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Sample records for non-surgical treatment options

  1. Non-surgical treatments for the management of early osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Madry, Henning; Marchettini, Paolo; Marmotti, Antonio; Van Assche, Dieter; Zanon, Giacomo; Peretti, Giuseppe M

    2016-06-01

    Non-surgical treatments are usually the first choice for the management of knee degeneration, especially in the early osteoarthritis (OA) phase when no clear lesions or combined abnormalities need to be addressed surgically. Early OA may be addressed by a wide range of non-surgical approaches, from non-pharmacological modalities to dietary supplements and pharmacological therapies, as well as physical therapies and novel biological minimally invasive procedures involving injections of various substances to obtain a clinical improvement and possibly a disease-modifying effect. Numerous pharmaceutical agents are able to provide clinical benefit, but no one has shown all the characteristic of an ideal treatment, and side effects have been reported at both systemic and local level. Patients and physicians should have realistic outcome goals in pharmacological treatment, which should be considered together with other conservative measures. Among these, exercise is an effective conservative approach, while physical therapies lack literature support. Even though a combination of these therapeutic options might be the most suitable strategy, there is a paucity of studies focusing on combining treatments, which is the most common clinical scenario. Further studies are needed to increase the limited evidence on non-surgical treatments and their combination, to optimize indications, application modalities, and results with particular focus on early OA. In fact, most of the available evidence regards established OA. Increased knowledge about degeneration mechanisms will help to better target the available treatments and develop new biological options, where preliminary results are promising, especially concerning early disease phases. Specific treatments aimed at improving joint homoeostasis, or even counteracting tissue damage by inducing regenerative processes, might be successful in early OA, where tissue loss and anatomical changes are still at very initial stages. PMID:27043347

  2. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions Strategies to improve non-surgical treatment use in orthopaedic practice should be targeted at changing the beliefs of orthopedic surgeons, communication with other OA care providers and involving patient’s environment in OA treatment. PMID:26799974

  3. Metatarsus adductus: development of a non-surgical treatment pathway.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cylie M; James, Alicia M; Tran, Ton

    2013-09-01

    Metatarsus adductus (MA) occurs in one to two cases per 1000 births and is the most common congenital foot deformity in newborns. The appearance is that of a curved or adducted forefoot with a normal hindfoot. A systematic literature review was conducted to answer the following question: For a child who presents with MA, what is the most evidence-based conservative treatment option? Thirteen articles were reviewed using the National Health and Medical Research Council levels of evidence and guidelines for clinical practice. Conservative treatment options reported on included the following: no treatment, stretching, splinting, serial casting, sitting and sleeping positions and footwear/orthotics. There was strong evidence supporting no treatment in the case of flexible MA. Some limited evidence was found for the treatment of semi-rigid MA. Clinicians should use these recommendations together with clinical experience when advising parents on treatment of MA. PMID:23647850

  4. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12 months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3 months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy may be improved to help patients manage their symptoms, and potentially delay the need for joint arthroplasty. PMID:26353874

  5. [The fate of patients with intermittent claudication--comparison of surgical and non-surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Zempo, N; Yoshimura, K; Akimoto, F; Nakamura, T; Ohara, M; Wakamatsu, T; Esato, K

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the operative indication for patients with intermittent claudication because of arteriosclerosis obliterans, and to compare the late result of the surgical treatment group (130 cases, 175 limbs) with that of the non-surgical treatment group (27 cases, 31 limbs). There were 3 operative deaths and 21 late deaths in the surgical group, and 11 late deaths in the non-surgical group. The number one cause of death was heart failure, including ischemic heart disease, in both groups. The 5-year cumulative patency rate was 92.5% in the aorto-iliac, 70.6% in the femoro-distal and 82.0% in the aorto-femoro-distal arterial reconstructions. Long term symptom free rates of the surgical group and the non-surgical group, except fatal cases, were 87.2% and 25.0% in the aorto-iliac, 57.7% and 25.0% in the femoro-distal, 86.7% and 0% in the aorto-femoro-distal arterial regions, respectively. Late result of intermittent claudication in the surgical group was better than that in the non-surgical group. We conclude that intermittent claudication should be considered to be the indication for surgery, except for the cases with high risk diseases or malignant diseases. PMID:1944136

  6. Modifiable Prognostic Factors of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Non-Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Hung, Chao-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Chen, Chien-Hung; Kee, Kwong-Ming; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Yen, Yi-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Yen-Yang; Hsu, Hsuan-Chi; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background & aims Current hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) staging systems only use baseline characteristics to predict outcome. We aimed to explore modifiable factors of the prognosis in HCC cases had undergone non-surgical treatment. Methods All HCC cases in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial hospital in southern Taiwan from 2002 to 2012 must met all below criteria: (1) met international diagnostic guidelines, (2) underwent the initial treatments in our hospital (3) treated by non-surgical treatment modalities and (4) survived more than two years, with follow-up time longer than five years. Results A total 698 patients were enrolled: 451 (24.6%, group A) survivied between 2 to 5 years, and 247 (13.5%, group B) had survived > 5 years. Aside from liver function reserve and BCLC stages, four interventional factors: initial treatment modality, outcomes of 1st or 2nd treatment, and anti-viral therapy to chronic viral hepatitis were associated with prognosis. After propensity score matching, multiple logistic regression of 223 well-matched pairs showed that recurrence within one year after 1st treatment (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.35–3.48), incomplete 2nd treatment (2.01, 1.27–3.17) and absence of anti-viral agents (1.68, 1.09–2.59) were independent poor prognostic factors. Conclusion Complete treatment and anti-viral agents to chronic hepatitis were both independent modifiable prognostic factors of HCC patients had undergone non-surgical treatment. Based on these findings, timely treatment to achieve maximal locoregional control and anti-viral treatment should be provided as possible. PMID:26661388

  7. Surgical versus non-surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to test whether there is a significant difference in the clinical outcomes between surgical and non-surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures. An electronic search was undertaken in February 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 36 publications. The estimates of an intervention were expressed as the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimetres. A statistically significant effect was observed for the outcome of post-treatment malocclusion (RR 0.46, P<0.00001), lateral deviation during maximum inter-incisal opening (RR 0.56, P=0.0001, dichotomous; MD -0.75, P=0.002, continuous), protrusion (MD 0.68, P=0.01), and laterotrusion (MD 0.53, P=0.03) favouring surgical treatment, and for infection (RR 3.43, P=0.03) favouring non-surgical treatment. There was no statistically significant effect on temporomandibular joint pain (RR 0.81, P=0.46) or noise (RR 1.44, P=0.24), or maximum inter-incisal opening (MD 2.24, P=0.14). The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures significantly affected the incidence of post-treatment complications, favouring surgical treatment, when all dichotomous and continuous outcomes were analysed (RR 0.70, P=0.006 and MD 1.17, P=0.0006, respectively). PMID:25457827

  8. The lived experience of dysphagia following non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence and severity of dysphagia in people treated non-surgically for primary head and neck cancer (HNC) is well documented. However, few studies have looked beyond the physiological impairment to explore the lived experience of dysphagia in the post-treatment period of HNC. The current study adopted a person-centred, qualitative approach to describe the experiences of people living with dysphagia in the months and years following non-surgical treatment for HNC. Using maximum variation sampling, 24 participants who had undergone radiotherapy treatment for HNC were recruited. Individual interviews were conducted to explore the impact of dysphagia on participants' everyday lives. The themes identified included: (1) physical changes related to swallowing; (2) emotions evoked by living with dysphagia; (3) altered perceptions and changes in appreciation of food; and (4) personal and lifestyle impacts. The data revealed the breadth and significance of the impact of dysphagia on the lives of people treated curatively for HNC. Assessment and management in the post-treatment period must be sufficiently holistic to address both the changing physical states and the psychosocial needs of people with dysphagia following HNC. Rehabilitation services which focus only on impairment-based management will fail to fully meet the support needs of this clinical population. PMID:24345002

  9. Systemic moxifloxacin vs amoxicillin/metronidazole adjunct to non-surgical treatment in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gurgan, Cem-Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of moxifloxacin compared to amoxicillin and metronidazole, combined with non-surgical treatment in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) in a 6-month follow-up. Material and Methods A total of 39 systemically healthy patients with GAgP were evaluated in this randomized clinical trial. Periodontal parameters were recorded at the baseline during the 1st, 3rd and 6th month. Patients received either 400 mg of moxifloxacin per os once daily or 500 mg of metronidazole and 500 mg amoxicillin per os three times daily for 7 days consecutively. Results No significant differences between groups were found in any parameters at the baseline. Both groups led to a statistically significant decrease in all clinical periodontal parameters compared to the baseline (PI, p<0.001 and GI, PD, BOP, CAL, p<0.01). There were no differences between the 1st and 3rd months or the 3rd and 6th months for clinical parameters in the groups. Also, no intergroup difference was observed in any parameters at any time, except the gingival index at 6th months. Conclusions Systemic administration of moxifloxacin as an adjunct to non-surgical treatment significantly improves clinical outcomes and provides comparable clinical improvement with less adverse events to that of combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole in the treatment of GAgP. Key words: Aggressive periodontitis, amoxicillin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, nonsurgical periodontal debridement. PMID:26034931

  10. Non-surgical alternative in the treatment of skeletal Class III problems.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Y

    1995-01-01

    The dental profession is not static, but dynamic. New research findings, along with medical and technological advances, necessitate constant re-examination of treatment philosophies and techniques. What were acceptable treatment techniques in the past may not necessarily be the most effective and best techniques for our patients today. Currently, many practitioners feel that the only treatment for the correction of a skeletal Class III abnormality is via orthognathic surgery in older patients. In some cases it may be the only treatment option. But in most cases today, there are more conservative, non-surgical treatment alternatives in correcting Class III problems in younger aged children. In treating facial-skeletal problems, it must be emphasized that the human face is a biological masterpiece of form and function. Its importance has been documented in arts and sciences since the beginning of modern civilization. It is important enough so that individuals who are blessed with attractive features are afforded greater opportunities in our society. Attractive faces are associated with intelligence, honesty and good work ethics. With the advent of orthognathic surgery, functional appliance, functional regulator, and myofunctional therapy, the dental profession has the capability of leveling out the playing field for many individuals in our society. It does so by being able to correct problems closely associated with the human psyche--the human face. The ability to change facial features brings tremendous prestige to our profession. Along with this prestige comes greater responsibility. Our ability to change facial features entails greater understanding of facial balance and harmony. Ricketts states that the face must conform to stringent proportions known as the "divine proportion" in order for it to be esthetically pleasing. Also, our ability to move facial-skeletal structures entails greater understanding of the biomechanics of the human face. Without this knowledge practitioners can cause iatrogenic problems, such as temporomandibular disorders. Conversely, correcting facial-skeletal abnormalities have been found to alleviate many medical problems, such as chronic headaches, neck-back-shoulder pain, respiratory disorders, auditory disorders, etc. As more and more information is gathered, it is becoming clear that the physical, emotional and psychological health of a human being is intimately related to craniomandibular anatomy. In fact, the jaw and dental structures (with the exception of the tooth enamel) is formed from the neural crest cells along with the endocrine system, while the central nervous system is formed from the neural tube. The entire nervous system, the endocrine system and the dental system are formed from common tissue origin. This can explain why many facial-skeletal corrections are often accompanied by alleviation of many medical and physiological problems. These are exciting times for our profession. However, if we wish to address the needs of our patients well into the next century, we must continue to seek greater and greater knowledge in the area of the craniomandibular anatomy relative to the rest of the human body. It has much to do with facial esthetics, physiologic and psychologic harmony, and TMJ health. This knowledge will enable our profession to have the power to change human lives in a very positive way. As doctors, there can be no greater personal and professional satisfaction than to realize that, through our professional intervention, we are able to offer our patients the possibility of achieving greater happiness and quality of life. PMID:9520715

  11. Rescue of a periodontally compromised tooth by non-surgical treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes a case of the successful non-surgical management of a periodontally compromised maxillary premolar. Methods A combination therapy, including root planing, occlusal adjustment, and tooth splinting, was applied. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed during the 16-month follow-up period. Results All periodontal parameters were improved. There were dramatic decreases (3–6 mm) in the probing pocket depth, tooth mobility, and marginal bone loss. Interestingly, gradual resolution of the periapical radiolucency and alveolar bone regeneration were observed in the radiographs, and the periodontal condition was maintained during the follow-up period. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, these results demonstrate the importance of natural tooth preservation through proper periodontal treatment and occlusal adjustment of the periodontally compromised tooth, which is typically targeted for tooth extraction and dental implantation. PMID:27127693

  12. Complications related to midfacial fractures: operative versus non-surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Kloss, F R; Stigler, R G; Brandsttter, A; Tuli, T; Rasse, M; Laimer, K; Hchl, O L; Gassner, R

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of midfacial fractures depends on the dislocation of the fracture and patient-related limitations. Surgical treatment risks iatrogenic complications. In 740 patients with midfacial fractures, the age, sex, fracture type, concomitant injuries, cause of accident and the decision to use operative or non-surgical treatment were recorded. Follow-up was performed 6 and 12 months after the injury. In 41% the fractures were isolated; they were multiple in 59%. Initially, hypaesthesia of the infraorbital nerve was present in 10% of the single and 16% of the multiple fracture patients. Surgical treatment was performed in 57% of the single and in 75% of the multiple fracture patients. Women underwent surgical treatment considerably less frequently than men. After 6 and 12 months, significantly more complications were present in the surgically treated cohort. Nerve disturbances and 'meteorosensitivity' were most prominent. These results, together with previous findings, indicate that there is a need for prospective clinical investigations that fulfil the criteria of evidence-based medicine to generate guidelines for decision making in trauma surgery. In the meantime, the decision to use surgical treatment for midfacial fractures has to be made carefully. PMID:20870393

  13. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  14. Non surgical laser and light in the treatment of chronic diseases: a review based on personal experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, L.

    2010-11-01

    Since many years some effects of non surgical laser and light on biological tissue have been demonstrated, in vitro and in vivo. This review is based on the results obtained by me and my colleagues/follower in Italy. Aim of our study is to verify the anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects of non surgical laser and light therapy on patients with chronic diseases not good treatable with traditional therapies, as diabetes, and central nervous system injuries. In addition, many clinical data have emerged from double-blind trials on laser treatment of rheumatic diseases and in sports medicine. So, we would like to do a review on the state of the art of non surgical laser treatment in medicine, included aesthetic laser and light therapy field. We discuss the indications and limitations of aesthetic laser medicine, as concluded from the data analysis of the published literature and from over thirty years of personal experiences.

  15. Women's Sex Lives Get a Boost After Non-Surgical Fibroid Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158124.html Women's Sex Lives Get a Boost After Non-Surgical Fibroid ... with bothersome uterine fibroids saw improvements in their sex lives and significant symptom relief a year after ...

  16. Orthotics Compared to Conventional Therapy and Other Non-Surgical Treatments for Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca D.; Wright, Paul; McCarthy, Laine H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Question In adults with acute plantar fasciitis whose symptoms have not been relieved with the conventional regimen of NSAIDS, stretching and lifestyle modification, do the addition of orthotics (prefabricated or custom fitted) reduce pain and improve function compared with other non-surgical treatments (manipulative chiropractic, physical therapy and/or heel steroid injections)? Answer Yes. Studies have shown that orthotics, both prefabricated and custom fitted, reduce pain and improve function in adults with acute plantar fasciitis with few risks or side effects. Used alone or in addition to conventional therapy (NSAIDs, stretching, lifestyle modification), orthotics are effective and well tolerated by patients for short-term pain relief and improved function. Prefabricated orthotics are less costly and provide similar relief to more expensive custom orthotics. Level of Evidence of the Answer A Search Terms Plantar fasciitis, heel pain, treatment, orthotics, Limits Adult, human, English, Review, Randomized-Control Trials, Systematic Reviews, adults age 18 or more, publication dates 2004 to present. Date Search was Conducted January 16, 2014; updated January 20, 2015 Inclusion Criteria Recent published systematic reviews, randomized controlled, meta-analyses; adults with confirmed acute or recent diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Exclusion Criteria Studies older than 10 years, children, adolescents less than 18 years of age, chronic or recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. PMID:26855444

  17. Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for Carrier Status Family Planning and Pregnancy Conception Options Prenatal Diagnosis Fetal Sex ... Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for Carrier Status Family Planning and Pregnancy Conception Options Prenatal Diagnosis Fetal Sex ...

  18. A systematic review of non-surgical treatments for lentigo maligna.

    PubMed

    Read, T; Noonan, C; David, M; Wagels, M; Foote, M; Schaider, H; Soyer, H P; Smithers, B M

    2016-05-01

    Lentigo maligna (LM) is the most common melanocytic malignancy of the head and neck. If left untreated, LM can progress to lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM). Complete surgical excision is the gold standard for treatment, however, due to the location, size, and advanced age of patients, surgery is not always acceptable. As a result, there is ongoing interest in alternative, less invasive treatment modalities. The objective was to provide a structured review of key literature reporting the use of radiotherapy, imiquimod and laser therapy for the management of LM in patients where surgical resection is prohibited. An independent review was conducted following a comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine using MEDLINE and PubMed, Embase, Scopus, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Library databases. Data were presented in tabular format, and crude data pooled to calculate mean recurrence rates for each therapy. 29 studies met the inclusion criteria: radiotherapy 10; topical imiquimod 10; laser therapies 9. Radiotherapy demostrated recurrence rates of up to 31% (mean 11.5%), with follow-up durations of 1-96 months. Topical imiquimod recurrence rates were up to 50% (mean 24.5%), with follow-up durations of 2-49 months. Laser therapy yielded recurrence rates of up to 100% (mean 34.4%), and follow-up durations of 8-78 months. in each of the treatment series the I(2) value measuring statistical heterogeneity exceeded the accepted threshold of 50% and as such a meta-analysis of included data were inappropriate. For non-surgical patients with LM, radiotherapy and topical imiquimod were efficacious treatments. Radiotherapy produced superior complete response rates and fewer recurrences than imiquimod although both are promising non-invasive modalities. There was no consistent body of evidence regarding laser therapy although response rates of up to 100% were reported in low quality studies. A prospective comparative trial is indicated and would provide accurate data on the long-term efficacy and overall utility of these treatments. PMID:26299846

  19. Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water Has Additive Effects on Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment of Improving Periodontitis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Tetsuji; Yamane, Mayu; Ekuni, Daisuke; Kawabata, Yuya; Kataoka, Kota; Kasuyama, Kenta; Maruyama, Takayuki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. A reduction of oxidative stress by drinking hydrogen-rich water (HW) might be beneficial to periodontal health. In this pilot study, we compared the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment with or without drinking HW on periodontitis. Thirteen patients (3 women, 10 men) with periodontitis were divided into two groups: The control group (n = 6) or the HW group (n = 7). In the HW group, participants consumed HW 4–5 times/day for eight weeks. At two to four weeks, all participants received non-surgical periodontal treatment. Oral examinations were performed at baseline, two, four and eight weeks, and serum was obtained at these time points to evaluate oxidative stress. At baseline, there were no significant differences in periodontal status between the control and HW groups. The HW group showed greater improvements in probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level than the control group at two, four and eight weeks (p < 0.05). The HW group also exhibited an increased serum level of total antioxidant capacity at four weeks, compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Drinking HW enhanced the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment, thus improving periodontitis. PMID:26783840

  20. Non-surgical treatment of vaginal agenesis using a simplified version of Ingram's method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Hwa

    2006-12-31

    Non-surgical vaginal dilation is a safe and effective method for the creation of neovagina in the patient with vaginal agenesis. Compared to surgical methods, non-surgical vaginal dilation has the advantage of low morbidity, the creation of a more physiologic vaginal milieu, and no surgical scarring. To overcome some technical limitations of original Frank's method, in 1981 Ingram proposed a modification of the technique that used dilators of gradually increasing size mounted on a bicycle seat stool. Although several studies have shown satisfactory outcomes using Ingram's method, there are some practical difficulties in making and handling the bicycle seat stool. This article reports a case of a 24-year-old woman with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome whose vaginal agenesis is successfully treated with a simplified version of Ingram's method. This method uses dilators of gradually increasing size mounted on an ordinary chair instead of a bicycle seat stool. When necessary, the patient may use a fulcrum under the dilator. PMID:17191323

  1. Concrescence of permanent maxillary second and third molars: case report of non-surgical root canal treatment.

    PubMed

    Foran, Denise; Komabayashi, Takashi; Lin, Louis M

    2012-03-01

    Concrescence is a rare developmental anomaly with an overall incidence of 0.8% in the permanent dentition. While many case reports describe the treatment of concrescence with extraction, there are few reports of non-surgical root canal treatment (NSRCT), due to the atypical root form, canal morphology, and technical difficulties involved in concrescence. This unique case report describes a technical modification of NSRCT that can retain joined posterior maxillary teeth to maintain natural posterior occlusion without surgical intervention or dental implants, thereby avoiding the risk of damage to a large portion of the alveolar bone near the maxillary sinus. PMID:22466898

  2. Treatment Options for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Cielo, Christopher M; Gungor, Anil

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of therapies available for the treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In children with enlarged adenoids or tonsils, adenotonsillectomy (AT) is the preferred treatment, but other surgical options include partial tonsillectomy and lingual tonsillectomy. In specific populations, craniofacial or bariatric surgery may be indicated, and tracheostomy should be reserved for cases where there is no other therapeutic option. Positive airway pressure (PAP) is the most effective non-surgical therapy for OSAS as it can be successfully used in even cases of severe OSAS. Nasal steroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists may be used in the treatment of mild or moderate OSAS. Rapid maxillary expansion and dental appliances may be effective in select populations with dental problems. Other non-surgical therapies, such as positional therapy, supplemental oxygen, and weight loss have not been shown to be effective in most pediatric populations. PMID:26597557

  3. [Non-surgical treatment of osteoarthritis of large joints - new aspects].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    A large number of treatment options exist for osteoarthritis of the knee and hip. The choice of therapy depends on clinical symptomatology, preexisting risk factors (e.g. obesity), and disease stage. This review includes the novel aspects of symptomatic conservative treatment (physical medicine and drugs), especially pain management (electrotherapy), and rehabilitational aspects. Rehabilitation is essential, as osteoarthritis is a chronic condition, that requires lifelong intervention, and a causal cure has not been identified yet. New aspects of hyaluronic acid, slow-acting symptomatic drugs in osteoarthritis (chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine sulfate, and diacerein), and experimental drugs, which claim the properties of disease modification in osteoarthritis (bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and interleukin-1 antagonists), are discussed. PMID:19247594

  4. Defining and predicting outcomes of non-surgical periodontal treatment: a 1-yr follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Baelum, Vibeke; López, Rodrigo

    2016-02-01

    This study reports on 1-yr outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy and compares predictive models resulting from different definitions of treatment success. A total of 149 participants, 30-70 yr of age, provided clinical periodontal data and data on sociodemographic status, health status, symptoms, and oral health-care behaviors at baseline. One week later, clinical attachment level and probing pocket depth were recorded again in 148 patients. Participants underwent non-surgical periodontal therapy, including scaling and root planing, during three to four clinical sessions. Three and 12 months later, clinical attachment level, probing pocket depth, and bleeding on probing (BOP) were recorded in 141 and 137 participants, respectively. Using test-retest data, patients were classified as having 'downhill', 'stable', or 'improved' results on three clinical attachment level and three probing pocket depth outcomes, and their classification was found to vary considerably according to outcome. Although the predictors of treatment outcome varied depending on the variable chosen to represent the treatment outcome, some predictors were more commonly noted as predicting improvement, namely a high baseline percentage of sites with subgingival calculus and the presence of suppuration at baseline. The latter was, however, also predictive for tooth loss during the study. Our findings underline the need for uniformity in defining the outcomes in trials of periodontal therapy. PMID:26714428

  5. Effectiveness of mechanical traction as a non-surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome compared to care as usual: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common condition (prevalence of 4%) where the median nerve is compressed within the carpal tunnel resulting in numbness, tingling, and pain in the hand. Current non-surgical treatment options (oral medication, corticosteroid injections, splinting, exercise, and mobilization) show limited effects, especially in the long-term. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is effective in 70 to 75% of patients, but is relatively invasive and can be accompanied by complications. In an observational study, mechanical traction proved to be effective in up to 70% of patients directly after treatment and in 60% after two years follow-up. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) will examine the effectiveness of mechanical traction compared to care as usual in CTS. Methods/Design Patients diagnosed with CTS will be recruited from an outpatient neurology clinic and randomly assigned to the intervention group (mechanical traction) or the control group (care as usual). Participants in the intervention group will receive 12 treatments with mechanical traction during six consecutive weeks. Primary outcome is symptom severity and functional status, which are measured with the Boston Carpel Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Secondary outcomes are quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), health related resource utilization, and absenteeism from work. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months after inclusion. Linear mixed effect models will be used to determine the change from baseline at 12 months on the BCTQ, WHOQOL-BREF, absenteeism from work and health related resource utilization. The baseline measurement, change from baseline at three and six months, as well as duration of symptoms until inclusion, age, gender, and co-morbidity will be included as covariates The Pearson’s correlation coefficient will be generated to assess the correlation between depression and anxiety and treatment outcome. Discussion Since current non-surgical treatment options are not effective long-term and CTR is relatively invasive, there is a need for an effective and non-invasive treatment option. Mechanical traction is a safe treatment option that may provide a good alternative for the usual care. Considering the prevalence of CTS, the study is of great clinical value to a large patient population. Trial registration Clinical Trials NL44692.008.13 (registered on 19 September 2013). PMID:24886455

  6. Life quality changes within 26 month after the non-surgical treatment in patients with deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Luo, Jun; Cao, Qiang; Bai, Chao; Magovia, Sairike

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate the life quality of lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) patients 26 m after progressive decompression elasticity socks therapy. Methods: SF-36 scale was used to record the life quality scores in 74 patients with acute and subacute deep venous thrombosis, all the patients received the non-surgical treatment. The eight dimensions of life quality variation were documented and analyzed. Results: The baseline data were comparable (P = 1.000 for age, P = 0.655 for sex). At the time of admission and at different time points after discharge, there were significant differences for eight dimensions in patients with deep vein thrombosis (Ps < 0.001). In addition that eight dimensions scores were significantly different between the score at 2 months, 4 months after discharge and the score at certain individual stages (Ps < 0.05), there were no significant difference for eight dimensions scores at different stages (Ps > 0.05). Conclusions: Showed slow improvement within six months of deep vein thrombosis in patients with non-surgical treatment, the life quality scores entered the plateau stage, the life quality of the RP and the PF dimension were slightly impaired, the VT dimension showed relatively obvious damage, the remaining dimensions can recover to healthy levels. The blood circulation activation drugs may help maintain the stability of life quality and delay the occurrence of PTS. The turning point of life quality did not show and required extended follow-up period. PMID:26131196

  7. Comparison of non-surgical treatment methods for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. Previous studies have shown that surgery is effective for severe cases of stenosis, but many patients with mild to moderate symptoms are not surgical candidates. These patients and their providers are seeking effective non-surgical treatment methods to manage their symptoms; yet there is a paucity of comparative effectiveness research in this area. This knowledge gap has hindered the development of clinical practice guidelines for non-surgical treatment approaches for lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/design This study is a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial that will be conducted from November 2013 through October 2016. The sample will consist of 180 older adults (>60 years) who have both an anatomic diagnosis of stenosis confirmed by diagnostic imaging, and signs/symptoms consistent with a clinical diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis confirmed by clinical examination. Eligible subjects will be randomized into one of three pragmatic treatment groups: 1) usual medical care; 2) individualized manual therapy and rehabilitative exercise; or 3) community-based group exercise. All subjects will be treated for a 6-week course of care. The primary subjective outcome is the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, a self-reported measure of pain/function. The primary objective outcome is the Self-Paced Walking Test, a measure of walking capacity. The secondary objective outcome will be a measurement of physical activity during activities of daily living, using the SenseWear Armband, a portable device to be worn on the upper arm for one week. The primary analysis will use linear mixed models to compare the main effects of each treatment group on the changes in each outcome measure. Secondary analyses will include a responder analysis by group and an exploratory analysis of potential baseline predictors of treatment outcome. Discussion Our study should provide evidence that helps to inform patients and providers about the clinical benefits of three non-surgical approaches to the management of lumbar spinal stenosis symptoms. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01943435 PMID:24872875

  8. A non-surgical uterine lavage technique in large cats intended for treatment of uterine infection-induced infertility.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T B; Göritz, F; Boardman, W; Strike, T; Strauss, G; Jewgenow, K

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the successful use of a non-surgical, transcervical uterine lavage technique for the treatment of uterine infection-induced infertility in three female large cats. We developed a non-surgical uterine lavage technique, which allowed repeated flushing of the uterine lumen and installation of therapeutic antibiotics. The entire procedure was performed under general anaesthesia (duration of anesthesia ranged from 40 to 70 min). It was successfully applied in a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), a Corbett tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) and an Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis). The tigers were treated only once, whereas the leopard received four uterine treatments, due to re-infection after mating. Decisions to conduct uterine treatments were based on detection of uterine fluid during previous transrectal ultrasound examinations. The catheter was guided into the vagina, with the aid of an endoscope, passing the urethra, and then into the uterus, with the aid of transrectal ultrasonography. Both uterine horns were separately flushed with approximately 300 mL of cell medium M199, followed by an antibiotic infusion. Upon ultrasonographic re-examination, the topical uterine treatments resulted in an apparent decline in the inflammatory and/or degenerative processes. The Corbett tiger had the most severe uterine alterations, in addition to an aseptic pyometra. As a result, she was treated 1 month prior to ovariohysterectomy (in order to reduce the surgical risk). The Sumatran tiger was artificially inseminated twice after hormone-induced estrus, and the Amur leopard expressed a spontaneous estrus and re-initiated mating behaviour. PMID:16530816

  9. Spasmodic Torticollis: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Options Medications Botulinum Toxin Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Selective Denervation Surgery Physical Therapy Helpful Products Books ... Treatment Options Medications Botulinum Toxin Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Selective Denervation Surgery Physical Therapy Latest News and ...

  10. Non-surgical periodontal treatment of peri-implant diseases with the adjunctive use of diode laser: preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Francesco; Roncati, Marisa; Gariffo, Annalisa; Attorresi, Enrica; Lucchese, Alessandra; Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Romeo, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implant diseases present in two forms: peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. The prevalence of peri-implant complications is significantly rising. The aim of this study was to compare conventional treatment of inflamed peri-implant tissues with conventional treatment together with diode laser application. Twenty-seven patients (age 36 to 67, 15 women and 12 men, 12 smokers and 15 non-smokers) requiring treatment for mucositis or peri-implantitis were taken into account for this preliminary study. Plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD), and bleeding on probing (BoP) were recorded at baseline evaluation. Patients in control group (CG) received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment. Patients in test group received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment together with diode laser application (810 nm, 30 s, 1 W, 50 Hz, t on = 100 ms, t off = 100 ms, energy density = 24.87 J/cm(2)). Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference in repeated measurements of considered indexes at T 0 and T 1 (1 year) in both groups. A total of 606 sites were taken into account in the test group (TG) and 144 in the CG. PD mean variation in the TG was 2.66 mm ± 1.07, while mean PD variation in the CG was 0.94 ± 1.13 mm. Paired t testing of the variation in PD in CG and TG revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.0001). A reduction of pathological sites from 89 % (T 0) to 14.35 % (T 1) was achieved in the TG, while reduction obtained in the CG was from 75.69 % (T 0) to 50 % (T 1); BoP scores at time T 1 had fallen below 5 % in the TG and decreased to 59.7 %, in the CG. Within the limitations of this study, diode laser seems to be an additional valuable tool for peri-implant disease treatment. PMID:26188854

  11. Non-Surgical Procedure Is Effective Treatment for Painful Ovarian Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... stent placement Cancer - bone Cancer - breast Cancer - kidney Cancer - liver Cancer - lung Deep vein thrombosis Endovascular Treatment of CCSVI for MS Gastrostomy (feeding tubes) Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Hypertension and end-stage renal ... biopsy Osteoporosis Pediatrics Pelvic pain (chronic) ...

  12. Non surgical treatment of a Class II malocclusion with skeletal hyperdivergency and anterior open bite.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Flores, Jose Ma

    2009-01-01

    The malocclusions with hyperdivergent vertical growth patterns are more difficult to treat without a combined approach, including orthodontics and orthodontic surgery. The goal of this article is to describe a nonsurgical approach of a Class II malocclusion on an adult patient presenting a skeletal hyperdivergency. Fundamental criteria must be respected including proper diagnosis, proper treatment timing to maximize growth potential, patient cooperation, etc. These factors are critical in the favorable treatment outcome of any jaw discrepancy. PMID:19438108

  13. Non-surgical functional treatment for displaced olecranon fractures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, G L; Piuzzi, N S; Slullitel, P A I; Boretto, J G; Alfie, V A; Donndorff, A; De Carli, P

    2014-04-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical and radiological outcomes of a consecutive cohort of patients aged > 70 years with a displaced fracture of the olecranon, which was treated non-operatively with early mobilisation. We identified 28 such patients (27 women) with a mean age of 82 years (71 to 91). The elbow was initially immobilised in an above elbow cast in 90° of flexion of the elbow for a mean of five days. The cast was then replaced by a sling. Active mobilisation was encouraged as tolerated. No formal rehabilitation was undertaken. At a mean follow-up of 16 months (12 to 26), the mean ranges of flexion and extension were 140° and 15° respectively. On a visual analogue scale of 1 (no pain) to 10, the mean pain score was 1 (0 to 8). Of the original 28 patients 22 developed nonunion, but no patients required surgical treatment. We conclude that non-operative functional treatment of displaced olecranon fractures in the elderly gives good results and a high rate of satisfaction. PMID:24692623

  14. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding ... changes Dietary changes Medication Bowel management/retraining program Biofeedback therapy Surgical treatments Newer procedures or devices Tips ...

  15. AB20. Non-surgical treatment of peyronie’s disease: a 2014 update

    PubMed Central

    Lue, Tom F.

    2014-01-01

    Peyronient of Urology, Schoolaracterized by the formation of fibrous plaque in the tunica albuginea of the penis. The patient usually complains of penile deformities in the form of curvature, palpable plaques, hourglass deformity, shortening or indentation with or without pain. The patient might also suffer from erectile dysfunction. The disease is associated with significant mental morbidity as 48% of the patients are clinically depressed. In addition, several comorbidities were found to be associated with the disease, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, obesity, and smoking. Furthermore, 20% of patients were found to have Dupuytren by the formation. This presentation summarizes the current literature pertaining to all pharmacotherapies (oral, intralesional, iontophoresis, and topical) and minimally invasive treatments available for PD (vacuum, traction device, shock wave therapy, and radiation treatment). Special emphasis will be on the recently FDA approved collagenase (Xiaflex). Clostridial collagenases’ ability to digest native, triple-helical types I, II, and III collagens into a mixture of small peptides is its primary distinguishing factor. This is accomplished by making multiple scissions in the triple helix. Digestion is completed by hydrolyzing those fragments into a mixture of small peptides. Conversely, vertebrate collagenases initiate collagenolysis by making a single scission across all three alpha chains after which attack on those alpha chains is very limited. Two phase 3 studies: IMPRESS (Investigation for Maximal Peyronie’s Reduction Efficacy and Safety Studies) I (417 men) and II (415 men) confirm the efficacy and safety. Men treated with collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH) showed a mean 34% improvement in penile curvature, representing a -17.0 ±14.8 degree change per subject, compared with a mean 18.2% improvement in placebo treated men, representing a -9.3±13.6 degree change per subject (P<0.0001). The mean change in Peyronie disease symptom bother score was significantly improved in treated men vs men on placebo (-2.8±3.8 vs. -1.8±3.5, P=0.0037). Three serious adverse events (corporeal rupture) were surgically repaired. We currently employ CCH in our practice as a first line therapy for stable PD with dorsal or dorsal-lateral

  16. Effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and oxidative status in platelets.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Mariana Alves de Sá; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães; Pereira, Natália Rodrigues; Martins, Marcela Anjos; Moss, Monique Bandeira; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Brunini, Tatiana Marlowe Cunha

    2013-06-01

    Several studies have suggested an increase of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on periodontitis patients. An enhancement has been demonstrated on both platelet activation and oxidative stress on periodontitis patients, which may contribute for this association. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway and oxidative status in platelets. A total of eight periodontitis patients and eight controls were included in this study. Clinical, laboratory and experimental evaluations were performed on baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment (except for western blot analysis). The clinical periodontal evaluation included measurements of probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), % of sites with plaque and % of sites with bleeding on probing. We evaluated: l-[(3)H]arginine influx; nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and arginase enzymes activity and expression; expression of guanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-5 enzymes; cGMP levels; platelet aggregation; oxidative status through superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The initial results showed an activation of both l-arginine influx and via system y (+ )L associated with reduced intraplatelet cGMP levels in periodontitis patients and increased systemic levels of CRP. After periodontal treatment, there was a significant reduction of the % of sites with PPD 4-5mm, % of sites with CAL 4-5 mm, and an enhancement in cGMP levels and SOD activity. Moreover, CRP levels were reduced after treatment. Therefore, alterations in the intraplatelet l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway and oxidant-antioxidant balance associated with a systemic inflammatory response may lead to platelet dysfunction, which may contribute to a higher risk of CVD in periodontitis. PMID:23918883

  17. Pituitary Disorders Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Treatment Options Medications Several types of ... and cons to estrogen and progesterone replacement during menopause, see the Hormone Health Network section on menopause . ...

  18. The international, prospective Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry: treatment modalities and outcomes of non-surgical bleeding episodes in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, Giovanni; Zotz, Rainer B; d'Oiron, Roseline; Bindslev, Niels; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Poon, Man-Chiu

    2015-08-01

    Standard treatment for Glanzmann thrombasthenia is platelet transfusion. Recombinant activated factor VII has been shown to be successful in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia with platelet antibodies or who are refractory to platelet transfusions. The Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry prospectively collected worldwide information on the effectiveness and safety of platelet transfusion, recombinant activated factor VII and/or antifibrinolytics for the treatment of bleeds in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. Data relating to 829 non-surgical bleeding episodes were entered into the Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry (severe/moderate: 216/613; spontaneous/post-traumatic: 630/199). Recombinant activated factor VII alone was used in 124/829 bleeds, recombinant activated factor VII+antifibrinolytics in 107/829, platelets±antifibrinolytics in 312/829, antifibrinolytics alone in 219/829, and recombinant activated factor VII+platelets±antifibrinolytics in 67/829. The proportion of successful treatments to stop bleeding was 91.0% in cases treated with recombinant activated factor VII only, 82.7% for recombinant activated factor VII+antifibrinolytics, 72.7% for treatment with recombinant activated factor VII+platelets±antifibrinolytics, 78.8% for platelets±antifibrinolytics and 84.7% for antifibrinolytics alone. Treatment failure was documented in 18 bleeding events (2% of the total treatments), the majority of which were in patients receiving treatment with antifibrinolytics; bleeding re-started in 6% of bleeds after initial effective treatment. Thirty-five adverse events were reported, none of which was a thromboembolic event. Among treatments that included recombinant activated factor VII, only one patient reported three possibly drug-related non-serious adverse events (nausea, dyspnea and headache). To conclude, non-surgical bleeds were common and often severe in Glanzmann thrombasthenia; both platelets and recombinant activated factor VII appeared to be effective, and with good safety profiles, for the treatment of non-surgical bleeds. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01476423. PMID:26001793

  19. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... is urinary incontinence (UI)? Taking Control (5-minute video) Click on the video above for an introduction ... Are there other women like me? (8-minute video) Urinary incontinence happens to women of all ages ...

  20. Fluorosis varied treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, I Anand

    2010-01-01

    Fluorosis has been reported way back in 1901. The treatment options for fluorosis are varied depending upon individual cases. This article comes from Madurai in India where its surrounding towns are fluorosis-prone zones. The purpose of this article is to report various treatment options available for dental fluorosis; this is the first time that complete full mouth rehabilitation for dental fluorosis is being reported. This article also dwells on the need for the dentists to be aware of their local indigenous pathologies to treat it in a better manner. PMID:20582220

  1. ARSENIC TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PPT presentation will provide information on the drinking water treatment options for small utilities to remove arsenic from ground water. The discussion will include information on the EPA BAT listed processes and on some of the newer technologies, such as the iron based ad...

  2. Achilles Tendinosis: Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Roberto Gabriel L.

    2015-01-01

    Athletes usually complain of an ongoing or chronic pain over the Achilles tendon, but recently even non-athletes are experiencing the same kind of pain which affects their daily activities. Achilles tendinosis refers to a degenerative process of the tendon without histologic or clinical signs of intratendinous inflammation. Treatment is based on whether to stimulate or prevent neovascularization. Thus, until now, there is no consensus as to the best treatment for this condition. This paper aims to review the common ways of treating this condition from the conservative to the surgical options. PMID:25729512

  3. Novel operative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, D N J; Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    There are an increasing number of more novel options available for operative intervention. This chapter outlines a series of operative treatment options which are available to the modern clinician to select from once a decision has been made to treat a carious lesion operatively. A series of novel methods of caries removal have been described; including chemomechanical caries removal, air abrasion, sono-abrasion, polymer rotary burs and lasers. There are also novel approaches to ensure complete caries removal and novel approaches for the management of deep caries. A novel question increasingly asked by clinicians is: does all the caries need to be removed? Operative management options here include: therapeutic fissure sealants, ultraconservative caries removal, stepwise excavation and the Hall technique. In conclusion, there is now a growing wealth of evidence that questions the traditional methods of caries removal and restoring the tooth. In parallel, there is a growing movement exploring the merits of therapeutically sealing caries into the tooth. This philosophy is alien to many of today's dentists and, until further randomized controlled trials are carried out in primary care, prudent caution must be exercised with this promising approach. Research is required into techniques which will allow monitoring of sealed caries to detect any rare, but insidious, failures. These novel techniques are an alternative way of managing the later stages of the caries process from a sounder biological basis and have marked potential benefits to patients from treatment, pain and outcome perspectives. PMID:19494685

  4. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hägi, Tobias T.; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Material and Methods Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. Results After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. Conclusion The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air-polishing with erythritol prevents from substance-loss and results in a smooth surface with nearly no residual biofilm that promotes the reattachment of PDL fibroblasts. PMID:26121365

  5. [Treatment options for brachymetatarsia].

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, C; Arbab, D; Abbara-Czardybon, M

    2013-01-01

    Brachymetatarsia can be congenital, idiopathic or secondary and describes an abnormal shortening of a metatarsal bone. The indications for treatment are not only due to cosmesis. The shortening of a ray changes the biomechanics of the foot and can lead to metatarsalgia. A frequent clinical feature is dorsal dislocation of a toe causing painful shoe conflict and disturbed proprioception. There are three main options for operative correction: lengthening osteotomy, interposition of a tricortical bone and gradual lengthening by callus distraction. While one stage lengthening procedures such as osteotomy and interposition are more appropriate for correction of moderate length deficiencies, the callus distraction method is more suitable for larger elongation. Common to all procedures is a long-term treatment with a high risk of different complications whereby patient compliance can be problematical. PMID:23238881

  6. Treatment Options for Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Barateau, Lucie; Lopez, Régis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 and narcolepsy type 2 are central disorders of hypersomnolence. Narcolepsy type 1 is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency. On the other hand, in narcolepsy type 2, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and cataplexy absent. Despite major advances in our understanding of narcolepsy mechanisms, its current management is only symptomatic. Treatment options may vary from a single drug that targets several symptoms, or multiple medications that each treats a specific symptom. In recent years, narcolepsy treatment has changed with the widespread use of modafinil/armodafinil for daytime sleepiness, antidepressants (selective serotonin and dual serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors) for cataplexy, and sodium oxybate for both symptoms. Other psychostimulants can also be used, such as methylphenidate, pitolisant and rarely amphetamines, as third-line therapy. Importantly, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness are required to monitor the treatment efficacy and to provide guidance on whether the treatment goals are met. Associated symptoms and comorbid conditions, such as hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, unpleasant dreams, REM- and non REM-related parasomnias, depressive symptoms, overweight/obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea, should also be taken into account and managed, if required. In the near future, the efficacy of new wake-promoting drugs, anticataplectic agents, hypocretin replacement therapy and immunotherapy at the early stages of the disease should also be evaluated. PMID:27155860

  7. Evaluation of Effect of Astringent on Oral Mucosa as a Non-surgical Preprosthetic Treatment Modality in Edentulous Patients: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Radke, Usha; Kahar, Anita; Zade, Prajakta; Lambade, Dipti; Deshpande, Saee; Radke, Pranjal

    2014-12-01

    Preprosthetic treatments are advocated in edentulous patients to enhance the denture bearing areas for good denture support. Most of the times the preprosthetic treatments are considered only in a surgical way. Ideally every edentulous patient undergoing complete denture treatment needs a non-surgical preprosthetic treatment. So that, the denture bearing area will be properly prepared before the denture construction. The present study was conducted on thirty completely edentulous male patients who had visited to our Institute for the treatment. Each patient was asked to massage with astringent gel on the denture bearing mucosa over a 4weeks period. Exfoliative cytology was used to collect the surface cells from the palatal mucosa. First scrape was taken before the stimulation treatment was started. The second and third scrape was taken after the stimulation treatment with astringent gel for each patient. In this way total 90 scrapes were made and the each smear was stained with the Papanicolaou's technique to examine under light microscope. About 100 cells were counted from each stained smear. The number of parabasal cells, intermediate cells and superficial cells were recorded to calculate the degree of keratinization. Statistical analysis was performed. A significant difference (p<0.001) in keratinization levels was found. The mean percentage of superficial cells before the stimulation treatment was 79.80%; this percentage was gradually increased to 84.60and 90.57% after the 2 and 4weeks period of stimulation treatment respectively with astringent gel. PMID:26199497

  8. Achalasia: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Volkanovska, Ance; Gigante, Giovanni; Cali, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder, characterized by impaired swallow-induced, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and defective esophageal peristalsis. Unfortunately, there are no etiological therapies for achalasia. Patients present with dysphagia, chest pain and regurgitation of undigested food, often leading to weight loss. The currently available treatments have the common aim of relieving symptoms by decreasing the pressure of the LES. This can be achieved with some medications, by inhibiting the cholinergic innervation (botulinum toxin), by stretching (endoscopic dilation) or cutting (surgery) the LES. Recently, other therapeutic options, including per-oral endoscopic myotomy have been developed and are gaining international consensus. The authors report on the benefits and weaknesses of the different therapies and provide an updated approach to the management of achalasia. PMID:26186641

  9. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  10. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-12-10

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  11. Non-Surgical Breast-Conserving Treatment (KORTUC-BCT) Using a New Radiosensitization Method (KORTUC II) for Patients with Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Aoyama, Nobutaka; Yamanishi, Tomoaki; Kariya, Shinji; Hamada, Norihiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Onogawa, Masahide; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conserving treatment (BCT) using KORTUC II radiosensitization treatment. A new radiosensitizing agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (a CD44 ligand) has been developed for intra-tumoral injection into various tumors. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for the treatment of breast cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. A total of 72 early-stage breast cancer patients (stage 0, 1 patient; stage I, 23; stage II, 48) were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial after providing fully informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 59.7 years. A maximum of 6 mL (usually 3 mL for tumors of less than approximately 3 cm in diameter) of the agent was injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. For radiotherapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was administered using a tangential fields approach including an ipsilateral axillary region and field-in-field method; the energy level was 4 MV, and the total radiation dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added three times. Treatment was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects in all 72 patients. No patients showed any significant complications other than mild dermatitis. A total of 24 patients under 75 years old with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or taxane) prior to KORTUC II treatment, and 58 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also received hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean duration of follow-up as of the end of September 2014 was 51.1 months, at which time 68 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only one patient had local recurrence and died of cardiac failure at 6.5 years. Another one patient had bone metastases. For two of the 72 patients, follow-up ended after several months following KORTUC II treatment. In conclusion, non-surgical BCT can be performed using KORTUC II, which has three major characteristics: imaging guidance; enzyme-targeting; and targeting of breast cancer stem cells via the CD44 receptor. PMID:26593948

  12. Is photodynamic therapy with adjunctive non-surgical periodontal therapy effective in the treatment of periodontal disease under immunocompromised conditions?

