinal tuberculosis. Methods Fifty adults were prospectively studied at our clinic for spinal cord compression due to tuberculous spondylitis, between May 1993 and July 2002. The inclusion criteria were cases with clinical and/or radiological evidence of cord compression (documented soft tissue effacement of the cord with complete obliteration of the thecal sac at that level on magnetic resonance imaging scan). Exclusion criteria were lesions below the conus level, presence of bony compression, severe or progressive neurological deficit (non-surgical protocol including hospital admission, antitubercular medications, baseline somatosensory evoked potentials and a regular clinico-radiological follow-up. Results At the time of presentation, 10 patients had a motor deficit, 18 had clinically detectable hyper-reflexia and 22 had normal neurology. Forty-seven of the 50 patients responded completely to non-operative treatment and healed with no residual neurological deficit. Three patients with progressive neurological deficit while on treatment were operated on with eventual excellent recovery. Conclusions Radiological evidence of cord compression and early neurological signs need not be an emergency surgical indication in the management of spinal tuberculosis. PMID:24967045

  12. Current and emerging treatment options for Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Ahmet; Wang, Julie C; Powers, Mary K; Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2013-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a condition of the penis, characterized by the presence of localized fibrotic plaque in the tunica albuginea. PD is not an uncommon disorder, with recent epidemiologic studies documenting a prevalence of 3–9% of adult men affected. The actual prevalence of PD may be even higher. It is often associated with penile pain, anatomical deformities in the erect penis, and difficulty with intromission. As the definitive pathophysiology of PD has not been completely elucidated, further basic research is required to make progress in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Similarly, research on effective therapies is limited. Currently, nonsurgical treatments are used for those men who are in the acute stage of PD, whereas surgical options are reserved for men with established PD who cannot successfully penetrate. Intralesional treatments are growing in clinical popularity as a minimally invasive approach in the initial treatment of PD. A surgical approach should be considered when men with PD do not respond to conservative, medical, or minimally invasive therapies for approximately 1 year and cannot have satisfactory sexual intercourse. As scientific breakthroughs in the understanding of the mechanisms of this disease process evolve, novel treatments for the many men suffering with PD are anticipated. PMID:24400231

  13. Melatonin receptor agonists: new options for insomnia and depression treatment.

    PubMed

    Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco

    2011-12-01

    The circadian nature of melatonin (MLT) secretion, coupled with the localization of MLT receptors to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, has led to numerous studies of the role of MLT in modulation of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms in humans. Although much more needs to be understood about the various functions exerted by MLT and its mechanisms of action, three therapeutic agents (ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT, and agomelatine) are already in use, and MLT receptor agonists are now appearing as new promising treatment options for sleep and circadian-rhythm related disorders. In this review, emphasis has been placed on medicinal chemistry strategies leading to MLT receptor agonists, and on the evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of compounds undergoing clinical evaluation. A wide range of clinical trials demonstrated that ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT and tasimelteon have sleep-promoting effects, providing an important treatment option for insomnia and transient insomnia, even if the improvements of sleep maintenance appear moderate. Well-documented effects of agomelatine suggest that this MLT agonist offers an attractive alternative for the treatment of depression, combining efficacy with a favorable side effect profile. Despite a large number of high affinity nonselective MLT receptor agonists, only limited data on MT? or MT? subtype-selective compounds are available up to now. Administration of the MT?-selective agonist IIK7 to rats has proved to decrease NREM sleep onset latency, suggesting that MT? receptor subtype is involved in the acute sleep-promoting action of MLT; rigorous clinical studies are needed to demonstrate this hypothesis. Further clinical candidates based on selective activation of MT? or MT? receptors are expected in coming years. PMID:21554566

  14. An emerging treatment option for glaucoma: Rho kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sean K; Chang, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors are a novel potential class of glaucoma therapeutics with multiple compounds currently in Phase II and III US Food and Drug Administration trials in the United States. These selective agents work by relaxing the trabecular meshwork through inhibition of the actin cytoskeleton contractile tone of smooth muscle. This results in increased aqueous outflow directly through the trabecular meshwork, achieving lower intraocular pressures in a range similar to prostaglandins. There are also animal studies indicating that ROCK inhibitors may improve blood flow to the optic nerve, increase ganglion cell survival, and reduce bleb scarring in glaucoma surgery. Given the multiple beneficial effects for glaucoma patients, ROCK inhibitors are certainly a highly anticipated emerging treatment option for glaucoma. PMID:24872673

  15. A comparative review of the options for treatment of erectile dysfunction: which treatment for which patient?

    PubMed

    Hatzimouratidis, Konstantinos; Hatzichristou, Dimitrios G

    2005-01-01

    The field of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been revolutionised over the last two decades. Several treatment options are available today, most of which are associated with high efficacy rates and favourable safety profiles. A MEDLINE search was undertaken in order to evaluate all currently available data on treatment modalities for ED. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil) are currently the first-choice of most physicians and patients for the treatment of ED. PDE5 inhibitors have differences in their pharmacological profiles, the most obvious being the long duration of action of tadalafil, but there are no data supporting superiority for any one of them in terms of efficacy or safety. Sublingual apomorphine has limited efficacy compared with the PDE5 inhibitors, and its use is limited to patients with mild ED. Treatment failures with oral drugs may be due to medication, clinician and patient issues. The physician needs to address all of these issues in order to identify true treatment failures. Patients who are truly unresponsive to oral drugs may be offered other treatment options.Intracavernous injections of alprostadil alone, or in combination with other vasoactive agents (papaverine and phentolamine), remain an excellent treatment option, with proven efficacy and safety over time. Topical pharmacotherapy is appealing in nature, but currently available formulations have limited efficacy. Vacuum constriction devices may be offered mainly to elderly patients with occasional intercourse attempts, as younger patients show limited preference because of the unnatural erection that is associated with this treatment modality. Penile prostheses are generally the last treatment option offered, because of invasiveness, cost and non-reversibility; however, they are associated with high satisfaction rates in properly selected patients. All treatment options are associated with particular strengths and weaknesses. A patient-centred approach based on patient needs and expectations is necessary for the management of ED. The clinician must educate the patient and provide a supportive environment for shared decision making. The management strategy must be supplemented by careful follow-up in order to identify changes in patient health and relationship/emotional status that may necessitate treatment optimisation. PMID:16060698

  16. Diagnostic methods and treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Renzo; Duchowny, Michael; Jayakar, Prasanna; Krsek, Pavel; Kahane, Philippe; Tassi, Laura; Melani, Federico; Polster, Tilman; Andre, Véronique M; Cepeda, Carlos; Krueger, Darcy A; Cross, J Helen; Spreafico, Roberto; Cosottini, Mirco; Gotman, Jean; Chassoux, Francine; Ryvlin, Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bernasconi, Andrea; Stefan, Hermann; Miller, Ian; Devaux, Bertrand; Najm, Imad; Giordano, Flavio; Vonck, Kristl; Barba, Carmen; Blumcke, Ingmar

    2015-11-01

    Our inability to adequately treat many patients with refractory epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), surgical inaccessibility and failures are significant clinical drawbacks. The targeting of physiologic features of epileptogenesis in FCD and colocalizing functionality has enhanced completeness of surgical resection, the main determinant of outcome. Electroencephalography (EEG)-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography are helpful in guiding electrode implantation and surgical treatment, and high-frequency oscillations help defining the extent of the epileptogenic dysplasia. Ultra high-field MRI has a role in understanding the laminar organization of the cortex, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is highly sensitive for detecting FCD in MRI-negative cases. Multimodal imaging is clinically valuable, either by improving the rate of postoperative seizure freedom or by reducing postoperative deficits. However, there is no level 1 evidence that it improves outcomes. Proof for a specific effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in FCD is lacking. Pathogenic mutations recently described in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) genes in FCD have yielded important insights into novel treatment options with mTOR inhibitors, which might represent an example of personalized treatment of epilepsy based on the known mechanisms of disease. The ketogenic diet (KD) has been demonstrated to be particularly effective in children with epilepsy caused by structural abnormalities, especially FCD. It attenuates epigenetic chromatin modifications, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell, thereby modifying disease progression. This could imply lasting benefit of dietary manipulation. Neurostimulation techniques have produced variable clinical outcomes in FCD. In widespread dysplasias, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has achieved responder rates >50%; however, the efficacy of noninvasive cranial nerve stimulation modalities such as transcutaneous VNS (tVNS) and noninvasive (nVNS) requires further study. Although review of current strategies underscores the serious shortcomings of treatment-resistant cases, initial evidence from novel approaches suggests that future success is possible. PMID:26434565

  17. Boswellic acids inhibit glioma growth: a new treatment option?

    PubMed

    Winking, M; Sarikaya, S; Rahmanian, A; Jödicke, A; Böker, D K

    2000-01-01

    Conventional malignant glioma therapy (surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy) does not yield satisfying results. The prognosis of the glioma patient depends more on the histological grading of the tumor and patient's age than on the therapy. Especially the adjuvant chemotherapy failed to date to influence survival time in glioma patients significantly. To improve results in malignant glioma therapy additional therapeutic regimes are necessary. In an earlier study we were able to show a significant reduction on perifocal edema by an extract from gum resin (EGR) accompanied with a clinical improvement in patients with malignant glioma. Also a decrease of urinary LTE4-excretion as a metabolite of leukotriene synthesis in brain tumors was observed. Furthermore we had found a proliferation inhibiting activity of the extract form EGR, the boswellic acids in cell cultures. The purpose of this experimental study was to elucidate the effects of the boswellic acids, which are constituents of an extract from gum resin on tumor growth in vivo. Female wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were treated with the drug 14 days after inoculation of C6 tumor cells into their right caudate nucleus and randomization into 4 groups. The treatment groups received different dosages and were compared to a control group without any additional treatment. Survival time of the rats in the highest dosage group (3 x 240 mg/kg body weight) was more than twice as long as in the control group (P < 0.05). In a second experiment the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation was examined. The C6 tumor cells were implanted into the caudate nucleus. Drug treatment was started immediately after implantation and stopped after 14 days. The animals were sacrificed and the brains were examined microscopically. Comparing low and high dosage of EGR treatment a significant difference in tumor volume was detected (P < 0.05). The proportion of apoptotic tumor cells in animals with high dose treatment was significantly larger than in the low dose (treatment) group (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate an influence of EGR in rat glioma growth and might represent a new therapeutic option on glioma treatment in man in future. Further experimental work on human gliomas is needed to definitively answer this question. PMID:10894362

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595?nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595?nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first-line agent, and systemic use glucocorticoids should be considered when associated with serious complications. The 595?nm PDL is effective in managing superficial vascular malformations in childhood, and could attempt to increase the treatment times to improve the outcomes. PMID:26448027

  19. Uterine artery embolization as a treatment option for uterine myomas.

    PubMed

    Marshburn, Paul B; Matthews, Michelle L; Hurst, Bradley S

    2006-03-01

    Information is still being collected on the long-term clinical responses and appropriate patient selection for UAE. Prospective RCTs have not been performed to compare the clinical results from UAE with more conventional therapies for symptomatic uterine leiomyomata. At least three attempts at conducting such RCTs have been unsuccessful because of poor patient accrual that related to differing patient expectation and desires, clinical bias, insurance coverage, and the tendency that patients who have exhausted other treatment options may be disposed more favorably to less invasive treatments. Other comparative studies have serious limitations. For example, the retrospective study that compared outcomes after abdominal myomectomy with UAE suggested that patients who received UAE were more likely to require further invasive treatment by 3 years than were recipients of myomectomy. Lack of randomization introduced a selection bias because women in the group that underwent UAEwere older and were more likely to have had previous surgeries. A prospective study of "contemporaneous cohorts," which excluded patients who had sub-mucosal and pedunculated subserosal myomas, sought to compare quality of life measures and adverse events in patients who underwent UAE or hysterectomy. The investigators concluded that both treatments resulted in marked improvement in symptoms and quality of life scores, but complications were higher in the group that underwent hysterectomy over 1 year. In this study,however, a greater proportion of patients who underwent hysterectomy had improved pelvic pain scores. Furthermore, hysterectomy eliminates uterine bleeding and the risk for recurrence of myomas. Despite the lack of controlled studies that compared UAE with conventional surgery, and despite limited extended outcome data, UAE has gained rapid acceptance, primarily because the procedure preserves the uterus, is less invasive, and has less short-term morbidity than do most surgical options. The cost of UAE varies by region, but is comparable to the charges for hysterectomy and is less expensive than abdominal myomectomy. The evaluation before UAE may entail additional fees for diagnostic testing, such as MRI, to assess the uterine size and screen for adenomyosis. Other centers have recommended pretreatment ultrasonography, laparoscopy, hysteroscopy, endometrial biopsy, and biopsy of large fibroids to evaluate sarcoma. Generally,after UAE the recovery time and time lost from work are less; however, the potential need for subsequent surgery may be greater when compared with abdominal myomectomy. Any center that offers UAE should adhere to published clinical guidelines,maintain ongoing assessment of quality improvements measures, and observe strict criteria for obtaining procedural privileges. After McLucas advocated that gynecologists learn the skill to perform UAE for managing symptomatic myomas, the Society of Interventional Radiology responded with a precautionary commentary on the level of technical proficiency that is necessary to maintain optimum results from UAE. The complexity of pelvic arterial anatomy, the skill that is required to master modern coaxial microcatheters, and the hazards of significant patient radiation exposure were cited as reasons why sound training and demonstration of expertise be obtained before clinicians are credentialed to perform UAE.A collaboration between the gynecologist and the interventional radiologist is necessary to optimize the safety and efficacy of UAE. The primary candidates for this procedure include women who have symptomatic uterine fibroids who no longer desire fertility, but wish to avoid surgery or are poor surgical risks. The gynecologist is likely to be the primary initial consultant to patients who present with complaints of symptomatic myomas. Therefore, they must be familiar with the indications, exclusions, outcome expectations, and complications of UAE in their particular center. When hysterectomy is the only option, UAE should be considered. Appropriate diagnostic testing should ai

  20. Current and future treatment options for polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Griesshammer, Martin; Gisslinger, Heinz; Mesa, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    Patients with polycythemia vera (PV), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by an elevated red blood cell mass, are at high risk of vascular and thrombotic complications and have reduced quality of life due to a substantial symptom burden that includes pruritus, fatigue, constitutional symptoms, microvascular disturbances, and bleeding. Conventional therapeutic options aim at reducing vascular and thrombotic risk, with low-dose aspirin and phlebotomy as first-line recommendations for patients at low risk of thrombotic events and cytoreductive therapy (usually hydroxyurea or interferon alpha) recommended for high-risk patients. However, long-term effective and well-tolerated treatments are still lacking. The discovery of mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) as the underlying molecular basis of PV has led to the development of several targeted therapies, including JAK inhibitors, and results from the first phase 3 clinical trial with a JAK inhibitor in PV are now available. Here, we review the current treatment landscape in PV, as well as therapies currently in development. PMID:25832853

  1. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral ?-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  2. Cachexia and pancreatic cancer: Are there treatment options?

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C; Burmeister, Marc A; Bachmann, Jeannine; Martignoni, Marc E

    2014-01-01

    Cachexia is frequently described in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is associated with reduced survival and quality of life. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options of this multi-factorial and complex syndrome are limited. This is due to the fact that, despite extensive preclinical and clinical research, the underlying pathological mechanisms leading to PDAC-associated cachexia are still not fully understood. Furthermore, there is still a lack of consensus on the definition of cachexia, which complicates the standardization of diagnosis and treatment as well as the analysis of the current literature. In order to provide an efficient therapy for cachexia, an early and reliable diagnosis and consistent monitoring is required, which can be challenging especially in obese patients. Although many substances have been tested in clinical and preclinical settings, so far none of them have been proven to have a long-term effect in ameliorating cancer-associated cachexia. However, recent studies have demonstrated that multidimensional therapeutic modalities are able to alleviate pancreatic cancer-associated cachexia and ultimately improve patients’ outcome. In this current review, we propose a stepwise and pragmatic approach to facilitate and standardize the treatment of cachexia in pancreatic cancer patients. This strategy consists of nutritional, dietary, pharmacological, physical and psychological methods. PMID:25071331

  3. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Chey, William D; Lembo, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral ?-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  4. Laparoscopic Cerclage as a Treatment Option for Cervical Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, D.; Raio, L.; Imboden, S.; Mueller, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The traditional surgical treatment for cervical insufficiency is vaginal placement of a cervical cerclage. However, in a small number of cases a vaginal approach is not possible. A transabdominal approach can become an option for these patients. Laparoscopic cervical cerclage is associated with good pregnancy outcomes but comes at the cost of a higher risk of serious surgical complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate intraoperative and long-term pregnancy outcomes after laparoscopic cervical cerclage, performed either as an interval procedure or during early pregnancy, using a new device with a blunt grasper and a flexible tip. Methods: All women who underwent laparoscopic cervical cerclage for cervical insufficiency in our institution using the Goldfinger® device (Ethicon Endo Surgery, Somerville, NJ, USA) between January 2008 and March 2014 were included in the study. Data were collected from the patients? medical records and included complications during and after the above-described procedure. Results: Eighteen women were included in the study. Of these, six were pregnant at the time of laparoscopic cervical cerclage. Mean duration of surgery was 55?±?10 minutes. No serious intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. All patients were discharged at 2.6?±?0.9 days after surgery. One pregnancy ended in a miscarriage at 12 weeks of gestation. All other pregnancies ended at term (>?37 weeks of gestation) with good perinatal and maternal outcomes. Summary: Performing a laparoscopic cervical cerclage using a blunt grasper device with a flexible tip does not increase intraoperative complications, particularly in early pregnancy. We believe that use of this device, which is characterized by increased maneuverability, could be an important option to avoid intraoperative complications if surgical access is limited due to the anatomical situation. However, because of the small sample size, further studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26366003

  5. Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

  6. Arsenic contaminated groundwater and its treatment options in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S M; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S M; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues. PMID:23343979

  7. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  8. Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater and Its Treatment Options in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S. M.; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S. M.; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues. PMID:23343979

  9. Antimicrobial Treatment Options for Granulomatous Mastitis Caused by Corynebacterium Species.

    PubMed

    Dobinson, Hazel C; Anderson, Trevor P; Chambers, Stephen T; Doogue, Matthew P; Seaward, Lois; Werno, Anja M

    2015-09-01

    Corynebacterium species are increasingly recognized as important pathogens in granulomatous mastitis. Currently, there are no published treatment protocols for Corynebacterium breast infections. This study describes antimicrobial treatment options in the context of other management strategies used for granulomatous mastitis. Corynebacterium spp. isolated from breast tissue and aspirate samples stored from 2002 to 2013 were identified and determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S RNA sequencing, and rpoB gene targets. The MICs for 12 antimicrobials were performed using Etest for each isolate. Correlations of these with antimicrobial characteristics, choice of antimicrobial, and disease outcome were evaluated. Corynebacterium spp. from breast tissue and aspirate samples were confirmed in 17 isolates from 16 patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii isolates (n = 11) were susceptible to seven antibiotic classes but resistant to ?-lactam antibiotics. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum isolates (n = 4) were multidrug resistant. Two nonlipophilic species were isolated, Corynebacterium glucuronolyticum and Corynebacterium freneyi, both of which have various susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents. Short-course antimicrobial therapy was common (median, 6 courses per subject; range, 1 to 9 courses). Patients with C. kroppenstedtii presented with a hot painful breast mass and underwent multiple surgical procedures (median, 4 procedures; range, 2 to 6 procedures). The management of Corynebacterium breast infections requires a multidisciplinary approach and includes culture and appropriate sensitivity testing to guide antimicrobial therapy. Established infections have a poor outcome, possibly because adequate concentrations of some drugs will be difficult to achieve in lipophilic granulomata. Lipophilic antimicrobial therapy may offer a therapeutic advantage. The role of immunotherapy has not been defined. PMID:26135858

  10. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, ‘Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?’ While the answer is ‘probably,’ more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature. PMID:25143737

  11. Treatment options for vancomycin-resistant enterococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Linden, Peter K

    2002-01-01

    Serious infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) usually occurs in patients with significantly compromised host defences and serious co-morbidities, and this magnifies the importance of effective antimicrobial treatment. Assessments of antibacterial efficacy against VRE have been hampered by the lack of a comparator treatment arm(s), complex treatment requirements including surgery, and advanced illness-severity associated with a high crude mortality. Treatment options include available agents which don't have a specific VRE approval (chloramphenicol, doxycycline, high-dose ampicillin or ampicillin/sulbactam), and nitrofurantoin (for lower urinary tract infection). The role of antimicrobial combinations that have shown in vitro or animal-model in vivo efficacy has yet to be established. Two novel antimicrobial agents (quinupristin/ dalfopristin and linezolid) have emerged as approved therapeutic options for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium on the basis of in vitro susceptibility and clinical efficacy from multicentre, pharmaceutical company-sponsored clinical trials. Quinupristin/dalfopristin is a streptogramin, which impairs bacterial protein synthesis at both early peptide chain elongation and late peptide chain extrusion steps. It has bacteriostatic activity against vancomycin-resistant E. faecium [minimum concentration to inhibit growth of 90% of isolates (MIC(90)) = 2 microg/ml] but is not active against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC(90 )= 16 microg/ml). In a noncomparative, nonblind, emergency-use programme in patients who were infected with Gram-positive isolates resistant or refractory to conventional therapy or who were intolerant of conventional therapy, quinupristin/dalfopristin was administered at 7.5 mg/kg every 8 hours. The clinical response rate in the bacteriologically evaluable subset was 70.5%, and a 65.8% overall response (favourable clinical and bacteriological outcome) was observed. Resistance to quinupristin/dalfopristin on therapy was observed in 6/338 (1.8%) of VRE strains. Myalgia/arthralgia was the most frequent treatment-limiting adverse effect. In vitro studies which combine quinupristin/dalfopristin with ampicillin or doxycyline have shown enhanced killing effects against VRE; however, the clinical use of combined therapy remains unestablished. Linezolid, an oxazolidinone compound that acts by inhibiting the bacterial pre-translational initiation complex formation, has bacteriostatic activity against both vancomycin resistant E. faecium (MIC(90) = 2 to 4 microg/ml) and E. faecalis (MIC(90) = 2 to 4 microg/ml). This agent was studied in a similar emergency use protocol for multi-resistant Gram-positive infections. 55 of 133 evaluable patients were infected with VRE. Cure rates for the most common sites were complicated skin and soft tissue 87.5% (7/8), primary bacteraemia 90.9% (10/11), peritonitis 91.7% (11/12), other abdominal/pelvic infections 91.7% (11/12), and catheter-related bacteraemia 100% (9/9). There was an all-site response rate of 92.6% (50/54). In a separate blinded, randomised, multicentre trial for VRE infection at a variety of sites, intravenous low dose linezolid (200mg every 12 hours) was compared to high dose therapy (600 mg every 12 hours) with optional conversion to oral administration. A positive dose response (although statistically nonsignificant) was seen with a 67% (39/58) and 52% (24/46) cure rate in the high- and low-dose groups, respectively. Adverse effects of linezolid therapy have been predominantly gastrointestinal (nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea), headache and taste alteration. Reports of thrombocytopenia appear to be limited to patients receiving somewhat longer courses of treatment (>14 to 21 days). Linezolid resistance (MIC > or = 8 microg/ml) has been reported in a small number of E. faecium strains which appears to be secondary to a base-pair mutation in the genome encoding for the bacterial 23S ribosome binding site. At present a comparative study between the two approved agents for VRE (quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid) has

  12. Effectiveness of a diode laser in addition to non-surgical periodontal therapy: study of intervention

    PubMed Central

    Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Iovane, Claudio; Del Giudice, Teresa; Lomanno, Simona; Pacifico, Delfina; Fortunato, Leonzio; Del Giudice, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Chronic periodontitis affects 47% of adult population over the age of 30. The first phase of periodontal treatment is always represented by scaling and root planning (SRP), that is a causal, non-surgical therapy that recognizes as primary aims the control of bacterial infection and the reduction of periodontal plaque-associated inflammation. Yet, another innovative causal therapy is represented by the irradiation of periodontal pockets with laser. Aim To evaluate the effect of a 940-nm diode laser as an adjunct to SRP in patients affected by periodontitis. Materials and methods Sixty-eight adult patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis were sequentially enrolled and undergone to periodontal examination (V1) in order to detect gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and probing depth (PD). The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first (n=34) received SRP treatment alone, the control group (n=34) received SRP and 940-nm diode laser therapy. Results Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test, with two tails; for all clinical parameters, both groups reported statistically significant differences compared to basal values (p<0.0001). Both procedures were effective in improving GI, PI and PD, but the use of diode laser was associated with more evident results. Conclusions Considered the better clinical outcomes, diode laser can be routinely associated with SRP in the treatment of periodontal pockets of patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis. PMID:26161248

  13. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  14. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  15. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  16. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) General. Except as provided in this section, a...

  17. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  18. Treatment options and outcomes for glioblastoma in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Arvold, Nils D; Reardon, David A

    2014-01-01

    Age remains the most powerful prognostic factor among glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Half of all patients with GBM are aged 65 years or older at the time of diagnosis, and the incidence rate of GBM in patients aged over 65 years is increasing rapidly. Median survival for elderly GBM patients is less than 6 months and reflects less favorable tumor biologic factors, receipt of less aggressive care, and comorbid disease. The standard of care for elderly GBM patients remains controversial. Based on limited data, extensive resection appears to be more beneficial than biopsy. For patients with favorable Karnofsky performance status (KPS), adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) has a demonstrated survival benefit with no observed decrement in quality of life. Concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) along with RT to 60 Gy have not been prospectively studied among patients aged over 70 years but should be considered for patients aged 65–70 years with excellent KPS. Based on the recent NOA-08 and Nordic randomized trials, testing for O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation should be performed routinely immediately after surgery to aid in adjuvant treatment decisions. Patients aged over 70 years with favorable KPS, or patients aged 60–70 years with borderline KPS, should be considered for monotherapy utilizing standard TMZ dosing for patients with MGMT-methylated tumors, and hypofractionated RT (34 Gy in ten fractions or 40 Gy in 15 fractions) for patients with MGMT-unmethylated tumors. The ongoing European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/National Cancer Institute of Canada trial will help clarify the role for concurrent TMZ with hypofractionated RT. For elderly patients with poor KPS, reasonable options include best supportive care, TMZ alone, hypofractionated RT alone, or whole brain RT for symptomatic patients needing to start treatment urgently. Given the balance between short survival and quality of life in this patient population, optimal management of elderly GBM patients must be made individually according to patient age, MGMT methylation status, performance score, and patient preferences. PMID:24591820

  19. PATIENT VALUATION OF PRIMARY CARE-BASED TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SUBSTANCE USE AND MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Andrew J.; Barry, Colleen L.; Fiellin, David A.; Busch, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals with substance use and mental health disorders do not receive treatment. If treatment options were more attractive, treatment rates might increase. Although the advantages of novel approaches, including primary care-based treatment and collaborative care in a primary care setting, have been documented, less is known about consumers’ valuation of these options. Contingent valuation methods were used to assess monetary valuation of these treatment types relative to usual care in specialty treatment using a national randomized experiment. Participants valued a primary care-based treatment visit over usual care by $9.00 and a collaborative care visit over usual care by $5.85. PMID:25930049

  20. A Protocol-Based Decision for Choosing a Proper Surgical Treatment Option for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, E-Wook; Chung, Joonho; Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are two established surgical treatment options for carotid artery stenosis. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been accepted as a gold standard for surgical treatment while carotid artery stenting (CAS) has recently become an alternative option. Each treatment option has advantages and disadvantages for the treatment outcomes. We propose a protocol for selection of a proper surgical treatment option for carotid artery stenosis. Materials and Methods A total of 192 published articles on management of carotid artery stenosis were reviewed. Preoperatively considerable factors which had been repeatedly noted in those articles for the risk/benefits of CEA or CAS were selected. According to those factors, a protocol with four categories was established. Results CEA or CAS is indicated when the patient has a symptomatic stenosis ? 50%, or when the patient has an asymptomatic stenosis ? 80%. Each treatment option has absolute indications and favorable indications. Each absolute indication is scored with three points, and each favorable indication, one point. Based on the highest scores, a proper treatment option (CEA or CAS) is selected. Conclusion We have been treating patients according to this protocol and evaluating the outcomes of our protocol-based decision because this protocol might be helpful in assessment of risk/benefit for selection of a proper surgical treatment option in patients with carotid artery stenosis. PMID:26157689

  1. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Non-surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Mayra G; Cantu, Myrna G; Wilson, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize the findings of studies that have evaluated non-surgical approaches for detoxification of implant body surfaces in vitro and in vivo, and to evaluate clinical trials on the use of these methodologies for treating peri-implant disease. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (Pubmed) from 1966 to 2013. In vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on non-surgical therapy were evaluated. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment levels, bleeding on probing; radiographic bone fill and histological re-osseointegration. Results: From 134 articles found 35 were analyzed. The findings, advantages and disadvantages of using lasers as well as mechanical and chemical methods are discussed. Most of the in vivo and human studies used combination therapies which makes determining the efficacy of one specific method difficult. Most human studies are case series with short term longitudinal analysis without survival or failure reports. Conclusion: Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve using these approaches. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Re-osseointegration may be difficult to achieve if not impossible without surgical access to ensure thorough debridement of the defect and detoxification of the implant surface. Combination protocols for non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical results but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:24894571

  2. Piggery wastewater treatment in a tropical climate: biological and chemical treatment options.

    PubMed

    Shipin, O V; Lee, S H; Chiemchaisri, C; Wiwattanakom, W; Ghosh, G C; Anceno, A J; Stevens, W F

    2007-03-01

    A novel biological treatment system was developed for the treatment of piggery wastewater under tropical conditions. It consisted of three consecutive sponge-based floating biofilters. The Upflow Anaerobic/Anoxic/Aerobic Floating Filter (UA3FF) system was shown to be effective with carbonaceous and, particularly, nitrogenous matter. The rationale for the processes occurring in anoxic-aerobic reactors was based on the concept of nitritation-denitritation rather than nitrification-denitrification. The N-related microbial communities manipulated by changing DO concentration and hydraulic retention time were able to effect a considerable increase in the total and specific N-removal (70% and 0.6 kg N m(-3) filter media per day, respectively) as compared to data reported elsewhere. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Polymerase Chain Reaction amplification of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene were used to study interrelationships between N-related microbial groups in the system. Microbiological data was interpreted in terms of operational behavior and performance of the reactors. The N-removal efficiency of the biological UA3FF system was compared with a combined biological/physicochemical system based on (a) biological anaerobic pretreatment followed by (b) a chemical precipitation (CP) and (c) an air stripping. Both systems were scrutinized as to operational advantages and costs. The treatment options could produce effluent of a high quality (202 mg COD l(-1), 126 total-N l(-1) and 89 mg COD l(-1) 48 total-N l(-1) in the biological and combined biological/physico-chemical treatment options, respectively) amenable for the subsequent treatment at the municipal facilities. However, the UA3FF biological treatment system was superior to the combined system by a factor of 20 as far as costs are concerned. PMID:17432385

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood CNS germ cell tumors may ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Some cancer ...

  5. Approved and Off-Label Uses of Obesity Medications, and Potential New Pharmacologic Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Isidro, Maria Luisa; Cordido, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Available anti-obesity pharmacotherapy options remain very limited and development of more effective drugs has become a priority. The potential strategies to achieve weight loss are to reduce energy intake by stimulating anorexigenic signals or by blocking orexigenic signals, and to increase energy expenditure. This review will focus on approved obesity medications, as well as potential new pharmacologic treatment options.

  6. Treatment Options in Massive and Submassive Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Rishi K; Piazza, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cardiovascular condition that represents a spectrum of disorders with a gradient of increased risk of adverse outcomes. The U.S. Surgeon General estimated that approximately 100,000 to 180,000 PE-related deaths occur in the United States annually, and that PE is the most preventable cause of death among hospitalized patients. Risk stratification is critical to identify the patients who may benefit from advanced therapy. This review will provide an overview of PE pathophysiology, evidence-based risk stratification strategies for patients with acute PE, a summary of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant options, and an in-depth discussion on the utilization of advanced therapeutic options, including systemic fibrinolysis, catheter-based pharmacomechanical therapy, and surgical embolectomy. PMID:26274535

  7. Non Surgical Correction of Mandibular Deviation and Neuromuscular Coordination after Two years of Mandibular Guidance Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nidhi; Sharma, Rohit; Parekh, Narzi

    2015-01-01

    Carcinomas of the mandible may require resection of a segment of bone (continuity defect), partial removal of bone (discontinuity defect), tongue, and floor of the mouth and muscle attachments. Patients undergoing such treatment suffer from facial disfigurement, loss of muscle function, loss of neuromuscular coordination resulting in inability to masticate and swallow acceptably. Surgical reconstruction may not always be possible because of high reoccurrence rate, inability of the patient to cope with another surgery etc. The treatment of choice in non surgical cases is prosthetic rehabilitation using guiding flange prosthesis. This article describes the management of a patient who had undergone hemimandibulectomy and was not willing for a surgical reconstruction. Interim maxillary ramp prosthesis was given to the patient 15 days postoperatively followed by definitive guiding flange prosthesis for two years after which the patient was able to occlude in centric occlusal position without any aid. PMID:26673016

  8. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic inflammatory response. Successful treatment requires adherence to a regime that is uncomfortable at best and at worst painful. Topical treatments can be successful in motivated adherent patients willing to accept these side effects. PMID:23788834

  9. Treatment Options for the Cardinal Symptoms of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tourian, Leon; LeBoeuf, Amélie; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Cohen, David; Gignac, Martin; Labelle, Réal; Guile, Jean-Marc; Renaud, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: DSM-5 has added a new developmentally appropriate child and adolescent mood disorder subtype called disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). The core features of DMDD are temper outbursts (manifested by either verbal rages and/or physical aggression) and unrelenting irritability or anger. Currently, the literature is lacking a thorough review of the possible treatment options for the cardinal symptoms constituting DMDD. The objective of this article is to provide a thorough review of peer-reviewed studies on the subject of pharmacological treatment options for children and adolescents with the cardinal symptoms of DMDD. Methods: Relevant articles for this study were obtained through Pubmed, Medline, PsychINFO and PsychINDEXplus using the key words: “adolescents,” “children,” “paediatric,” “youth,” “irritability,” “temper outbursts,” “aggression,” “rage,” “disruptive behaviour,” “treatment,” “dysphoria,” “autism,” “mental retardation/intellectual disability,” “impulsivity,” “ADHD,” “oppositional defiant disorder,” and “conduct disorder.” A total of 823 studies were generated; only English studies focusing on pharmacological treatment were retained. Results: Currently there are no established guidelines or thorough reviews summarizing the treatment of DMDD. Pharmacotherapeutic treatment options of both aggression and chronic irritability include: antidepressants/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mood stabilizers, psychostimulants, antipsychotics, and alpha-2 agonists. Conclusion: Treatment options of severe, persistent irritability in youth are numerous, and a consensual treatment algorithm has not yet emerged from the literature. Further studies and clinical trials are warranted to determine efficacious and safe treatment modalities. PMID:26336379

  10. Rare treatment option for a common pediatric airway problem

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Raylene; Deshmukh, Chandrahas T.; Tullu, Milind S.; Divecha, Chhaya; Karande, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Laryngomalacia is a common cause of respiratory obstruction with stridor in infants. Although most cases resolve spontaneously, severe laryngomalacia needs surgical intervention. Tracheostomies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, this procedure was associated with high morbidity. At present, newer modalities of treatment are being tried. We discuss successful management of an infant having severe laryngomalacia (who had three failed extubation trials) with glossoepiglottopexy.

  11. Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A Frequently Missed Diagnosis, Part 2: Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shirley C; Wang, Sheila C; Alavi, Afsaneh; Alhusayen, Raed; Bashash, Morteza; Sibbald, R Gary

    2015-08-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the intertriginous area. Patients with HS have several challenges to their quality of life and activities of everyday living, including malodor, purulent discharge, and discomfort. There is often a delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The need for cosmetically acceptable local treatments and dressing application makes this disease an important challenge for wound care specialists. The choice of optimal treatment varies depending on the disease severity, expert knowledge, the availability of an interprofessional team, and patient factors. PMID:26181861

  12. Bacterial meningitis: an update of new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Spreer, Annette; Ribes, Sandra; Eiffert, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    The outcome of bacterial meningitis critically depends on the rapid initiation of bactericidal antibiotic therapy and adequate management of septic shock. In community-acquired meningitis, the choice of an optimum initial empirical antibiotic regimen depends on the regional resistance patterns. Pathogens resistant to antibacterials prevail in nosocomial bacterial meningitis. Dexamethasone is recommended as adjunctive therapy for community-acquired meningitis in developed countries. In comatose patients, aggressive measures to lower intracranial pressure <20 mmHg (in particular, external ventriculostomy, osmotherapy and temporary hyperventilation) were effective in a case-control study. Although many experimental approaches were protective in animal models, none of them has been proven effective in patients. Antibiotics, which are bactericidal but do not lyse bacteria, and inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases or complement factor C5 appear the most promising therapeutic options. At present, vaccination is the most efficient method to reduce disease burden. Palmitoylethanolamide appears promising to enhance the resistance of the brain to infections. PMID:26293166

  13. Advanced pancreatic cancer - how to choose an adequate treatment option.

    PubMed

    Korkeila, Eija A

    2015-10-14

    The prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is poor, making it one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. The 5-year overall survival rate remains below 5% and little progress is made during the past decade. Only about 10%-20% of patients are eligible for curative-intent surgery and the majority end up having recurring disease even after radical surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy in metastatic disease is palliative at best, aiming at disease and symptom control and prolongation of life. Treatment always causes side effects, the degree of which varies from patient to patient, depending on the patient's general condition, concomitant morbidities as well as on the chosen treatment modality. Why is pancreatic cancer so resistant to treatment? How to best help the patient to reach the set treatment goals? PMID:26478662

  14. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  15. Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer (Treatment Options by Stage)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a team of doctors with expertise in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a team of doctors with expertise in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  20. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  1. Advanced pancreatic cancer - how to choose an adequate treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Korkeila, Eija A

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is poor, making it one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. The 5-year overall survival rate remains below 5% and little progress is made during the past decade. Only about 10%-20% of patients are eligible for curative-intent surgery and the majority end up having recurring disease even after radical surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy in metastatic disease is palliative at best, aiming at disease and symptom control and prolongation of life. Treatment always causes side effects, the degree of which varies from patient to patient, depending on the patient’s general condition, concomitant morbidities as well as on the chosen treatment modality. Why is pancreatic cancer so resistant to treatment? How to best help the patient to reach the set treatment goals? PMID:26478662

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be indolent or aggressive. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma grows and spreads at different ... according to whether the cancer is indolent or aggressive and whether affected lymph nodes are next to ...

  3. Treatment Options When Your SSRI Antidepressant Is Not Working Well

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Plug-ins EHC Component EPC Project Topic Title Treatment for Depression After Unsatisfactory Response to SSRIs Full Report Research Review Apr. 26, 2012 Related Products for this Topic Research Protocol Jun. 15, ...

  4. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  5. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  6. Relapsed small cell lung cancer: treatment options and latest developments

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Kaneko, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Etsuro; Kubo, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    According to recent analyses, there was a modest yet significant improvement in median survival time and 5-year survival rate of limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in North America, Europe, Japan and other countries over the last 30 years. The median survival time of limited stage SCLC is 15–20 months and 5-year survival rate is 15% or less. In terms of extensive stage SCLC, a median survival time of 9.4–12.8 months and 2-year survival of 5.2–19.5% are still disappointing. Despite being highly sensitive to first-line chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments, most patients with SCLC experience relapse within 2 years and die from systemic metastasis. While several clinical trials of cytotoxic chemotherapies and molecular targeting agents have been investigated in the treatment of relapsed SCLC, none showed a significant clinical activity to be able to exceed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy. There are problematic issues to address for relapsed SCLC, such as standardizing the treatment for third-line chemotherapy. Topotecan alone was the first approved therapy for second-line treatment for relapsed SCLC. Amrubicin is a promising drug and a variety of trials evaluating its efficacy have been carried out. Amrubicin has shown superiority to topotecan in a Japanese population, but was not superior in a study of western patients. There are some controversial issues for relapsed SCLC, such as treatment for older patients, third-line chemotherapy and efficacy of molecular targeting therapy. This article reviews current standard treatment, recent clinical trials and other topics on relapsed SCLC. PMID:24587832

  7. Medical Treatments of Hidradenitis Suppurativa: More Options, Less Evidence.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Hessel H; Gulliver, Wayne P

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a common debilitating skin disease that has been neglected by science. The disease is getting more and more attention, reflected by the rising number of scientific publications. There is a clear need for effective treatment. We are still at the beginning of improving care for these patients as demonstrated by the low levels of evidence for the medical treatments. Many of these therapies showed promising results, but are still waiting to be validated in randomized, controlled trials. Much more research is needed to strengthen the Level of Evidence for these therapies and thus improve patient care. PMID:26617362

  8. A Comprehensive Review of Treatment Options for Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Shalini; Trevino, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome that involves a combination of emotional and physical symptoms that result in significant functional impairment. Because of the debilitating nature of PMDD, multiple treatment options have been considered. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these therapeutic regimens to help health care professionals provide adequate treatment for PMDD and premenstrual syndrome. The treatments that are reviewed are organized into the following categories: psychiatric, anovulatory, supplements, herbal, nonpharmacological, and other. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been established as the first-line treatment for PMDD. Although luteal phase or continuous dosing can be used, additional research is needed to more thoroughly compare the efficacies and differential symptom response of continuous, semi-intermittent, luteal phase, and symptoms-onset dosing. The psychiatric medications venlafaxine, duloxetine, alprazolam, and buspirone have also been found to be useful treatments for PMDD. Various anovulatory-related treatments have demonstrated efficacy; however, the use of some of these treatments remains limited due to potential side effects and/or the availability of cheaper alternatives. Although a variety of supplement and herbal-related treatments have been proposed, with some warranting further research, at this time only calcium supplementation has demonstrated a consistent therapeutic benefit. In conclusion, serotoninergic antidepressants have been established as the first-line treatment option for PMDD; however, there are a variety of additional treatment options that should be considered if a patient fails to achieve an adequate therapeutic response with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. PMID:26352222

  9. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30–70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy – oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent “t” test and within-group analysis was done using dependent “t” test. Results: At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Conclusion: Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care. PMID:25984468

  10. New treatment options for lupus - a focus on belimumab.

    PubMed

    Chiche, Laurent; Jourde, Noémie; Thomas, Guillemette; Bardin, Nathalie; Bornet, Charleric; Darque, Albert; Mancini, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Belimumab is the first biologic approved for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Belimumab is the first of a new class of drug targeting B cell-stimulating factors or their receptors to reach the market. Its target, BLyS, also known as BAFF (B cell-activating factor from the tumor necrosis factor family), is a type II transmembrane protein that exists in both membrane-bound and soluble forms. Additionally to a robust rational from murine experiments conducted in lupus prone mice, BLyS circulating levels are increased in SLE patients. After the negative results of a Phase II trial, two Phase III trials met their primary endpoints. Some SLE patients are still refractory to the standard options of care or necessitate prolonged high-dose corticotherapy and/or long-term immunosuppressive regimens. However, some experts still feel that the effect of this biologic might not be clinically relevant and blame the use of the new systemic lupus response index as well as the discrepancies between both trials and the noninclusion of the severe form of the disease as nephritis. In this review, we aim to discuss the characteristics of belimumab, critically evaluate the different steps of its development, and consider its future place in the arsenal against SLE, taking into account the patients' perspectives. PMID:22346356

  11. Treatment Options for Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trials is available from the NCI Web site . Ultraviolet B radiation therapy Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation therapy uses a special lamp or laser that ... monoclonal antibody ( denileukin diftitox ). A clinical trial of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation therapy . A clinical trial of a new treatment. ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trials is available from the NCI Web site . Ultraviolet B radiation therapy Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation therapy uses a special lamp or laser that ... monoclonal antibody ( denileukin diftitox ). A clinical trial of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation therapy . A clinical trial of a new treatment. ...

  13. Treatment Options by Stage (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trials is available from the NCI Web site . Ultraviolet B radiation therapy Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation therapy uses a special lamp or laser that ... monoclonal antibody ( denileukin diftitox ). A clinical trial of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation therapy . A clinical trial of a new treatment. ...

  14. Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears: A Guide for Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Plug-ins EHC Component EPC Project Topic Title Comparative Effectiveness of Nonoperative and Operative Treatments for Rotator Cuff Tears Full Reports Research Review Jul. 5, 2010 Appendixes Jul. 5, 2010 Related Products for this Topic Disposition of Comments Report ...

  15. Endoscopic options for treatment of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Vance, R Brooks; Dunbar, Kerry B

    2015-12-25

    Recent advances in the endoscopic treatment of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) have allowed endoscopists to provide effective and durable eradication therapies. This review summarizes the available endoscopic eradication techniques for dysplasia in patients with BE including endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection, photodynamic therapy, argon plasma coagulation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. PMID:26722612

  16. Options assessment report: Treatment of nitrate salt waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-09-16

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognized that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL's preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  17. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Bridge: A Treatment Option in Children

    PubMed Central

    Yelluri, Rama Krishna; Munshi, AK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of treatment options, ranging from Maryland bridges to implants, are available for the replacement of congenitally or traumatically missing permanent anterior teeth. But, there are several limitations of these therapeutic options when they have to be used before the completion of the growth, particularly in children. Reinforcement of composite resins with polyethylene fibers significantly improves their mechanical properties. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) bridge can offer a good alternative to conventional treatment options in replacing a missing permanent anterior tooth until a more definitive prosthesis can be provided at the end of the growth period. The purpose of this article is to present a clinical case of a single tooth replacement utilizing noninvasive and metal free fixed FRC bridge in a 13 years old child as an interim treatment option. How to cite this article: Gupta A, Yelluri RK, Munshi AK. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Bridge: A Treatment Option in Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):62-65. PMID:26124584

  18. Pharmacologic treatments for opioid dependence: detoxification and maintenance options

    PubMed Central

    Kleber, Herbert D.

    2007-01-01

    While opioid dependence has more treatment agents available than other abused drugs, none are curative. They can, however, markedly diminish withdrawal symptoms and craving, and block opioid effects due to lapses. The most effective withdrawal method is substituting and tapering methadone or buprenorphine, ?-2 Adrenergic agents can ameliorate untreated symptoms or substitute for agonists if not available. Shortening withdrawal by precipitating it with narcotic antagonists has been studied, but the methods are plagued by safety issues or persisting symptoms. Neither the withdrawal agents nor the methods are associated with better long-term outcome, which appears mostly related to post-detoxification treatment. Excluding those with short-term habits, the best outcome occurs with long-term maintenance on methadone or buprenorphine accompanied by appropriate psychosocial interventions. Those with strong external motivation may do well on the antagonist naltrexone. Currently, optimum duration of maintenance on either is unclear. Better agents are needed to impact the brain changes related to addiction. PMID:18286804

  19. Multidisciplinary Treatment Options of Tooth Avulsion Considering Different Therapy Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kostka, Eckehard; Meissner, Simon; Finke, Christian H; Mandirola, Manlio; Preissner, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of permanent front teeth is a rare accident, mostly affecting children between seven and nine years of age. Replanted and splinted, these teeth often develop inflammation, severe resorption or ankylosis affecting alveolar bone development and have to be extracted sooner or later. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate different therapy concepts to create a structured concept for the treatment of avulsions. Results: Based on existing therapy concepts, a concept for different initial conditions (dry time, age, growth, tooth, hard and soft tissues) was developed and is presented here. Conclusion: A great deal of research has been performed during recent years and guidelines for the management of avulsions have been published. With the help of this literature it is possible to identify the best treatment procedure for each tooth. Clinical Relevance: The prognosis of avulsed teeth can be improved by considering evidence-based therapy concepts. Resorption, ankylosis and tooth loss could be minimized. PMID:25352922

  20. Dynamic optimization of chronic migraine treatment: current and future options.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ninan T

    2009-02-01

    Comparator studies that assess treatment effects in a clinical setting have improved the understanding of the efficacy and tolerability of prophylactic treatments for chronic migraine (CM). It is premature to recommend device-based treatments, such as occipital nerve stimulation, vagal nerve stimulation, and patent foramen ovale closure for CM, because clinical trials are in the preliminary stages. Physical therapy techniques, like applying heat or cold packs, ultrasonography, and electrical stimulation, have been shown to lessen pain. Nonpharmacologic treatments, including cognitive behavioral therapy, stress management, and biofeedback, have been investigated and proved effective in some areas of pain management, including migraine. However, pharmacologic interventions may be necessary for effective, long-term prophylaxis. Several medications under investigation, including topiramate, gabapentin, tizanidine, and amitriptyline, have proved efficacious in reducing the number of migraine episodes and the pain associated with migraine, although adverse events may prevent continued use of some agents. Evidence supports the use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for CM, with or without medication overuse, to achieve a significant reduction in headache episodes. Efficacy of BoNT-A for CM is comparable with or better than that of valproate and topiramate, with better tolerability. Predictors of response to BoNT-A for CM appear to include predominantly unilateral location of the headache and the presence of cutaneous or muscle allodynia. BoNT-A has been demonstrated to be safe and well tolerated, with rare discontinuations due to adverse events. Recent clinical trials indicate that rational combination therapy may have a place in treating refractory CM. Well-controlled multicenter trials are awaited. PMID:19188563

  1. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Marco, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs), such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. PMID:26316784

  2. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Patients with Relapsed Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Roberto; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Orofino, Nicola; Losurdo, Agnese; Gandolfi, Sara; Cugno, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic disorder. It results from proliferation of clonal plasma cells in bone marrow with production of monoclonal proteins, which are detectable in serum or urine. MM is clinically characterized by destructive bone lesions, anemia, hypercalcemia and renal insufficiency. Its prognosis is severe, with a median survival after diagnosis of approximately 3 years due to frequent relapses. Treatments for patients with relapsed/refractory MM include hematopoietic cell transplantation, a rechallenge using a previous chemotherapy regimen or a trial of a new regimen. The introduction of new drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib has markedly improved MM outcomes. When relapse occurs, the clinician’s challenge is to select the optimal treatment for each patient while balancing efficacy and toxicity. Patients with indolent relapse can be first treated with a 2-drug or a 3-drug combination. Patients with more aggressive relapse often require therapy with a combination of multiple active agents. Autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered as salvage therapy at first relapse for patients who have cryopreserved stem cells early in the disease course. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the pharmacological and molecular action of treatments used for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. PMID:24179412

  3. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  4. Pathophysiology, epidemiology, classification and treatment options for polycystic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Abu-Wasel, Bassam; Walsh, Caolan; Keough, Valerie; Molinari, Michele

    2013-09-21

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLD) represent a group of genetic disorders in which cysts occur in the liver (autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease) or in combination with cysts in the kidneys (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). Regardless of the genetic mutations, the natural history of these disorders is alike. The natural history of PLD is characterized by a continuous increase in the volume and the number of cysts. Both genders are affected; however, women have a higher prevalence. Most patients with PLD are asymptomatic and can be managed conservatively. Severe symptoms can affect 20% of patients who develop massive hepatomegaly with compression of the surrounding organs. Rrarely, patients with PLD suffer from acute complications caused by the torsion of hepatic cysts, intraluminal cystic hemorrhage and infections. The most common methods for the diagnosis of PLD are cross sectional imaging studies. Abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography are the two most frequently used investigations. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive and specific, and it is a valuable test for patients with intravenous contrast allergies or renal dysfunction. Different treatment modalities are available to physicians caring for these patients. Medical treatment has been ineffective. Percutaneous sclerotherapy, trans-arterial embolization, cyst fenestration, hepatic resection and liver transplantation are indicated to specific groups of patients and have to be tailored according to the extent of disease. This review outlines the current knowledge of the pathophysiology, clinical course, diagnosis and treatment strategies of PLD. PMID:24124322

  5. Emerging Treatment Options in Mild to Moderate Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Gary R.; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Sandborn, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with rectal bleeding and urgency, tenesmus, and diarrhea. Several medical therapies can be used in the treatment of UC. Aminosalicylates are widely used based on their efficacy in the induction and maintenance of remission. Although corticosteroids are effective in patients with more severe disease, systemic use is associated with significant safety concerns. The newer corticosteroid budesonide has lower systemic bioavailability and, consequently, a more favorable safety profile. A budesonide extended-release formulation allows once-daily dosing and delivers the agent locally throughout the colon. Biologic agents used for the treatment of moderate to severe UC include the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, and the integrin inhibitor vedolizumab. Rectally administered therapy can also be useful in the treatment of UC. In October 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a budesonide foam formulation for inducing remission in patients with active mild to moderate distal UC extending up to 40 cm from the anal verge. Budesonide foam rapidly distributes to the sigmoid colon and the rectum and avoids some of the drawbacks of suppositories and enemas. PMID:26491415

  6. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical trials are coming down the drug discovery pipeline, it is clear that the field is moving in a direction that values the development of molecular biomarkers, less subjective quantitative measures of symptom improvement, and rating scales developed specifically for use in FXS in conjunction with drug safety. While summarizing preclinical evidence, where applicable, and discussing challenges in FXS treatment development, this review details both completed clinical trials for the targeted and symptomatic treatment of FXS and introduces novel projects on the cusp of clinical trial investigation. PMID:25897255

  7. Unmet needs of patients with narcolepsy: perspectives on emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Dariusz R; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment options currently available for narcolepsy are often unsatisfactory due to suboptimal efficacy, troublesome side effects, development of drug tolerance, and inconvenience. Our understanding of the neurobiology of narcolepsy has greatly improved over the last decade. This knowledge has not yet translated into additional therapeutic options for patients, but progress is being made. Some compounds, such as histaminergic H3 receptor antagonists, may prove useful in symptom control of narcolepsy. The prospect of finding a cure still seems distant, but hypocretin replacement therapy offers some promise. In this narrative review, we describe these developments and others which may yield more effective narcolepsy treatments in the future. PMID:26045680

  8. Circadian rhythm disorders among adolescents: assessment and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Delwyn J; Biggs, Sarah N; Armstrong, Stuart M

    2013-10-21

    Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) - a circadian rhythm sleep disorder - is most commonly seen in adolescents. The differential diagnosis between DSPD and conventional psychophysiological insomnia is important for correct therapeutic intervention. Adolescent DSPD sleep duration is commonly 9 hours or more. Depression may be comorbid with DSPD. DSPD has a negative impact on adolescent academic performance. DSPD treatments include bright light therapy, chronotherapeutic regimens, and administration of melatonin as a chronobiotic (as distinct from a soporific). Attention to non-photic and extrinsic factors including healthy sleep parameters is also important to enable better sleep and mood outcomes in adolescents. PMID:24138360

  9. Treatment of Acute Seizures: Is Intranasal Midazolam a Viable Option?

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Lesley K.; Eiland, Lea S.

    2013-01-01

    Seizures in the pediatric population commonly occur, and when proper rescue medication is not administered quickly, the risk of neurologic compromise emerges. For many years, rectal diazepam has been the standard of care, but recent interest in a more cost-effective, safe alternative has led to the investigation of intranasal midazolam for this indication. Although midazolam and diazepam are both members of the benzodiazepine class, the kinetic properties of these 2 anticonvulsants vary. This paper will review available data pertaining to the efficacy, safety, cost, and pharmacokinetics of intranasal midazolam versus rectal diazepam as treatment for acute seizures for children in the prehospital, home, and emergency department settings. PMID:23798902

  10. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eldebawy, Eman; Parker, William; Abdel Rahman, Wamied; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  11. Treatment options for the eradication of intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Michael J G

    2006-08-01

    Pathogenic intestinal protozoa are responsible for clinically important infections in both the developed and the developing world. These organisms are responsible for both acute and chronic diarrhea, and Entamoeba histolytica, which affects the colon, can spread to involve the liver. Many of these pathogens, particularly the intracellular protozoa that predominantly affect the small intestine, produce their most devastating effects in patients with HIV/AIDS and other forms of immune deficiency. There are also various intestinal protozoa that do not seem to have any adverse effects on humans and can, therefore, be regarded as harmless commensal organisms. Although treatment has been available for several decades for giardiasis, isosporiasis and amoebiasis, until recently there have been no effective remedies for infection with intestinal coccidia--Cryptosporidium, Microsporidium and Cyclospora species. Cyclospora respond well to co-trimoxazole, microsporidia respond variably to albendazole, and cryptosporidia can often be eradicated by nitazoxanide. In chronically infected HIV-positive patients, treatment with multidrug regimens usually results in rapid resolution of the diarrhea and, in many instances, eradication of the parasite. PMID:16883348

  12. Rhinophototherapy: gimmick or an emerging treatment option for allergic rhinitis?

    PubMed

    Leong, S C

    2011-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been used in treating immune-mediated dermatological conditions such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. There are emerging reports on the efficacy of intranasal phototherapy in allergic rhinitis. The aim of this review was to assess intranasal phototherapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, with particular emphasis on clinical efficacy, scientific basis and safety. A structured search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (PubMed), the Cochrane Collaboration library, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Knowledge database was undertaken using MeSH terms `phototherapy` and `rhinitis.` Fourteen full-text articles were available for review. Three different phototherapy medical devices were assessed: (1) Bionase(TM), (2) Allergy Reliever SN206 and (3) Rhinolight(®). Light wavelength used in these devices ranged from red light to ultraviolet. Clinical use of intranasal phototherapy appears to be safe and well tolerated. Most studies demonstrated symptomatic improvement and quality of life scores. No improvement in objective measures of nasal airflow was demonstrated. Beneficial effects of phototherapy on inflammatory markers remain equivocal. Phototherapy treatment results in DNA damage but does not appear to predispose to carcinogenesis. However, long-term prospective studies are required to verify this. The quality of published studies was variable and thus the current strength of recommending intranasal phototherapy is currently weak. PMID:22125778

  13. [Pleural empyema and lung abscess: current treatment options].

    PubMed

    Hecker, E; Hamouri, S; Müller, E; Ewig, S

    2012-06-01

    Parapneumonic pleural empyema has been classified into different stages and classes. While the American Thoracic Society (ATS) classification is based on the natural course of the disease, Light has classified pleural empyema according to the radiological, physical and biochemical characteristics, and the American College of Chest Physician (ACCP) has categorised the patients with pleural empyema according to the risk of a poor outcome. According to this classification the management of the pleural empyema is based on the stage of the disease. Therapeutic strategies include chest tube, chest tube with fibrinolysis, thoracoscopic debridement and decortication in open or minimally invasive techniques. Primary lung abscesses develop in previously healthy lung parenchyma and are caused by aspiration. In addition, abscess formation can occur without aspiration, and important differences relate to community-acquired, nosocomial abscesses and those in the immunosuppressed host. 90 % of all lung abscesses can be cured with antibiotic treatment alone, 10 % have to be treated with an interventional catheter or chest tubes and only 1 % require thoracic surgery because of complications independent of the former conservative or interventional treatment strategies. PMID:22711325

  14. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  15. Treatment options for chronic idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    George, J N

    2000-01-01

    The goal of treatment for idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is to prevent serious bleeding. Traditionally, corticosteroids have been used as first-line therapy followed by splenectomy. Experience with splenectomy over 60 years shows that approximately two thirds of patients achieve normal platelet counts during the initial observation, but that thrombocytopenia often recurs with longer follow-up. We know that long-term use of corticosteroids can lead to significant morbidities; there is no consensus regarding the appropriate timing or indications for splenectomy. To address the Issue of appropriate use of splenectomy, we designed a multicenter clinical trial that will randomize patients to either standard care, involving prednisone followed by splenectomy, or to a novel regimen of limited prednisone treatment followed by WinRho SDF (Nabi, Boca Raton, FL) (anti-D) therapy to maintain the platelet count in a safe range for 1 year. Anti-D can be administered easily in an outpatient setting with few side effects and can provide predictable, transient increases in platelet count. The hypothesis is that prolonged maintenance therapy with a nontoxic regimen may increase the percentage of patients who will experience a spontaneous remission from thrombocytopenia, thereby avoiding an invasive and permanent surgical procedure, splenectomy, and its potentially life-threatening sequelae. PMID:10676922

  16. Vilazodone: a new treatment option for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Owen, R T

    2011-07-01

    Vilazodone hydrochloride belongs to a new class of antidepressants-the indolalkylamines-and has dual activity as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and as a partial agonist of the serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor. Its antidepressant activity has been demonstrated in two 8-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials and in a 1-year open-label study. None of these trials compared vilazodone with existing antidepressants; however, changes in depressive symptoms after vilazodone treatment were similar to those reported for SSRIs. The most common adverse events were diarrhea and nausea, although these were mild to moderate in severity and rarely a cause for discontinuation. No important clinical changes in vital signs, laboratory values, ECG morphology and sexual function were observed or reported. PMID:22013560

  17. Surgical treatment of recurring ameloblastoma, are there options?

    PubMed

    Hammarfjord, Oscar; Roslund, Johan; Abrahamsson, Peter; Nilsson, Peter; Thor, Andreas; Magnusson, Mikael; Kjeller, Göran; Englesson-Sahlström, Charlotta; Strandkvist, Tomas; Warfvinge, Gunnar; Krüger-Weiner, Carina

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the treatment given to patients with intraosseus ameloblastomas with special emphasis on recurrence and the outcomes of primary and secondary resection. Forty-eight patients who were treated for intraosseous ameloblastoma at 8 centres across Sweden met the inclusion criteria. They showed typical distribution of age, sex, site of lesion, and characteristic presenting features. Eleven of the 48 were initially treated with radical resection and none recurred. Twenty-two of the remaining 37 who were initially treated by conservative resection presented with recurrences. Sixteen of the 22 then had conservative secondary resections, which resulted in further recurrence in 6 patients. Initial radical resection is therefore superior to conservative management as far as recurrences are concerned. We argue, however, that a conservative surgical approach is adequate for many intraosseous ameloblastomas with limited extension, because relapse can be followed by radical resection if clinically indicated in selected cases. PMID:24050920

  18. New Options for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Fecal incontinence, the loss of anal sphincter control leading to the unwanted release of stool or gas, is a physical and psychological handicap that has a tremendous impact on an individual's quality of life. Although medical management is the mainstay of therapy for fecal incontinence, the main focus in this review is on invasive techniques with a goal of highlighting newer technologic and therapeutic advancements. While the standard surgical treatment for fecal incontinence still remains direct sphincter repair with an overlapping sphincteroplasty, this review concentrates specifically on biofeedback, the Procon incontinence device, local injection of synthetic materials, radio frequency energy (Secca procedure), antegrade colonic enemas, sphincteroplasty, gluteoplasty, graciloplasty both stimulated and non-stimulated, the artificial bowel sphincter, and sacral nerve stimulation. PMID:21603552

  19. Breakthrough pain in elderly patients with cancer: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pautex, Sophie; Vogt-Ferrier, Nicole; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of pain is high in the elderly and increases with the occurrence of cancer. Pain treatment is challenging because of age-related factors such as co-morbidities, and over half of the patients with cancer pain experience transient exacerbation of pain that is known as breakthrough pain (BTP). As with background pain, BTP should be properly assessed before being treated. The first step to be taken is optimizing around-the-clock analgesia with expert titration of the painkiller. Rescue medication should then be provided as per the requested need, while at the same time preventing identified potential precipitating factors. In the elderly, starting treatment with a lower dose of analgesics may be justified because of age-related physiological changes such as decreased hepatic and renal function. Whenever possible, oral medication should be provided prior to a painful maneuver. In the case of unpredictable BTP, immediate rescue medication is mandatory and the subcutaneous route is preferred unless patient-controlled analgesia via continuous drug infusion is available. Recently, transmucosal preparations have appeared in the medical armamentarium but it is not yet known whether they represent a truly efficient alternative, although their rapid onset of activity is already well recognized. Adjuvant analgesics, topical analgesics, anesthetic techniques and interventional techniques are all valid methods to help in the difficult management of pain and BTP in elderly patients with cancer. However, none has reached a satisfying scientific level of evidence as to nowadays make the development of undisputed best practice guidelines possible. Further research is therefore on the agenda. PMID:24817569

  20. Current management of fecal incontinence: Choosing amongst treatment options to optimize outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Van Koughnett, Julie Ann M; Wexner, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The severity of fecal incontinence widely varies and can have dramatic devastating impacts on a person’s life. Fecal incontinence is common, though it is often under-reported by patients. In addition to standard treatment options, new treatments have been developed during the past decade to attempt to effectively treat fecal incontinence with minimal morbidity. Non-operative treatments include dietary modifications, medications, and biofeedback therapy. Currently used surgical treatments include repair (sphincteroplasty), stimulation (sacral nerve stimulation or posterior tibial nerve stimulation), replacement (artificial bowel sphincter or muscle transposition) and diversion (stoma formation). Newer augmentation treatments such as radiofrequency energy delivery and injectable materials, are minimally invasive tools that may be good options before proceeding to surgery in some patients with mild fecal incontinence. In general, more invasive surgical treatments are now reserved for moderate to severe fecal incontinence. Functional and quality of life related outcomes, as well as potential complications of the treatment must be considered and the treatment of fecal incontinence must be individualized to the patient. General indications, techniques, and outcomes profiles for the various treatments of fecal incontinence are discussed in detail. Choosing the most effective treatment for the individual patient is essential to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of fecal incontinence. PMID:24409050

  1. A new therapeutic option for the treatment of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    McCabe, R; Chirurgi, V; Farkas, S A; Haddow, A; Heinz, G; Greene, S

    1996-06-24

    Patients with bacterial pneumonia often are treated empirically with parenteral broad-spectrum antimicrobials intended to cover potential gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. However, beta-lactamase-mediated resistance has developed to many of these antimicrobials, particularly third-generation cephalosporins, and has led to the development of fourth-generation agents that are relatively beta-lactamase stable. The purpose of these studies was to compare the efficacy and safety of the fourth-generation agent, cefepime, with that of the third-generation agent, ceftazidime, in the treatment of hospitalized patients with moderate-to-severe bacterial pneumonia. A total of 336 (97 evaluable) patients were enrolled in an open-label study, and 99 (23 evaluable) patients were enrolled in a blinded study of patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) including pneumonia. Patients were randomized to receive either cefepime 1 g every 12 hours or ceftazidime 1 g every 8 hours given as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes. Efficacy analysis included the evaluable patients while the safety analysis included all patients. The results in the open-label study were as follows: In patients with pneumonia, clinical response was satisfactory in 58 (85%) of 68 patients in the cefepime group and 21 (72%) of 29 patients in the ceftazidime group. Bacteriologic eradication occurred for 75 (93%) of 81 pathogens and 30 (94%) of 32 pathogens isolated from the 68 cefepime-treated patients and 29 ceftazidime-treated patients, respectively. The results in the blinded study were as follows: In patients with pneumonia, clinical response was satisfactory in 12 (80%) of 15 cefepime patients and in 7 (88%) of 8 ceftazidime patients, and the bacteriologic eradication rates were 85% (17/20 pathogens) and 73% (8/11 pathogens) isolated from the 15 cefepime-treated patients and the eight ceftazidime-treated patients, respectively. Among the most frequent adverse events in both groups were nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Similar adverse events were noted in the 99 patients in the blinded study. These studies indicate that the efficacy and safety of cefepime administered at 1 g twice daily is comparable to that of ceftazidime administered at 1 g three times daily for treatment of hospitalized patients with pneumonia caused by susceptible pathogens. PMID:8678099

  2. PSEUDOXANTHOMA ELASTICUM: DIAGNOSTIC FEATURES, CLASSIFICATION, AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, Jouni; Jiang, Qiujie; Váradi, András; Bercovitch, Lionel G.; Terry, Sharon F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a multisystem orphan disease, clinically affects the skin, the eyes, and the cardiovascular system with considerable morbidity and mortality. The clinical manifestations reflect the underlying pathology consisting of ectopic mineralization of peripheral connective tissues. Areas Covered The diagnostic criteria of PXE include characteristic clinical findings, together with histopathology of accumulation of pleiomorphic elastic structures in the dermis with progressive mineralization, and the presence of mutations in the ABCC6 gene. PXE-like cutaneous changes can also be encountered in other ectopic mineralization disorders, including generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene. In some cases, overlapping clinical features of PXE/GACI, associated with mutations either in ABCC6 or ENPP1, have been noted. PXE demonstrates considerable inter- and intrafamilial heterogeneity, and consequently, accurate diagnosis is required for appropriate classification with prognostic implications. There is no effective and specific treatment for the systemic manifestations of PXE, but effective therapies to counteract the ocular complications are in current clinical use. Expert Opinion A number of observations in the murine model, the Abcc6?/? mouse, have indicated that the mineral composition of diet, particularly the magnesium content, can influence the severity of the mineralization phenotype. These observations suggest that appropriate dietary interventions, coupled with lifestyle modifications, including smoking cessation, might alleviate the symptoms and improve the quality of life of individuals affected with this, currently intractable, orphan disease. PMID:25383264

  3. Genetics and Treatments Options for Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Celeste A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Worldwide research efforts demonstrate a major role of gene-environment interactions for the risk, development, and progression of most pancreatic diseases, including recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis. New findings of pancreas disease-associated risk variants have been reported in the CPA1, GGT1, CLDN2, MMP1, MTHFR, and other genes. These risk genes and their regulatory regions must be added to the known pathogenic variants in the PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC, CASR, UBR1, SBDS, CEL, and CTSB genes. This new knowledge promises to improve disease management and prevention through personalized medicine. At the same time, however, knowledge of an increasing number of pathogenic variants, and their complicated effects when present in combination, results in increasing difficulty in interpretation and development of recommendations. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic testing results also adds complexity to disease management paradigms, especially without interpretation and, in many cases, proven accuracy. While improvements in the ability to rapidly and accurately interpret complex genetic tests are clearly needed, some results, such as pathogenic CFTR variants – including a new class of bicarbonate-defective mutations – and PRSS1 variants have immediate implications that direct management. In addition, discovery of pancreatitis-associated genetic variants in patients with glucose intolerance may suggest underlying type 3c diabetes, which also has implications for treatment and disease management. PMID:24954874

  4. Hand dermatitis - differential diagnoses, diagnostics, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hand dermatitis is multifactorial, and includes factors such as genetic predisposition and exposure. A high incidence rate is associated with female gender, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. The most important risk factors for the persistence of hand dermatitis include its extent, contact allergic or atopic etiology, childhood dermatitis, and early onset (before the age of 20). The cost of illness of hand dermatitis corresponds to this seen in moderate to severe psoriasis. The diagnostic workup of hand dermatitis and its differential diagnoses requires a detailed assessment of occupational and recreational exposure. In case of possible work-related triggers, early notification of the accident insurer should be sought (via the dermatologist's report). Exposure to a contact allergen is a contributing factor in one-half of all cases of hand dermatitis. It is therefore imperative that all patients with hand dermatitis persisting for more than three months undergo patch testing. Successful and sustainable treatment of hand dermatitis starts with the proper identification and elimination of individual triggers, including the substitution of identified contact allergens and irritants, as well as optimizing preventive measures. Graded therapy taking the clinical severity into account is essential. Validated instruments may be used to monitor therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26713631

  5. Treatment options for low-level radiologically contaminated ORNL filtercake

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hom-Ti; Bostick, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    Water softening sludge (>4000 stored low level contaminated drums; 600 drums per year) generated by the ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant must be treated, stabilized, and placed in safe storage/disposal. The sludge is primarily CaCO{sub 3} and is contaminated by low levels of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. In this study, microwave sintering and calcination were evaluated for treating the sludge. The microwave melting experiments showed promise: volume reductions were significant (3-5X), and the waste form was durable with glass additives (LiOH, fly ash). A commercial vendor using surrogate has demonstrated a melt mineralization process that yields a dense monolithic waste form with a volume reduction factor (VR) of 7.7. Calcination of the sludge at 850-900 C yielded a VR of 2.5. Compaction at 4500 psi increased the VR to 4.2, but the compressed form is not dimensionally stable. Addition of paraffin helped consolidate fines and yielded a VR of 3.5. In conclusion, microwave melting or another form of vitrification is likely to be the best method; however for immediate implementation, the calculation/compaction/waxing process is viable.