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Qadri, Talat; Ahmed, Hameeda Bashir; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Corbet, Francis Esmonde; Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-10-01

    The aim was to assess whether or not photodynamic therapy (PDT) with adjunctive scaling-and-root-planing (SRP) is effective in the treatment of periodontitis under immunocompromised conditions. PubMed/Medline and Google-Scholar databases were searched from 1967 to May 2013 using various key words. Six studies (five experimental and one clinical) were included. In the clinical study, SRP with PDT was reported to be ineffective in treating chronic periodontitis in T2DM patients. All experimental studies reported significantly less bone loss in periodontal defects treated with SRP+PDT than those treated with SRP alone. Efficacy of PDT+SRP in the treatment of periodontal disease under immunocompromised conditions remains unclear. PMID:24112260

  13. Treatment Options Summary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Microsurgery over Radiation Typical Advantages of Microsurgery over Radiation Surgery removes the tumor for those that want ... Advantages of Radiation over Microsurgery Typical Advantages of Radiation over Microsurgery Good option for patients in their ...

  14. Use of a water-vapour permeable polyurethane film (omiderm) in the non-surgical treatment of aplasia cutis congenita.

    PubMed

    Canter, Halil Ibrahim; Vargel, Ibrahim; Nasir, Serdar; Kayikcioglu, Aycan

    2004-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita is characterised by congenital absence of all layers of skin, and most commonly affects the scalp. It is often associated with absence of the bone and dura underlining the defective scalp. In this report, we present the result of use of a water-vapour permeable polyurethane film (Omiderm) together with absorbant fine mesh gauze impregnated with 3% bismuth tribromophenate (Xeroform) in the treatment of a cranial defect in a newborn baby of low birth weight, who could not be operated on because of associated medical problems. PMID:15370806

  15. Manual Physical Therapy for Non-Surgical Treatment of Adhesion-Related Small Bowel Obstructions: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Amanda D.; King, Richard; Reed, Evette D’Avy; Patterson, Kimberley; Wurn, Belinda F.; Wurn, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adhesion formation is a widely acknowledged risk following abdominal or pelvic surgery. Adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis can cause or contribute to partial or total small bowel obstruction (SBO). These adhesions deter or prevent the passage of nutrients through the digestive tract, and may bind the bowel to the peritoneum, or other organs. Small bowel obstructions can quickly become life-threatening, requiring immediate surgery to resect the bowel, or lyse any adhesions the surgeon can safely access. Bowel repair is an invasive surgery, with risks including bowel rupture, infection, and peritonitis. An additional risk includes the formation of new adhesions during the healing process, creating the potential for subsequent adhesiolysis or SBO surgeries. Objective: Report the use of manual soft tissue physical therapy for the reversal of adhesion-related partial SBOs, and create an initial inquiry into the possibility of nonsurgical lysis of adhesions. Case Reports: Two patients presenting with SBO symptoms due to abdominal adhesions secondary to abdominal and pelvic surgery were treated with manual soft tissue physical therapy focused on decreasing adhesions. Conclusions: Successful treatment with resolution of symptom presentation of partial SBO and sustained results were observed in both patients treated. PMID:26237678

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Melanoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treatments will also be taken. Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy : Procedures in which ... has spread to the lymph nodes . Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy are done to ...

  17. IBS Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... or bring on symptoms Stress management, gut-directed hypnosis, biofeedback, relaxation, or pain management techniques Consulting with ... Complimentary or Alternative Treatments Selecting a CAM Practitioner Hypnosis for IBS Yoga Medications Laxatives Anticholinergic/Antispasmodic Agents ...

  18. Advances in non-surgical management of primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Liu, Hai-Peng; Li, Mei; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. There have been great improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of HCC in recent years, but the problems, including difficult diagnosis at early stage, quick progression, and poor prognosis remain unsolved. Surgical resection is the mainstay of the treatment for HCC. However, 70%-80% of HCC patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage when most are ineligible for potentially curative therapies such as surgical resection and liver transplantation. In recent years, non-surgical management for unrespectable HCC, such as percutaneous ethanol injection, percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, biotherapy, and hormonal therapy have been developed. These therapeutic options, either alone or in combination, have been shown to control tumor growth, prolong survival time, and improve quality of life to some extent. This review covers the current status and progress of non-surgical management for HCC. PMID:25469032

  19. Treatment Options in Cushing's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Ahmed; Honegger, Juergen; Milian, Monika; Psaras, Tsambika

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a grave disease that requires a multidisciplinary and individualized treatment approach for each patient. Approximately 80% of all patients harbour a corticotroph pituitary adenoma (Cushing's disease) with excessive secretion of adrenocorticotropin-hormone (ACTH) and, consecutively, cortisol. The goals of treatment include normalization of hormone excess, long-term disease control and the reversal of comorbidities caused by the underlying pathology. The treatment of choice is neurosurgical tumour removal of the pituitary adenoma. Second-line treatments include medical therapy, bilateral adrenalectomy and radiation therapy. Drug treatment modalities target at the hypothalamic/pituitary level, the adrenal gland and at the glucocorticoid receptor level and are commonly used in patients in whom surgery has failed. Bilateral adrenalectomy is the second-line treatment for persistent hypercortisolism that offers immediate control of hypercortisolism. However, this treatment option requires a careful individualized evaluation, since it has the disadvantage of permanent hypoadrenalism which requires lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy and bears the risk of developing Nelson's syndrome. Although there are some very promising medical therapy options it clearly remains a second-line treatment option. However, there are numerous circumstances where medical management of CD is indicated. Medical therapy is frequently used in cases with severe hypercortisolism before surgery in order to control the metabolic effects and help reduce the anestesiological risk. Additionally, it can help to bridge the time gap until radiotherapy takes effect. The aim of this review is to analyze and present current treatment options in Cushing's disease. PMID:22346367

  20. Hyperphosphataemia: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Malberti, Fabio

    2013-05-01

    Hyperphosphataemia can be induced by three main conditions: a massive acute phosphate load, a primary increase in renal phosphate reabsorption, and an impaired renal phosphate excretion due to acute or chronic renal insufficiency. Renal excretion is so efficient in normal subjects that balance can be maintained with only a minimal rise in serum phosphorus concentration even for a large phosphorus load. Therefore, acute hyperphosphataemia usually resolves within few hours if renal function is intact. The most frequent cause of chronic hyperphosphataemia is chronic renal failure. Hyperphosphataemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Lowering the phosphate load and maintaining serum phosphorus levels within the normal range are considered important therapeutic goals to improve clinical outcomes in CKD patients. Treatment consists of diminishing intestinal phosphate absorption by a low phosphate diet and phosphate binders. In CKD patients on dialysis an efficient dialysis removal of phosphate should be ensured. Dietary restriction of phosphorus while maintaining adequate protein intake is not sufficient to control serum phosphate levels in most CKD patients; therefore, the prescription of a phosphate binder is required. Aluminium-containing agents are efficient but no longer widely used because of their toxicity. Calcium-based salts are inexpensive, effective and most widely used, but there is now concern about their association with hypercalcaemia, parathyroid gland suppression, adynamic bone disease, and vascular and extraosseous calcification. The average daily dose of calcium acetate or carbonate prescribed in the randomised controlled trials to control hyperphosphataemia in dialysis patients ranges between 1.2 and 2.3 g of elemental calcium. Such doses are greater than the recommended dietary calcium intake and can lead to a positive calcium balance. Although large amounts of calcium salts should probably be avoided, modest doses (<1 g of elemental calcium) may represent a reasonable initial approach to reduced serum phosphorus levels. A non-calcium-based binder can then be added when large doses of binder are required. At present, there are three types of non-calcium-based phosphate binders available: sevelamer, lanthanum carbonate and magnesium salts. Each of these compounds is as effective as calcium salts in lowering serum phosphorus levels depending on an adequate prescribed dose and adherence of the patient to treatment. Sevelamer is the only non-calcium-containing phosphate binder that does not have potential for systemic accumulation and presents pleiotropic effects that may impact on cardiovascular disease. In contrast, lanthanum carbonate and magnesium salts are absorbed in the gut and their route of excretion is biliary for lanthanum and urinary for magnesium. There are insufficient data to establish the comparative superiority of non-calcium binding agents over calcium salts for such important patient-level outcomes as all-cause mortality and cardiovascular end points. Moreover, full adoption of sevelamer and lanthanum by government drug reimbursement agencies in place of calcium salts would lead to a large increase in health-care expenditure. Therefore, the choice of phosphate binder should be individualised, considering the clinical context, the costs, and the individual tolerability the concomitant effects on other parameters of mineral metabolism, such as serum calcium and parathyroid hormone, besides those on serum phosphorus. PMID:23625273

  1. Clinical effect of azithromycin as an adjunct to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zheng, Y; Bian, X

    2016-06-01

    The results of recent published studies focusing on the effect of azithromycin as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials to examine the effect of azithromycin combined with SRP on periodontal clinical parameters as compared to SRP alone. An electronic search was carried out on Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from their earliest records through December 28, 2014 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed. Data were extracted independently by two authors. Either a fixed- or random-effects model was used to calculate the overall effect sizes of azithromycin on probing depth, attachment level (AL) and bleeding on probing (BOP). Heterogeneity was evaluated using the Q test and I(2) statistic. Publication bias was evaluated by Begg's test and Egger's test. A total of 14 trials were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with SRP alone, locally delivered azithromycin plus SRP statistically significantly reduced probing depth by 0.99 mm (95% CI 0.42-1.57) and increased AL by 1.12 mm (95% CI 0.31-1.92). In addition, systemically administered azithromycin plus SRP statistically significantly reduced probing depth by 0.21 mm (95% CI 0.12-0.29), BOP by 4.50% (95% CI 1.45-7.56) and increased AL by 0.23 mm (95% CI 0.07-0.39). Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results. No evidence of publication bias was observed. The additional benefit of systemic azithromycin was shown at the initially deep probing depth sites, but not at shallow or moderate sites. The overall effect sizes of systemic azithromycin showed a tendency to decrease with time, and meta-regression analysis suggested a negative relation between the length of follow-up and net change in probing depth (r = -0.05, p = 0.02). This meta-analysis provides further evidence that azithromycin used as an adjunct to SRP significantly improves the efficacy of non-surgical periodontal therapy on reducing probing depth, BOP and improving AL, particularly at the initially deep probing depth sites. PMID:26362529

  2. Wastewater treatment plant cogeneration options

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfield, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews municipal sewage cogeneration and digester gas utilization options available to wastewater treatment plants, and will focus on utilizing the digester gas in combustion turbines and engine-generator systems. Defining the digestion and gas generation process is crucial to understanding the best gas utilization system. In municipal wastewater treatment plants biosolids (sludge) reduction is accomplished using aerobic or anaerobic digestion. The basic process of treating sewage solids with digestion is not new and has been practiced as far back as the nineteenth century. High energy usage consumed by aerobic blow systems supplying air to the process and the potential ``free`` energy generated by anaerobic digesters sometimes sways designers to select anaerobic over aerobic digestion. The following areas will be covered in this paper: gas utilization and cogeneration; definition of digestion process; sizing the cogeneration system and reviewing the systems components; emissions requirements and options; and capital, and O and M cost analysis.

  3. [Non surgical management of ectopic pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kdous, Moez

    2006-06-01

    During the past 25 years, the incidence of ectopic pregnancy has progressively increased while the morbidity and mortality have substantialy decreased, and the treatment has progressed from salpingectomy by laparotomy to conservative surgery by laparoscopy and more recently to medical therapy with Methotrexate or expectant management. This therapeutic transition from surgical emergency to non surgical managment has been attributed to early diagnosis through the use of sensitive assays for hCG and the high definition of vaginal ultrasound. By using these sensitive diagnostic tools, we are now able to select those patients who are most likely to respond to expectant or medical managment versus those who are at high risk of rupture and require surgery. We have reviewed the scientific literature on ectopic pregnancy published over the past 20 years, with the aim to assess the value of non surgical managment of etopic pregnancy. Predictor factors of expectant managment are discussed. Medical therapy with methotrexate: results, indications, Unpleasant side effects and complications are detailed. Several protocols are defined and therapeutic supervision is etablished. The authors offred several recommandations for OB/GY wich will optimize the effectivness of non invasive methods for treatment of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17042204

  4. Non-surgical and non-chemical attempts to treat echinococcosis: do they work?

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Vuitton, Lucine; Brunetti, Enrico; Vuitton, Dominique Angèle; Koch, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) are chronic, complex and neglected diseases. Their treatment depends on a number of factors related to the lesion, setting and patient. We performed a literature review of curative or palliative non-surgical, non-chemical interventions in CE and AE. In CE, some of these techniques, like radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA), were shelved after initial attempts, while others, such as High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound, appear promising but are still in a pre-clinical phase. In AE, RFA has never been tested, however, radiotherapy or heavy-ion therapies have been attempted in experimental models. Still, application to humans is questionable. In CE, although prospective clinical studies are still lacking, therapeutic, non-surgical drainage techniques, such as PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration) and its derivatives, are now considered a useful option in selected cases. Finally, palliative, non-surgical drainage techniques such as US- or CT-guided percutaneous biliary drainage, centro-parasitic abscesses drainage, or vascular stenting were performed successfully. Recently, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-associated techniques have become increasingly used to manage biliary fistulas in CE and biliary obstructions in AE. Development of pre-clinical animal models would allow testing for AE techniques developed for other indications, e.g. cancer. Prospective trials are required to determine the best use of PAIR, and associated procedures, and the indications and techniques of palliative drainage. PMID:25531730

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Craniopharyngioma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... treatment. Some treatments for tumors cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  6. Treatment Options for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... treatment. Some treatments for tumors cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  7. EVerT2—needling versus non-surgical debridement for the treatment of verrucae: study protocol for a single-centre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Farina; Torgerson, David; Fairhurst, Caroline; Cockayne, Sarah; Bell, Kerry; Cullen, Michelle; Harrison-Blount, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Verrucae are extremely common, and are experienced by most people at some time during their lives. Although most verrucae will spontaneously disappear without treatment, many patients seek treatment, often because they have persisted for many years, are unsightly or painful or prevent them from doing sports or other activities. There are many different treatments available; including the Falknor's needling procedure. To date, there has only been one small trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of this treatment and no health economic analysis has been undertaken. The Effective Verruca Treatments (EVerT2) trial aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the needling procedure for the treatment of verrucae. Methods and analysis This single-centre randomised controlled trial will recruit 58 participants (aged 18 years and over with a plantar verruca) from Salford Podiatry Clinic patient lists and the surrounding area. If the participant presents with multiple verrucae, an ‘index’ verruca (largest and thickest lesion) will be identified and patients will be randomised 1:1 to the intervention group to receive the needling treatment or the control group to have the callus overlying the verruca debrided. The primary outcome is complete clearance of the index verruca at 12 weeks after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include clearance and recurrence of the treated verruca, clearance of all verrucae, number of verrucae remaining, change in size of the index verruca, pain, and participant satisfaction. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the needling versus callus debridement will be carried out from the perspective of health services over a time horizon of 12 weeks. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the University of Salford, Department of Health Sciences Ethical Approval Committee (HSCR15/24) and the University of York, Department of Health Sciences Research Governance Committee (HSRGC/2014/98/B). Findings will be disseminated through publication and conference presentations. Trial registration number ISRCTN16429440. PMID:26603251

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Testicular Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... having treatment. Sperm banking is the process of freezing sperm and storing it for later use. Stages ... from recurring (coming back) or reduce the side effects of cancer treatment. Clinical trials are taking place ...

  9. The Effect of Race on Outcomes of Surgical or Non-surgical Treatment of Patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J.; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Bono, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of the data collected prospectively through the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective Determine the effect that race or ethnicity had on outcomes following spine surgery in the three arms of SPORT. Summary of Background Data There is a dearth of research regarding the effect of race or ethnicity on outcome following treatment for spinal disorders. Methods All participants from the three arms of the SPORT were evaluated in an as-treated analysis with patients categorized as white, black, or other. Baseline and operative characteristics of the groups were compared using the chi-square test and ANOVA. Differences in the changes between baseline and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year time-points in the operative and non-operative treatments were evaluated with a mixed effects longitudinal regression model and differences between racial groups were compared with a multiple degrees of freedom Wald test. Results Included were 2,427 patients (85% white, 8% black, 7% other). Surgery was performed on 67% of white patients, 54% of blacks, and 68% of others. Whites and others were significantly more likely to undergo surgery than blacks (67% and 68% vs 54%, p=0.003). Complications and the risk of additional surgeries were not significantly different between racial groups. Regardless of race, all patients improved more with surgical management than with nonoperative treatment for all outcome measures at all time-points. The average 4-year area- under-the-curve results revealed surgical and non-operative treatment resulted in statistically significant improvement in whites relative to blacks for BP (p<0.001), SF (p<0.001), and ODI (p<0.001). No significant differences were appreciated in treatment effect for primary outcome measures or self-rated progress across racial groups. Conclusion These results illustrate important differences between racial groups in terms of response to spine care. While there were quantitative differences between groups, these findings are not necessarily indications of healthcare disparities. PMID:22842539

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  11. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  12. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Non-surgical treatment of deep wounds triggered by harmful physical and chemical agents: a successful combined use of collagenase and hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Onesti, Maria G; Fino, Pasquale; Ponzo, Ida; Ruggieri, Martina; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-02-01

    Some chronic ulcers often occur with slough, not progressing through the normal stages of wound healing. Treatment is long and other therapies need to be performed in addition to surgery. Patients not eligible for surgery because of ASA class (American Society of Anesthesiologists class) appear to benefit from chemical therapy with collagenase or hydrocolloids in order to prepare the wound bed, promoting the healing process. We describe four cases of traumatic, upper limb deep wounds caused by different physical and chemical agents, emphasising the effectiveness of treatment based on topical application of collagenase and hyaluronic acid (HA) before standardised surgical procedures. We performed careful disinfection of lesions combined with application of topical cream containing hyaluronic acid, bacterial fermented sodium hyaluronate (0·2%w/w) salt, and bacterial collagenase obtained from non-pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus (>2·0 nkat1/g). In one patient a dermo-epidermal graft was used to cover the wide loss of substance. In two patients application of a HA-based dermal substitute was done. We obtained successful results in terms of wound healing, with satisfactory aesthetic result and optimal recovery of the affected limb functionality. Topical application of collagenase and HA, alone or before standardised surgical procedures allows faster wound healing. PMID:24698215

  15. Anesthetic efficacy of Oraqix® versus Hurricaine® and placebo for pain control during non-surgical periodontal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mayor-Subirana, Gemma; Yagüe-García, José; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of Oraqix® during scaling and root planing (SRP) in comparison with 20% benzocaine and placebo. Study Design: 15 patients requiring 4 sessions of SRP were enrolled. For each patient, Oraqix®, Hurricaine®, vaseline or no anesthetic product were randomly assigned each to a quadrant. Treatment pain was evaluated on a 100 mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and on a Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). The amount of product administered, the need to re-anesthetise, patient and operator satisfaction and the onset of side-effects were also recorded. Results: Oraqix® was significantly better than nothing, with a reduction of VAS score to 13.3 units, but without significant differences with Vaseline or Hurricaine®. Oraqix® was better in VRS reduction than not using any anesthetic (p=0.001) or using vaseline (p=0.024), but similar to Hurricaine® (p=0.232). Conclusions: Oraqix® effectively controls pain in SRP procedures, with few side-effects and a good acceptance on the part of patients and clinicians. Key words:Controlled clinical trial, topical anesthetic, scaling and root planing. PMID:24316699

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Melanoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treatments will also be taken. Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy : Procedures in which ... has spread to the lymph nodes . Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy are done to ...

  18. Nail Psoriasis: A Review of Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Pasch, Marcel C

    2016-04-01

    Nail involvement affects 80-90 % of patients with plaque psoriasis, and is even more prevalent in patients with psoriatic arthritis. This review is the result of a systemic approach to the literature and covers topical, intralesional, conventional systemic, and biologic systemic treatments, as well as non-pharmacological treatment options for nail psoriasis. The available evidence suggests that all anti-tumor necrosis factor-α, anti-interleukin (IL)-17, and anti-IL-12/23 antibodies which are available for plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are highly effective treatments for nail psoriasis. Conventional systemic treatments, including methotrexate, cyclosporine, acitretin, and apremilast, as well as intralesional corticosteroids, can also be effective treatments for nail psoriasis. Topical treatments, including corticosteroids, calcipotriol, tacrolimus, and tazarotene, have also been shown to have a position in the treatment of nail psoriasis, particularly in mild cases. Finally, non-pharmacological treatment options, including phototherapy, photodynamic therapy, laser therapy, and several radiotherapeutic options, are also reviewed but cannot be advised as first-line treatment options. Another conclusion of this review is that the lack of a reliable core set of outcomes measures for trials in nail psoriasis hinders the interpretation of results, and is urgently needed. PMID:27041288

  19. [Treatment options of T1 glottic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Fan, Guokang

    2016-01-01

    T1 glottic carcinoma is part of early laryngeal carcinoma which involves the vocal cords, including anterior commissure or posterior commissure. We analyzed the treatment options of T1 glottic carcinoma by reviewing the related literatures about T1 glottic carcinoma treated by conservative surgery (open surgery and laser microsurgery), radiotherapy, robot surgery, photodynamic treatment. PMID:27192922

  20. Treatment options for acne rosacea.

    PubMed

    Goldgar, Constance; Keahey, David J; Houchins, John

    2009-09-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic, and sometimes progressive, dermatosis. It is characterized, alone or in combination, by central facial erythema,symmetric flushing, stinging sensation, inflammatory lesions (papules and pustules), telangiectasias, and phymatous changes (tissue hyperplasia and nodules). Rosacea can occur in adults of any ethnicity,and adversely affects patients' quality of life. The condition can be effectively controlled with therapy tailored to the specific subtype of rosacea that is affecting the patient. Topical metronidazole, sulfacetamide/sulfur, and azelaic acid are generally effective for patients with mild rosacea. For moderate papulopustular rosacea, combination therapy with oral tetracyclines and topical agents is the first-line choice. Treatment with a topical agent, such as metronidazole, may help maintain remission. Patients with ocular involvement may benefit from long-term oral antibiotics and metronidazole gel. Referral to a subspecialist is necessary for patients who have ocular rosacea with ophthalmic complications, severe or recalcitrant rosacea, or phymatous changes. PMID:19725487

  1. Pseudotumor cerebri: An update on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Sarita B; Subramanian, Prem S

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to identify Pseudotumor cerebri treatment options and assess their efficacy. Setting and Design: Review article. Materials and Methods: Existing literature and the authors’ experience were reviewed. Results: Treatment options range from observation to surgical intervention. Weight loss and medical treatment may be utilized in cases without vision loss or in combination with surgical treatment. Cerebrospinal fluid shunting procedures and/or optic nerve sheath decompression is indicated for severe vision loss or headache unresponsive to medical management. The recent use of endovascular stenting of transverse sinus stenoses has also demonstrated benefit in patients with pseudotumor cerebri. Conclusion: While each treatment form may be successful individually, a multimodal approach is typically utilized with treatments selected on a case-by-case basis. PMID:25449933

  2. Chronic constipation: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Liu, Louis Wing Cheong

    2011-10-01

    Constipation is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects patients of all ages. In 2007, a consensus group of 10 Canadian gastroenterologists developed a set of recommendations pertaining to the management of chronic constipation and constipation dominant irritable bowel syndrome. Since then, tegaserod has been withdrawn from the Canadian market. A new, highly selective serotonin receptor subtype 4 agonist, prucalopride, has been examined in several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy and safety in the management of patients with chronic constipation. Additional studies evaluating the use of stimulant laxatives, polyethylene glycol and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation have also been published. The present review summarizes the previous recommendations and new evidence supporting different treatment modalities - namely, diet and lifestyle, bulking agents, stool softeners, osmotic and stimulant laxatives, prucalopride and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation. A brief summary of lubiprostone and linaclotide is also presented. The quality of evidence is presented by adopting the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Finally, a management pyramid for patients with chronic constipation is proposed based on the quality of evidence, impact of each modality on constipation and on general health, and their availabilities in Canada. PMID:22114754

  3. New Labor Pain Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Koyyalamudi, Veerandra; Sidhu, Gurleen; Cornett, Elyse M; Nguyen, Viet; Labrie-Brown, Carmen; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Presently, the gold standard for pain control in laboring patients is neuraxial blockade, which includes a spinal, epidural, or a combined spinal-epidural technique. In conjunction with neuraxial blockade or by itself, some of the other agents employed related to labor pain include opioids, non-opioids, nitrous oxide, patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and distraction therapy. Alternative treatments include acupuncture, hypnotism, yoga, exercise during pregnancy, hydrotherapy, transcutaneous electronic nerve stimulation, massage, and relaxation techniques. This review will focus on current updates and recent trends in labor pain management. Neuraxial management, pharmacotherapy, and newer alternative methods to mitigate labor pain are reviewed. Newer techniques in epidural analgesia include the dural puncture epidural technique, which needs further evaluation. There are limited published data on the use of acupuncture, hypnotism, yoga, exercise during pregnancy, hydrotherapy, transcutaneous electronic nerve stimulation, massage, and relaxation techniques in the alleviation of labor pain. These alternative therapies maybe considered as an adjuvant as the analgesic efficiency is inferior to that provided by typical standard pharmacotherapy. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the role of immersion virtual reality in alleviating labor pain. PMID:26780039

  4. Treatment Options in Cushing’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Ahmed; Honegger, Juergen; Milian, Monika; Psaras, Tsambika

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is a grave disease that requires a multidisciplinary and individualized treatment approach for each patient. Approximately 80% of all patients harbour a corticotroph pituitary adenoma (Cushing’s disease) with excessive secretion of adrenocorticotropin-hormone (ACTH) and, consecutively, cortisol. The goals of treatment include normalization of hormone excess, long-term disease control and the reversal of comorbidities caused by the underlying pathology. The treatment of choice is neurosurgical tumour removal of the pituitary adenoma. Second-line treatments include medical therapy, bilateral adrenalectomy and radiation therapy. Drug treatment modalities target at the hypothalamic/pituitary level, the adrenal gland and at the glucocorticoid receptor level and are commonly used in patients in whom surgery has failed. Bilateral adrenalectomy is the second-line treatment for persistent hypercortisolism that offers immediate control of hypercortisolism. However, this treatment option requires a careful individualized evaluation, since it has the disadvantage of permanent hypoadrenalism which requires lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy and bears the risk of developing Nelson’s syndrome. Although there are some very promising medical therapy options it clearly remains a second-line treatment option. However, there are numerous circumstances where medical management of CD is indicated. Medical therapy is frequently used in cases with severe hypercortisolism before surgery in order to control the metabolic effects and help reduce the anestesiological risk. Additionally, it can help to bridge the time gap until radiotherapy takes effect. The aim of this review is to analyze and present current treatment options in Cushing’s disease. PMID:22346367

  5. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  6. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95?mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  7. Treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Portis, A. J.; Mador, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine current treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia with emphasis on randomized, clinical trials and our current management approach. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Benign prostatic hyperplasia remains difficult to define clinically or measure objectively. As a result, research has been fairly weak. With newer treatments, however, more definitive studies have been reported. MAIN FINDINGS: Transurethral resection of the prostate remains the criterion standard for severe disease. Watchful waiting, medical management, or early surgical intervention are all valid options for moderate disease and should be tailored to the characteristics and desires of individual patients. Recent minimally invasive surgical techniques, such as microwave and laser surgery, have not yet achieved the quality of evidence to be generally recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Management of benign prostatic hyperplasia should be individualized to patients' circumstances and personal choices. PMID:9266125

  8. New treatment options for alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shasthry, Saggere Muralikrishna; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2016-04-21

    The burden of alcoholic liver disease has rapidly grown in the past two decades and is expected to increase further in the coming years. Alcoholic hepatitis, the most florid presentation of alcoholic liver disease, continues to have high morbidity and mortality, with significant financial and healthcare burden with limited treatment options. Steroids remain the current standard of care in severe alcoholic hepatitis in carefully selected patients. No specific treatments are available for those patients who are steroid ineligible, intolerant or unresponsive. Liver transplant has shown good short-term outcome; however, feasibility, ethical and economic concerns remain. Modification of gut microbiota composition and their products, such as lipopolysaccharide, nutritional interventions, immune modulation, increasing steroid sensitivity, genetic polymorphism and epigenetic modification of alcohol induced liver damage, augmenting hepatic regeneration using GCSF are potential therapeutic avenues in steroid non-responsive/ineligible patients. With better understanding of the pathophysiology, using "Omics" platforms, newer options for patients with alcoholic hepatitis are expected soon. PMID:27099434

  9. Treatment options for brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Badilas, Nikolaos K; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

  10. Treatment Options for Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

  11. Treatment options for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morton, Gerard; Vigneault, Eric; Usmani, Nawaid; Morris, W. James

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe treatment options for clinically localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy, prostate brachytherapy, external beam radiation, and active surveillance. Quality of evidence Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) outcomes presented are from non-randomized, cohort, and other comparisons trials (level II evidence). We describe PSA outcomes from Canadian centres when they are available. One small randomized controlled trial (level I evidence) in localized prostate cancer is available to compare radical prostatectomy with brachytherapy. Main message Treatment choice in prostate cancer is based on initial PSA level, clinical stage of disease, and Gleason score, together with baseline urinary function, comorbidities, and patient age. In this article, we describe patients’ eligibility for and the common side effects of all treatment options. Prostate brachytherapy and active surveillance have evolved as new standard treatments of localized prostate cancer. We give a brief overview of the brachytherapy procedure, side effects, and PSA outcomes across Canada, as well as active surveillance guidelines. Conclusion Prostate cancer treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach, with input from both urology and radiation oncology. Input from family physicians is often as important in helping guide patients through the treatment decision process. PMID:24336537

  12. Fibromyalgia Pathogenesis and Treatment Options Update.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Steven; Caldwell, William; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-03-01

    This review article presents and summarizes up-to-date literature on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for fibromyalgia patients. First, the most recent diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, as put forth by the American College of Rheumatology will be summarized. Clinical features, including chronic widespread pain, hyperalgesia, mood disorders, anxiety, and disturbed sleep patterns will be explored in-depth. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia involves alterations in multiple ascending and descending central nervous system pathways, as well as peripheral pathways, leading to heightened pain sensitivity. Risk factors have been studied extensively, and the most recent research focuses on various genetic influences and the contributions of stress and poor sleep. Lastly, the discussion in this article focuses on treatment options for fibromyalgia; some have been mainstay options for many years. Pharmacological agents include tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as some investigational agents. The evidence behind non-pharmacologic treatments, including massage therapy, exercise, and acupuncture, are discussed. PMID:26922414

  13. Chronic rhinosinusitis and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the epidemiology and various treatments in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). Evidence for short-term use of systemic corticosteroids has been shown to be favorable in CRSwNP, but still limited in CRSsNP. Topical corticosteroids improve symptom scores in both CRS subgroups. The role of microbes in CRS is still controversial. Culture-directed antibiotics are recommended for CRSsNP with exacerbation. Long-term use of low dosage antibiotics is recommended for CRSsNP for their anti-inflammatory effects. Other emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:23785241

  14. Emerging treatment options for meibomian gland dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jing; Yan, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common diseases observed in clinics; it influences a great number of people, and is the leading cause of evaporative dry eye. Given the increased recognition of the importance of MGD, a great amount of attention has been paid to therapies targeting this condition. The traditional treatments of MGD consist of warm compresses and lid hygiene for removing an obstructed meibum, as well as antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents to improve the quality of the meibum. However, each of these treatments has a different shortcoming and the treatment of MGD remains challenging. Despite the numerous possible treatment options for MGD, it is still difficult to obtain complete relief of signs and symptoms. This review focuses on current emerging treatment options for MGD including intraductal meibomian gland probing, emulsion eye drops containing lipids, the LipiFlow® thermal pulsation system, N-acetyl-cysteine, azithromycin, oral supplementation with omega-3 essential fatty acids, and cyclosporine A. PMID:24043929

  15. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T; Stark, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  16. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  17. Evolving treatment options for melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Parkinson, Christine; Fife, Kate; Corrie, Pippa; Jefferies, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Melanoma is a leading cause of lost productivity due to premature cancer mortality. Melanoma frequently spreads to the brain and is associated with rapid deterioration in quality and quantity of life. Until now, treatment options have been restricted to surgery and radiotherapy, although neither modality has been well studied in clinical trials. However, the new immune checkpoint inhibitors and molecularly targeted agents that have been introduced for treatment of metastatic melanoma are active against brain metastases and offer new opportunities to improve disease outcomes. New challenges arise, including how to integrate or sequence multiple treatment modalities, and current practice varies widely. In this Review, we summarise evidence for the treatment of melanoma brain metastases, and discuss the rationale and evidence for combination modalities, highlighting areas for future research. PMID:26433822

  18. Chronic Migraine – New Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    ROCEANU, Adina; ANTOCHI, Florina; BAJENARU, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is defined as headache occurring more than fifteen days/month for at least three consecutive months, with headache having the clinical features of migraine without aura for at least eight days per month. Recently, new treatment options became available in chronic migraine patients. Topiramate is effective in chronic migraine, in the presence or absence of medication overuse, and/or other migraine prophylaxis. Efficacy of onabotulinumtoxin A as a preventive treatment of chronic migraine has been shown in the PREEMPT studies. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is an invasive treatment for refractory chronic headaches. ONS has encouraging results in refractory chronic migraine patients in commercially funded, multi-centre randomized trials. PMID:25705314

  19. [Options in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a result of insufficient liver function, with grave consequences for the patients. It is primarily caused by disturbed hepatic elimination of the neurotoxin, ammonia (NH3). Aside from dietetic measures, treatment rests on drugs designed to reduce the NH3 burden. The primary options, lactulose and the practically unabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin are suitable to decrease the bacterial NH3 generation in the intestine. Other antibiotics like neomycin at best have a place in acute treatment. L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA) and branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine) aim at supporting the scavenge of NH3 in glutamine; however, the final balance of this pathway is unfavourable. In addition, the constituents of LOLA enhance the capacity of the urea cycle and, ultimately, the elimination of NH3. As the evidence from available studies--is not unequivocal in each case, the current place of LOLA in treatment is that of an option for patients, who do not respond to standard therapy. PMID:26364405

  20. 24-h Efficacy of Glaucoma Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Konstas, Anastasios G P; Quaranta, Luciano; Bozkurt, Banu; Katsanos, Andreas; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian; Rossetti, Luca; Shaarawy, Tarek; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Miglior, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Current management of glaucoma entails the medical, laser, or surgical reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) to a predetermined level of target IOP, which is commensurate with either stability or delayed progression of visual loss. In the published literature, the hypothesis is often made that IOP control implies a single IOP measurement over time. Although the follow-up of glaucoma patients with single IOP measurements is quick and convenient, such measurements often do not adequately reflect the untreated IOP characteristics, or indeed the quality of treated IOP control during the 24-h cycle. Since glaucoma is a 24-h disease and the damaging effect of elevated IOP is continuous, it is logical that we should aim to understand the efficacy of all treatment options throughout the 24-h period. This article first reviews the concept and value of diurnal and 24-h IOP monitoring. It then critically evaluates selected available evidence on the 24-h efficacy of medical, laser and surgical therapy options. During the past decade several controlled trials have significantly enhanced our understanding on the 24-h efficacy of all glaucoma therapy options. Nevertheless, more long-term evidence is needed to better evaluate the 24-h efficacy of glaucoma therapy and the precise impact of IOP characteristics on glaucomatous progression and visual prognosis. PMID:26909513

  1. Sacral perineural cysts: imaging and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Landers, J; Seex, K

    2002-04-01

    Perineural cysts are an uncommon radiological finding and a rare cause of radicular leg pain. We report the clinical findings, imaging and operative appearances of a patient who presented with radicular leg and perineal pain, which was found to be associated with multiple sacral perineural cysts. The diagnostic and treatment options are explored. In particular, the use of percutaneous fine-needle cyst drainage as a guide to the value of surgery is discussed. Postoperative complications, such as pseudomeningocoele can occur, but may be effectively treated with lumbar drainage. PMID:12046741

  2. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. PMID:27012935

  3. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternative treatments now available. These alternative treatments include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), percutaneous cryoablation therapy (PCT), photodynamic therapy (PDT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), including stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy. We describe the established alternatives to surgical resection, their advantages and disadvantages, potential complications and efficacy. We then describe the optimal treatment approach for patients with early-stage NSCLC based on tumor operability, size and location. Finally, we discuss future directions and whether any alternative therapies will challenge surgical resection as the treatment of choice for patients with operable early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26380185

  4. Minimally invasive treatment options in fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Liebermann, Anja; Beuer, Florian; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Güth, Jan-Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options have become increasingly feasible in restorative dentistry, due to the introduction of the adhesive technique in combination with restorative materials featuring translucent properties similar to those of natural teeth. Mechanical anchoring of restorations via conventional cementation represents a predominantly subtractive treatment approach that is gradually being superseded by a primarily defect-oriented additive method in prosthodontics. Modifications of conventional treatment procedures have led to the development of an economical approach to the removal of healthy tooth structure. This is possible because the planned treatment outcome is defined in a wax-up before the treatment is commenced and this wax-up is subsequently used as a reference during tooth preparation. Similarly, resin- bonded FDPs and implants have made it possible to preserve the natural tooth structure of potential abutment teeth. This report describes a number of clinical cases to demonstrate the principles of modern prosthetic treatment strategies and discusses these approaches in the context of minimally invasive prosthetic dentistry. PMID:26925471

  5. A safe treatment option for esophageal bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Sheraz; Shafique, Muhammad; Kjæstad, Erik; Thorsen, Yngve; Lie, Erik S.; Dahl, Vegard; Bakka, Njål; Røkke, Ola

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bezoar in the esophagus is a rare condition and associated with structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. Endoscopy is the main tool for diagnosis and treatment for bezoar in the esophagus. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we present a case where an endoscopic evacuation of an esophageal bezoar was unsuccessful. We treated the bezoar through a nasogastric tube using a cocktail composed of pancreatic enzymes dissolved in Coca-Cola. DISCUSSION Endoscopy is regarded as the mainstay for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bezoars. However, when this approach fails, other treatment options include dissolution therapy, and surgical exploration and removal of the bezoar. Surgical removal of an esophageal bezoar is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. We advocate that dissolving therapy should be the first choice of treatment when endoscopic evacuation is not possible. CONCLUSION This is the first report describing a successful treatment of an esophageal bezoar with a cocktail of Coca-Cola and pancreatic enzymes. It is an effective, inexpensive, and worldwide available treatment and should be considered when endoscopic evacuation fails. PMID:22609703

  6. Tackling sleeplessness: Psychological treatment options for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Dautovich, Natalie D; McNamara, Joseph; Williams, Jacob M; Cross, Natalie J; McCrae, Christina S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to review and summarize the research supporting nonpharmacologic treatment options for insomnia. The different treatment approaches are described followed by a review of both original research articles and meta-analyses. Meta-analytic reviews suggest that common nonpharmacologic approaches exert, on average, medium to large effect sizes on SOL, WASO, NWAK, SQR, and SE while smaller effects are seen for TST. Stimulus control therapy, relaxation training, and CBT-I are considered standard treatments for insomnia by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). Sleep restriction, multicomponent therapy without cognitive therapy, paradoxical intention, and biofeedback approaches have received some levels of support by the AASM. Sleep hygiene, imagery training, and cognitive therapy did not receive recommendation levels as single (standalone) therapies by the AASM due to lack of empirical evidence. Less common approaches have been introduced (Internet-based interventions, bright light treatment, biofeedback, mindfulness, acupuncture, and intensive sleep retraining) but require further research. Brief and group treatments have been shown to be as efficacious as longer and individually-administered treatments. Considerations are presented for special populations, including older adults, children and teens, individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds, insomnia comorbid with other disorders, and individuals who are taking hypnotics. PMID:23616696

  7. New treatment options for alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shasthry, Saggere Muralikrishna; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The burden of alcoholic liver disease has rapidly grown in the past two decades and is expected to increase further in the coming years. Alcoholic hepatitis, the most florid presentation of alcoholic liver disease, continues to have high morbidity and mortality, with significant financial and healthcare burden with limited treatment options. Steroids remain the current standard of care in severe alcoholic hepatitis in carefully selected patients. No specific treatments are available for those patients who are steroid ineligible, intolerant or unresponsive. Liver transplant has shown good short-term outcome; however, feasibility, ethical and economic concerns remain. Modification of gut microbiota composition and their products, such as lipopolysaccharide, nutritional interventions, immune modulation, increasing steroid sensitivity, genetic polymorphism and epigenetic modification of alcohol induced liver damage, augmenting hepatic regeneration using GCSF are potential therapeutic avenues in steroid non-responsive/ineligible patients. With better understanding of the pathophysiology, using “Omics” platforms, newer options for patients with alcoholic hepatitis are expected soon. PMID:27099434

  8. Current treatment options for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Bocchino, Marialuisa; Matarese, Alessandro; Sanduzzi, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a key component in TB control strategies worldwide. However, as people with LTBI are neither symptomatic nor contagious, any screening decision should be weighed carefully against the potential benefit of preventing active disease in those who are known to be at higher risk and are willing to accept therapy for LTBI. This means that a targeted approach is desirable to maximize cost effectiveness and to guarantee patient adherence. We focus on LTBI treatment strategies in patient populations at increased risk of developing active TB, including candidates for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α blockers. In the last 40 years, isoniazid (INH) has represented the keystone of LTBI therapy across the world. Although INH remains the first therapeutic option, alternative treatments that are effective and associated with increased adherence and economic savings are available. Current recommendations, toxicity, compliance, and cost issues are discussed in detail in this review. A balanced relationship between the patient and healthcare provider could increase adherence, while cost-saving treatment strategies with higher effectiveness, fewer side effects, and of shorter duration should be offered as preferred. PMID:24789003

  9. Treatment options for polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Ahmed; Elnashar, Abubaker

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women. The clinical manifestation of PCOS varies from a mild menstrual disorder to severe disturbance of reproductive and metabolic functions. Management of women with PCOS depends on the symptoms. These could be ovulatory dysfunction-related infertility, menstrual disorders, or androgen-related symptoms. Weight loss improves the endocrine profile and increases the likelihood of ovulation and pregnancy. Normalization of menstrual cycles and ovulation could occur with modest weight loss as little as 5% of the initial weight. The treatment of obesity includes modifications in lifestyle (diet and exercise) and medical and surgical treatment. In PCOS, anovulation relates to low follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations and the arrest of antral follicle growth in the final stages of maturation. This can be treated with medications such as clomiphene citrate, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, metformin, glucocorticoids, or gonadotropins or surgically by laparoscopic ovarian drilling. In vitro fertilization will remain the last option to achieve pregnancy when others fail. Chronic anovulation over a long period of time is also associated with an increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma, which should be seriously investigated and treated. There are androgenic symptoms that will vary from patient to patient, such as hirsutism, acne, and/or alopecia. These are troublesome presentations to the patients and require adequate treatment. Alternative medicine has been emerging as one of the commonly practiced medicines for different health problems, including PCOS. This review underlines the contribution to the treatment of different symptoms. PMID:21339935

  10. Chronic myeloid leukemia: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J M; Druker, B J

    2001-10-01

    The choice of primary treatment for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) diagnosed in chronic phase has become exceedingly difficult. There is little doubt that allogeneic stem cell transplantation can eradicate the leukemia and that a graft-versus-leukemia effect makes a major contribution to this result; conversely, only a minority of patients are eligible for transplantation, which still carries an appreciable risk for death or protracted illness. For most patients, interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) prolongs life to some degree in comparison with hydroxyurea, but it is associated with considerable toxicity. The newly introduced tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 induces complete hematologic remission in almost all patients and is associated with a very high rate of cytogenetic response; its capacity to prolong life in comparison with IFN-alpha is not yet established. Here are reviewed some factors that predict survival after nontransplantation therapy and after allografting for CML in chronic phase. Two contrasting options are considered for managing the patient with newly diagnosed disease, and it can be concluded that, for now, allogeneic stem cell transplantation soon after diagnosis should continue to be offered as an option for selected patients. Further experience with the use of STI571 as a single agent or in combination with other antileukemic agents may alter the picture in the near future. PMID:11567987

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on POU and POE arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems. The presentation provides information on the arsenic rule, arsenic chemistry and arsenic treatment. The arsenic treatment options proposed for POU and POE treatment consist prim...

  12. Investigational treatment options in microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Madisch, Ahmed; Morgner, Andrea; Stolte, Manfred; Miehlke, Stephan

    2008-12-01

    Collagenous and lymphocytic colitis are the two recognized major presentations of microscopic colitis. Both diseases present with chronic watery diarrhea and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the colonic mucosa without specific endoscopic abnormalities, and hence diagnosis is established by histology. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that microscopic colitis may affect as many patients as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The cause of these diseases is unknown; however, several lines of evidence support the hypothesis of mucosal injury from an unknown agent in the fecal stream. Due to the lack of disease causality, therapeutic management of microscopic colitis is now directed primarily at symptoms' resolution or improvement. Based on current evidence, oral budesonide represents an effective treatment option for patients with microscopic colitis to achieve and maintain remission. Other anti-inflammatory drugs such as mesalazine or bismuth subsalicylate are now under evaluation. The optimal long-term management strategy of microscopic colitis, however, remains an unsolved issue. PMID:19012499

  13. EVALUATION OF ON-SITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature review of published and unpublished data was conducted to identify all conceivable alternative on-site systems, including wastewater manipulation, treatment and disposal options. Wastewater manipulation options included flow reduction, wasteload reduction and waste s...