  6. Stem cells: An eventual treatment option for heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Bilgimol, Joseph C; Ragupathi, Subbareddy; Vengadassalapathy, Lakshmanan; Senthil, Nathan S; Selvakumar, Kalimuthu; Ganesan, M; Manjunath, Sadananda Rao

    2015-09-26

    Stem cells are of global excitement for various diseases including heart diseases. It is worth to understand the mechanism or role of stem cells in the treatment of heart failure. Bone marrow derived stem cells are commonly practiced with an aim to improve the function of the heart. The majority of studies have been conducted with acute myocardial infarction and a few has been investigated with the use of stem cells for treating chronic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Heterogeneity in the treated group using stem cells has greatly emerged. Ever increasing demand for any alternative made is of at most priority for cardiomyopathy. Stem cells are of top priority with the current impact that has generated among physicians. However, meticulous selection of proper source is required since redundancy is clearly evident with the present survey. This review focuses on the methods adopted using stem cells for heart diseases and outcomes that are generated so far with an idea to determine the best therapeutic possibility in order to fulfill the present demand. PMID:26435771

  7. Stem cells: An eventual treatment option for heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bilgimol, Joseph C; Ragupathi, Subbareddy; Vengadassalapathy, Lakshmanan; Senthil, Nathan S; Selvakumar, Kalimuthu; Ganesan, M; Manjunath, Sadananda Rao

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are of global excitement for various diseases including heart diseases. It is worth to understand the mechanism or role of stem cells in the treatment of heart failure. Bone marrow derived stem cells are commonly practiced with an aim to improve the function of the heart. The majority of studies have been conducted with acute myocardial infarction and a few has been investigated with the use of stem cells for treating chronic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Heterogeneity in the treated group using stem cells has greatly emerged. Ever increasing demand for any alternative made is of at most priority for cardiomyopathy. Stem cells are of top priority with the current impact that has generated among physicians. However, meticulous selection of proper source is required since redundancy is clearly evident with the present survey. This review focuses on the methods adopted using stem cells for heart diseases and outcomes that are generated so far with an idea to determine the best therapeutic possibility in order to fulfill the present demand. PMID:26435771

  8. EMG monitoring during functional non-surgical therapy of Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Tobias; Wohifarth, Kai; Fink, Matthias; Thermann, H; Rollnik, Jens D

    2002-07-01

    After surgical therapy of Achilles tendon rupture, neuromuscular changes may persist, even one year after surgery. We were interested whether these changes are also evident following a non-surgical functional therapy (Variostabil therapy boot/Adidas). Twenty-one patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture were enrolled in the study (mean age 38.5 years, range 24 to 60; 18 men, three women) and followed-up clinically and with surface EMG of the gastrocnemius muscles after four, eight, 12 weeks, and one year after rupture. EMG differences between the affected and non-affected side could only be observed at baseline and after four weeks following Achilles tendon rupture. The results from our study show that EMG changes are not found following non-surgical functional therapy. PMID:12146771

  9. Update on the pathogenic potential and treatment options for Blastocystis sp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although Blastocystis is one of the most common enteric parasites, there is still much controversy surrounding the pathogenicity and potential treatment options for this parasite. In this review we look at the evidence supporting Blastocystis as an intestinal pathogen as shown by numerous case studies and several in vivo studies and the evidence against. We describe the chronic nature of some infections and show the role of Blastocystis in immunocompromised patients and the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and Blastocystis infection. There have been several studies that have suggested that pathogenicity may be subtype related. Metronidazole is the most widely accepted treatment for Blastocystis but several cases of treatment failure and resistance have been described. Other treatment options which have been suggested include paromomycin and trimethroprim- sulfamethoxazole. PMID:24883113

  10. Second-line treatment of metastatic gastric cancer: Current options and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavel, Dheepak; Fedyanin, Mikhail; Tryakin, Alexey; Tjulandin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths, regardless of its decreasing incidence and newly available treatment options. Most patients present at an advanced stage and are treated with upfront systemic chemotherapy. Those patients receiving first-line therapy may initially respond to treatment, but many of them relapse over time. In such condition, second-line treatment for disease progression remains the only available option. Although there exists no standard approach in the second-line setting, several phase III trials have shown modest survival benefit in patients receiving irinotecan, taxane and ramucirumab over the best supportive care or active agents. This review analyzes the currently available treatment regimens and future directions of research in the second-line setting for metastatic gastric cancer with the best available evidence. Additionally, the prognostic factors that influence patient survival in those receiving second-line therapy are discussed. PMID:26556991

  11. Emerging treatment options for management of malignant ascites in patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ramez N; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2012-01-01

    Malignant ascites affects approximately 10% of patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer and is associated with troublesome symptoms, including abdominal pressure and distension, dyspnea, bloating, pelvic pain, and bowel/bladder dysfunction. To date, no effective therapy has been identified for the treatment of malignant ascites in patients with recurrent, advanced ovarian cancer. In this article, we discuss currently existing options for the treatment of ascites associated with ovarian cancer, and review the literature as it pertains to novel, targeted therapies. Specifically, preclinical and clinical trials exploring the use of the antiangiogenic agents, bevacizumab and vascular endothelial growth factor-trap, as well as the nonangiogenic agent, catumaxomab, will be reviewed. Despite current limitations in treatment, knowledge regarding management options in the palliation of ascites is critical to practicing physicians. Ultimately, as with all novel therapies, symptom relief and treatment goals must be weighed against patient discomfort and potentially significant adverse events. PMID:22927770

  12. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%–90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of “precision therapeutics”. No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  13. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  14. Therapeutical options for the treatment of Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    PubMed

    Randerath, Winfried J

    2009-03-01

    The awareness of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) and of the co-existence of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and central breathing disturbances has rapidly grown in recent years. CSR is defined by a waxing and waning pattern of the breathing amplitude. Sleep related breathing disorders in patients with heart failure are associated with impaired clinical outcome and survival. While continuous positive airway pressure treatment (CPAP) is widely used to treat CSR, it has failed to improve overall survival of heart failure patients. Nevertheless, it has been shown that CPAP reduces mortality if breathing disturbances were sufficiently eliminated. Therefore, optimal suppression of CSR is critical. While CPAP reduces CSR by 50% on average, adaptive servoventilation (ASV) normalises CSR in most patients. ASV devices apply different levels of pressure support: during periods of hypoventilation the inspiratory pressure is increased while it is reduced to the lowest possible level during hyperventilation. The devices deliver an expiratory pressure to overcome upper airways obstruction. Pressure support is defined by the difference between expiratory and inspiratory pressure. Thus, while pressure support is fixed in bilevel devices, it varies under ASV. However, the hypothesis that ASV might improve survival in CSR patients has to be proved in prospective studies in CPAP nonresponders. There is a lack of evidence on the use of bilevel devices in CSR. However, ASV has proven both to effectively treat CSR and to be superior to CPAP in respiratory and sleep parameters in short term and medium term studies. Nevertheless, data on the long term use and the influence on cardiac parameters are necessary. PMID:19274490

  15. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  16. Preharvest Treatment Options for Dry Edible Beans Christy Sprague, Associate Professor and Weed Extension Specialist

    E-print Network

    Preharvest Treatment Options for Dry Edible Beans Christy Sprague, Associate Professor and Weed Extension Specialist Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University "Green" weeds not controlled by earlier weed management practices and "green" stems or leaves of dry bean plants can be a major problem

  17. Parkinson's Disease and Its Management: Part 3: Nondopaminergic and Nonpharmacological Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    DeMaagd, George; Philip, Ashok

    2015-10-01

    This installment of a five-part series reviews the role of nondopaminergic pharmacotherapies and adjunctive options-such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, and anticholinergic agents-in managing Parkinson's disease. Nonpharmacological treatments are also explored. PMID:26535023

  18. New treatment option for an incomplete vertical root fracture–a preliminary case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Instead of extraction this case report presents an alternative treatment option for a maxillary incisor with a vertical root fracture (VRF) causing pain in a 78-year-old patient. After retreatment of the existing root canal filling the tooth was stabilized with a dentine adhesive and a composite restoration. Then the tooth was extracted, the VRF gap enlarged with a small diamond bur and the existing retrograde root canal filling removed. The enlarged fracture line and the retrograde preparation were filled with a calcium-silicate-cement (Biodentine). Afterwards the tooth was replanted and a titanium trauma splint was applied for 12d. A 24 months clinical and radiological follow-up showed an asymptomatic tooth, reduction of the periodontal probing depths from 7 mm prior to treatment to 3 mm and gingival reattachment in the area of the fracture with no sign of ankylosis. Hence, the treatment of VRF with Biodentine seems to be a possible and promising option. PMID:24670232

  19. Restoration of disk height through non-surgical spinal decompression is associated with decreased discogenic low back pain: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Because previous studies have suggested that motorized non-surgical spinal decompression can reduce chronic low back pain (LBP) due to disc degeneration (discogenic low back pain) and disc herniation, it has accordingly been hypothesized that the reduction of pressure on affected discs will facilitate their regeneration. The goal of this study was to determine if changes in LBP, as measured on a verbal rating scale, before and after a 6-week treatment period with non-surgical spinal decompression, correlate with changes in lumbar disc height, as measured on computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods A retrospective cohort study of adults with chronic LBP attributed to disc herniation and/or discogenic LBP who underwent a 6-week treatment protocol of motorized non-surgical spinal decompression via the DRX9000 with CT scans before and after treatment. The main outcomes were changes in pain as measured on a verbal rating scale from 0 to 10 during a flexion-extension range of motion evaluation and changes in disc height as measured on CT scans. Paired t-test or linear regression was used as appropriate with p < 0.05 considered to be statistically significant. Results We identified 30 patients with lumbar disc herniation with an average age of 65 years, body mass index of 29 kg/m2, 21 females and 9 males, and an average duration of LBP of 12.5 weeks. During treatment, low back pain decreased from 6.2 (SD 2.2) to 1.6 (2.3, p < 0.001) and disc height increased from 7.5 (1.7) mm to 8.8 (1.7) mm (p < 0.001). Increase in disc height and reduction in pain were significantly correlated (r = 0.36, p = 0.044). Conclusions Non-surgical spinal decompression was associated with a reduction in pain and an increase in disc height. The correlation of these variables suggests that pain reduction may be mediated, at least in part, through a restoration of disc height. A randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these promising results. Clinical trial registration number NCT00828880 PMID:20615252

  20. Surgical treatment of trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    TACCARDO, GIUSEPPE; DE VITIS, ROCCO; PARRONE, GIUSEPPE; MILANO, GIUSEPPE; FANFANI, FRANCESCO

    2013-01-01

    Trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis is a common cause of radial-sided wrist pain that prevalently affects women. It is diagnosed on the basis of a thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation. While radiographs are used to determine the stage of disease, treatment is dependent on the severity of the symptoms. Non-surgical treatment frequently consists of activity modification, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, splinting and corticosteroid injections. After failure of conservative treatment, various surgical options exist depending on the stage of the disease. These options range from ligament reconstruction or osteotomy, for early painful laxity, to trapeziectomy, arthrodesis and arthroplasty for more severe osteoarthritis. This article reviews the literature supporting the various surgical treatment options and analyzes the surgical techniques most frequently used in the different disease stages. PMID:25606524

  1. Treatment for infections with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: what options do we still have?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The global spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is increasingly becoming a major challenge in clinical and public health settings. To date, the treatment for serious CRE infections remains difficult. The intelligent use of antimicrobials and effective infection control strategies is crucial to prevent further CRE spread. Early consultation with experts in the treatment of infections with multidrug-resistant organisms is valuable in patient management. This brief review will focus on the current, yet limited, treatment options for CRE infections. PMID:25041592

  2. [Partial reconstruction after conservative treatment for breast cancer: classification of sequelae and treatment options].

    PubMed

    Clough, K B; Nos, C; Fitoussi, A; Couturaud, B; Inguenault, C; Sarfati, I

    2008-04-01

    Most patients presenting with breast cancer are treated by breast conserving treatment (BCT). Some of these patients present with poor cosmetic results and ask for partial breast reconstruction. These reconstructions following BCT are presenting more frequently to plastic surgeons as a difficult management problem. We have defined and published a classification of the different cosmetic sequelae (CS) after BCT into three types. This classification helps to analyse these complex deformities aggravated by radiotherapy. Furthermore, our classification helps to choose between the different surgical techniques and propose the optimal option for their surgical correction. Our initial publications reported 35 and 85 patients: we have currently operated more than 150 cases of CS after BCT. Type-1 CS are defined by an asymmetry between the two breasts, with no distortion or deformity of the radiated breast. Type-2 CS are those with an obvious breast deformity, that can be corrected with a partial reconstruction of the breast. Type-3 CS are those with such a deformity that only a mastectomy with total reconstruction of the breast can be performed. Most of the patients present with type-2 CS, but are reluctant to undergo what they feel is a major reconstructive procedure: in a initial prospective series of 85 patients operated for CS after BCT, 48 (56.5%) had type-1 CS, 33 patients (38.8%) type-2 CS and four patients (4.7%) type-3 CS. Type-1 patients should be managed essentially by contralateral symmetrizing procedures. One should limit any surgery on the radiated breast, as a mammoplasty or an augmentation is at high risk of complications. Type-2 is the most difficult to manage and requires all the surgical armamentarium of breast reconstructive surgery. The insetting of a myocutaneous flap is often necessary and autologous fat grafting is a promising tool in selected cases. Type-3 CS requires mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with a myocutaneous flap. The major development though in the past 10 years has been the development of oncoplastic techniques at the time of the original tumour removal, in order to avoid most of type 2 and type 3 deformities. This paper reaffirms the validity of the Cosmetic Sequelae classification as a simple, practical guide for breast reconstructive surgeons. It discusses the various choices of reconstructive procedures available, the importance of "preventing" these CS and defining the role of the plastic surgeon in the management of these patients. PMID:18387726

  3. Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ...

  4. Future pharmacological treatment options for nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Comer, Grant M; Ciulla, Thomas A; Heier, Jeffery S; Criswell, Mark H

    2005-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in the industrialised world. Within the past decade, researchers have introduced many promising prevention and treatment options in an attempt to minimise the central vision loss imparted from AMD. Based on large-scale, randomised, prospective, placebo-controlled trials, a specially formulated combination of the antioxidants vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, copper and zinc is the only proven means of AMD prophylaxis. Thermal laser photocoagulation and photodynamic therapy with verteporfin are the only standard treatment options. However, efficacy is limited and treatment is only applicable to a minority of AMD patients. Thus, alternative pharmacological interventions are in all phases of clinical development. Researchers are guardedly optimistic that these advances may change the entire approach to AMD management in the near future. This review article will detail the currently accepted treatment options, as well as describe several of the more promising investigational pharmacological approaches to AMD. PMID:15757408

  5. 26 CFR 1.1234-3 - Special rules for the treatment of grantors of certain options granted after September 1, 1976.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...for the treatment of grantors of certain options granted after September 1, 1976. 1...for the treatment of grantors of certain options granted after September 1, 1976. ...general. In the case of the grantor of an option (including an option granted as...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1234-3 - Special rules for the treatment of grantors of certain options granted after September 1, 1976.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...for the treatment of grantors of certain options granted after September 1, 1976. 1...for the treatment of grantors of certain options granted after September 1, 1976. ...general. In the case of the grantor of an option (including an option granted as...

  7. Balloon Pulmonary Angioplasty: A Treatment Option for Inoperable Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Aiko; Matsubara, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    In chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), stenoses or obstructions of the pulmonary arteries due to organized thrombi can cause an elevation in pulmonary artery resistance, which in turn can result in pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH can be cured surgically by pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA); however, patients deemed unsuitable for PEA due to lesion, advanced age, or comorbidities have a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Recently, advances have been made in balloon pulmonary angioplasty for these patients, and this review highlights this recent progress.

  8. Fully-customized lingual appliances: how lingual orthodontics became a viable treatment option.

    PubMed

    George, Richard D; Hirani, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    Despite being available for over 30 years, it is perhaps only over the past decade or so that lingual therapy has entered into the mainstream and become a viable treatment option. This paper outlines the problems encountered with traditional lingual techniques and describes how fully-customized lingual appliances have been designed to overcome many of the issues that had risked confining lingual orthodontics to the margins of clinical practice. PMID:24005954

  9. Options Assessment Report: Treatment of Nitrate Salt Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-12-17

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognizes that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and that a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL’s preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  10. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  11. Current and future treatment options for nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Comer, Grant M; Ciulla, Thomas A; Criswell, Mark H; Tolentino, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in the industrialised world. Although relatively simple to diagnose through direct visualisation augmented with rapid sequence fluorescein angiography, treatment has presented a far greater challenge because the true aetiology of AMD is largely unknown. Within the past decade, researchers have introduced many new, potentially promising treatment and prevention options in an attempt to minimise the damage imparted from AMD. They capitalise on many of the theoretical and known factors contributing to AMD progression. A high-dose of an orally administered combination of the antioxidants ascorbic acid (vitamin C), tocopherol (vitamin E) and beta-carotene, in addition to copper and zinc, is the only widely accepted preventive therapy. Thermal laser photocoagulation and verteporfin photodynamic therapy are the only standard treatment options available based on large scale, randomised, prospective, placebo-controlled trials; however, efficacy is limited and only a minority of patients who present with AMD are eligible for these treatments. Many other preventive and treatment options are in all phases of clinical studies and expected to change the entire approach to AMD management in the near future. For example, alternative antioxidants, drusen ablation, apheresis and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors have shown promise in some studies by preventing or slowing the progression of certain forms of AMD. In addition, alternative photodynamic therapies, low-intensity laser, antiangiogenic medications, radiation treatment and surgery have demonstrated the ability, albeit to differing degrees, to inhibit or possibly even reverse the severe vision loss often associated with AMD characterised by choroidal neovascularisation. PMID:15631528

  12. Management of localized and locally advanced renal tumors. A contemporary review of current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Brookman-May, S; Langenhuijsen, J F; Volpe, A; Minervini, A; Joniau, S; Salagierski, M; Roscigno, M; Akdogan, B; Vandromme, A; Rodriguez-Faba, O; Marszalek, M

    2013-06-01

    About 70% of patients with renal cell carcinoma present with localized or locally advanced disease at primary diagnosis. Whereas these patients are potentially curable by surgical treatment alone, a further 20% to 30% of patients are diagnosed with primary metastatic disease. Although over the past years medical treatment for metastatic patients has nearly completely changed from immunotherapy to effective treatment with targeted agents, metastatic disease still represents a disease status which is not curable. Also in patients with metastatic disease, surgical treatment of the primary tumor plays an important role, since local tumor related complications can be avoided or minimized by surgery. Furthermore, also improvement of overall survival has been proven for surgery in metastatic patients when combined with cytokine treatment. Hence, surgical combined with systemic treatment as a multi-modal, adjuvant, and neo-adjuvant treatment is also required in patients with advanced or metastatic disease. A growing number of elderly and comorbid patients are currently diagnosed with small renal masses, which has led to increased attention paid to alternative ablative treatment modalities as well as active surveillance strategies, which are applied in order to avoid unnecessary overtreatment in these patients. Since surgical treatment also might enhance the risk of chronic kidney disease with consecutive cardiac disorders as well as reduced overall survival, ablative techniques and active surveillance are increasingly applied. In this review article we focus on current surgical and none-surgical treatment options for the management of patients with localized, locally advanced, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:23748279

  13. Novel Therapeutic Options for the Treatment of Mineral Metabolism Abnormalities in End Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Abnormalities in mineral metabolism are a universal complication in dialysis patients and are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Hyperphosphatemia, increased fibroblast growth factor 23 levels and secondary hyperparathyroidism are all strongly associated with adverse outcomes in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and most treatment strategies target these parameters. Over the past few years, new therapies have emerged for the treatment of abnormalities of mineral metabolism in ESRD and many are promising. This article will review these new therapeutic options including the potential advantages and disadvantages compared to existing therapies. PMID:26278462

  14. Treatment options and neurocognitive outcome in patients with diffuse low-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Klein, M

    2015-12-01

    In the management of patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) there still is controversy on how surgical intervention, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy contribute to an ameliorated progression-free survival, overall survival, and treatment-related neurotoxicity. With the ongoing changes in treatment options for these patients, neurocognitive functioning is an increasingly important outcome measure, because neurocognitive impairments can have a large impact on self-care, social and professional functioning, and consequently on health-related quality of life. Many factors contribute to neurocognitive outcome, such as direct and indirect tumor effects, seizures, medication, and oncological treatment. Although the role of radiotherapy has been studied extensively, the adverse effects on neurocognitive function of other treatment-related factors remain elusive. This not only holds for resective surgery, where the use of intraoperative stimulation mapping has a high potential benefit concerning survival and patient functioning, but also for the use of chemotherapy that might have some interesting new applications, like the facilitation of total resection for initially primary or recurrent diffuse LGG tumors. This paper will discuss these treatment options in LGG patients and their potential effects on neurocognitive functioning. PMID:26375636

  15. Environmental assessment of sewage sludge recycling options and treatment processes in Tokyo.

    PubMed

    Hara, K; Mino, T

    2008-12-01

    Tokyo has historically suffered from a shortage of final disposal sites for the treated sewage sludge. Given this situation, sludge recycling and incineration have been promoted to reduce the volume of treated sludge conveyed to the disposal site, and the recycling options have changed since the late 1990s. This study aims to revisit the sewage sludge treatment and recycling processes in Tokyo and to evaluate different recycling options (brick, aggregate, refuse derived fuel and slag) from the energy consumption perspective by clarifying the complex flow of treated sludge within Tokyo's 23 wards. The study also estimates environmental loads associated with the operation of the whole sludge management system in the area. The environmental loads include: (1) total energy consumption and (2) gas emissions (greenhouse and acidification gases). The estimation was carried out for the years 1995, 1997, 1999 and 2001, during which a drastic change in recycling options occurred. The results indicated that the production of refuse derived fuel was the most energy consuming recycling option while aggregate production is the least energy consuming. They also showed that despite the increasing sludge volume, the energy consumption associated with the operation of the whole system decreased during the period while the gas emissions increased. PMID:18439814

  16. Integrating first-line treatment options into clinical practice: what's new in advanced melanoma?

    PubMed

    Dummer, Reinhard; Schadendorf, Dirk; Ascierto, Paolo A; Larkin, James; Lebbé, Celeste; Hauschild, Axel

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma remains a serious form of skin cancer in Europe and worldwide. Localized, early-stage melanomas can usually be treated with surgical excision. However, the prognosis is poorer for patients with advanced disease. Before 2011, treatment for advanced melanoma included palliative surgery and/or radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with or without immunotherapy, such as interleukin-2. As none of these treatments had shown survival benefits in patients with advanced melanoma, European guidelines had recommended that patients be entered into clinical trials. The lack of approved first-line options and varying access to clinical trials meant that European clinicians relied on experimental regimens and chemotherapy-based treatments when no other options were available. Since 2011, ipilimumab, an immuno-oncology therapy, and vemurafenib and dabrafenib, targeted agents that inhibit mutant BRAF, have been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of advanced melanoma. More recently, the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, received European marketing authorization for use in patients with BRAF mutation-positive advanced melanoma. In 2014, the anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab was approved as a first-line therapy in Japan. Whereas nivolumab and another anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, were approved as second-line therapies in the USA, their recent approval in Europe are for first-line use based on new clinical trial data in this setting. Together these agents are changing clinical practice and making therapeutic decisions more complex. Here, we discuss current and emerging therapeutic options for the first-line treatment of advanced melanoma, and how these therapies can be optimized to provide the best possible outcomes for patients. PMID:26426764

  17. Ustekinumab as an Alternative Treatment Option for Chronic Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Davila, Ulysses; Cohen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is an exceptionally rare, chronic inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology. Patients classically present with small, follicular keratosis and salmon-colored plaques that begin at the head and neck and slowly progress to widespread erythroderma including the palms and soles. It is difficult to distinguish PRP from other inflammatory dermatoses; however, features that help aid in the diagnosis include ‘islands’ of spared skin, orangish hue and typical findings on biopsy. There are no specific guidelines on therapy and treatment options include corticosteroids, vitamin D analogs, retinoids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, azathioprine and tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists. Unfortunately options are limited for patients when these drugs do not work. We report a case of chronic PRP, refractory to conventional treatment, successfully treated with ustekinumab monotherapy. The patient was treated with 90 mg subcutaneous ustekinumab injections and began to show improvement within only 8 weeks. Long-term control of the disease has been attained without any significant side effects. We report this case to show that ustekinumab can be used as an alternative treatment method for patients with chronic, unremitting PRP. Treatment response is remarkably rapid and the infrequent dosing leads to patient compliance and a significantly improved quality of life. PMID:25969677

  18. Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating in Type 1 Diabetes: Prevalence, Screening, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Hanlan, Margo E.; Griffith, Julie; Patel, Niral

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on the prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Recent research indicates higher prevalence rates of eating disorders among people with type 1 diabetes, as compared to their peers without diabetes. Eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors – especially insulin omission – are associated with poorer glycemic control and serious risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Screening should begin in pre-adolescence and continue through early adulthood, as many disordered eating behaviors begin during the transition to adolescence and may persist for years. Available screening tools and treatment options are reviewed. Given the complexity of diabetes management in combination with eating disorder treatment, it is imperative to screen early and often, in order to identify those most vulnerable and begin appropriate treatment in a timely manner. PMID:24022608

  19. Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis and Its Treatment Options: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Roshna, T.; Nandakumar, K.

    2012-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis results in rapid destruction of the periodontium and can lead to early tooth loss in the affected individuals if not diagnosed early and treated appropriately. The diagnostic features of the disease are characteristic, but the clinical presentation and patterns of destructions may vary between patients. Successful management of the disease is challenging especially if diagnosed at advanced stages of the disease, but not impossible with the current therapeutic choices for the disease. A vast array of treatment modalities is available which can be employed in the treatment of generalized aggressive periodontitis with varying success rates, but a definite guideline for the management is yet to be formulated. However, with the exponential rate of developments in periodontal research, regenerative therapy, tissue engineering, and genetic technologies, the future seems promising in regard to options at managing the disease. This paper attempts to describe the clinical and radiographic diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of generalized aggressive periodontitis patients with case reports and a brief review. PMID:22291715

  20. Evolution of the treatment options of ulnar collateral ligament injuries of the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Langer, P; Fadale, P; Hulstyn, M

    2006-01-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) insufficiency is potentially a career threatening, or even a career ending, injury, particularly in overhead throwing athletes. The evolution of treating modalities provides afflicted athletes with the opportunity to avoid premature retirement. There have been several clinical and basic science research efforts which have investigated the pathophysiology of UCL disruption, the biomechanics specific to overhead throwing, and the various types of treatment modalities. UCL reconstruction is currently the most commonly performed surgical treatment option. An in depth analysis of the present treatment options, both non?operative and operative, as well as their respective results and biomechanical evaluation, is lacking in the literature to date. This article provides a comprehensive current review and comparative analysis of these modalities. Over the last 30 years there has been an evolution of the original UCL reconstruction. Yet, despite the variability in modifications, such as the docking technique, interference screw fixation, and use of suture anchors, the unifying concepts of UCL reconstruction are that decreased dissection of the flexor?pronator mass and decreased handling of the ulnar nerve leads to improved outcomes. PMID:16488902

  1. Non-Surgical Chemotherapeutic Treatment Strategies for the Management of Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Krayer, Joe W.; Leite, Renata S.; Kirkwood, Keith L.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Periodontal diseases are initiated by subgingival periodontal pathogens in susceptible periodontal sites. The host immune response towards periodontal pathogens helps to sustain periodontal disease and eventual alveolar bone loss. Numerous adjunctive therapeutic strategies have evolved to manage periodontal diseases. Systemic and local antibiotics, antiseptics, and past and future host immune modulatory agents are reviewed and discussed to facilitate the dental practitioner’s appreciation of this ever-growing field in clinical periodontics. PMID:20103470

  2. Desmoid tumors: clinical features and treatment options: a case report and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jenayah, Amel Achour; Bettaieb, Hajer; Saoudi, Sarra; Gharsa, Anissa; Sfar, Ezzeddine; Boudaya, Fethia; Chelli, Dalenda

    2015-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion and may even result in a fatal outcome when located around vital organs. Their clinical presentation, biological behavior and natural history can be quite varied and is incompletely understood at the present time. The optimal therapeutic approach depends on various factors, and a multidisciplinary approach is necessary to achieve local control with acceptable morbidity. Despite progress in the understanding of these tumors and the treatment options, local recurrence remains a major problem. PMID:26516394

  3. Treatment Options for Liquid Radioactive Waste. Factors Important for Selecting of Treatment Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.J.

    1998-09-28

    The cleanup of liquid streams contaminated with radionuclides is obtained by the selection or a combination of a number of physical and chemical separations, processes or unit operations. Among those are: Chemical treatment; Evaporation; Ion exchange and sorption; Physical separation; Electrodialysis; Osmosis; Electrocoagulation/electroflotation; Biotechnological processes; and Solvent extraction.

  4. Treatment and prevention of cryptosporidiosis: what options are there for a country like Zambia?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a major infection of humans, leading to diarrhoea and growth failure in children, diarrhoea and malnutrition in immunocompromised adults, and is associated with increased mortality in all age groups. Using the country of Zambia as an example, I review the possible approaches to treatment and prevention in a tropical setting. The current optimal therapy for cryptosporidiosis is nitazoxanide which works well in HIV uninfected children, but treatment in patients with HIV infection remains remarkably difficult. No single drug has demonstrated efficacy in a randomised trial. No vaccine is available, so the best option for prevention for the moment is filtration and clean storage of drinking water. This would be expected to reduce cryptosporidiosis dramatically, but this needs to be demonstrated directly. Water filtration would have the added benefit of protection against many other pathogens, but the paucity of alternative approaches highlights the need for a better understanding of this important human pathogen. PMID:21320387

  5. Treatment options for community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly people.

    PubMed

    Petrosillo, Nicola; Cataldo, Maria Adriana; Pea, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) represents one of the most common reasons for hospitalization in elderly people. Because older persons are the fastest growing segment of the population, a further increase of the incidence of CAP is expected in the next few years. Due to the high frequency, the different epidemiology, the atypical clinical presentation and the age-related modifications in drug metabolism that complicate the treatment, infections in the elderly people represent a major challenge for physicians. Despite the peculiarity of the management of CAP in the elderly people, no specific recommendations for antimicrobial treatment are provided in the international guidelines. The aim of this review is to give an update of the current antibiotic options for CAP in the elderly people reporting available data on the CAP etiology and risk factors, and tolerability, toxicity and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic of antimicrobial agents used for elderly patients. PMID:25746632

  6. Semidirect Restorations in Multidisciplinary Treatment: Viable Option for Children and Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Frizzera, Fausto; Silva, Monica Barros da; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maio; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-04-01

    Due to the esthetic necessity required nowadays, the multidisciplinary treatment became a fundamental step in the restoration success. When the patient exhibits dental agenesis of one or more elements, he can show difficulty in social interactions. The age of the patient is a limiting factor to esthetic procedures, however, it should be evaluated as a real indicative with each case. The utilization of semi-direct restorations is a viable option due the cost, esthetic and improvement of physical and mechanical properties. The purpose of this paper is to present a case detailing the confection and cementation of anterior semi-direct restorations aimed at an anatomic reestablishment associated with integrated treatment with periodontics and orthodontics. PMID:26067730

  7. Preferences for different insomnia treatment options in people with schizophrenia and related psychoses: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Waters, Flavie; Chiu, Vivian W; Janca, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Amanda; Ree, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations and delusions can be intrusive and unwanted and often remain treatment-resistant. Due to recent progress in basic and clinical sciences, novel approaches such as sleep-based interventions are increasingly becoming offered to address the physical and mental health issues of people with severe mental illness. While the primary outcome is to improve sleep, studies have demonstrated that interventions that target symptoms of insomnia can also produce improvements in the severity of psychotic symptoms, quality of life, and functional outcomes. This study presents qualitative data on the attitudes and preferences of people with schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorders to three different types of therapies for insomnia (standard pharmacological, melatonin-based, and cognitive and/or behavior therapy). Interviews included discussions regarding the perceived advantages and limitations of different therapies, enablers to taking up the preferred option, as well as personal strategies that have helped respondents with sleep problems in the past. Results showed that, when given the choice, these individuals prefer psychological and behavioral-type therapy to other sleep interventions because of its potential to support and empower them in taking responsibility for their own recovery. Pharmacological therapies, by contrast, are viewed as useful in managing acute sleep problems, but only as a short-term solution. Overall, the findings underscore the need for patients' active engagement when making decisions about treatment options. PMID:26236265

  8. Preferences for different insomnia treatment options in people with schizophrenia and related psychoses: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Flavie; Chiu, Vivian W.; Janca, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Amanda; Ree, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations and delusions can be intrusive and unwanted and often remain treatment-resistant. Due to recent progress in basic and clinical sciences, novel approaches such as sleep-based interventions are increasingly becoming offered to address the physical and mental health issues of people with severe mental illness. While the primary outcome is to improve sleep, studies have demonstrated that interventions that target symptoms of insomnia can also produce improvements in the severity of psychotic symptoms, quality of life, and functional outcomes. This study presents qualitative data on the attitudes and preferences of people with schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorders to three different types of therapies for insomnia (standard pharmacological, melatonin-based, and cognitive and/or behavior therapy). Interviews included discussions regarding the perceived advantages and limitations of different therapies, enablers to taking up the preferred option, as well as personal strategies that have helped respondents with sleep problems in the past. Results showed that, when given the choice, these individuals prefer psychological and behavioral-type therapy to other sleep interventions because of its potential to support and empower them in taking responsibility for their own recovery. Pharmacological therapies, by contrast, are viewed as useful in managing acute sleep problems, but only as a short-term solution. Overall, the findings underscore the need for patients’ active engagement when making decisions about treatment options. PMID:26236265

  9. Pityriasis Lichenoides in Childhood: Review of Clinical Presentation and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Geller, Lauren; Antonov, Nina K; Lauren, Christine T; Morel, Kimberly D; Garzon, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    Pityriasis lichenoides (PL) is a skin condition of unclear etiology that occurs not uncommonly in childhood. It is often classified into the acute form, pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA), and the chronic form, pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC). We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language literature using the PubMed database of all cases of childhood PL reported from 1962 to 2014 and summarized the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment options, and prognosis of this condition in children. The proposed etiologies are discussed, including its association with infectious agents, medications, and immunizations and evidence for PL as a lymphoproliferative disorder. We found an average age of PL onset of 6.5 years, with a slight (61%) male predominance. We also found that PLEVA and PLC tend to occur with equal frequency and that, in many cases, there is clinical and histopathologic overlap between the two phenotypes. When systemic therapy is indicated, we propose that oral erythromycin and narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy should be first-line treatment options for children with PL since they have been shown to be effective and well tolerated. In most cases, PL follows a benign course with no greater risk of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, although given the rare case reports of transformation, long-term follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:25816855

  10. A critical appraisal of systemic treatment options for metastatic non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Salima; Meskawi, Malek; Hansen, Jens; Bianchi, Marco; Tian, Zhe; Latour, Mathieu; Graefen, Markus; Montorsi, Francesco; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Perrotte, Paul; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Sun, Maxine

    2014-04-01

    Current guidelines provide most support for the use of temsirolimus in first line therapy for metastatic non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma (nccRCC). However, this recommendation is based on scant level 2a evidence. The objective of this review is to examine the evidence supporting first line temsirolimus use in patients with metastatic nccRCC as well as alternative first line treatment options. Six studies, that assessed the efficacy of five agents qualified for inclusion. Among recognized treatment options for metastatic nccRCC, mean weighted progression free survival values of 7.9 months for temsirolimus vs. 7.3 for sunitinib vs. 8.5 months for sorafenib vs. ?4.1 months for erlotinib were recorded based on data from 10, 74, 33 and 51 patients respectively. In conclusion, the data supporting first line temsirolimus for metastatic nccRCC are based on a small patient sample. Sunitinib's efficacy is similar to that of temsirolimus but is based on a bigger patient sample that originates from phase II studies. PMID:24411587

  11. High-altitude treatment: a therapeutic option for patients with severe, refractory asthma?

    PubMed

    Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, L H; Bel, E H

    2011-06-01

    High-altitude treatment has been applied for more than a century in the treatment of pulmonary diseases including asthma. Many uncontrolled and controlled studies have shown its beneficial effects in children and adolescents with house dust mite allergic asthma. A recent study also showed an improvement in markers of airway inflammation in adult patients with severe intrinsic asthma, suggesting that factors other than HDM avoidance may contribute to the beneficial influence of the high-altitude climate therapy on asthma. The dry mountain climate not only has decreased levels of mite allergens but also decreased levels of pollens, fungal spores and air pollution, as well as high exposure to UV light with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Treatments targeting environmental control have never been investigated systematically in severe asthma, which is surprising, as environmental factors have been recognized as important contributors to asthma severity for many years and more evidence has been accumulating ever since. Preliminary evidence shows the beneficial effects of high-altitude treatment in patients with severe refractory asthma on symptoms, lung function and oral corticosteroid requirement, irrespective of atopic status. In this narrative review, we will discuss why high-altitude treatment might be a promising therapeutic option for patients who suffer from this disabling disease. PMID:21518039

  12. Topical tretinoin in the treatment of vulvar lichen sclerosus: an advisable option?

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alessandro; Corazza, Monica; Minghetti, Sara; Virgili, Annarosa

    2015-10-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of a 24-week application of tretinoin 0.025% cream, with an alternate-day regimen, in achieving control of VLS signs and symptoms. 17 patients affected with VLS were included. The main efficacy parameters were the response rate, as defined by protocol parameters, the rate of patients achieving an improvement from baseline of ?75% in the subjective and objective scores, and the mean reduction in subjective and objective scores throughout the treatment. The safety of the treatment was also assessed. By the end of the 24-week treatment, 12 patients (70.6%) experienced a response; 35.3% and 17.6% of patients achieved an improvement of at least 75% in subjective and objective scores, respectively. Mean scores of itching, leukoderma (pallor) and hyperkeratosis decreased significantly in the study patients, and none presented itching-related excoriations. Erythema increased compared with baseline. Six patients (35.29%) experienced some side effects related to tretinoin, mainly mild erythema and burning. None of the subjects discontinued the treatment because of side effects. Tretinoin 0.025% cream applied for 24 weeks may represent a useful alternative option to corticosteroids in the treatment of active VLS, acting particularly on hyperkeratosis and pallor. PMID:26243060

  13. Treatment options in recurrent ovarian cancer: latest evidence and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Luvero, Daniela; Milani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women. Although significant progress has been made in the treatment of OC, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence and receive second-line and sometimes several lines of treatment. Here we review the options available for the treatment of recurrent disease and discuss how different agents are selected, combined and offered in a rationale sequence in the context of multidisciplinary care. We reviewed published work between 1990 and 2013 and meeting abstracts related to the use of chemotherapy and surgery in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. We discuss treatment regimens, efficacy endpoints and safety profiles of the different therapies. Platinum-based drugs are the most active agents and are selected on the basis of a probability of response to retreatment. Nonplatinum-based chemotherapy regimens are usually given in the ‘platinum-resistant’ setting and have a modest effect on outcome. Molecular targeted therapy of ovarian cancer given alone or integrated with chemotherapy is showing promising results. Many patients are now receiving more than one line of therapy for recurrent disease, usually platinum based until platinum resistance emerges. The sequential use of chemotherapy regimens and the incorporation of molecularly targeted treatments, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, have over the last decade significantly extended the median survival of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:25342990

  14. 26 CFR 1.1504-4 - Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... option is issued or transferred or on which the terms of an existing option or the underlying stock are adjusted (including an adjustment pursuant to the terms of the option or the underlying stock). (ii... occurs in the terms or pursuant to the terms of an option or the underlying stock that does...

  15. Addressing the unmet needs of patients with persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia: emerging pharmacological treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Chue, Pierre; Lalonde, Justine K

    2014-01-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia represent an impairment of normal emotional responses, thought processes and behaviors, and include blunting or flattening of affect, alogia/aprosody, avolition/apathy, anhedonia, and asociality. Negative symptoms contribute to a reduced quality of life, increased functional disability, increased burden of illness, and poorer long-term outcomes, to a greater degree than positive symptoms. Primary negative symptoms are prominent and persistent in up to 26% of patients with schizophrenia, and they are estimated to occur in up to 58% of outpatients at any given time. Negative symptoms respond less well to medications than positive symptoms, and to date treatment options for negative symptoms have been limited, with no accepted standard treatment. Modest benefits have been reported with a variety of different agents, including second-generation antipsychotics and add-on therapy with antidepressants and other pharmacological classes. Recent clinical research focusing on negative symptoms target novel biological systems, such as glutamatergic neurotransmission. Different approaches include: enhancing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function with agents that bind directly to the glycine ligand site or with glycine reuptake inhibitors; influencing the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) with positive allosteric modulators; and stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In conclusion, the lack of clearly efficacious pharmacological treatments for the management of negative symptoms represents a significant unmet need, especially considering the importance of these symptoms on patient outcomes. Hence, further research to identify and characterize novel pharmacological treatments for negative symptoms is greatly needed. PMID:24855363

  16. An alternative treatment option for a bony defect from large odontoma using recycled demineralization at chairside

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Odontoma is the most common odontogenic benign tumor, and the treatment of choice is generally surgical removal. After excision, bone grafts may be necessary depending on the need for further treatment, or the size and location of the odontoma. Although the osteogenic capacity of a demineralized tooth was verified as early as 1967 by Urist and many other investigators, the cumbersome procedure, including a long demineralization time, may be less than comfortable for clinicians. A modified ultrasonic technology, with periodic negative pressure and temperature control, facilitated rapid and aseptic preparation of demineralized teeth for bone grafts. This approach reduces the demineralization time dramatically (?80 minutes), so that the graft material can be prepared chairside on the same day as the extraction. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of large compound odonotomas used as graft material prepared chairside for enucleation-induced bony defects. These two clinical cases showed favorable wound healing without complications, and good bony support for future dental implants or orthodontic treatment. Finally, this report will suggest the possibility of recycling the benign pathologic hard tissue as an alternative treatment option for conventional bone grafts in clinics. PMID:25922824

  17. Managing Urinary Incontinence in Patients with Dementia: Pharmacological Treatment Options and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Orme, Susie; Morris, Vikky; Gibson, William; Wagg, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms are highly prevalent in late life and are strongly associated with dementia and frailty. Incontinence is extremely common among those living in long-term care and is most commonly due to urgency incontinence. Although national and international guidelines for continence care exist, they often fail to consider the complex comorbidity found in patients with dementia and are often not followed; continence practices in long-term care may promote rather than prevent incontinence. The majority of those with dementia living in the community can be managed successfully with standard treatments, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological; the expectations and aims of treatment of both the patient and their caregivers should be considered. A dementia diagnosis does not preclude management of incontinence, but treatment options may be more limited in those with advanced dementia who are unable to retain information and modify behaviors. High-quality data to guide the choice of pharmacological agent in those with dementia are lacking. Oxybutynin has been shown to have significant adverse cognitive effects, but data to support the use of trospium, solifenacin, darifenacin, and fesoterodine are limited. No data are available for mirabegron. Neither age, frailty, nor dementia should be considered a barrier to pharmacological management, but consideration should be given to the total anticholinergic load. Evidence to guide the treatment of incontinence in this vulnerable patient group is scarce, and available guidelines adapted for each individual's situation should be applied. PMID:26169438

  18. Options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions during wastewater treatment for agricultural use.

    PubMed

    Fine, Pinchas; Hadas, Efrat

    2012-02-01

    Treatment of primarily-domestic sewage wastewater involves on-site greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to energy inputs, organic matter degradation and biological nutrient removal (BNR). BNR causes both direct emissions and loss of fertilizer value, thus eliminating possible reduction of emissions caused by fertilizer manufacture. In this study, we estimated on-site GHG emissions under different treatment scenarios, and present options for emission reduction by changing treatment methods, avoiding BNR and by recovering energy from biogas. Given a typical Israeli wastewater strength (1050mg CODl(-1)), the direct on-site GHG emissions due to energy use were estimated at 1618 and 2102g CO(2)-eq m(-3), respectively, at intermediate and tertiary treatment levels. A potential reduction of approximately 23-55% in GHG emissions could be achieved by fertilizer preservation and VS conversion to biogas. Wastewater fertilizers constituted a GHG abatement potential of 342g CO(2)-eq m(-3). The residual component that remained in the wastewater effluent following intermediate (oxidation ponds) and enhanced (mechanical-biological) treatments was 304-254g CO(2)-eq m(-3) and 65-34g CO(2)-eq m(-3), respectively. Raw sludge constituted approximately 47% of the overall wastewater fertilizers load with an abatement potential of 150g CO(2)-eq m(-3) (385kg CO(2)-eq dry tonne(-1)). Inasmuch as anaerobic digestion reduced it to 63g CO(2)-eq m(-3) (261kg CO(2)-eq dry tonne(-1)), the GHG abatement gained through renewable biogas energy (approx. 428g CO(2)-eq m(-3)) favored digestion. However, sludge composting reduced the fertilizer value to 17g CO(2)-eq m(-3) (121kg CO(2)-eq dry tonne(-1)) or less (if emissions, off-site inputs and actual phytoavailability were considered). Taking Israel as an example, fully exploiting the wastewater derived GHG abatement potential could reduce the State overall GHG emissions by almost 1%. This demonstrates the possibility of optional carbon credits which might be exploited in the construction of new wastewater treatment facilities, especially in developing countries. PMID:22209373

  19. Musculoskeletal Conditions of the Foot and Ankle: Assessments and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Smita; Riskowski, Jody; Hannan, Marian T.

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle are an important public health challenge due to their increasing incidence combined with their substantial negative impact on patients’ quality of life. Non-pharmacological treatments serve as the first line of treatment and are frequently used for patients with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle. This review provides a summary of the assessments and non-invasive treatment options based upon available evidence. Recent studies show that individuals with foot and ankle pain have multiple co-existing impairments in alignment, motion, load distribution and muscle performance that may be evident in static and/or dynamic tasks. Additionally, both clinical and epidemiological studies support the inter-dependence between the foot and proximal joints. For instance, aberrant foot structure has been linked to foot osteoarthritis (OA), as well as OA and pain at the knee and hip. Most recently, advances in motion capture technology and plantar load distribution measurement offer opportunities for precise dynamic assessments of the foot and ankle. In individuals with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle, the chief objectives of treatment are to afford pain relief, restore mechanics (alignment, motion and/or load distribution) and return the patient to their desired level of activity participation. Given that most patients present with multiple impairments, combinational therapies that target foot-specific as well as global impairments have shown promising results. In particular, in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases, comprehensive rehabilitation strategies including early detection, foot-based interventions (such as orthoses) and wellness-based approaches for physical activity and self-management have been successful. While significant improvements have been made in the last decade to the assessment and treatment of foot and ankle conditions, few randomized clinical trials specifically have investigated patients with foot or ankle conditions to provide global insights into this area. Consequently, current recommendations vary based upon the scope of studies presented in this review as well as the strength of studies. This review indicates a need for more in-depth investigations into the components of assessment and treatment options for foot and ankle musculoskeletal conditions. PMID:22867931

  20. Getting it right for children: improving tuberculosis treatment access and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Brigden, Grania; Furin, Jennifer; Van Gulik, Clara; Marais, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Children were often the forgotten victims of the global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, neglected by traditional TB services as well as maternal and child health initiatives. Luckily this is changing with a greater focus on children and the issues regarding their optimal management. A common misconception is that children with TB are always difficult to diagnose and treat. New diagnostic tools are urgently needed, but most children with TB in high-burden settings can be diagnosed with available approaches and treatment outcomes are generally excellent. Increased TB awareness, appropriate training of health care workers and inclusion in integrated management of childhood illness strategies will improve the access and quality of care that children receive. This review highlights what needs to be done to ensure that no child unnecessarily dies from TB and provides a brief overview of new advances in the field. PMID:25739933

  1. Surgical and Non-Surgical Procedures Associated with Recurrence of Periodontitis in Periodontal Maintenance Therapy: 5-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Cyrino, Renata Magalhães; Lages, Eugênio José Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Prospective studies that investigated the influence of surgical and nonsurgical procedures in the recurrence of periodontitis and tooth loss in periodontal maintenance therapy (PMT) programs have not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate longitudinally the recurrence of periodontitis in regular compliers (RC) and irregular compliers (IC) individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures over 5 years in a program of PMT. Materials and Methods A total of 212 individuals participated in this study. Full-mouth periodontal examination including bleeding on probing, probing depth, and clinical attachment level were determined at all PMT visits over 5 years. The recurrence of periodontitis was evaluated in RC and IC individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures in PMT. The influences of risk variables of interest were tested through univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression. Results Recurrence of periodontitis was significantly lower among RC when compared to IC. Individuals with recurrence of periodontitis and undergoing surgical procedures showed higher probing depth and clinical attachment loss than those who received non-surgical procedures. Recurrence of periodontitis was higher in individual undergoing surgical procedures and irregular compliance during PMT. Conclusions Irregular compliance and surgical procedures in individuals undergoing PMT presented higher rates of recurrence of periodontitis when compared to regular compliant patients undergoing non-surgical procedures. PMID:26496187

  2. Patent ductus arteriosus: are current neonatal treatment options better or worse than no treatment at all?

    PubMed Central

    Clyman, Ronald I.; Couto, Jim; Murphy, Gail M.

    2012-01-01

    Although a moderate-size PDA needs to be closed by the time a child is 1–2 years old, there is great uncertainty about whether it needs to be closed during the neonatal period. While 95% of neonatologists believe that a moderate-size PDA should be closed if it persists in infants (born before 28 weeks) who still require mechanical ventilation, the number that treat a PDA when it occurs in infants that do not require mechanical ventilation varies widely. Both the high likelihood of spontaneous ductus closure and the absence of RCTs, specifically addressing the risks and benefits of neonatal ductus closure, adds to the current uncertainty. New information suggests that early pharmacologic treatment has several important short-term benefits for the preterm newborn. On the other hand, ductus ligation, while eliminating the detrimental effects of a PDA on lung development, may create its own set of morbidities that counteract many of the benefits derived from ductus closure. PMID:22414883

  3. Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Solh, Tia; Botsford, Ashley; Solh, Melhem

    2015-01-01

    Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (GT) is a genetic platelet surface receptor disorder of GPIIb/IIIa (ITG ?IIb?3), either qualitative or quantitative, which results in faulty platelet aggregation and diminished clot retraction. Spontaneous mucocutaneous bleeding is common and can lead to fatal bleeding episodes. Control and prevention of bleeding among patients with GT is imperative, and remains challenging. Local measures, including anti-fibrinolytic therapy, with or without platelet transfusions, used to be the mainstay of therapy. However, in recent years the use of recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has increased significantly, with excellent response rates in treating and preventing hemorrhage among GT patients. Gene therapy and stem cell transplantation offer a potential cure of this disease, but both are costly and remain experimental at this point. This manuscript offers a comprehensive review of our understanding of GT and the available treatment options. PMID:26185478

  4. INVO Procedure: Minimally Invasive IVF as an Alternative Treatment Option for Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Elkin; Saa, Angela M.; Navarro, Doris E.; Pulido, Carlos; Lombana, Oscar; Moran, Abby

    2012-01-01

    Intravaginal culture (IVC), also called INVO (intravaginal culture of oocytes), is an assisted reproduction procedure where oocyte fertilization and early embryo development are carried out within a gas permeable air-free plastic device, placed into the maternal vaginal cavity for incubation. In the present study we assessed the outcome of the INVO procedure, using the recently designed INVOcell device, in combination with a mild ovarian stimulation protocol. A total of 125 cycles were performed. On average 6.5 oocytes per cycle were retrieved, and a mean of 4.2 were placed per INVOcell device. The cleavage rate obtained after the INVO culture was 63%. The procedure yielded 40%, 31.2%, and 24% of clinical pregnancy, live birth, and single live birth rates per cycle, respectively. Our results suggest that the INVO procedure is an effective alternative treatment option in assisted reproduction that shows comparable results to those reported for existing IVF techniques. PMID:22645435

  5. INVO procedure: minimally invasive IVF as an alternative treatment option for infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Elkin; Saa, Angela M; Navarro, Doris E; Pulido, Carlos; Lombana, Oscar; Moran, Abby

    2012-01-01

    Intravaginal culture (IVC), also called INVO (intravaginal culture of oocytes), is an assisted reproduction procedure where oocyte fertilization and early embryo development are carried out within a gas permeable air-free plastic device, placed into the maternal vaginal cavity for incubation. In the present study we assessed the outcome of the INVO procedure, using the recently designed INVOcell device, in combination with a mild ovarian stimulation protocol. A total of 125 cycles were performed. On average 6.5 oocytes per cycle were retrieved, and a mean of 4.2 were placed per INVOcell device. The cleavage rate obtained after the INVO culture was 63%. The procedure yielded 40%, 31.2%, and 24% of clinical pregnancy, live birth, and single live birth rates per cycle, respectively. Our results suggest that the INVO procedure is an effective alternative treatment option in assisted reproduction that shows comparable results to those reported for existing IVF techniques. PMID:22645435

  6. Continual evolution of type 2 diabetes: an update on pathophysiology and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a complex and progressive disease that has a major societal and economic impact. The most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is a multifactorial disease, the pathophysiology of which involves not only the pancreas but also the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and kidney. Novel therapies with mechanisms of action that are different from most existing drugs are emerging. One such class consists of compounds that inhibit renal sodium-glucose cotransporter 2, which is responsible for the bulk of glucose reabsorption by the kidneys. This new class of compounds improves glycemic control independently of insulin and promotes weight reduction, providing an additional tool to treat patients with T2DM. This review discusses the underlying pathophysiology of T2DM, clinical guidelines, and available and emerging treatment options, with particular emphasis on sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. PMID:25931824

  7. Update on Susac syndrome: new insights in brain and retinal imaging and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Jan; Ringelstein, Marius; Duning, Thomas; Kleffner, Ilka

    2014-01-01

    Susac syndrome (SuS) is a rare endotheliopathy of the brain, the retina, and the inner ear. The underlying pathophysiology is likely an autoimmune mediated occlusion of microvessels resulting in variable degrees of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, visual disturbances, and hearing loss. The disease manifests either with a monophasic or polycyclic course. Patients suffering from SuS are frequently misdiagnosed as having inflammatory demyelinating CNS disease, particularly multiple sclerosis because of some overlap in the clinical presentation and the paraclinical findings. Since appropriate treatment of SuS is crucial for the prognosis, a timely and sound establishment of the diagnosis is important. Here, we summarize currently available information on the clinical presentation and diagnostic procedures in SuS. In particular, we discuss the added value of advanced techniques of brain and retinal imaging such as ultrahigh field magnetic resonance imaging and optical coherence tomography in SuS with respect to its differential diagnosis and pathophysiology. Since evidence-based treatment standards will not be available in the near future, we share some experiences in terms of treatment options. Finally, we briefly outline future areas of research in SuS. PMID:24662104

  8. Treatment of retinopathy of prematurity: a review of conventional and promising new therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Fatih Mehmet; Sarici, Serdar Umit

    2013-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a retinal vascular disease of premature infants, continues to be a major cause of preventable childhood blindness all over the world. The incidence of ROP varies among countries, being influenced by the quality of the level of neonatal intensive care. Here, we discuss the potential treatments that are now available or will soon or probably be available for ROP. Although ablation of the avascular retina with laser photocoagulation remains the current gold standard and well established therapy for ROP, some new therapeutic options including angiostatic therapies are being explored based on our knowledge of the pathophysiology of the ROP and complications and efficacy of laser treatment. However, prevention of the development of severe ROP and screening for ROP seem to be the best strategy in avoiding visual impairment caused by ROP in premature infants. New therapeutic interventions including vascular endothelial growth factor antibody administration, gene therapy and supplemental therapies should be supported with evidence-based data for the treatment of ROP. PMID:23641347

  9. Depression and Cerebrovascular Disease: Could Vortioxetine Represent a Valid Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Pala, Andrea Norcini; Finco, Gabriele; Musu, Mario; Moro, Maria Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Depression and cerebrovascular atherosclerosis often occur in comorbidity showing neuropsychological impairment and poor response to antidepressant treatment. Objective is to evaluate if new antidepressant vortioxetine may be a potential treatment option. Mechanism of Action : Vortioxetine has 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D antagonists, 5-HT1B partial agonist and a 5-HT1A agonist and serotonin transporter inhibitor property. Efficacy and safety in Major Depressive Disorders and in cognitive impairment : The majority of trials (one of them in older people) showed efficacy for vortioxetine against placebo and no differences against other active treatments. The Adverse Effects ranged from 15.8% more to 10.8% less than placebo. In the elderly, only nausea was found higher than placebo. Effects on arterial blood pressure and cardiac parameters including the ECG-QT segment were similar to placebo. Elderly depressive patients on vortioxetine showed improvement versus placebo and other active comparators in Auditory Verbal Learning Test and Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores. The inclusion criteria admitted cases with middle cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion : The mechanism of action, the efficacy on depression and safety profile and early data on cognitive impairment make Vortioxetine a strong candidate for use in depression associated with cerebrovascular disease. This information must be supported by future randomized controlled trials. PMID:25893002

  10. Renal Artery Embolization - A First Line Treatment Option For End-Stage Hydronephrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Kakali; Prabhudesai, Vikramaditya; James, R. Lester; Jones, Robert W. A.; French, Michael E.; Cowling, Mark; West, David J.

    2004-09-15

    Conventionally poorly functioning hydronephrotic kidneys have been removed if they are symptomatic. In our unit, patients are offered renal artery embolization as an alternative treatment option. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients (11 male, 4 female) with a mean age of 32.9 yr (20-51 yrs) have undergone renal artery embolization for symptomatic hydronephrosis with poor function. Mean follow-up was 64.13 weeks (range 14-200). All patients had loin pain and hydronephrosis. Twelve patients had primary pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO). Two patients had poorly functioning hydronephrotic kidneys secondary to chronic calculous obstruction. One patient had chronic pain in an obstructed but reasonably functioning kidney following a previous pyeloplasty for PUJO which demanded intervention. Mean split function on renography was 11% (range 0-46%). Selective renal artery embolization was carried out under antibiotic cover using a 7 Fr balloon occlusion catheter and absolute alcohol, steel coils, and polyvinyl alcohol particles.Results: Nine patients developed post-embolization syndrome of self-limiting pain and pyrexia with no evidence of sepsis. One patient required readmission with this condition. One patient developed a hematoma at the puncture site. Mean hospital stay was 2.3 days. Fourteen patients are happy with the result and are completely pain free. One patient has minor discomfort but is delighted with the result. Nine patients have had follow-up ultrasound confirming resolution of the hydronephrosis. Conclusion: Renal artery embolization is an effective, safe, well-tolerated minimally invasive treatment option in end-stage hydronephrosis and we routinely offer it as an alternative to nephrectomy.

  11. Patients’ preference of established and emerging treatment options for obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Pengo, Martino F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep-disordered breathing. The standard treatment, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), has limited long-term compliance. Alternative treatment options are required and new methods, including hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) and continuous transcutaneous electrical stimulation (CTES), are currently emerging. We report on patients’ preference for different treatments of OSA. Methods We recorded patients’ age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire with 10 questions (FOSQ10), severity of OSA, and current treatment. We showed pictures of existing [CPAP, mandibular advancement device (MAD)] and emerging treatments (HNS and CTES). We then asked (I) whether participants were interested in further information about HNS/CTES; (II) if they would be willing to try HNS/CTES; and (III) if they were to choose only one of the four listed treatments, which one would they prefer to use every night. Results One hundred sixty-two patients completed the survey {81 males, mean age 52 [12] years, BMI 34 [7] kg/m2, ESS 10.2 (6.0) points, FOSQ10 28.5 (8.1) points}. The majority of the respondents (89.5%) had been diagnosed with OSA. A total of 91.3% of the respondents were interested in more information and were willing to try HNS/CTES. Most respondents preferred the potential use of CTES (56.7%), while 21.7% chose HNS, 17.8% CPAP, and 3.8% the MAD. There were no differences in the characteristics of the patients who preferred CTES compared to those who preferred other treatments, but a regression analysis revealed that a low ESS score was an independent predictor of patients choosing CTES (P<0.05). Conclusions More than 9 out of 10 of the respondents were interested in trying emerging technologies to treat OSA, most preferring CTES. Less sleepy patients were more likely to choose less invasive treatments. These findings will likely impact on future research and development of therapies for sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:26101652

  12. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...on behalf of other customers of the futures commission...or foreign options transactions... (iii) A futures commission... (iv) A derivatives clearing organization... (2) Each futures commission...and foreign options customers and...depositories or other places...

  13. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...on behalf of other customers of the futures commission...or foreign options transactions... (iii) A futures commission... (iv) A derivatives clearing organization... (2) Each futures commission...and foreign options customers and...depositories or other places...

  14. Efficacy of herbal tincture as treatment option for retained placenta in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dongan; Li, Jianxi; Wang, Xuezhi; Xie, Jiasheng; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Xurong; Zhang, Jingyan; Wang, Lei; Qin, Zhe; Yang, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    Retained placenta remains therapeutic challenge in cattle. Certain traditional medicines are believed to be able to alleviate retained placenta condition and improve overall fertility in cows. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of an herbal tincture for treatment of retained placenta. The herbal tincture was extracted from a combination of Herba Leonuri, Angelicae Sinensis Radix, Flos Carthami, Myrrha and Rhizoma Cyperi by percolation with 70% ethanol to a concentration of 0.5g crude herb/ml. Cows diagnosed with retained placenta (n=48) were randomly divided into one of two treatment groups (A and B), with animals in group A (n=26) receiving herbal tincture orally, and cows in group B (n=22) receiving oxytetracycline infusion into the uterus. Eighty six cows with no clinically visible pathological conditions, given birth alone and with no retained placenta diagnosis were included into control group (C). Retained placenta was expelled within 72h following initial treatment in 19 cows in group A, yet no cows in group B were recorded to expel placenta in the same time. The median number of days to first service (70.0 vs. 102.5 days; P<0.05) and median number of days open (76.0 vs. 134.0 days; P<0.01) were lower in group A than in group B. Percentage of cows pregnant within 100 days postpartum was the highest for animals in group A compared to controls (61.5% vs. 39.5%, P<0.05), and for animals in group B (61.5% vs. 22.7%; P<0.01). Herbal tincture used in the present study might facilitate expulsion of retained placenta and improve subsequent fertility, thus could present effective treatment option for retained placenta in cows. PMID:24467962

  15. Functional outcomes of acutely infected knee arthroplasty: a comparison of different surgical treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Dzaja, Ivan; Howard, James; Somerville, Lyndsay; Lanting, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background An infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be treated with irrigation and débridement with polyethylene exchange (IDPE) or a 2-staged revision (2SR). Although research has examined infection eradication rates of both treatments, patient outcomes have not been reported. We examined patient-reported outcomes following treatment compared with matched, noninfected controls. Methods We retrospectively identified patients with infected TKAs who had undergone the index procedure between May 1991 and November 2011. Patient-reported outcomes included the 12-item Short Form Health Survey, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, and Knee Society Scores as well as range of motion. Patients with noninfected primary TKAs matched by age and age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index score were used as controls. Intention-to-treat groups of 2SR and IDPE were used, with the IDPE group subdivided into successful and unsuccessful groups. Results We included 145 patients with infected TKAs with mean follow-up of 64.2 months and 145 controls with a mean follow-up of 35.4 months in our analysis. Outcomes of the controls and the successful IDPE groups were equivalent. The 2SR cohort had lower scores in all categories than controls. There was a 39% success rate in eradicating infection with IDPE. Patients in whom IDPE failed had lower scores in all categories than controls. There was no difference between the failed IDPE group and the 2SR group. Conclusion Controversy regarding treatment options for acutely infected TKA has been focused on infection eradication. However, functional outcomes following treatment need to be taken into consideration. Patients whose infections were successfully treated with IDPE had equivalent outcomes to controls. PMID:26574832

  16. A new optional recycled water pre-treatment system prior to use in the household laundry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Pham, Thi Thu Nga; Lim, Richard; Wang, Xiaochang C; Miechel, Clayton; Halloran, Kelly O'; Listowski, Andrzej; Corby, Nigel

    2014-04-01

    With a constantly growing population, water scarcity becomes the limiting factor for further social and economic growth. To achieve a partial reduction in current freshwater demands and lessen the environmental loadings, an increasing trend in the water market tends to adopt recycled water for household laundries as a new recycled water application. The installation of a small pre-treatment unit for water purification can not only further improve the recycled water quality, but also be viable to enhance the public confidence and acceptance level on recycled water consumption. Specifically, this paper describes column experiments conducted using a 550 mm length bed of zeolite media as a one-dimensional flow reactor. The results show that the zeolite filter system could be a simple low-cost pre-treatment option which is able to significantly reduce the total hardness level of recycled water via effective ion exchange. Additionally, depending on the quality of recycled water required by end users, a new by-pass controller using a three-level operation switching mechanism is introduced. This approach provides householders sufficient flexibility to respond to different levels of desired recycled water quality and increase the reliability of long-term system operation. These findings could be beneficial to the smooth implementation of new end uses and expansion of the potential recycled water market. The information could also offer sound suggestions for future research on sustainable water management and governance. PMID:24496024

  17. Evolving treatment options for prevention of cardiovascular events in high-risk hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Deedwania, Prakash

    2007-11-01

    The identification and treatment of high-risk patients for cardiovascular disease reduces the risk of morbidity and mortality. Significant risk factors for cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients over and above dyslipidemia, smoking, and obesity include coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, cerebrovascular/carotid artery disease, and diabetes. Treatment options for the reduction of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients include diuretics, beta-blockers, alpha-blockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and aldosterone antagonists. All of these agents, in various combinations, have been found to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, even in high-risk patients. The use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs (usually in combination with a diuretic) has proven especially effective in reducing cardiovascular events in diabetes and, although both classes of drugs target the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, each has a different mechanism of action. Some investigators believe that combination therapy with an ACE inhibitor and ARB, usually given with other medications, may be more effective than either agent alone with other drugs. The Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) is evaluating the cardioprotective effect of an ACE inhibitor (ramipril) plus an ARB (telmisartan) in high-risk patients. PMID:17978596

  18. Selenium contaminated waters: An overview of analytical methods, treatment options and recent advances in sorption methods.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sílvia; Ungureanu, Gabriela; Boaventura, Rui; Botelho, Cidália

    2015-07-15

    Selenium is an essential trace element for many organisms, including humans, but it is bioaccumulative and toxic at higher than homeostatic levels. Both selenium deficiency and toxicity are problems around the world. Mines, coal-fired power plants, oil refineries and agriculture are important examples of anthropogenic sources, generating contaminated waters and wastewaters. For reasons of human health and ecotoxicity, selenium concentration has to be controlled in drinking-water and in wastewater, as it is a potential pollutant of water bodies. This review article provides firstly a general overview about selenium distribution, sources, chemistry, toxicity and environmental impact. Analytical techniques used for Se determination and speciation and water and wastewater treatment options are reviewed. In particular, published works on adsorption as a treatment method for Se removal from aqueous solutions are critically analyzed. Recent published literature has given particular attention to the development and search for effective adsorbents, including low-cost alternative materials. Published works mostly consist in exploratory findings and laboratory-scale experiments. Binary metal oxides and LDHs (layered double hydroxides) have presented excellent adsorption capacities for selenium species. Unconventional sorbents (algae, agricultural wastes and other biomaterials), in raw or modified forms, have also led to very interesting results with the advantage of their availability and low-cost. Some directions to be considered in future works are also suggested. PMID:25847169

  19. Infliximab as a treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulou, Despoina; Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Akriviadis, Evangelos; Garyfallos, Alexandros

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease which commonly requires treatment with biologic agents targeting various inflammatory pathways. Tumor necrosis factor alpha is a proinflammatory cytokine which plays a pivotal role not only in the pathogenesis of RA but also in other autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis. The co-existence of more than one autoimmune disorder in the same individual is very challenging in the daily practice as therapy strategies applicable to one disease setting may cause clinical and/or biochemical relapse of the other clinical entity. As a result, treatment options able to control different diseases are highly desirable among rheumatologists and other specialties. In that respect, we present a case of a 61-year-old female patient with RA and concomitant primary biliary cirrhosis with poor clinical response to conventional disease-modifying drugs for RA. The introduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist infliximab led to significant clinical improvement of RA and to stabilization of liver function. In this case review study, we discuss aspects of pathophysiology of primary biliary cirrhosis associated with tumor necrosis alpha and we review the available data of similar published cases. PMID:26411882

  20. Current and emerging treatment options for the elderly patient with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fassett, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the current and emerging treatments of CKD prior to dialysis in the elderly. Worldwide, there are increasing numbers of people who are aged over 65 years. In parallel, there are increasing numbers of elderly patients presenting with chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in the more advanced stages. The elderly have quite different health care needs related to their associated comorbidity, frailty, social isolation, poor functional status, and cognitive decline. Clinical trials assessing treatments for CKD have usually excluded patients older than 70–75 years; therefore, it is difficult to translate current therapies recommended for younger patients with CKD across to the elderly. Many elderly people with CKD progress to end-stage kidney disease and face the dilemma of whether to undertake dialysis or accept a conservative approach supported by palliative care. This places pressure on the patient, their family, and on health care resources. The clinical trajectory of elderly CKD patients has in the past been unclear, but recent evidence suggests that many patients over 75 years of age with multiple comorbidities have greatly reduced life expectancies and quality of life, even if they choose dialysis treatment. Offering a conservative pathway supported by palliative care is a reasonable option for some patients under these circumstances. The elderly person who chooses to have dialysis will frequently have different requirements than younger patients. Kidney transplantation can still result in improved life expectancy and quality of life in the elderly, in carefully selected people. There is a genuine need for the inclusion of the elderly in CKD clinical trials in the future so we can produce evidence-based therapies for this group. In addition, new therapies to treat and slow CKD progression are needed for all age groups. PMID:24477220

  1. Locoregional Treatment for Breast Carcinoma After Hodgkin's Lymphoma: The Breast Conservation Option

    SciTech Connect

    Haberer, Sophie; Belin, Lisa; Le Scodan, Romuald; Kirova, Youlia M.; Savignoni, Alexia; Stevens, Denise; Moisson, Patricia; Decaudin, Didier; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of breast cancer (BC) after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in women treated at the Institut Curie, with a special focus on the breast-conserving option. Methods and Materials: Medical records of 72 women who developed either ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma of the breast after HL between 1978 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age at HL diagnosis was 23 years (range, 14-53 years). Median total dose received by the mediastinum was 40 Gy, mostly by a mantle-field technique. Breast cancers occurred after a median interval of 21 years (range, 5-40 years). Ductal invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ represented, respectively, 51 cases (71%) and 14 cases (19%). Invasive BCs consisted of 47 cT0-2 tumors (82%), 5 cN1-3 tumors (9%), and 20 Grade 3 tumors (35%). Locoregional treatment for BCs consisted of mastectomy with (3) or without (36) radiotherapy in 39 patients and lumpectomy with (30) or without (2) adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients. The isocentric lateral decubitus radiation technique was used in 17 patients after breast-conserving surgery (57%). With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival rate and locoregional control rate were, respectively, 74.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64-88%) and 82% (95% CI, 72-93%) for invasive carcinoma and 100% (95% CI, 100 -100%) and 92% (95% CI, 79-100%) for in situ carcinoma. In patients with invasive tumors, the 5-year distant disease-free survival rate was 79% (95% CI, 69-91%), and 13 patients died of progressive BC. Contralateral BC was diagnosed in 10 patients (14%). Conclusions: Breast-conserving treatment can be an option for BCs that occur after HL, despite prior thoracic irradiation. It should consist of lumpectomy and adjuvant breast radiotherapy with use of adequate techniques, such as the lateral decubitus isocentric position, to protect the underlying heart and lung.

  2. The Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Engebretson, Steven P.; Hyman, Leslie G.; Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Schoenfeld, Elinor R.; Gelato, Marie C.; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Reddy, Michael S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Oates, Thomas W.; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A.; Orlander, Philip R.; Paquette, David W.; Hanson, Naomi Q.; Tsai, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. Objective To determine if non-surgical periodontal treatment reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes (DM) and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. Design, Setting and Participants The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) is a 6-month, single-masked, randomized, multi-center clinical trial. Participants had DM, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c ?7% and <9%, and untreated periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with five academic medical centers. Intervention The treatment group (n=257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline, and supportive periodontal therapy at three and six months. The control group (n=257) received no treatment for six months. Main Outcome Measure Difference in HbA1c change from baseline between groups at six months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose, and the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2). Results Enrollment was stopped early due to futility. At 6 months, the periodontal therapy group increased HbA1c 0.17% (1.0) (mean (SD)) compared to 0.11% (1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference = -0.05%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.23%, 0.12%; p=0.55). Probing depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing and gingival index measures improved in the treatment group compared to the control group at six months with adjusted between-group differences of 0.33mm (95% CI: 0.26, 0.39), 0.31mm (95% CI: 0.23, 0.39), 16.5% (95% CI: 12.9, 20.0) and 0.28 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.35), respectively; all p values <0.0001). Conclusions and Relevance Non-surgical periodontal therapy did not improve glycemic control in patients with DM and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. These findings do not support the use of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with diabetes for the purpose of lowering HbA1c. PMID:24346989

  3. Systems engineering study: tank 241-C-103 organic skimming,storage, treatment and disposal options

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, M.J.

    1996-10-23

    This report evaluates alternatives for pumping, storing, treating and disposing of the separable phase organic layer in Hanford Site Tank 241-C-103. The report provides safety and technology based preferences and recommendations. Two major options and several varations of these options were identified. The major options were: 1) transfer both the organic and pumpable aqueous layers to a double-shell tank as part of interim stabilization using existing salt well pumping equipment or 2) skim the organic to an above ground before interim stabilization of Tank 241-C-103. Other options to remove the organic were considered but rejected following preliminary evaluation.