  14. Non-surgical embryo transfer in cattle.

    PubMed

    Tervit, H R; Cooper, M W; Goold, P G; Haszard, G M

    1980-01-01

    Embryos collected surgically from donors superovulated with PMSG and synchronized with either prostaglandin F(2)alpha or progestagen impregnated sponges were transferred non-surgically to prostaglandin or progestagen synchronized recipients. One embryo was transferred to the uterine horn ipsilateral to the corpus luteum either through a flexible catheter introduced through a steel tube and passed to the uterine tip, or through a Cassou inseminating gun passed approximately 6 cm into the horn. Of 16 recipients receiving 5 or 6 day old embryos through the catheter (1976), 6 (38%) were palpated pregnant at 42 days and 4 (25%) subsequently calved. Of 16 recipients receiving 7 or 8 day old embryos through the straw and 16 through the catheter (1977), 10 (63%) and 3 (19%), respectively, were palpated pregnant (P<0.05) and 8 (50%) and 3 (19%), respectively, had normal embryos at slaughter 4 to 29 days after palpation (P reverse similar0.10 ). Forty 7 to 9 day old embryos were transferred through the straw in 1978. Eighteen (45%) of the recipients were palpated pregnant and 16 (40%) had normal embryos at slaughter 98 to 168 days after palpation. The success of the transfers in 1978 was affected by embryo quality [good vs poor embryos; 64% vs 22% recipients pregnant (P<0.01) and 59% vs 17% embryos surviving to slaughter (P<0.05)]. Also, in 1978, pregnancy rate was affected by the time taken to transfer the embryo with the highest rate achieved with the fastest transfers (P<0.10, b = -0.47). Injection of Indomethacin near the time of transfer, synchronization between donor and recipient onset of estrus and embryo age did not affect pregnancy rates. The pregnancy rate achieved after the transfer of good quality embryos by the straw technique was equal to that expected from surgical techniques. PMID:16725455

  15. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year and only 6% will make it past 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25585100

  16. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation. PMID:26297204

  17. Overactive bladder syndrome pharmacotherapy: future treatment options

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a lifestyle disease and its incidence increases with age. Although it is not a life-threatening disease, it is known to have a significant impact on the quality of life. The first-choice pharmacological treatment of OAB is antimuscarinics. However, their limited clinical effectiveness and unsatisfactory tolerance profile, combined with the advancement of knowledge on the aetiopathogenesis of the disease, have inspired research on new pharmacotherapy options for OAB. Basic research has provided foundations for the development of new OAB treatments, which seem very promising and can be applied in clinical practice. The mechanisms of the studied compounds are based on their effect on certain receptors and neurotransmitters that contribute to regulating the micturition reflex. These compounds are not only more receptor-specific as compared to currently used drugs, but also some of them are organ-specific. Some of such compounds have already passed the proof-of-concept stage of development and have the therapeutic potential to determine the future of OAB pharmacotherapy. This review focuses on the mechanisms of substances that are now undergoing pre-clinical and clinical tests and their effects on the micturition cycle, while also identifying opportunities for using them with specific groups of patients. Due to the fact that OAB is a disease of symptoms and its aetiopathogenesis is complex, it seems that modern treatment methods should be tailor-made and based on the pathophysiological mechanisms that induce disease symptoms, rather than only treating the symptoms by inhibiting the contractility of the urinary bladder. PMID:26848291

  18. Overactive bladder syndrome pharmacotherapy: future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a lifestyle disease and its incidence increases with age. Although it is not a life-threatening disease, it is known to have a significant impact on the quality of life. The first-choice pharmacological treatment of OAB is antimuscarinics. However, their limited clinical effectiveness and unsatisfactory tolerance profile, combined with the advancement of knowledge on the aetiopathogenesis of the disease, have inspired research on new pharmacotherapy options for OAB. Basic research has provided foundations for the development of new OAB treatments, which seem very promising and can be applied in clinical practice. The mechanisms of the studied compounds are based on their effect on certain receptors and neurotransmitters that contribute to regulating the micturition reflex. These compounds are not only more receptor-specific as compared to currently used drugs, but also some of them are organ-specific. Some of such compounds have already passed the proof-of-concept stage of development and have the therapeutic potential to determine the future of OAB pharmacotherapy. This review focuses on the mechanisms of substances that are now undergoing pre-clinical and clinical tests and their effects on the micturition cycle, while also identifying opportunities for using them with specific groups of patients. Due to the fact that OAB is a disease of symptoms and its aetiopathogenesis is complex, it seems that modern treatment methods should be tailor-made and based on the pathophysiological mechanisms that induce disease symptoms, rather than only treating the symptoms by inhibiting the contractility of the urinary bladder. PMID:26848291

  19. Abfraction lesions: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Dilbone, Deborah A; Pereira, Patricia NR; Duarte, Wagner R; Geraldeli, Saulo; Delgado, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Abfraction is a type of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) characterized by loss of tooth tissues with different clinical appearances. Evidence supports that abfraction lesions, as any NCCLs, have a multifactorial etiology. Particularly, the cervical wear of abfraction can occur as a result of normal and abnormal tooth function and may also be accompanied by pathological wear, such as abrasion and erosion. The interaction between chemical, biological, and behavioral factors is critical and helps to explain why some individuals exhibit more than one type of cervical wear mechanism than others. In an era of personalized dentistry, patient risk factors for NCCLs must be identified and addressed before any treatment is performed. Marked variations exist in dental practice concerning the diagnosis and management of these lesions. The lack of understanding about the prognosis of these lesions with or without intervention may be a major contributor to variations in dentists’ management decisions. This review focuses on the current knowledge and available treatment strategies for abfraction lesions. By recognizing that progressive changes in the cervical area of the tooth are part of a physiologically dynamic process that occurs with aging, premature and unnecessary intervention can be avoided. In cases of asymptomatic teeth, where tooth vitality and function are not compromised, abfraction lesions should be monitored for at least 6 months before any invasive procedure is planned. In cases of abfraction associated with gingival recession, a combined restorative-surgical approach may be performed. Restorative intervention and occlusal adjustment are not indicated as treatment options to prevent further tooth loss or progression of abfraction. The clinical decision to restore abfraction lesions may be based on the need to replace form and function or to relieve hypersensitivity of severely compromised teeth or for esthetic reasons. PMID:27217799

  20. Periorbital Rejuvenation: Overview of Nonsurgical Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Dee Anna; Kurta, Anastasia

    2016-05-01

    Numerous nonsurgical options for periorbital rejuvenation are available and can be used alone or as adjuncts to other nonsurgical and surgical options. Topicals, chemical peels, laser resurfacing, and dermabrasion therapy, along with neuromodulators and fillers, can be used to enhance the appearance of the periorbital region. PMID:27105800

  1. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  2. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  4. Ear keloids: a review and update of treatment options

    PubMed Central

    SOBEC, RALUCA; DOBREANU, CODRIN; FODOR, LUCIAN; ŞOMCUTEAN, ANA; ŢICHIL, IOANA; COSGAREA, MARCEL

    2013-01-01

    Ear keloids are among the most challenging plastic surgery conditions and may have significant psychosocial impact for the patient. Their aesthetic considerations are serious and despite a variety of treatment options, they often proved to be recurrent. This paper reviews the management options of ear keloids available in literature up to date. Multiple therapeutic options are discussed, such as: surgical treatment, corticosteroid injections, laser therapy, cryotherapy, radiotherapy, pressure therapy, therapy with antitumor or immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26527968

  5. Non-surgical interventions for threatened and recurrent miscarriages.

    PubMed

    Tien, J C; Tan, T Y T

    2007-12-01

    Many surgical and non-surgical interventions are used in the management of threatened and recurrent miscarriages. Evidence-based management of recurrent miscarriages requires investigations into the underlying aetiology. When a specific cause is identified, directed treatment may reduce miscarriage rates. Combined aspirin and heparin for antiphospholipid syndrome, and screening and treatment of bacterial vaginosis between ten and 22 weeks of pregnancy with clindamycin, are the only interventions proven to be useful in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The use of periconceptional metformin for polycystic ovarian (PCO) syndrome is promising, though data from RCTs are still required. The use of heparin in inherited thrombophilias, bromocriptine in hyperprolactinaemia and luteinising hormone suppression in fertile patients with PCO syndrome are more controversial. In threatened miscarriages, or when no cause is found, treatment becomes empirical. Supportive care may reduce miscarriage rates. Dydrogesterone, a progesterone derivative, may further reduce miscarriage rates. Bed rest and avoidance of sexual intercourse, though commonly advised, are of no proven benefit. Use of uterine relaxing agents, human chorionic gonadotrophin, immunotherapy and vitamins remain controversial in idiopathic recurrent miscarriages. PMID:18043834

  6. College Student Receptiveness to Various Alcohol Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epler, Amee J.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Loomis, Tiffany B.; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Heavy episodic drinking remains a significant problem on college campuses. Although most interventions for college students are behavioral, pharmacological treatments, such as naltrexone, could provide additional options. Participants: The authors evaluated receptivity to various alcohol treatment options in a general population of…

  7. Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Using Triangular Titanium Implants vs. Non-Surgical Management: Six-Month Outcomes from a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Whang, Peter; Polly, David; Frank, Clay; Lockstadt, Harry; Glaser, John; Limoni, Robert; Sembrano, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is a prevalent, underdiagnosed cause of lower back pain. SI joint fusion can relieve pain and improve quality of life in patients who have failed nonoperative care. To date, no study has concurrently compared surgical and non-surgical treatments for chronic SI joint dysfunction. Methods We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial of 148 subjects with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis or sacroiliac joint disruptions who were assigned to either minimally invasive SI joint fusion with triangular titanium implants (N=102) or non-surgical management (NSM, n=46). SI joint pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) were collected at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment commencement. Six-month success rates, defined as the proportion of treated subjects with a 20-mm improvement in SI joint pain in the absence of severe device-related or neurologic SI joint-related adverse events or surgical revision, were compared using Bayesian methods. Results Subjects (mean age 51, 70% women) were highly debilitated at baseline (mean SI joint VAS pain score 82, mean ODI score 62). Six-month follow-up was obtained in 97.3%. By 6 months, success rates were 81.4% in the surgical group vs. 23.9% in the NSM group (difference of 56.6%, 95% posterior credible interval 41.4-70.0%, posterior probability of superiority >0.999). Clinically important (≥15 point) ODI improvement at 6 months occurred in 75% of surgery subjects vs. 27.3% of NSM subjects. At six months, quality of life improved more in the surgery group and satisfaction rates were high. The mean number of adverse events in the first six months was slightly higher in the surgical group compared to the non-surgical group (1.3 vs. 1.0 events per subject, p=0.1857). Conclusions Six-month follow-up from this level 1 study showed that minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular titanium implants was more effective than non-surgical management in relieving pain, improving function and improving quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis or SI joint disruptions. Clinical relevance Minimally invasive SI joint fusion is an acceptable option for patients with chronic SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis and sacroiliac joint disruptions unresponsive to non-surgical treatments. PMID:25785242

  8. Salivary Visfatin Concentration in Response to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Zahra Alizadeh; Azadmehr, Abbas; Nohekhan, Ali; Tabrizi, Mohammad Amir Alizadeh; Ardakani, Mohammad Reza Talebi; Naddafpour, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Visfatin is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been associated with several immunomodulating processes. The relationship between visfatin and periodontitis has been the subject of a few studies that have described visfatin as an inflammatory marker for periodontitis. However, studies on visfatin as a potential therapeutic target in periodontal diseases are scarce. In the present study, we evaluated the alterations in salivary visfatin levels in response to non-surgical periodontal treatment. Materials and Methods: Twenty individuals with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis and twenty periodontally healthy individuals were selected for this study according to clinical parameters. Patients with chronic periodontitis were treated by non-surgical periodontal therapy. Clinical parameters were recorded and saliva samples were obtained from the control group and test group before (T1 group) and one month after periodontal treatment (T2 group). Salivary visfatin concentrations were measured by standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed with the statistical software SPSS, version 18. Results: Visfatin was detectable in all samples. T1 and control groups were significantly different in terms of clinical parameters and visfatin levels. Visfatin concentrations were reduced significantly after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal treatment also resulted in significant reductions of all clinical parameters with the exception of clinical attachment level. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that salivary levels of visfatin are reduced after non-surgical periodontal therapy to the levels comparable with those found in healthy individuals. Therefore, the salivary visfatin level may have the potential to be a target marker for assessment of responses to non-surgical periodontal therapy. However, more studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:26023633

  9. Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Key Points AIDS-related lymphoma is ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (AIDS Related-Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Key Points AIDS-related lymphoma is ...

  11. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Key Points Hairy cell leukemia is a ...

  12. Treatment Options for Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  13. Therapeutic options in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2009-01-01

    Current theraputic options for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are reviewed. Therapeutic options for mild lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), as defined by the American Urological Association, are generally treated medically. Moderate to severe LUTS can be treated medically or with surgical therapy. Current medical and surgical treatments for LUTS secondary to BPH are reviewed and evolving treatments are explored. PMID:19936164

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Carcinoma of Unknown Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a single lymph node area is usually: Surgery to remove the lymph nodes. See PDQ summary on Melanoma Treatment for more information. Multiple Involvement There is no standard treatment for carcinoma ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  16. Treatment Options for Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Testicular Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... having treatment. Sperm banking is the process of freezing sperm and storing it for later use. Stages ... from recurring (coming back) or reduce the side effects of cancer treatment. Clinical trials are taking place ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Key Points Extragonadal germ cell tumors form ...

  19. Understanding Bone Marrow Transplantation as a Treatment Option

    MedlinePlus

    ... icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Understanding Transplantation as a Treatment Option When you are diagnosed with a ... Transplant Talking with Your Doctor Diseases Treatable with a Bone Marrow Transplant or Cord Blood Transplant A ...

  20. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Cancer.gov

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  1. Treatment Options for Congenital Pigmented Nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read more about nevus removal here. What about LASER Treatment? We all want to think modern medicine has miracles to offer us. Although use of lasers are successful for many superficial skin imperfections, lasers ...

  2. Opioid Dependence Treatment: Options In Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Stotts, Angela L.; Dodrill, Carrie L.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    The development of effective treatments for opioid dependence is of great importance given the devastating consequences of the disease. Pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction include opioid agonists, partial agonists, opioid antagonists, and alpha-2-adrenergic agonists, which are targeted toward either detoxification or long-term agonist maintenance. Agonist maintenance therapy is currently the recommended treatment for opioid dependence due to its superior outcomes relative to detoxification. Detoxification protocols have limited long term efficacy and patient discomfort remains a significant therapy challenge. Buprenorphine’s effectiveness relative to methadone remains a controversy and may be most appropriate for patients in need of low doses of agonist treatment. Buprenorphine appears superior to alpha-2 agonists, however, and office-based treatment with buprenorphine in the US is gaining support. Studies of sustained-release formulations of naltrexone suggest improved effectiveness for retention and sustained abstinence, however, randomized clinical trials are needed. PMID:19538000

  3. Cognitive and behavioral treatment options for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Matthew R; Narizhnaya, Mariya

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is a costly disorder that affects a significant number of people. In many cases, insomnia is comorbid with other illnesses, which complicates its diagnosis and treatment. Most often it is treated with medication; however, patients are not always safe using hypnotics, and medication does not attack the source of the disorder. Cognitive behavioral therapies are better for long-term treatment because they address factors causing or perpetuating insomnia, as opposed to treatments that focus on symptoms. This article examines various nonpharmacological treatments for insomnia. In addition, because circadian rhythm disorders may exhibit symptoms similar to insomnia, there is also a brief overview of 2 common circadian rhythm disorders, delayed sleep phase syndrome and advanced sleep phase syndrome. PMID:22786741

  4. Treatment Options for Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of alcohol for many years or being an alcoholic. Having metabolic syndrome , a set of conditions that ... up tests may be needed. There are different types of treatment for patients with adult primary liver ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Primary Liver Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of alcohol for many years or being an alcoholic. Having metabolic syndrome , a set of conditions that ... up tests may be needed. There are different types of treatment for patients with adult primary liver ...

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  7. Treatment Options for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Unusual Cancers of Childhood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in one year, treatment may include: Biologic therapy . Laser therapy combined with targeted therapy using bevacizumab . Midline Tract ... the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from the throat to the stomach . Most esophageal ...

  12. Patellofemoral pain: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rothermich, Marcus A; Glaviano, Neal R; Li, Jiacheng; Hart, Joe M

    2015-04-01

    Patients with anterior knee pain present a complex and common problem to health care providers. The diagnosis and treatment of these patients often involve a comprehensive evaluation that includes assessing the chronicity of the pain, the specific location of the complaint, and the previous treatment modalities attempted by the patient. This common diagnosis includes a wide variety of different pathologic abnormalities that can be present independently or concomitantly and cause a spectrum of disabilities for the patient. PMID:25818716

  13. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  14. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... induction therapy : This is the first phase of treatment. The goal is to kill the leukemia cells in the ... begins after the leukemia is in remission. The goal of post-remission therapy is to kill any remaining leukemia cells that ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... induction therapy : This is the first phase of treatment. The goal is to kill the leukemia cells in the ... begins after the leukemia is in remission. The goal of post-remission therapy is to kill any remaining leukemia cells that ...

  16. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  17. [Extended options of anticoagulant treatment in thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Karetová, Debora; Bultas, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TD) is a relatively common disease with acute risk of death and potential long-term consequences in term of postthrombotic syndrome or chronic pulmonary hypertension. Anticoagulant therapy is the basic therapeutic procedure; thrombolytic therapy and the introduction cava filter are appropriately indicated for individual cases. In past few years, new direct oral anticoagulant drugs (NOAC) have occurred - Xa factor or thrombin inhibitors which have demonstrated the same efficacy and even higher safety in comparison to conventional treatment. In mid 2014, 3 drugs of this group are registered in Czech Republic - rivaroxaban (Xarelto®), dabigatran (Pradaxa®) and apixaban (Eliquis®). These drugs have comparable efficacy and safety but they differ in schedule of dose administration. Rivaroxaban and apixaban can be administered immediately after diagnosis of venous thrombosis or hemodynamically stable pulmonary embolism. LMWH application has to precede few days the administration of dabigatran. Limitation of new drugs is their price. Unavailability of antidotes is temporary because current researches continue to find one for dabigatran and another for both of xabans. Duration of anticoagulant treatment after acute phase depends on the presence of thrombosis risk factors and the individual bleeding risk. Minimal duration of anticoagulant therapy is 3 months, commonly 6-12 months and in high risk patients it is "long term" treatment. Good results of new anticoagulant drugs in trials in term of thromboembolism recurrence prevention may change established habits in TD patients with long term treatment. PMID:25600045

  18. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... that brings blood into the liver. Blocking the flow of blood to the liver helps kill cancer cells growing there. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that brings blood into the liver. Blocking the flow of blood to the liver helps kill cancer cells growing there. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation ...

  20. New Treatment Options in Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Dobesberger, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of Levetiracetam (LEV) in the treatment of focal and generalised epilepsies is well established. LEV has a wide spectrum of action, good tolerability and a favourable pharmacokinetic profile. An injectable formulation has been released as an intravenous (IV) infusion in 2006 for patients with epilepsy when oral administration is temporarily not feasible. Bioequivalence to the oral preparation has been demonstrated with good tolerability and safety enabling a smooth transition from oral to parenteral formulation and vice versa. Although IV LEV is not licensed for treatment of status epilepticus (SE), open-label experience in retrospective case series is accumulating. Until now (August 2008) 156 patients who were treated with IV LEV for various forms of SE have been reported with an overall success rate of 65.4%. The most often used initial dose was 2000-3000 mg over 15 minutes. Adverse events were reported in 7.1%, and were mild and transient. Although IV LEV is an interesting alternative for the treatment of SE due to the lack of centrally depressive effects and low potential of drug interactions, one has to be aware of the nonrandomised retrospective study design, the heterogenous patient population and treatment protocols, and the publication bias inherent in these type of studies. Only a large randomised controlled trial with an adequate comparator will reveal the efficacy and effectiveness of this promising new IV formulation. PMID:21180643

  1. Alcohol use disorder: pathophysiology, effects, and pharmacologic options for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wackernah, Robin C; Minnick, Matthew J; Clapp, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) continue to be a concerning health issue worldwide. Harmful alcohol use leads to 2.5 million deaths annually worldwide. Multiple options exist for the management of dependence on alcohol, not all of which are approved by drug-regulating agencies. Current practice in treating AUD does not reflect the diversity of pharmacologic options that have potential to provide benefit, and guidance for clinicians is limited. Few medications are approved for treatment of AUD, and these have exhibited small and/or inconsistent effects in broad patient populations with diverse drinking patterns. The need for continued research into the treatment of this disease is evident in order to provide patients with more specific and effective options. This review describes the neurobiological mechanisms of AUD that are amenable to treatment and drug therapies that target pathophysiological conditions of AUD to reduce drinking. In addition, current literature on pharmacologic (both approved and non-approved) treatment options for AUD offered in the United States and elsewhere are reviewed. The aim is to inform clinicians regarding the options for alcohol abuse treatment, keeping in mind that not all treatments are completely successful in reducing craving or heavy drinking or increasing abstinence. PMID:24648792

  2. Perinatal depression: treatment options and dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Teri

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period raises unique concerns about safety for the developing fetus and the infant. An increasing number of studies suggest adverse effects from untreated stress, anxiety and depression as well as adverse effects from antidepressant and other psychotropic medications. Even when studies suggest a lack of short-term adverse effects with some medications, the paucity of systematic longitudinal follow-up studies investigating the development of children exposed to medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes apprehension. This review's objective is to highlight what is currently known about the negative effects of untreated disease and exposure to psychotropic medication, the treatment dilemmas confronting women with perinatal depression and issues that future studies should address so that a woman with perinatal depression can make an optimally informed decision. PMID:18592032

  3. [Options for stress management in obesity treatment].

    PubMed

    Czeglédi, Edit

    2016-02-14

    Overeating and physical inactivity are of great importance in the etiology of obesity. Psychological factors are often found in the background of life style. Chronic stress can contribute to physical inactivity and behaviors that hinder the keeping of a diet (e.g., irregular eating pattern, emotional eating). Results of randomized controlled trials show that relaxation can reduce emotional eating, improve cognitive restraint, and thereby reduce weight. However, stress management is more than relaxation. It consists of adaptive emotion-focused and problem-focused coping strategies and skills to improve relationships. Deflection skills may help in replacing emotional eating with other behaviors. Cognitive restructuring, saying no, and problem solving help to prevent or manage conflicts and difficulties otherwise would result in overeating due to distress. Developing stress management skills may result in greater compliance with the treatment. The techniques presented in the study can be easily applied by general practitioners or specialists, and provide tools for optimizing obesity treatment. PMID:26853727

  4. Treatment options for postdissection aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sobocinski, Jonathan; Patterson, Benjamin O; Clough, Rachel E; Spear, Rafaelle; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Azzaoui, Richard; Hertault, Adrien; Haulon, Stéphan

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection is one of the most devastating catastrophes that can affect the aorta. Surgical treatment is proposed only when complications such as rupture or malperfusion occur. No clear consensus has been reached regarding the best therapy to prevent aortic rupture after the acute phase. We have performed a thorough review of the most recent literature on the strategies to treat patients in the chronic phase of aortic dissection. PMID:26771869

  5. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. PMID:27119465

  6. Acute intermittent porphyria: Diagnostic dilemma and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Mohan Deep; Hazarika, Nita; Saraswat, Namita; Sood, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) presents with diverse group of symptoms making its early diagnosis difficult. Delaying diagnosis and treatment of AIP can be fatal or can cause long term or permanent neurological damage. We present here a case report of AIP where the diagnosis was missed. The diversity of symptoms and details concerning the treatment options for AIP are discussed. PMID:26330726

  7. The Evolving Treatment Options for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Atul; Varshney, Neeta; Smith, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss in working-age adults, and diabetic macular edema (DME) is the most common cause of visual impairment in individuals with DR. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, previous treatment paradigms, and emerging treatment options in the management of DME. PMID:24106640

  8. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug-drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure completion of adequate therapy will be necessary to exploit fully the potential of the newer regimens to eliminate tuberculosis. PMID:22287857

  9. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure completion of adequate therapy will be necessary to exploit fully the potential of the newer regimens to eliminate tuberculosis. PMID:22287857

  10. Pharmacologic Options for the Treatment of Sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia is now clinically defined as a loss of muscle mass coupled with functional deterioration (either walking speed or distance or grip strength). Based on the FRAX studies suggesting that the questions without bone mineral density can be used to screen for osteoporosis, there is now a valid simple questionnaire to screen for sarcopenia, i.e., the SARC-F. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of sarcopenia. These include genetic factors, mitochondrial defects, decreased anabolic hormones (e.g., testosterone, vitamin D, growth hormone and insulin growth hormone-1), inflammatory cytokine excess, insulin resistance, decreased protein intake and activity, poor blood flow to muscle and deficiency of growth derived factor-11. Over the last decade, there has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the molecular biology of muscle, resulting in a marked increase in potential future targets for the treatment of sarcopenia. At present, resistance exercise, protein supplementation, and vitamin D have been established as the basic treatment of sarcopenia. High-dose testosterone increases muscle power and function, but has a number of potentially limiting side effects. Other drugs in clinical development include selective androgen receptor molecules, ghrelin agonists, myostatin antibodies, activin IIR antagonists, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, beta antagonists, and fast skeletal muscle troponin activators. As sarcopenia is a major predictor of frailty, hip fracture, disability, and mortality in older persons, the development of drugs to treat it is eagerly awaited. PMID:26100650

  11. Pediatric Ureteroceles: Diagnosis, Management and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Günşar, Cüneyt; Mir, Erol; Şencan, Aydin; Ertan, Pelin; Özcan, Cansu Ünden

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical characteristics of ureteroceles particularly for diagnostic and treatment challenges. Methods Data about patients treated for ureterocele in the two hospital clinics during 1996- 2009 are retrospectively evaluated. Findings There were 12 girls and 7 boys. Symptomatic urinary tract infection was found in twelve cases. Ureterocele was associated with duplex systems in eleven cases. Vesicoureteral reflux was detected in 4 patients. Bladder diverticulum complicated with ureterocele in 1 patient. Ultrasonography diagnosed ureterocele in 12 patients. Renal scarring was detected in 6 patients at the side of ureterocele. Fifteen patients showed varying degrees of hydro-ureteronephrosis. Surgical therapy included upper pole nephrectomy in 3 cases. Bladder level reconstruction was performed in 11 cases. Five patients were treated only by endoscopic incision. In the follow up period 4 patients showed long term urinary tract infections whereas 3 of them were treated endoscopically. Postoperative reflux was still present in two patients who were treated by endoscopic incision. Conclusion Ureterocele diagnosis and treatment show challenges. Urinary tract infection is important marker for urinary system evaluation. Preoperative management generally depends on a combination of diagnostic methods. Endoscopic incision needs serious follow up for postoperative problems. PMID:23056740

  12. Psoriasis: characteristics, psychosocial effects and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sheila

    Psoriasis is a complex chronic non-infectious inflammatory skin disease with a variety of different presentations. The classic presentation is of well-defined red plaques with silver scale. The characteristic scale makes the disorder highly visible and intrusive on the patient's lifestyle. The visible nature of the disease ensures that psoriasis has both physical and psychosocial effects. In normal skin, epidermal cell reproduction and proliferation takes 28 days. In psoriasis this process is considerably accelerated to approximately 4 days, resulting in the deposit of immature cells on the skin. While the exact cause of this process is unknown, certain environmental and genetic factors are known to be triggers. Disease management depends on disease severity, psychosocial effects and the patient's lifestyle. To effectively treat this disease the nurse must be skilled in psoriasis management, and in patient education and motivation. This article reviews the characteristics, aetiology, psychosocial effects and treatment strategies of psoriasis. PMID:20606610

  13. Treatment options in hepatocellular carcinoma today.

    PubMed

    Livraghi, T; Mäkisalo, H; Line, P-D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. As over 90% of HCCs arise in cirrhotic livers preventive methods and surveillance policies have been adopted in most countries with high prevalence of hepatitis B or C infected people. Poor prognosis of HCC has shown some improvement during the last years. Targeted therapy with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), hepatic resection (HR), liver transplantation (LT), and transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation (TACE) seems to have an influence on this development. The heterogeneity of cirrhotic patients with HCC is still a big challenge. A patient with a small tumour in a cirrhotic liver may have a worse prognosis than a patient with a large tumor in a relatively preserved liver after "curative" HR. The choice of the treatment modality depends on the size and the number of tumours, the stage and the cause of cirrhosis and finally on the availability of various modalities in each centre. PMID:21482502

  14. Metformin: a new option in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Pernía, Olga; Simó, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    Metformin is a biguanine, the most widely used antidiabetic drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Some studies suggest that metformin decreases the incidence of cancer and cancer-related mortality in diabetic patients. Metformin activates the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, a major sensor of the energy status of the cell and an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) catalytic activity, inducing a decrease in blood glucose by decreasing hepatic gluconeogenesis and stimulating glucose uptake in the muscle. Some preclinical data supports the inhibition of tumour cancer cell growth associated with mTOR inhibition and a decrease in phosphorylation of S6K, rpS6 and 4E-BP1. Here we have summarised some of the preclinical data and data of many clinical trials that are exploring the true value of metformin for cancer patients, mainly breast and prostate cancer. PMID:21680296

  15. Degenerative meniscus: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Richard; Kumar, Neil S; Patel, Nimit; Tom, James

    2014-01-01

    The symptomatic degenerative meniscus continues to be a source of discomfort for a significant number of patients. With vascular penetration of less than one-third of the adult meniscus, healing potential in the setting of chronic degeneration remains low. Continued hoop and shear stresses upon the degenerative meniscus results in gross failure, often in the form of complex tears in the posterior horn and midbody. Patient history and physical examination are critical to determine the true source of pain, particularly with the significant incidence of simultaneous articular pathology. Joint line tenderness, a positive McMurray test, and mechanical catching or locking can be highly suggestive of a meniscal source of knee pain and dysfunction. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging are frequently utilized to examine for osteoarthritis and to verify the presence of meniscal tears, in addition to ruling out other sources of pain. Non-operative therapy focused on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy may be able to provide pain relief as well as improve mechanical function of the knee joint. For patients refractory to conservative therapy, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy can provide short-term gains regarding pain relief, especially when combined with an effective, regular physiotherapy program. Patients with clear mechanical symptoms and meniscal pathology may benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, but surgery is not a guaranteed success, especially with concomitant articular pathology. Ultimately, the long-term outcomes of either treatment arm provide similar results for most patients. Further study is needed regarding the short and long-term outcomes regarding conservative and surgical therapy, with a particular focus on the economic impact of treatment as well. PMID:25405088

  16. Chronic constipation and treatment options (Review).

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Svensen, Rune; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Gilja, Odd-Helge; Hausken, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) is a highly prevalent heterogeneous disorder. Although CC is not known to be associated with the development of serious disease or with excess mortality, it considerably reduces the patients quality of life. In addition, it represents an economic burden to patients and society. The majority of patients with CC successfully manage the disorder by dietary management and the use of laxatives. Patients with functional CC (slow‑transit and non‑slow transit constipation) do not respond to laxatives and are a small fraction of the total population complaining of constipation. Regardless of the low number of these patients, the intractability of their symptoms causes psychological and social stress and greatly impairs their quality of life. Furthermore, these patients consume a disproportionate quantity of medical resources. It appears that these patients have a disturbance in the serotonin transmission system, which results in a cascade of alterations in a number of gut neuroendocrine hormones/transmitters. The effect of prucalopride, a serotonin receptor agonist, in this category of patients appears to be not only a pharmacological prokinetic action, but also a correction of a pre‑existing disturbance. Linaclotide, a member of the guanylin peptide family, binds to the ligand‑binding region of guanylate cyclase‑C on the luminal surface of gastrointestinal epithelia resulting in increased fluid secretion. This drug has also been found to be effective for the treatment of functional CC. In addition, biofeedback and sacral nerve stimulation are effective in the treatment of CC caused by pelvic floor disorders. PMID:24189940

  17. Bowens disease a review of newer treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Thorsten; Lehmann, Percy

    2008-01-01

    Bowens disease (squamous cell carcinoma in situ) has a 3%5% risk to develop into invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common cancer among Caucasians and its incidence has increased during the last decades dramatically. Multiple treatment options for Bowens disease have been described and are established with advantages and disadvantages. Bowens disease occurs more often in elderly patients (with a higher risk of comorbidities) and is frequently located on body sites with poor wound healing. Therefore there is need for non-invasive/non-destructive but effective treatment options. We would like to give an overview of established therapies and more detailed information about the newer treatment options for Bowens disease with topical diclofenac, topical imiquimod and photodynamic therapy. PMID:19209288

  18. Proposed HWIR alters waste treatment, disposal options

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.; Robinson, C.

    1996-04-01

    In what it has called its most important change to the hazardous waste rules since 1980, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule for process wastes that currently are regulated by the hazardous waste provisions in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, or RCRA Subtitle C. The rule addresses wastes that EPA has individually listed as hazardous, as well as wastes that are mixed with, derived from or contain listed hazardous wastes. The HWIR sets constituent-specific exit levels that would let low-risk process wastes escape the rigorous regulations of Subtitle C. EPA also proposes changes to RCRA`s land disposal restrictions so that some wastes that currently must be treated according to strict universal treatment standards may not have to be treated at all -- or could be treated in a less expensive manner -- before disposal. The proposed rule is important to virtually every company that is subject to RCRA`s hazardous waste regulations and raises many issues on which companies may want to comment.

  19. Update on Treatment Options for Gonococcal Infections.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Jason W; Mahoney, Monica V; Mandal, Sana; Lawrence, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in the United States has grown over the past decade. The most recent data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that reported cases have increased by almost 10% over the last 5 years. In conjunction with this rise, the presence of multidrug-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae has also emerged. The 2015 CDC guidelines recommend dual therapy with intramuscular ceftriaxone and oral azithromycin as first-line treatment, although components of this regimen are met with a high level of resistance. Although ceftriaxone resistance has not yet been reported in the United States, it is only a matter of time before such isolates are detected, thus ushering in a new era of difficult-to-manage uncomplicated gonococcal infection. The potential public health crisis and patient-associated sequelae (e.g., pelvic inflammatory disease, epididymitis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection) linked with untreatable gonorrhea are cause for great concern. To try to stem this tide, a number of new agents targeted against N. gonorrhoeae are being investigated in clinical trials. In this article, we review the various agents, both currently available and under clinical investigation, and provide recommendations for the management of gonococcal infections. PMID:26343813

  20. Naegleria fowleri: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  1. Treatment options for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Brian; Younossi, Zobair M.

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become increasingly recognized as the most common cause of abnormal liver enzymes in the last few decades and is among the most common forms of chronic liver disease in the Western world and across the globe. With the growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, NAFLD is estimated to affect about one-quarter of the US population. Although most patients with NAFLD have nonprogressive bland steatosis, a minority of patients develop the histological subtype of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related death. This is especially true when NASH patients have type 2 diabetes. Treatment of NAFLD should therefore be directed towards patients with established NASH. Sustained weight loss seems to improve insulin resistance and associated NASH. In fact, weight loss with bariatric surgery leads to biochemical and histological improvement in morbidly obese patients with NASH. Several pharmacologic agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and pro-inflammatory mediators potentially responsible for the development and progression of NASH. While some studies have shown initial promise, none has established long-term efficacy using randomized clinical trials. This paper briefly reviews the epidemiology, natural history, and pathophysiology of NAFLD and NASH and then focuses on the clinical trials of various therapeutic modalities for NAFLD. These include weight loss agents, bariatric surgery, insulin-sensitizing agents, lipid-lowering agents, antioxidants, probiotics, anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, cytoprotective and other novel agents. PMID:21180596

  2. An overview of treatment options for urinary stones

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Hamid; Moazzami, Bobak; Pourghasem, Mohsen; Kasaeian, Aliakbar

    2016-01-01

    Urolithiasis has become a worldwide problem with the prevalence of the disease increasing over the past few decades. While various treatment modalities have evolved over the years, discrepancies exist regarding the clinical indications and the efficacy of each of these treatment options. In the present review, we aim to review the current treatment modalities for urinary tract stones to provide a better understanding on the therapeutic approaches as well as their clinical indications. PMID:26958325

  3. Hypercalcemia of malignancy and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Sternlicht, Hillel; Glezerman, Ilya G

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy affects up to one in five cancer patients during the course of their disease. It is associated with both liquid malignancies, commonly multiple myeloma, leukemia, and non-Hodgkins lymphoma and solid cancers, particularly breast and renal carcinomas as well as squamous cell carcinomas of any organ. The clinical manifestations of hypercalcemia are generally constitutional in nature and not specific to the inciting malignancy. Such physical manifestations can range from malaise to lethargy and confusion. Constipation and anorexia are common. Acute kidney injury is likely the most frequently encountered manifestation of end organ damage. Symptomatology is closely linked to both the absolute elevation of serum calcium levels and the rapidity of calcium rise. The majority of cases are humoral in etiology and related to parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Approximately 20% of cases are the result of direct bone metastasis with extra-renal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) and ectopic parathyroid hormone production likely accounting for less than 1% of cases. The diagnosis of hypercalcemia of malignancy is confirmed either by an elevated PTHrP or by an evidence of bone metastasis in the appropriate clinical setting. Treatment is predicated on the patient’s symptoms and absolute serum calcium level. Interventions are aimed at lowering the serum calcium concentration by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing urinary calcium excretion, the former accomplished via bisphosphonate therapy and the latter with aggressive hydration. Novel therapies for refractory disease include denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand, and the calcimimetic cinacalcet. Finally, anti-PTHrP antibodies have been successfully deployed in animal models of disease. Despite the efficacy of the above therapies, hypercalcemia of malignancy portends an ominous prognosis, indicating advanced and often refractory cancer with survival on the order of months. PMID:26675713

  4. Update on treatment options for spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ulu-Kilic, A; Karakas, A; Erdem, H; Turker, T; Inal, A S; Ak, O; Turan, H; Kazak, E; Inan, A; Duygu, F; Demiraslan, H; Kader, C; Sener, A; Dayan, S; Deveci, O; Tekin, R; Saltoglu, N; Aydın, M; Horasan, E S; Gul, H C; Ceylan, B; Kadanalı, A; Karabay, O; Karagoz, G; Kayabas, U; Turhan, V; Engin, D; Gulsun, S; Elaldı, N; Alabay, S

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of antibiotic regimens and optimal duration of therapy in complicated and uncomplicated forms of spinal brucellosis. This is a multicentre, retrospective and comparative study involving a total of 293 patients with spinal brucellosis from 19 health institutions. Comparison of complicated and uncomplicated spinal brucellosis was statistically analysed. Complicated spinal brucellosis was diagnosed in 78 (26.6%) of our patients. Clinical presentation was found to be significantly more acute, with fever and weight loss, in patients in the complicated group. They had significantly higher leukocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C-reactive protein levels, and lower haemoglobulin levels. The involvement of the thoracic spine was significantly more frequent in complicated cases. Spondylodiscitis was complicated, with paravertebral abscess in 38 (13.0%), prevertebral abscess in 13 (4.4%), epidural abscess in 30 (10.2%), psoas abscess in 10 (3.4%) and radiculitis in 8 (2.7%) patients. The five major combination regimens were: doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and gentamicin 5 mg/kg; doxycycline 200 mg/day and rifampicin 600 mg/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; and doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1 g/day. There were no significant therapeutic differences between these antibiotic groups; the results were similar regarding the complicated and uncomplicated groups. Patients were mostly treated with doxycycline and rifampicin with or without an aminoglycoside. In the former subgroup, complicated cases received antibiotics for a longer duration than uncomplicated cases. Early recognition of complicated cases is critical in preventing devastating complications. Antimicrobial treatment should be prolonged in complicated spinal brucellosis in particular. PMID:24118178

  5. Hypercalcemia of malignancy and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Hillel; Glezerman, Ilya G

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy affects up to one in five cancer patients during the course of their disease. It is associated with both liquid malignancies, commonly multiple myeloma, leukemia, and non-Hodgkins lymphoma and solid cancers, particularly breast and renal carcinomas as well as squamous cell carcinomas of any organ. The clinical manifestations of hypercalcemia are generally constitutional in nature and not specific to the inciting malignancy. Such physical manifestations can range from malaise to lethargy and confusion. Constipation and anorexia are common. Acute kidney injury is likely the most frequently encountered manifestation of end organ damage. Symptomatology is closely linked to both the absolute elevation of serum calcium levels and the rapidity of calcium rise. The majority of cases are humoral in etiology and related to parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Approximately 20% of cases are the result of direct bone metastasis with extra-renal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) and ectopic parathyroid hormone production likely accounting for less than 1% of cases. The diagnosis of hypercalcemia of malignancy is confirmed either by an elevated PTHrP or by an evidence of bone metastasis in the appropriate clinical setting. Treatment is predicated on the patient's symptoms and absolute serum calcium level. Interventions are aimed at lowering the serum calcium concentration by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing urinary calcium excretion, the former accomplished via bisphosphonate therapy and the latter with aggressive hydration. Novel therapies for refractory disease include denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand, and the calcimimetic cinacalcet. Finally, anti-PTHrP antibodies have been successfully deployed in animal models of disease. Despite the efficacy of the above therapies, hypercalcemia of malignancy portends an ominous prognosis, indicating advanced and often refractory cancer with survival on the order of months. PMID:26675713

  6. Non-Surgical Interventions for Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Płaszewski, Maciej; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis remain highly controversial. Despite the publication of numerous reviews no explicit methodological evaluation of papers labeled as, or having a layout of, a systematic review, addressing this subject matter, is available. Objectives Analysis and comparison of the content, methodology, and evidence-base from systematic reviews regarding non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. Design Systematic overview of systematic reviews. Methods Articles meeting the minimal criteria for a systematic review, regarding any non-surgical intervention for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, with any outcomes measured, were included. Multiple general and systematic review specific databases, guideline registries, reference lists and websites of institutions were searched. The AMSTAR tool was used to critically appraise the methodology, and the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and the Joanna Briggs Institute’s hierarchies were applied to analyze the levels of evidence from included reviews. Results From 469 citations, twenty one papers were included for analysis. Five reviews assessed the effectiveness of scoliosis-specific exercise treatments, four assessed manual therapies, five evaluated bracing, four assessed different combinations of interventions, and one evaluated usual physical activity. Two reviews addressed the adverse effects of bracing. Two papers were high quality Cochrane reviews, Three were of moderate, and the remaining sixteen were of low or very low methodological quality. The level of evidence of these reviews ranged from 1 or 1+ to 4, and in some reviews, due to their low methodological quality and/or poor reporting, this could not be established. Conclusions Higher quality reviews indicate that generally there is insufficient evidence to make a judgment on whether non-surgical interventions in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are effective. Papers labeled as systematic reviews need to be considered in terms of their methodological rigor; otherwise they may be mistakenly regarded as high quality sources of evidence. Protocol registry number CRD42013003538, PROSPERO PMID:25353954

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  8. NON-SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF HEAVY MENSTRUAL BLEEDING: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND PRACTICE GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Matteson, Kristen A.; Rahn, David D.; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Casiano, Elizabeth; Siddiqui, Nazema Y.; Harvey, Heidi S.; Mamik, Mamta M.; Balk, Ethan M.; Sung, Vivian W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of non-surgical abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) treatments for bleeding control, quality of life, pain, sexual health, patient satisfaction, additional treatments needed, and adverse events. Data Sources MEDLINE and Cochrane databases from inception to May 2012. We included randomized controlled trials of non-surgical treatments for AUB. Interventions included the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, progestins, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antifibrinolytics. Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists, danazol, and placebo were allowed as comparators. Study selection Two reviewers independently screened the 5846 citations and extracted eligible trials. Studies were assessed for quality and strength of evidence. Tabulation, Integration, and Results Twenty-six trials of eight different interventions met inclusion criteria. For the reduction of menstrual bleeding in women with AUB-E, the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, extended cycle oral progestins, tranexamic acid, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were all effective treatments. The levonorgestrel intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, and antifibrinolytics were all superior to luteal phase progestins. The levonorgestrel intrauterine system was superior to combined oral contraceptives and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Antifibrinolytics were superior to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for menstrual bleeding reduction. Data were limited on other important outcomes for women with AUB-E and on women with AUB-O. Conclusion Many non-surgical treatments for AUB are effective for reducing menstrual bleeding in women with AUB-E. Additional research is necessary to determine the effectiveness of treatments for other essential quality of life outcomes, and for other populations, including women with AUB-O. PMID:23635628

  9. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Haley J.; Pogue, Jason M.; Kaye, Keith S.; LaPlante, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of currently available treatment options for infections due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is an emerging and serious global public health threat. Carbapenems have been used as the “last-line” treatment for infections caused by resistant Enterobacteriaceae, including those producing extended spectrum ß-lactamases. However, Enterobacteriaceae that produce carbapenemases, which are enzymes that deactivate carbapenems and most other ß-lactam antibiotics, have emerged and are increasingly being reported worldwide. Despite this increasing burden, the most optimal treatment for CRE infections is largely unknown. For the few remaining available treatment options, there are limited efficacy data to support their role in therapy. Nevertheless, current treatment options include the use of older agents, such as polymyxins, fosfomycin, and aminoglycosides, which have been rarely used due to efficacy and/or toxicity concerns. Optimization of dosing regimens and combination therapy are additional treatment strategies being explored. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections are associated with poor outcomes and high mortality. Continued research is critically needed to determine the most appropriate treatment. PMID:26125030

  10. Current options for the treatment of facial angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Salido-Vallejo, R; Garnacho-Saucedo, G; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are hamartomatous growths that are closely associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and, in fact, they constitute one of the main diagnostic criteria for that disease. These lesions composed of blood vessels and fibrous tissue appear on the face at an early age. Since they have important physical and psychological repercussions for patients, several treatment options have been used to remove them or improve their appearance. However, the lack of treatment guidelines prevents us from developing a common protocol for patients with this condition. The present article aims to review the treatments for facial angiofibromas used to date and to propose a new evidence-based treatment protocol. PMID:23522741

  11. Some current treatment options for symptoms of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Shader, R I; Greenblatt, D J

    1983-11-01

    The psychologic (i.e., psychotherapeutic or behavioral) and pharmacologic approaches available for the treatment of anxiety are reviewed. Accurate diagnosis and consideration of patient characteristics are essential in choosing among the numerous treatment options. Nonpharmacologic methods are generally the first treatment choice in situational and nonincapacitating anxiety. When anxiety is severe and prolonged, adjunctive drug treatment is appropriate, with antidepressants for phobic and panic states and anxiolytics for generalized anxiety disorder and mixed anxiety and depression. Benzodiazepines are currently the anxiolytics of choice; newer nonbenzodiazepine compounds may provide increased safety. PMID:6139367

  12. Waste battery treatment options: comparing their environmental performance.

    PubMed

    Briffaerts, K; Spirinckx, C; Van der Linden, A; Vrancken, K

    2009-08-01

    Waste consumer batteries are recycled using different routes based on hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. Two hydrometallurgical and two pyrometallurgical treatment scenarios are compared starting from an average composition of Belgian waste batteries. The environmental performance is compared using life cycle analysis (LCA). The recycling rate is studied through mass balance calculation. Each treatment scenario results in a specific recycling rate. The environmental impact and benefits also vary between the treatment options. There is no such thing as a typical hydrometallurgical or pyrometallurgical treatment. When applying a hydrometallurgical treatment scenario, the focus lies on zinc and iron recycling. When allowing manganese recycling, the energy demand of the hydrometallurgical process increases considerably. Both pyrometallurgical options recycle zinc, iron and manganese. According to the LCA, none of the treatment scenarios performs generally better or worse than the others. Each option has specific advantages and disadvantages. The Batteries Directive 2006/66/EC sets out a recycling rate of 50% for consumer waste batteries. Based on metal recycling alone, the mass balances show that the target is difficult to obtain. PMID:19386482

  13. The ProFHER (PROximal Fracture of the Humerus: Evaluation by Randomisation) trial - a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of surgical compared with non-surgical treatment for proximal fracture of the humerus in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Handoll, Helen; Brealey, Stephen; Rangan, Amar; Keding, Ada; Corbacho, Belen; Jefferson, Laura; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Goodchild, Lorna; Hewitt, Catherine; Torgerson, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Proximal humeral fractures account for 5-6% of all fractures in adults. There is considerable variation in whether or not surgery is used in the management of displaced fractures involving the surgical neck. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of surgical compared with non-surgical treatment of the majority of displaced fractures of the proximal humerus involving the surgical neck in adults. DESIGN A pragmatic parallel-group multicentre randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation. Follow-up was for 2 years. SETTING Recruitment was undertaken in the orthopaedic departments of 33 acute NHS hospitals in the UK. Patient care pathways included outpatient and community-based rehabilitation. PARTICIPANTS Adults (aged ≥ 16 years) presenting within 3 weeks of their injury with a displaced fracture of the proximal humerus involving the surgical neck. INTERVENTIONS The choice of surgical intervention was left to the treating surgeons, who used techniques with which they were experienced. Non-surgical treatment was initial sling immobilisation followed by active rehabilitation. Provision of rehabilitation was comparable in both groups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) assessed at 6, 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes were the 12-item Short Form health survey, surgical and other shoulder fracture-related complications, secondary surgery to the shoulder or increased/new shoulder-related therapy, medical complications during inpatient stay and mortality. European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions data and treatment costs were also collected. RESULTS The mean age of the 250 trial participants was 66 years and 192 (77%) were female. Independent assessment using the Neer classification identified 18 one-part fractures, 128 two-part fractures and 104 three- or four-part fractures. OSS data were available for 215 participants at 2 years. We found no statistically or clinically significant differences in OSS scores between the two treatment groups (scale 0-48, with a higher score indicating a better outcome) over the 2-year period [difference of 0.75 points in favour of the surgery group, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.33 to 2.84; p = 0.479; data from 114 surgery and 117 non-surgery participants] or at individual time points. We found no statistically significant differences between surgical and non-surgical group participants in SF-12 physical or mental component summary scores; surgical or shoulder fracture-related complications (30 vs. 23 respectively); those undergoing further shoulder-related therapy, either surgery (11 vs. 11 respectively) or other therapy (seven vs. four respectively); or mortality (nine vs. five respectively). The base-case economic analysis showed that, at 2 years, the cost of surgical intervention was, on average, £1780.73 more per patient (95% CI £1152.71 to £2408.75) than the cost of non-surgical intervention. It was also slightly less beneficial in terms of utilities, although this difference was not statistically significant. The net monetary benefit associated with surgery is negative. There was only a 5% probability of surgery achieving the criterion of costing < £20,000 to gain a quality-adjusted life-year, which was confirmed by extensive sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSIONS Current surgical practice does not result in a better outcome for most patients with displaced fractures of the proximal humerus involving the surgical neck and is not cost-effective in the UK setting. Two areas for future work are the setting up of a national database of these fractures, including the collection of patient-reported outcomes, and research on the best ways of informing patients with these and other upper limb fractures about initial self-care. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN50850043. FUNDING This project was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 19, No. 24. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:25822598

  14. Lack of tolerable treatment options for patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie; Eramo, Anna; Francois, Clement; Duffy, Ruth; Legacy, Susan N; Offord, Steve J; Krasa, Holly B; Johnston, Stephen S; Guiraud-Diawara, Alice; Kamat, Siddhesh A; Rohman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Atypical antipsychotics (AAs), an effective treatment for schizophrenia, have a range of pharmacologic properties leading to differences in tolerability as well as heterogeneity in treatment response. Individual patient characteristics must be considered when making treatment choices, especially from an adverse event (AE) or tolerability perspective. Despite the availability of numerous AAs, after appraising patient characteristics at the time of treatment selection, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options. Patients and methods AE risk factors, defined as having either a prior history of an AE or a risk factor for that AE, were determined for Medicaid-insured and Commercially insured patients using database analysis. Patients receiving AA treatment between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 defined the index date of first observed AA prescription during this period. Nine AAs were evaluated for association with AE risk factors as informed by drug prescribing information from the different manufacturers and published meta-analyses. The proportion of patients with pre-index AE risk factors prescribed an AA associated with that risk factor was then determined. Results A high proportion of patients (>80%) were prescribed an AA associated with extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia despite experiencing extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia prior to AA treatment initiation. Similar trends were observed among patients with diabetes (>60%) and obesity (>40%). From the nine treatment options available, the number of optimal choices for individual patient segments were limited based on their prior history, including those with cardiometabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities (four); experiencing prolactin elevation-related problems (seven); needing to avoid excessive sedation (four); or at risk of extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia (two). Options were then further restricted among patients in more than one segment when multiple pre-index AE risk factors were combined. Conclusion When combining patient risk profile with antipsychotic AE profile, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options for individual patients, despite the availability of many AAs, suggesting a need for additional treatment options with better tolerability and without compromising efficacy. PMID:26719694

  15. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  16. Parents’ Online Portrayals of Pediatric Treatment and Research Options

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Rebecca; Henderson, Gail E.; Churchill, Larry R.; King, Nancy M. P.; Rothschild, Barbra B.; Lohser, Sara; Davis, Arlene M.

    2012-01-01

    Parents of seriously ill children face difficult decisions when standard therapies are limited or ineffective. In their search for information, they may turn to websites created by other parents facing similar experiences. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of 21 websites created by families with children affected by cancer or genetic disease, two serious conditions with a range of treatment and clinical trial options. Our research questions address how parent authors portray serious pediatric illness, available options, parties to decision making, and sources of influence. In addition, we examine what these sites reveal about family vulnerability to various risks, particularly the risk of misunderstanding the distinction between standard treatment and research and the risk of overestimating the likely benefits of research participation, as well as whether vulnerability varies by type of condition. Our results demonstrate typically favorable views on research, but with inadequate distinctions between research and treatment and a complex set of trade-offs in consideration of research risks and potential benefits. While portraits of vulnerability emerge for both parents and children, so do portraits of strength and resilience. As a result, parents describe frustration with both under- and over-protection from research participation. Our discussion of these findings clarifies the potential for parent-authored websites to inform and influence families considering research and treatment options for their seriously ill children. PMID:19754237

  17. Gastroparesis: a review of current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Enweluzo, Chijioke; Aziz, Fahad

    2013-01-01

    Gastroparesis is a motility disorder of the stomach causing delay in food emptying from the stomach without any evidence of mechanical obstruction. The majority of cases are idiopathic. Patients need to be diagnosed properly by formal testing, and the evaluation of the severity of the gastroparesis may assist in guiding therapy. Initially, dietary modifications are encouraged, which include frequent and small semisolid-based meals. Promotility medications, like erythromycin, and antiemetics, like prochlorperazine, are offered for symptom relief. In patients who are refractory to pharmacologic treatment, more invasive options, such as intrapyloric botulinum toxin injections, placement of a jejunostomy tube, or implantation of a gastric stimulator, can be considered. Hemin therapy and gastric electric stimulation are emerging treatment options that are still at different stages of research. Regenerative medicine and stem cell-based therapies also hold promise for gastroparesis in the near future. PMID:24039443

  18. Treatment options for active removal of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, G J J; De Laet, K; Wijn, R P W F; Wijn, P F F

    2012-04-01

    This study provides an update on the technological aspects of the methods for active removal of renal stones. Currently, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureteroscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) are the available options. Findings are based upon recent literature from the PubMed database and the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. ESWL remains the option of choice for stones with diameter ≤ 20 mm due to its low invasive character, whereas PCNL is the standard for stones with diameter > 20 mm because of its high stone-free rates. Although ESWL treatment has become more patient friendly, its efficacy has not improved. On the other hand, URS has gained renewed interest due to new technological developments and improved treatment methods. PMID:22384986

  19. Treatment Options for Patellofemoral Instability in Sports Traumatology

    PubMed Central

    M. Tscholl, Philippe; P. Koch, Peter; F. Fucentese, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Patellofemoral instability not only involves lateral patellar dislocation, patellar mal-tracking or subluxation but can also cause a limiting disability for sports activities. Its underlying causes are known as morphological anomalies of the patellofemoral joint or the mechanical axis, femorotibial malrotation, variants of the knee extensor apparatus, and ligamentous insufficiencies often accompanied by poor proprioception. Athletes with such predisposing factors are either suffering from unspecific anterior knee pain or from slightly traumatic or recurrent lateral patellar dislocation Treatment options of patellar instability are vast, and need to be tailored individually depending on the athlete’s history, age, complaints and physical demands. Different conservative and surgical treatment options are reviewed and discussed, especially limited expectations after surgery. PMID:24191183

  20. Onychomycosis: Evaluation, Treatment Options, Managing Recurrence, and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C

    2016-07-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common nail disease seen in podiatric practice. Effective long-term management remains problematic. We need to treat onychomycosis effectively to prevent its progression into a severe, debilitating, and painful condition, and to manage recurrence. With new agents now available and greater discussion on management strategies, this article reviews the appropriate evaluation of the disease, treatment options, and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:27215153

  1. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Endovascular Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Raghuram; Scott, Paul M.; Robinson, Graham J.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2011-02-15

    Carotid stump syndrome is one of the recognised causes of recurrent ipsilateral cerebrovascular events after occlusion of the internal carotid artery. It is believed that microemboli arising from the stump of the occluded internal carotid artery or the ipsilateral external carotid artery can pass into the middle cerebral artery circulation as a result of patent external carotid-internal carotid anastomotic channels. Different pathophysiologic causes of this syndrome and endovascular options for treatment are discussed.

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated. We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: “CAM” in conjunction with “OM” and “children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies. The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications. The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  3. Biological treatment options for cyanobacteria metabolite removal--a review.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lionel; Sawade, Emma; Newcombe, Gayle

    2012-04-01

    The treatment of cyanobacterial metabolites can consume many resources for water authorities which can be problematic especially with the recent shift away from chemical- and energy-intensive processes towards carbon and climate neutrality. In recent times, there has been a renaissance in biological treatment, in particular, biological filtration processes, for cyanobacteria metabolite removal. This in part, is due to the advances in molecular microbiology which has assisted in further understanding the biodegradation processes of specific cyanobacteria metabolites. However, there is currently no concise portfolio which captures all the pertinent information for the biological treatment of a range of cyanobacterial metabolites. This review encapsulates all the relevant information to date in one document and provides insights into how biological treatment options can be implemented in treatment plants for optimum cyanobacterial metabolite removal. PMID:22133838

  4. Vaginitis: Making Sense of Over-the-Counter Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    B. Angotti, Lauren; C. Lambert, Lara; E. Soper, David

    2007-01-01

    Background. The FDA approved over-the-counter (OTC) use of vaginal antifungals in 1990. Subsequently, a plethora of OTC products have become available to women on drugstore shelves. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of OTC products marketed for the treatment of vaginitis and to determine if their efficacy had been confirmed by published prospective randomized control trials (RCTs). Materials and methods. The authors chose four retail locations frequented by women seeking vaginitis treatment. All products deemed a viable treatment option were purchased. Results. All intravaginal imidazoles purchased, regardless of treatment duration or active ingredient, were found to be of proven efficacy. We were unable to find an RCT confirming the effectiveness of vaginal anti-itch creams and homeopathic treatments for vaginitis. Conclusion. 45% of products available to women in the feminine hygiene section of the stores surveyed could not be confirmed to be effective for treating infectious vaginitis. PMID:18253469

  5. Chemical fixation increases options for hazardous waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, G.J.; Tipton, G.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) govern the manner in which hazardous materials are managed. Disposing RCRA hazardous wastes on or in the land is no longer an accepted remedial option. This land disposal restriction requires that all listed and characteristic hazardous wastes must be treated according to specified standards before they are disposed. These treatment standards define technologies and concentration limits. Hazardous wastes that do not meet the standards are prohibited from being disposed on land, such as in landfills, surface impoundments, land treatment units, injection wells, and mines or caves.

  6. Helping Women Understand Treatment Options for Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Parks, Diane M; Levine, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) is a common and progressive medical condition in postmenopausal women. The REVIVE (REal Women's VIews of Treatment Options for Menopausal Vaginal ChangEs) survey assessed knowledge about VVA and its impact in 3,046 postmenopausal U.S. women, and recorded women's attitudes about their interactions with health care providers and about available treatments. REVIVE identified poor disease awareness and understanding among women, failure of health care professionals to evaluate women for VVA signs and symptoms, low treatment rates and concerns about the safety and efficacy of available therapies. Strategies to address these needs include proactive screening, education for women and clinicians about VVA and recommendations for treatment and follow-up. PMID:26264795

  7. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis: a comprehensive review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Elliot; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2004-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF), also known as Ofuji disease, is a disease that manifests with follicular papules or pustules. Its variants include a classic type that occurs most commonly in Japan, an HIV-associated type, an infantile type, a type that occurs on the palms and soles, a rare medication-associated variant, and a rare neoplasia-associated variant.A wide range of medications has been used to treat EPF. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line treatment option for EPF. Topical tacrolimus seems to be useful initial therapy as well. Oral indometacin (50-75 mg/day) is an effective treatment of classic EPF although it can induce peptic ulcers. For treatment of HIV-associated EPF when topical corticosteroids and indometacin do not work, various other treatments should be considered. These treatment options include cetirizine 20-40 mg/day, metronidazole 250 mg three times a day, itraconazole starting at a dosage of 200 mg/day and increasing to 300-400 mg/day, and topical permethrin. If these treatments do not work phototherapy with UVB is the 'gold standard' of treatment and is often curative. Treatments with less certain risk-benefit ratios but with some efficacy include PUVA (psoralen + UVA) photochemotherapy, oral corticosteroids, synthetic retinoids (i.e. isotretinoin 1 mg/kg/day), and acitretin (0.5 mg/kg/day), oral cyclosporine (ciclosporine) 5 mg/kg/day, interferon (IFN)-alpha-2b, and IFNgamma. Minocycline 100mg twice daily and dapsone 50-100mg twice daily have been used with some effect. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV has resulted in the amelioration of EPF as CD4 cell counts rise above 250/mm(3). The diversity of clinical presentations and affected populations make it seem that EPF is a reaction pattern as much as a disease and that therapy should be tailored to the variant of EPF and the underlying etiology. PMID:15186198

  8. Non-invasive treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-TING; ZHOU, DONG

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) presents a strong clinical challenge especially for the treatment of the associated epilepsy. Epilepsy in FCD is often treatment-resistant and constitutes 50% of treatment-resistant cases. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely used in the treatment of FCD. However, evidence to suggest their specific effect on the treatment of FCD remains to be established. In view of this resistance, several alternative treatments have been suggested. Although treatment currently involves surgical management, non-invasive treatments have been identified. The aim of the present review, was to assess non-invasive management strategies including, i) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, ii) ketogenic diet (KD), and iii) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). In addition, we discussed the literature available regarding the use of AEDs in FCD. Experiments conducted with mammals detailing rapamycin gene mutations in FCD have produced vital information for exploring treatment options using mTOR inhibitors. Of note is the importance of KD in children with FCD. This diet has been shown to modify disease progression by attenuating chromatin modification, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell. FCD has also been studied widely with neurostimulation techniques. The outcomes of these techniques have been found to be variable. For widespread dysplasias, VNS has been shown to produce responder rates of >50%. Nevertheless, non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation techniques such as transcutaneous VNS and non-invasive VNS are gaining better patient compatibility, albeit their efficacy remains to be established. PMID:27168769

  9. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  10. Treatment Options for Breast Cancer Resistant to Anthracycline and Taxane

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Perez, Edith A.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among every major ethnic group of women in the United States. Anthracyclines and taxanes are the most active and widely used chemotherapeutic agents for breast cancer, but the increased use of these agents at an early stage of disease often renders tumors resistant to these drugs by the time the disease recurs, thereby reducing the number of treatment options for metastatic disease. Moreover, even when these agents can be used in the metastatic setting, treatment failure occurs in most cases, and as a result the 5-year survival rates of patients with metastatic breast cancer are low. This outcome underscores the need for new, effective treatments of metastatic breast cancer and has led to investigation of novel ways to overcome the problem of drug resistance. This article reviews the current treatment options for breast cancer resistant to anthracycline and taxane and provides recommendations for disease management. Published sources for this review were found by searching PubMed (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) and congress Web sites. PMID:19483170

  11. Options and opportunities for clinical management and treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Udita; Gupta, Madhu; Dube, Devyani; Vyas, Suresh P

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a complex, multifactorial disease that appears to be influenced by immune-mediated components. For many years the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been discordant; the clinical picture suggested that the psoriasis was secondary to abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, but later the role of the T cell was revealed. A variety of treatment options range from topical agents (e.g., coal tar, dithranol, and emollients for milder forms) to systemic agents (i.e., methotrexate or cyclosporin), and phototherapy. Recently, biologics have been added to this list that target particular steps in the immune or inflammatory pathways. Various nanocarriers (e.g., liposomes, niosomes, and microemulsions) have been successfully exploited for the delivery of several antipsoriatic drugs. This review provides insight into various psoriasis treatment strategies-from conventional to novel-currently in use or in development as well as the novel targets that have been explored and/or investigated for anti-psoriatic therapy. The pathogenesis of psoriasis and some of the topical, systemic biological, and novel approaches currently in use or in development are reviewed here. The pros and cons of each treatment strategy are presented, as are some of the animal models used to study features reminiscent of psoriasis. This information can be used to better the understanding of treatment options for this disease. PMID:23510110

  12. [Therapy of both surgical and non-surgical related complication of gastric cancer for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zheng, Jiabin

    2016-05-25

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common digestive malignant tumors. More and more elderly gastric cancer patients are diagnosed and need to undergo surgical treatment as the population ages. Since the elderly patients decrease in organ function and increase in internal diseases, the tolerance to anesthesia and surgery is poor. As a result, the incidence of surgical and postoperative complications is obviously higher. Complications can be divided into surgical complications and non-surgical related complications. Surgical complications consist mainly of hemorrhage, anastomotic leakage, anastomotic dehiscence and intestinal obstruction, while non-surgical related complications include deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary infection, anesthesia-related complication, abdominal infection, urinary infection, incision infection, poor wound healing, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, dumping syndrome and so on. Hence, we should consider more about the elderly patients' physical condition instead of the extent of radical operation. To reduce complications, we should evaluate the organ function and take an active role in underlying diseases before operation. Meanwhile, high quality nursing, powerful analgesia, anti-inflammation, keeping water electrolyte balance and nutrition support are also required postoperatively. Moreover, laparoscopic surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) can reduce the postoperative complications in elderly patients with gastric cancer as well. Further prospective randomized controlled trials about elderly gastric cancer should be carried out in the future, which can provide advanced evidences for treatment. PMID:27215514

  13. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate–guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has yet to be proven in clinical trials. PMID:25733916

  14. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has yet to be proven in clinical trials. PMID:25733916

  15. Medical and Surgical Treatment Options for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Kathleen E; Rinella, Mary E

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease in the USA with a growing prevalence worldwide. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), progressive form of NAFLD, can lead to the development of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and the need for liver transplantation. Treatment of NASH may decrease the risk of progressive disease. Treatment for NAFLD should center around weight loss and exercise. Pharmacotherapy with vitamin E and pioglitazone should be considered for those with NASH, especially those with fibrosis. Weight loss surgery is also an effective treatment for NASH in individuals with other indications for surgery. In this review, we will discuss the currently available therapies for NASH including lifestyle, pharmacologic, and surgical options. PMID:26942734

  16. Radiofrequency ablation for treatment of hypersplenism: A feasible therapeutic option

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Guilherme Lopes P; Bernardes, Joao Paulo G; Rovella, Marcello S; Andrade, Raphael G; Viana, Publio Cesar C; Herman, Paulo; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with hypersplenism secondary to portal hypertension due to hepato-splenic schistosomiasis, which was accompanied by severe and refractory thrombocytopenia. We performed spleen ablation and measured the total spleen and ablated volumes with contrast-enhanced computed tomography and volumetry. No major complications occurred, thrombocytopenia was resolved, and platelet levels remained stable, which allowed for early treatment of the patient’s underlying disease. Previous work has shown that splenic radiofrequency ablation is an attractive alternative treatment for hypersplenism induced by liver cirrhosis. We aimed to contribute to the currently sparse literature evaluating the role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the management of hypersplenism. We conclude that splenic RFA appears to be a viable and promising option for the treatment of hypersplenism. PMID:26034376

  17. Treatment options for vasomotor symptoms in menopause: focus on desvenlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Umland, Elena M; Falconieri, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), including hot flashes and night sweats, occur in as many as 68.5% of women as a result of menopause. While the median duration of these symptoms is 4 years, approximately 10% of women continue to experience VMS as many as 12 years after their final menstrual period. As such, VMS have a significant impact on the quality of life and overall physical health of women experiencing VMS, leading to their pursuance of treatment to alleviate these symptoms. Management of VMS includes lifestyle modifications, some herbal and vitamin supplements, hormonal therapies including estrogen and tibolone, and nonhormonal therapies including clonidine, gabapentin, and some of the serotonin and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The latter agents, including desvenlafaxine, have been the focus of increased research as more is discovered about the roles of serotonin and norepinephrine in the thermoregulatory control system. This review will include an overview of VMS as they relate to menopause. It will discuss the risk factors for VMS as well as the proposed pathophysiology behind their occurrence. The variety of treatment options for VMS will be discussed. Focus will be given to the role of desvenlafaxine as a treatment option for VMS management. PMID:22870045

  18. Treatment options for vasomotor symptoms in menopause: focus on desvenlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Umland, Elena M; Falconieri, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), including hot flashes and night sweats, occur in as many as 68.5% of women as a result of menopause. While the median duration of these symptoms is 4 years, approximately 10% of women continue to experience VMS as many as 12 years after their final menstrual period. As such, VMS have a significant impact on the quality of life and overall physical health of women experiencing VMS, leading to their pursuance of treatment to alleviate these symptoms. Management of VMS includes lifestyle modifications, some herbal and vitamin supplements, hormonal therapies including estrogen and tibolone, and nonhormonal therapies including clonidine, gabapentin, and some of the serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The latter agents, including desvenlafaxine, have been the focus of increased research as more is discovered about the roles of serotonin and norepinephrine in the thermoregulatory control system. This review will include an overview of VMS as they relate to menopause. It will discuss the risk factors for VMS as well as the proposed pathophysiology behind their occurrence. The variety of treatment options for VMS will be discussed. Focus will be given to the role of desvenlafaxine as a treatment option for VMS management. PMID:22870045

  19. Treatment options of inflammatory appendiceal masses in adults

    PubMed Central

    Tannoury, Jenny; Abboud, Bassam

    2013-01-01

    At present, the treatment of choice for uncomplicated acute appendicitis in adults continues to be surgical. The inflammation in acute appendicitis may sometimes be enclosed by the patient’s own defense mechanisms, by the formation of an inflammatory phlegmon or a circumscribed abscess. The management of these patients is controversial. Immediate appendectomy may be technically demanding. The exploration often ends up in an ileocecal resection or a right-sided hemicolectomy. Recently, the conditions for conservative management of these patients have changed due to the development of computed tomography and ultrasound, which has improved the diagnosis of enclosed inflammation and made drainage of intra-abdominal abscesses easier. New efficient antibiotics have also given new opportunities for nonsurgical treatment of complicated appendicitis. The traditional management of these patients is nonsurgical treatment followed by interval appendectomy to prevent recurrence. The need for interval appendectomy after successful nonsurgical treatment has recently been questioned because the risk of recurrence is relatively small. After successful nonsurgical treatment of an appendiceal mass, the true diagnosis is uncertain in some cases and an underlying diagnosis of cancer or Crohn’s disease may be delayed. This report aims at reviewing the treatment options of patients with enclosed appendiceal inflammation, with emphasis on the success rate of nonsurgical treatment, the need for drainage of abscesses, the risk of undetected serious disease, and the need for interval appendectomy to prevent recurrence. PMID:23840138

  20. Clinical outcomes in surgical and non-surgical management of hepatic portal venous gas

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Soo-Kyung; Park, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is a rare condition, with poor prognosis and a mortality rate of up to 75%. Indications for surgical and non-surgical management of HPVG including associated complications and mortality remain to be clarified. Methods From January 2008 to December 2014, 18 patients with HPVG diagnosed through abdominal computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively identified. Clinical symptoms, laboratory data, underlying diseases, treatment, and mortality rate were analyzed. Patients were classified into 2 groups: surgical management recommended (SR, n=10) and conservative management (CM, n=8). The SR group was further subdivided into patients who underwent surgical management (SM-SR, n=5) and those who were managed conservatively (NS-SR, n=5). Results Conditions underlying HPVG included mesenteric ischemia (38.9%), intestinal obstruction (22.2%), enteritis (22.2%), duodenal ulcer perforation (5.6%), necrotizing pancreatitis (5.6%), and diverticulitis (5.6%). In terms of mortality, 2 patients (40%) died in the SM-SR group, 1 (12.5%) in the CM group, and 100% in the NS-SR group. Higher scores from Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II predicted the mortality rates of the NS-SR and CM groups. Conclusions Identification of HPVG requires careful consideration for surgical management. If surgical management is indicated, prompt laparotomy should be performed. However, even in the non-surgical management condition, aggressive laparotomy can improve survival rates for patients with high APACHE II scores. PMID:26693238

  1. Current Treatment Options for Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease Dementia.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Jennifer Y Y; Lewis, Simon J G

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders encountered in clinical practice. Whilst dementia has long been synonymous with AD, it is becoming more widely accepted as part of the clinical spectrum in PD (PDD). Neuropsychiatric complications, including psychosis, mood and anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders also frequently co-exist with cognitive dysfunctions in AD and PDD patients. The incidence of such symptoms is often a significant source of disability, and may aggravate pre-existing cognitive deficits. Management of AD and PDD involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. Although research on pharmacological therapies for AD and PDD has so far had some success in terms of developing symptomatic treatments, the benefits are often marginal and non-sustained. These shortcomings have led to the investigation of non-pharmacological and novel treatments for both AD and PD. Furthermore, in light of the diverse constellation of other neuropsychiatric, physical, and behavioural symptoms that often occur in AD and PD, consideration needs to be given to the potential side effects of pharmacological treatments where improving one symptom may lead to the worsening of another, rendering the clinical management of these patients challenging. Therefore, the present article will critically review the evidence for both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for cognitive impairment in AD and PD patients. Treatment options for other concomitant neuropsychiatric and behavioural symptoms, as well as novel treatment strategies will also be discussed. PMID:26644155

  2. Tackling sleeplessness: psychological treatment options for insomnia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M; O’Brien, Erin M; Kay, Daniel; McCrae, Christina S

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a broad review of the extant literature involving the treatment of sleeplessness in older adults with insomnia. First, background information (including information regarding key issues in late-life insomnia and epidemiology of late-life insomnia) pertinent to achieving a general understanding of insomnia in the elderly is presented. Next, theories of insomnia in older adults are examined and discussed in relation to treatment of insomnia in late-life. With a general knowledge base provided, empirical evidence for both pharmacological (briefly) and psychological treatment options for insomnia in late-life are summarized. Recent advances in the psychological treatment of insomnia are provided and future directions are suggested. This review is not meant to be all-inclusive; however, it is meant to provide professionals across multiple disciplines (physicians; psychologists; applied and basic researchers) with a mix of breadth and depth of knowledge related to insomnia in late-life. It is our hope that readers will see the evidence in support of psychological treatments for late-life insomnia, and the utility in continuing to investigate this treatment modality. PMID:22323897

  3. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee: Biomechanics, Evaluation, and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allison J; Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Yanke, Adam B; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  4. Gastroparesis: A Review of Current Diagnosis and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Stein, Benjamin; Everhart, Kelly K; Lacy, Brian E

    2015-08-01

    Gastroparesis (GP) is a chronic neuromuscular disorder of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The incidence of GP is not well described; however, the number of individuals affected by symptoms of GP in the United States is estimated to be over 4 million. The etiology of GP is diverse. Approximately 25% of cases are associated with diabetes, whereas nearly 50% are classified as idiopathic; many of these latter cases likely represent a postinfectious process. Connective tissue disorders, autoimmune disorders, prior gastric surgery, ischemia, and medications make up the vast majority of the remaining cases. The pathophysiology of GP is also diverse. Abnormalities in fundic tone, antroduodenal dyscoordination, a weak antral pump, gastric dysrhythmias, and abnormal duodenal feedback all contribute to delays in gastric emptying and symptom expression. Characteristic symptoms of GP include nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, early satiety, and weight loss. The diagnosis of GP is made using a combination of characteristic symptoms in conjunction with objective evidence of delayed gastric emptying in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Once the diagnosis is made, treatment options include dietary modification, medications to accelerate gastric emptying, antiemetic agents, gastric electrical stimulation, and surgery. In the following sections we will provide an overview of the health care impact of GP, describe the underlying pathophysiology, and review treatment options using an evidence-based approach. PMID:25874755

  5. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: pathophysiology and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, J; Jörg, I; Fenyvesi, T

    2002-01-01

    Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a severe complication of heparin therapy. It is generally accompanied by a paradoxical decrease in platelets leading to activation of platelets and of the coagulation system. HIT type I is a mild, transient, non-immune disorder. HIT type II is an immune-mediated reaction towards neo-antigen on PF4, which is platelet factor 4 (PF4) that is exposed upon binding to heparins. A low sulfated octasaccharide is required for binding to PF4. The generated immunoglobulines bridge platelets by binding to the FcgRIIa-receptor. In patients with HIT type II heparin/LMW-heparin has to be discontinued immediately upon clinical suspicion. Diagnosis can be confirmed by laboratory tests. As patients are at high risk for or because they have developed thromboembolism, anticoagulation is mandatory, despite thrombocytopenia. Treatment options are danaparoid, r-hirudin, bivalirudin, argatroban, dextransulfate, and dermatansulfate. In future, fondaparinux and ximelagatran may be considered for treatment. PMID:13679659

  6. New treatment options for the management of restless leg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toro, Beatriz Elizabeth Carmona

    2014-08-01

    Restless leg syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, is a condition that includes sensations such as crawling, tingling, or aching in the limbs and creates an urge to move. The prevalence is estimated at 3% to 15% of the population and may present as primary RLS or secondary RLS. Secondary RLS may be a result of some medications, iron deficiency, or conditions such as neuropathies, or it may be related to pregnancy. The guidelines for diagnosis, which is usually made on clinical presentation, are discussed in the article. Medication use is not always necessary in the management of RLS. Multiple options are available and are reviewed within the article. Since 2011, two medications have been approved for the treatment of RLS, and these are discussed in detail. Neupro (rotigotine) is a dopamine agonist available as a patch that has been approved for the treatment of RLS as well as Parkinson disease. One of the major issues in treating RLS with dopamine agonists is augmentation, meaning symptoms occur earlier in the day due to medication use. This rate of augmentation with use of rotigotine is significantly lower than other dopamine agonists. Horizant (gabapentin enacarbil) is the only nondopaminergic medication approved for the treatment of RLS. Bioavailability is greater in gabapentin enacarbil as compared to gabapentin. Augmentation has not been associated with gabapentin or gabapentin enacarbil. Neupro (rotigotine) and Horizant (gabapentin enacarbil) provide additional treatment options for patients with RLS who are in need of medications. Consideration of each individual patient is necessary when determining if medication is needed and in choosing the appropriate agent. PMID:24992148

  7. [Non-surgical therapy of pancreatitis complications (pseudocyst, abscesses, stenoses)].

    PubMed

    Singer, M V; Forssmann, K

    1994-08-01

    Acute and chronic pseudocysts differ. Chronic pseudocysts develop during the evolution of chronic pancreatitis unrelated to a specific bout of clinically recognizable acute pancreatitis. Acute pseudocysts arise in conjunction with an episode of acute pancreatitis. Whereas until recently surgical therapy has been the standard treatment for acute (or chronic) pancreatic pseudocysts, a range of nonsurgical options has been developed. The most important nonsurgical treatment of all is to watch and wait. Pseudocysts following acute pancreatitis should be observed when they are truly asymptomatic and less than or equal to 6 cm in diameter and left alone if not increasing in size. Only if after a six-week observation period pancreatic pseudocysts increase in diameter and become symptomatic, percutaneous needle aspiration, catheter drainage or an endoscopic drainage procedure (cystogastrostomy/cystoduodenostomy) or ultimately operative drainage procedure should be considered. Antibiotic therapy should be considered for all patients presenting with pancreatic necrosis. They should be treated with drugs administered intravenously at the maximum recommended dose as early as possible after onset of symptoms, continued throughout at least the first two weeks of the disease. Moreover, they should be treated alone and/or in combination with antibiotics that are active against gram-negative organisms of intestinal origin, commonly isolated in necrotic tissue, pseudocysts and infected pancreatic abscesses, and that are capable of penetrating into the pancreatic juice and necrotic tissue (e.g. mezlocillin, cephalosporin, metronidazole). Removal of pancreatic stones and pancreatic stenosis by endoscopic procedures in the treatment of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis is still not an established and generally accepted treatment. Controlled trials to validate stenting and ESWL in chronic pancreatitis are needed. PMID:8091055

  8. Guanfacine Extended Release: A New Pharmacological Treatment Option in Europe.

    PubMed

    Huss, Michael; Chen, Wai; Ludolph, Andrea G

    2016-01-01

    Children/adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have a poor or inadequate response to psychostimulants or be unable to tolerate their side-effects; furthermore, stimulants may be inappropriate because of co-existing conditions. Only one non-stimulant ADHD pharmacotherapy, the noradrenaline transporter inhibitor atomoxetine, is currently approved for use in Europe. We review recent advances in understanding of the pathophysiology of ADHD with a focus on the roles of catecholamine receptors in context of the α2A-adrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine extended release (GXR), a new non-stimulant treatment option in Europe. Neuroimaging studies of children/adolescents with ADHD show impaired brain maturation, and structural and functional anomalies in brain regions and networks. Neurobiological studies in ADHD and medication response patterns support involvement of monoaminergic neurotransmitters (primarily dopamine and noradrenaline). Guanfacine is a selective α2A-adrenergic receptor agonist that has been shown to improve prefrontal cortical cognitive function, including working memory. The hypothesized mode of action of guanfacine centres on direct stimulation of post-synaptic α2A-adrenergic receptors to enhance noradrenaline neurotransmission. Preclinical data suggest that guanfacine also influences dendritic spine growth and maturation. Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of GXR in ADHD, and it is approved as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy to stimulants in Canada and the USA (for children and adolescents). GXR was approved recently in Europe for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents for whom stimulants are not suitable, not tolerated or have been shown to be ineffective. GXR may provide particular benefit for children/adolescents who have specific co-morbidities such as chronic tic disorders or oppositional defiant disorder (or oppositional symptoms) that have failed to respond to first-line treatment options. PMID:26585576

  9. An Update on Medical Treatment Options for Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Deckers, I E; Prens, E P

    2016-02-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by recurrent inflammatory nodules mostly located in the armpits and groin. Over the years multiple treatments for HS have been proposed; however, to date a cure is still lacking. In this update we provide an overview of most drug treatments reported on for HS, where possible with their mode of action and side effects. In mild cases, clindamycin lotion or resorcinol cream have proven effective. Tetracyclines are a first-line systemic option in more widespread or severe cases, followed by the combination of clindamycin and rifampicin. However, the recurrence rate is high after discontinuation of clindamycin plus rifampicin combination therapy. Long-term treatment with retinoids, especially acitretin is feasible, although teratogenicity has to be taken into account in females of reproductive age. Multiple anti-inflammatory drugs have been suggested for HS, such as dapsone, fumarates or cyclosporine. However, their effectiveness in HS is based on small case series with varying results. If most common treatments have failed, biologics (e.g., infliximab or adalimumab) are the next step. Although not addressed in this review, surgical interventions are often needed to achieve remission. PMID:26659474

  10. Emerging treatment options for myelofibrosis: focus on pacritinib

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; O’Connell, Casey Lee; Mehrvar, Azim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is a myeloid malignancy associated with a heavy symptomatic burden that decreases quality of life and presents a risk for leukemic transformation. While there are limited curative treatments, the recent discovery of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway dysregulation has led to many clinical investigations for new treatment approaches. This review provides practical knowledge on the disease state, an overview of treatment options, and specifically focuses on the efficacy and safety of pacritinib in the management of MF. Pacritinib is a novel selective inhibitor of JAK2 and FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) currently in Phase III trials for the treatment of MF. Thus far, studies have demonstrated clinical efficacy in reducing splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms. Common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, while hematologic toxicity was limited. However, it was announced that all ongoing clinical trials on pacritinib have been placed on hold by the US Food and Drug Administration in February 2016, due to concerns for increased intracranial hemorrhage and cardiac events. With comprehensive risk-benefit analysis of clinical trial data, the utility of pacritinib in the management of MF may be more clearly defined. PMID:27226728

  11. Viral myocarditis--diagnosis, treatment options, and current controversies.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Ari; Kontorovich, Amy R; Fuster, Valentin; Dec, G William

    2015-11-01

    Myocarditis--a frequent cause of dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden cardiac death--typically results from cardiotropic viral infection followed by active inflammatory destruction of the myocardium. Characterization of this disease has been hampered by its heterogeneous clinical presentations and diverse aetiologies. Advances in cardiac MRI and molecular detection of viruses by endomyocardial biopsy have improved our ability to diagnose and understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of this elusive disease. However, therapeutic options are currently limited for both the acute and chronic phases of myocarditis. Several randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated potential benefit with immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory therapies, but further investigations are warranted. In this Review, we explore the pathophysiology, natural history, and modes of diagnosis of myocarditis, as well as evidence-based treatment strategies. As novel imaging techniques and human in vitro models of the disease emerge, the landscape of therapies for myocarditis is poised to improve. PMID:26194549

  12. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC. PMID:25253949

  13. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Abolfazli, Nader; Jabali, Sahar; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an important role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and radiographic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]). Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05). Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels. PMID:25973148

  14. Association of Preexisting Symptoms with Treatment Decisions among Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zeliadt, Steven B.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Potosky, Arnold L.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Blough, David K.; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hamilton, Ann S.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Penson, David F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The choice between surgical versus non-surgical treatment options is a fundamental decision for men with local stage prostate cancer because of differences in risks of genitourinary side effects among available treatments. Objectives We assessed whether preexisting genitourinary symptoms at the time of diagnosis influenced men’s preferences for surgery versus other management options. Methods We recruited 593 patients with newly diagnosed local stage prostate cancer prior to initiating treatment from an integrated health care system, an academic urology center, and community urology clinics. Using logistic regression we compared whether men had a preference for non-surgical options or only preferred surgery. Results Nearly 60% indicated they were considering non-surgical options. Age and clinical characteristics but not preexisting genitourinary symptoms influenced the decision between preferences for surgical or non-surgical options. A total of 62% of men reported side effects as a main factor in their treatment decision. Men with more aggressive tumor types were less likely to consider side effects, however, men who reported poor ability to have an erection were more likely to consider side effects (p<0.001). Conclusion Sexual dysfunction at time of diagnosis, but not other genitourinary symptoms, is associated with men considering treatment-related side effects when considering surgery versus other options. Men who are not experiencing sexual dysfunction at diagnosis may discount the risks of side effects in the decision making process. PMID:20119493

  15. Diagnostic methods and treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Renzo; Duchowny, Michael; Jayakar, Prasanna; Krsek, Pavel; Kahane, Philippe; Tassi, Laura; Melani, Federico; Polster, Tilman; Andre, Véronique M; Cepeda, Carlos; Krueger, Darcy A; Cross, J Helen; Spreafico, Roberto; Cosottini, Mirco; Gotman, Jean; Chassoux, Francine; Ryvlin, Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bernasconi, Andrea; Stefan, Hermann; Miller, Ian; Devaux, Bertrand; Najm, Imad; Giordano, Flavio; Vonck, Kristl; Barba, Carmen; Blumcke, Ingmar

    2015-11-01

    Our inability to adequately treat many patients with refractory epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), surgical inaccessibility and failures are significant clinical drawbacks. The targeting of physiologic features of epileptogenesis in FCD and colocalizing functionality has enhanced completeness of surgical resection, the main determinant of outcome. Electroencephalography (EEG)-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography are helpful in guiding electrode implantation and surgical treatment, and high-frequency oscillations help defining the extent of the epileptogenic dysplasia. Ultra high-field MRI has a role in understanding the laminar organization of the cortex, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is highly sensitive for detecting FCD in MRI-negative cases. Multimodal imaging is clinically valuable, either by improving the rate of postoperative seizure freedom or by reducing postoperative deficits. However, there is no level 1 evidence that it improves outcomes. Proof for a specific effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in FCD is lacking. Pathogenic mutations recently described in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) genes in FCD have yielded important insights into novel treatment options with mTOR inhibitors, which might represent an example of personalized treatment of epilepsy based on the known mechanisms of disease. The ketogenic diet (KD) has been demonstrated to be particularly effective in children with epilepsy caused by structural abnormalities, especially FCD. It attenuates epigenetic chromatin modifications, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell, thereby modifying disease progression. This could imply lasting benefit of dietary manipulation. Neurostimulation techniques have produced variable clinical outcomes in FCD. In widespread dysplasias, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has achieved responder rates >50%; however, the efficacy of noninvasive cranial nerve stimulation modalities such as transcutaneous VNS (tVNS) and noninvasive (nVNS) requires further study. Although review of current strategies underscores the serious shortcomings of treatment-resistant cases, initial evidence from novel approaches suggests that future success is possible. PMID:26434565

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595 nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first-line agent, and systemic use glucocorticoids should be considered when associated with serious complications. The 595 nm PDL is effective in managing superficial vascular malformations in childhood, and could attempt to increase the treatment times to improve the outcomes. PMID:26448027

  17. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595 nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first-line agent, and systemic use glucocorticoids should be considered when associated with serious complications. The 595 nm PDL is effective in managing superficial vascular malformations in childhood, and could attempt to increase the treatment times to improve the outcomes. PMID:26448027

  18. Treatment options for uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Alba; Compare, Debora; Caruso, Flora; Nardone, Gerardo

    2009-10-01

    Patients affected by uncomplicated diverticular disease (DD) suffer from colicky, unexplained, recurrent, and short-lived but often debilitating abdominal pain and alteration in bowel habit. Although the goals of therapy, such as to improve symptoms and to prevent both recurrent attacks and complications, are clearly established, the standard approach remains still debated. We examined the current scientific evidence supporting the different treatment options for uncomplicated DD. An internet-based search strategy of the Medline and Science Citation Index was performed using the keywords: diverticulosis, DD, fiber, bran, diet, antibiotics, rifaximin, probiotics, prebiotics, bacteria, lactobacillus, bifidobacteria, 5-aminosalicylic acid, sulfasalazine, mesalazine, balsalazide in various combinations to select randomized trials published in the English language between January 1966 and March 2009. The use of fiber and nonabsorbable antibiotics is supported by the existence of randomized controlled studies. More recently, alternative treatments, such as probiotics and mesalazine have been proposed even if no definite data are available. Although the preliminary results seem to be promising, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are needed before new therapies can be recommended in the management of uncomplicated DD. PMID:19652620

  19. Treatment options for the management of pervasive developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Nash, Kathryn; Carter, K Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (previously known as pervasive developmental disorders) is characterized by social communication deficits, impaired functioning, and restrictive or repetitive behaviors and interests. Patients with autism spectrum disorder also commonly experience core maladaptive behaviors such as aggression and irritability, self-injurious behaviors, hyperactivity, and sleep abnormalities. These behaviors may be sources of stress for caregivers and patients alike and may require pharmacologic management. Risperidone and aripiprazole are frequently used to treat both irritability and self-injurious behavior related to autism spectrum disorder. The opioid antagonist naltrexone has also been studied for self-injurious behaviors, although long-term data are lacking when used in the autism spectrum disorder population. Methylphenidate, atomoxetine, clonidine, and guanfacine are all potential options for the treatment of hyperactivity or attention-deficient hyperactivity disorder-like symptoms in patients with autism spectrum disorder. Lastly, melatonin is the most widely researched medication strategy for the management of sleep disorders in autism spectrum disorder. Future studies reviewing new pharmacologic treatment approaches in combination with non-pharmacologic therapies are warranted to ensure that target behaviors of autism spectrum disorder are appropriately managed. PMID:27079778

  20. Treatment options for diabetes: potential role of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stanekzai, Jamil; Isenovic, Esma R; Mousa, Shaker A

    2012-12-01

    There are diseases and injuries in which a patient's cells or tissues are destroyed that can only be adequately corrected by tissue or organ transplants. Stem cells may be able to generate new tissue and even cure diseases for which there is no adequate therapy. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM), an insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic disease affecting genetically predisposed individuals, in which insulin-secreting beta (β)-cells within pancreatic islets of Langerhans are selectively and irreversibly destroyed by autoimmune assault. Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is characterized by a gradual decrease in insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues and the liver (insulin resistance), followed by a gradual decline in β-cell function and insulin secretion. Successful replacing of damaged β-cells has shown considerable potential in treating T1DM, but lack of adequate donors is a barrier. The literature suggests that embryonic and adult stem cells are promising alternatives in long-term treatment of diabetes. However, any successful strategy should address both the need for β-cell replacement and controlling the autoimmune response to cells that express insulin. This review summarizes the current knowledge of options and the potential of stem cell transplantation in diabetes treatment. PMID:23020931

  1. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  2. Cachexia and pancreatic cancer: are there treatment options?

    PubMed

    Mueller, Tara C; Burmeister, Marc A; Bachmann, Jeannine; Martignoni, Marc E

    2014-07-28

    Cachexia is frequently described in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is associated with reduced survival and quality of life. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options of this multi-factorial and complex syndrome are limited. This is due to the fact that, despite extensive preclinical and clinical research, the underlying pathological mechanisms leading to PDAC-associated cachexia are still not fully understood. Furthermore, there is still a lack of consensus on the definition of cachexia, which complicates the standardization of diagnosis and treatment as well as the analysis of the current literature. In order to provide an efficient therapy for cachexia, an early and reliable diagnosis and consistent monitoring is required, which can be challenging especially in obese patients. Although many substances have been tested in clinical and preclinical settings, so far none of them have been proven to have a long-term effect in ameliorating cancer-associated cachexia. However, recent studies have demonstrated that multidimensional therapeutic modalities are able to alleviate pancreatic cancer-associated cachexia and ultimately improve patients' outcome. In this current review, we propose a stepwise and pragmatic approach to facilitate and standardize the treatment of cachexia in pancreatic cancer patients. This strategy consists of nutritional, dietary, pharmacological, physical and psychological methods. PMID:25071331

  3. Cachexia and pancreatic cancer: Are there treatment options?

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C; Burmeister, Marc A; Bachmann, Jeannine; Martignoni, Marc E

    2014-01-01

    Cachexia is frequently described in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is associated with reduced survival and quality of life. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options of this multi-factorial and complex syndrome are limited. This is due to the fact that, despite extensive preclinical and clinical research, the underlying pathological mechanisms leading to PDAC-associated cachexia are still not fully understood. Furthermore, there is still a lack of consensus on the definition of cachexia, which complicates the standardization of diagnosis and treatment as well as the analysis of the current literature. In order to provide an efficient therapy for cachexia, an early and reliable diagnosis and consistent monitoring is required, which can be challenging especially in obese patients. Although many substances have been tested in clinical and preclinical settings, so far none of them have been proven to have a long-term effect in ameliorating cancer-associated cachexia. However, recent studies have demonstrated that multidimensional therapeutic modalities are able to alleviate pancreatic cancer-associated cachexia and ultimately improve patients’ outcome. In this current review, we propose a stepwise and pragmatic approach to facilitate and standardize the treatment of cachexia in pancreatic cancer patients. This strategy consists of nutritional, dietary, pharmacological, physical and psychological methods. PMID:25071331

  4. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Chey, William D; Lembo, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  5. Small Vestibular Schwannomas: Does Surgery Remain a Viable Treatment Option?