  4. Current aproach to cancer pain management: Availability and implications of different treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Nersesyan, Hrachya; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2007-01-01

    Despite tremendous progress in medicine during last couple of decades, cancer still remains the most horrifying diagnosis for anybody due to its almost inevitable futility. According to American Cancer Society Statistics, it is estimated that only in the United States more than half a million people will die from cancer in 2006. For those who survive, probably the most fearsome symptom regardless of cancer type will be the pain. Although most pain specialists and oncologists worldwide are well aware of the importance to adequately treat the pain, it was yet established that more than half of cancer patients have insufficient pain control, and about quarter of them actually die in pain. Therefore, in this review article we attempted to provide the comprehensive information about different options available nowadays for treating cancer pain focusing on most widely used pharmacologic agents, surgical modalities for intractable pain control, their potential for adverse effects, and ways to increase the effectiveness of treatment maximally optimizing analgesic regimen and improving compliance. PMID:18488078

  5. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: outcomes and treatment options for recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Robert S.; Trotter, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Overall survival and recurrence rates after liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) vary, however observational data support the notion that patients with HCC have an overall worse long-term prognosis after LT compared to patients transplanted without HCC. Patient selection for LT in patients with HCC fluctuated as changes in the model for end-stage liver disease score was adjusted from 2002 to 2005. In the last decade, management of HCC patients on the waiting list has varied based on center experience. Since HCC patients have better access to the donor pool compared to non-HCC patients as evidenced by their lower dropout rate from the waiting list, living donation has been implemented in certain centers. Overall patient survival, recurrence free survival, and recurrence rates have been compared between living donor LT (LDLT) and deceased donor LT, with one meta-analysis reporting a lower disease free survival in LDLT, however overall patient survival and recurrence rates showed no difference at 1, 3 and 5 years. In patients exhibiting HCC recurrence, different modalities regarding immunosuppression and therapies have been evaluated. Currently there are no consensus treatment strategies regarding post-transplant HCC recurrence in patients not suitable for locoregional therapy, hence consideration of a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors with the addition of sorafenib might be a feasible option with close monitoring in clinical practice despite the notable toxicities. PMID:26130250

  6. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor as treatment option in patients with recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Santjohanser, Claudia; Knieper, Catherine; Franz, Cordula; Hirv, Kaino; Meri, Osama; Schleyer, Manfred; Würfel, Wolfgang; Toth, Bettina

    2013-04-01

    In 1-5% of patients during childbearing years recurrent miscarriages (RM) occur. There are established risk factors like anatomical, endocrine and hemostatic disorders as well as immunological changes in the maternal immune system. Nevertheless, further elucidation of the pathogenesis remains a matter of debate. In addition, there are no standardized immunological treatment strategies. Recent studies indicate possible effects of tumor necrosis factor ? blocker and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) concerning live birth rate (LBR) in RM patients. Therefore, we performed a retrospective cohort study in patients undergoing assisted reproductive treatment (ART) with known RM analysing the possible benefits of G-CSF application. From January 2002 to December 2010, 127 patients (199 cylces) with RM (at least 2 early miscarriages) 49 (72 cycles) receiving G-CSF and 78 (127 cycles) controls receiving either no medication (subgroup 1) or Cortisone, intravenous immunoglobulins or low molecular weight heparin (subgroup 2) undergoing ART for in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection were analysed. G-CSF was administered weekly once (34 Mill) in 11 patients, 38 patients received 2 × 13 Mill G-CSF per week until the 12th week of gestation. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS for Windows (19.0), p < 0.05 significant. The mean age of the study population was 37.3 ± 4.4 years (mean ± standard deviation) and differed not significantly between patients and subgroups. However, the number of early miscarriages was significantly higher in the G-CSF group as compared to the subgroups (G-CSF 2.67 ± 1.27, subgroup 1 0.85 ± 0.91, subgroup 2 0.64 ± 0.74) and RM patients receiving G-CSF had significantly more often a late embryo transfer (day 5) (G-CSF 36.7%, subgroup 1 12.1%, subgroup 2 8.9%). The LBR of patients and the subgroups differed significantly (G-CSF 32%, subgroup 1 13%, subgroup 2 14%). Side effects were present in less than 10% of patients, consisting of irritation at the injection side, slight leukocytosis, rise of the temperature (<38 °C), mild bone pain and hyperemesis gravidarum. None of the newborn showed any kind of malformations. According to our data, G-CSF seems to be a safe and promising immunological treatment option for RM patients. However, with regard to the retrospective setting and the possible bias of a higher rate of late embryo transfers in the G-CSF group additional studies are needed to further strengthen our results. PMID:23344173

  7. Micro-treatment options for components of organic fraction of MSW in residential areas.

    PubMed

    Chanakya, H N; Ramachandra, T V; Guruprasad, M; Devi, Vinuta

    2007-12-01

    There is a growing interest in management of MSW through micro-treatment of organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) in many cities of India. The OFMSW fraction is high (>80%) in many pockets within South Indian cities like Bangalore, Chikkamagalur, etc. and is largely represented by vegetable, fruit, packing and garden wastes. Among these, the last three have shown problems for easy decomposition. Fruit wastes are characterized by a large pectin supported fraction that decomposes quickly to organic acids (becomes pulpy) that eventually slow down anaerobic and aerobic decomposition processes. Paper fraction (newsprint and photocopying paper) as well as paddy straw (packing), bagasse (from cane juice stalls) and tree leaf litter (typical garden waste and street sweepings) are found in reasonably large proportions in MSW. These decompose slowly due to poor nutrients or physical state. We have examined the suitability of these substrates for micro-composting in plastic bins by tracking decomposition pattern and physical changes. It was found that fruit wastes decompose rapidly to produce organic acids and large leachate fraction such that it may need to be mixed with leachate absorbing materials (dry wastes) for good composting. Leaf litter, paddy straw and bagasse decompose to the tune of 90, 68 and 60% VS and are suitable for composting micro-treatment. Paper fractions even when augmented with 10% leaf compost failed to show appreciable decomposition in 50 days. All these feedstocks were found to have good biological methane potential (BMP) and showed promise for conversion to biogas under a mixed feed operation. Suitability of this approach was verified by operating a plug-flow type anaerobic digester where only leaf litter gathered nearby (as street sweepings) was used as feedstock. Here only a third of the BMP was realized at this scale (0.18 m(3 )biogas/kg VS 0.55 m(3)/kg in BMP). We conclude that anaerobic digestion in plug-flow like digesters appear a more suitable micro-treatment option (2-10 kg VS/day) because in addition to compost it also produces biogas for domestic use nearby. PMID:17503210

  8. Atrial fibrillation in Sub-Saharan Africa: epidemiology, unmet needs, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Stambler, Bruce Sheldon; Ngunga, Leonard M

    2015-01-01

    Health care in Sub-Saharan Africa is being challenged by a double burden of disease as lifestyle diseases common in the developed world, such as stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF), increase, while, simultaneously, health issues of the developing world in terms of communicable disease persist. The prevalence of AF is lower in Africa than in the developed world but is expected to increase significantly over the next few decades. Patients with AF in Africa tend to be younger and have a higher prevalence of rheumatic valvular heart disease than patients with AF in other regions. Permanent AF is the most prevalent type of AF in Africa, possibly due to the lower use of rhythm control strategies than in the developed world. Mortality rates of patients with AF in Africa are high, due largely to poor health care access and suboptimal therapy. The risk of stroke in AF, which is moderate to high in Africans as in the developed world, contributes to the high mortality rate. Patients with AF in Africa are often undertreated with antithrombotics, as cost and access to monitoring are major barriers. Vitamin K antagonists, including warfarin, are the most commonly available oral anticoagulants, but regular monitoring can be challenging, especially for patients in remote areas. Several non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been approved for use in countries across Sub-Saharan Africa and have the potential to reduce stroke burden. The higher cost of newer agents may be offset by the reduced need for regular monitoring, fixed dosing, and lower risk of intracranial bleeding; NOACs could provide a treatment option for patients in remote areas with limited access to regular monitoring. However, NOACs are not indicated in valvular AF. More work is needed to increase understanding of the epidemiology of AF and stroke, as well as to improve management strategies to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease predicted for Africa. PMID:26261423

  9. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...141.716(b). Pre Filtration Toolbox Options (3) Presedimentation...717(b). (5) Bank filtration 0.5-log credit for...Systems using wells followed by filtration when conducting source water monitoring must sample...

  10. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...141.716(b). Pre Filtration Toolbox Options (3) Presedimentation...717(b). (5) Bank filtration 0.5-log credit for...Systems using wells followed by filtration when conducting source water monitoring must sample...

  11. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...141.716(b). Pre Filtration Toolbox Options (3) Presedimentation...717(b). (5) Bank filtration 0.5-log credit for...Systems using wells followed by filtration when conducting source water monitoring must sample...

  12. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...141.716(b). Pre Filtration Toolbox Options (3) Presedimentation...717(b). (5) Bank filtration 0.5-log credit for...Systems using wells followed by filtration when conducting source water monitoring must sample...

  13. 78 FR 8060 - Treatment of Grantor of an Option on a Partnership Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ...value of the aggregate Federal tax liabilities of the partners...value of the aggregate Federal tax liabilities of the partners...option holder's aggregate tax liabilities. The Treasury Department...events are necessary to prevent avoidance of the characterization...

  14. Three cases of complications after high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment in unmarried women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Doa; Lee, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Chae-Rim; Kang, So-Yeon; Chung, Youn-Jee; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Jang-Heub; Kim, Mee-Ran

    2015-11-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been regarded as a non-surgical, minimally invasive therapeutic option for patients who prioritize uterus-conservation. Although many studies have shown that HIFU therapy is a safe and effective treatment of uterine fibroid, not all fibroids are suitable for HIFU due to risks of serious complications. We experienced three cases of complications after the HIFU ablation for huge uterine fibroids, including two cases of rapid myoma enlargement and one case of heavy vaginal bleeding. PMID:26623424

  15. Three cases of complications after high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment in unmarried women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Doa; Lee, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Chae-Rim; Kang, So-Yeon; Chung, Youn-Jee; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Jang-Heub

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been regarded as a non-surgical, minimally invasive therapeutic option for patients who prioritize uterus-conservation. Although many studies have shown that HIFU therapy is a safe and effective treatment of uterine fibroid, not all fibroids are suitable for HIFU due to risks of serious complications. We experienced three cases of complications after the HIFU ablation for huge uterine fibroids, including two cases of rapid myoma enlargement and one case of heavy vaginal bleeding. PMID:26623424

  16. Sexual Functioning and Sex Hormones in Persons with Extreme Obesity and Seeking Surgical and Non-Surgical Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sarwer, David B.; Spitzer, Jacqueline C.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Rosen, Raymond C.; Mitchell, James E.; Lancaster, Kathy; Courcoulas, Anita; Gourash, William; Christian, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many individuals with obesity are motivated to lose weight to improve weight-related comorbidities or psychosocial functioning, including sexual functioning. Few studies have documented rates of sexual dysfunction in persons with obesity. Objectives This study investigated sexual functioning, sex hormones, and relevant psychosocial constructs in individuals with obesity who sought surgical and non-surgical weight loss. Setting University based health systems. Methods One hundred forty-one bariatric surgery patients (median BMI [25th percentile, 75th percentile] 44.6 [41.4, 50.1]) and 109 individuals (BMI = 40.0 [38.0, 44.0]) who sought nonsurgical weight loss participated. Sexual functioning was assessed by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Hormones were assessed by blood assay. Quality of life, body image, depressive symptoms and marital adjustment were assessed by validated questionnaires. Results Fifty-one percent of women presenting for bariatric surgery reported a sexual dysfunction; 36% of men presenting for bariatric surgery reported erectile dysfunction (ED). This is in contrast to 41% of women who sought nonsurgical weight loss and reported a sexual dysfunction and 20% of men who sought nonsurgical weight loss and reported ED. These differences were not statistically significant. Sexual dysfunction was strongly associated with psychosocial distress in women; these relationships were less strong and less consistent among men. Sexual dysfunction was unrelated to sex hormones, except for sex hormone binding globulin (SHGB) in women. Conclusion Women and men who present for bariatric surgery, as compared to individuals who sought non-surgical weight loss, were not significantly more likely to experience a sexual dysfunction. There were few differences in reproductive hormones and psychosocial constructs between candidates for bariatric surgery and individuals interested in non-surgical weight loss. PMID:24120985

  17. [Early onset scoliosis. What are the options?].

    PubMed

    Farrington, D M; Tatay-Díaz, A

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of children with progressive early onset scoliosis has improved considerably due to recent advances in surgical and non-surgical techniques and the understanding of the importance of preserving the thoracic space. Improvements in existing techniques and development of new methods have considerably improved the management of this condition. Derotational casting can be considered in children with documented progression of a <60° curve without previous surgical treatment. Both single and dual growing rods are effective, but the latter seem to offer better results. Hybrid constructs may be a better option in children who require a low-profile proximal anchor. The vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR(®)) appears to be beneficial for patients with congenital scoliosis and fused ribs, and thoracic Insufficiency Syndrome. Children with medical comorbidities who may not tolerate repeated lengthenings should be considered for Shilla or Luque Trolley technique. Growth modulation using shape memory alloy staples or other tethers seem promising for mild curves, although more research is required to define their precise indications. PMID:24071039

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  19. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must be operated continuously with coagulant addition and all plant flow must pass through basins... where chemical addition and hardness precipitation occur in both stages. All plant flow must pass... criteria are in § 141.719(d). Inactivation Toolbox Options (14) Chlorine dioxide Log credit based...

  20. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must be operated continuously with coagulant addition and all plant flow must pass through basins... where chemical addition and hardness precipitation occur in both stages. All plant flow must pass... criteria are in § 141.719(d). Inactivation Toolbox Options (14) Chlorine dioxide Log credit based...

  1. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must be operated continuously with coagulant addition and all plant flow must pass through basins... where chemical addition and hardness precipitation occur in both stages. All plant flow must pass... criteria are in § 141.719(d). Inactivation Toolbox Options (14) Chlorine dioxide Log credit based...

  2. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...criteria are in § 141.716(b). Pre Filtration Toolbox Options (3) Presedimentation...in § 141.717(b). (5) Bank filtration 0.5-log credit for 25-foot...NTU. Systems using wells followed by filtration when conducting source water...

  3. Successful Non-Surgical Deep Uterine Transfer of Porcine Morulae after 24 Hour Culture in a Chemically Defined Medium

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emilio A.; Angel, Miguel Angel; Cuello, Cristina; Sanchez-Osorio, Jonatan; Gomis, Jesus; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Vila, Jordi; Colina, Ignaci; Diaz, Marta; Reixach, Josep; Vazquez, Jose Luis; Vazquez, Juan Maria; Roca, Jordi; Gil, Maria Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Excellent fertility and prolificacy have been reported after non-surgical deep uterine transfers of fresh in vivo-derived porcine embryos. Unfortunately, when this technology is used with vitrified embryos, the reproductive performance of recipients is low. For this reason and because the embryos must be stored until they are transferred to the recipient farms, we evaluated the potential application of non-surgical deep uterine transfers with in vivo-derived morulae cultured for 24 h in liquid stage. In Experiment 1, two temperatures (25°C and 37°C) and two media (one fully defined and one semi-defined) were assessed. Morulae cultured in culture medium supplemented with bovine serum albumin and fetal calf serum at 38.5°C in 5% CO2 in air were used as controls. Irrespective of medium, the embryo viability after 24 h of culture was negatively affected (P<0.05) at 25°C but not at 37°C compared with the controls. Embryo development was delayed in all experimental groups compared with the control group (P<0.001). Most of the embryos (95.7%) cultured at 37°C achieved the full or expanded blastocyst stage, and unlike the controls, none of them hatched at the end of culture. In Experiment 2, 785 morulae were cultured in the defined medium at 37°C for 24 h, and the resulting blastocysts were transferred to the recipients (n?=?24). Uncultured embryos collected at the blastocyst stage (n?=?750) were directly transferred to the recipients and used as controls (n?=?25). No differences in farrowing rates (91.7% and 92.0%) or litter sizes (9.0±0.6 and 9.4±0.8) were observed between the groups. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that high reproductive performance can be achieved after non-surgical deep uterine transfers with short-term cultured morulae in a defined medium, which opens new possibilities for the sanitary, safe national and international trade of porcine embryos and the commercial use of embryo transfer in pigs. PMID:25118944

  4. Oral health-related quality of life following non-surgical (routine) tooth extraction: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Wasiu L.; Taiwo, Olanrewaju A.; Oderinu, Olabisi H.; Adeyemi, Moshood F.; Ladeinde, Akinola L.; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study was designed to explore the changes in oral health-related quality of life (QoL) in the immediate postoperative period following routine (non-surgical) dental extraction. Setting and Design: A prospective study carried out at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Subjects attending who required non-surgical removal of one or two teeth under local anesthesia were included in the study. A baseline QoL questionnaire (oral health impact profile-14 [OHIP-14]) was filled by each patient just before surgery, and only those who were considered to have their QoL “not affected” (total score 14 or less) were included in the study. After the extraction, each subject was given a modified form of “health related QoL” [OHIP-14]-instrument to be completed by the 3rd day-after surgery, and were given the opportunity to review the questionnaire on the 7th day postoperative review. Results: Total OHIP-14 scores ranged between 14 and 48 (mean ± SD, 26.2 ± 8.3). Majority of the subjects (60%) reported, “a little affected.” Only few subjects (5.8%) reported, “not at all affected,” and about 32% reported, “quite a lot.” Summation of OHIP-14 scores revealed that QoL was “affected” in 41 subjects (34.2%) and “not affected” in 79 subjects (65.8%). More than 30% of subjects reported that their ability to chew, ability to open the mouth and enjoyment of food were affected following tooth extraction. Few subjects (14-34%) reported deterioration in their speech and less than 20% of subjects reported that change in their appearance was “affected.” Only few subjects (12.5-15.1%) reported sleep and duty impairment. Thirty-percent of subjects reported their inability to keep social activities, and 41% were not able to continue with their favorite sports and hobbies. Multiple regression analysis revealed no significant association between age, sex, indications for extraction, duration of extraction, intra-operative complications, and deterioration in QoL (P < 0.05). Consumption of analgesics beyond postoperative day 1 (POD1) was more common in subjects with socket healing complications than those without (P = 0.000). About 33% of subjects reported, “inability to work” (1-3 days). Conclusion: About a third of subjects experienced significant deterioration in QoL. The most affected domains were eating/diet variation and speech variation. Therefore, patients should be informed of possible deterioration in their QoL following non-surgical tooth extraction. PMID:23633803

  5. Orthodontic Camouflage Treatment in an Adult Patient with a Class II, Division 1 Malocclusion – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Naragond, Appasaheb; Kenganal, Smitha; Sagarkar, Roshan; Sugaradday

    2013-01-01

    Since so many decades, various treatment modalities have been presented for the treatment for the class II, div 1 malocclusions. In recent times, we have seen enormously increasing numbers of young adults who desire the shortest, cost effective and a non surgical correction of Class II malocclusions and they accept dental camouflage as a treatment option to mask the skeletal discrepancy. This case report presents one such case of a 22 year old non-growing female who had a skeletal Class II, division 1 malocclusion with an orthognathic maxilla, a retrognathic mandible, a negative VTO and an overjet of 12mm, who did not want a surgical treatment. We considered the camouflage treatment by extracting the upper first premolars. Following the treatment, a satisfactory result was achieved with an ideal, static and a functional occlusion, facial profile, smile and lip competence and stability of the treatment results. PMID:23543878

  6. Non-surgical interventions for pelvic organ prolapse in rural Nepal: a prospective monitoring and evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Bhatta, Surya; Sherpa, Tenzing Y; Malla, Bishwo S; A Fitchett, Elizabeth J; Samen, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major cause of morbidity in Nepal, particularly affecting women in the rural communities. Women with POP in Nepal may suffer from symptoms for decades. At present, the Government of Nepal advocates surgical intervention but access to surgical care is inadequate. This report evaluated the feasibility of a non-surgical public health programme in rural Nepal, and describes risk factors associated with POP in this setting. Design Prospective monitoring and evaluation study of a new public health programme. Setting Baglung district, rural Nepal. Participants Women with gynaecological symptoms of POP. Main outcome measures Risk factors for disease progression were assessed using Fisher’s exact test, Pearson’s ?2-test and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 74 women included in this analysis, 70.8% were diagnosed with stage 2 POP or greater. The majority of women did not have any further children following the onset of POP symptoms (63.5%). Duration of symptoms ranged from 2 months to 60 years, with 73.4% of women suffering for over 5 years and 28.4% suffering for over 20 years. Univariate analyses identified age at screening, age at onset of symptoms, the duration of symptoms and an associated rectocele as factors associated with increasing POP severity (p?Non-surgical interventions may provide an opportunity to address the significant burden of POP in rural Nepal. PMID:26664731

  7. Treatment Issues in Adolescent Substance Use and Addictions: Options, Outcome, Effectiveness, Reimbursement, and Admission Criteria.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann; Mee-Lee; Arrowood

    1993-06-01

    Cost-reduction strategies and a lack of overall perspective have created a potentially dangerous climate for the treatment of the various forms of adolescent substance abuse. The authors argue for a holistic approach that focuses on demographics, family issues, school functioning, and other related problems as well as on careful evaluation of treatment outcome and criteria for admission, continued stay, and discharge from treatment programs. PMID:10356221

  8. Splinting rationale and contemporary treatment options for luxated and avulsed permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    The continued growth in athletic participation among children and adults has increased the potential incidence of sports-related dental injuries. Regardless of preventive measures, damage and injury to the oral cavity can occur during participation in sports. Luxations, root fractures, bony fractures, and avulsions involving 1 or more teeth are a possibility. Many of these injuries require specific protocols for splinting of the traumatized tooth or teeth to allow the best possible outcomes. This article identifies luxation and avulsion injuries, explains the rationale for splinting, reviews guidelines for splint duration, and discusses contemporary material options available to stabilize affected permanent dentition. PMID:26545276

  9. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  10. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  11. Psychopharmacological Treatment Options for Global Child and Adolescent Mental Health: The WHO Essential Medicines Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutcher, Stan; Murphy, Andrea; Gardner, David

    2008-01-01

    The article examines the World Health Organization's Model List of Essential Medicines (EML) and suggests modification for appropriate psychopharmacological treatment of child- and adolescent-onset mental disorders. The EML enlists few of the psychotropic medicines that are useful for the treatment of young people thereby limiting the…

  12. Options for treatment of hepatitis C in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David L

    2006-01-01

    Irrespective of whether a patient has HIV infection, the optimal treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is peginterferon alpha and ribavirin. In both HIV-infected and uninfected persons, sustained virologic response (SVR) rates are higher for genotype 2 and genotype 3 HCV infection and for patients with lower pre-treatment HCV RNA levels. HIV-infection does not alter either the reality that persons who fail to achieve a 2log(10) reduction in HCV RNA level after 12 weeks of therapy rarely achieve a SVR, or the theoretical benefits of maintenance therapy in those without viral responses. The same adverse treatment effects can occur in HIV-infected and uninfected persons, but treatment of HIV-infected persons is complicated by interactions between ribavirin and antiretroviral medications and effects of HCV treatment on the course of HIV. The optimal treatment doses and durations are not known for HIV-infected persons, who are also less likely to achieve a SVR. A final difference is that the benefits of HCV treatment breakthroughs are usually realized in patients without HIV years before those with HIV. Future research must focus both on improving outcomes with currently available medications and rapidly evaluating the safety and efficacy of forthcoming antiviral compounds in HIV/HCV coinfected persons. PMID:16356578

  13. Treatment options for irreparable postero-superior cuff tears in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Galasso, Olimpio; Familiari, Filippo; Gasparini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) occur more commonly with advanced age, with most rotator cuff abnormalities in patients less than 30 years old being painful tendinoses or partial-thickness RCTs. Irreparable postero-superior cuff tears has been reported as frequent as 7% to 10% in the general population, and the incidence of irreparable RCTs in young patients is still unknown. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for young patients with irreparable postero-superior RCTs, such as rotator cuff debridement, partial rotator cuff repair, biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, rotator cuff grafting, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer, and reverse shoulder arthroplasty. After being thoroughly investigated in open surgery, arthroscopic techniques for latissimus dorsi tendon transfer have been recently described. They have been shown to be an adequate option to open surgery for managing irreparable postero-superior RCTs refractory to conservative management. PMID:26601058

  14. Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost

    E-print Network

    Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

    2008-01-01

    A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

  15. New treatment option for women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a common breast cancer prevention drug, tamoxifen, in preventing breast cancer recurrence in young women who also receive post-surgical treatment to suppress ovarian funct

  16. Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant

    E-print Network

    Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

  17. Introduction: Cancer treatment and male fertility: effects of therapy and current and future management options.

    PubMed

    Sigman, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Cancer treatments are detrimental to spermatogenesis. This series reviews effects of anticancer therapies on male fertility, current and future approaches to determine sperm health, and gives recommendations for patient management. PMID:24074753

  18. Fontan Repair of Single Ventricle Physiology: Consequences of a Unique Physiology and Possible Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    John, Anitha S

    2015-11-01

    The Fontan operation is a unique approach to create a circulation in series without 2 distinct pumping chambers. Although the approach has enabled many patients to live well into adulthood, the unique physiology results in many complications, cardiac and extracardiac. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of the failing Fontan and suggests possible treatment strategies. By understanding the physiology and interpreting patient data based on this understanding, an individualized treatment plan can be designed for this unique patient population. PMID:26471820

  19. Erythromycin as a Safe and Effective Treatment Option for Erythema Annulare Centrifugum

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Fu-Chen; Lin, Shang-Hong; Wu, Wei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Erythema annulare centrifugum (EAC) is an inflammatory dermatosis with unknown etiology. It is usually self-limited, but chronic disease may be difficult to treat. We observed incidentally the therapeutic effect of erythromycin for EAC among patients taking erythromycin for other diseases. Aim: To evaluate the treatment response of erythromycin for EAC. Materials and Methods: During the study period, from July 2007 to February 2011, all patients with EAC were assigned to erythromycin stearate tablet 1000 mg per day for two weeks. EAC was diagnosed by a constellation of clinical and pathological findings. The efficacy (before and after the treatment) was assessed clinically by one dermatologist and photographically by two blinded dermatologists. Secondary outcomes included adverse drug effects and recurrence. Results: Eight patients were enrolled in this study. Most patients had chronic relapsing disease with poor response to previous treatment. All the patients showed rapid response with profound reduction in the size of lesion and erythema two weeks after initiation of erythromycin treatment. The response was so obvious and complete that a coincidental response was less likely. Three patients had recurrence of disease and they tended to have more extensive lesions. Readministration of erythromycin was effective. All patients tolerated the treatment well. Conclusion: Our study documented erythromycin as a safe and cost-effective treatment for EAC. PMID:26538713

  20. Cannabis dependence as a primary drug use-related problem: the case for harm reduction-oriented treatment options.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, A D; Callaghan, R C; Macdonald, S; Erickson, P G

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have focused on cannabis dependence as compared to other drugs more commonly acknowledged as presenting a substantial need for treatment. This paper presents findings from a 2004-2005 study of drug user treatment clients in Southern Ontario, Canada. Clients with cannabis (n = 128) or cocaine (n = 300) as their primary drug problem were compared on psychosocial and demographic characteristics, drug effects, and clinical impairment. There are more similarities than differences between groups, with DAST and DSM scores showing high rates of "dependence" and reported symptoms of "abuse." However, cannabis consistently scored lower on these items, supporting the idea of a continuum of risk on which its rank compared with other potentially misused drugs holds across a wide range of symptoms of impairment. The less disruptive nature of cannabis use-related problems poses greater challenges for drug user treatment providers guided by strict abstinence agendas. The authors call for the expansion of harm reduction treatment options and educational initiatives beyond primary prevention that acknowledge benefits of moderate controlled use when addressing cannabis misuse. PMID:19938940

  1. Update on the use of topical NSAIDs for the treatment of soft tissue and musculoskeletal pain: a review of recent data and current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Alan R; McCarberg, Bill; Argoff, Charles E

    2010-06-01

    Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have an emerging role in the treatment of certain types of acute pain. In addition to their convenience, efficacy, and safety, they are an attractive option, particularly when considering current concerns about the safety of traditional NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs). Topical analgesics act largely within the peripheral nervous system. Studies have demonstrated that topical NSAIDs penetrate the skin and distribute to the target tissues underlying the application site. Because the pharmacologically effective dose is delivered at the site of pain, there is minimal systemic absorption and risk of related adverse events. Topical NSAIDs have been used for many years in Europe, with extensive post-marketing data available for some of the agents. Three topical NSAID formulations have recently been approved for use in the United States: the diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP), diclofenac sodium 1% gel, and diclofenac sodium topical solution 1.5%. Topical NSAIDs provide a therapeutic option for treatment of acute, localized, soft tissue injuries or painful conditions in areas of the body that can be readily treated using the topical route of administration. This article reviews available data on the use of topical NSAID therapy. PMID:20631465

  2. Condylar growth after non-surgical advancement in adult subject: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola

    2009-01-01

    Background A defect of condylar morphology can be caused by several sources. Case report A case of altered condylar morphology in adult male with temporomandibular disorders was reported in 30-year-old male patient. Erosion and flattening of the left mandibular condyle were observed by panoramic x-ray. The patient was treated with splint therapy that determined mandibular advancement. Eight months after the therapy, reduction in joint pain and a greater opening of the mouth was observed, although crepitation sounds during mastication were still noticeable. Conclusion During the following months of gnatologic treatment, new bone growth in the left condyle was observed by radiograph, with further improvement of the symptoms. PMID:19619334

  3. The pharmacological treatment options for pediatric migraine: an evidence-based appraisal.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Donald W; Winner, Paul

    2006-04-01

    The treatment of children and adolescents who suffer from migraine headaches must be individually tailored, flexible, and balanced with a blend of bio-behavioral measures, agents for acute treatment and, if needed, daily preventive medicines. While controlled data is limited, there is now enough evidence available to provide a rational framework to build treatment plans appropriate for the pediatric population. Essentially, the pharmacological management of pediatric migraine divides into agents for the acute attacks and agents used daily to prevent or reduce the frequency of attacks. For the acute treatment, the most rigorously studied agents are ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and the nasal spray forms of sumatriptan and zolmitriptan, all of which have shown both safety and efficacy in controlled trials. For preventive treatment the calcium channel blocker flunarezine has the best efficacy profile in controlled trials, but is not available in the U.S. A growing body of data, mostly uncontrolled, is emerging regarding the use of several anti-epileptic agents (e.g. topiramate, disodium valproate, levateracetam), as well as the antihistamine cyproheptadine and the anti-depressant amitriptyline. PMID:16554256

  4. Gaining momentum: New options and opportunities for the treatment of advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Michielin, Olivier; Hoeller, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Before 2011, patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma had a particularly poor long-term prognosis. Since traditional treatments failed to confer a survival benefit, patients were preferentially entered into clinical trials of investigational agents. A greater understanding of the epidemiology and biology of disease has underpinned the development of newer therapies, including six agents that have been approved in the EU, US and/or Japan: a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 inhibitor (ipilimumab), two programmed cell death-1 receptor inhibitors (nivolumab and pembrolizumab), two BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib and dabrafenib) and a MEK inhibitor (trametinib). The availability of these treatments has greatly improved the outlook for patients with advanced melanoma; however, a major consideration for physicians is now to determine how best to integrate these agents into clinical practice. Therapeutic decisions are complicated by the need to consider patient and disease characteristics, and individual treatment goals, alongside the different efficacy and safety profiles of agents with varying mechanisms of action. Long-term survival, an outcome largely out of reach with traditional systemic therapies, is now a realistic goal, creating the additional need to re-establish how clinical benefit is evaluated. In this review we summarise the current treatment landscape in advanced melanoma and discuss the promise of agents still in development. We also speculate on the future of melanoma treatment and discuss how combination and sequencing approaches may be used to optimise patient care in the future. PMID:26096079

  5. Interferon Beta-1a (AVONEX®) as a Treatment Option for Untreated Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (AXIOM): A Prospective, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Niemczyk, Gabriele; Rehberg-Weber, Karin; Wernsdörfer, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of first-line disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) has been demonstrated in pivotal, randomized trials, but these studies do not reflect the routine care setting where treatment gaps or switches are common. The Avonex as Treatment Option for Untreated MS Patients (AXIOM) trial assessed the efficacy of newly-initiated intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IM IFNb-1a) after a treatment-free interval, with particular consideration of the previous course of disease and therapy. The AXIOM trial was an open, 12-month, observational, non-interventional study with a retrospective and a prospective part conducted in Germany. RRMS patients with a treatment-free interval of at least three months were included and treated with IFNb-1a for up to 12 months. Relapse rate, disability progression, injection-related parameters and quality of life observed during the prospective part were compared with retrospectively-collected data. Two hundred and thirty five RRMS patients participated in AXIOM. The mean relapse rate decreased from 1.1 in the three months before baseline to 0.2 per quarter during the twelve-month observational period; the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score improved during twelve months of IM IFNb-1a treatment, while the Expanded Disability Status Scale score did not change over the course of this study. Compared to previous DMTs (IM IFNb-1a, subcutaneous IFNb-1a (SC IFNb-1a), SC IFNb-1b, glatiramer acetate), the patients experienced less injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms, with a stated improved quality of life. IM IFNb-1a was effective and well accepted in RRMS patients with no or discontinued previous therapy. These results from the routine care setting may inform optimization of DMT treatment in RRMS, but need confirmation in further studies. PMID:26154767

  6. Interferon Beta-1a (AVONEX®) as a Treatment Option for Untreated Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (AXIOM): A Prospective, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Niemczyk, Gabriele; Rehberg-Weber, Karin; Wernsdörfer, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of first-line disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) has been demonstrated in pivotal, randomized trials, but these studies do not reflect the routine care setting where treatment gaps or switches are common. The Avonex as Treatment Option for Untreated MS Patients (AXIOM) trial assessed the efficacy of newly-initiated intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IM IFNb-1a) after a treatment-free interval, with particular consideration of the previous course of disease and therapy. The AXIOM trial was an open, 12-month, observational, non-interventional study with a retrospective and a prospective part conducted in Germany. RRMS patients with a treatment-free interval of at least three months were included and treated with IFNb-1a for up to 12 months. Relapse rate, disability progression, injection-related parameters and quality of life observed during the prospective part were compared with retrospectively-collected data. Two hundred and thirty five RRMS patients participated in AXIOM. The mean relapse rate decreased from 1.1 in the three months before baseline to 0.2 per quarter during the twelve-month observational period; the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score improved during twelve months of IM IFNb-1a treatment, while the Expanded Disability Status Scale score did not change over the course of this study. Compared to previous DMTs (IM IFNb-1a, subcutaneous IFNb-1a (SC IFNb-1a), SC IFNb-1b, glatiramer acetate), the patients experienced less injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms, with a stated improved quality of life. IM IFNb-1a was effective and well accepted in RRMS patients with no or discontinued previous therapy. These results from the routine care setting may inform optimization of DMT treatment in RRMS, but need confirmation in further studies. PMID:26154767

  7. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  8. Near-infrared light as a possible treatment option for Parkinson's disease and laser eye injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSmet, Kristina; Buchmann, Ellen; Henry, Michele; Wong-Riley, Margaret; Eells, Janis; VerHoeve, Jim; Whelan, Harry

    2009-02-01

    Studies in our laboratory demonstrate that the action spectrum for stimulation of cytochrome oxidase activity and cellular ATP parallels the near-infrared absorption spectrum of cytochrome oxidase and that 660-680 nm irradiation upregulates cytochrome oxidase activity in cultured neurons. Treatment with nearinfrared light augments cellular energy production and neuronal viability following mitochondrial injury linking the actions of red to near-infrared light on mitochondrial metabolism in vitro and cell injury in vivo. NIR light treatment represents an innovative therapeutic approach for disease processes in which mitochondrial dysfunction is postulated to play a role including Parkinson's disease, laser eye injury and Age-related macular degeneration.

  9. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women: treatment options beyond testosterone and approaches to communicating with patients on sexual health.

    PubMed

    Lodise, Nicole M

    2013-04-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) affects nearly 1 in 10 women. Thus, it is essential for pharmacists and other health care providers to be comfortable when discussing a patient's sexual health to ensure appropriate triage so that the specific causes of HSDD can be identified and potential recommendations provided. HSDD is defined as the absence or deficiency of sexual interest and/or desire, leading to significant distress and interpersonal difficulties. As health care providers, pharmacists have a critical role in assessing the presence of HSDD and providing education on available treatment options. This article will review the potential causes of HSDD and low sexual desire, the screening tools available, and the significant role of health care professionals in communicating with patients about their sexual health. An overview of the importance of behavioral modifications, the current pharmacologic options being investigated, and the use of complementary and alternative therapies will also be explored. Currently, buproprion is the primary pharmacologic agent that has shown positive results in treating patients with HSDD. The use of testosterone therapy will not be addressed in this article, as this therapy is described in greater detail elsewhere. PMID:23553810

  10. Update on the management of chronic eczema: new approaches and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Walling, Hobart W; Swick, Brian L

    2010-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease with worldwide prevalence, affecting up to 20% of children and 3% of adults. Recent evidence regarding pathogenesis has implicated epidermal barrier defects deriving from filagrin mutations with resulting secondary inflammation. In this report, the authors comprehensively review the literature on atopic dermatitis therapy, including topical and systemic options. Most cases of AD will benefit from emollients to enhance the barrier function of skin. Topical corticosteroids are first-line therapy for most cases of AD. Topical calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus ointment, pimecrolimus cream) are considered second line therapy. Several novel barrier-enhancing prescription creams are also available. Moderate to severe cases inadequately controlled with topical therapy may require phototherapy or systemic therapy. The most commonly employed phototherapy modalites are narrow-band UVB, broadband UVB, and UVA1. Traditional systemic therapies include short-term corticosteroids, cyclosporine (considered to be the gold standard), methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and most recently leflunamide. Biologic therapies include recombinant monoclonal antibodies acting on the immunoglobulin E / interleukin-5 pathway (omalizumab, mepolizumab), acting as tumor necrosis factor-? inhibitors (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab), and acting as T-cell (alefacept) and B-cell (rituxumab) inhibitors, as well as interferon ? and intravenous immunoglobulin. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability are reviewed for each medication. PMID:21437065

  11. A direct steam heat option for hydrothermal treatment of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-04-12

    A conceptual process for producing a gasifiable slurry from raw municipal solid waste (MSW) using direct steam heating is outlined. The process is based on the hydrothermal decomposition of the organic matter in the MSW, which requires the MSW to be heated to 300-350{degrees}C in the presence of water. A process model is developed and it is shown, based on preliminary estimates of the hydrothermal reaction stoichiometry, that a process using multiple pressure vessels, which allows recovery of waste heat, results in a process capable of producing a product slurry having a 40 wt % solids content with no waste water emissions. Results for a variety of process options and process parameters are presented. It is shown that the addition of auxiliary feedstock to the gasifier, along with the MSW derived slurry, results in more efficient gasification. It is estimated that 2.6 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of MSW and 16 kg/s of heavy oil. Without the additional feedstock, heavy oil in this case, only 0.49 kmol/s of hydrogen would be produced.