    PubMed

    Anaizi, Amjad N; DiNapoli, Vincent V; Pensak, Myles; Theodosopoulos, Philip V

    2016-06-01

    Background Surgery for small vestibular schwannomas (Koos grade I and II) has been increasingly rejected as the optimal primary treatment, instead favoring radiosurgery and observation that offer lower morbidity and potentially equal efficacy. Our study assesses the outcomes of contemporary surgical strategies including tumor control, functional preservation, and implications of pathologic findings. Design Retrospective review. Setting/Participants Eighty consecutive patients (45 women, 35 men; mean: 47 years of age). Main Outcomes Measures Approaches included retrosigmoid approach (52%), translabyrinthine (40%), and middle fossa (8%). Operated on by the same surgical team, we analyzed presentation, radiographic imaging, surgical data, and outcomes. Results At last follow-up (mean: 34 months), 95% had good facial nerve function (House-Brackmann grade I or II); 36% who presented with serviceable hearing retained it; and 93% who presented with vestibular dysfunction reported resolution. Pathology identified two grade I meningiomas. Conclusions As one of the largest contemporary surgical series of small vestibular schwannomas, we discuss some nuances to help refine treatment algorithms. Although observation and radiosurgery have established roles, our results reinforce microsurgery as a viable, safe option for a subgroup of patients. PMID:27175315

  6. Features and treatment options of Chinese hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2013-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. More than 53% of the total HCC patients in the world come from China. The absolute number of new Chinese HCC cases still keeps increasing and it remains a most dominant cancer burden in the next several decades. Compared to the HCC occurred in Europe and North America, Chinese HCC patients have their own special features in etiology, demographic features (risk factors, age of onset, gender distribution time trend of incidence), biological behavior, clinical manifestation, treatment strategy and prognosis. The success or failure of a series of clinical trials related with systemic therapy for advanced HCC can be partly attributed to those features of Chinese HCC. Thus it is suggested that new trials should be performed respectively for Chinese HCC patients from the Western population, like the success of sorafenib SHARP and ORIENTAL studies. The protocal design, organization and practice of trials in HCC of China should be made individually to avoid or reduce the possible heterogeneity of HCC populations and facilitate the personalized therapy of HCC. The present review discussed the features and treatment options of HCC in China that maybe help to understand the clinical course for Chinese patients with HCC. More importantly, the future strategies for clinical trials of Chinese HCC were emphasized. PMID:25841917

  7. Laparoscopic Cerclage as a Treatment Option for Cervical Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, D.; Raio, L.; Imboden, S.; Mueller, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The traditional surgical treatment for cervical insufficiency is vaginal placement of a cervical cerclage. However, in a small number of cases a vaginal approach is not possible. A transabdominal approach can become an option for these patients. Laparoscopic cervical cerclage is associated with good pregnancy outcomes but comes at the cost of a higher risk of serious surgical complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate intraoperative and long-term pregnancy outcomes after laparoscopic cervical cerclage, performed either as an interval procedure or during early pregnancy, using a new device with a blunt grasper and a flexible tip. Methods: All women who underwent laparoscopic cervical cerclage for cervical insufficiency in our institution using the Goldfinger® device (Ethicon Endo Surgery, Somerville, NJ, USA) between January 2008 and March 2014 were included in the study. Data were collected from the patientsʼ medical records and included complications during and after the above-described procedure. Results: Eighteen women were included in the study. Of these, six were pregnant at the time of laparoscopic cervical cerclage. Mean duration of surgery was 55 ± 10 minutes. No serious intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. All patients were discharged at 2.6 ± 0.9 days after surgery. One pregnancy ended in a miscarriage at 12 weeks of gestation. All other pregnancies ended at term (> 37 weeks of gestation) with good perinatal and maternal outcomes. Summary: Performing a laparoscopic cervical cerclage using a blunt grasper device with a flexible tip does not increase intraoperative complications, particularly in early pregnancy. We believe that use of this device, which is characterized by increased maneuverability, could be an important option to avoid intraoperative complications if surgical access is limited due to the anatomical situation. However, because of the small sample size, further studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26366003

  8. Geothermal Produced Fluids: Characteristics, Treatment Technologies, and Management Options

    SciTech Connect

    Finster, Molly; Clark, Corrie; Schroeder, Jenna; Martino, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Geothermal power plants use geothermal fluids as a resource and create waste residuals as part of the power generation process. Both the geofluid resource and the waste stream are considered produced fluids. The chemical and physical nature of produced fluids can have a major impact on the geothermal power industry and can influence the feasibility of geothermal power development, exploration approaches, power plant design, operating practices, and the reuse or disposal of residuals. In general, produced fluids include anything that comes out of a geothermal field and that subsequently must be managed on the surface. These fluids vary greatly depending on the geothermal reservoir being harnessed, power plant design, and the life cycle stage in which the fluid exists, but generally include water and fluids used to drill geothermal wells, fluids used to stimulate wells in enhanced geothermal systems, and makeup and/or cooling water used during operation of a geothermal power plant. Additional geothermal-related produced fluids include many substances that are similar to waste streams from the oil and gas industry, such as scale, flash tank solids, precipitated solids from brine treatment, hydrogen sulfide, and cooling-tower-related waste. This review paper aims to provide baseline knowledge on specific technologies and technology areas associated with geothermal power production. Specifically, this research focused on the management techniques related to fluids produced and used during the operational stage of a geothermal power plant; the vast majority of which are employed in the generation of electricity. The general characteristics of produced fluids are discussed. Constituents of interest that tend to drive the selection of treatment technologies are described, including total dissolved solids, noncondensable gases, scale and corrosion, silicon dioxide, metal sulfides, calcium carbonate, corrosion, metals, and naturally occurring radioactive material. Management options for produced fluids that require additional treatment for these constituents are also discussed, including surface disposal, reuse and recycle, agricultural industrial and domestic uses, mineral extraction and recovery, and solid waste handling.

  9. Evolving treatment strategies for colorectal cancer: A critical review of current therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Damin, Daniel C; Lazzaron, Anderson R

    2014-01-01

    Management of rectal cancer has markedly evolved over the last two decades. New technologies of staging have allowed a more precise definition of tumor extension. Refinements in surgical concepts and techniques have resulted in higher rates of sphincter preservation and better functional outcome for patients with this malignancy. Although, preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision has become the standard of care for locally advanced tumors, many controversial matters in management of rectal cancer still need to be defined. These include the feasibility of a non-surgical approach after a favorable response to neoadjuvant therapy, the ideal margins of surgical resection for sphincter preservation and the adequacy of minimally invasive techniques of tumor resection. In this article, after an extensive search in PubMed and Embase databases, we critically review the current strategies and the most debatable matters in treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:24574762

  10. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  11. Arsenic contaminated groundwater and its treatment options in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S M; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S M; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues. PMID:23343979

  12. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options.

    PubMed

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  13. Treatment options in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara, P N; Meyers, F J

    1999-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Although most patients will respond to androgen ablation as initial systemic therapy, nearly all patients will develop androgen-independent prostate cancer (AI CaP) and will succumb to the disease. Advances in molecular biology have demonstrated mutations in and persistent expression of the human androgen receptor in metastatic disease. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that an apoptotic block through p53 mutations or bcl-2 overexpression may have a potential role in the poor responses seen with standard chemotherapy. Presently, the six general treatment options available for AI CaP are best supportive care, radiation therapy, radioisotopes, secondline hormonal therapy, chemotherapy (single agent or combination), and investigational therapies such as monoclonal antibodies, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and antiangiogenesis agents, among others. None of these modalities have produced durable remissions, although some have demonstrated palliative benefit. The next generation of clinical trials should not consist of futile hormonal manipulations or repetitive chemotherapy. Therapeutic strategies aimed at circumventing molecular blocks to cell death or targeting unique cancer molecules and genes will be more likely to improve quality of life and longevity. Furthermore, the aggressive use of palliative care will ensure effective caring for patients and the healing of families in the absence of cure. PMID:10071598

  14. Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater and Its Treatment Options in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S. M.; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S. M.; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues. PMID:23343979

  15. Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

  16. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: Case-based review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Federica; Peroni, Anna; Colato, Chiara; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-08-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a rare dermatological condition characterized by keratotic papules arranged in a parallel linear or reticular pattern and facial lesions resembling seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea. The clinical, histological and therapeutic information on 71 patients with KLC retrieved through a PubMed search plus one our new case were analyzed. KLC affects patients of all ages, with a modest male predominance. Pediatric cases represent about one quarter of patients. Diagnosis is usually delayed and histologically confirmed. All patients have thick, rough and scaly papules and plaques arranged in a linear or reticular pattern, on limbs (>80%) and trunk (about 60%). Face involvement is described in two-thirds of patients. Lesions are usually asymptomatic or mildly pruritic. Other manifestations, such as palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal involvement, ocular manifestations, nail dystrophy, are reported in 20-30% of patients. Children present more frequently alopecia. No controlled trials are available. Results from small case series or single case reports show that the best treatment options are phototherapy and systemic retinoids, alone or in combination, with nearly half of patients reaching complete remission. Systemic corticosteroids as well as antibiotics and antimalarials are not effective. PMID:26652284

  17. Antimicrobial Treatment Options for Granulomatous Mastitis Caused by Corynebacterium Species.

    PubMed

    Dobinson, Hazel C; Anderson, Trevor P; Chambers, Stephen T; Doogue, Matthew P; Seaward, Lois; Werno, Anja M

    2015-09-01

    Corynebacterium species are increasingly recognized as important pathogens in granulomatous mastitis. Currently, there are no published treatment protocols for Corynebacterium breast infections. This study describes antimicrobial treatment options in the context of other management strategies used for granulomatous mastitis. Corynebacterium spp. isolated from breast tissue and aspirate samples stored from 2002 to 2013 were identified and determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S RNA sequencing, and rpoB gene targets. The MICs for 12 antimicrobials were performed using Etest for each isolate. Correlations of these with antimicrobial characteristics, choice of antimicrobial, and disease outcome were evaluated. Corynebacterium spp. from breast tissue and aspirate samples were confirmed in 17 isolates from 16 patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii isolates (n = 11) were susceptible to seven antibiotic classes but resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum isolates (n = 4) were multidrug resistant. Two nonlipophilic species were isolated, Corynebacterium glucuronolyticum and Corynebacterium freneyi, both of which have various susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents. Short-course antimicrobial therapy was common (median, 6 courses per subject; range, 1 to 9 courses). Patients with C. kroppenstedtii presented with a hot painful breast mass and underwent multiple surgical procedures (median, 4 procedures; range, 2 to 6 procedures). The management of Corynebacterium breast infections requires a multidisciplinary approach and includes culture and appropriate sensitivity testing to guide antimicrobial therapy. Established infections have a poor outcome, possibly because adequate concentrations of some drugs will be difficult to achieve in lipophilic granulomata. Lipophilic antimicrobial therapy may offer a therapeutic advantage. The role of immunotherapy has not been defined. PMID:26135858

  18. Antimicrobial Treatment Options for Granulomatous Mastitis Caused by Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Dobinson, Hazel C.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Chambers, Stephen T.; Doogue, Matthew P.; Seaward, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are increasingly recognized as important pathogens in granulomatous mastitis. Currently, there are no published treatment protocols for Corynebacterium breast infections. This study describes antimicrobial treatment options in the context of other management strategies used for granulomatous mastitis. Corynebacterium spp. isolated from breast tissue and aspirate samples stored from 2002 to 2013 were identified and determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S RNA sequencing, and rpoB gene targets. The MICs for 12 antimicrobials were performed using Etest for each isolate. Correlations of these with antimicrobial characteristics, choice of antimicrobial, and disease outcome were evaluated. Corynebacterium spp. from breast tissue and aspirate samples were confirmed in 17 isolates from 16 patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii isolates (n = 11) were susceptible to seven antibiotic classes but resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum isolates (n = 4) were multidrug resistant. Two nonlipophilic species were isolated, Corynebacterium glucuronolyticum and Corynebacterium freneyi, both of which have various susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents. Short-course antimicrobial therapy was common (median, 6 courses per subject; range, 1 to 9 courses). Patients with C. kroppenstedtii presented with a hot painful breast mass and underwent multiple surgical procedures (median, 4 procedures; range, 2 to 6 procedures). The management of Corynebacterium breast infections requires a multidisciplinary approach and includes culture and appropriate sensitivity testing to guide antimicrobial therapy. Established infections have a poor outcome, possibly because adequate concentrations of some drugs will be difficult to achieve in lipophilic granulomata. Lipophilic antimicrobial therapy may offer a therapeutic advantage. The role of immunotherapy has not been defined. PMID:26135858

  19. Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS): treatment options and considerations.

    PubMed

    Vilke, Gary M; Bozeman, William P; Dawes, Donald M; Demers, Gerard; Wilson, Michael P

    2012-04-01

    The term Excited Delirium Syndrome (ExDS) has traditionally been used in the forensic literature to describe findings in a subgroup of patients with delirium who suffered lethal consequences from their untreated severe agitation.(1-5) Excited delirium syndrome, also known as agitated delirium, is generally defined as altered mental status and combativeness or aggressiveness. Although the exact signs and symptoms are difficult to define precisely, clinical findings often include many of the following: tolerance to significant pain, rapid breathing, sweating, severe agitation, elevated temperature, delirium, non-compliance or poor awareness to direction from police or medical personnel, lack of fatiguing, unusual or superhuman strength, and inappropriate clothing for the current environment. It has become increasingly recognized that individuals displaying ExDS are at high risk for sudden death, and ExDS therefore represents a true medical emergency. Recently the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) published the findings of a white paper on the topic of ExDS to better find consensus on the issues of definition, diagnosis, and treatment.(6) In so doing, ACEP joined the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) in recognizing ExDS as a medical condition. For both paramedics and physicians, the difficulty in diagnosing the underlying cause of ExDS in an individual patient is that the presenting clinical signs and symptoms of ExDS can be produced by a wide variety of clinical disease processes. For example, agitation, combativeness, and altered mental status can be produced by hypoglycemia, thyroid storm, certain kinds of seizures, and these conditions can be difficult to distinguish from those produced by cocaine or methamphetamine intoxication.(7) Prehospital personnel are generally not expected to differentiate between the multiple possible causes of the patient's presentation, but rather simply to recognize that the patient has a medical emergency and initiate appropriate stabilizing treatment. ExDS patients will generally require transfer to an emergency department (ED) for further management, evaluation, and definitive care. In this paper, we present a typical ExDS case and then review existing literature for current treatment options. PMID:22390995

  20. Treatment options and outcomes for glioblastoma in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Arvold, Nils D; Reardon, David A

    2014-01-01

    Age remains the most powerful prognostic factor among glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Half of all patients with GBM are aged 65 years or older at the time of diagnosis, and the incidence rate of GBM in patients aged over 65 years is increasing rapidly. Median survival for elderly GBM patients is less than 6 months and reflects less favorable tumor biologic factors, receipt of less aggressive care, and comorbid disease. The standard of care for elderly GBM patients remains controversial. Based on limited data, extensive resection appears to be more beneficial than biopsy. For patients with favorable Karnofsky performance status (KPS), adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) has a demonstrated survival benefit with no observed decrement in quality of life. Concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) along with RT to 60 Gy have not been prospectively studied among patients aged over 70 years but should be considered for patients aged 65–70 years with excellent KPS. Based on the recent NOA-08 and Nordic randomized trials, testing for O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation should be performed routinely immediately after surgery to aid in adjuvant treatment decisions. Patients aged over 70 years with favorable KPS, or patients aged 60–70 years with borderline KPS, should be considered for monotherapy utilizing standard TMZ dosing for patients with MGMT-methylated tumors, and hypofractionated RT (34 Gy in ten fractions or 40 Gy in 15 fractions) for patients with MGMT-unmethylated tumors. The ongoing European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/National Cancer Institute of Canada trial will help clarify the role for concurrent TMZ with hypofractionated RT. For elderly patients with poor KPS, reasonable options include best supportive care, TMZ alone, hypofractionated RT alone, or whole brain RT for symptomatic patients needing to start treatment urgently. Given the balance between short survival and quality of life in this patient population, optimal management of elderly GBM patients must be made individually according to patient age, MGMT methylation status, performance score, and patient preferences. PMID:24591820

  1. Polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents: current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Mastorakos, George; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Creatsas, George

    2006-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a very common disorder affecting 5-10% of women of reproductive age. The pivotal endocrine abnormalities of this syndrome are insulin resistance and ovarian and, to a lesser degree, adrenal hypersensitivity to hormonal stimulation. PCOS may manifest itself as early as the first decade of life by premature pubarche or menarche. Oligoamenorrhea in the first postpubarchal years, although very common, may be an early symptom of PCOS, especially in overweight girls with hirsutism or acne. Girls with low birth weight as well as a family history of diabetes mellitus or premature cardiovascular disease are at high risk for developing PCOS. Circulating bioavailable testosterone levels are usually elevated, while total testosterone may be normal due to low levels of sex hormone-binding globulin. The typical sonographic appearance of PCOS ovaries consists of high ovarian volume (>10 mL) and the presence of 12 or more follicles in each ovary measuring 2-9 mm in diameter. However, this finding is not specific, since it may occur in >20% of healthy girls. The therapeutic goals in adolescents with PCOS is first to restore bodyweight and menses and to reduce the signs of hyperandrogenism. The reduction of bodyweight in this young age group may require the collaboration of the pediatrician, dietitian, and psychotherapist. The adolescent should be urged to adopt a healthy lifestyle with the aim to maintain a normal body mass index throughout adolescence and adult life. The choice of medical therapy depends on the clinical presentation. Oral contraceptives are a good option when acne and hirsutism are the principal complaints. Adolescents with isolated cycle irregularity may be placed on a cyclical progestin regimen to induce withdrawal bleeding. Metformin, by decreasing insulin resistance, alleviates many of the hormonal disturbances and restores menses in a considerable proportion of patients. It may be used alone or in combination with oral contraceptives. Independently of medical treatment, restoration and maintenance of bodyweight within normal range is of paramount importance. PMID:17037948

  2. Stochastic water quality: Timing and option value of treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jon M.; López, Andrés

    2002-05-01

    An option-pricing model is developed to rank investments that might improve water quality. The model presumes that two investment options exist that have the potential to alter the stochastic drift of a pollutant. The investments have capital and operating costs and are irreversible once constructed. A stochastically evolving pollutant induces damage. The model provides a criterion for determining when it is optimal to adopt the investment with the highest option value. Option value, in this model, measures the expected present value of reduced damage, relative to doing nothing. If the investments are mutually exclusive, it is possible to obtain closed-form solutions for the barriers which would trigger investment. If the investments can be sequentially adopted, a methodology is developed to calculate option values for all possible combinations of adoption dates. To illustrate the option-pricing approach, a stylized analysis of investments to protect New York City's water supply is presented. Watershed management dominates filtration and, in the case of mutually exclusive investments, is initiated when the concentration of phosphorus reaches 22.80 μg/L.

  3. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  4. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  5. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  6. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) General. Except as provided in this section, a...

  7. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  8. 78 FR 8060 - Treatment of Grantor of an Option on a Partnership Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... (noncompensatory partnership option regulations) were published in the Federal Register (68 FR 2930). Final... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BH89 Treatment of Grantor of an Option on a Partnership...: This document contains proposed regulations relating to the tax treatment of noncompensatory...

  9. New Treatment Option for Young Women with Hormone-Sensitive Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Releases 2014 Press Releases NCI Press Release New treatment option for young women with hormone-sensitive ... breaking abstract #1) and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine . Treatment with exemestane plus ...

  10. Effectiveness of a diode laser in addition to non-surgical periodontal therapy: study of intervention

    PubMed Central

    Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Iovane, Claudio; Del Giudice, Teresa; Lomanno, Simona; Pacifico, Delfina; Fortunato, Leonzio; Del Giudice, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Chronic periodontitis affects 47% of adult population over the age of 30. The first phase of periodontal treatment is always represented by scaling and root planning (SRP), that is a causal, non-surgical therapy that recognizes as primary aims the control of bacterial infection and the reduction of periodontal plaque-associated inflammation. Yet, another innovative causal therapy is represented by the irradiation of periodontal pockets with laser. Aim To evaluate the effect of a 940-nm diode laser as an adjunct to SRP in patients affected by periodontitis. Materials and methods Sixty-eight adult patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis were sequentially enrolled and undergone to periodontal examination (V1) in order to detect gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and probing depth (PD). The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first (n=34) received SRP treatment alone, the control group (n=34) received SRP and 940-nm diode laser therapy. Results Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test, with two tails; for all clinical parameters, both groups reported statistically significant differences compared to basal values (p<0.0001). Both procedures were effective in improving GI, PI and PD, but the use of diode laser was associated with more evident results. Conclusions Considered the better clinical outcomes, diode laser can be routinely associated with SRP in the treatment of periodontal pockets of patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis. PMID:26161248

  11. A Protocol-Based Decision for Choosing a Proper Surgical Treatment Option for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, E-Wook; Chung, Joonho; Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are two established surgical treatment options for carotid artery stenosis. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been accepted as a gold standard for surgical treatment while carotid artery stenting (CAS) has recently become an alternative option. Each treatment option has advantages and disadvantages for the treatment outcomes. We propose a protocol for selection of a proper surgical treatment option for carotid artery stenosis. Materials and Methods A total of 192 published articles on management of carotid artery stenosis were reviewed. Preoperatively considerable factors which had been repeatedly noted in those articles for the risk/benefits of CEA or CAS were selected. According to those factors, a protocol with four categories was established. Results CEA or CAS is indicated when the patient has a symptomatic stenosis ≥ 50%, or when the patient has an asymptomatic stenosis ≥ 80%. Each treatment option has absolute indications and favorable indications. Each absolute indication is scored with three points, and each favorable indication, one point. Based on the highest scores, a proper treatment option (CEA or CAS) is selected. Conclusion We have been treating patients according to this protocol and evaluating the outcomes of our protocol-based decision because this protocol might be helpful in assessment of risk/benefit for selection of a proper surgical treatment option in patients with carotid artery stenosis. PMID:26157689

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood CNS germ cell tumors may ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Some cancer ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  14. Treatment Options in Massive and Submassive Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Rishi K; Piazza, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cardiovascular condition that represents a spectrum of disorders with a gradient of increased risk of adverse outcomes. The U.S. Surgeon General estimated that approximately 100,000 to 180,000 PE-related deaths occur in the United States annually, and that PE is the most preventable cause of death among hospitalized patients. Risk stratification is critical to identify the patients who may benefit from advanced therapy. This review will provide an overview of PE pathophysiology, evidence-based risk stratification strategies for patients with acute PE, a summary of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant options, and an in-depth discussion on the utilization of advanced therapeutic options, including systemic fibrinolysis, catheter-based pharmacomechanical therapy, and surgical embolectomy. PMID:26274535

  15. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Non-surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Mayra G; Cantu, Myrna G; Wilson, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize the findings of studies that have evaluated non-surgical approaches for detoxification of implant body surfaces in vitro and in vivo, and to evaluate clinical trials on the use of these methodologies for treating peri-implant disease. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (Pubmed) from 1966 to 2013. In vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on non-surgical therapy were evaluated. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment levels, bleeding on probing; radiographic bone fill and histological re-osseointegration. Results: From 134 articles found 35 were analyzed. The findings, advantages and disadvantages of using lasers as well as mechanical and chemical methods are discussed. Most of the in vivo and human studies used combination therapies which makes determining the efficacy of one specific method difficult. Most human studies are case series with short term longitudinal analysis without survival or failure reports. Conclusion: Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve using these approaches. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Re-osseointegration may be difficult to achieve if not impossible without surgical access to ensure thorough debridement of the defect and detoxification of the implant surface. Combination protocols for non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical results but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:24894571

  16. 40 CFR 141.715 - Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements. 141.715 Section 141.715 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Protection and Management Toolbox Options (1) Watershed control program 0.5-log credit for...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  18. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  19. Potential treatment options and future research to increase hepatitis C virus treatment response rate

    PubMed Central

    TenCate, Veronica; Sainz, Bruno; Cotler, Scott J; Uprichard, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a liver-tropic blood-borne pathogen that affects more than 170 million people worldwide. Although acute infections are usually asymptomatic, up to 90% of HCV infections persist with the possibility of long-term consequences such as liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, steatosis, insulin resistance, or hepatocellular carcinoma. As such, HCV-associated liver disease is a major public health concern. Although the currently available standard of care therapy of pegylated interferon α plus ribavirin successfully treats infection in a subset of patients, the development of more effective, less toxic HCV antivirals is a health care imperative. This review not only discusses the limitations of the current HCV standard of care but also evaluates upcoming HCV treatment options and how current research elucidating the viral life cycle is facilitating the development of HCV-specific therapeutics that promise to greatly improve treatment response rates both before and after liver transplantation. PMID:21331152

  20. Parkinson Disease Treatment Options - Education, Support, and Therapy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Parkinson disease treatment options — education, support, and therapy (Beyond the Basics) Author Daniel ... managed with a combination of close monitoring, medication, education, support and therapy, exercise, and nutrition. Surgery can ...

  1. Prognostic factors in non-surgically treated sciatica: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When present sciatica is considered an obstacle to recovery in low back pain patients, yet evidence is limited regarding prognostic factors for persistent disability in this patient group. The aim of this study is to describe and summarise the evidence regarding prognostic factors for sciatica in non-surgically treated cohorts. Understanding the prognostic factors in sciatica and their relative importance may allow the identification of patients with particular risk factors who might benefit from early or specific types of treatment in order to optimise outcome. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL electronic databases. Prospective cohort studies describing subjects with sciatica and measuring pain, disability or recovery outcomes were included. Studies of cohorts comprised entirely of surgically treated patients were excluded and mixed surgically and conservatively treated cohorts were included only if the results were analysed separately by treatment group or if the analysis was adjusted for treatment. Results Seven adequate or high quality eligible studies were identified. There were conflicting but mainly negative results regarding the influence of baseline pain severity, neurological deficit, nerve root tension signs, duration of symptoms and radiological findings on outcome. A number of factors including age, gender, smoking, previous history of sciatica and heaviness of work do not appear to influence outcome. In contrast to studies of low back pain and purely surgically treated sciatica cohorts, psychological factors were rarely investigated. Conclusions At present, the heterogeneity of the available studies makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about sciatica prognosis, and highlights the need for further research for this group of patients. Large scale prospective studies of high methodological quality, using a well-defined, consistent definition of sciatica and investigating psychosocial factors alongside clinical and radiological findings are recommended to identify prognostic factors in this population. PMID:21943339

  2. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic inflammatory response. Successful treatment requires adherence to a regime that is uncomfortable at best and at worst painful. Topical treatments can be successful in motivated adherent patients willing to accept these side effects. PMID:23788834

  3. EXTRA-ABDOMINAL DESMOID TUMOR: LOCAL RECURRENCE AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, LUIZ EDUARDO MOREIRA; ARANTES, EUGÊNIO COSTA; VILLELA, RAFAEL FREITAS; SOARES, CLAUDIO BELING GONÇALVES; COSTA, ROBERTO BITARÃES DE CARVALHO; ANDRADE, MARCO ANTÔNIO PERCOPE DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the rate of local recurrence of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor and compare the outcomes of surgical treatment and conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty one patients (14 women and seven men), mean age 33.0±8.7 years old, with a diagnosis of desmoid tumor were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 58.5±29.0 months. Fourteen cases involved the lower limbs, four cases involved the upper limbs, and three cases involved the trunk. The average tumor size was 12.7±7.5 cm. Of the 21 patients, 14 did not undergo previous treatment and seven patients relapsed before the initial evaluation. Surgical treatment was performed in 16 patients and conservative treatment was performed in five patients. Results: Recurrence occurred in seven patients (33%) and six of them relapsed within the first 18 months. No significant difference was observed between conservative and surgical treatment. However, a significant difference was observed among patients undergoing wide resection and who experienced improved local control. Conclusion: The recurrence rate of desmoid tumor was 33.3%. There was no difference in recurrence between conservative and surgical treatment. In surgical treatment, wide margins showed better results for recurrence control. Level of Evidence III. Retrospective Observational Study.

  4. Managing your patient with gout: a review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Doghramji, Paul P

    2011-05-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis that typically presents as acute onset, recurrent, monoarticular pain. In most patients, management of pain, risk assessment for future flares, and disability is not optimal and diagnostic and management approaches are applied inconsistently. Obtaining an accurate patient history, including comorbidities, concomitant medications, and familial history, is important for optimal results. Recognizing the acute flare in the patient at risk and establishing a definitive diagnosis of gout should be conducted promptly. Therapeutic options appropriate for treating the acute flare include colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroids. After flare remission, prophylaxis with a flare prevention medication, such as colchicine, should be administered followed by initiation of urate-lowering therapy with allopurinol or febuxostat. Patient education, especially counseling on risk factors and contributors to hyperuricemia and gout, can improve the likelihood of successful therapy for this often suboptimally managed disease. PMID:21566416

  5. Transdermal estradiol for postpartum depression: A promising treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Berga, Sarah L.; Kalro, Brinda; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbirth and affects one out of seven childbearing women. While conventional pharmacological and psychotherapeutic antidepressant treatments are effective for PPD, a natural alternative may be preferred by postpartum women, especially those who breastfeed their infants. The treatment of PPD with synthetic forms of naturally occurring estrogen is mechanistically appealing because PPD occurs in the context of estrogen withdrawal at parturition. Preliminary evidence suggests that PPD is a disorder of hormone-related mood dysregulation (similar to perimenopausal depression) that can be effectively treated with estrogen. This review provides the basic science and clinical background as well as safety considerations to support the application of transdermal estradiol as a treatment for PPD. We conclude that estradiol treatment for PPD requires confirmation of efficacy in a randomized clinical trial prior to routine clinical use as monotherapy. Additional data regarding maternal tolerability of cyclic progestins, long-term safety of estradiol treatment, estradiol passage into breastmilk and infants, and interdisciplinary collaboration among psychiatrists and gynecologists is also needed before estradiol is used in women who decline or fail to respond to first-line antidepressant treatments, or as an augmentation of conventional antidepressant treatment. PMID:19661765

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... machine in the same position before each treatment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a type of ... the tumor . Thin beams of radiation of different intensities (strengths) are aimed at the tumor from many ...

  7. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... machine in the same position before each treatment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a type of ... the tumor . Thin beams of radiation of different intensities (strengths) are aimed at the tumor from many ...

  8. Treatment Options for Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past treatment for cancer and having a weakened immune system affect the risk of having childhood non-Hodgkin ... or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Having a weakened immune system after a transplant or from medicines given after ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past treatment for cancer and having a weakened immune system affect the risk of having childhood non-Hodgkin ... or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Having a weakened immune system after a transplant or from medicines given after ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a team of doctors with expertise in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  12. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  13. Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer (Treatment Options by Stage)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a team of doctors with expertise in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer ...

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  15. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy, we expect that more pathophysiology-based treatments will be available in the near future. PMID:24122734

  16. Current options and perspectives in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vrkonyi, Tams; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Keresztes, Katalin; Martos, Tmea; Lengyel, Csaba; Stirban, Alin; Jermendy, Gyrgy; Kempler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to summarise recent advances in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. Although all therapeutic choices in the treatment of diabetes mellitus itself are based on clear pathophysiological basis, this approach is less present in the treatment of the "forgotten complication", diabetic neuropathy. As part of pathogenetic oriented treatment, the role of glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors are reviewed. The mode of action of benfotiamine is based on inhibition of key alternative pathways, including the polyol, hexosamine, protein-kinase-C pathways, and inhibition of advanced glycation end products formation, just as on activation of transketolase. Alpha- lipoic-acid is considered as the most potent antioxidant. Other forms of pathogenetic oriented treatment, including actovegin, will be summarised. The anticonvulsants gabapentin and pregabalin, as well as the antidepressant duloxetine represent the most important new drugs among agents for symptomatic relief. Most likely, we should offer combination treatment to our patients much more often, first of all combination of pathogenetic and symptomatic drugs. Finally, the broad spectrum of non-pharmacological treatment will be reviewed. PMID:23278494

  17. Consumers' Valuation of Primary Care-Based Treatment Options for Mental and Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Andrew J; Barry, Colleen L; Fiellin, David A; Busch, Susan H

    2015-08-01

    Most individuals with substance use disorders and with mental disorders do not receive treatment. If treatment options were more attractive, treatment rates might increase. The advantages of novel approaches, including primary care-based treatment and collaborative care in a primary care setting, have been documented. However, less is known about consumers' valuation of these options. The authors assessed monetary valuation of these treatment types compared with usual care in a specialty treatment setting. Contingent valuation methods were used in a Web-based randomized vignette experiment that involved 2,146 individuals who screened positive for a drug or alcohol use disorder or a mental disorder. Participants valued a primary care-based treatment visit over usual care in a specialty treatment setting by $9.00 and a collaborative care visit over usual care in a specialty treatment setting by $5.85. PMID:25930049

  18. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  19. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  20. Psychiatric manifestations of Graves' hyperthyroidism: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bunevicius, Robertas; Prange, Arthur J

    2006-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Other symptoms associated with the disease are goitre, ophthalmopathy, and psychiatric manifestations such as mood and anxiety disorders and, sometimes, cognitive dysfunction. Graves' hyperthyroidism may result in these latter manifestations via the induction of hyperactivity of the adrenergic nervous system. This review addresses the psychiatric presentations, and their pathophysiology and treatment, in patients with hyperthyroidism, based on literature identified by a PubMed/MEDLINE database search. Although the focus is on mental symptoms associated with Graves' disease, it is not always clear from the literature whether patients had Graves' disease: in some studies, the patients were thought to have Graves' disease based on clinical findings such as diffuse goitre or ophthalmopathy or on measurements of thyroid antibodies in serum; however, in other studies, no distinction was made between Graves' hyperthyroidism and hyperthyroidism from other causes. Antithyroid drugs combined with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are the treatments of choice for hyperthyroidism, as well as for the psychiatric disorders and mental symptoms caused by hyperthyroidism. A substantial proportion of patients have an altered mental state even after successful treatment of hyperthyroidism, suggesting that mechanisms other than hyperthyroidism, including the Graves' autoimmune process per se and ophthalmopathy, may also be involved. When psychiatric disorders remain after restoration of euthyroidism and after treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, specific treatment for the psychiatric symptoms, especially psychotropic drugs, may be needed. PMID:17044727

  1. Treatment options for second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Eperon, Gilles; Balasegaram, Manica; Potet, Julien; Mowbray, Charles; Valverde, Olaf; Chappuis, François

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis relied on toxic arsenic-based derivatives for over 50 years. The availability and subsequent use of eflornithine, initially in monotherapy and more recently in combination with nifurtimox (NECT), has drastically improved the prognosis of treated patients. However, NECT logistic and nursing requirements remain obstacles to its deployment and use in peripheral health structures in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Two oral compounds, fexinidazole and SCYX-7158, are currently in clinical development. The main scope of this article is to discuss the potential impact of new oral therapies to improve diagnosis-treatment algorithms and patients’ access to treatment, and to contribute to reach the objectives of the recently launched gambiense human African trypanosomiasis elimination program. PMID:25204360

  2. Faropenem medoxomil: a treatment option in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hadley, James A; Tillotson, Glenn S; Tosiello, Robert; Echols, Roger M

    2006-12-01

    Faropenem medoxomil is the first oral penem in a new class of beta-lactam antibiotics. Faropenem medoxomil has excellent in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and other key pathogens implicated in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Clinical studies have demonstrated that, in the treatment of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in adults, 7 days of treatment with faropenem medoxomil is as clinically and bacteriologically effective as 10 days of treatment with cefuroxime axetil. One study showed faropenem medoxomil to be superior to cefuroxime axetil. Overall, the safety profile of faropenem medoxomil is similar to that of most comparators. Specifically, the minimal impact of faropenem medoxomil on the gastrointestinal flora leads to less diarrhea and other adverse events than coamoxicillin-clavulanate. Faropenem medoxomil has almost no drug-drug interactions and little requirement for dosage adjustments in the typical acute rhinosinusitis population. PMID:17181408

  3. Treatment options for hypertriglyceridemia: from risk reduction to pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Stalenhoef, Anton

    2013-01-01

    While there has been considerable focus on the role and treatment of LDL cholesterol levels, a definitive role of triglycerides in the management of cardiovascular disease has been uncertain. Notably, with increasing triglyceride levels, there is a parallel increase in cholesterol levels carried by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, which has prompted interest in the use of non-HDL cholesterol levels as a tool guiding interventions. Recent studies have provided evidence for an independent role of triglyceride levels as a cardiovascular risk factor, and recently, an Endocrine Society guideline was published for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia. In contrast to the relative uncertainty regarding triglycerides and cardiovascular disease, a role of very high triglyceride levels as a risk factor for pancreatitis has been well known. The present paper summarizes the underlying evidence for a risk role for triglyceride levels in cardiovascular disease and pancreatitis, current treatment recommendations and areas of future research. PMID:24840268

  4. Pityriasis rubra pilaris: evolution of challenges in promising treatment options.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Verma, Prashant

    2012-01-01

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris is an uncommon inflammatory dermatosis that is well recognized across the globe. Erythroderma is a common presentation. A precise diagnosis of pityriasis rubra pilaris is based on morphologic features and is classified into 6 types: classic adult onset (type I), atypical adult (type II), classic juvenile (type III), circumscribed juvenile (type IV), atypical juvenile (type V), and human immunodeficiency virus-associated (type VI). Several conventional systemic and/or topical treatments are currently in use. Largely, their results are unsatisfactory and limited by long-term toxicity. The authors investigate the efficacy of a wide spectrum of drugs by examining historical (archive) and promising (modern) treatment modalities for the treatment of pityriasis rubra pilaris. PMID:22324172

  5. Relapsed small cell lung cancer: treatment options and latest developments

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Kaneko, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Etsuro; Kubo, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    According to recent analyses, there was a modest yet significant improvement in median survival time and 5-year survival rate of limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in North America, Europe, Japan and other countries over the last 30 years. The median survival time of limited stage SCLC is 15–20 months and 5-year survival rate is 15% or less. In terms of extensive stage SCLC, a median survival time of 9.4–12.8 months and 2-year survival of 5.2–19.5% are still disappointing. Despite being highly sensitive to first-line chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments, most patients with SCLC experience relapse within 2 years and die from systemic metastasis. While several clinical trials of cytotoxic chemotherapies and molecular targeting agents have been investigated in the treatment of relapsed SCLC, none showed a significant clinical activity to be able to exceed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy. There are problematic issues to address for relapsed SCLC, such as standardizing the treatment for third-line chemotherapy. Topotecan alone was the first approved therapy for second-line treatment for relapsed SCLC. Amrubicin is a promising drug and a variety of trials evaluating its efficacy have been carried out. Amrubicin has shown superiority to topotecan in a Japanese population, but was not superior in a study of western patients. There are some controversial issues for relapsed SCLC, such as treatment for older patients, third-line chemotherapy and efficacy of molecular targeting therapy. This article reviews current standard treatment, recent clinical trials and other topics on relapsed SCLC. PMID:24587832

  6. Treatment of postpartum depression: clinical, psychological and pharmacological options

    PubMed Central

    Fitelson, Elizabeth; Kim, Sarah; Baker, Allison Scott; Leight, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common complication of childbearing, and has increasingly been identified as a major public health problem. Untreated maternal depression has multiple potential negative effects on maternal-infant attachment and child development. Screening for depression in the perinatal period is feasible in multiple primary care or obstetric settings, and can help identify depressed mothers earlier. However, there are multiple barriers to appropriate treatment, including concerns about medication effects in breastfeeding infants. This article reviews the literature and recommendations for the treatment of postpartum depression, with a focus on the range of pharmacological, psychotherapeutic, and other nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:21339932

  7. Non Surgical Correction of Mandibular Deviation and Neuromuscular Coordination after Two years of Mandibular Guidance Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nidhi; Sharma, Rohit; Parekh, Narzi

    2015-01-01

    Carcinomas of the mandible may require resection of a segment of bone (continuity defect), partial removal of bone (discontinuity defect), tongue, and floor of the mouth and muscle attachments. Patients undergoing such treatment suffer from facial disfigurement, loss of muscle function, loss of neuromuscular coordination resulting in inability to masticate and swallow acceptably. Surgical reconstruction may not always be possible because of high reoccurrence rate, inability of the patient to cope with another surgery etc. The treatment of choice in non surgical cases is prosthetic rehabilitation using guiding flange prosthesis. This article describes the management of a patient who had undergone hemimandibulectomy and was not willing for a surgical reconstruction. Interim maxillary ramp prosthesis was given to the patient 15 days postoperatively followed by definitive guiding flange prosthesis for two years after which the patient was able to occlude in centric occlusal position without any aid. PMID:26673016

  8. [Multidrug-resistant bacteria require new treatment options].

    PubMed

    Panknin, Hardy-Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    By now multidrug-resistant bacteria are a common cause of infections, especially in immunocompromised patient. These infections have to be treated with last resort antibiotics, such as colistin for the treatment of drug-resistant enterobacteriaceae or acinetobacter spp. Additionally the prevention of infections plays an important role in protecting critically ill patients. PMID:26837160

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower back is numbed. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue is a way of giving high doses ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  10. Endoscopic options for treatment of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Vance, R Brooks; Dunbar, Kerry B

    2015-12-25

    Recent advances in the endoscopic treatment of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) have allowed endoscopists to provide effective and durable eradication therapies. This review summarizes the available endoscopic eradication techniques for dysplasia in patients with BE including endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection, photodynamic therapy, argon plasma coagulation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. PMID:26722612

  11. Chronic sacroiliac joint pain: fusion versus denervation as treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, Bryan; Norvell, Daniel C.; Hermsmeyer, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review Objective: To compare the safety and effectiveness of fusion versus denervation for chronic sacroiliac joint pain after failed conservative management. Summary of background: Methods of confirming the sacroiliac joint as a pain source have been extensively studied and reported in the literature. After confirmation of the origin of the pain by positive local anesthetic blocks, chronic sacroiliac joint pain is usually managed with a combination of medication, physical therapies, and injections. We have chosen to compare two alternative treatments for sacroiliac pain that was refractory to conservative therapies. Methods: A systematic review of the English-language literature was undertaken for articles published between 1970 and June 2010. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies evaluating fusion or denervation for chronic sacroiliac joint pain after failed conservative management. Studies involving only conservative treatment or traumatic onset of injury were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the level of evidence quality using the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) system, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: We identified eleven articles (six fusion, five denervation) meeting our inclusion criteria. The majority of patients report satisfaction after both treatments. Both treatments reported mean improvements in pain and functional outcome. Rates of complications were higher among fusion studies (13.7%) compared to denervation studies (7.3%). Only fusion studies reported infections (5.3%). No infections were reported among denervation patients. The evidence for all findings were very low to low; therefore, the relative efficacy or safety of one treatment over another cannot be established. Conclusions: Sacroiliac joint fusion or denervation can reduce pain for many patients. Whether a true arthrodesis of the joint is achieved by percutaneous techniques is open to question and whether denervation of the joint gives durable pain relief is not clear. Further comparative studies of these two techniques may provide the answers. PMID:22956926

  12. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Review of Current Evidence-based Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amy; Nguyen, Christine; Lu, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    A central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) can induce an ischemic and hypoxic state with resulting sequelae of macular edema and neovascularization. Many treatment options have been studied. Our review aims to investigate the safety and efficacy of the multiple treatment options of CRVO. A PubMed and Cochrane literature search was performed. Well-controlled randomized clinical trials that demonstrated strong level 1 evidence-based on the rating scale developed by the British Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine were included. Seven clinical trials met inclusion criteria to be included in this review. These included studies that investigated the safety and efficacy of retinal photocoagulation (1 study), intravitreal steroid treatment (2 studies), and antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment (4 studies) for the treatment of CRVO. In addition, studies evaluating surgical treatment options for CRVO were also included. Many treatment modalities have been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of CRVO. These treatment options offer therapeutic benefits for patients and clinically superior visual acuity and perhaps the quality of life after suffering from a CRVO. PMID:26957838

  13. Three-year follow-up results for non-surgical root canal therapy of idiopathic external root resorption on a maxillary canine with MTA: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Li-Li; Wang, Cong-Yi; Dai, Lin; Cheng, Bo; Sun, Jun; Sun, Jun

    2014-01-01

    External root resorption (ERR) is an uncommon and intractable disease. Treatment alternatives are case-dependant and aim for the repair of the resorptive lesion and long-term retention of the tooth. A forty-year-old Asian female was diagnosed with idiopathic ERR on tooth #11 (the left maxillary canine) by CBCT. Non-surgical root canal therapy was completed with the aid of an operating microscope. The apical third of the root canal was filled with warm gutta-percha and the resorption defect was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The periapical radiographs were taken immediately after operation, one-month follow-up, six-month follow-up and three-year follow-up, respectively. Clinically, the canine was asymptomatic, and no evidence of any further resorption was found. The six-month follow-up radiograph showed initial healing of the bony lesion, while the three-year follow-up radiograph manifested almost complete healing. MTA can be a superior material to be successfully used in the non-surgical treatment of ERR. CBCT is very useful for evaluating the true nature and severity of absorption lesions in root resorption. It is the first complete case report from China about non-surgical treatment of severe ERR along with a relatively long term follow-up. PMID:25031758

  14. Standard and emerging treatment options for diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tentolouris, Nicholas; Alexiadou, Kleopatra; Makrilakis, Konstantinos; Liatis, Stavros; Jude, Edward; Boulton, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus affecting 30-50% of patients and is a major cause for increased costs, morbidity and mortality. Strict diabetes control prevents this complication and may restore neurologic deficits in the early stages. Several efforts have been undertaken to alter the natural history of this complication, including the use of aldose reductase and protein kinase-C inhibitors, as well as antioxidants. Available data so far do not support the use of aldose reductase inhibitors due to safety issues and efficacy. Protein kinase-C inhibitors have provided encouraging initial results but their development has been halted. Antioxidants, like a-lipoic acid, improve some neurological deficits and painful symptoms. There are effective and safe medications such as anticonvulsants, antidepressants and opioids for the management of patients with painful symptoms. In this revew we present standard and emerging treatment modalities for the etiologic and symptomatic treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24040869

  15. Current Standards and Novel Treatment Options for Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Benjamin A; Yabar, Cinthya S; Brody, Jonathan R; Pishvaian, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal solid tumors. The prognosis of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains dismal, with a median survival of less than 1 year, due in large part to the fact that pancreatic adenocarcinoma is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy. However, there recently have been significant improvements in outcomes for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: ongoing trials have shown promise, and these may lead to still further progress. Here we review the current treatment paradigms for metastatic disease, focusing on ways to ameliorate symptoms and lengthen survival. We then summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular aspects of pancreatic cancer. Finally, we outline new approaches currently under development for the treatment of metastatic disease, arising from our improved understanding of the genetic and nongenetic alterations within pancreatic cancer cells-and of interactions between cancer cells, the tumor microenvironment, and the immune system. PMID:26573060

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension Survival Effects and Treatment Options in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Adriano R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review discusses the current impact of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the outcome and treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). Recent findings Pulmonary hypertension is commonly encountered in advanced lung diseases such as CF. The prevalence of PH in CF patients varies based on disease severity and methodology used for diagnosis. Chronic alveolar hypoxia is the most likely etiology. The majority of recent studies have shown worse survival in CF patients who develop PH. The impact of PH-specific therapies on symptomatology and outcomes in CF patients has not been well studied. Summary Pulmonary hypertension is common in patients with CF and it occurs largely because of hypoxemia. The presence of PH in patients with CF is likely associated with worse outcome; however it remains unknown whether treatment with PH-specific therapies would be beneficial. PMID:24048083

  17. The antimicrobial armamentarium: evaluating current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bosso, John A

    2005-10-01

    The development and introduction of new antibiotics has, unfortunately, not kept pace with the development of bacterial resistance, and the need for new agents is becoming acute. Although some currently marketed agents remain valuable tools in the treatment of infectious diseases, few new drugs have reached the market in the last decade. In recent years, antibiotics with activity against certain problematic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including linezolid and daptomycin, have been approved for clinical practice. Recently, tigecycline, a minocycline derivative, received approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of complicated skin and skin structure and intraabdominal infections; the agent is also active against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Of the other agents in phase III development, ceftobiprole--a cephalosporin, and faropenem and doripenem--both carbapenems, have wide antibacterial spectra. Antimicrobial agents in the pipeline with marked gram-positive activity include dalbavancin, telavancin, and oritavancin. PMID:16178676

  18. Pathological fractures in children: Diagnosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Canavese, F; Samba, A; Rousset, M

    2016-02-01

    A fracture is defined as pathological when it arises in a bone tissue that has been modified and reshaped by a local or systemic pathological process. In children, pathological fractures can be secondary to several conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases to tumors, infections or neuromuscular pathologies. History, clinical examination and radiologic assessment are essential to making a diagnosis, to identifying the underlying cause and to planning the right treatment of a pathological fracture. Treatment must be tailored to both the fracture and the underlying cause. The objective of this work is to present the diagnostic approach and the course to follow when a child presents with a pathological fracture. The most common causes of pathological fractures, as well as their characteristics, will be described. Pathological fractures occurring in osteogenesis imperfecta and in abused children as well as stress fractures will not be discussed. PMID:26774903

  19. Current treatment options in the management of chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Duclos, Alain Jean; Lee, Chun-Te; Shoskes, Daniel Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis is a disease with an unknown etiology that affects a large number of men. The optimal management for category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is unknown. The recent years have seen a significant increase in research efforts to understand, classify and treat CP/CPPS. Standard treatment usually consists of prolonged courses of antibiotics, even though well-designed clinical trials have failed to demonstrate their efficacy. Recent treatment strategies with some evidence of efficacy include: alpha-blockers, anti-inflammatory agents, hormonal manipulation, phytotherapy (quercetin, bee pollen), physiotherapy and chronic pain therapy. A stepwise, multimodal approach can be successful for the majority of patients who present with this difficult condition. PMID:18472971

  20. [Interventional options in modern treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Dulguerov, F; Radermecker, M A; Legrand, V

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a complex pathology. The understanding of its physiopathology and, notably, of the SAM phenomenon (Systolic Anterior Motion), is crucial for all available treatments. Amongst the most efficient therapies, one can cite the septal myectomy and its most recent technical updates, as well as the alcohol septal ablation. The choice between these two methods depends on the general state of the patient, the thickness of the interventricular septum and the coronary anatomy of the patients. PMID:21374955

  1. Modern treatment options for the therapy of keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Tomalla, Mark; Cagnolati, Wolfgang

    2007-03-01

    The following case report describes the implantation of intrastromal corneal ring segments (ICRS) and the postoperative contact lens treatment in a 42-year-old patient with bilateral advanced keratoconus. The patient had a preoperative contact lens intolerance. After femtosecond laser assisted surgery and the implantation of ICRS new custom mini-scleral contact lenses were fitted. The postoperative subjective and objective contact lens tolerance was excellent. PMID:17207654

  2. Treatment options for tank farms long-length contaminated equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, W.S.

    1995-10-16

    This study evaluated a variety of treatment and disposal technologies for mixed waste (MW) meeting the following criteria: 1. Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank System (tank farms) equipment and other debris; 2. length greater than 12 feet; and contaminated with listed MW from the tank farms. This waste stream, commonly referred to as tank farms long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE), poses a unique and costly set of challenges during all phases of the waste management lifecycle.

  3. Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B.; Knezevic, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

  4. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Patients with Relapsed Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Roberto; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Orofino, Nicola; Losurdo, Agnese; Gandolfi, Sara; Cugno, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic disorder. It results from proliferation of clonal plasma cells in bone marrow with production of monoclonal proteins, which are detectable in serum or urine. MM is clinically characterized by destructive bone lesions, anemia, hypercalcemia and renal insufficiency. Its prognosis is severe, with a median survival after diagnosis of approximately 3 years due to frequent relapses. Treatments for patients with relapsed/refractory MM include hematopoietic cell transplantation, a rechallenge using a previous chemotherapy regimen or a trial of a new regimen. The introduction of new drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib has markedly improved MM outcomes. When relapse occurs, the clinician’s challenge is to select the optimal treatment for each patient while balancing efficacy and toxicity. Patients with indolent relapse can be first treated with a 2-drug or a 3-drug combination. Patients with more aggressive relapse often require therapy with a combination of multiple active agents. Autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered as salvage therapy at first relapse for patients who have cryopreserved stem cells early in the disease course. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the pharmacological and molecular action of treatments used for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. PMID:24179412

  5. Emerging Treatment Options in Mild to Moderate Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Gary R.; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Sandborn, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with rectal bleeding and urgency, tenesmus, and diarrhea. Several medical therapies can be used in the treatment of UC. Aminosalicylates are widely used based on their efficacy in the induction and maintenance of remission. Although corticosteroids are effective in patients with more severe disease, systemic use is associated with significant safety concerns. The newer corticosteroid budesonide has lower systemic bioavailability and, consequently, a more favorable safety profile. A budesonide extended-release formulation allows once-daily dosing and delivers the agent locally throughout the colon. Biologic agents used for the treatment of moderate to severe UC include the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, and the integrin inhibitor vedolizumab. Rectally administered therapy can also be useful in the treatment of UC. In October 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a budesonide foam formulation for inducing remission in patients with active mild to moderate distal UC extending up to 40 cm from the anal verge. Budesonide foam rapidly distributes to the sigmoid colon and the rectum and avoids some of the drawbacks of suppositories and enemas. PMID:26491415

  6. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  7. Treatment options in renal cell carcinoma: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Oudard, S; George, D; Medioni, J; Motzer, R

    2007-09-01

    Cytokine therapies have been the standard of care in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, these agents only provide clinical benefit to a small subset of patients and are associated with significant toxicity. A better understanding of the molecular biology of RCC has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor signalling pathways as rational targets for anticancer therapy. The multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors sunitinib and sorafenib have both demonstrated improved efficacy as second-line therapy in patients with RCC. Sunitinib has also been shown to be effective in the first-line setting, and has recently received European Union approval as first-line treatment for advanced and/or metastatic RCC. There is also recent evidence that temsirolimus (an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin) and bevacizumab (a mAb targeted against VEGF) may provide benefits in the first-line treatment setting. These results confirm that inhibiting these tumour targets is a feasible approach to treatment and provides a more positive outlook for the future management of metastatic RCC. PMID:17761720

  8. Current and emerging treatment options for patients with relapsed myeloma.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Roberto; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Orofino, Nicola; Losurdo, Agnese; Gandolfi, Sara; Cugno, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic disorder. It results from proliferation of clonal plasma cells in bone marrow with production of monoclonal proteins, which are detectable in serum or urine. MM is clinically characterized by destructive bone lesions, anemia, hypercalcemia and renal insufficiency. Its prognosis is severe, with a median survival after diagnosis of approximately 3 years due to frequent relapses. Treatments for patients with relapsed/refractory MM include hematopoietic cell transplantation, a rechallenge using a previous chemotherapy regimen or a trial of a new regimen. The introduction of new drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib has markedly improved MM outcomes. When relapse occurs, the clinician's challenge is to select the optimal treatment for each patient while balancing efficacy and toxicity. Patients with indolent relapse can be first treated with a 2-drug or a 3-drug combination. Patients with more aggressive relapse often require therapy with a combination of multiple active agents. Autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered as salvage therapy at first relapse for patients who have cryopreserved stem cells early in the disease course. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the pharmacological and molecular action of treatments used for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. PMID:24179412

  9. Chronic urticaria: aetiology, management and current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Martina M A; Sabroe, Ruth A

    2004-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common condition that can be very disabling when severe. A cause for chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is only infrequently identified. Potential causes include reactions to food and drugs, infections (rarely) and, apart from an increased incidence of thyroid disease, uncomplicated urticaria is not usually associated with underlying systemic disease or malignancy. About one-third of patients with CIU have circulating functional autoantibodies against the high affinity IgE receptor or against IgE, although it is not known why such antibodies are produced, or how the presence of such antibodies alters the course of the disease or response to treatment. There are only a few publications relating to childhood urticaria, but it is probably similar to the adult form, except that adult urticaria is more common. The diagnosis is based on patient history and it is vital to spend time documenting this in detail. Extensive laboratory tests are not required in the vast majority of patients. Chronic urticaria resolves spontaneously in 30-55% of patients within 5 years, but it can persist for many years. Treatment is aimed firstly at avoiding underlying causative or exacerbating factors. Histamine H1 receptor antagonists remain the mainstay of oral treatment for all forms of urticaria. The newer low-sedating antihistamines desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine and mizolastine should be tried first. Sedating antihistamines have more adverse effects but are useful if symptoms are causing sleep disturbance. Low-dose dopexin is effective and especially suitable for patients with associated depression. There is controversy as to whether the addition of an histamine H2 receptor antagonist or a leukotriene antagonist is helpful. For CIU, second-line agents include ciclosporin (cyclosporine) [which is effective in approximately 75% of patients], short courses of oral corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis, although the last two were found to be beneficial in small trials only. Treatments for CIU with only limited or anecdotal supportive evidence include sulphasalazine, methotrexate, stanazol, rofecoxib and cyclophosphamide. The efficacy of photo(chemo)therapy is controversial. Physical urticarias may respond to H1 receptor antagonists, although in delayed pressure urticaria, and cold, solar and aquagenic urticaria, the response may be disappointing. Second-line agents for physical urticarias vary depending on the urticaria and most have limited supportive evidence. The potential for spontaneous resolution, the variation in the disease activity and the unpredictable nature of the disease makes the efficacy of treatments difficult to assess. PMID:15516152

  10. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical trials are coming down the drug discovery pipeline, it is clear that the field is moving in a direction that values the development of molecular biomarkers, less subjective quantitative measures of symptom improvement, and rating scales developed specifically for use in FXS in conjunction with drug safety. While summarizing preclinical evidence, where applicable, and discussing challenges in FXS treatment development, this review details both completed clinical trials for the targeted and symptomatic treatment of FXS and introduces novel projects on the cusp of clinical trial investigation. PMID:25897255

  11. Pediatric migraine: new diagnostic strategies and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pakalnis, Ann

    2006-03-01

    Migraine headaches are seen commonly by physicians caring for children and adolescents. The prevalence in the pediatric population ranges from 3.2 to 10.6%. With the advent of new inclusive diagnostic criteria, reproducibility of definitive diagnosis in children and adolescents should improve. Although advances with clinical drug trials have yielded new, approved therapies in adults, information remains inconclusive in the pediatric population. Further clinical studies are warranted to develop consensus on treatment paradigms for clinicians to utilize in children and adolescents with migraine. PMID:16533133

  12. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host–pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  13. [Plastic-surgical treatment options in necrotising fasciitis].

    PubMed

    Altmann, S; Meyer, F; Infanger, M; Damert, H-G

    2015-04-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is considered a rare and possibly life-threatening infection of the subcutaneous tissue and of the fascia. A specific characteristic is the rapid progress of the disease associated with considerable local pain. Since laboratory parameters as well as imaging are only unspecific, diagnosis is set up clinically. Even in the case of a serious suspicion, an immediate and radical debridement has to be initiated, accompanied by intensive care and adequate antibiotic treatment. Only after stabilisation of the general physical condition and local - sometimes extensive - wound debridement, can coverage and reconstruction of soft tissue defects be appropriately performed by the measures and procedures of plastic surgery. PMID:25874471

  14. Current and future systemic treatment options in metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Cagatay

    2014-01-01

    Although pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death, only modest improvement has been observed in the past two decades, single agent gemcitabine has been the only standard treatment in patients with advanced disease. Recently newer agents such as nab-paclitaxel, nimotuzumab and regimens such as FOLFIRINOX have been shown to have promising activity being superior to gemcitabine as a single agent. With better understanding of tumour biology coupled with the improvements in targeted and immunotherapies, there is increasing expectation for better response rates and extended survival in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25083302

  15. Osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint: nonsurgical treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carfagno, David G; Ellenbecker, Todd S

    2002-04-01

    Glenohumeral osteoarthritis is a relatively uncommon type of osteoarthritis characterized by loss of anterior or forward flexion. Assessing range of motion, impingement, and strength, combined with radiologic imaging, can help determine the extent of damage. Published studies focus primarily on surgical treatment, but commonly used nonsurgical approaches include anti-inflammatory medications, oral and injectable viscosupplementation, and physical therapy. These conservative measures can be very effective for active patients and also appeal to their physicians who consider shoulder surgery as a last resort. PMID:20086520

  16. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-08-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  17. Opioids: an unexplored option for treatment of dyspnea in IPF

    PubMed Central

    Kohberg, Charlotte; Andersen, Charlotte Uggerhøj; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common among the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and has the worst prognosis, with a median survival of 3–5 years. The most common symptom in IPF is dyspnea, impacting on the patient's quality of life and life expectancy. Morphine in the treatment of dyspnea has been investigated but with conflicting results. This review aims to clarify the role of opioids in the treatment of dyspnea in patients with IPF. Methods A literature search was performed using the MeSH and PubMed databases. As only very few studies included patients with IPF, studies conducted primarily with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were also included. In total, 14 articles were found. Results Seven studies reported use of systemic morphine and seven studies of inhaled morphine. Five of the seven studies investigating systemic administration detected an improvement in either dyspnea or exercise capacity, whereas no beneficial effect on dyspnea was detected in any study using inhaled morphine. No severe adverse effects such as respiratory depression were reported in any study, although constipation was reported as a notable adverse effect. Conclusions Results were inconsistent, but in some studies systemic morphine administration showed a significant improvement in the dyspnea score on a visual analog scale without observation of severe side effects. Nebulized morphine had no effect on dyspnea. PMID:26969472

  18. New Topical Treatment Options for Actinic Keratosis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Sibbring, Gillian C; Alarcon, Ivette

    2016-01-20

    This systematic review compared the relative efficacy of 5-fluorouracil 0.5% in salicylic acid 10% (5-FU/SA), ingenol mebutate (IMB) and imiquimod 2.5%/3.75% (IMI) for actinic keratosis on the face, forehead or scalp. Only 11 publications, relating to 7 randomised controlled trials, met inclusion criteria and it was only possible to compare the effect of all 3 treatments on complete clinical clearance, and the effect of 5-FU/SA and IMB on actinic keratosis recurrence rate. Despite a higher vehicle response rate for 5-FU/SA, complete clinical clearance was higher than IMB and IMI (55.4, 42.7, and 25.0/30.6%, respectively). 5-FU/SA was also associated with lower actinic keratosis recurrence rate than IMB at 12 months post-treatment (32.7 vs. 53.9%). Although qualitative assessment suggested a numerical advantage of 5-FU/SA over IMB and IMI in terms of complete clinical clearance and sustained clearance, clinical data from longer term trials, with comparable outcome measures, are required to corroborate these findings. PMID:26068001

  19. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  20. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eldebawy, Eman; Parker, William; Abdel Rahman, Wamied; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  1. Newer treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Murugan; Linden, Peter K

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, serious skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by multidrug resistant pathogens have become more common. While the majority of SSTIs are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or beta-haemolytic streptococci that are methicillin/oxacillin susceptible, the emergence of methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-resistant community-acquired and nosocomial Gram-positive pathogens has created a need for different therapeutic agents, such as linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, and newer generation carbapenems and fluoroquinolones. This review focuses on agents presently in clinical development for the treatment of SSTIs caused by Gram-positive pathogens such as staphylococci, streptococci and enterococci including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Newer-generation carbapenems, such as meropenem and ertapenem, are characterised by a broad-spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and -negative aerobes and anaerobes, and are resistant to hydrolysis by many beta-lactamases. Current-generation fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, have demonstrated better eradication rates for S. aureus than conventional penicillin and cephalosporins. These antimicrobial agents can be used to treat methicillin-susceptible staphylococcal and streptococcal strains. Oxazolidinones, streptogramin combinations and cyclic lipopeptides have novel mechanisms of action and have been studied in several multinational phase III clinical trials in the treatment of complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. They possess a broad spectrum of activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, including MRSA and VRE. Linezolid has been shown to be active against a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial antimicrobial-resistant pathogens with comparability to vancomycin, as well as resulting in reduced lengths of hospital stay. Cyclic lipopeptides such as daptomycin have a unique mechanism of action by disruption of bacterial membrane electric potentials with less likelihood for development of cross-resistance. Daptomycin has recently been US FDA approved for the treatment of complicated SSTI. However, rapid development of resistance to some of these newer agents has already been reported and this trend magnifies the importance of further need for effective antimicrobial agents. Several investigational agents, such as dalbavancin, oritavancin and tigecycline, are in advanced stages of development and are likely to proceed to licensing in the next few years. With their long half-lives, these agents have an advantage of less frequent dose administration with more rapid bactericidal activity and less likelihood for development of resistance. However, because of their proven activity against highly resistant organisms, these antibacterial agents should be reserved only for life-threatening situations and/or when resistant pathogens are suspected. Rational antimicrobial use coupled with awareness of infection control measures is paramount to avert the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms. PMID:15257625

  2. [Low Back Pain in Pregnancy: Diagnosis, Treatment Options and Outcomes].

    PubMed

    Mühlemann, Daniel; Mühlemann, Malin B

    2015-05-20

    Low back pain in pregnancy is a common occurrence and is mainly caused by hormonal and biomechanical changes. Patients with pregnancy-induced low back pain (PILBP) frequently complain of moderate to severe and disabling pain often restricting their daily activities. In these cases, a “watch and wait” approach cannot be the best solution. On the basis of anamnesis and examination PILBP can be divided into three subgroups: pregnancy-related low back pain (PLBP), pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and the combination of PLBP and PGP. The three entities ask for different diagnostic workups and therapeutic modalities. There are many possible treatments for PLBP, however, only a few are based on sound evidence. Information and advice, exercise and training programs, acupuncture, stabilizing belts and analgesic medication can have a positive impact on pain and disability. PGP und PLBP respond well to chiropractic interventions. PMID:26098153

  3. Management and treatment options for patients with open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Davidson, Brian

    2016-01-13

    Abdominal sepsis and trauma are the main indications for open abdomen. However, there is no robust evidence that open abdomen is better than closed in these cases. When using open abdomen, treatment goals are to control the source of infection, protect the bowel from damage, minimise adhesions between the bowel and abdominal wall, facilitate nursing care and allow permanent closure of the wound by bringing the fascial edges closer. Several temporary abdominal closure techniques exist, but are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. There is no evidence that any specific temporary abdominal closure technique is better than others; however, negative pressure wound therapy appears to be a popular method of management of open abdomen. PMID:26758169

  4. Stem cell therapy: a novel treatment option for cerebral malaria?

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Qian, Hui; Cao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria, a severe form of the disease, is one of the most severe complications of infection with Plasmodium parasites and a leading cause of malaria mortality. Currently available antimalarial therapy has proven insufficient to prevent neurological complications and death in all cases of cerebral malaria. Souza and colleagues observed that transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) increased survival, reduced parasitemia, decreased malaria pigment accumulation in the spleen, liver and kidney, elevated Kupffer cell count in liver, alleviated renal injury and lung inflammation, and improved lung mechanics in an experimental mouse model of cerebral malaria. Although plenty of challenges lie ahead, their findings show the promise of BM-MSC therapy for the treatment of cerebral malaria. PMID:26253514

  5. Emergency treatment options for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Exo, J; Smith, C; Smith, R; Bell, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading killer of children and is a major public health problem around the world. Using general principles of neurocritical care, various treatment strategies have been developed to attempt to restore homeostasis to the brain and allow brain healing, including mechanical factors, cerebrospinal fluid diversion, hyperventilation, hyperosmolar therapies, barbiturates and hypothermia. Careful application of these therapies, normally in a step-wise fashion as intracranial injuries evolve, is necessary in order to attain maximal neurological outcome for these children. It is hopeful that new therapies, such as early hypothermia or others currently in preclinical trials, will ultimately improve outcome and quality of life for children after traumatic brain injury. PMID:20191093

  6. Managing pediatric hepatitis C: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Karnsakul, Wikrom; Alford, Mary Kay; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2009-01-01

    Since 1992, the maternal–fetal route of transmission has become the dominant route for acquisition of hepatitis C (HCV) infection by children. With increasing knowledge of antiviral treatment for HCV infection, the main goal of therapy is to achieve a sustained virological response (SVR) as defined by undetectable serum HCV RNA by polymerase chain reaction assay six months after cessation of therapy. In young children, interferon therapy is more effective than in adults with chronic HCV infection (CHC). Although children clearly have a milder degree of liver pathology, data have indicated that hepatic inflammation from HCV infection can progress to fibrosis or cirrhosis in children. Hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported in adolescents with CHC. In this article, recent improvements in therapy of children with CHC and in the clinical development of new emerging drugs with potential use in children will be reviewed. PMID:19707281

  7. New and emerging treatment options for biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Marcus S; Hezel, Aram F

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a group of relatively rare tumors with a poor prognosis. The current standard of care consists of doublet chemotherapy (platinum plus gemcitabine); however, even with cytotoxic therapy, the median overall survival is less than 1 year. The genetic basis of BTC is now more clearly understood, allowing for the investigation of targeted therapy. Combinations of doublet chemotherapy with antiepidermal growth factor receptor agents have provided modest results in Phase II and Phase III setting, and responses with small molecule inhibitors are limited. Moving forward as we continue to characterize the genetic hallmarks of BTC, a stepwise, strategic, and cooperative approach will allow us to make progress when developing new treatments. PMID:24204165

  8. Treatment options: biological basis of regenerative endodontic procedures.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Diogenes, Anibal; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2013-01-01

    Dental trauma occurs frequently in children and often can lead to pulpal necrosis. The occurrence of pulpal necrosis in the permanent but immature tooth represents a challenging clinical situation because the thin and often short roots increase the risk of subsequent fracture. Current approaches for treating the traumatized immature tooth with pulpal necrosis do not reliably achieve the desired clinical outcomes, consisting of healing of apical periodontitis, promotion of continued root development, and restoration of the functional competence of pulpal tissue. An optimal approach for treating the immature permanent tooth with a necrotic pulp would be to regenerate functional pulpal tissue. This review summarizes the current literature supporting a biological rationale for considering regenerative endodontic treatment procedures in treating the immature permanent tooth with pulp necrosis. PMID:23635981

  9. Treatment options: biological basis of regenerative endodontic procedures.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Diogenes, Anibal; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2013-03-01

    Dental trauma occurs frequently in children and often can lead to pulpal necrosis. The occurrence of pulpal necrosis in the permanent but immature tooth represents a challenging clinical situation because the thin and often short roots increase the risk of subsequent fracture. Current approaches for treating the traumatized immature tooth with pulpal necrosis do not reliably achieve the desired clinical outcomes, consisting of healing of apical periodontitis, promotion of continued root development, and restoration of the functional competence of pulpal tissue. An optimal approach for treating the immature permanent tooth with a necrotic pulp would be to regenerate functional pulpal tissue. This review summarizes the current literature supporting a biological rationale for considering regenerative endodontic treatment procedures in treating the immature permanent tooth with pulp necrosis. PMID:23439043

  10. Treatment Options: Biological Basis of Regenerative Endodontic Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Diogenes, Anibal; Teixeira, Fabricio B.

    2013-01-01

    Dental trauma occurs frequently in children and often can lead to pulpal necrosis. The occurrence of pulpal necrosis in the permanent but immature tooth represents a challenging clinical situation since the thin and often short roots increase the risk of subsequent fracture. Current approaches for treating the traumatized immature tooth with pulpal necrosis do not reliably achieve the desired clinical outcomes, consisting of healing of apical periodontitis, promotion of continued root development and restoration of the functional competence of pulpal tissue. An optimal approach for treating the immature permanent tooth with a necrotic pulp would be to regenerate functional pulpal tissue. This review summarizes the current literature supporting a biological rationale for considering regenerative endodontic treatment procedures in treating the immature permanent tooth with pulp necrosis. PMID:23439043

  11. Contemporary treatment options for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salhofer-Polanyi, S; Leutmezer, F

    2014-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, encompassing both neuroinflammatory as well as prominent neurodegenerative aspects. A significant proportion of MS patients will develop neurological disability over time and up until recently licensed drugs could not satisfactorily halt this process. However, in the last years MS treatment has raised a stage of rapid progress. Several new drugs with significantly improved efficacy have entered the therapeutic field and several others are currently undergoing phase III clinical trials. In this review, we will summarize efficacy data as well as safety and tolerability issues of currently licensed drugs for relapsing-remitting MS and will give a short update on new drugs currently undergoing late-stage clinical trials. PMID:24918837

  12. Laser and light-based treatment options for hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Hamzavi, Iltefat H; Griffith, James L; Riyaz, Farhaad; Hessam, Schapoor; Bechara, Falk G

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that commonly develops painful, deep dermal abscesses and chronic, draining sinus tracts. Classically, pharmacologic and surgical therapies have been effective for reducing lesion activity and inflammation, but provide only modest success in the prevention of future recurrences and disease progression. Adjunctive therapies, such as laser and light-based therapies, have become more commonly used in the management of HS. These therapies work to reduce the occurrence of painful HS flare-ups by decreasing the number of hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and bacteria in affected areas, and by ablatively debulking chronic lesions. The best results are seen when treatment is individualized, taking disease severity into consideration when selecting specific energy-based approaches. This article will discuss various light-based therapies and the evidence supporting their use in the management of HS. PMID:26470622

  13. Breakthrough pain in elderly patients with cancer: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pautex, Sophie; Vogt-Ferrier, Nicole; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of pain is high in the elderly and increases with the occurrence of cancer. Pain treatment is challenging because of age-related factors such as co-morbidities, and over half of the patients with cancer pain experience transient exacerbation of pain that is known as breakthrough pain (BTP). As with background pain, BTP should be properly assessed before being treated. The first step to be taken is optimizing around-the-clock analgesia with expert titration of the painkiller. Rescue medication should then be provided as per the requested need, while at the same time preventing identified potential precipitating factors. In the elderly, starting treatment with a lower dose of analgesics may be justified because of age-related physiological changes such as decreased hepatic and renal function. Whenever possible, oral medication should be provided prior to a painful maneuver. In the case of unpredictable BTP, immediate rescue medication is mandatory and the subcutaneous route is preferred unless patient-controlled analgesia via continuous drug infusion is available. Recently, transmucosal preparations have appeared in the medical armamentarium but it is not yet known whether they represent a truly efficient alternative, although their rapid onset of activity is already well recognized. Adjuvant analgesics, topical analgesics, anesthetic techniques and interventional techniques are all valid methods to help in the difficult management of pain and BTP in elderly patients with cancer. However, none has reached a satisfying scientific level of evidence as to nowadays make the development of undisputed best practice guidelines possible. Further research is therefore on the agenda. PMID:24817569

  14. Oral antihyperglycemic treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Brietzke, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Table 3 provides an overview of the oral antihyperglycemic drugs reviewed in this article. A 2011 meta-analysis by Bennett and colleagues found low or insufficient quality of evidence favoring an initial choice of metformin, SUs, glinides, TZDs, or (table see text) DPP-4 inhibitors (alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, bromocriptine mesylate, and SGLT2 inhibitors were not included in this meta-analysis) with regard to the outcomes measures of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and mortality, and incidence of microvascular disease (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) in previously healthy individuals with newly diagnosed T2DM. Likewise, the Bennett and colleagues meta-analysis judged these drugs to be of roughly equal efficacy with regard to reduction of HbA1c (1%–1.6%) from the pretreatment baseline. The ADOPT clinical trial of 3 different and, at the time, popular, oral monotherapies for T2DM provides support for the consensus recommendation of metformin as first-line therapy. The ADOPT trial showed slightly superior HbA1c reduction for rosiglitazone compared with metformin, which was in turn superior to glyburide. However, significant adverse events, including edema, weight gain, and fractures, were more common in the rosiglitazone-treated patients. The implication of this trial is that the combination of low cost, low risk, minimal adverse effects, and efficacy of metformin justifies use of this agent as the cornerstone of oral drug treatment of T2DM. Judicious use of metformin in groups formerly thought to be at high risk for lactic acidosis (ie, those with CHF, chronic kidney disease [eGFR >30 mL/min/1.73 m2], and the elderly) may be associated with mortality benefit rather than increased risk. Secondary and tertiary add-on drug therapy should be individualized based on cost, personal preferences, and overall treatment goals, taking into account the wishes and priorities of the patient. PMID:25456645

  15. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  16. Neutrophilic dermatoses: a review of current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R

    2009-01-01

    Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, and subcorneal pustular dermatosis are neutrophilic dermatoses - conditions that have an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of mature polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The neutrophils are usually located within the dermis in Sweet syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum; however, in subcorneal pustular dermatosis, they are found in the upper layers of the epidermis. Sweet syndrome, also referred to as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is characterized by pyrexia, elevated neutrophil count, painful erythematous cutaneous lesions that have an infiltrate of mature neutrophils typically located in the upper dermis, and prompt clinical improvement following the initiation of systemic corticosteroid therapy. Classical, malignancy-associated, and drug-induced variants of Sweet syndrome exist. Pyoderma gangrenosum is characterized by painful, enlarging necrotic ulcers with bluish undermined borders surrounded by advancing zones of erythema; its clinical variants include: ulcerative or classic, pustular, bullous or atypical, vegetative, peristomal, and drug-induced. Subcorneal pustular dermatosis is an uncommon relapsing symmetric pustular eruption that involves flexural and intertriginous areas; it can be idiopathic or associated with cancer, infections, medications, and systemic diseases. Since Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, and subcorneal pustular dermatosis share not only the same inflammatory cell but also similar associated systemic diseases, it is not surprising that the concurrent or sequential development of these neutrophilic dermatoses has been observed in the same individual. Also, it is not unexpected that several of the effective therapeutic interventions - including systemic drugs, topical agents, and other treatment modalities - for the management of these dermatoses are the same. The treatment of choice for Sweet syndrome and idiopathic pyoderma gangrenosum is systemic corticosteroids; however, for subcorneal pustular dermatosis, dapsone is the drug of choice. Yet, tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists are becoming the preferred choice when pyoderma gangrenosum is accompanied by inflammatory bowel disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Potassium iodide and colchicine are alternative first-line therapies for Sweet syndrome and indomethacin (indometacin), clofazimine, cyclosporine (ciclosporin), and dapsone are second-line treatments. Cyclosporine is effective in the acute management of pyoderma gangrenosum; however, when tapering the drug, additional systemic agents are necessary for maintaining the clinical response. In some patients with subcorneal pustular dermatosis, systemic corticosteroids may be effective; yet, systemic retinoids (such as etretinate and acitretin) have effectively been used for treating this neutrophilic dermatosis - either as monotherapy or in combination with dapsone or as a component of phototherapy with psoralen and UVA radiation. Topical agents can have an adjuvant role in the management of these neutrophilic dermatoses; however, high-potency topical corticosteroids may successfully treat localized manifestations of Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, and subcorneal pustular dermatosis. Intralesional corticosteroid therapy for patients with Sweet syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum, hyperbaric oxygen and plasmapheresis for patients with pyoderma grangrenosum, and phototherapy for patients with subcorneal pustular dermatosis are other modalities that have been used effectively for treating individuals with these neutrophilic dermatoses. PMID:19658442

  17. A Comprehensive Review of Treatment Options for Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Shalini; Trevino, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome that involves a combination of emotional and physical symptoms that result in significant functional impairment. Because of the debilitating nature of PMDD, multiple treatment options have been considered. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these therapeutic regimens to help health care professionals provide adequate treatment for PMDD and premenstrual syndrome. The treatments that are reviewed are organized into the following categories: psychiatric, anovulatory, supplements, herbal, nonpharmacological, and other. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been established as the first-line treatment for PMDD. Although luteal phase or continuous dosing can be used, additional research is needed to more thoroughly compare the efficacies and differential symptom response of continuous, semi-intermittent, luteal phase, and symptoms-onset dosing. The psychiatric medications venlafaxine, duloxetine, alprazolam, and buspirone have also been found to be useful treatments for PMDD. Various anovulatory-related treatments have demonstrated efficacy; however, the use of some of these treatments remains limited due to potential side effects and/or the availability of cheaper alternatives. Although a variety of supplement and herbal-related treatments have been proposed, with some warranting further research, at this time only calcium supplementation has demonstrated a consistent therapeutic benefit. In conclusion, serotoninergic antidepressants have been established as the first-line treatment option for PMDD; however, there are a variety of additional treatment options that should be considered if a patient fails to achieve an adequate therapeutic response with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. PMID:26352222

  18. CNS complications of breast cancer: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kaal, Evert C A; Vecht, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    In general, the development of CNS metastases of breast cancer depends on several prognostic factors, including younger age and a negative hormone receptor status. Also, the presence of a breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) germline mutation and expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2/neu) proto-oncogene seem to contribute to an increased rate of development of CNS metastases. The choice of appropriate therapy for brain metastases also depends on prognostic factors, including the age of the patient, the Karnofsky performance score, the number of brain metastases and the presence of systemic disease. Surgery followed by whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is generally restricted to ambulant patients with a single brain metastasis without active extracranial disease. In patients who have two to four metastases, stereotactic focal radiotherapy (i.e. radiosurgery) with or without WBRT is usually indicated. In the remainder of patients, WBRT alone provides adequate palliation. Although breast carcinoma is sensitive to chemotherapy, the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of brain metastases is still unclear. Objective responses after cyclophosphamide-based therapies were reported in studies performed in the 1980s. Subgroup analysis of data from a randomised study indicates that survival may improve if WBRT is combined with the radiosensitiser efaproxiral. Interestingly, the Her2/neu antibody trastuzumab, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, produces systemic responses and enhanced survival, without a clear effect on brain metastases. Breast cancer constitutes the most common solid primary tumour leading to leptomeningeal disease. Clinical symptoms such as cranial nerve dysfunction or a cauda equina syndrome can be treated with local radiotherapy. A randomised study in patients with leptomeningeal disease secondary to breast cancer has revealed that intrathecal chemotherapy is associated with substantially more adverse effects than non-intrathecal treatment, without a clear benefit in terms of response or survival. Intramedullary metastasis is rare but often presents with a rapidly progressive myelopathy. Local radiotherapy may preserve neurological function. Epidural spinal cord metastasis occurs in approximately 4% of patients and can lead to paraplegia. A randomised study has shown that surgical intervention together with local radiotherapy is superior to local radiotherapy alone. PMID:17579499

  19. Options assessment report: Treatment of nitrate salt waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-09-16

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognized that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL's preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  20. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Bridge: A Treatment Option in Children

    PubMed Central

    Yelluri, Rama Krishna; Munshi, AK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of treatment options, ranging from Maryland bridges to implants, are available for the replacement of congenitally or traumatically missing permanent anterior teeth. But, there are several limitations of these therapeutic options when they have to be used before the completion of the growth, particularly in children. Reinforcement of composite resins with polyethylene fibers significantly improves their mechanical properties. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) bridge can offer a good alternative to conventional treatment options in replacing a missing permanent anterior tooth until a more definitive prosthesis can be provided at the end of the growth period. The purpose of this article is to present a clinical case of a single tooth replacement utilizing noninvasive and metal free fixed FRC bridge in a 13 years old child as an interim treatment option. How to cite this article: Gupta A, Yelluri RK, Munshi AK. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Bridge: A Treatment Option in Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):62-65. PMID:26124584

  1. Post-treatment management options for patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Virgo, K S; McKirgan, L W; Caputo, M C; Mahurin, D M; Chao, L C; Caputo, N A; Naunheim, K S; Flye, M W; Gillespie, K N; Johnson, F E

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first objective was to identify variations in patient management practice patterns after potentially curative lung cancer surgery. Patient management practice patterns were expected to range from intensive follow-up to no active surveillance. The second objective was to measure whether intensity of follow-up was related to patient outcomes. METHODS: An 18-month retrospective analysis was conducted of 182 patients with low TNM stage (< or = IIIA) lung cancer who were surgically treated with curative intent over the 11-year period from 1982 through 1992 at the St. Louis Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. RESULTS: Patients were followed for a mean of 3.3 years, until death or the end of the study. Analyses of diagnostic test and outpatient visit frequency distributions and cluster analyses facilitated the identification of 62 nonintensively followed patients and 120 intensively followed patients. Both groups were comparable at baseline, and there were no significant differences in patient outcomes attributable to intensity of follow-up. Intensively followed patients did, however, live an average of 192 days longer than nonintensively followed patients. CONCLUSIONS: Significant variations in follow-up practice patterns can exist within a single health care facility. In this analysis, variations in test and visit frequency did not result in statistically significant differences in patient outcomes, though the survival difference between groups suggests that some benefit might exist. Only well-designed prospective trials are likely to answer the question of what constitutes optimal follow-up after potentially curative lung cancer treatment. PMID:8526576

  2. Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution of antimicrobial resistance-treatment options.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  3. Genetics and Treatments Options for Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Celeste A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Worldwide research efforts demonstrate a major role of gene-environment interactions for the risk, development, and progression of most pancreatic diseases, including recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis. New findings of pancreas disease-associated risk variants have been reported in the CPA1, GGT1, CLDN2, MMP1, MTHFR, and other genes. These risk genes and their regulatory regions must be added to the known pathogenic variants in the PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC, CASR, UBR1, SBDS, CEL, and CTSB genes. This new knowledge promises to improve disease management and prevention through personalized medicine. At the same time, however, knowledge of an increasing number of pathogenic variants, and their complicated effects when present in combination, results in increasing difficulty in interpretation and development of recommendations. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic testing results also adds complexity to disease management paradigms, especially without interpretation and, in many cases, proven accuracy. While improvements in the ability to rapidly and accurately interpret complex genetic tests are clearly needed, some results, such as pathogenic CFTR variants – including a new class of bicarbonate-defective mutations – and PRSS1 variants have immediate implications that direct management. In addition, discovery of pancreatitis-associated genetic variants in patients with glucose intolerance may suggest underlying type 3c diabetes, which also has implications for treatment and disease management. PMID:24954874

  4. Velaglucerase alfa: a new option for Gaucher disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Zimran, A

    2011-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) results from inherited ?-glucocerebrosidase gene mutations, leading to anemia, thrombocytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and skeletal disease. Velaglucerase alfa is a ?-glucocerebrosidase produced by gene activation in a human cell line, and indicated for type 1 GD. A phase I/II clinical trial (TKT025; N = 12), its ongoing extension (TKT025EXT) and three phase III trials (total N = 82), showed that velaglucerase alfa is generally well tolerated in adult and pediatric patients. Many disease-related parameters improved significantly in two phase III trials in treatment-nave patients, and were successfully maintained in imiglucerase-experienced patients in a phase II/III switch study. Ten adults in TKT025EXT sustained improvements through 5 years, including bone mineral density. Comparison with imiglucerase shows that velaglucerase alfa is an effective, generally well-tolerated alternative enzyme replacement therapy. In vitro data suggest velaglucerase alfa may be internalized into cells more efficiently and have a lower rate of seroconversion. However, these results do not necessarily correlate with clinical efficacy. PMID:22013559

  5. Acinetobacter baumannii: Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance—Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2015-01-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  6. Treatment options for low-level radiologically contaminated ORNL filtercake

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hom-Ti; Bostick, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    Water softening sludge (>4000 stored low level contaminated drums; 600 drums per year) generated by the ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant must be treated, stabilized, and placed in safe storage/disposal. The sludge is primarily CaCO{sub 3} and is contaminated by low levels of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. In this study, microwave sintering and calcination were evaluated for treating the sludge. The microwave melting experiments showed promise: volume reductions were significant (3-5X), and the waste form was durable with glass additives (LiOH, fly ash). A commercial vendor using surrogate has demonstrated a melt mineralization process that yields a dense monolithic waste form with a volume reduction factor (VR) of 7.7. Calcination of the sludge at 850-900 C yielded a VR of 2.5. Compaction at 4500 psi increased the VR to 4.2, but the compressed form is not dimensionally stable. Addition of paraffin helped consolidate fines and yielded a VR of 3.5. In conclusion, microwave melting or another form of vitrification is likely to be the best method; however for immediate implementation, the calculation/compaction/waxing process is viable.

  7. Pharmacotherapy Treatment Options for Insomnia: A Primer for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Asnis, Gregory M.; Thomas, Manju; Henderson, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder with deleterious effects such as decreased quality of life, and a predisposition to a number of psychiatric disorders. Fortunately, numerous approved hypnotic treatments are available. This report reviews the state of the art of pharmacotherapy with a reference to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) as well. It provides the clinician with a guide to all the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved hypnotics (benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepines, ramelteon, low dose sinequan, and suvorexant) including potential side effects. Frequently, chronic insomnia lasts longer than 2 years. Cognizant of this and as a result of longer-term studies, the FDA has approved all hypnotics since 2005 without restricting the duration of use. Our manuscript also reviews off-label hypnotics (sedating antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and antihistamines) which in reality, are more often prescribed than approved hypnotics. The choice of which hypnotic to choose is discussed partially being based on which segment of sleep is disturbed and whether co-morbid illnesses exist. Lastly, we discuss recent label changes required by the FDA inserting a warning about “sleep-related complex behaviors”, e.g., sleep-driving for all hypnotics. In addition, we discuss FDA mandated dose reductions for most zolpidem preparations in women due to high zolpidem levels in the morning hours potentially causing daytime carry-over effects. PMID:26729104

  8. PSEUDOXANTHOMA ELASTICUM: DIAGNOSTIC FEATURES, CLASSIFICATION, AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, Jouni; Jiang, Qiujie; Váradi, András; Bercovitch, Lionel G.; Terry, Sharon F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a multisystem orphan disease, clinically affects the skin, the eyes, and the cardiovascular system with considerable morbidity and mortality. The clinical manifestations reflect the underlying pathology consisting of ectopic mineralization of peripheral connective tissues. Areas Covered The diagnostic criteria of PXE include characteristic clinical findings, together with histopathology of accumulation of pleiomorphic elastic structures in the dermis with progressive mineralization, and the presence of mutations in the ABCC6 gene. PXE-like cutaneous changes can also be encountered in other ectopic mineralization disorders, including generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene. In some cases, overlapping clinical features of PXE/GACI, associated with mutations either in ABCC6 or ENPP1, have been noted. PXE demonstrates considerable inter- and intrafamilial heterogeneity, and consequently, accurate diagnosis is required for appropriate classification with prognostic implications. There is no effective and specific treatment for the systemic manifestations of PXE, but effective therapies to counteract the ocular complications are in current clinical use. Expert Opinion A number of observations in the murine model, the Abcc6−/− mouse, have indicated that the mineral composition of diet, particularly the magnesium content, can influence the severity of the mineralization phenotype. These observations suggest that appropriate dietary interventions, coupled with lifestyle modifications, including smoking cessation, might alleviate the symptoms and improve the quality of life of individuals affected with this, currently intractable, orphan disease. PMID:25383264

  9. Sofosbuvir: A novel treatment option for chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Harmeet Kaur; Singh, Harmanjit; Grewal, Nipunjot; Natt, Navreet Kaur

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis C currently infects more than 170 million people around the world, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The current standard of care for HCV infection, including one of the two protease inhibitors, telaprevir or boceprevir, for 12-32 weeks, along with pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin for up to 48 weeks, is unsatisfactory in many cases, either because of lack of efficacy or because of treatment-related adverse effects. There is an urgent need of new drugs with improved efficacy as well as a safety profile. Sofosbuvir, a recently approved nucleotide analog, is a highly potent inhibitor of the NS5B polymerase in the Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and has shown high efficacy in combination with several other drugs, with and without PEG-INF, against HCV. It offers many advantages due to its high potency, low side effects, oral administration, and high barrier to resistance. The efficacy and safety were demonstrated in many large and well-designed phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials like NEUTRINO, PROTON, ELECTRON, ATOMIC, COSMOS, FUSION, FISSION, NUCLEAR, POSITRON, and the like. It is generally well-tolerated. Adverse events that occurred include: Headache, insomnia, fatigue, nausea, dizziness, pruritis, upper respiratory tract infections, rash, back pain, grade 1 anemia, and grade 4 lymphopenia; however, the exact safety profile can only be judged when this drug is actually used on a large scale. PMID:25422576

  10. Hand dermatitis--differential diagnoses, diagnostics, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hand dermatitis is multifactorial, and includes factors such as genetic predisposition and exposure. A high incidence rate is associated with female gender, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. The most important risk factors for the persistence of hand dermatitis include its extent, contact allergic or atopic etiology, childhood dermatitis, and early onset (before the age of 20). The cost of illness of hand dermatitis corresponds to this seen in moderate to severe psoriasis. The diagnostic workup of hand dermatitis and its differential diagnoses requires a detailed assessment of occupational and recreational exposure. In case of possible work-related triggers, early notification of the accident insurer should be sought (via the dermatologist's report). Exposure to a contact allergen is a contributing factor in one-half of all cases of hand dermatitis. It is therefore imperative that all patients with hand dermatitis persisting for more than three months undergo patch testing. Successful and sustainable treatment of hand dermatitis starts with the proper identification and elimination of individual triggers, including the substitution of identified contact allergens and irritants, as well as optimizing preventive measures. Graded therapy taking the clinical severity into account is essential. Validated instruments may be used to monitor therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26713631

  11. Pharmacotherapy Treatment Options for Insomnia: A Primer for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Asnis, Gregory M; Thomas, Manju; Henderson, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder with deleterious effects such as decreased quality of life, and a predisposition to a number of psychiatric disorders. Fortunately, numerous approved hypnotic treatments are available. This report reviews the state of the art of pharmacotherapy with a reference to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) as well. It provides the clinician with a guide to all the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved hypnotics (benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepines, ramelteon, low dose sinequan, and suvorexant) including potential side effects. Frequently, chronic insomnia lasts longer than 2 years. Cognizant of this and as a result of longer-term studies, the FDA has approved all hypnotics since 2005 without restricting the duration of use. Our manuscript also reviews off-label hypnotics (sedating antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and antihistamines) which in reality, are more often prescribed than approved hypnotics. The choice of which hypnotic to choose is discussed partially being based on which segment of sleep is disturbed and whether co-morbid illnesses exist. Lastly, we discuss recent label changes required by the FDA inserting a warning about "sleep-related complex behaviors", e.g., sleep-driving for all hypnotics. In addition, we discuss FDA mandated dose reductions for most zolpidem preparations in women due to high zolpidem levels in the morning hours potentially causing daytime carry-over effects. PMID:26729104

  12. Treatment options for AIDS patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Beatriz; Dronda, Fernando; Moreno, Santiago

    2009-02-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating viral disease produced by the John Cunningham (JC) virus, which is ubiquitously distributed. Up to 80% of adults seroconvert to JC virus. Classically, PML is a life-threatening AIDS-defining disease of the CNS, usually occurring in severely immunocompromised individuals. Until now, and despite several therapeutic attempts, there is no specific treatment for PML. Soon after the widespread use of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), several studies showed prolonged survival for patients with AIDS-associated PML who were treated with CART. The outcome of PML in patients receiving CART is unpredictable at disease onset. Prognostic markers are needed. The JC virus DNA detection in cerebrospinal fluid by nucleic acid amplification techniques and the CD4+ cell count are the most promising parameters. Higher levels of CD4+ cell counts were independently associated with an improved survival in different clinical observations. A summary of the main current knowledge about AIDS-related PML is presented. The most effective strategy is to optimize CART to completely suppress HIV-1 viral load and allow the best CD4+ T-cell immune recovery. Nowadays, AIDS-related PML is no longer an ultimately fatal disease. A substantial number of HIV-1-infected patients with this condition can improve with CART. PMID:19191678

  13. Stem cells: An eventual treatment option for heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bilgimol, Joseph C; Ragupathi, Subbareddy; Vengadassalapathy, Lakshmanan; Senthil, Nathan S; Selvakumar, Kalimuthu; Ganesan, M; Manjunath, Sadananda Rao