  12. Music performance anxiety-part 2. a review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Brugués, Ariadna Ortiz

    2011-09-01

    Music performance anxiety (MPA) affects many individuals independent of age, gender, experience, and hours of practice. In order to prevent MPA from happening or to alleviate it when it occurs, a review of the literature about its prevention and treatment was done. Forty-four articles, meeting evidence-based medicine (EBM) criteria, were identified and analyzed. Performance repertoire should be chosen based on the musician's skill level, and it should be practiced to the point of automaticity. Because of this, the role of music teachers is essential in preventing MPA. Prevention is the most effective method against MPA. Several treatments (psychological as well as pharmacological) have been studied on subjects in order to determine the best treatment for MPA. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) seems to be the most effective, but further investigation is desired. Some musicians, in addition to CBT, also take beta-blockers; however, these drugs should only be prescribed occasionally after analyzing the situation and considering the contraindications and possible side effects. Despite these conclusions, more randomized studies with larger, homogeneous groups of subjects would be desirable (according to the EBM criteria), as well as support for the necessity of both MPA prevention and optimized methods of treatment when it does occur. PMID:21987072

  13. Current and Potential Pharmacological Treatment Options for Maintenance Therapy in Opioid-Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Fiellin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid dependence, manifesting as addiction to heroin and pharmaceutical opioids is increasing. Internationally, there are an estimated 15.6 million illicit opioid users. The global economic burden of opioid dependence is profound both in terms of HIV and hepatitis C virus transmission, direct healthcare costs, and indirectly through criminal activity, absenteeism and lost productivity. Opioid agonist medications, such as methadone and buprenorphine, that stabilize neuronal systems and provide narcotic blockade are the most effective treatments. Prolonged provision of these medications, defined as maintenance treatment, typically produces improved outcomes when compared with short-duration tapers and withdrawal. The benefits of opioid agonist maintenance include decreased illicit drug use, improved retention in treatment, decreased HIV risk behaviours and decreased criminal behaviour. While regulations vary by country, these medications are becoming increasingly available internationally, especially in regions experiencing rapid transmission of HIV due to injection drug use. In this review, we describe the rationale for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence, discuss emerging uses of opioid antagonists such as naltrexone, and sustained-release formulations of naltrexone and buprenorphine, and provide a description of the experimental therapies. PMID:22235870

  14. Chronic proctalgia and chronic pelvic pain syndromes: New etiologic insights and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Asteria, Corrado; Whitehead, William E

    2011-01-01

    This systematic review addresses the pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of several chronic pain syndromes affecting the pelvic organs: chronic proctalgia, coccygodynia, pudendal neuralgia, and chronic pelvic pain. Chronic or recurrent pain in the anal canal, rectum, or other pelvic organs occurs in 7% to 24% of the population and is associated with impaired quality of life and high health care costs. However, these pain syndromes are poorly understood, with little research evidence available to guide their diagnosis and treatment. This situation appears to be changing: A recently published large randomized, controlled trial by our group comparing biofeedback, electrogalvanic stimulation, and massage for the treatment of chronic proctalgia has shown success rates of 85% for biofeedback when patients are selected based on physical examination evidence of tenderness in response to traction on the levator ani muscle-a physical sign suggestive of striated muscle tension. Excessive tension (spasm) in the striated muscles of the pelvic floor appears to be common to most of the pelvic pain syndromes. This suggests the possibility that similar approaches to diagnostic assessment and treatment may improve outcomes in other pelvic pain disorders. PMID:22110274

  15. Environmental and cost life cycle assessment of disinfection options for municipal wastewater treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the data collection, analysis, and results for a base case wastewater treatment (WWT) plant reference model. The base case is modeled after the Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati (MSDGC) Mill Creek Plant. The plant has an activated sludge s...

  16. New surgical treatment options in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T. W.; Nelius, Thomas; Aronoff, David R.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2003-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in males older than 50 years of age. 75-80% of this population is considered to have some degree of BPH causing clinical symptoms and requiring urological treatment. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) is currently the standard surgical treatment modality for BPH. In an attempt to minimize the need for hospitalization and the associated perioperative and postoperative morbidity, alternatives have been sought. Various types of Laser techniques such as interstitial Laser cogaulation and side-firing technology have been proposed. Numerous studies have shown that Laser procedures safely and effectively reduce the volume of the prostate. Intra- and postoperative bleeding are nearly unknown complications for Laser procedures, whereas this is the most relevant complication for the TUR-P. Due to significant tissue edema after Laser treatment, patients commonly show delayed time to void adequately, and therefore, catheter drainage is often necessary for 3 to 21 days. Retrograde ejaculation is reported to occur less (0 - 10%) compared to TUR-P (> 60%). Urinary tract infections are very common after interstitial laser coagulation. Although not many long-term clinical data are available, various studies have shown that BPH patients improve in symptom score, flow rate and post-void residual up to 3 years after Laser treatment. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently used Laser techniques as well as the long-term clinical data compared to TUR-P.

  17. Endoscopic options for treatment of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Vance, R Brooks; Dunbar, Kerry B

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the endoscopic treatment of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) have allowed endoscopists to provide effective and durable eradication therapies. This review summarizes the available endoscopic eradication techniques for dysplasia in patients with BE including endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection, photodynamic therapy, argon plasma coagulation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. PMID:26722612

  18. Bronchial thermoplasty: a new therapeutic option for the treatment of severe, uncontrolled asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Dombret, Marie-Christine; Alagha, Khuder; Boulet, Louis Philippe; Brillet, Pierre Yves; Joos, Guy; Laviolette, Michel; Louis, Renaud; Rochat, Thierry; Soccal, Paola; Aubier, Michel; Chanez, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    Bronchial thermoplasty is a young yet promising treatment for severe asthma whose benefit for long-term asthma control outweighs the short-term risk of deterioration and hospitalisation in the days following the treatment. It is an innovative treatment whose clinical efficacy and safety are beginning to be better understood. Since this is a device-based therapy, the overall evaluation of risk-benefit is unlike that of pharmaceutical products; safety aspects, regulatory requirements, study design and effect size assessment may be unfamiliar. The mechanisms of action and optimal patient selection need to be addressed in further rigorous clinical and scientific studies. Bronchial thermoplasty fits in perfectly with the movement to expand personalised medicine in the field of chronic airway disorders. This is a device-based complimentary asthma treatment that must be supported and developed in order to meet the unmet needs of modern severe asthma management. The mechanisms of action and the type of patients that benefit from bronchial thermoplasty are the most important challenges for bronchial thermoplasty in the future. PMID:25445950

  19. The Epidemiology of Psychiatric Disorders among Repeat DUI Offenders Accepting a Treatment-Sentencing Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Howard J.; Nelson, Sarah E.; LaPlante, Debi A.; LaBrie, Richard A.; Albanese, Mark; Caro, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity likely contributes to driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol among repeat offenders. This study presents one of the first descriptions of the prevalence and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders among repeat DUI offenders in treatment. Participants included all consenting eligible admissions (N=729) to a 2-week…

  20. The Epidemiology of Psychiatric Disorders among Repeat DUI Offenders Accepting a Treatment-Sentencing Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Howard J.; Nelson, Sarah E.; LaPlante, Debi A.; LaBrie, Richard A.; Albanese, Mark; Caro, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity likely contributes to driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol among repeat offenders. This study presents one of the first descriptions of the prevalence and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders among repeat DUI offenders in treatment. Participants included all consenting eligible admissions (N = 729) to a 2-week…

  1. Trastuzumab resistance induces EMT to transform HER2+ PTEN? to a triple negative breast cancer that requires unique treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Joseph P.; Korkaya, Hasan; Ouzounova, Maria D.; Jiang, Hui; Conley, Sarah J.; Newman, Bryan W.; Sun, Lichao; Connarn, Jamie N.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Zhang, Ning; Wicha, Max S.; Sun, Duxin

    2015-01-01

    Although trastuzumab is an effective treatment in early stage HER2+ breast cancer the majority of advanced HER2+ breast cancers develop trastuzumab resistance, especially in the 40% of breast cancers with loss of PTEN. However, HER2+ breast cancer patients continue to receive trastuzumab regardless PTEN status and the consequence of therapy in these patients is unknown. We demonstrate that continued use of trastuzumab in HER2+ cells with loss of PTEN induces the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and transform HER2+ to a triple negative breast cancer. These transformed cells exhibited mesenchymal morphology and gene expression markers, while parent HER2+ cells showed epithelial morphology and markers. The transformed cells exhibited loss of dependence on ERBB family signaling (such as HER2, HER3, HER4, BTC, HRG, EGF) and reduced estrogen and progesterone receptors. Continued use of trastuzumab in HER2+ PTEN? cells increased the frequency of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and metastasis potential. Strikingly, parental HER2+ cells and transformed resistant cells respond to treatment differently. Transformed resistant cells were sensitive to chemical probe (sulforaphane) through inhibition of IL-6/STAT3/NF-?B positive feedback loop whereas parental HER2+ cells did not respond. This data suggests that trastuzumab resistance in HER2+ PTEN? breast cancer induces EMT and subtype switching, which requires unique treatment options. PMID:26522776

  2. A new option for endovascular treatment of leg ulcers caused by venous insufficiency with fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rybak, Zbigniew; Jargiello, Tomasz; ?okaj, Marek; Czapla, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ulcers of lower legs are the most bothersome complication of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Aim To assess the effectiveness of endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy for the treatment of venous ulcers. Material and methods Thirty-eight limbs in 35 patients with crural venous ulcers were treated with guided sclerotherapy under the control of fluoroscopy. Patients with non-healing ulcers in the course of chronic venous insufficiency, with and without features of past deep vein thrombosis, were qualified for the study. Doppler ultrasound and dynamic venography with mapping of venous flow were performed. Ambulatory venous pressure measurements, leg circumference and varicography were performed just before and following the procedure. Results In 84% of cases, ulcers were treated successfully and healed. Patients with post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 17) healed in 13 (76.5%) cases, whereas patients without post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 21) healed in 19 (90.5%) cases. The mean time of healing of an ulcer for all patients was 83 days (in the first group it was 121 days and in the second group 67 days). Recurrence of an ulcer was observed in 10 limbs: 6 cases in the first group and 4 cases in the second group. Occurrence of deep vein thrombosis associated with the procedure was not observed. Temporary complications were reported but none giving a serious clinical outcome. Conclusions Endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy can be an alternative method of treatment of venous ulcers, especially in situations when surgical procedures or other options of treatment are impossible. PMID:26649090

  3. Open Surgical Repair Can Be One Option for the Treatment of Persistent Type II Endoleak after EVAR

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hideki; Tauchi, Yuya; Satoh, Hisashi; Matsuda, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    Purposes: Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an increasingly used method of repairing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, the treatment of persistent type II endoleak is still a controversial issue. Five cases are reported here in which we performed open surgical repair of growing aneurysm due to persistent type II endoleak. Method: Totally 128 EVAR cases were retrospectively reviewed, which were operated in our hospital from April 2008 to October 2013. These cases were followed by periodical contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) after EVAR. When persistent type II endoleak caused aneurysm sac growth, we performed surgical repair method for the first line treatment. In the operation, we incised the aneurysm sac by abdominal small median incision approach and sutured lumber arteries from inside of aneurysm sac and tied inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) in addition to aneurysmorrhaphy. Contrast-enhanced CT scanning was performed in a week after open repair for the confirmation of complete treatment. Results: Five of 128 cases (3.9%) were needed to be surgically repaired because of aneurysm sac growth (>5 mm), including two ruptured AAA cases. All patients recovered uneventfully. Contrast-enhanced CT scanning performed a week after these operations showed no endoleak and intact stent grafts and reduction of the aneurysm size. Conclusion: We believe open surgical repair method of persistent type II endoleak with aneurysm expansion is secure method, and can be one of the preferable options for this life threatening complication after EVAR. PMID:26421069

  4. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: a review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Worswick, Scott; Cotliar, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous reactions that are medication-induced in most instances. While the clinical manifestations of SJS and TEN are well-defined, the optimal treatment for these disorders is not. Case reports have shown benefit with the use of a variety of agents including tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors and cyclophosphamide, whereas thalidomide was associated with an increased mortality. Plasmapheresis and cyclosporine have also demonstrated efficacy anecdotally, albeit with an even smaller number of cases in the literature. Most of the reporting has focused on the use of systemic corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for these severe reactions. The majority of studies analyzing the use of IVIG in the treatment of SJS/TEN show a benefit, though more recent series cast doubt upon this conclusion. The results of these studies are summarized in this present review study. PMID:21410610

  5. Treatment options in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer after BCG failure

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Nathan A.; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the ninth-most prevalent cancer worldwide. Most patients with urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder present with non-muscle-invasive disease and are treated with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical therapy. Many of these patients experience disease recurrence after BCG failure. Radical cystectomy is the recommended treatment for high-risk patients failing BCG. However, many patients are unfit for or unwilling to undergo this procedure. We searched the published literature on the treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after BCG failure. We review current evidence regarding intravesical therapy with gemcitabine, mitomycin combined with thermo-chemotherapy, docetaxel, nab-paclitaxel, photodynamic therapy (PDT), BCG with interferon (IFN), and combination sequentially administered chemotherapy. PMID:26604442

  6. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Michael E; Chaudhary, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. PMID:26648763

  7. Current options for prophylactic treatment of hereditary angioedema in the United States: patient-based considerations.

    PubMed

    Gower, Richard G; Lumry, William R; Davis-Lorton, Mark A; Johnston, Douglas T; Busse, Paula J

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) results from mutations in the C1-esterase inhibitor (C1 INH) gene that decrease production of C1 INH or render it dysfunctional. HAE is characterized by recurrent, unpredictable, bradykinin-mediated edema of the extremities, face, genitalia, trunk, gastrointestinal tract, or upper airway. Attacks causing laryngeal edema can be fatal. Patients with HAE need medications for acute attacks; some also require prophylaxis. Management requires consideration of the patient's disease burden and effect on the patient's quality of life. This review examines an individualized approach to identifying HAE patients who may benefit from prophylaxis. A literature search was performed for HAE and prophylaxis. HAE guidelines, case reports, safety studies, and randomized, controlled clinical prophylaxis trials were selected. Authors provided cases demonstrating individualized prophylaxis. U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved options for prophylaxis of HAE include attenuated androgens and nanofiltered C1 INH (C1 INH-nf). In other countries, pasteurized C1 INH and purified C1 INH are also available. Alternative therapies include fresh frozen plasma for preprocedural prophylaxis and antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis. Attenuated androgens reduce attack frequency in many patients. Adverse effects include weight gain, virilization, increased hair growth, hypercholesterolemia, depression, and liver adenomas. C1 INH-nf reduces frequency of attacks and is well tolerated. Each patient with HAE has unique needs, based on the nature and frequency of past attacks, proximity to a medical center, occupation, and the patient's wishes. These factors should be used to create a patient-centered approach to management of HAE. PMID:22584192

  8. Pharmacological treatment options for autism spectrum disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Leskovec, Thomas J; Rowles, Brieana M; Findling, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Autism and other pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) are frequently associated with dysfunctional behaviors and are characterized by deficits in socialization, communication, and behavioral rigidity. Despite the absence of a pharmacological cure for PDDs, many of the dysfunctional, coinciding behaviors may be treated pharmacologically. This article reviews what is known about the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacological interventions for the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from autistic spectrum disorders. PMID:18415882

  9. The potential of panobinostat as a treatment option in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia V; Berenson, James R

    2014-12-01

    Panobinostat is an investigational and potent histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that has shown promise as an antimultiple myeloma agent in the preclinical setting. In this review, we discuss the rationale for the use of panobinostat as a combination therapy for multiple myeloma and provide an overview of recent and ongoing clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of panobinostat for the treatment of the disease. PMID:25469210

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: natural history, diagnosis, and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Gharibeh, Tarek; Mehra, Reena

    2010-01-01

    Sleep apnea is an entity characterized by repetitive upper airway obstruction resulting in nocturnal hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. It is estimated that 2%–4% of the middle-aged population has sleep apnea with a predilection in men relative to women. Risk factors of sleep apnea include obesity, gender, age, menopause, familial factors, craniofacial abnormalities, and alcohol. Sleep apnea has been increasingly recognized as a major health burden associated with hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Increased airway collapsibility and derangement in ventilatory control responses are the major pathological features of this disorder. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold-standard method for diagnosis of sleep apnea and assessment of sleep apnea severity; however, portable sleep monitoring has a diagnostic role in the setting of high pretest probability sleep apnea in the absence of significant comorbidity. Positive pressure therapy is the mainstay therapy of sleep apnea. Other treatment modalities, such as upper airway surgery or oral appliances, may be used for the treatment of sleep apnea in select cases. In this review, we focus on describing the sleep apnea definition, risk factor profile, underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, associated adverse consequences, diagnostic modalities, and treatment strategies. PMID:23616712

  11. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  12. Advanced basal cell carcinoma, the hedgehog pathway, and treatment options – role of smoothened inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, Leslie A; Sharfman, William H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer and its incidence is rising worldwide. Ultraviolet radiation exposure, including tanning bed use, as well as host factors play a role in its development. The majority of cases are treated and cured with local therapies including surgery. Yet, the health care costs of diagnosis and treatment of BCCs in the US is substantial. In the United States, the cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer care in the Medicare population is estimated to be US$426 million per year. While rare, locally advanced BCCs that can no longer be controlled with surgery and/or radiation, and metastatic BCCs do occur and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a smoothened inhibitor targeted at the hedgehog pathway, is the first US Food and Drug Association (FDA)-approved agent in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, and metastatic BCCs. This class of agents appears to be changing the survival rates in advanced BCC patients, but appropriate patient selection and monitoring are important. Multidisciplinary assessments are essential for the optimal care and management of these patients. For some patients with locally advanced BCC, treatment with a hedgehog inhibitor may eliminate the need for an excessively disfiguring or morbid surgery. PMID:26604681

  13. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-09-01

    Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  14. Neuronal Dysregulation in Stroke-Associated Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA): Diagnostic Scales and Current Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Until recently there was little understanding of the exact pathophysiology and treatment choices for stroke patients with Pseudobulbar affect (PBA). PBA is typically characterized by outbursts or uncontrollable laughing or crying and in the majority of patients, the outbursts being involuntary and incompatible with the patients’ emotional state. PBA is a behavioral syndrome reported to be displayed in 28–52% of stroke patients with first or multiple strokes, and incidence may be higher in patients who have had prior stroke events, and higher in females. There is typically involvement of glutaminergic, serotoninergic and dopaminergic neuronal circuits of the corticolimbic-subcorticothalamic-pontocerebellar network. PBA is now understood to be a disinhibition syndrome in which specific pathways involving serotonin and glutamate are disrupted or modulated causing reduced cortical inhibition of a cerebellar/brainstem-situated “emotional” laughing or crying focal center. Stroke-induced disruption of one or more neuronal pathway circuits may “disinhibit” voluntary laughing and crying making the process involuntary. With a “new” treatment currently being marketed to treat PBA patients, this article will delve into the neurological and physiological basis for PBA in stroke, and review progress with the diagnosis and treatment of PBA. PMID:26693049

  15. Treatment options beyond IFN? and NUCs for chronic HBV infection: expectations for tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Baltayiannis, G; Karayiannis, P

    2014-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may progress to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and end-stage liver failure with time. Interruption of this process can only be achieved through effective antiviral treatment. This approach has so far involved the use of immunomodulators such as pegylated interferon alpha (Peg-IFN?) for a finite period of up to a year and nucleos-(t)ide analogues (NUCs) for treatment over much longer periods of time. The latter act by suppressing HBV replication at the level of DNA synthesis by inhibiting the viral reverse transcriptase/DNA polymerase and causing premature termination of DNA synthesis. The ideal treatment end point is loss of HBsAg in both HBeAg+ve and HBeAg-ve patients following monotherapy. This, however, is only achievable in a minority of patients. Secondary outcomes are durable HBeAg loss and seroconversion to anti-HBe, which occur in about 18-30% of HBeAg+ve patients depending on the antiviral used, and sustained suppression of HBV-DNA accompanied by biochemical normalization and histological improvement in non-HBeAg+ve seroconverting and HBeAg-ve patients. There is therefore a need for additional direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting different stages of the life cycle of the virus, as well as immunotherapeutic approaches. Such developments may pave the way for their use either alone or more likely in combination in the fight against chronic HBV infection. Such drugs or approaches, which are currently undergoing preclinical or clinical testing, are the subject of this review. PMID:25271858

  16. Investigations of the endocannabinoid system in adipose tissue: effects of obesity/ weight loss and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Marianne Faurholt

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is a world wide epidemic; it is becoming more usual to be overweight or obese than to be normal weight. Obesity increases the risk of an extensive range of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, depression and some types of cancer. Adipose tissue is more than a storage organ for surplus energy - it is also a setting for complex metabolic processes and adipose tissue releases substances that interact with other parts of the body to influence several systems including food intake and energy metabolism. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is one of the signalling systems that control feeding behaviour. The ECS is implicated in many functions, such as pain, memory, addiction, inflammation, and feeding, and could be considered a stress recovery system. It also seems to integrate nutrient intake, metabolism and storage maintaining homeostatic balance. The ECS is a recently discovered system, and research indicates hyperactivity in obesity. The aim of this thesis is to elaborate on the relationships of this widespread system and its elements in adipose tissue in obesity. Study I is a 4 weeks rat intervention study to investigate whether weight independent effect of Rimonabant treatment exists. We found that food intake-tolerance development could be circumvented by cyclic administration of Rimonabant and implications of weight independent effects of treatment. Study II is a cross-sectional study to establish the expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 from various adipose tissue depots of lean and obese persons. In this study we conclude, that the subcutaneous adipose tissue express more CBR1 than the visceral depot in lean, but comparable levels in obese. Study III is a 10 weeks human intervention study to asses the effects on the ECS of 10% weight loss. We found reduction in the ECS in obesity that normalised with weight loss. Our results clearly show the presence of all the components of the ECS in human adipose tissue, and suggest that the ECS is reduced in adipose tissue in obesity. Our results do not support the hypothesis of hyperactivity of the ECS in human obesity. Possible future treatment of obesity with CBR1 antagonist could involve cyclic treatment of specific peripheral compounds. PMID:21466769

  17. Treatment of humeral shaft nonunion by external fixation: a valuable option.

    PubMed

    Martínez AA; Herrera, A; Pérez, J M; Cuenca, J; Martínez, J

    2001-01-01

    We report the treatment of six patients with nonunion of the humerus, using a unilateral fixator and bone grafting. Union was obtained in all patients, with an average time to union of 4.5 months. Superficial pin tract infection was seen in five patients, but resolved uneventfully. One patient had transient radial nerve palsy. The results, according to the Stewart and Hundley criteria, were excellent in one patient, good in three, fair in one, and poor in one. The main cause of the fair and poor results was marked limitation of shoulder and elbow motion. This method, however, seems to be therapeutically effective. PMID:11484117

  18. Pharmacological management of binge eating disorder: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Susan L; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; O’Melia, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that pharmacotherapy may be beneficial for some patients with binge eating disorder (BED), an eating disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of uncontrollable consumption of abnormally large amounts of food without inappropriate weight loss behaviors. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of BED and review the rationales and data supporting the effectiveness of specific medications or medication classes in treating patients with BED. We conclude by summarizing these data, discussing the role of pharmacotherapy in the BED treatment armamentarium, and suggesting future areas for research. PMID:22654518

  19. Drug Induced Liver Injury: Review with a Focus on Genetic Factors, Tissue Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Yosha, Liron; Benson, Ariel A.; Daher, Saleh; Mizrahi, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare but potentially life threatening adverse drug reaction. DILI may mimic any morphologic characteristic of acute or chronic liver disease, and the histopathologic features of DILI may be indistinguishable from those of other causes of liver injury, such as acute viral hepatitis. In this review article, we provide an update on causative agents, clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnosis modalities, and outcomes of DILI. In addition, we review results of recently reported genetic studies and updates on pharmacological and invasive treatments. PMID:26356634

  20. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: current treatment options and critical appraisal of nintedanib

    PubMed Central

    Bonella, Francesco; Stowasser, Susanne; Wollin, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common type of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia and is characterized by a poor prognosis, with an estimated 5-year survival of approximately 20%. Progressive and irreversible lung functional impairment leads to chronic respiratory insufficiency with a severely impaired quality of life. In the last 2 decades, novel treatments for IPF have been developed as a consequence of an increasing understanding of disease pathogenesis and pathobiology. In IPF, injured dysfunctional alveolar epithelial cells promote fibroblast recruitment and proliferation, resulting in scarring of the lung tissue. Recently, pirfenidone and nintedanib have been approved for the treatment of IPF, having shown efficacy to slow functional decline and disease progression. This article focuses on the pharmacologic characteristics and clinical evidence supporting the use of nintedanib, a potent small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as therapy for IPF. After introducing the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics, an overview of the safety and efficacy results from the most recent clinical trials of nintedanib in IPF is presented. PMID:26715838

  1. Efficacy and Tolerability of Pharmacotherapy Options for the Treatment of Irritability in Autistic Children

    PubMed Central

    Kirino, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism have a high rate of irritability and aggressive symptoms. Irritability or self-injurious behavior can result in significant harm to those affected, as well as to marked distress for their families. This paper provides a literature review regarding the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacotherapy for the treatment of irritability in autistic children. Although antipsychotics have not yet been approved for the treatment of autistic children by many countries, they are often used to reduce symptoms of behavioral problems, including irritability, aggression, hyperactivity, and panic. However, among antipsychotics, the Food and Drug Administration has approved only risperidone and aripiprazole to treat irritability in autism. Among atypical antipsychotics, olanzapine and quetiapine are limited in their use for autism spectrum disorders in children because of high incidences of weight gain and sedation. In comparison, aripiprazole and ziprasidone cause less weight gain and sedation. However, potential QTc interval prolongation with ziprasidone has been reported. Contrary to ziprasidone, no changes were evident in the QT interval in any of the trials for aripiprazole. However, head-to-head comparison studies are needed to support that aripiprazole may be a promising drug that can be used to treat irritability in autistic children. On the other hand, risperidone has the greatest amount of evidence supporting it, including randomized controlled trials; thus, its efficacy and tolerability has been established in comparison with other agents. Further studies with risperidone as a control drug are needed. PMID:24932108

  2. Treatment options in patients with metastatic gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of gastric cancer, it remains the world’s second highest cause of cancer death. As gastric cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, systemic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for these patients. However, no standard palliative chemotherapy regimen has been accepted for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. Palliative chemotherapy including fluoropyrimidine, platin compounds, docetaxel and epirubicin prolongs survival, and improves a high quality of life to a greater extent than best supportive care. The number of clinical investigations associated with targeted agents has recently increased. Agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have been widely tested. Trastuzumab was the first target drug developed, and pivotal phase III trials showed improved survival when trastuzumab was integrated into cisplatin/fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic gastric cancer. Trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy was thus approved to be a new standard of care for patients with HER2-positive advanced esophagogastric adenocarcinoma. Thus, the evaluation of HER2 status in all patients with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma should be considered. Other agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and other biological pathways have also been investigated in clinical trials, but showed little impact on the survival of patients. In this review, systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer in the first- and second-line setting are summarized in the light of recent advances. PMID:24744580

  3. Update on options for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Tan, Winston W

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men in US and European countries. Despite having a favorable prognosis, the incidence of incurable metastatic disease and mortality in the US is about 28,000 per year. Although hormone-based androgen deprivation therapies typically result in rapid responses, nearly all patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant disease state. With readily available prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, most of these patients are asymptomatic and manifest progression simply as a rising PSA. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the median survival is about 1–2 years, with improvements in survival seen mostly with docetaxel-based regimens. The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments in the treatment of advanced CRPC. Recent findings: Since the two landmark trials (TAX-327 and Southwest Oncology Group 99–16) in CRPC, several newer cytotoxic drugs (epothilones, satraplatin), targeted agents (abiraterone, MDV3100) and vaccines have been tested in phase II and III setting with promising results. Conclusions: The role of newer agents in the treatment of CRPC still needs to be validated by phase III trials, which are currently ongoing. Whilst the novel biomarkers, ‘circulating tumor cells’, have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation. PMID:20616956

  4. Helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure: A superior option

    PubMed Central

    XU, QI-HUA; ZHAO, CHEN; ZHU, JIAN-GANG; CHEN, MEI-JUAN; LIU, QING-HUAI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure and compare the results with those of a combined drugs and surgery regimen. A total of 70 patients with hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure in 70 eyes were randomly divided into two groups: Helium-neon laser therapy (group A) and drugs plus surgery (group B). Each group contained 35 patients. The healing rates and times of the conjunctival wound were recorded and compared following helium-neon laser treatment or the drugs plus surgery regimen. Changes in the hydroxyapatite orbital implant prior to and following helium-neon laser irradiation were analyzed. A similar animal study was conducted using 24 New Zealand white rabbits, which received orbital implants and were then received drug treatment or helium-neon therapy. In the human experiment, the rates for conjunctival wound healing were 97.14% in group A and 74.29% in group B, with a significant difference between the groups (?2=5.71, P<0.05). Patients with mild exposure were healed after 7.22±2.11 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 14.33±3.20 days of drugs plus surgery. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups (t=8.97, P<0.05). Patients with moderate to severe exposure were healed after 18.19±2.12 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 31.25±4.21 days of drugs plus surgery. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (t=7.91, P<0.05). Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the helium-neon laser therapy significantly promoted vascularization of the hydroxyapatite orbital implant. These results, combined with pathological findings in animals, which showed that a helium-neon laser promoted vascularization and had anti-inflammatory effects, suggest that helium-neon laser irradiation is an effective method for treating hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure, thereby avoiding secondary surgery.

  5. Lifestyle modification and metformin as long-term treatment options for obese adolescents: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a serious health concern affecting over 155 million children in developed countries worldwide. Childhood obesity is associated with significantly increased risk for development of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychosocial functioning problems (i.e., depression and decreased quality of life). The two major strategies for management of obesity and associated metabolic abnormalities are lifestyle modification and pharmacologic therapy. This paper will provide the background rationale and methods of the REACH childhood obesity treatment program. Methods/design The REACH study is a 2-year multidisciplinary, family-based, childhood obesity treatment program. Seventy-two obese adolescents (aged 10-16 years) and their parents are being recruited to participate in this randomized placebo controlled trial. Participants are randomized to receive either metformin or placebo, and are then randomized to a moderate or a vigorous intensity supervised exercise program for the first 12-weeks. After the 12-week exercise program, participants engage in weekly exercise sessions with an exercise facilitator at a local community center. Participants engage in treatment sessions with a dietitian and social worker monthly for the first year, and then every three months for the second year. The primary outcome measure is change in body mass index and the secondary outcome measures are changes in body composition, risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, changes in diet, physical activity, and psychosocial well-being (e.g., quality of life). It is hypothesized that participants who take metformin and engage in vigorous intensity exercise will show the greatest improvements in body mass index. In addition, it is hypothesized that participants who adhere to the REACH program will show improvements in body composition, physical activity, diet, psychosocial functioning and risk factor profiles for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These improvements are expected to be maintained over the 2-year program. Discussion The findings from this study will advance the knowledge regarding the long-term efficacy and sustainability of interventions for childhood obesity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00934570 PMID:19943971

  6. Primary Linitis Plastica of the Rectum: Focus on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Patterns and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Boustani, Jihane; Kim, Stefano; Lescut, Nicolas; Lakkis, Zaher; de Billy, Marjolaine; Arbez-Gindre, Francine; Jary, Marine; Borg, Christophe; Bosset, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 59 • Male, 85 • Male, 27 Final Diagnosis: refractory metastatic rectal cancer Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Chemotherapy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Rectal linitis plastica (RLP) is a rare disease with poor outcome. It is often accompanied by a delayed histopathological diagnosis, primarily due to submucosal disease. A concentric ring pattern or “target sign” on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as being characteristic for early suspicion. Even though RLP is more aggressive and has poorer survival than other rectal adenocarcinomas, no specific treatment is recommended. In this case report of 3 patients, we challenge the sensitivity of the characteristic radiological pattern, and we review the existing data for a treatment strategy. Case Report: One patient presented classic clinical characteristics of RLP with young age and advanced stage at diagnosis, with chemo-refractory disease and rapid fatal evolution. Biopsies confirmed the RLP with the presence of signet-ring cells (SRC) in a strong desmoplastic stromal reaction. However, the characteristic concentric ring pattern was absent. Instead, he had a large vegetative lesion with important tumor infiltration in mesorectum and pelvic organs, with major lymph node involvement. The 2 other patients presented resectable locally advanced disease with characteristic concentric ring pattern. No clinical and radiological responses were observed to neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), including 1 patient with non-resectable disease at surgery and another with upstaged disease at pathological specimen after resection. However, data suggest 2 types of RLP: about half of patients are extremely sensitive to CRT with pathological complete response, and the other half are highly resistant with no response to CRT. Current data are insufficient to distinguish between these 2 populations. Conclusions: The absence of a concentric ring pattern should not eliminate the suspicion of RLP, especially in young patients with aggressive clinical presentation. There are probably 2 types of RLP in terms of chemoradiosensitivity, and neoadjuvant CRT could delay the curative-intent surgery in refractory patients. Future molecular analysis of the tumor and its environment are required to characterize the 2 different forms of RLP to develop more personalized treatment strategies. PMID:26322720

  7. Auditory verbal hallucinations as atypical inner speech monitoring, and the potential of neurostimulation as a treatment option.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Peter; Fernyhough, Charles; Ellison, Amanda

    2013-12-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are the experience of hearing voices in the absence of any speaker, often associated with a schizophrenia diagnosis. Prominent cognitive models of AVHs suggest they may be the result of inner speech being misattributed to an external or non-self source, due to atypical self- or reality monitoring. These arguments are supported by studies showing that people experiencing AVHs often show an externalising bias during monitoring tasks, and neuroimaging evidence which implicates superior temporal brain regions, both during AVHs and during tasks that measure verbal self-monitoring performance. Recently, efficacy of noninvasive neurostimulation techniques as a treatment option for AVHs has been tested. Meta-analyses show a moderate effect size in reduction of AVH frequency, but there has been little attempt to explain the therapeutic effect of neurostimulation in relation to existing cognitive models. This article reviews inner speech models of AVHs, and argues that a possible explanation for reduction in frequency following treatment may be modulation of activity in the brain regions involving the monitoring of inner speech. PMID:24125858

  8. Auditory verbal hallucinations as atypical inner speech monitoring, and the potential of neurostimulation as a treatment option?