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are of global excitement for various diseases including heart diseases. It is worth to understand the mechanism or role of stem cells in the treatment of heart failure. Bone marrow derived stem cells are commonly practiced with an aim to improve the function of the heart. The majority of studies have been conducted with acute myocardial infarction and a few has been investigated with the use of stem cells for treating chronic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Heterogeneity in the treated group using stem cells has greatly emerged. Ever increasing demand for any alternative made is of at most priority for cardiomyopathy. Stem cells are of top priority with the current impact that has generated among physicians. However, meticulous selection of proper source is required since redundancy is clearly evident with the present survey. This review focuses on the methods adopted using stem cells for heart diseases and outcomes that are generated so far with an idea to determine the best therapeutic possibility in order to fulfill the present demand. PMID:26435771

  14. Treatment options for acute uncomplicated cystitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Naber, K G

    2000-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is classified as uncomplicated if it occurs in a patient with a structurally and functionally normal urinary tract. Acute uncomplicated cystitis is observed chiefly in women. It needs, however, to be differentiated depending on whether it occurs in premenopausal, postmenopausal or pregnant women. Only a small number of 15-50 year old, otherwise healthy men suffer acute uncomplicated cystitis. In premenopausal, non-pregnant women, single-dose antimicrobial therapy is generally less effective than the same antibiotic used for longer duration. However, most antimicrobial agents given for 3 days are as effective as those given for longer duration, and adverse events tend to be found more often with longer treatment. Trimethoprim (or co-trimoxazole) can be recommended as first-line empirical therapy only in communities with resistance rates of uropathogens to trimethoprim of < or =10-20%. Otherwise fluoroquinolones are recommended. Alternatives are fosfomycin trometamol or beta-lactams, such as second- or third-generation oral cephalosporins or pivmecillinam, especially when fluoroquinolones are contraindicated or a high proportion (>10%) of Escherichia coil strains in the community are already resistant to fluoroquinolones, as in Spain, for example. Recurrent UTIs are common among young, healthy women even though they generally have anatomically and physiologically normal urinary tracts. The following prophylactic antimicrobial regimens are recommended: (i) the use of long-term, low-dose prophylactic antimicrobials taken at bedtime; (ii) post-coital prophylaxis for women in whom episodes of infection are associated with sexual intercourse. Other prophylactic methods are not as yet as effective as antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:11051620

  15. Treatment options for acute uncomplicated cystitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Naber

    2000-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is classified as uncomplicated if it occurs in a patient with a structurally and functionally normal urinary tract. Acute uncomplicated cystitis is observed chiefly in women. It needs, however, to be differentiated depending on whether it occurs in premenopausal, postmenopausal or pregnant women. Only a small number of 15-50 year old, otherwise healthy men suffer acute uncomplicated cystitis. In premenopausal, non-pregnant women, single-dose antimicrobial therapy is generally less effective than the same antibiotic used for longer duration. However, most antimicrobial agents given for 3 days are as effective as those given for longer duration, and adverse events tend to be found more often with longer treatment. Trimethoprim (or co-trimoxazole) can be recommended as first-line empirical therapy only in communities with resistance rates of uropathogens to trimethoprim of 10%) of Escherichia coli strains in the community are already resistant to fluoroquinolones, as in Spain, for example. Recurrent UTIs are common among young, healthy women even though they generally have anatomically and physiologically normal urinary tracts. The following prophylactic antimicrobial regimens are recommended: (i) the use of long-term, low-dose prophylactic antimicrobials taken at bedtime; (ii) post-coital prophylaxis for women in whom episodes of infection are associated with sexual intercourse. Other prophylactic methods are not as yet as effective as antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:10969048

  16. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  17. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%–90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of “precision therapeutics”. No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  18. Distal biceps tendon injuries--current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Quach, Tony; Jazayeri, Reza; Sherman, Orrin H; Rosen, Jeffrey E

    2010-01-01

    Three percent of all biceps tendon ruptures occur at the distal aspect, where the tendon inserts into the radial tuberosity. Distal bicep tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males after an eccentric extension load is applied to the elbow. Patients usually complain of a sudden, sharp, and painful tearing sensation in the antecubital region, with a palpable defect. The biceps squeeze and hook tests are specific maneuvers by which to diagnose distal biceps ruptures on physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound maybe be helpful to distinguish between partial and complete tears. Anatomic studies suggest there are two distinct insertions for the short and long heads of the distal biceps. The short head may be a more powerful flexor, and the long head may be a more powerful supinator. Nonoperative treatment typically results in loss of flexion and supination strength and endurance. Early anatomic re-attachment is the goal. Surgical approaches include one- or two-incision techniques, and tendon fixation methods include the use of suture anchors, bone tunnels, an endobutton, or biotenodesis screws. Biomechanical studies have shown that endobuttons have higher load-to-failure strengths, compared to the other fixation methods. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that patients do well regardless of surgical approach or fixation method. Possible complications include nerve injuries, heterotopic ossification, postoperative fracture, tendon rerupture, complex regional pain syndrome, and wound infection. Partial ruptures are significantly less common and initially can be treated conservatively. Chronic tears are more difficult to treat because of possible tendon retraction and poor tissue quality. Tendon grafts using semitendinosus, fascia lata, hamstring, Achilles (calcaneal), or flexor carpi radialis have been successfully used for length restoration in these cases. PMID:20632985

  19. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%-90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of "precision therapeutics". No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  20. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  1. Unmet needs of patients with narcolepsy: perspectives on emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Dariusz R; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment options currently available for narcolepsy are often unsatisfactory due to suboptimal efficacy, troublesome side effects, development of drug tolerance, and inconvenience. Our understanding of the neurobiology of narcolepsy has greatly improved over the last decade. This knowledge has not yet translated into additional therapeutic options for patients, but progress is being made. Some compounds, such as histaminergic H3 receptor antagonists, may prove useful in symptom control of narcolepsy. The prospect of finding a cure still seems distant, but hypocretin replacement therapy offers some promise. In this narrative review, we describe these developments and others which may yield more effective narcolepsy treatments in the future. PMID:26045680

  2. Serum levels of intravitreal bevacizumab after vitrectomy, lensectomy and non-surgical controls

    PubMed Central

    Christoforidis, John B.; Xie, Zhiliang; Jiang, Angela; Wang, Jillian; Pratt, Cedric; Gemensky-Metzler, Anne; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Roy, Sashwati; Liu, Zhongfa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine serum level differences of intravitreally-placed bevacizumab after vitrectomy and lensectomy-vitrectomy and to compare these with non-operated eyes in a rabbit model. Methods Five Dutch-belted rabbits underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV), 5 rabbits underwent pars plana lensectomy (PPL) and 5 rabbits served as non-surgical controls. Twelve days following the surgical procedures, each operated eye underwent an intravitreal injection consisting of 1.25 mg/0.05 mL bevacizumab. Serum levels from each rabbit were drawn on days 2, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and 35 and were measured with ELISA immunoassay. Results The average peak serum concentration (Cmax) was highest for the PPL group (11.33 µg ± 3.48 mL), and was similar between the PPV (5.35 µg ± 2.69 mL) and non-surgical control groups (5.35 µg ± 0.69 mL). The average time to maximal plasma concentration (Tmax) in days was earliest for the PPL group (2.8 ± 0.47), followed by the PPV (5.6 ± 0.84) and non-surgical control groups (6.4 ± 0.71). The PPL group had higher serum levels than the other 2 groups until day 7 that was significant only at day 2 (p<0.0001). After day 4 there were no significant differences or trends between any of the 3 groups. The half-life (T1/2) was fastest for the PPL group (1.41±0.21 days) followed by the PPV (2.80±3.35 days) and non-surgical control groups (6.69±10.4 days). Conclusions Serum bevacizumab levels were initially elevated following lensectomy and vitrectomy compared to non-surgical eyes following intravitreal injection. The half-life of bevacizumab was prolonged in non-surgical eyes presumably due to a slower release from the vitreous cavity. PMID:23548066

  3. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30–70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy – oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent “t” test and within-group analysis was done using dependent “t” test. Results: At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Conclusion: Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care. PMID:25984468

  4. EMG monitoring during functional non-surgical therapy of Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Tobias; Wohifarth, Kai; Fink, Matthias; Thermann, H; Rollnik, Jens D

    2002-07-01

    After surgical therapy of Achilles tendon rupture, neuromuscular changes may persist, even one year after surgery. We were interested whether these changes are also evident following a non-surgical functional therapy (Variostabil therapy boot/Adidas). Twenty-one patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture were enrolled in the study (mean age 38.5 years, range 24 to 60; 18 men, three women) and followed-up clinically and with surface EMG of the gastrocnemius muscles after four, eight, 12 weeks, and one year after rupture. EMG differences between the affected and non-affected side could only be observed at baseline and after four weeks following Achilles tendon rupture. The results from our study show that EMG changes are not found following non-surgical functional therapy. PMID:12146771

  5. Preoperative non-surgical over-correction of cleft lip nasal deformity.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, K; Hirose, T

    1991-01-01

    Alar cartilage, which is elastic like auricular cartilage, is correctable in the early neonatal period. Taking advantage of this correctability, we have performed preoperative non-surgical over-correction for cleft lip nasal deformity of incomplete and complete cleft lips with a Simonart's band. The device for this correction was made by processing a nostril retainer into a nostril over-corrector which utilises a spring of silicone rubber, works like a tissue expander and is supported by the nostril floor. Twenty cases are reviewed whose follow-up lasted more than 19 months. The earlier the non-surgical over-correction began, the more satisfactory were the results that were obtained. PMID:1993238

  6. Treatment Options for the Cardinal Symptoms of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tourian, Leon; LeBoeuf, Amélie; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Cohen, David; Gignac, Martin; Labelle, Réal; Guile, Jean-Marc; Renaud, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: DSM-5 has added a new developmentally appropriate child and adolescent mood disorder subtype called disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). The core features of DMDD are temper outbursts (manifested by either verbal rages and/or physical aggression) and unrelenting irritability or anger. Currently, the literature is lacking a thorough review of the possible treatment options for the cardinal symptoms constituting DMDD. The objective of this article is to provide a thorough review of peer-reviewed studies on the subject of pharmacological treatment options for children and adolescents with the cardinal symptoms of DMDD. Methods: Relevant articles for this study were obtained through Pubmed, Medline, PsychINFO and PsychINDEXplus using the key words: “adolescents,” “children,” “paediatric,” “youth,” “irritability,” “temper outbursts,” “aggression,” “rage,” “disruptive behaviour,” “treatment,” “dysphoria,” “autism,” “mental retardation/intellectual disability,” “impulsivity,” “ADHD,” “oppositional defiant disorder,” and “conduct disorder.” A total of 823 studies were generated; only English studies focusing on pharmacological treatment were retained. Results: Currently there are no established guidelines or thorough reviews summarizing the treatment of DMDD. Pharmacotherapeutic treatment options of both aggression and chronic irritability include: antidepressants/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mood stabilizers, psychostimulants, antipsychotics, and alpha-2 agonists. Conclusion: Treatment options of severe, persistent irritability in youth are numerous, and a consensual treatment algorithm has not yet emerged from the literature. Further studies and clinical trials are warranted to determine efficacious and safe treatment modalities. PMID:26336379

  7. Current management of fecal incontinence: Choosing amongst treatment options to optimize outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Van Koughnett, Julie Ann M; Wexner, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The severity of fecal incontinence widely varies and can have dramatic devastating impacts on a person’s life. Fecal incontinence is common, though it is often under-reported by patients. In addition to standard treatment options, new treatments have been developed during the past decade to attempt to effectively treat fecal incontinence with minimal morbidity. Non-operative treatments include dietary modifications, medications, and biofeedback therapy. Currently used surgical treatments include repair (sphincteroplasty), stimulation (sacral nerve stimulation or posterior tibial nerve stimulation), replacement (artificial bowel sphincter or muscle transposition) and diversion (stoma formation). Newer augmentation treatments such as radiofrequency energy delivery and injectable materials, are minimally invasive tools that may be good options before proceeding to surgery in some patients with mild fecal incontinence. In general, more invasive surgical treatments are now reserved for moderate to severe fecal incontinence. Functional and quality of life related outcomes, as well as potential complications of the treatment must be considered and the treatment of fecal incontinence must be individualized to the patient. General indications, techniques, and outcomes profiles for the various treatments of fecal incontinence are discussed in detail. Choosing the most effective treatment for the individual patient is essential to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of fecal incontinence. PMID:24409050

  8. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration – an Appraisal of the Current Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    CINTEZA, Dragos; PERSINARU, Iulia; MACIUCEANU ZARNESCU, Bogdan Mircea; IONESCU, Dan; LASCAR, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades significant progress was made in the understanding of the physiopathology of the peripheral nerve regeneration. Although the evolution of therapy is not as spectacular, a series of new treatment solutions were developed. The gold standard in therapy remains the use of autografts. We present the current concepts and therapeutic options available. PMID:26225155

  9. 26 CFR 1.1504-4 - Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... single class are considered to have the same value. Thus, control premiums and minority and blockage... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests. 1.1504-4 Section 1.1504-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1504-4 - Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... single class are considered to have the same value. Thus, control premiums and minority and blockage... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests. 1.1504-4 Section 1.1504-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...

  11. Parkinson's Disease and Its Management: Part 3: Nondopaminergic and Nonpharmacological Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    DeMaagd, George; Philip, Ashok

    2015-10-01

    This installment of a five-part series reviews the role of nondopaminergic pharmacotherapies and adjunctive options-such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, and anticholinergic agents-in managing Parkinson's disease. Nonpharmacological treatments are also explored. PMID:26535023

  12. Occurrence of Deep Vein Thrombosis among Hospitalized Non-Surgical Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanzawa, Kazuhiko; Ota, Satoshi; Nakamura, Mashio; Sato, Koichi; Ikura, Maiko; Suzuki, Takeo; Kaise, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Hiromu; Ito, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the frequency of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) among non-surgical inpatients, and to evaluate the D-dimer assay as a screening tool for DVT. Methods: Subjects were non-surgical inpatients aged 20 years or older who had been bedridden for at least 24 hours and had moderate-to-high risk factors for DVT. We assessed the presence of DVT by venous ultrasonography. Patients who received a diagnosis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) before admission, who had symptoms or findings of VTE at admission, or who had surgery or trauma within the past 3 months before admission were excluded. Results: DVT was confirmed in 96 of 525 patients (18.3%). In a logistic regression analysis, longer duration of hospitalization, higher D-dimer value, and history of cancer surgery were significantly associated with the occurrence of DVT. The D-dimer assay showed high sensitivity (96.1%) and high negative predictive value (97.6%). Conclusion: Non-surgical inpatients with a long-term hospitalization or history of cancer surgery have a risk for DVT, and need to be considered for added DVT preventive measures as recommended in the prevention guidelines. In addition, the D-dimer assay is beneficial for the screening of DVT in medical practice. PMID:26421068

  13. Update on the pathogenic potential and treatment options for Blastocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Tamalee; Stark, Damien; Harkness, John; Ellis, John

    2014-01-01

    Although Blastocystis is one of the most common enteric parasites, there is still much controversy surrounding the pathogenicity and potential treatment options for this parasite. In this review we look at the evidence supporting Blastocystis as an intestinal pathogen as shown by numerous case studies and several in vivo studies and the evidence against. We describe the chronic nature of some infections and show the role of Blastocystis in immunocompromised patients and the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and Blastocystis infection. There have been several studies that have suggested that pathogenicity may be subtype related. Metronidazole is the most widely accepted treatment for Blastocystis but several cases of treatment failure and resistance have been described. Other treatment options which have been suggested include paromomycin and trimethroprim- sulfamethoxazole. PMID:24883113

  14. Update on neuropathic pain treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. The pharmacological and surgical options.

    PubMed

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W

    2015-04-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome of unilateral, paroxysmal, stabbing facial pain, originating from the trigeminal nerve. Careful history of typical symptoms is crucial for diagnosis. Most cases are caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal root adjacent to the pons leading to focal demyelination and ephaptic axonal transmission. Brain imaging is required to exclude secondary causes. Many medical and surgical treatments are available. Most patients respond well to pharmacotherapy; carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are first line therapy, while lamotrigine and baclofen are considered second line treatments. Other drugs such as topiramate, levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and botulinum toxin-A are alternative treatments. Surgical options are available if medications are no longer effective or tolerated. Microvascular decompression, gamma knife radiosurgery, and percutaneous rhizotomies are most promising surgical alternatives. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on available evidence and guidelines. PMID:25864062

  15. Update on the pathogenic potential and treatment options for Blastocystis sp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although Blastocystis is one of the most common enteric parasites, there is still much controversy surrounding the pathogenicity and potential treatment options for this parasite. In this review we look at the evidence supporting Blastocystis as an intestinal pathogen as shown by numerous case studies and several in vivo studies and the evidence against. We describe the chronic nature of some infections and show the role of Blastocystis in immunocompromised patients and the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and Blastocystis infection. There have been several studies that have suggested that pathogenicity may be subtype related. Metronidazole is the most widely accepted treatment for Blastocystis but several cases of treatment failure and resistance have been described. Other treatment options which have been suggested include paromomycin and trimethroprim- sulfamethoxazole. PMID:24883113

  16. Second-line treatment of metastatic gastric cancer: Current options and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavel, Dheepak; Fedyanin, Mikhail; Tryakin, Alexey; Tjulandin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths, regardless of its decreasing incidence and newly available treatment options. Most patients present at an advanced stage and are treated with upfront systemic chemotherapy. Those patients receiving first-line therapy may initially respond to treatment, but many of them relapse over time. In such condition, second-line treatment for disease progression remains the only available option. Although there exists no standard approach in the second-line setting, several phase III trials have shown modest survival benefit in patients receiving irinotecan, taxane and ramucirumab over the best supportive care or active agents. This review analyzes the currently available treatment regimens and future directions of research in the second-line setting for metastatic gastric cancer with the best available evidence. Additionally, the prognostic factors that influence patient survival in those receiving second-line therapy are discussed. PMID:26556991

  17. State of the art psychopharmacological treatment options in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mesut; Batmaz, Sedat; Songur, Emrah; Oral, Esat Timuçin

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is defined as a subtype of mood disorders in DSM 5, and it is characterized by a seasonal onset. SAD is proposed to be related to the seasonal changes in naturally occurring light, and the use of bright light therapy for depressive symptoms has been shown to reduce them in placebo controlled trials. Cognitive behavioral therapy has also been demonstrated to be effective in SAD. This review article aims to focus on the psychopharmacological treatment options for SAD. According to clinical trial results, first line treatment options seem to be sertraline and fluoxetine, and are well tolerated by the patients. There is some evidence that other antidepressants (e.g. bupropion) might be effective as well. Although clinical trials have shown that some of these antidepressants may be of benefit, a recent review has concluded that there is not enough evidence to support the use of any of these agents for the treatment of SAD yet. Moreover, more studies are still needed to evaluate the effectiveness of other treatment options, e.g., propranolol, melatonin, hypericum, etc. In addition to the above proposed treatments, patients with seasonal depressive symptoms should thoroughly be evaluated for any cues of bipolarity, and their treatment should be planned accordingly. PMID:26938817

  18. [Advanced malignant soft tissue tumors: plastic reconstructive options for palliative treatment].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M; Jokuszies, A

    2010-12-01

    Plastic and reconstructive procedures for the oncological treatment of malignant tumors in the head and neck region, trunk and extremities are primarily curative. Less is known about the treatment options of plastic surgery in patients with locally advanced or incurable tumors. Therefore superficial, mostly exulcerated and superinfected tumors are treated with a palliative approach. A plethora of symptoms drastically restricts the quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. Pain, oozing of blood and bacterial superinfection with fetidness compromise the patient's general condition, self-esteem and activity. Many patients suffer from increasing isolation. A stage-adapted and plastic-reconstructive approach aiming at reducing the tumor mass and closing ulcerating wounds provides a considerable benefit especially in these patients. In this article a variety of treatment options regarding palliative resections and plastic reconstructive procedures and the disease alleviating benefits for patients with incurable tumors are presented. PMID:19949764

  19. Standard and Novel Treatment Options for Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Elliott M; Yu, Katherine; Wong, Nathan D.; Malik, Shaista

    2014-01-01

    Type II Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are two intertwined conditions that are critical to the healthcare landscape in the United States and abroad. Patients with either diabetes or metabolic syndrome can have a dramatically increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Numerous treatment options have existed for some time, which include non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies. Additionally, within the last decade a multiple of novel treatment options have emerged for the management of hyperglycemia in particular. By targeting novel pathways beyond the secretion and supply of insulin, these new therapeutics provide a valuable adjunctive to the currently available therapies for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Here we discuss the current guideline driven usage of standard therapies with some novel indications. In addition we discuss the novel therapies for the treatment of hyperglycemia, their mechanisms of action and appropriate therapeutic indications. PMID:24234946

  20. Piriformis syndrome: implications of anatomical variations, diagnostic techniques, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Lindsey; Walters, Andrew; Bubb, Kathleen; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2012-08-01

    Details of piriformis syndrome, including the proper diagnosis and most effective form of treatment, continue to be controversial. While the cause, diagnosis, and treatment of piriformis syndrome remain elusive, many studies have been conducted to investigate newly developed diagnostic techniques as well as various treatment options for piriformis-induced sciatica. Despite the quantity of literature, few studies have demonstrated statistically significant results that support one form of treatment over another. Thus, despite the evidence supporting the newer treatment methodologies for piriformis syndrome, research should continue. It is important not only to evaluate treatment outcomes based on associated pain relief, but also to investigate the functional and anatomical return that patients experience from these studied treatments in order to fully explore the most effective form of therapy for piriformis syndrome. PMID:22327640

  1. PARP Inhibitors for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: Current Treatment Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J.; Braicu, E. I.; Chekerov, R.

    2016-01-01

    More than simply a promising management option, PARP inhibitors can be regarded as a milestone in the development of personalised treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Their mechanism of action, known as “synthetic lethality”, is dependent on functional differences of the DNA repair mechanisms of healthy cells and tumour cells; cells that repair DNA damage less efficiently are particularly sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Olaparib, licensed for use this year, is the best-studied PARP inhibitor used for treatment of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC). The efficacy of PARP inhibitors appears to be increased when used in combination with other treatments. PMID:26941449

  2. Treatment for infections with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: what options do we still have?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The global spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is increasingly becoming a major challenge in clinical and public health settings. To date, the treatment for serious CRE infections remains difficult. The intelligent use of antimicrobials and effective infection control strategies is crucial to prevent further CRE spread. Early consultation with experts in the treatment of infections with multidrug-resistant organisms is valuable in patient management. This brief review will focus on the current, yet limited, treatment options for CRE infections. PMID:25041592

  3. [Quadriceps tendon insufficiency and rupture : Treatment options in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Thiele, K; von Roth, P; Pfitzner, T; Preininger, B; Perka, C

    2016-05-01

    Quadriceps tendon injuries and insufficiencies in total knee arthroplasty are rare, but are followed by a devastating complication that left untreated leads to a complete loss of function of the knee. This review article summarizes the functional anatomy, risk factors, and the prevalence and diagnosis of quadriceps tendon injuries, in addition to the possible management options for partial and complete ruptures. The treatment options are adapted according to the extent of the loss of function (partial, complete) and the duration of the injury (acute vs chronic). Furthermore, the choice of treatment should take into account the quality and availability of primary tissue, the patient's general health, along with their likely functional requirements. Conservative treatment is often justified in partial ruptures with good results. Complete ruptures require surgical intervention and multiple operative techniques are described. Treatment options for acute ruptures include direct primary repair with autogenous or synthetic tissue augmentation. In the case of chronic insufficiency and a lack of soft-tissue surroundings, reconstruction with the aid of a muscle flap or allograft tissue can be considered. All surgical intervention techniques used so far have been fraught with complications and rarely lead to satisfactory results. A new surgical approach to the reconstruction and augmentation of the extensor mechanism consists of the use of a synthetic mesh. The technique is described here in detail. PMID:27125235

  4. Therapeutic Success of the Ketogenic Diet as a Treatment Option for Epilepsy: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-feng; Zou, Yan; Ding, Gangqiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To systematically evaluate therapeutic success of the ketogenic diet (KD) as a treatment option for epilepsy. Methods Using MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, we searched for studies investigating the therapeutic success of ketogenic diet for epilepsy. We estimated therapeutic success rate for ketogenic diet as a treatment option for epilepsy and its 95% CIs using generic inverse variance method. Findings A total of 38 studies met the inclusion criteria. In retrospective studies, the weighted success rate of the patients who take the KD as a treatment option for epilepsy was 58.4% (95% confidence interval (95%CI)=48.7% – 69.9%) at 3 months (n=336); 42.8% (95%CI =36.3% – 50.3%) at 6 months (n=492), and 30.1% (95%CI =24.3% – 37.2%) at 12 months (n=387); in prospective studies, weighted success rate was 53.9% (95%CI 45.5% – 63.8%) at 3 months (n=474); 53.2% (95%CI =44.0% – 64.2%) at 6 months (n=321), and 55.0% (95%CI =45.9% – 65.9%) at 12 months (n=347). Conclusion This meta-analysis provides formal statistical support for the efficacy of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of epileptic patients. PMID:24910737

  5. Future pharmacological treatment options for nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Comer, Grant M; Ciulla, Thomas A; Heier, Jeffery S; Criswell, Mark H

    2005-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in the industrialised world. Within the past decade, researchers have introduced many promising prevention and treatment options in an attempt to minimise the central vision loss imparted from AMD. Based on large-scale, randomised, prospective, placebo-controlled trials, a specially formulated combination of the antioxidants vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, copper and zinc is the only proven means of AMD prophylaxis. Thermal laser photocoagulation and photodynamic therapy with verteporfin are the only standard treatment options. However, efficacy is limited and treatment is only applicable to a minority of AMD patients. Thus, alternative pharmacological interventions are in all phases of clinical development. Researchers are guardedly optimistic that these advances may change the entire approach to AMD management in the near future. This review article will detail the currently accepted treatment options, as well as describe several of the more promising investigational pharmacological approaches to AMD. PMID:15757408

  6. Treatment options for patients with large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Iyoda, Akira; Makino, Takashi; Koezuka, Satoshi; Otsuka, Hajime; Hata, Yoshinobu

    2014-06-01

    Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the lung is categorized as a variant of large cell carcinomas, and LCNEC tumors display biological behaviors resembling those of small cell lung carcinomas and features of high-grade neuroendocrine tumors. Because patients with LCNEC have a poor prognosis, surgery alone is not sufficient. Multimodality therapies, including adjuvant chemotherapy, appear promising for improved prognosis in patients with LCNEC. In this review article, we discuss treatment options for patients with LCNEC of the lung. PMID:24719260

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated.We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: "CAM" in conjunction with "OM" and "children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies.The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications.The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  8. Alternative treatment options in colorectal cancer patients with 5-fluorouracil- or capecitabine-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Deboever, Guido; Hiltrop, Nick; Cool, Mike; Lambrecht, Guy

    2013-03-01

    Most chemotherapy regimens in colorectal cancer treatment are 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin or capecitabine-based. Cardiotoxicity is a less common but potentially lethal complication of 5-FU or capecitabine treatment, and some physicians might be unfamiliar with treatment alternatives. Rechallenging should be avoided because it carries a high risk of recurrence of the cardiac symptoms and prophylactic treatment is not always protective. Possible alternative treatment options to be considered are to replace the oral capecitabine or intravenous 5-FU by a 5-FU bolus regimen, by uracil-tegafur or tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil, both oral fluoropyrimidines combining a 5-FU prodrug with a dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) inhibitor, or by raltitrexed, a thymidilate synthase inhibitor whose metabolism is independent of DPD. Patients with advanced colorectal cancer and fluoropyrimidine-induced cardiotoxicity can be treated with other non-fluoropyrimidine related chemotherapy, either as a single agent, combined, or in combination with biological agents. In this report we discuss the different alternative treatment options. PMID:23102544

  9. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--Novel targets for designing treatment options?

    PubMed

    Grassmann, Felix; Fauser, Sascha; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the central retina and the main cause of legal blindness in industrialized countries. Risk to develop the disease is conferred by both individual as well as genetic factors with the latter being increasingly deciphered over the last decade. Therapeutically, striking advances have been made for the treatment of the neovascular form of late stage AMD while for the late stage atrophic form of the disease, which accounts for almost half of the visually impaired, there is currently no effective therapy on the market. This review highlights our current knowledge on the genetic architecture of early and late stage AMD and explores its potential for the discovery of novel, target-guided treatment options. We reflect on current clinical and experimental therapies for all forms of AMD and specifically note a persisting lack of efficacy for treatment in atrophic AMD. We further explore the current insight in AMD-associated genes and pathways and critically question whether this knowledge is suited to design novel treatment options. Specifically, we point out that known genetic factors associated with AMD govern the risk to develop disease and thus may not play a role in its severity or progression. Treatments based on such knowledge appear appropriate rather for prevention than treatment of manifest disease. As a consequence, future research in AMD needs to be greatly focused on approaches relevant to the patients and their medical needs. PMID:25986585

  10. The challenge of faecal sludge management in urban areas--strategies, regulations and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ingallinella, A M; Sanguinetti, G; Koottatep, T; Montanger, A; Strauss, M

    2002-01-01

    In urban centres of industrialising countries, the majority of houses are served by on-site sanitation systems such as septic tanks and unsewered toilets. The faecal sludges (FS) collected from these systems are usually discharged untreated into the urban and peri-urban environment, posing great risks to water resources and to public health. Contrary to wastewater management, the development of strategies to cope with faecal sludges, adapted to the conditions prevailing in developing countries, have long been neglected. The authors describe the current situation and discuss selected issues of FS management. A proposal is made for a rational setting of sludge quality or treatment standards in economically emerging countries. The authors stipulate that regulatory setting should take into account local economic, institutional and technical conditions. Defining suitable treatment options as critical control points in securing adequate sludge quality is better than setting and relying on numerical sludge quality standards. A separate section is devoted to the practice and to regulatory aspects of (faecal) sludge use in Argentina. An overview of treatment options, which may prove sustainable in less industrialized countries is provided. Planted sludge drying beds are one of these options. It has been piloted in Thailand for four years and details on its performance and operation are presented along with data on the hygienic quality of treated biosolids. PMID:12479483

  11. Options Assessment Report: Treatment of Nitrate Salt Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-12-17

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognizes that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and that a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL’s preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  12. Association of susceptible genotypes to periodontal disease with the clinical outcome and tooth survival after non-surgical periodontal therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet; Kalogirou, Fotini

    2016-01-01

    Background The real clinical utility of genetic testing is the prognostic value of genetic factors in the clinical outcome of periodontal treatment and the tooth survival. A meta-analysis was undertaken to estimate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis on the clinical outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy and the tooth survival. Material and Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE-Pubmed, Cochrane Library and Scopus was performed. Additionally, a hand search was done in three journals. No specific language restriction was applied. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases resulted in 283 articles. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria, nine of them examined the clinical outcome, while the other one investigated the tooth survival in susceptible individuals after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Eight of included studies were selected for the meta-analysis. IL-1 positive genotypes increase the risk of tooth loss, while no association found between the bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment loss (CAL) and plaque index (PI) with the genotype status. Probing pocket depth (PPD) reduction in the first three months and in long-term results found to have a significant association with the genotype. Conclusions There is no difference in the clinical measurements after non-surgical periodontal treatment, apart from PPD. More publications are needed to identify a cause-effect relationship. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, periodontal therapy, clinical outcome, tooth loss, susceptibility, polymorphism, genotype, meta-analysis, systematic review. PMID:26595831

  13. Environmental assessment of sewage sludge recycling options and treatment processes in Tokyo.

    PubMed

    Hara, K; Mino, T

    2008-12-01

    Tokyo has historically suffered from a shortage of final disposal sites for the treated sewage sludge. Given this situation, sludge recycling and incineration have been promoted to reduce the volume of treated sludge conveyed to the disposal site, and the recycling options have changed since the late 1990s. This study aims to revisit the sewage sludge treatment and recycling processes in Tokyo and to evaluate different recycling options (brick, aggregate, refuse derived fuel and slag) from the energy consumption perspective by clarifying the complex flow of treated sludge within Tokyo's 23 wards. The study also estimates environmental loads associated with the operation of the whole sludge management system in the area. The environmental loads include: (1) total energy consumption and (2) gas emissions (greenhouse and acidification gases). The estimation was carried out for the years 1995, 1997, 1999 and 2001, during which a drastic change in recycling options occurred. The results indicated that the production of refuse derived fuel was the most energy consuming recycling option while aggregate production is the least energy consuming. They also showed that despite the increasing sludge volume, the energy consumption associated with the operation of the whole system decreased during the period while the gas emissions increased. PMID:18439814

  14. Treatment options in trigeminal trophic syndrome: a multi-institutional case series.

    PubMed

    Willis, Mark; Shockley, William W; Mobley, Steven R

    2011-04-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is an uncommon medical condition that may be encountered by otolaryngologists and facial plastic surgeons. TTS begins with damage to the trigeminal nerve or its central sensory connections, causing anesthesia in a dermatomal distribution. With repeated scratching and manipulation, an ulceration occurs, often in the alar region. In this multi-institutional report, we summarize a small series of patients with TTS. Treatment options are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Although rare, it is important that practicing otolaryngologists be familiar with the classic signs and symptoms of this condition in order to avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21433016

  15. Current treatment options in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Palme, Carsten E; Gullane, Patrick J; Gilbert, Ralph W

    2004-01-01

    Oral cavity SCC remains a significant health problem and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Treatment with surgery alone or in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy for more advanced lesions is the standard of care. Major advances have been made in surgical approaches,reconstructive options, and the rehabilitation of patients who have oral cavity SCC. These advances have significantly improved disease-specific outcome and quality of life. The future may lie in the development of treatment regimes that combine early detection with organ preservation and result in improved cure rates and quality of life. PMID:15062361

  16. Current and emerging therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Claudio A; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by a unicellular parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi) that affects almost 18 million people. This condition involves the heart, causing heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, thromboembolism, stroke, and sudden death. In this article, we review the current and emerging treatment of Chagas’ cardiomyopathy focusing mostly on management of heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure therapeutical options including drugs, stem cells and heart transplantation are revised. Antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and intracardiac devices are discussed as well. Finally, the evidence for a potential role of specific antiparasitic treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is reviewed. PMID:20730015

  17. Current challenges in treatment options for visceral leishmaniasis in India: a public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Om Prakash; Singh, Bhawana; Chakravarty, Jaya; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a serious parasitic disease causing considerable mortality and major disability in the Indian subcontinent. It is most neglected tropical disease, particularly in terms of new drug development for the lack of financial returns. An elimination campaign has been running in India since 2005 that aim to reduce the incidence of VL to below 1 per 10,000 people at sub-district level. One of the major components in this endeavor is reducing transmission through early case detection followed by complete treatment. Substantial progress has been made during the recent years in the area of VL treatment, and the VL elimination initiatives have already saved many lives by deploying them effectively in the endemic areas. However, many challenges remain to be overcome including availability of drugs, cost of treatment (drugs and hospitalization), efficacy, adverse effects, and growing parasite resistance. Therefore, better emphasis on implementation research is urgently needed to determine how best to deliver existing interventions with available anti-leishmanial drugs. It is essential that the new treatment options become truly accessible, not simply available in endemic areas so that they may promote healing and save lives. In this review, we highlight the recent advancement and challenges in current treatment options for VL in disease endemic area, and discuss the possible strategies to improve the therapeutic outcome. PMID:26951132

  18. Recent understanding of cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis: implication to non-surgical therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Tazuma, Susumu

    2008-10-01

    This article reviews the recent understanding of cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis in light of etiology and molecular mechanisms of the cholesterol gallstone formation process, to provide the future direction of a non-surgical therapeutic strategy. In principle, cholesterol gallstone formation, which is associated with an altered bile salt metabolism, is based primarily upon the impairment of cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis. Cholesterol is eliminated physiologically into bile; thus, the excess cholesterol induces bile metastability due to a relative insufficiency of bile salt, to initiate cholesterol crystal nucleation in the gallbladder with an impaired function. Those crystals grow to become macroscopic stones in the gallbladder mucin gel, accumulated under an arachidonate-prostanoid pathway induced-hypersecretion by the gallbladder wall. These events can be modified by bile salt supplementation, which provides a detergent action. Therefore, oral bile salt administration is a cost-effective, non-surgical therapy under certain circumstances. Understanding the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstones attributes to the therapeutic guideline based upon scientific and clinical evidence. PMID:26193643

  19. Integrating first-line treatment options into clinical practice: what's new in advanced melanoma?

    PubMed

    Dummer, Reinhard; Schadendorf, Dirk; Ascierto, Paolo A; Larkin, James; Lebbé, Celeste; Hauschild, Axel

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma remains a serious form of skin cancer in Europe and worldwide. Localized, early-stage melanomas can usually be treated with surgical excision. However, the prognosis is poorer for patients with advanced disease. Before 2011, treatment for advanced melanoma included palliative surgery and/or radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with or without immunotherapy, such as interleukin-2. As none of these treatments had shown survival benefits in patients with advanced melanoma, European guidelines had recommended that patients be entered into clinical trials. The lack of approved first-line options and varying access to clinical trials meant that European clinicians relied on experimental regimens and chemotherapy-based treatments when no other options were available. Since 2011, ipilimumab, an immuno-oncology therapy, and vemurafenib and dabrafenib, targeted agents that inhibit mutant BRAF, have been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of advanced melanoma. More recently, the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, received European marketing authorization for use in patients with BRAF mutation-positive advanced melanoma. In 2014, the anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab was approved as a first-line therapy in Japan. Whereas nivolumab and another anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, were approved as second-line therapies in the USA, their recent approval in Europe are for first-line use based on new clinical trial data in this setting. Together these agents are changing clinical practice and making therapeutic decisions more complex. Here, we discuss current and emerging therapeutic options for the first-line treatment of advanced melanoma, and how these therapies can be optimized to provide the best possible outcomes for patients. PMID:26426764

  20. Treatment Options for Individuals with PTSD and Concurrent TBI: A Literature Review and Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Hans R; Ghani, Musammar; Correll, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a well-studied mental health condition with existing guidelines and algorithms for treatment of PTSD. Those guidelines, while acknowledging an increased complexity, fail to provide clear PTSD treatment guidelines when an individual has a concurrent traumatic brain injury (TBI) diagnosis. Therefore, a literature review along with an accompanying case presentation is presented to demonstrate the minimum necessary considerations for approaching treatment of this complex population. Treatment approaches must be lead by providers that have the expertise and training necessary to consider all facets of the patient and their potential options. The provider must consider the pathophysiology of PTSD and TBI and be capable of leading a team to identify the patient's source(s) of dysfunction, current cognitive abilities, and potential indications for psychotropic medications and/or other types of therapeutic intervention. PMID:27222137

  1. Update of the management of chronic psoriasis: new approaches and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Laws, Philip M; Young, Helen S

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease which is associated with a number of significant co-morbidities including: impairment of quality of life; cardiovascular disease; and a seronegative arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis has developed at a remarkable rate in recent years. These new insights have significantly changed our perception of the condition and have led to the development of several new treatment strategies. Biological agents have proved a major step forward in therapeutic options for psoriasis. The ability to clear, or almost clear, cutaneous disease has changed the outcomes and expectations of many patients with this disease. The impact on both physical and psychological health may be great. This review covers the clinical features and management of psoriasis with specific reference to new therapeutic options. PMID:21437057

  2. Treatment options of untreatable traumatized anterior maxillary teeth for future use of dental implantation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz-Arad, Devorah; Levin, Liran; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2004-03-01

    The anterior maxilla is the most traumatized region during childhood. Posttraumatic complications occasionally lead to tooth loss as well as the need for future implants. Unfortunately, it is contraindicated to place dental implants during childhood. A waiting period of approximately 8 to 10 years before completion of growth is required. For this patient to become a candidate for future dental implants, it is necessary to ensure the continuous growth and to preserve the dimensions of the alveolar process until growth has ceased from time of injury until joint maturation. To achieve these goals, it is essential to coordinate the treatment sequence at the time of trauma. After loss of a traumatized anterior permanent maxillary incisor in young adults, treatment options are limited: orthodontic closure of the gap and reshaping the adjacent teeth, or tooth extraction and maintaining the gap with a temporary restoration. Orthodontic space closure has limited indications and requires prosthetic restoration of at least 2 teeth. Extraction and temporary restoration will usually lead to bone augmentation before implantation. Other possible treatment options include orthodontic extrusion of the root remnant (in cases of untreatable root fracture or complicated crown-root fracture) and a temporary crown to serve the patient until the completion of growth and development, autogenous tooth transplantation, intentional extraction and immediate tooth replantation, distraction osteogenesis, and decoronation. Because general rules do not apply, individual treatment plans are necessary. PMID:15017299

  3. Treatment options of untreatable traumatized anterior maxillary teeth for future use of dental implantation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz-Arad, Devorah; Levin, Liran; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2004-06-01

    The anterior maxilla is the most traumatized region during childhood. Posttraumatic complications occasionally lead to tooth loss as well as the need for future implants. Unfortunately, it is contraindicated to place dental implants during childhood. A waiting period of approximately 8 to 10 years before completion of growth is required. For this patient to become a candidate for future dental implants, it is necessary to ensure the continuous growth and to preserve the dimensions of the alveolar process until growth has ceased from time of injury until joint maturation. To achieve these goals, it is essential to coordinate the treatment sequence at the time of trauma. After loss of a traumatized anterior permanent maxillary incisor in young adults, treatment options are limited: orthodontic closure of the gap and reshaping the adjacent teeth, or tooth extraction and maintaining the gap with a temporary restoration. Orthdontic space closure has limited indications and requires prosthetic restoration of at least 2 teeth. Extraction and temporary restoration will usually lead to bone augmentation before implantation. Other possible treatment options include orthodontic extrusion of the root remnant (in cases of untreatable root fracture or complicated crown-root fracture) and a temporary crown to serve the patient until the completion of growth and development, autogenous tooth transplantation, intentional extraction and immediate tooth replantation, distraction osteogenesis, and decoronation. Because general rules do not apply, individual treatment plans are necessary. PMID:15179087

  4. Ustekinumab as an Alternative Treatment Option for Chronic Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Davila, Ulysses; Cohen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is an exceptionally rare, chronic inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology. Patients classically present with small, follicular keratosis and salmon-colored plaques that begin at the head and neck and slowly progress to widespread erythroderma including the palms and soles. It is difficult to distinguish PRP from other inflammatory dermatoses; however, features that help aid in the diagnosis include ‘islands’ of spared skin, orangish hue and typical findings on biopsy. There are no specific guidelines on therapy and treatment options include corticosteroids, vitamin D analogs, retinoids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, azathioprine and tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists. Unfortunately options are limited for patients when these drugs do not work. We report a case of chronic PRP, refractory to conventional treatment, successfully treated with ustekinumab monotherapy. The patient was treated with 90 mg subcutaneous ustekinumab injections and began to show improvement within only 8 weeks. Long-term control of the disease has been attained without any significant side effects. We report this case to show that ustekinumab can be used as an alternative treatment method for patients with chronic, unremitting PRP. Treatment response is remarkably rapid and the infrequent dosing leads to patient compliance and a significantly improved quality of life. PMID:25969677

  5. A systematic review of active treatment options in patients with desmoid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yao, X.; Corbett, T.; Gupta, A.A.; Kandel, R.A.; Verma, S.; Werier, J.; Ghert, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We conducted a systematic review to determine the optimal treatment options in patients with desmoid tumours who have declined observational management. Methods A search was conducted of the medline and embase databases (1990 to September 2012), the Cochrane Library, and relevant guideline Web sites and conference materials. Results One systematic review and forty-six studies met the preplanned study selection criteria; data from twenty-eight articles were extracted and analyzed. For local control, three studies reported a statistically significant difference in favour of surgery plus radiotherapy (rt) compared with surgery alone, and one study did not; two studies reported the lack of a statistical difference between surgery plus rt and rt alone in maintaining local control. Multivariate risk factors for local recurrence included positive surgical margins and young patient age. Single-agent imatinib led to a progression-free survival rate of 55% at 2 years and 58% at 3 years. Methotrexate plus vinblastine led to a progression-free survival rate of 67% at 10 years. Significant toxicities were reported for all treatment modalities, including surgical morbidity, and rt- and chemotherapy-related toxicities. Conclusions In patients who have declined observational management, the local control rate was higher with surgery plus rt than with surgery alone. However, the additional rt-related complications should be considered in treatment decision-making. Surgery, rt, and systemic therapy are all reasonable treatment options for patients with desmoid tumours. PMID:25089111

  6. Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating in Type 1 Diabetes: Prevalence, Screening, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Hanlan, Margo E.; Griffith, Julie; Patel, Niral

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on the prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Recent research indicates higher prevalence rates of eating disorders among people with type 1 diabetes, as compared to their peers without diabetes. Eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors – especially insulin omission – are associated with poorer glycemic control and serious risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Screening should begin in pre-adolescence and continue through early adulthood, as many disordered eating behaviors begin during the transition to adolescence and may persist for years. Available screening tools and treatment options are reviewed. Given the complexity of diabetes management in combination with eating disorder treatment, it is imperative to screen early and often, in order to identify those most vulnerable and begin appropriate treatment in a timely manner. PMID:24022608

  7. New treatment options for infections caused by increasingly antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyukmin; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of high-level resistance to ceftriaxone is giving rise to serious concern about absence of effective treatment options to cure gonococcal infections. Increasing the dosage regimen can be applied to ceftriaxone and azithromycin, but the emergence of high-level resistance has already been reported. Spectinomycin is another active drug but has low efficacy in the treatment of pharyngeal gonorrhoea. Conventional antibiotics could be introduced for gonococcal treatment, but they have some limitations, such as the absence of clinical trials and breakpoint. Combining antibiotics is another promising method to cure patients and to prevent the emergence of resistance. The most important strategy to maintain the efficacy of antibiotics is rapid detection and dissemination control of novel resistant isolate. PMID:26690658

  8. Comparative Study of Peroneal Tenosynovitis as the Complication of Intraarticular Calcaneal Fracture in Surgically and Non-Surgically Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bahari Kashani, Mahmoud; Kachooei, Amir Reza; Ebrahimi, Hengameh; Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; Amelfarzad, Sara; Bekhradianpoor, Nastoor; Azami, Mehran; Fatehi, Amirreza; Bahari Kashani, Golsa

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcaneus has the most fracture prevalence among tarsal bones. About 3/4 of calcaneal fractures are intra-articular fractures with displacement. The majority of calcaneal fractures occur in 21 - 35 year old young men, and that are mostly active people, these fractures cause complete disability for 15 months. Moreover, inappropriate treatment leads to lots of social and economical damages. Objectives In this study we compared the incidence and the severity of peroneal tenosynovitis as a complication of non-operative and operative treatment of intra-articular calcaneal fractures. In this study, some other complications of this fracture were also analyzed and the prevalence of the complication was higher in non-operated patients. Patients and Methods A total of 140 patients with intra-articular calcaneal fracture were analyzed prospectively. These patients were divided into 2 groups: operated group and non-operated group. Results In non-operated group (56 patients), 22 patients were complicated by peroneal tenosynovitis. In operated group (84 patients), 8 patients had the same complication. Statistical analysis revealed that the prevalence, and the severity of this complication in the mentioned groups had a meaningful difference. The results in operated group were much better than the non-operated one. Conclusions Although some of the orthopedic surgeons are not interested to manage these fractures surgically and most of them treat these cases conservatively (casting, etc.), in most displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures, surgical treatment is the method of choice. Moreover, in non-surgical treatment the prevalence of these complications among the patients is more and as a result, inevitable social, occupational and familial damages occur. PMID:24693362

  9. The best MSW treatment option by considering greenhouse gas emissions reduction: a case study in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tayyeba, Omid; Olsson, Monika; Brandt, Nils

    2011-08-01

    The grave concern over climate change and new economic incentives such as the clean development mechanism (CDM) have given more weight to the potential of projects for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the Adjara solid waste management project, even though the need for reductions in GHG emissions is acknowledged, it is not one of the key factors for selecting the most appropriate treatment method. This study addresses the benefit of various solid waste treatment methods that could be used in the Adjara project in terms of reducing GHG emissions. Seven different options for solid waste treatment are examined: open dumping as the baseline case, four options for landfill technology (no provision of landfill gas capture, landfill gas capture with open flare system, with enclosed flare system and with electricity generation), composting and anaerobic digestion with electricity production. CDM methodologies were used to quantify the amount of reductions for the scenarios. The study concludes sanitary landfill with capture and burning of landfill gas by an enclosed flare system could satisfy the requirements, including GHG reduction potential. The findings were tested for uncertainty and sensitivity by varying the data on composition and amount of waste and were found to be robust. PMID:21382876

  10. Primary Treatment Options for High-Risk/Medically Inoperable Early Stage NSCLC Patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, Guy C; Kehrer, Jason D; Kahn, Jenna; Koneru, Bobby N; Narayan, Ram; Thomas, Tarita O; Camphausen, Kevin; Mehta, Minesh P; Kaushal, Aradhana

    2015-11-01

    Lung cancer is among the most common cancers worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. For patients with early stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer T1-2, N0) non-small-cell lung cancer, the current standard of care is lobectomy with systematic lymph node evaluation. Unfortunately, patients with lung cancer often have medical comorbities, which may preclude the option of surgical resection. In such cases, a number of minimally invasive to noninvasive treatment options have gained popularity in the treatment of these high-risk patients. These modalities provide significant advantages, including patient convenience, treatment in an outpatient setting, and acceptable toxicities, including reduced impact on lung function and a modest risk of postprocedure chest wall pain. We provide a comprehensive review of the literature, including reported outcomes, complications, and limitations of sublobar resection with or without intraoperative brachytherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, percutaneous cryoablation, photodynamic therapy, and stereotactic body radiotherapy. PMID:26027433

  11. New treatment option for an incomplete vertical root fracture–a preliminary case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Instead of extraction this case report presents an alternative treatment option for a maxillary incisor with a vertical root fracture (VRF) causing pain in a 78-year-old patient. After retreatment of the existing root canal filling the tooth was stabilized with a dentine adhesive and a composite restoration. Then the tooth was extracted, the VRF gap enlarged with a small diamond bur and the existing retrograde root canal filling removed. The enlarged fracture line and the retrograde preparation were filled with a calcium-silicate-cement (Biodentine). Afterwards the tooth was replanted and a titanium trauma splint was applied for 12d. A 24 months clinical and radiological follow-up showed an asymptomatic tooth, reduction of the periodontal probing depths from 7 mm prior to treatment to 3 mm and gingival reattachment in the area of the fracture with no sign of ankylosis. Hence, the treatment of VRF with Biodentine seems to be a possible and promising option. PMID:24670232

  12. Grey water characteristics and treatment options for rural areas in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Halalsheh, M; Dalahmeh, S; Sayed, M; Suleiman, W; Shareef, M; Mansour, M; Safi, M

    2008-09-01

    Low water consumption in rural areas in Jordan had resulted in the production of concentrated grey water. Average COD, BOD and TSS values were 2568mg/l, 1056mg/l and 845mg/l, respectively. The average grey water generation was measured to be 14L/c.d. Three different treatment options were selected based on certain criterions, and discussed in this article. The examined treatment systems are septic tank followed by intermittent sand filter; septic tank followed by wetlands; and UASB-hybrid reactor. Advantages and disadvantages of each system are presented. It was concluded that UASB-hybrid reactor would be the most suitable treatment option in terms of compactness and simplicity in operation. The volume of UASB-hybrid reactor was calculated to be 0.268m(3) with a surface area of 0.138m(2) for each house having 10 inhabitants on average. Produced effluent is expected to meet Jordanian standards set for reclaimed water reuse in irrigating fruit trees. PMID:18299193

  13. Non-Surgical Chemotherapeutic Treatment Strategies for the Management of Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Krayer, Joe W.; Leite, Renata S.; Kirkwood, Keith L.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Periodontal diseases are initiated by subgingival periodontal pathogens in susceptible periodontal sites. The host immune response towards periodontal pathogens helps to sustain periodontal disease and eventual alveolar bone loss. Numerous adjunctive therapeutic strategies have evolved to manage periodontal diseases. Systemic and local antibiotics, antiseptics, and past and future host immune modulatory agents are reviewed and discussed to facilitate the dental practitioner’s appreciation of this ever-growing field in clinical periodontics. PMID:20103470

  14. Non-Surgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence: A Review of the Research for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the seat or under the seat. An electric current is sent into the coils, creating a magnetic ... that is inserted near the ankle. Pulses of electricity are sent into the needle to travel through ...