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Peter; Fernyhough, Charles; Ellison, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are the experience of hearing voices in the absence of any speaker, often associated with a schizophrenia diagnosis. Prominent cognitive models of AVHs suggest they may be the result of inner speech being misattributed to an external or non-self source, due to atypical self- or reality monitoring. These arguments are supported by studies showing that people experiencing AVHs often show an externalising bias during monitoring tasks, and neuroimaging evidence which implicates superior temporal brain regions, both during AVHs and during tasks that measure verbal self-monitoring performance. Recently, efficacy of noninvasive neurostimulation techniques as a treatment option for AVHs has been tested. Meta-analyses show a moderate effect size in reduction of AVH frequency, but there has been little attempt to explain the therapeutic effect of neurostimulation in relation to existing cognitive models. This article reviews inner speech models of AVHs, and argues that a possible explanation for reduction in frequency following treatment may be modulation of activity in the brain regions involving the monitoring of inner speech. PMID:24125858

  9. Melatonin in Aging and Disease —Multiple Consequences of Reduced Secretion, Options and Limits of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Melatonin is a pleiotropically acting regulator molecule, which influences numerous physiological functions. Its secretion by the pineal gland progressively declines by age. Strong reductions of circulating melatonin are also observed in numerous disorders and diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, various other neurological and stressful conditions, pain, cardiovascular diseases, cases of cancer, endocrine and metabolic disorders, in particular diabetes type 2. The significance of melatonergic signaling is also evident from melatonin receptor polymorphisms associated with several of these pathologies. The article outlines the mutual relationship between circadian oscillators and melatonin secretion, the possibilities for readjustment of rhythms by melatonin and its synthetic analogs, the consequences for circadian rhythm-dependent disorders concerning sleep and mood, and limits of treatment. The necessity of distinguishing between short-acting melatonergic effects, which are successful in sleep initiation and phase adjustments, and attempts of replacement strategies is emphasized. Properties of approved and some investigational melatonergic agonists are compared. PMID:22724080

  10. Cytomegalovirus in human brain tumors: Role in pathogenesis and potential treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    During the last years increasing evidence implies that human cytomegalovirus (CMV) can be attributed to human malignancies arising from numerous tissues. In this perspective, we will review and discuss the potential mechanisms through which CMV infection may contribute to brain tumors by affecting tumor cell initiation, progression and metastasis formation. Recent evidence also suggests that anti-CMV treatment results in impaired tumor growth of CMV positive xenografts in animal models and potentially increased survival in CMV positive glioblastoma patients. Based on these observations and the high tumor promoting capacity of this virus, the classical and novel antiviral therapies against CMV should be revisited as they may represent a great promise for halting tumor progression and lower cancer deaths. PMID:25699229

  11. Inflammatory Acne Treatment: Review of Current and New Topical Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of comedones, papules, pustules, and nodules. Consensus guidelines recommend the use of combination therapy using different drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to best address as many acne pathogenic factors as possible at the same time. Topical acne medications exist as individual agents that may be combined in physician-recommended regimens or as pre-formulated fixed-dose combination products. In addition, there are several new and promising topical therapies currently being developed that work by different mechanisms of action from traditionally used acne therapies. The following review will cover commonly used drugs, newcomers to the market, and what the future holds for the topical treatment of AV.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(1 Suppl 1):s11-s16. PMID:26741391

  12. Wet Oxidation: A Promising Option for the Treatment of Pulp and Paper Mill Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) is used to degrade persistent organic or inorganic impurities present in industrial wastewater. The process utilizes severe oxidation conditions (i.e., high temperature and pressures) to achieve the efficient degradation of pollutants. To obtain high degradation at lower operation conditions, catalytic WO process is being suggested. The wastewater generated from a pulp and paper mill contains several recalcitrant compounds like lignin, hemi-cellulose, phenols, sulfides etc. Therefore, pulp and paper mill effluent have low biodegradability and are not amenable for conventional biological process. With the implementation of stringent regulations, pulp and paper mill operators need a cleaner disposal route for the wastewater. In this mini-review, the results obtained from the recently published studies on WO treatment for pulp and paper mill effluent are compiled and presented. Finally, the recommendations for the future work are also given.

  13. Pre-treatment options for halophytic microalgae and associated methane production.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Lewis, David

    2015-02-01

    Methane production from lipid extracted, pre-treated disrupted and non-pretreated Tetraselmis spp. microalgae was investigated. The results demonstrated that 122 mL per g VS methane was produced for the lipid extracted Tetraselmis spp., demonstrating that lipid free Tetraselmis can be effectively digested in an anaerobic environment. A total of 252 mL per g VS and 248 mL per g VS of methane was reported for non-disrupted and pre-treated disrupted Tetraselmis sp. respectively. It was also observed that the microbial community caused cell lysis of Tetraselmis spp. during the anaerobic digestion process. Cell lyses can offer a direct conversion pathway of intact Tetraselmis spp. for energy production, thus negating the need for pre-treatment. PMID:25515151

  14. Vaginally Administered Danazol: An Overlooked Option in the Treatment of Rectovaginal Endometriosis?

    PubMed

    Godin, Richard; Marcoux, Violaine

    2015-12-01

    Danazol has been used in the treatment of endometriosis and heavy menstrual bleeding for more than 40 years. This medication has both central antigonadotropic actions and direct atrophic effects on endometriotic tissue. Although it demonstrates a high-efficacy profile, the associated side effects have resulted in limited usage. Vaginal administration of the drug may prove favourable specifically in rectovaginal endometriosis. This targeted mode of delivery is associated with a significant reduction in both pain symptoms and nodule size. The relative persistence of these therapeutic benefits is likely related to the direct tissue effects after absorption through the vaginal mucosa. Vaginal administration would also limit systemic propagation of danazol and thus should minimize androgenic side effects. Use of vaginal danazol also improves heavy menstrual bleeding and may even restore fertility in some patients. In this review we provide a critical analysis of the existing literature on the use of vaginal danazol. PMID:26637082

  15. Mini–slings – an option in stress urinary incontinence treatment. Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Micha?; Kli?, Rafa?; Ró?a?ski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a social disease caused by numerous contributing factors such as natural childbirth, obesity, hormonal deficiencies and changes in collagen fibers, to name a few. Currently, mini–slings, among all the surgical treatment methods, have gained significance. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of this method. Material and methods From 2008 to 2012, one hundred sixty women suffering from SUI underwent surgical procedures to implant mini–slings under the middle part of the urethra and 140 (87.5%) of them remained under observation. In 65 cases, Johnson & Johnson's TVT–Secur was used; in 70 cases, BARD's Adjust mini–sling was used; and in 5 cases, AMS Mini–Arc mini–sling was used. The average period of hospitalization was 3 days per admission, operation and discharge day. Results In 82 cases, patients urinated well after the removal of the catheter, and had full urine continence. Fourteen patients showed great improvement, and in four cases temporary urine retention was observed. In two cases vaginal bleeding was observed, yet there was no need for wound revision. Evaluation of the ‘quality of life improvement’ was done using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Conclusions The obtained results allowed the conclusion that the implantation of mini–slings is a low invasive, relatively safe and effective procedure for the treatment of SUI even in cases of recurrence. Almost full recovery was achieved in all the cases of this study. The mini–sling has become an important element in modern urogynecology. PMID:25914841

  16. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

  17. INEL Operable Unit 7-13 Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration options: INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Systems Analysis project

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.G.; Rudin, M.J.; O`Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Raivo, B.

    1992-07-01

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Systems Analysis project is to identify and evaluate cradle-to-grave systems for the remediation of Transuranic (TRU)Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The BWID program will use the results of the BWID Systems Analysis in conjunction with identified Department of Energy (DOE) Complex buried waste needs to develop a long-term strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities throughout the DOE system. This report presents Buried Waste Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration option concepts in the form of block diagrams. These configuration options are: Retrieval/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; Retrieval/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; and Retrieval/Interim Storage/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment. Each option is presented as a complete end-to-end system.

  18. Sleep In Older Adults: Normative Changes, Sleep Disorders, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    1 Synopsis Sleep disorders are common in older adults: Approximately 5% of older adults meet criteria for clinically significant insomnia disorders and 20% for sleep apnea syndromes. When considering insomnia symptoms, it is important to distinguish age-appropriate changes in sleep from clinically significant insomnia, with the latter distinguished by the presence of significant daytime symptoms such as fatigue. Evaluation with a sleep diary and screening for comorbid conditions, especially mood disorders, is essential. Non-pharmacologic therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, can be highly effective and have sustained benefit. A broad range of pharmacologic therapies are also available but can have unwanted psychomotor effects. If left untreated, insomnia can be associated with increased risk of depression and significant impairments in quality of life. In regards to sleep apnea, a high index of suspicion is crucial for effective diagnosis because symptoms commonly noted in younger patients, such as obesity or loud snoring, may not be present in older patients. Diagnosis and management is fairly similar across age groups, except that a more nuanced approach to weight loss is warranted in older adults. The increasing use of home-based portable polysomnography and auto-titrating positive-airway pressure therapy can reduce barriers to treatment. PMID:25037297

  19. Treatment options for lactic acidosis and metabolic crisis in children with mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Danhauser, Katharina; Smeitink, Jan A M; Freisinger, Peter; Sperl, Wolfgang; Sabir, Hemmen; Hadzik, Berit; Mayatepek, Ertan; Morava, Eva; Distelmaier, Felix

    2015-05-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation route is a tightly regulated process, which is essential for aerobic cellular energy production. Disruption of this pathway may lead to severe neurometabolic disorders with onset in early childhood. A frequent finding in these patients is acute and chronic lactic acidemia, which is caused by increased conversion of pyruvate via the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. Under stable clinical conditions, this process may remain well compensated and does not require specific therapy. However, especially in situations with altered energy demands, such as febrile infections or longer periods of fasting, children with mitochondrial disorders have a high risk of metabolic decompensation with exacerbation of hyperlactatemia and severe metabolic acidosis. Unfortunately, no controlled studies regarding therapy of this critical condition are available and clinical outcome is often unfavorable. Therefore, the aim of this review was to formulate expert-based suggestions for treatment of these patients, including dietary recommendations, buffering strategies and specific drug therapy. However, it is important to keep in mind that a specific therapy for the underlying metabolic cause in children with mitochondrial diseases is usually not available and symptomatic therapy especially of severe lactic acidosis has its ethical limitations. PMID:25687154

  20. Impact of new treatment options for hepatitis C virus infection in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Righi, Elda; Londero, Angela; Carnelutti, Alessia; Baccarani, Umberto; Bassetti, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplant candidates and recipients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver disease greatly benefit from an effective antiviral therapy. The achievement of a sustained virological response before transplantation can prevent the recurrence of post-transplant HCV disease that occurs universally and correlates with enhanced progression to graft cirrhosis. Previous standard-of-care regimens (e.g., pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin with or without first generation protease inhibitors, boceprevir and telaprevir) displayed suboptimal results and poor tolerance in liver transplant recipients. A new class of potent direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) characterized by all-oral regimens with minimal side effects has been approved and included in the recent guidelines for the treatment of liver transplant recipients with recurrent HCV disease. Association of sofosbuvir with ribavirin and/or ledipasvir is recommended in liver transplant recipients and patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Other regimens include simeprevir, daclatasvir, and combination of other DAA. Possible interactions should be monitored, especially in coinfected human immunodeficiency virus/HCV patients receiving antiretrovirals. PMID:26478668

  1. Update on the management of restless legs syndrome: existing and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Facheris, Maurizio F; Hicks, Andrew A; Pramstaller, Peter P; Pichler, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder, characterized by a circadian variation of symptoms involving an urge to move the limbs (usually the legs) as well as paresthesias. There is a primary (familial) and a secondary (acquired) form, which affects a wide variety of individuals, such as pregnant women, patients with end-stage renal disease, iron deficiency, rheumatic disease, and persons taking medications. The symptoms reflect a circadian fluctuation of dopamine in the substantia nigra. RLS patients have lower dopamine and iron levels in the substantia nigra and respond to both dopaminergic therapy and iron administration. Iron, as a cofactor of dopamine production and a regulator of the expression of dopamine type 2-receptor, has an important role in the RLS etiology. In the management of the disease, the first step is to investigate possible secondary causes and their treatment. Dopaminergic agents are considered as the first-line therapy for moderate to severe RLS. If dopaminergic drugs are contraindicated or not efficacious, or if symptoms are resistant and unremitting, gabapentin or other antiepileptic agents, benzodiazepines, or opioids can be used for RLS therapy. Undiagnosed, wrongly diagnosed, and untreated RLS is associated with a significant impairment of the quality of life. PMID:23616710

  2. New treatment options in the management of fibromyalgia: role of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common, chronic pain disorder with unknown etiology, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and tenderness, and accompanied by several other symptoms such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, and mood disorders. Pregabalin is the first drug approved for the treatment of FM. Pregabalin has analgesic, anticonvulsant, and anxiolytic activity and has earlier demonstrated efficacy in the management of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and as adjuvant therapy for adult patients with partial onset seizures. Pregabalin, a lipophilic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog, is ?2?-1 ligand that binds to, and modulates, voltage-gated calcium channels. This modulation is characterized by a reduction of the excessive neurotransmitter release that is observed in certain neurological and psychotic disorders. Several randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that pregabalin has been effective in pain management, improving sleep quality and fatigue, as well as in several domains of health related quality of life. Because of mild to moderate adverse effects it can be considered a well-tolerated therapy for FM. PMID:19337459

  3. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Viehman, J. Alexander; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Doi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Due to various intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of resistance, most ?-lactam agents are not effective against many strains, and carbapenems have played an important role in therapy. Recent trends show many infections are caused by carbapenem-resistant, or even extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains, for which effective therapy is not well established. Evidence to date suggests that colistin constitutes the backbone of therapy, but the unique pharmacokinetic properties of colistin have led many to suggest the use of combination antimicrobial therapy. However, the combination of agents and dosing regimens that delivers the best clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity is yet to be defined. Carbapenems, sulbactam, rifampin and tigecycline have been the most studied in the context of combination therapy. Most data regarding therapy for invasive, resistant A. baumannii infections come from uncontrolled case series and retrospective analyses, though some clinical trials have been completed and others are underway. Early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is shown to consistently improve survival of patients with carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii infection, but the choice of empiric therapy in these infections remains an open question. This review summarizes the most current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance, and treatment considerations of carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii. PMID:25091170

  4. Imepitoin as novel treatment option for canine idiopathic epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, distribution, and metabolism in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rundfeldt, C; Gasparic, A; Wla?, P

    2014-01-01

    Imepitoin is a novel anti-epileptic licensed in the European Union for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of imepitoin in dogs and to evaluate the interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Upon administration of imepitoin tablets at a dose of 30 mg/kg to beagle dogs, high plasma levels were observed within 30 min following oral dosing, with maximal plasma concentrations of 14.9–17.2 ?g/mL reached after 2–3 h. In a crossover study, co-administration of imepitoin tablets with food reduced the total AUC by 30%, but it did not result in significant changes in Tmax and Cmax, indicating lack of clinical relevance. No clinically relevant effects of sex and no accumulation or metabolic tolerance were observed upon twice daily dosing. Following single dose administration of 10–100 mg/kg, dose linearity was found. Administering [14C] imepitoin, high enteral absorption of 92% and primary fecal excretion were identified. Plasma protein binding was only 55%. At therapeutic plasma concentrations, imepitoin did not inhibit microsomal cytochrome P450 family liver enzymes in vitro. In rats, no relevant induction of liver enzymes was found. Therefore, protein binding or metabolism-derived drug–drug interactions are unlikely. Based on these data, imepitoin can be dosed twice daily, but the timing of tablet administration in relation to feeding should be kept consistent. PMID:24611573

  5. First experience with the ATOMS® implant, a new treatment option for male urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Cansino, Jose Ramón; Portilla, María Alejandra; Rodriguez, Simón Claudio; Hidalgo, Luis; De la Peña, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence (UI) is defined as any complaint of involuntary urine leakage. A description is provided of our experience with the ATOMS® (Adjustable Transobturator Male System. Agency for Medical Innovations. A.M.I.) adjustable implant in patients with mild to moderate UI. Material and methods A retrospective study was made of the data referring to 13 patients treated with this adjustable system. Demographic and personal data were collected along with information on the etiology, severity, characteristics, duration of UI, complementary tests, surgery times, complications and results obtained. Results The full continence (no use of pad) recovery rate at the close of the study was 12/13 (92.3%). Three cases required a single filling during the mean 16 months of follow–up (range 4–32; median 14 months). A complication in the form of perineal hematoma was resolved with conservative treatment and a case of urinary retention was resolved by placing a bladder catheter for the duration of one week. Three patients experienced perineal–scrotal dysesthesias that disappeared spontaneously in the first three months. Conclusions The described adjustable continence system has been found to be very effective in males with mild to moderate UI. In our experience, the ATOMS® implant offers excellent results over the middle term with a very low rate of complications that were easily resolved in all cases. PMID:25667760

  6. Emerging treatment options to improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome: focus on losmapimod

    PubMed Central

    Kragholm, Kristian; Newby, Laura Kristin; Melloni, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Each year, despite optimal use of recommended acute and secondary prevention therapies, 4%–5% of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) experience relapse of ACS or other cardiovascular events including stroke, heart failure, or sudden cardiac death after the index ACS. The sudden atherosclerotic plaque rupture leading to an ACS event is often accompanied by inflammation, which is thought to be a key pathogenic pathway to these excess cardiovascular events. Losmapimod is a novel, oral p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor that targets MAPKs activated in macrophages, myocardium, and endothelial cells that occur as a part of global coronary vascular inflammation following plaque rupture. This review aims to 1) discuss the pathophysiological pathways through which p38 MAPKs may play key roles in initiation and progression of inflammatory disease and how losmapimod is thought to counteract these p38 MAPKs, and 2) to describe the efficacy and safety data for losmapimod obtained from preclinical studies and randomized controlled trials that support the hypothesis that it has promise as a treatment for patients with ACS. PMID:26273189

  7. Preterm labor: current tocolytic options for the treatment of preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jan Stener; Weile, Louise Katrine Kjær; Lamont, Ronald Francis

    2014-04-01

    While tocolytic therapy may not be indicated in all cases of spontaneous preterm labor (SPTL), the evidence that they are superior to placebo is robust. The perfect tocolytic that is 100% efficacious and 100% safe does not exist and efforts should continue to develop and introduce safer and more effective agents. A reduction in the rate of neonatal mortality and morbidity using tocolysis has not been shown but no tocolytic study has been powered by numbers sufficient to demonstrate such an effect. Tocolytics can delay delivery long enough to administer a course of antepartum glucocorticoids and arrange in utero transfer to a center with neonatal intensive care facilities, both of which reduce neonatal mortality and morbidity. Few tocolytics (??-agonists and atosiban) are licensed for use as tocolytics and only one was developed specifically to treat preterm labor (atosiban). Accordingly, most tocolytics have multi-organ adverse effects. Currently, based on the evidence of safety and efficacy, atosiban should be the first-choice tocolytic for the treatment of SPTL to prevent or delay preterm birth. PMID:24456411

  8. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck: pathogenesis, current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Alok T; Miles, Brett A

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a relatively uncommon, neuroendocrine, cutaneous malignancy that often exhibits clinically aggressive features and is associated with a poor prognosis. It typically presents as a painless, rapidly enlarging, dome-shaped red or purplish nodule in a sun-exposed area of the head and neck or upper extremities. Our understanding of MCC has increased dramatically over the last several years and the pathogenesis continues to be an area of active research. The etiology is likely multifactorial with immunosuppression, UV-induced skin damage, and viral factors contributing to the development of MCC. The recent discovery of Merkel cell polyomavirus has allowed for at least one aspect of disease development to be much better understood. In most cases, treatment consists of wide local excision with adjuvant radiation therapy. The role of chemotherapeutics is still being defined. The recent advancement of knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of MCC has led to an explosion research into novel therapeutic agents and strategies. This review seeks to summarize the current body of literature regarding the pathogenesis of MCC and potential targets for future therapies. PMID:26316785

  9. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy on the Concentration of Volatile Sulfur Compound in Mouth Air of a Group of Nigerian Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ehizele, AO; Akhionbare, O

    2013-01-01

    Background: The major goal of non-surgical periodontal therapy is to reduce or eliminate the subgingival pathogenic microbial flora that is known to be associated with volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Aim: The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the concentration of VSC in mouth air of young adults. Subjects and Methods: Four hundred subjects, grouped into two based on the absence or presence of periodontal diseases, were involved in this study. Basic periodontal examination was used for the grouping. The measurement of the concentration of the VSC in the mouth air of the subjects was done objectively, using the Halimeter, before and after the therapy, and at recall visits 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Chi-square and Paired t-test were used to find statistical significance. Results: The results revealed that at baseline, 78.7% (48/61) of the subjects who had VSC concentration more than 250 parts per billion (ppb) were from the group with periodontal disease. Immediately after non-surgical periodontal therapy, only 8.5% (17/200) of the subjects with periodontal disease had VSC concentration of more than 250 ppb while all the subjects with no periodontal disease had VSC concentration less than 181 ppb. The same pattern of reduction in the concentration of the VSC and improvement in oral hygiene was also obtained 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Conclusion: It can be concluded that non-surgical periodontal therapy brought about reduction in the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air of young adults. PMID:24116328

  10. Report from the European Continuous Medical Education Course: diagnostic and treatment options in CKD in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, G

    2010-07-01

    (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). Nephrologists and internists who work in the field of renal replacement therapy with dialysis had an opportunity to attend the continuing medical (nephrology) education (CME) on the subject of: Diagnostic and treatment options in CKD in the new millennium. The course was held on 25 April 2009, in the premises of the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, in honour of the 70th anniversary of Academician Momir Polenakovic, one of the founders of the Macedonian nephrology. It is important to mention that this is the second CME event (the first was held in September 2006) of the nephrology area that is co-organized by the Macedonian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation and Artificial Organs (MSNDTAO), the European Renal Association (ERA), the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) and the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts. The support by the international associations confirms the successfully built relations and authority of our national association, which is an associate member thereof. Thus, we had a rare possibility of attending 10 exceptional lectures on current topics presented by eminent European nephrologists. The participants on the course were welcomed by the President of the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Acad. Georgi Stardelov, Acad. Horst Klinkman, member of the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Gerard London - President of the ERA, John Feehally, Secretary of the ISN, the President of the Macedonian Medical Chamber, Vladimir Borozanov, the President of the Macedonian Medical Association, Jovan Tofoski, the Head of the Nephrology Department, Aleksandar Sikole, and the President of the ERA Continuing Medical Education Committee and local co-organizer, Goce Spasovski. In the opening lecture, Meguid El Nahas (Sheffield, UK; CKD Global Outlook: Myth and Reality) discussed the problem of the increasing number of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in different stages that we are facing today, as well as the need for their prevention. Due to the fact that a significant part of the pool of new patients derives from the glomerulopathies, John Feehally (Leicester, UK; Early Detection and Treatment of Primary Glomerulopathies) delivered the message about our situation today concerning early detection, the need for research in the area of new biomarkers on CKD progression and the possibilities for successful treatment in this regard. With the ensuing end-stage kidney disease and the need for treatment with dialysis, artificial kidneys are necessary, i.e. dialysis machines, as well as membranes, filters through which the dialysis is performed. Here, Raymond Vanholder (Ghent, Belgium; Advantages of Treatment in Dialysis Patients with New Membranes and Dialysis Equipments) presented the advantages provided by the new modalities and scientific achievements implemented in clinical practice. One of the functions that cannot be replaced with an artificial kidney is of course the hormone regulation of the haematopoiesis, i.e. the existence of anaemia in CKD. Today, the possibilities for complete replacement of that kidney function are extraordinary in all groups of patients with CKD, which was elaborated by Iain MacDougall (London, UK; Anemia Treatment in CKD, ESRD and Kidney Transplant Recipients). The area in nephrology practice where there are still controversies is the problem associated with mineral and bone disorders (MBD). Ziad Massy (Amiens, France; Oxidative Stress and Cardiovascular Risks in CKD Patients) spoke on the topic of cardiovascular risks and the oxidative stress which is the Achilles' heel for vascular damage. The role of vitamin D and its involvement, not only as part of the MBD problem, but also with its impact on other target organs and systems, was discussed by Jorge Cannata (Oviedo, Spain; Effect of Treatment with Vit. D - Pros et Cons). The most important problem with CKD patients is hyperphosphatemia. Goce Spasovski (Skopje, Republic of Macedonia; Treatment of Hyperphosphatemia, Benefit and/or Hazar

  11. Idiopathic Non-Cirrhotic Intrahepatic Portal Hypertension (NCIPH)—Newer Insights into Pathogenesis and Emerging Newer Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ashish; Elias, Joshua E.; Eapen, Chundamannil E.; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Elias, Elwyn

    2014-01-01

    Chronic microangiopathy of portal venules results in idiopathic non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH). Recent data suggest a role for vasoactive factors of portal venous origin in the pathogenesis of this ‘pure’ vasculopathy of the liver. Enteropathies (often silent), are an important ‘driver’ of this disease. NCIPH is under-recognized and often mis-labeled as cryptogenic cirrhosis. Liver biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of NCIPH. In these patients, with advancing disease and increased porto-systemic shunting, the portal venous vasoactive factors bypass the liver filter and contribute to the development of pulmonary vascular endothelial disorders—porto-pulmonary hypertension and hepato-pulmonary syndrome as well as mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis. Prognosis in NCIPH patients is determined by presence, recognition and management of associated disorders. With better understanding of the pathogenesis of NCIPH, newer treatment options are being explored. Imbalance in ADAMTS 13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13): vWF (von-Willebrand factor) ratio is documented in NCIPH patients and may have a pathogenic role. Therapeutic interventions to correct this imbalance may prove to be important in the management of NCIPH. PMID:25755567

  12. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax-deductible donation. Last modified on November 19, 2014 ... problem arises requiring an expert’s care. Call us toll-free (in the U.S.) at 1.888.964. ...

  13. Treatment options for subjective tinnitus: Self reports from a sample of general practitioners and ENT physicians within Europe and the USA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tinnitus affects about 10-15% of the general population and risks for developing tinnitus are rising through increased exposure to leisure noise through listening to personal music players at high volume. The disorder has a considerable heterogeneity and so no single mechanism is likely to explain the presence of tinnitus in all those affected. As such there is no standardized management pathway nor singly effective treatment for the condition. Choice of clinical intervention is a multi-factorial decision based on many factors, including assessment of patient needs and the healthcare context. The present research surveyed clinicians working in six Westernized countries with the aims: a) to establish the range of referral pathways, b) to evaluate the typical treatment options for categories of subjective tinnitus defined as acute or chronic, and c) to seek clinical opinion about levels of satisfaction with current standards of practice. Methods A structured online questionnaire was conducted with 712 physicians who reported seeing at least one tinnitus patients in the previous three months. They were 370 general practitioners (GPs) and 365 ear-nose-throat specialists (ENTs) from the US, Germany, UK, France, Italy and Spain. Results Our international comparison of health systems for tinnitus revealed that although the characteristics of tinnitus appeared broadly similar across countries, the patient's experience of clinical services differed widely. GPs and ENTs were always involved in referral and management to some degree, but multi-disciplinary teams engaged either neurology (Germany, Italy and Spain) or audiology (UK and US) professionals. For acute subjective tinnitus, pharmacological prescriptions were common, while audiological and psychological approaches were more typical for chronic subjective tinnitus; with several specific treatment options being highly country specific. All therapy options were associated with low levels of satisfaction. Conclusions Despite a large variety of treatment options, the low success rates of tinnitus therapy lead to frustration of physicians and patients alike. For subjective tinnitus in particular, effective therapeutic options with guidelines about key diagnostic criteria are urgently needed. PMID:22053947

  14. Economic evaluation of carbon adsorption/ion exchange wastewater-treatment options for Sunflower AAP (Army Ammunition Plant) NQ (nitroguanidine) wastewater-treatment facility. Final report, October 1986-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Balasco, A.A.; Cheng, G.C.; Field, E.L.; Vejins, V.R.

    1987-07-31

    The objective of this subtask was to provide an estimate of the capital investment and operating costs for the wastewater-treatment technology option involving activated-carbon adsorption and ion exchange for primary separation, and multiple-effect evaporation and spray drying for volume reduction. During the course of this study, however, it became evident that the process economics could be significantly improved of the ion-exchange step was eliminated from the process scheme. The bases for the system design, plant operation, and cost evaluation were provided to Arthur D. Little by Sunflower AAP personnel to make certain that direct comparisons could be made with other treatment options under consideration.

  15. Treatment Options for Retinoblastoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , wires, plaques, or catheters that are placed directly ... different from an x-ray. Plaque radiotherapy : Radioactive seeds are attached to one side of a disk, ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Retinoblastoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , wires, plaques, or catheters that are placed directly ... different from an x-ray. Plaque radiotherapy : Radioactive seeds are attached to one side of a disk, ...

  17. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for most tumors that test positive for either estrogen or progesterone receptors (called ER-positive or PR- ... symptoms. Tamoxifen. Tamoxifen is a drug that blocks estrogen from binding to breast cancer cells. It is ...

  18. Pituitary Disorders Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones ...

  19. OCD Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Support Group Support Groups Online and By Phone Support Groups in Australia Support Groups in South Africa Start a Support Group Coaching Mobile Apps Helping Others Children Spouse or Partner Older ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Neuroblastoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  1. Treatment Options for Neuroblastoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  2. Porphyria Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or public purposes. The American Porphyria Foundation (APF) Tax Forms 990 are readily available to the public. If you would like a copy, please contact the APF: 4900 Woodway, Suite 780, Houston, TX 77056. Toll free: 1.866.APF.3635. Join the APF - ...

  3. IBS Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax-deductible donation. Last modified on October 28, 2013 ... problem arises requiring an expert’s care. Call us toll-free (in the U.S.) at 1.888.964. ...

  4. Brain Aneurysm: Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  5. Treatment Options for Scoliosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... which are generally greater than 50 degrees for adolescent patients and adults. Surgery can be performed for smaller curves if the ... your life. What factors influence the recommendation for surgery? Area ... more common in adults) Growth remaining Personal factors ...

  6. Keratoconus Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    NKCF National Keratoconus Foundation + Font Size – Translate website: Search Home About Keratoconus How The Eye Works What Causes Keratoconus? Keratoconus Symptoms Living with Keratoconus Personal Stories Frequently Asked Questions ...

  7. Assessing Ammonia Treatment Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the second of three articles to help water system operators understand ammonia and how to monitor and control its effects at the plant and in the distribution system. The first article (Opflow, April 2012) provided an overview of ammonia's chemistry, origins, and water sy...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Melanoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma . They are nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancers rarely spread to other parts of the body. (See the PDQ summary on Skin Cancer ... cell and squamous cell skin cancer.) Melanoma can occur anywhere on ...

  9. Treatment Options in IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinical trials have not shown that antibiotics have value in treating severe ulcerative colitis. The exception is toxic megacolon, a condition that places people at high risk for perforation. This life- ...

  10. Treatment Options Summary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Video Library Start a Local Support Group ANA Discussion Forum Willing To Talk Program Caregivers Caregivers Overview ... Programs & Services Join/Renew Ways to Give ANA Discussion Forum Contact Member Section Login ANA provides information ...

  11. Direct electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on graphite as a treatment option for stored source-separated urine.

    PubMed

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Fritzsche, Cristina; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2015-02-01

    Electrolysis can be a viable technology for ammonia removal from source-separated urine. Compared to biological nitrogen removal, electrolysis is more robust and is highly amenable to automation, which makes it especially attractive for on-site reactors. In electrolytic wastewater treatment, ammonia is usually removed by indirect oxidation through active chlorine which is produced in-situ at elevated anode potentials. However, the evolution of chlorine can lead to the formation of chlorate, perchlorate, chlorinated organic by-products and chloramines that are toxic. This study focuses on using direct ammonia oxidation on graphite at low anode potentials in order to overcome the formation of toxic by-products. With the aid of cyclic voltammetry, we demonstrated that graphite is active for direct ammonia oxidation without concomitant chlorine formation if the anode potential is between 1.1 and 1.6 V vs. SHE (standard hydrogen electrode). A comparison of potentiostatic bulk electrolysis experiments in synthetic stored urine with and without chloride confirmed that ammonia was removed exclusively by continuous direct oxidation. Direct oxidation required high pH values (pH > 9) because free ammonia was the actual reactant. In real stored urine (pH = 9.0), an ammonia removal rate of 2.9 ± 0.3 gN·m(-2)·d(-1) was achieved and the specific energy demand was 42 Wh·gN(-1) at an anode potential of 1.31 V vs. SHE. The measurements of chlorate and perchlorate as well as selected chlorinated organic by-products confirmed that no chlorinated by-products were formed in real urine. Electrode corrosion through graphite exfoliation was prevented and the surface was not poisoned by intermediate oxidation products. We conclude that direct ammonia oxidation on graphite electrodes is a treatment option for source-separated urine with three major advantages: The formation of chlorinated by-products is prevented, less energy is consumed than in indirect ammonia oxidation and readily available and cheap graphite can be used as the electrode material. PMID:25497427

  12. 78 FR 35559 - Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ...1545-BA53 Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue...to the tax treatment of noncompensatory options and convertible instruments issued by...that the exercise of a noncompensatory option does not cause the recognition of...

  13. 78 FR 17868 - Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ...1545-BA53 Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue...to the tax treatment of noncompensatory options and convertible instruments issued by...that the exercise of a noncompensatory option does not cause the recognition of...

  14. Expression changes of antioxidant, apoptotic, anti-apoptotic genes and miR-15b-34a-21-98 in over tissue by using erythromycin, quinacrine and tetracycline in non-surgical sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kara, Murat; Yumrutas, Onder; Atilgan, Remzi; Baspinar, Melike; Sapmaz, Ekrem; Kuloglu, Tuncay

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, effects on expression of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes (GSR, GRX3, SOD1, RAI-NOS, HSP7, BAX, Bcl-2, CASP3 and MDH1) of substances being used in non-surgical sterilization such as quinacrine, erythromycin and tetracycline were evaluated in over tissue. Moreover, expression of some specific mi-RNA (miR-15b, miR-21, miR34a and miR-98) that playing a role in apoptosis was determined in same tissue. Prospective comparative experimental study. Genetics and Histology laboratory. Total number of 28 Wistar albino 12-14 week old female rats with regular cycles and 200-220 grams in weight. Total RNA was isolated from tissues by using a RNA isolation kit. Gene expression levels were evaluated by Real-Time PCR method. Tubal passage and fibrosis induction in tissues was observed in the histochemical analysis. In the statistical analysis of data Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis and Mann-Whitney U test were used and p < 0.05 were accepted as significant. While the expressions of target genes found to be increased in quinacrine and erythromycin group when compared to control group, this increase was insignificant. In quinacrine group, increase in the SOD1 expression levels was only statistically significant (p < 0.05). Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21, miR34a and miR-98 microRNAs were found to be up-regulated in all experimental groups, despite this, only the increased expression miR-34 was found as statistically significant when compared to control. Tubal blockage and fibrosis induction scores of quinacrine, erythromycin and tetracycline were significantly higher than control. Results of the present study suggest that the doses treated of quinacrine, erythromycin and tetracycline used in non-surgical sterilization effect poorly the expression of anti-oxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes, but the expression of miR-34 playing the role in apoptosis increased after treatment of these substances. PMID:25195052

  15. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  16. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  17. Rehabilitation Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Speech Pathology Occupational Therapy Art Therapy Recreational therapy Neuropsychology Home Care Options Advanced Care Planning Palliative Care ... Speech Pathology Occupational Therapy Art Therapy Recreational therapy Neuropsychology Home Care Options Advanced Care Planning Palliative Care ...

  18. Pricing Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Presents results of a recent survey of over 100 public and academic libraries about pricing options from online companies. Most options fall into three categories: pay-as-you-go, fixed-rate, and user-based. Results are discussed separately for public and academic libraries and for consortial discounts. Trends in pricing options preferred by…

  19. Pyroprocessing of Oxidized Sodium-Bonded Fast Reactor Fuel -- an Experimental Study of Treatment Options for Degraded EBR-II Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. Herrmann; L. A. Wurth; N. J. Gese

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electrometallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li2O at 650 °C with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. The experimental study illustrated how zirconium oxide and sodium oxide present different challenges to a lithium-based electrolytic reduction system for conversion of select metal oxides to metal.

  20. Nd:YAG Q-switched laser for the treatment of a hemicorporal epidermal nevus: A safe and effective option.

    PubMed

    Aguado Gil, Leyre; Alberdi Soto, Mirentxu; Pretel Irazábal, Maider; Irarrazábal Armendàriz, Isabel; Lera Imbuluzqueta, Miguel; Yanguas Bayona, Ignacio; Bernad Alonso, Isabel; Ivars Alonso, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Epidermal nevi are benign proliferations of the epidermis for which different treatments have been used with disappointing results due to their recurrences and anesthetic scars. Topical therapies have generally been ineffective and surgical treatment provides more definitive results, but with high risk of scarring. In recent years, multiple laser modalities have been described for the treatment of these lesions. In the literature, there are no reported cases of treatment of these lesions with Neodymium-doped Yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. We present the case of a 3-year-old patient with a hemicorporal epidermal nevus treated with Nd:YAG laser at an early stage with good results. PMID:25803678

  1. Toxicity evaluation with the microtox® test to assess the impact of in situ oiled shoreline treatment options: natural attenuation and sediment relocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kenneth; Wohlgeschaffen, Gary; Tremblay, Gilles H.; Johnson, B. Thomas; Sergy, Gary A.; Prince, Roger C.; Guenette, Chantal C.; Owens, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    Changes in the toxicity levels of beach sediment, nearshore water, and bottom sediment samples were monitored with the Microtox® Test to evaluate the two in situ oil spill treatment options of natural attenuation (natural recovery––no treatment) and sediment relocation (surf washing). During a series of field trials, IF-30 fuel oil was intentionally sprayed onto the surface of three mixed sediment (pebble and sand) beaches on the island of Spitsbergen, Svalbard, Norway (78°56? N, 16°45? E). At a low wave-energy site (Site 1 with a 3-km wind fetch), where oil was stranded within the zone of normal wave action, residual oil concentrations and beach sediment toxicity levels were significantly reduced by both options in less than five days. At Site 3, a higher wave-energy site with a 40-km wind fetch, oil was intentionally stranded on the beach face in the upper intertidal/supratidal zones, above the level of normal wave activity. At this site under these experimental conditions, sediment relocation was effective in accelerating the removal of the oil from the sediments and reducing the Microtox® Test toxicity response to background levels. In the untreated (natural attenuation) plot at this site, the fraction of residual oil remaining within the beach sediments after one year (70%) continued to generate a toxic response. Chemical and toxicological analyses of nearshore sediment and sediment-trap samples at both sites confirmed that oil and suspended mineral fines were effectively dispersed into the surrounding environment by the in situ treatments. In terms of secondary potential detrimental effects from the release of stranded oil from the beaches, the toxicity level (Microtox® Test) of adjacent nearshore sediment samples did not exceed the Canadian regulatory limit for dredged spoils destined for ocean disposal.

  2. Treatment Options for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Budget Impact Analysis from the Perspective of the Brazilian Public Health System

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Flávia Tavares Silva; da Silva, Everton Nunes; Belfort, Rubens; Silva, Marcus Tolentino; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2015-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease that causes reduced visual acuity and blindness. The new treatment options for AMD are not provided by the Brazilian public health system. Objective To conduct a budget impact analysis of three scenarios for the introduction of AMD treatments: all the medications (verteporfin, ranibizumab, and bevacizumab–the reference scenario), ranibizumab alone, and bevacizumab alone. Methods The basic assumption was that the Brazilian public health system would treat the entire target population with AMD aged > 70 years between 2008 and 2011. The size of the population of interest was estimated from official population projections and the prevalence of the disease was obtained from a systematic review. Medication prices were estimated by weighting their market values with correction factors to take account of the public procurement policy. The possibility of aliquoting bevacizumab was also considered. A panel of experts was consulted to estimate the market share of the different medications for the reference scenario. The incremental costs of the ranibizumab-alone and bevacizumab-alone scenarios compared to the reference scenario were calculated. Univariate sensitivity analyses were run to check the robustness of the model. Results In four years, the Brazilian public health system would have treated 1,136,349 individuals with AMD. The annual costs of treating one patient would have been US$476.65 for bevacizumab, US$11,469.39 for ranibizumab, and US$4,376.28 for verteporfin. The incremental cost of the ranibizumab-alone scenario would have been US$1,878,318,056.00 in four years, while the incremental cost for the bevacizumab-alone scenario would have been a reduction of US$4,978,326,359.00 (i.e., a cost saving) in the same period. The bevacizumab-alone option was found to represent a cost saving across sensitivity analyses. Conclusion The introduction of bevacizumab for the treatment of AMD is recommended for the Brazilian Public Health System. PMID:26457416

  3. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator as a novel treatment option for infective endocarditis: a retrospective clinical study in 32 children.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Aviva; Krymko, Hanna; Richardson, Justin; Zalzstein, Eli; Ioffe, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infectious syndrome, with high morbidity and mortality. Current treatments for infective endocarditis include intravenous antibiotics, surgery, and involve a lengthy hospital stay. We hypothesised that adjunctive recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment for infective endocarditis may facilitate faster resolution of vegetations and clearance of positive blood cultures, and therefore decrease morbidity and mortality. This retrospective study included follow-up of patients, from 1997 through 2014, including clinical presentation, causative organism, length of treatment, morbidity, and mortality. We identified 32 patients, all of whom were diagnosed with endocarditis and were treated by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Among all, 27 patients (93%) had positive blood cultures, with the most frequent organisms being Staphylococcus epidermis (nine patients), Staphylococcus aureus (six patients), and Candida (nine patients). Upon treatment, in 31 patients (97%), resolution of vegetations and clearance of blood cultures occurred within hours to few days. Out of 32 patients, one patient (3%) died and three patients (9%) suffered embolic or haemorrhagic events, possibly related to the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. None of the patients required surgical intervention to assist vegetation resolution. In conclusion, it appears that recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may become an adjunctive treatment for infective endocarditis and may decrease morbidity as compared with current guidelines. Prospective multi-centre studies are required to validate our findings. PMID:25682953

  4. Characterisation of medical-waste sterilisation-plant wastewater and a preliminary study of coagulation-flocculation treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, O; Mihçiokur, H; Azgin, S T; Ozdemir, O

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater from a medical-waste sterilisation plant (MWSP) contains unique pollutants and requires on-site treatment to prevent contamination of the municipal sewage system and receiving water bodies. Therefore, to meet the prescribed discharge standards and comply with the legal regulations, pre-treatment must be applied to MWSP wastewater. In this study, the capabilities of coagulation-flocculation processes were investigated for MWSP wastewater treatment. Processes using ferric chloride, ferrous sulfate and aluminium sulfate as coagulants were characterised. During the coagulation experiments, seven different coagulant dosages and four different pH values were evaluated to determine the optimum coagulant dosage and pH value. The highest removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was obtained using 300 mg/L of ferric chloride at pH 10. A COD removal of about 60% as well as considerable reductions in the amounts of suspended solids, nitrogen and phosphorus were realised. PMID:20651429

  5. Application of DOE prescribed guides to the evaluation of Hanford`s Mixed Low Level Solid Waste Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.F.; Nash, C.R.

    1994-10-01

    A recent Westinghouse Hanford Company report (WHC-SD-W100-ES-008, February, 1994), compared a Vitrification process to the WRAP-2A Grout/PE process for the treatment of Mixed Low Level Waste (MLLW). This comparison applied a limited scope numerical evaluation to compare technology complexity of the two processes, but focused primarily on capital and operating costs. The work reported here is supplementary to WHC-SD-Wl00-ES-008. It provides a record of the application of the more formal DOE-prescribed criteria (Treatment Selection Guides for Federal Facility Compliance Act Draft Site Treatment Plans) to the Vitrification and Grout/PE processes previously evaluated. Results of the evaluation favored the Grout/PE process by a weighted score of 83 to 78 over the Plasma arc vitrification process.

  6. Management options of varicoceles

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Varicocele is one of the most common causes of male infertility. Treatment options for varicoceles includes open varicocelectomy performed at various anatomical levels. Laparoscopic varicocelectomy has been established to be a safe and effective treatment for varicoceles. Robotic surgery has been introduced recently as an alternative surgical option for varicocelectomy. Microsurgical varicocelectomy has gained increasing popularity among experts in male reproductive medicine as the treatment of choice for varicocele because of its superior surgical outcomes. There is a growing volume of literature in the recent years on minimal invasive varicocele treatment with percutaneous retrograde and anterograde venous embolization/sclerotherapy. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and limitations associated with each treatment modality for varicoceles. Employment of these advanced techniques of varicocelectomy can provide a safe and effective approach aiming to eliminate varicocele, preserve testicular function and, in a substantial number of men, increase semen quality and the likelihood of pregnancy. PMID:21716892

  7. Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

    2014-01-01

    Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

  8. Post-brushing and fine-needle aspiration biopsy follow-up and treatment options for patients with pancreatobiliary lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kurtycz, Daniel F. I.; Field, Andrew; Tabatabai, Laura; Michaels, Claire; Young, Nancy; Schmidt, C. Max; Farrell, James; Gopal, Deepak; Simeone, Diane; Merchant, Nipun B.; Pitman, Martha Bishop

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC) has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology, ancillary testing and post-procedure management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature and discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the PSC web site (www.papsociety.org). This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on the follow-up and treatment options for patients after procedures performed for obtaining cytology samples for the evaluation of biliary strictures and solid and cystic masses in the pancreas. These recommendations follow the six-tiered terminology and nomenclature scheme proposed by committee III. PMID:25191519

  9. Clinical Evaluation of Non-surgical Sterilization of Male Cats with Single Intra-testicular Injection of Calcium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Calcium chloride solution is an established injectable sterilant in dogs and other mammals. With cat populations a continuing problem, we sought to explore its first use in cats. Six cats per group were injected with 5%, 10% or 20% calcium chloride dihydrate in saline solution with lignocaine hydrochloride, a local anaesthetic. Results At the 60th day post-injection, cat testes were collected and showed complete testicular necrosis and replacement by fibrous tissue; very low sperm counts; and reduction of serum testosterone by at least 70% in 20% dose. Androgenic enzyme activities and their expressions were also reduced in all the treated groups along with intra-testicular testosterone concentration was also low. Increased testicular lipid peroxidation, with reduced antioxidants and mitochondrial membrane potential, were evident following calcium chloride treatments. However, there were no apparent changes in serum concentrations of cortisol, fasting blood sugar level, blood urea nitrogen, packed cell volume, or total serum protein following calcium chloride injection, suggesting that this method of sterilization is not associated with any general stress response. Conclusion Calcium chloride solution demonstrates potential for androgenesis-eliminating nonsurgical sterilization of male cats in addition to its proven efficacy in dogs and other mammals. PMID:21774835

  10. Expensing options solves nothing.

    PubMed

    Sahlman, William A

    2002-12-01

    The use of stock options for executive compensation has become a lightning rod for public anger, and it's easy to see why. Many top executives grew hugely rich on the back of the gains they made on their options, profits they've been able to keep even as the value they were supposed to create disappeared. The supposed scam works like this: Current accounting regulations let companies ignore the cost of option grants on their income statements, so they can award valuable option packages without affecting reported earnings. Not charging the cost of the grants supposedly leads to overstated earnings, which purportedly translate into unrealistically high share prices, permitting top executives to realize big gains when they exercise their options. If an accounting anomaly is the problem, then the solution seems obvious: Write off executive share options against the current year's revenues. The trouble is, Sahlman writes, expensing option grants won't give us a more accurate view of earnings, won't add any information not already included in the financial statements, and won't even lead to equal treatment of different forms of executive pay. Far worse, expensing evades the real issue, which is whether compensation (options and other-wise) does what it's supposed to do--namely, help a company recruit, retain, and provide the right people with appropriate performance incentives. Any performance-based compensation system has the potential to encourage cheating. Only ethical management, sensible governance, adequate internal control systems, and comprehensive disclosure will save the investor from disaster. If, Sahlman warns, we pass laws that require the expensing of options, thinking that's fixed the fundamental flaws in corporate America's accounting, we will have missed a golden opportunity to focus on the much more extensive defects in the present system. PMID:12510541

  11. Meta-Analysis of Ultrafiltration versus Diuretics Treatment Option for Overload Volume Reduction in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Barkoudah, Ebrahim; Kodali, Sindhura; Okoroh, Juliet; Sethi, Rosh; Hulten, Edward; Suemoto, Claudia; Bittencourt, Marcio Sommer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although diuretics are mainly used for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), inadequate responses and complications have led to the use of extracorporeal ultrafiltration (UF) as an alternative strategy for reducing volume overloads in patients with ADHF. Objective The aim of our study is to perform meta-analysis of the results obtained from studies on extracorporeal venous ultrafiltration and compare them with those of standard diuretic treatment for overload volume reduction in acute decompensated heart failure. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were systematically searched using a pre?specified criterion. Pooled estimates of outcomes after 48 h (weight change, serum creatinine level, and all-cause mortality) were computed using random effect models. Pooled weighted mean differences were calculated for weight loss and change in creatinine level, whereas a pooled risk ratio was used for the analysis of binary all-cause mortality outcome. Results A total of nine studies, involving 613 patients, met the eligibility criteria. The mean weight loss in patients who underwent UF therapy was 1.78 kg [95% Confidence Interval (CI): ?2.65 to ?0.91 kg; p < 0.001) more than those who received standard diuretic therapy. The post-intervention creatinine level, however, was not significantly different (mean change = ?0.25 mg/dL; 95% CI: ?0.56 to 0.06 mg/dL; p = 0.112). The risk of all-cause mortality persisted in patients treated with UF compared with patients treated with standard diuretics (Pooled RR = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.64–1.56; p = 0.993). Conclusion Compared with standard diuretic therapy, UF treatment for overload volume reduction in individuals suffering from ADHF, resulted in significant reduction of body weight within 48 h. However, no significant decrease of serum creatinine level or reduction of all-cause mortality was observed. PMID:25626761

  12. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shackelford, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy.

  13. POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

    2001-06-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. This project, a cooperative effort between the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Grand Forks Water Treatment Plant, and the University of North Dakota Department of Civil Engineering, consists of several interrelated tasks. The objective of the research was to evaluate a cost-effective PAC produced from North Dakota lignite for removing NOM from water and reducing trihalomethane formation potential. The research approach was to develop a statistically valid testing protocol that can be used to compare dose-response relationships between North Dakota lignite-derived PAC and commercially available PAC products. A statistical analysis was performed to determine whether significant correlations exist between operating conditions, water properties, PAC properties, and dose-response behavior. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were also measured for each of the waters and each of the PACs.

  14. Pain management in children: Part 1 — Pain assessment tools and a brief review of nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cecile; Lau, Elaine; Palozzi, Lori; Campbell, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    If pain is not treated quickly and effectively in children, it can cause long-term physical and psychological sequelae. Therefore, it is important for all health care providers to understand the importance of effective pain control in children. This article is divided into 2 parts: Part 1 reviews the pharmacotherapy of pain management in children and Part 2 will review the problems relating to the use of codeine in children, and the rationale for recommending morphine as the opioid of choice in the treatment of moderate to severe pain. There has been growing concern about codeine's lack of efficacy and increased safety concerns in its use in children. Due to the variability of codeine metabolism and unpredictable effects on efficacy and safety, The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, no longer includes codeine or codeine-containing products on the regular hospital formulary and now recommends oral morphine as the agent of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in children. A knowledge translation (KT) strategy was developed and implemented by the hospital's Pain Task Force to support this practice change. PMID:23509570

  15. The ketogenic diet as a treatment option in adults with chronic refractory epilepsy: efficacy and tolerability in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Danielle A J E; Wielders, Laura H P; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Kessels, Fons G H; de Kinderen, Reina J A; Majoie, Marian J M

    2012-03-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, low-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that is used as a treatment for patients with difficult-to-control epilepsy. The present study assesses the efficacy and tolerability of the KD as an add-on therapy in adults with chronic refractory epilepsy. 15 adults were treated with the classical diet or MCT diet. During a follow-up period of 1 year we assessed seizure frequency, seizure severity, tolerability, cognitive performance, mood and quality of life (QOL). We found a significant reduction in seizures among the patients who followed the diet at least 1 year (n=5). Of these 5 patients, 2 had a reduction between 50 and 90%. Analyzing the study months separately, we found a seizure reduction of ?50% in 26.6% of the patients during at least 1 month of treatment. Common side-effects were gastrointestinal disorders, loss of weight and fatigue. There was a considerable, non-significant improvement found in mood and QOL scores. Improvements were independent of reduction in seizure frequency, indicating that the effects of the KD reach further than seizure control. PMID:22366051

  16. Autologous Conditioned Serum as a Novel Alternative Option in the Treatment of Unilateral Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G.; Y. K., Batra

    2015-01-01

    Study Design The study was conducted on patients who received autologous conditioned serum (ACS) as a line of treatment at the Orthopedics outpatient department of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER, Chandigarh) from January 2011 to June 2012. Of the 1,224 patients, 20 males or females were included in the study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The institutional board of PGIMER approved the study before it was initiated. Purpose To study the efficacy of ACS in the treatment of unilateral lumbar radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Interleukin (IL)-1 appears to be of special importance among the cytokines identified in orthopedic diseases. ACS contains high concentrations of IL-1 receptor antagonist, antagonist to IL-1 in that is a biochemical 'sensitizer' of nerve roots in radiculopathy. Methods We included 20 patients with unilateral lumbar radiculopathy after obtaining informed consent. We prepared ACS as described by Meijer et al. Under bi-planar fluoroscopic imaging in anterior-posterior and lateral views, ACS was administered via epidural perineural technique. Patients in both groups were evaluated by quadruple visual analogue scale, straight leg raising test, revised Oswestry disability index, and 12-Item Short Form of Health Survey before and after epidural injections at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Results There was a statistically significant change in all parameters from pre-injection to first, second, and third follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions ACS can modify the disease course in addition to reducing pain, disability and improving general health. PMID:26713125

  17. A novel intravitreal fluocinolone acetonide implant (Iluvien®) in the treatment of patients with chronic diabetic macular edema that is insufficiently responsive to other medical treatment options: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Schmit-Eilenberger, Vera K

    2015-01-01

    Background Iluvien® is a novel, nonbiodegradable, sustained-release drug delivery system (0.2 ?g/d fluocinolone acetonide [FAc]) indicated in Europe for the treatment of vision impairment associated with chronic diabetic macular edema (DME), considered insufficiently responsive to available therapies. Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of 190-?g FAc implant in patients with chronic DME refractory to other medical treatment options in a clinical setting. Methods Retrospective registry data were collected by using standard case report forms (CRFs). Prior to intravitreal injection of the FAc implant, all patients were treated either with a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonist and/or a steroid (triamcinolone, dexamethasone implant). Patients were excluded from receiving FAc if they had a known history of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) following corticosteroid therapy, glaucoma, ocular hypertension, or any contraindications cited in the summary of product characteristics. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was the main study parameter. Central fovea thickness (CFT) and IOP were measured concurrently. These parameters were recorded prior to and after the injection of the 190-?g FAc implant (between 1 week and 9 months). Injections were performed between May 2013 and March 2014. Results Fifteen eyes from ten patients were treated. Thirteen eyes (nine patients) were pseudophakic, and seven eyes (five patients) were vitrectomized prior to receiving therapy. BCVA improved in eleven eyes (73.3%), remained unchanged in two eyes (13.3%), and decreased slightly in two eyes (13.3%) at the last follow-up visit versus baseline levels. IOP increased in two patients and was controlled using fixed-combination of IOP-lowering eyedrops or sectorial cyclocryotherapy (n=1). Conclusion The 190-?g FAc implant was efficacious and showed a favorable benefit-to-risk profile in the patient population with chronic DME of this case series that were refractory to other therapies. The longer-term efficacy and safety in a real-life setting is still being assessed in this center. FAc may offer an important treatment option for patients with chronic DME refractory to other treatment options. PMID:25999689

  18. Complementary Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment Medications for Motor Symptoms Surgical Treatment Options Exercise Complementary Treatment Clinical Studies and Clinical Trials You Can Make A Difference Your donation to the National Parkinson Foundation goes directly to support and develop treatments ...

  19. Xenotransplantation of porcine islet cells as a potential option for the treatment of type 1 diabetes in the future.

    PubMed

    Reichart, B; Niemann, H; Chavakis, T; Denner, J; Jaeckel, E; Ludwig, B; Marckmann, G; Schnieke, A; Schwinzer, R; Seissler, J; Tönjes, R R; Klymiuk, N; Wolf, E; Bornstein, S R

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ and cell transplantation, including pancreatic islets constitute the treatment of choice for chronic terminal diseases. However, the clinical use of allogeneic transplantation is limited by the growing shortage of human organs. This has prompted us to initiate a unique multi-center and multi-team effort to promote translational research in xenotransplantation to bring xenotransplantation to the clinical setting. Supported by the German Research Foundation, an interdisciplinary group of surgeons, internal medicine doctors, diabetologists, material sciences experts, immunologists, cell biologists, virologists, veterinarians, and geneticists have established a collaborative research center (CRC) focusing on the biology of xenogeneic cell, tissue, and organ transplantation. A major strength of this consortium is the inclusion of members of the regulatory bodies, including the Paul-Ehrlich Institute (PEI), infection specialists from the Robert Koch Institute and PEI, veterinarians from the German Primate Center, and representatives of influential ethical and religious institutions. A major goal of this consortium is to promote islet xenotransplantation, based on the extensive expertise and experience of the existing clinical islet transplantation program. Besides comprehensive approaches to understand and prevent inflammation-mediated islet xenotransplant dysfunction [immediate blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR)], we also take advantage of the availability of and experience with islet macroencapsulation, with the goal to improve graft survival and function. This consortium harbors a unique group of scientists with complementary expertise under a cohesive program aiming at developing new therapeutic approaches for islet replacement and solid organ xenotransplantation. PMID:25506683

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N.; Rooij, Peter van; Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  1. Novel treatment options for perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract: endoscopic vacuum therapy and over-the-scope clips.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Rudolf; Senninger, Norbert; Laukoetter, Mike G

    2014-06-28

    Endoscopic management of leakages and perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract has gained great importance as it avoids the morbidity and mortality of surgical intervention. In the past years, covered self-expanding metal stents were the mainstay of endoscopic therapy. However, two new techniques are now available that enlarge the possibilities of defect closure: endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT), and over-the-scope clip (OTSC). EVT is performed by mounting a polyurethane sponge on a gastric tube and placing it into the leakage. Continuous suction is applied via the tube resulting in effective drainage of the cavity and the induction of wound healing, comparable to the application of vacuum therapy in cutaneous wounds. The system is changed every 3-5 d. The overall success rate of EVT in the literature ranges from 84% to 100%, with a mean of 90%; only few complications have been reported. OTSCs are loaded on a transparent cap which is mounted on the tip of a standard endoscope. By bringing the edges of the perforation into the cap, by suction or by dedicated devices, such as anchor or twin grasper, the OTSC can be placed to close the perforation. For acute endoscopy associated perforations, the mean success rate is 90% (range: 70%-100%). For other types of perforations (postoperative, other chronic leaks and fistulas) success rates are somewhat lower (68%, and 59%, respectively). Only few complications have been reported. Although first reports are promising, further studies are needed to define the exact role of EVT and OTSC in treatment algorithms of upper gastrointestinal perforations. PMID:24976714

  2. Sensitivity of aquatic invertebrate resting eggs to SeaKleen (Menadione): a test of potential ballast tank treatment options.

    PubMed

    Raikow, David E; Reid, David E; Maynard, Erynn E; Landrum, Peter E

    2006-02-01

    The introduction of aquatic species in resting life stages by the release of ballast water is a less well-known but potentially important invasive species vector. Best-management practices designed to minimize transport of ballast water cannot eliminate this threat, because residual water and sediment are retained in ballast tanks after draining. To evaluate the potential efficacy of chemical treatment of residual material in ship ballast tanks, the present study examined the acute toxicity of the proposed biocide SeaKleen (menadione; Garnett, Watkinsville, GA, USA) on resting eggs of Brachionus plicatilis (a marine rotifer), a freshwater copepod, Daphnia mendotae (a freshwater cladoceran), and Artemia sp. (a marine brine shrimp). SeaKleen was toxic to resting eggs of all taxa. Daphnia mendotae resting eggs encased in protective ephippia were the least sensitive, as indicated by a 24-h lethal concentration of toxicant to 90% of organisms of 8.7 mg/L (95% confidence interval, +/- 0.1 mg/L). SeaKleen induced teratogenic effects in D. mendotae and Artemia sp. Exposure to sunlight quickly degraded SeaKleen, which lost all toxicity after 72 h outdoors. SeaKleen increased in toxicity slightly after 72 h in darkness. Burial of D. mendotae ephippia in natural lake sediment reduced SeaKleen toxicity by a factor of 20. Reduced toxicity in the presence of sediment raises serious doubts as to the potential for this, or any, chemical biocide to kill aquatic invertebrate resting stages buried in sediment retained in ship ballast tanks. PMID:16519319

  3. The novel bladder preservation therapy BOAI-CDDP-radiation (OMC-regimen): a new treatment option for invasive bladder cancer patients with lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Haruhito; Inamoto, Teruo; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Nomi, Hayahito; Hirano, Hajime; Ibuki, Naokazu; Uehara, Hiroshi; Komura, Kazumasa; Minami, Koichiro; Uchimoto, Taizo; Saito, Kenkichi; Takai, Tomoaki; Tanda, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Narumi, Yoshihumi; Kiyama, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a novel bladder preservation therapy for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and lymph node metastasis: balloon-occluded arterial infusion (BOAI) of cisplatin/gemcitabine, with concomitant hemodialysis and irradiation [the so-called 'OMC (Osaka Medical College) regimen']. The OMC regimen delivers an extremely high concentration of anticancer agent to the site of the tumor, as well as the pelvic area, without causing any adverse systemic effects. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of the OMC regimen in 34 patients who underwent BOAI with cisplatin (100, 200 or 300 mg) along with 60 Gy of irradiation; patients who failed to achieve CR underwent secondary BOAI with gemcitabine (1,600 mg). The overall clinical response was 73.5% (CR: 35.3%; PR: 17.6%; SD: 20.6%). The 5-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 54.4% and 52.5%, respectively. For treatment failure, N2 stage was selected as a significant risk factor by simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. Cox proportional hazards analyses showed that N2 stage, T4 stage and the presence of hydronephrosis were significant risk factors for overall survival. Indeed, 55.6% of patients with N1 stage achieved a complete response (CR) (vs. 12.5% for N2 patients, p=0.0151), and 90% (9/10) of the CR patients survived without recurrence with an intact bladder after a mean follow-up of 85 (range 7-193) weeks. The 3-year progrssion-free survival rate with an intact bladder was 65.8% (vs. 37.5% for N2, p=0.034), and the 5-year overall survival rate was 71.8% (vs. 30.6% for N2, p=0.004). No patients suffered severe toxicities of Grade II or more; the oldest patient, aged 85 years, successfully completed this therapy. In conclusion, the OMC regimen can be regarded as a new option for patients with macroscopic lymph node involvement, especially those at stage N1. Therapy will improve the feasibility of radical cure even without the need for cystectomy in patients for whom surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy would otherwise be necessary, and also facilitate potential cure in patients for whom, otherwise, merely palliative treatment would seem the only option. PMID:24728124

  4. Alirocumab as Add-On to Atorvastatin Versus Other Lipid Treatment Strategies: ODYSSEY OPTIONS I Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Daniel; Weiss, Robert; Ruiz, Juan Lima; Watts, Gerald F.; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Robinson, Jennifer; Zhao, Jian; Hanotin, Corinne; Donahue, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Context: Despite current standard of care, many patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) still have elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Alirocumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody inhibitor of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the LDL-C-lowering efficacy of adding alirocumab vs other common lipid-lowering strategies. Design, Patients, and Interventions: Patients (n = 355) with very high CVD risk and LDL-C levels of 70 mg/dL or greater or high CVD risk and LDL-C of 100 mg/dL or greater on baseline atorvastatin 20 or 40 mg were randomized to one of the following: 1) add-on alirocumab 75 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) sc; 2) add-on ezetimibe 10 mg/d; 3) double atorvastatin dose; or 4) for atorvastatin 40 mg regimen only, switch to rosuvastatin 40 mg. For patients not achieving protocol-defined LDL-C goals, the alirocumab dose was increased (blinded) at week 12 to 150 mg Q2W. Main Outcome Measure: The primary end point was percentage change in calculated LDL-C from baseline to 24 weeks (intent to treat). Results: Among atorvastatin 20 and 40 mg regimens, respectively, add-on alirocumab reduced LDL-C levels by 44.1% and 54.0% (P < .001 vs all comparators); add-on ezetimibe, 20.5% and 22.6%; doubling of atorvastatin dose, 5.0% and 4.8%; and switching atorvastatin 40 mg to rosuvastatin 40 mg, 21.4%. Most alirocumab-treated patients (87.2% and 84.6%) achieved their LDL-C goals. Most alirocumab-treated patients (86%) maintained their 75-mg Q2W regimen. Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 65.4% of alirocumab patients vs 64.4% ezetimibe and 63.8% double atorvastatin/switch to rosuvastatin (data were pooled). Conclusions: Adding alirocumab to atorvastatin provided significantly greater LDL-C reductions vs adding ezetimibe, doubling atorvastatin dose, or switching to rosuvastatin and enabled greater LDL-C goal achievement. PMID:26030325

  5. Adverse Events Profile of PrePex a Non-Surgical Device for Adult Male Circumcision in a Ugandan Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Galukande, Moses; Duffy, Kevin; Bitega, Jean Paul; Rackara, Sam; Bbaale, Denis Sekavuga; Nakaggwa, Florence; Nagaddya, Teddy; Wooding, Nick; Dea, Monica; Coutinho, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Background Safe Male Circumcision is a proven approach for partial HIV prevention. Several sub Saharan African countries have plans to reach a prevalence of 80% of their adult males circumcised by 2015. These targets require out of ordinary organization, demand creation, timely execution and perhaps the use of SMC devices. Objective To profile Adverse Events rate and acceptance of PrePex, a non surgical device for adult male circumcision. Methods A prospective study, conducted at International Hospital Kampala, Uganda, between August and October 2012. Ethical approval was obtained from Uganda National Council of Science and Technology. Results Of 1,040 men received to undergo SMC, 678 opted for PrePex, 36 were excluded at an initial physical examination screening. 642 were enrolled and consented, and another 17 were excluded before device placement. 625 underwent the procedure. Average age was 24 years (±7). Twelve moderate AEs occurred among 10 participants 12/625, (1.9%). These were all reversible. Five had device displacement, one had an everted foreskin; five had bleeding after the device was removed and one had voiding difficulties. The majority (279 out of 300) of men interviewed complained of some pain within the week of placement. Mean pain score at device placement (using visual analogue scale) was 0.5, at device removal 4.5 and within 2 min of removal the pain score was 1.4. Over 70% of the devices were placed and removed by non-physician clinicians. Presented with a choice, 60% of men chose PrePex over surgical SMC. Close to 90% would recommend the device to their friends. Odour from the necrotic skin was a concern. Removals done 1–2 days earlier than day 7 were beneficial and conferred no extra risk. Conclusion AEs of a moderate or severe nature associated with PrePex were low and reversible. PrePex is feasible for mass safe male circumcision scaling up. PMID:24489754

  6. Combined Treatments with Photodynamic Therapy for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Silvia Rocío; Salazar, Nerea; Gracia-Cazaña, Tamara; Zamarrón, Alicia; González, Salvador; Juarranz, Ángeles; Gilaberte, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common form of cancer in the Caucasian population. Among NMSC types, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has the highest incidence and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is less common although it can metastasize, accounting for the majority of NMSC-related deaths. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and non-surgical modalities. Even though surgical approaches are most commonly used to treat these lesions, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has the advantage of being a non-invasive option, and capable of field treatment, providing optimum cosmetic outcomes. Numerous clinical research studies have shown the efficacy of PDT for treating pre-malignant and malignant NMSC. However, resistant or recurrent tumors appear and sometimes become more aggressive. In this sense, the enhancement of PDT effectiveness by combining it with other therapeutic modalities has become an interesting field in NMSC research. Depending on the characteristics and the type of tumor, PDT can be applied in combination with immunomodulatory (Imiquimod) and chemotherapeutic (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, diclofenac, or ingenol mebutate) agents, inhibitors of some molecules implicated in the carcinogenic process (COX2 or MAPK), surgical techniques, or even radiotherapy. These new strategies open the way to a wider improvement of the prevention and eradication of skin cancer. PMID:26516853

  7. Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis: Limited Available Treatment Options but Promising Drugs in Development and Recent Progress Towards a Regulatory Approval Pathway.

    PubMed

    Filozof, Claudia; Goldstein, Barry J; Williams, Richard N; Sanyal, Arun

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing world-wide in parallel to the increase of the obesity epidemic. Insulin resistance (IR) and the accumulation of triglyceride-derived toxic lipid metabolites play a key role in its pathogenesis. Multiple biomarkers are being evaluated for the non-invasive diagnosis of NASH. However, a percutaneous liver biopsy is still the gold standard method; the minimal diagnostic criteria include the presence of >5% macrovesicular steatosis, inflammation, and liver cell ballooning. Several pharmaceutical agents have been evaluated for the treatment of NASH; however, no single therapy has been approved so far. Due to the increasing prevalence and the health burden, there is a high need to develop therapeutic strategies for patients with NASH targeting both those with early-stage disease as well as those with advanced liver fibrosis. There are unique challenges in the design of studies for these target populations. Collaborative efforts of health authorities, medical disease experts, and the pharmaceutical industry are ongoing to align options for a registrational pathway. Several companies pursuing different mechanisms of action are nearing the end of phase II with their candidates. This manuscript reviews those compounds with a variety of mode of actions that have been evaluated and/or are currently being tested with the goal of achieving a NAFLD/NASH indication. PMID:26201461

  8. Treatment options for patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma who have previously been treated with novel agents and high-dose chemotherapy/autologous stem cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nina; Lonial, Sagar

    2014-01-01

    A 64 year-old man with a history of multiple myeloma presents with new back pain. He has a history of International Staging System stage 1, IgG kappa multiple myeloma with normal cytogenetics which was diagnosed 4 years ago when he presented with a pathological fracture of the left humerus. He was initially managed with mechanical stabilization and 4 cycles of bortezomib-dexamethasone, as well as 2 years of bisphosphanates. Following induction therapy he achieved a very good partial response (VGPR). He subsequently received high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) and achieved a complete reponse (CR) post-transplant. He did not receive maintenance therapy and had been lost-to follow-up for about a year. He now presents 5 years after initial diagnosis with back pain and is noted to have a new lytic lesion with a compression fracture at T8. A serum protein electrophoresis demonstrates reappearance of his original monoclonal protein. After appropriate stabilization he comes to you to discuss additional treatment options. PMID:21239811

  9. Exercising options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    In a recent speech to graduates of the College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences at the University of Maryland, Anne Petersen, deputy director of the National Science Foundation, encouraged a new generation of scientists to embrace opportunity and choice, and to use their scientific training as an employment credential, not a limit. In her May 23 commencement address, Petersen exhorted students to view their freshly minted diplomas as tickets to a broad and diverse job market, not just one-way trips to the laboratory.“Looking for the options and alternatives open to us—and creating options for ourselves where they are not apparent—can give us a sense of direction and volition that enriches our lives immensely…

  10. Evaluation of retinoids for induction of the redundant gene ABCD2 as an alternative treatment option in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Franziska D; Weinhofer, Isabelle; Einwich, Angelika; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Muneer, Zahid; Maier, Harald; Weber, Willi H A; Berger, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), the most common peroxisomal disorder, is a clinically heterogeneous disease that can manifest as devastating inflammatory cerebral demyelination (CALD) leading to death of affected males. Currently, the only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, HSCT is only effective when performed at an early stage because the inflammation may progress for eighteen months after HSCT. Thus, alternative treatment options able to immediately halt the progression are urgently needed. X-ALD is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, encoding the peroxisomal membrane protein ABCD1, resulting in impaired very long-chain fatty acid metabolism. The related ABCD2 protein is able to functionally compensate for ABCD1-deficiency both in vitro and in vivo. Recently, we demonstrated that of the cell types derived from CD34+ stem cells, predominantly monocytes but not lymphocytes are metabolically impaired in X-ALD. As ABCD2 is virtually not expressed in these cells, we hypothesize that a pharmacological up-regulation of ABCD2 should compensate metabolically and halt the inflammation in CALD. Retinoids are anti-inflammatory compounds known to act on ABCD2. Here, we investigated the capacity of selected retinoids for ABCD2 induction in human monocytes/macrophages. In THP-1 cells, 13-cis-retinoic acid reached the highest, fivefold, increase in ABCD2 expression. To test the efficacy of retinoids in vivo, we analyzed ABCD2 mRNA levels in blood cells isolated from acne patients receiving 13-cis-retinoic acid therapy. In treated acne patients, ABCD2 mRNA levels were comparable to pre-treatment levels in monocytes and lymphocytes. Nevertheless, when primary monocytes were in vitro differentiated into macrophages and treated with 13-cis-retinoic acid, we observed a fourfold induction of ABCD2. However, the level of ABCD2 induction obtained by retinoids alone is probably not of therapeutic relevance for X-ALD. In conclusion, our results suggest a change in promoter accessibility during macrophage differentiation allowing induction of ABCD2 by retinoids. PMID:25079382

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Ependymoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the brain (just above the back of the neck). The brain stem controls breathing, heart rate , and the nerves ... Nausea and vomiting . Pain or stiffness in the neck. Loss of balance or trouble ... irritability. Tests that examine the brain and spinal cord are used to detect (find) ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Endometrial Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mellitus . Taking tamoxifen for breast cancer or taking estrogen alone (without progesterone) can increase the risk of ... menstrual bleeding) as soon as possible. Women taking estrogen (a hormone that can affect the growth of ...

  13. Lewy Body Disease Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms: When to Consider Antipsychotic Medications" . REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) RBD can be quite responsive to ... commonly prescribed for individuals with Alzheimer’s with disruptive behavior, these medications can affect the brain of an ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Ewing Sarcoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion . They may be used alone or to carry ... and given back to the patient through an infusion. These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) ...

  15. Treatment Options for Ewing Sarcoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion . They may be used alone or to carry ... and given back to the patient through an infusion. These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tumors, not anal cancer . Being infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV) increases the risk of developing anal cancer. Risk factors include the following: Being infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). Having many sexual partners. Having receptive anal ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Penile Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the prostate, penis, testicles, bladder, and other organs. Human papillomavirus infection may increase the risk of developing penile ... following: Circumcision may help prevent infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). A circumcision is an operation in which ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the urine (slightly rusty to bright red in color). Frequent urination. Pain during urination. Lower back pain. ... for lumps. Urinalysis : A test to check the color of urine and its contents, such as sugar, ...

  19. Treatment Options for Urethral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Urethral cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the urethra. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the urethra or to other ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Gastric Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gastric cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lining of the stomach. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the stomach or to other ...