  15. All Roads Lead to Rome: Update on Rome III Criteria and New Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Shih, David Q.; Kwan, Lola Y.

    2010-01-01

    The recently published Rome III criteria reflect current understanding of functional gastrointestinal disorders. These criteria include definitions of these conditions and their pathophysiologic subtypes and offer guidelines for their management. At the 2006 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, a panel of experts discussed these criteria as they pertain to irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and chronic constipation. This article reviews the panel’s findings, highlights the differences between the Rome II and III criteria, and summarizes best treatment options currently available to practitioners and their patients. PMID:21544252

  16. Balloon Pulmonary Angioplasty: A Treatment Option for Inoperable Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Aiko; Matsubara, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    In chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), stenoses or obstructions of the pulmonary arteries due to organized thrombi can cause an elevation in pulmonary artery resistance, which in turn can result in pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH can be cured surgically by pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA); however, patients deemed unsuitable for PEA due to lesion, advanced age, or comorbidities have a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Recently, advances have been made in balloon pulmonary angioplasty for these patients, and this review highlights this recent progress. PMID:26664876

  17. Current endovascular treatment options for central retinal arterial occlusion: a review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Gala, Nihar B; Karimi, Reza J; Turbin, Roger E; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    Central retinal artery occlusion, although relatively rare, is an ophthalmological emergency. If left untreated, complete blindness will ensue. Conventional therapies have not significantly improved outcomes compared with the natural history of the disease. Several case series of more recent endovascular approaches, such as intraarterial fibrinolysis, report successful outcomes. Still other studies regarding intraarterial fibrinolysis do not demonstrate any significantly better outcomes, with some even indicating increased complication rates. Therefore, the authors present a review of the current endovascular treatment options for central retinal artery occlusion. PMID:24380484

  18. Are we taking full advantage of the growing number of pharmacological treatment options for osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karl J; Schlecht, Stephen H; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2014-06-01

    We are becoming increasingly aware that the manner in which our skeleton ages is not uniform within and between populations. Pharmacological treatment options with the potential to combat age-related reductions in skeletal strength continue to become available on the market, notwithstanding our current inability to fully utilize these treatments by accounting for an individual's unique biomechanical needs. Revealing new molecular mechanisms that improve the targeted delivery of pharmaceuticals is important; however, this only addresses one part of the solution for differential age-related bone loss. To improve current treatment regimes, we must also consider specific biomechanical mechanisms that define how these molecular pathways ultimately impact whole bone fracture resistance. By improving our understanding of the relationship between molecular and biomechanical mechanisms, clinicians will be better equipped to take full advantage of the mounting pharmacological treatments available. Ultimately this will enable us to reduce fracture risk among the elderly more strategically, more effectively, and more economically. In this interest, the following review summarizes the biomechanical basis of current treatment strategies while defining how different biomechanical mechanisms lead to reduced fracture resistance. It is hoped that this may serve as a template for the identification of new targets for pharmacological treatments that will enable clinicians to personalize care so that fracture incidence may be globally reduced. PMID:24747363

  19. PTSD and comorbid AUD: a review of pharmacological and alternative treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ralevski, Elizabeth; Olivera-Figueroa, Lening A; Petrakis, Ismene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) frequently co-occur there are no specific treatments for individuals diagnosed with these comorbid conditions. The main objectives of this paper are to review the literature on pharmacological options for PTSD and comorbid AUD, and to summarize promising behavioral and alternative interventions for those with these dual diagnoses. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PubMed databases using Medical Subject Headings terms in various combinations to identify articles that used pharmacotherapy for individuals with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Similar strategies were used to identify articles on behavioral and alternative treatments for AUD and PTSD. We identified and reviewed six studies that tested pharmacological treatments for patients with PTSD and comorbid AUD. Results The literature on treatment with US Food and Drug Administration approved medications for patients with dual diagnosis of PTSD and AUD is very limited and inconclusive. Promising evidence indicates that topiramate and prazosin may be effective in reducing PTSD and AUD symptoms in individuals with comorbidity. Seeking safety has had mixed efficacy in clinical trials. The efficacy of other behavioral and alternative treatments (mindfulness-based, yoga, and acupuncture) is more difficult to evaluate since the evidence comes from small, single studies without comparison groups. Conclusion There is a clear need for more systematic and rigorous study of pharmacological, behavioral, and alternative treatments for patients with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. PMID:24648794

  20. Preferences for different insomnia treatment options in people with schizophrenia and related psychoses: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Waters, Flavie; Chiu, Vivian W; Janca, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Amanda; Ree, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations and delusions can be intrusive and unwanted and often remain treatment-resistant. Due to recent progress in basic and clinical sciences, novel approaches such as sleep-based interventions are increasingly becoming offered to address the physical and mental health issues of people with severe mental illness. While the primary outcome is to improve sleep, studies have demonstrated that interventions that target symptoms of insomnia can also produce improvements in the severity of psychotic symptoms, quality of life, and functional outcomes. This study presents qualitative data on the attitudes and preferences of people with schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorders to three different types of therapies for insomnia (standard pharmacological, melatonin-based, and cognitive and/or behavior therapy). Interviews included discussions regarding the perceived advantages and limitations of different therapies, enablers to taking up the preferred option, as well as personal strategies that have helped respondents with sleep problems in the past. Results showed that, when given the choice, these individuals prefer psychological and behavioral-type therapy to other sleep interventions because of its potential to support and empower them in taking responsibility for their own recovery. Pharmacological therapies, by contrast, are viewed as useful in managing acute sleep problems, but only as a short-term solution. Overall, the findings underscore the need for patients' active engagement when making decisions about treatment options. PMID:26236265

  1. Immunotoxin – a new treatment option in patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Barbara Jezersek

    2015-01-01

    Background Even though Hodgkin lymphoma is a highly curable disease, some of the patients have either a refractory disease or experience a relapse following a successful primary therapy. Durable responses and remissions in patients with relapsed or refractory disease may be achieved in approximately one-half with salvage chemotherapy followed by high dose chemotherapy (HDT) and autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (SCT). On the other hand, patients who relapse after HDT and autologous SCT or those who have failed at least two prior multi-agent chemotherapy regimens and are not candidates for HDT have limited treatment options. Conclusions A new treatment option in this population is an immunotoxin Brentuximab vedotin composed of a CD30 directed antibody linked to the antitubulin agent monomethyl auristatin E. It has demonstrated a substantial effectiveness and an acceptable toxicity. In the pivotal study, the overall response rate was 75% with 34% of complete remissions. The median durations of response were 20.5 and 6.7 months for those with complete remission and all responding patients, respectively. The median overall survival was 40.5 months (3-years overall survival 54%) and the median progression-free survival 9.3 months. The most common non-hematologic toxicities were peripheral sensory neuropathy, nausea, and fatigue while the most common severe side effects were neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and peripheral sensory neuropathy. PMID:26834516

  2. Preferences for different insomnia treatment options in people with schizophrenia and related psychoses: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Flavie; Chiu, Vivian W.; Janca, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Amanda; Ree, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations and delusions can be intrusive and unwanted and often remain treatment-resistant. Due to recent progress in basic and clinical sciences, novel approaches such as sleep-based interventions are increasingly becoming offered to address the physical and mental health issues of people with severe mental illness. While the primary outcome is to improve sleep, studies have demonstrated that interventions that target symptoms of insomnia can also produce improvements in the severity of psychotic symptoms, quality of life, and functional outcomes. This study presents qualitative data on the attitudes and preferences of people with schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorders to three different types of therapies for insomnia (standard pharmacological, melatonin-based, and cognitive and/or behavior therapy). Interviews included discussions regarding the perceived advantages and limitations of different therapies, enablers to taking up the preferred option, as well as personal strategies that have helped respondents with sleep problems in the past. Results showed that, when given the choice, these individuals prefer psychological and behavioral-type therapy to other sleep interventions because of its potential to support and empower them in taking responsibility for their own recovery. Pharmacological therapies, by contrast, are viewed as useful in managing acute sleep problems, but only as a short-term solution. Overall, the findings underscore the need for patients’ active engagement when making decisions about treatment options. PMID:26236265

  3. Secondary intention healing in lower eyelid reconstruction--a valuable treatment option.

    PubMed

    Morton, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    Secondary intention healing--or laissez-faire technique--is the first rung on the reconstructive ladder but may often be overlooked in favour of more elegant reconstructive options. Whilst the nose and medial canthus of eye have long been considered suitable sites for secondary intention healing, most plastic surgeons would hesitate to employ this technique with full-thickness lower eyelid wounds. There are currently no reports in the plastic surgery literature advocating its use, but the technique is gaining credence in the field of oculoplastics as a genuinely useful alternative to formal reconstruction. Four cases are presented where tumours excised from the lower eyelid were allowed to heal by secondary intention. The largest involved 75% of the lid margin. All were elderly patients in whom formal reconstruction was either declined by the patient or considered unwise by the surgeon. The cosmetic and functional results were quite remarkable, so much so that this technique demands serious consideration as a valuable treatment option, and quite possibly the treatment of choice in elderly or infirm patients whose tolerance of more complicated procedures may be limited. PMID:20338834

  4. Treatment Options for Liquid Radioactive Waste. Factors Important for Selecting of Treatment Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.J.

    1998-09-28

    The cleanup of liquid streams contaminated with radionuclides is obtained by the selection or a combination of a number of physical and chemical separations, processes or unit operations. Among those are: Chemical treatment; Evaporation; Ion exchange and sorption; Physical separation; Electrodialysis; Osmosis; Electrocoagulation/electroflotation; Biotechnological processes; and Solvent extraction.

  5. Treatment options for community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly people.

    PubMed

    Petrosillo, Nicola; Cataldo, Maria Adriana; Pea, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) represents one of the most common reasons for hospitalization in elderly people. Because older persons are the fastest growing segment of the population, a further increase of the incidence of CAP is expected in the next few years. Due to the high frequency, the different epidemiology, the atypical clinical presentation and the age-related modifications in drug metabolism that complicate the treatment, infections in the elderly people represent a major challenge for physicians. Despite the peculiarity of the management of CAP in the elderly people, no specific recommendations for antimicrobial treatment are provided in the international guidelines. The aim of this review is to give an update of the current antibiotic options for CAP in the elderly people reporting available data on the CAP etiology and risk factors, and tolerability, toxicity and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic of antimicrobial agents used for elderly patients. PMID:25746632

  6. Primary Intracranial Melanoma with Early Leptomeningeal Spread: A Case Report and Treatment Options Available

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Rajesh; Porag, Rokeya; Asif, Dewan Shamsul; Satter, A. M. Rejaus; Taufiq, Md.; Gaddam, Samson S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Primary CNS melanomas are rare and they constitute about 1% of all cases of melanomas and 0.07% of all brain tumors. These tumors are aggressive in nature and may metastasise to other organs. Till date less than 25 cases have been reported in the literature. The primary treatment for local intraparenchymal tumours is complete resection and/or radiotherapy and it is associated with good survival. However once there is disease spread to leptomeninges the overall median survival is around 10 weeks. In this case report we describe a primary intracranial melanoma without any dural attachment in 16-year-old boy who had radical excision of the tumor followed by radiotherapy who eventually had rapidly developed leptomeningeal disease and review the literature with a focus on the clinic pathological, radiological, and treatment options. PMID:26294993

  7. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation: review of literature and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Jillella, A P; Kallab, A M; Kutlar, A

    2000-10-01

    Autoimmune thrombocytopenia after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow/peripheral blood stem cell transplantation occurs infrequently and only six cases meeting the criteria have been reported in the literature. All six of these patients had either acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL). Immune thrombocytopenia following autologous transplantation in solid tumors has not been reported. We report the first case of autoimmune thrombocytopenia after high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in a patient with breast cancer. A review of the literature has been conducted and treatment options are discussed. In two patients the condition resolved with treatment and in a third patient it improved. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in the post-transplant period is one of the causes of a low platelet count. It should be recognized promptly and treated. PMID:11081398

  8. Paediatric Stroke: Review of the Literature and Possible Treatment Options, including Endovascular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ciceri, Elisa F.; Cuccarini, Valeria; Chiapparini, Luisa; Saletti, Veronica; Valvassori, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is among the top 10 causes of death in childhood. More than half of the surviving children have long-term neurological sequelae. Ischemic stroke (IS) includes arterial ischemic stroke and cerebral venous thrombosis with venous infarction. Haemorrhagic stroke (HS) includes intracerebral haematoma or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Risk factors for stroke are different in children and in adults. 10–30% of IS have no identified risk factors. However, multiple risk factors are recognizable in the majority of stroke in children; thus, a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation is crucial. Vascular abnormalities, such as arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, vessel dissection, stenosis, and moyamoya disease, are frequently associated with both IS and HS and lead to high recurrence rates. Endovascular and surgical treatment options are sometimes indicated, performed on the basis of expert opinion, and extrapolated from the adult procedures. In the present paper, we review the recent literature and we discuss the treatment in five cases managed at our institutions. PMID:21789272

  9. Current and emerging treatment options for interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce S; Fischer, Aryeh

    2016-05-01

    The management of connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD) is complex and this arena offers many challenges to the practicing clinician. Unfortunately, treatment strategies and recommendations are often based on experience rather than evidence, and there are few effective therapeutic options. Pharmacologic intervention with immunosuppression is usually the mainstay of therapy and is reserved for those with clinically significant and/or progressive ILD. There is a desperate need for controlled trials across the spectrum of CTD-ILD and a number of potentially promising novel therapies warrant further study. It is important to address co-morbid conditions or aggravating factors (e.g., gastroesophageal reflux, aspiration, bone health, pulmonary hypertension, Pneumocystis jiroveci prophylaxis) and to institute non-pharmacologic management strategies (e.g., supplemental oxygen and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation) as part of a comprehensive treatment plan in CTD-ILD. PMID:26752397

  10. Treatment and prevention of cryptosporidiosis: what options are there for a country like Zambia?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a major infection of humans, leading to diarrhoea and growth failure in children, diarrhoea and malnutrition in immunocompromised adults, and is associated with increased mortality in all age groups. Using the country of Zambia as an example, I review the possible approaches to treatment and prevention in a tropical setting. The current optimal therapy for cryptosporidiosis is nitazoxanide which works well in HIV uninfected children, but treatment in patients with HIV infection remains remarkably difficult. No single drug has demonstrated efficacy in a randomised trial. No vaccine is available, so the best option for prevention for the moment is filtration and clean storage of drinking water. This would be expected to reduce cryptosporidiosis dramatically, but this needs to be demonstrated directly. Water filtration would have the added benefit of protection against many other pathogens, but the paucity of alternative approaches highlights the need for a better understanding of this important human pathogen. PMID:21320387

  11. 26 CFR 1.1504-4 - Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... See § 601.601(d)(2)(ii)(b) of this chapter. (b) Options not treated as stock or as excerised—(1... (as described in paragraph (g) of this section). (ii) Aggregation of options. All options with the... other parties. (B) Cash settlement options, phantom stock, stock appreciation rights, or...

  12. Treatment options in recurrent ovarian cancer: latest evidence and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Luvero, Daniela; Milani, Andrea; Ledermann, Jonathan A

    2014-09-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women. Although significant progress has been made in the treatment of OC, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence and receive second-line and sometimes several lines of treatment. Here we review the options available for the treatment of recurrent disease and discuss how different agents are selected, combined and offered in a rationale sequence in the context of multidisciplinary care. We reviewed published work between 1990 and 2013 and meeting abstracts related to the use of chemotherapy and surgery in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. We discuss treatment regimens, efficacy endpoints and safety profiles of the different therapies. Platinum-based drugs are the most active agents and are selected on the basis of a probability of response to retreatment. Nonplatinum-based chemotherapy regimens are usually given in the 'platinum-resistant' setting and have a modest effect on outcome. Molecular targeted therapy of ovarian cancer given alone or integrated with chemotherapy is showing promising results. Many patients are now receiving more than one line of therapy for recurrent disease, usually platinum based until platinum resistance emerges. The sequential use of chemotherapy regimens and the incorporation of molecularly targeted treatments, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, have over the last decade significantly extended the median survival of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:25342990

  13. Switch of anti-VEGF agents is an option for nonresponders in the treatment of AMD

    PubMed Central

    Ehlken, C; Jungmann, S; Böhringer, D; Agostini, H T; Junker, B; Pielen, A

    2014-01-01

    Background Although anti-VEGF therapy of exudative AMD with bevacizumab and ranibizumab proved efficacious in the majority of patients, CNV activity does not respond to continued treatment after repeated injections in a considerable amount of patients. These are referred to as nonresponders. A change of the drug to bevacizumab or ranibizumab could possibly offer an alternative option for the treatment of nonresponding exudative AMD. Methods and materials A total of 138 nonresponders who switched therapy from bevacizumab to ranibizumab (n=114) or vice versa (n=24) were included in a retrospective study. Visual acuity (VA) and foveal thickness before and after the switch of therapy were compared. By means of linear regression analysis, we analyzed possible prognostic factors associated with a favorable outcome for visual acuity. Results Linear regression analysis revealed a statistically significant benefit for nonresponders when treatment was changed to a different anti-VEGF drug (bevacizumab or ranibizumab). VA at the time of the switch was positively correlated with a beneficial development of VA after changing the drug. There was no significant correlation with age, macular thickness, number of injections before the switch, or the development of VA under treatment before the switch. Both patients switching to Avastin and Lucentis benefitted without statistically significant differences. Conclusions An exchange of bevacizumab with ranibizumab or vice versa should be considered in nonresponders in the treatment of exudative AMD. Further prognostic factors may help to identify patients who might benefit from a switch. These factors should be investigated in further studies. PMID:24722504

  14. The retina dose-area histogram: a metric for quantitatively comparing rival eye plaque treatment options

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Episcleral plaques have a history of over a half century in the delivery of radiation therapy to intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanoma. Although the tumor control rate is high, vision-impairing complications subsequent to treatment remain an issue. Notable, late complications are radiation retinopathy and maculopathy. The obvious way to reduce the risk of radiation damage to the retina is to conform the prescribed isodose surface to the tumor base and to reduce the dose delivered to the surrounding healthy retina, especially the macula. Using a fusion of fundus photography, ultrasound and CT images, tumor size, shape and location within the eye can be accurately simulated as part of the radiation planning process. In this work an adaptation of the dose-volume histogram (DVH), the retina dose-area histogram (RDAH) is introduced as a metric to help compare rival plaque designs and conformal treatment planning options with the goal of reducing radiation retinopathy. Material and methods The RDAH is calculated by transforming a digitized fundus-photo collage of the tumor into a rasterized polar map of the retinal surface known as a retinal diagram (RD). The perimeter of the tumor base is digitized on the RD and its area computed. Area and radiation dose are calculated for every pixel in the RD. Results The areal resolution of the RDAH is a function of the pixel resolution of the raster image used to display the RD and the number of polygon edges used to digitize the perimeter of the tumor base. A practical demonstration is presented. Conclusions The RDAH provides a quantitative metric by which episcleral plaque treatment plan options may be evaluated and compared in order to confirm adequate dosimetric coverage of the tumor and margin, and to help minimize dose to the macula and retina. PMID:23634152

  15. Osteoporosis in the adult solid organ transplant population: underlying mechanisms and available treatment options.

    PubMed

    Early, C; Stuckey, L; Tischer, S

    2016-04-01

    The prevention and treatment of osteoporosis is an increasingly important topic in the solid organ transplant (SOT) population. Compared to the general population, these patients are at an elevated risk of developing osteoporosis due to progressive disease, lifelong immunosuppressant therapy, and malnutrition. As patients live longer after transplant, chronic disease management is increasingly more important. Supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is often necessary in the SOT population due to a high incidence of vitamin D deficiency. Bisphosphonate therapy is most commonly used for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, but therapy can be limited by renal dysfunction which is common in transplant recipients. Alternative agents such as teriparatide and calcitonin have not been shown to provide a significant impact on the rate of fractures in this population. Additionally, denosumab may be a promising treatment option due to its novel mechanism of action, and is currently being studied in renal transplant patients. Timely initiation of supplementation and treatment, and minimizing glucocorticoid exposure prior to and after transplantation will aid in the prevention and proper management of osteoporosis in these patients. PMID:26475288

  16. Conservative surgery for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: current options

    PubMed Central

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Baldi, Jacopo; Bilotta, Vincenzo; Moretti, Antimo; Tarantino, Umbertto

    2015-01-01

    Summary The prevention of femoral head collapse and the maintenance of hip function would represent a substantial achievement in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head; however it is difficult to identify appropriate treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis in order to obtain a successful outcome in joint preserving procedures. Conservative treatments, including pharmacological management and biophysical modalities, are not supported by any evidence and require further investigation. The appropriate therapeutic approach has not been identified. The choice of surgical procedures is based on patient clinical conditions and anatomopathological features; preservation of the femoral head by core decompression may be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Biological factors, such as bone morphogenetic proteins and bone marrow stem cells, would improve the outcome of core decompression. Another surgical procedure proposed for the treatment of avascular necrosis consists of large vascularized cortical bone grafts, but its use is not yet common due to surgical technical issues. Use of other surgical technique, such as osteotomies, is controversial, since arthroplasty is considered as the first option in case of severe femoral head collapse without previous intervention. PMID:27134632

  17. Treatment Options for Class III Malocclusion in Growing Patients with Emphasis on Maxillary Protraction

    PubMed Central

    Azamian, Zeinab; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    It is very difficult to diagnose and treat Class III malocclusion. This type of malocclusion involves a number of cranial base and maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental compensation components. In Class III malocclusion originating from mandibular prognathism, orthodontic treatment in growing patients is not a good choice and in most cases orthognathic surgery is recommended after the end of growth. Approximately 30–40% of Class III patients exhibit some degree of maxillary deficiency; therefore, devices can be used for maxillary protraction for orthodontic treatment in early mixed dentition. In cases in which dental components are primarily responsible for Class III malocclusion, early therapeutic intervention is recommended. An electronic search was conducted using the Medline database (Entrez PubMed), the Cochrane Collaboration Oral Health Group Database of Clinical Trials, Science Direct, and Scopus. In this review article, we described the treatment options for Class III malocclusion in growing patient with an emphasis on maxillary protraction. It seems that the most important factor for treatment of Class III malocclusion in growing patient is case selection. PMID:27144056

  18. Advancing the Care of Post-Acne Scarring: Expert Insights Into New Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Werschler, Wm Philip; Few, Julius W; Jacob, Carolyn I; Joseph, John H; Spencer, James M; Taub, Amy Forman

    2016-05-01

    Most patients with acne have some degree of facial scarring even after their acne resolves, extending the period of psychosocial distress. Unfortunately, management of acne scars remains challenging. Many treatments for post-acne scarring including chemical peels, skin needling, laser resurfacing, surgical repair, subcision lifting, and punch elevation lifting, are limited by moderate and unpredictable results, significant morbidity, and substantial patient investments in time and money. The most recent addition to the armamentarium is tissue augmentation with soft tissue fillers, including a recently approved polymethylmethacrylate-collagen filler. Matching individual patient needs to the appropriate treatment is crucial. While many patients with acne scars have unrealistic expectations about treatment outcomes, open, honest, and realistic dialogue regarding their treatment options and concerns can facilitate realistic expectations. This article is based on a consensus discussion by the authors, who all have experience managing post-acne scarring, as well as the content of a series of live CME-accredited symposia in connection with major dermatology meetings.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(5):518-525. PMID:27168260

  19. An alternative treatment option for a bony defect from large odontoma using recycled demineralization at chairside

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Odontoma is the most common odontogenic benign tumor, and the treatment of choice is generally surgical removal. After excision, bone grafts may be necessary depending on the need for further treatment, or the size and location of the odontoma. Although the osteogenic capacity of a demineralized tooth was verified as early as 1967 by Urist and many other investigators, the cumbersome procedure, including a long demineralization time, may be less than comfortable for clinicians. A modified ultrasonic technology, with periodic negative pressure and temperature control, facilitated rapid and aseptic preparation of demineralized teeth for bone grafts. This approach reduces the demineralization time dramatically (≤80 minutes), so that the graft material can be prepared chairside on the same day as the extraction. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of large compound odonotomas used as graft material prepared chairside for enucleation-induced bony defects. These two clinical cases showed favorable wound healing without complications, and good bony support for future dental implants or orthodontic treatment. Finally, this report will suggest the possibility of recycling the benign pathologic hard tissue as an alternative treatment option for conventional bone grafts in clinics. PMID:25922824

  20. An alternative treatment option for a bony defect from large odontoma using recycled demineralization at chairside.

    PubMed

    Lee, JuHyon; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Eun-Jin; Kim, Eun-Suk

    2015-04-01

    Odontoma is the most common odontogenic benign tumor, and the treatment of choice is generally surgical removal. After excision, bone grafts may be necessary depending on the need for further treatment, or the size and location of the odontoma. Although the osteogenic capacity of a demineralized tooth was verified as early as 1967 by Urist and many other investigators, the cumbersome procedure, including a long demineralization time, may be less than comfortable for clinicians. A modified ultrasonic technology, with periodic negative pressure and temperature control, facilitated rapid and aseptic preparation of demineralized teeth for bone grafts. This approach reduces the demineralization time dramatically (≤80 minutes), so that the graft material can be prepared chairside on the same day as the extraction. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of large compound odonotomas used as graft material prepared chairside for enucleation-induced bony defects. These two clinical cases showed favorable wound healing without complications, and good bony support for future dental implants or orthodontic treatment. Finally, this report will suggest the possibility of recycling the benign pathologic hard tissue as an alternative treatment option for conventional bone grafts in clinics. PMID:25922824

  1. Addressing the unmet needs of patients with persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia: emerging pharmacological treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Chue, Pierre; Lalonde, Justine K

    2014-01-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia represent an impairment of normal emotional responses, thought processes and behaviors, and include blunting or flattening of affect, alogia/aprosody, avolition/apathy, anhedonia, and asociality. Negative symptoms contribute to a reduced quality of life, increased functional disability, increased burden of illness, and poorer long-term outcomes, to a greater degree than positive symptoms. Primary negative symptoms are prominent and persistent in up to 26% of patients with schizophrenia, and they are estimated to occur in up to 58% of outpatients at any given time. Negative symptoms respond less well to medications than positive symptoms, and to date treatment options for negative symptoms have been limited, with no accepted standard treatment. Modest benefits have been reported with a variety of different agents, including second-generation antipsychotics and add-on therapy with antidepressants and other pharmacological classes. Recent clinical research focusing on negative symptoms target novel biological systems, such as glutamatergic neurotransmission. Different approaches include: enhancing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function with agents that bind directly to the glycine ligand site or with glycine reuptake inhibitors; influencing the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) with positive allosteric modulators; and stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In conclusion, the lack of clearly efficacious pharmacological treatments for the management of negative symptoms represents a significant unmet need, especially considering the importance of these symptoms on patient outcomes. Hence, further research to identify and characterize novel pharmacological treatments for negative symptoms is greatly needed. PMID:24855363

  2. Managing Urinary Incontinence in Patients with Dementia: Pharmacological Treatment Options and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Orme, Susie; Morris, Vikky; Gibson, William; Wagg, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms are highly prevalent in late life and are strongly associated with dementia and frailty. Incontinence is extremely common among those living in long-term care and is most commonly due to urgency incontinence. Although national and international guidelines for continence care exist, they often fail to consider the complex comorbidity found in patients with dementia and are often not followed; continence practices in long-term care may promote rather than prevent incontinence. The majority of those with dementia living in the community can be managed successfully with standard treatments, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological; the expectations and aims of treatment of both the patient and their caregivers should be considered. A dementia diagnosis does not preclude management of incontinence, but treatment options may be more limited in those with advanced dementia who are unable to retain information and modify behaviors. High-quality data to guide the choice of pharmacological agent in those with dementia are lacking. Oxybutynin has been shown to have significant adverse cognitive effects, but data to support the use of trospium, solifenacin, darifenacin, and fesoterodine are limited. No data are available for mirabegron. Neither age, frailty, nor dementia should be considered a barrier to pharmacological management, but consideration should be given to the total anticholinergic load. Evidence to guide the treatment of incontinence in this vulnerable patient group is scarce, and available guidelines adapted for each individual's situation should be applied. PMID:26169438

  3. Musculoskeletal Conditions of the Foot and Ankle: Assessments and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Smita; Riskowski, Jody; Hannan, Marian T.

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle are an important public health challenge due to their increasing incidence combined with their substantial negative impact on patients’ quality of life. Non-pharmacological treatments serve as the first line of treatment and are frequently used for patients with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle. This review provides a summary of the assessments and non-invasive treatment options based upon available evidence. Recent studies show that individuals with foot and ankle pain have multiple co-existing impairments in alignment, motion, load distribution and muscle performance that may be evident in static and/or dynamic tasks. Additionally, both clinical and epidemiological studies support the inter-dependence between the foot and proximal joints. For instance, aberrant foot structure has been linked to foot osteoarthritis (OA), as well as OA and pain at the knee and hip. Most recently, advances in motion capture technology and plantar load distribution measurement offer opportunities for precise dynamic assessments of the foot and ankle. In individuals with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle, the chief objectives of treatment are to afford pain relief, restore mechanics (alignment, motion and/or load distribution) and return the patient to their desired level of activity participation. Given that most patients present with multiple impairments, combinational therapies that target foot-specific as well as global impairments have shown promising results. In particular, in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases, comprehensive rehabilitation strategies including early detection, foot-based interventions (such as orthoses) and wellness-based approaches for physical activity and self-management have been successful. While significant improvements have been made in the last decade to the assessment and treatment of foot and ankle conditions, few randomized clinical trials specifically have investigated patients with foot or ankle conditions to provide global insights into this area. Consequently, current recommendations vary based upon the scope of studies presented in this review as well as the strength of studies. This review indicates a need for more in-depth investigations into the components of assessment and treatment options for foot and ankle musculoskeletal conditions. PMID:22867931

  4. Options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions during wastewater treatment for agricultural use.

    PubMed

    Fine, Pinchas; Hadas, Efrat

    2012-02-01

    Treatment of primarily-domestic sewage wastewater involves on-site greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to energy inputs, organic matter degradation and biological nutrient removal (BNR). BNR causes both direct emissions and loss of fertilizer value, thus eliminating possible reduction of emissions caused by fertilizer manufacture. In this study, we estimated on-site GHG emissions under different treatment scenarios, and present options for emission reduction by changing treatment methods, avoiding BNR and by recovering energy from biogas. Given a typical Israeli wastewater strength (1050mg CODl(-1)), the direct on-site GHG emissions due to energy use were estimated at 1618 and 2102g CO(2)-eq m(-3), respectively, at intermediate and tertiary treatment levels. A potential reduction of approximately 23-55% in GHG emissions could be achieved by fertilizer preservation and VS conversion to biogas. Wastewater fertilizers constituted a GHG abatement potential of 342g CO(2)-eq m(-3). The residual component that remained in the wastewater effluent following intermediate (oxidation ponds) and enhanced (mechanical-biological) treatments was 304-254g CO(2)-eq m(-3) and 65-34g CO(2)-eq m(-3), respectively. Raw sludge constituted approximately 47% of the overall wastewater fertilizers load with an abatement potential of 150g CO(2)-eq m(-3) (385kg CO(2)-eq dry tonne(-1)). Inasmuch as anaerobic digestion reduced it to 63g CO(2)-eq m(-3) (261kg CO(2)-eq dry tonne(-1)), the GHG abatement gained through renewable biogas energy (approx. 428g CO(2)-eq m(-3)) favored digestion. However, sludge composting reduced the fertilizer value to 17g CO(2)-eq m(-3) (121kg CO(2)-eq dry tonne(-1)) or less (if emissions, off-site inputs and actual phytoavailability were considered). Taking Israel as an example, fully exploiting the wastewater derived GHG abatement potential could reduce the State overall GHG emissions by almost 1%. This demonstrates the possibility of optional carbon credits which might be exploited in the construction of new wastewater treatment facilities, especially in developing countries. PMID:22209373

  5. Getting it right for children: improving tuberculosis treatment access and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Brigden, Grania; Furin, Jennifer; Van Gulik, Clara; Marais, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Children were often the forgotten victims of the global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, neglected by traditional TB services as well as maternal and child health initiatives. Luckily this is changing with a greater focus on children and the issues regarding their optimal management. A common misconception is that children with TB are always difficult to diagnose and treat. New diagnostic tools are urgently needed, but most children with TB in high-burden settings can be diagnosed with available approaches and treatment outcomes are generally excellent. Increased TB awareness, appropriate training of health care workers and inclusion in integrated management of childhood illness strategies will improve the access and quality of care that children receive. This review highlights what needs to be done to ensure that no child unnecessarily dies from TB and provides a brief overview of new advances in the field. PMID:25739933

  6. Nanoliposomal irinotecan plus fluorouracil and folinic acid: a new treatment option in metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Sana Saif; Lim, Kian; Wang-Gillam, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a deadly disease with half of patients diagnosed in the metastatic setting. Until recently, patients after progression on front-line gemcitabine-based regimen had no standard second-line option, although flouropyrimidine-based regimens were frequently used in this setting. Encapsulation of chemotherapeutics in liposomal formulation is an effective way of prolonging drug deposition thereby enhancing cytotoxic efficacy. In a large phase III randomized trial on metastatic PDAC patients who progressed after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, a novel nanoliposome-encapsulated irinotecan (PEP02, MM-398, nal-IRI, Onivyde, Merrimack, Boston, US) plus fluorouracil and folinic acid demonstrated a significant survival advantage compared to fluorouracil and folinic acid alone. This pivotal study led to the recent FDA approval of nanoliposomal irinotecan in patients with metastatic PDAC. In this article, we will review the literature regarding existing treatment options for metastatic PDAC, focusing specifically on nanoliposomal irinotecan in the clinical setting and its future implication. PMID:27043737

  7. Choosing treatment options for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Roberto; Orofino, Nicola; Losurdo, Agnese; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Cugno, Massimo

    2014-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal plasma cell disorder that is still incurable using conventional treatments. Over the last decade, advances in front-line therapy have led to an increase in survival, but there are still some doubts in the case of relapsed/refractory disease. We searched the PubMed database for articles on treatment options for patients with relapsed/refractory MM published between 1996 and 2013. These treatments included hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), rechallenges using previous chemotherapy regimens, and trials of new regimens. The introduction of new agents such as the immunomodulatory drugs (IMIDs) thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the first-in-its-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, has greatly improved clinical outcomes in patients with relapsed/refractory MM, but not all patients respond and those that do may eventually relapse or become refractory to treatment. The challenge is therefore to select the optimal treatment for each patient by balancing efficacy and toxicity. To do this, it is necessary to consider disease-related factors, such as the quality and duration of responses to previous therapies, and the aggressiveness of the relapse, and patient-related factors such as age, comorbidities, performance status, pre-existing toxicities and cytogenetic patterns. The message from the trials reviewed in this article is that the new agents may be used to re-treat relapsed/refractory disease, and that the sequencing of their administration should be modulated on the basis of the various disease and patient-related factors. Moreover, our understanding of the pharmacology and molecular action of the new drugs will contribute to the possibility of developing tailored treatment. PMID:24329153

  8. Surgical and Non-Surgical Procedures Associated with Recurrence of Periodontitis in Periodontal Maintenance Therapy: 5-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Cyrino, Renata Magalhães; Lages, Eugênio José Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Prospective studies that investigated the influence of surgical and nonsurgical procedures in the recurrence of periodontitis and tooth loss in periodontal maintenance therapy (PMT) programs have not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate longitudinally the recurrence of periodontitis in regular compliers (RC) and irregular compliers (IC) individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures over 5 years in a program of PMT. Materials and Methods A total of 212 individuals participated in this study. Full-mouth periodontal examination including bleeding on probing, probing depth, and clinical attachment level were determined at all PMT visits over 5 years. The recurrence of periodontitis was evaluated in RC and IC individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures in PMT. The influences of risk variables of interest were tested through univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression. Results Recurrence of periodontitis was significantly lower among RC when compared to IC. Individuals with recurrence of periodontitis and undergoing surgical procedures showed higher probing depth and clinical attachment loss than those who received non-surgical procedures. Recurrence of periodontitis was higher in individual undergoing surgical procedures and irregular compliance during PMT. Conclusions Irregular compliance and surgical procedures in individuals undergoing PMT presented higher rates of recurrence of periodontitis when compared to regular compliant patients undergoing non-surgical procedures. PMID:26496187

  9. Locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma: molecular pathways, treatment options and new targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Salas, Veronica; Alegre, Marta; Garcés, Joan Ramón; Puig, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified as important to normal embryonic development in living organisms and it is implicated in processes including cell proliferation, differentiation and tissue patterning. Aberrant Hh pathway has been involved in the pathogenesis and chemotherapy resistance of different solid and hematologic malignancies. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma are two well-recognized cancers with mutations in components of the Hh pathway. Vismodegib has recently approved as the first inhibitor of one of the components of the Hh pathway (smoothened). This review attempts to provide current data on the molecular pathways involved in the development of BCC and the therapeutic options available for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, and the new targeted therapies in development. PMID:24611655

  10. Continual evolution of type 2 diabetes: an update on pathophysiology and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a complex and progressive disease that has a major societal and economic impact. The most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is a multifactorial disease, the pathophysiology of which involves not only the pancreas but also the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and kidney. Novel therapies with mechanisms of action that are different from most existing drugs are emerging. One such class consists of compounds that inhibit renal sodium-glucose cotransporter 2, which is responsible for the bulk of glucose reabsorption by the kidneys. This new class of compounds improves glycemic control independently of insulin and promotes weight reduction, providing an additional tool to treat patients with T2DM. This review discusses the underlying pathophysiology of T2DM, clinical guidelines, and available and emerging treatment options, with particular emphasis on sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. PMID:25931824

  11. An update on the management of peripheral T-cell lymphoma and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Adrienne A; Owens, Colette; Lee, Sangmin; Bhagat, Govind

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) comprise a rare and heterogeneous subset of non-Hodgkins lymphomas (NHLs) that arise from post-thymic T-cells or natural killer (NK)-cells at nodal or extranodal sites. Worldwide, PTCLs represent approximately 12% of all NHLs and the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification includes over 20 biologically and clinically distinct T/NK-cell neoplasms that differ significantly in presentation, pathology, and response to therapy. Because of the rarity and heterogeneity of these diseases, large clinical trials have not been conducted and optimal therapy is not well defined. Most subtypes are treated with similar combination chemotherapy regimens as used for aggressive B-cell NHL, but with poorer outcomes. New treatment combinations and novel agents are currently being explored for PTCLs and this review highlights a number of options that appear promising. PMID:22287871

  12. INVO Procedure: Minimally Invasive IVF as an Alternative Treatment Option for Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Elkin; Saa, Angela M.; Navarro, Doris E.; Pulido, Carlos; Lombana, Oscar; Moran, Abby

    2012-01-01

    Intravaginal culture (IVC), also called INVO (intravaginal culture of oocytes), is an assisted reproduction procedure where oocyte fertilization and early embryo development are carried out within a gas permeable air-free plastic device, placed into the maternal vaginal cavity for incubation. In the present study we assessed the outcome of the INVO procedure, using the recently designed INVOcell device, in combination with a mild ovarian stimulation protocol. A total of 125 cycles were performed. On average 6.5 oocytes per cycle were retrieved, and a mean of 4.2 were placed per INVOcell device. The cleavage rate obtained after the INVO culture was 63%. The procedure yielded 40%, 31.2%, and 24% of clinical pregnancy, live birth, and single live birth rates per cycle, respectively. Our results suggest that the INVO procedure is an effective alternative treatment option in assisted reproduction that shows comparable results to those reported for existing IVF techniques. PMID:22645435

  13. Malignant melanoma in a grey horse: case presentation and review of equine melanoma treatment options

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 15 year-old grey Thoroughbred gelding presented for investigation of chronic weight loss and recent onset of respiratory difficulty. Clinical examination confirmed tachypnoea with increased respiratory effort. Thoracic ultrasound examination detected pleural effusion. The dyspnoea was related to the large volume of pleural effusion and, following post-mortem examination, to the presence of a large mediastinal mass. Multiple pigmented masses, likely melanomas, were detected peri-anally. Thoracic radiography, cytological examination of the pleural fluid and a fine needle aspirate of a thoracic mass led to a presumptive diagnosis of malignant melanoma and this was confirmed at post mortem examination. Further metastatic spread to the central nervous system and right guttural pouch was also identified. In conclusion this case manifests the potential malignant behaviour of equine melanomas, and a review of proposed therapies for melanoma treatment highlights the therapeutic options and current areas of research. PMID:24196087

  14. Constipation in palliative care: treatment options and considerations for individual patient management.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Amanda; Morgan, Gwyneth

    2013-06-01

    Constipation is an all too common symptom in palliative care patients and may be associated with a range of severe issues and experiences. Its effects on patients contribute to both physical and psychological scarring during a very distressing stage of life not only for the patient but also for their caregivers. It is during this time that, too often, the complexity of managing the condition moves the locus of control away from the patient toward the health professionals. This article considers a number of different treatment options and facets of individual management that may enable patients to move the locus of control back to a position of joint management by patients, caregivers, and health professionals. PMID:24151737

  15. Intraperitoneal insulin infusion: treatment option for type 1 diabetes resulting in beneficial endocrine effects beyond glycaemia.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, P R; Logtenberg, S J J; Gans, R O B; Bilo, H J G; Kleefstra, N

    2014-10-01

    Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) is a treatment option for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who fail to reach adequate glycaemic control despite intensive subcutaneous (SC) insulin therapy. CIPII has clear advantages over SC insulin administration in terms of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and has been shown to improve glycaemic regulation. Due to the delivery of insulin predominantly in the portal vein, as opposed to systemically, CIPII offers a unique research model to investigate the effects of insulin on endocrine and metabolic parameters in vivo. The aim of the present article is to provide an overview of the literature with respect to the effects of CIPII on glucose management, quality of life, complications and costs, with additional focus on metabolic and endocrine aspects. Finally, future use and research objectives are discussed. PMID:25041605

  16. Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Solh, Tia; Botsford, Ashley; Solh, Melhem

    2015-01-01

    Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (GT) is a genetic platelet surface receptor disorder of GPIIb/IIIa (ITG αIIbβ3), either qualitative or quantitative, which results in faulty platelet aggregation and diminished clot retraction. Spontaneous mucocutaneous bleeding is common and can lead to fatal bleeding episodes. Control and prevention of bleeding among patients with GT is imperative, and remains challenging. Local measures, including anti-fibrinolytic therapy, with or without platelet transfusions, used to be the mainstay of therapy. However, in recent years the use of recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has increased significantly, with excellent response rates in treating and preventing hemorrhage among GT patients. Gene therapy and stem cell transplantation offer a potential cure of this disease, but both are costly and remain experimental at this point. This manuscript offers a comprehensive review of our understanding of GT and the available treatment options. PMID:26185478

  17. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a treatment option in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Sutaria, Nilesh; Ariff, Ben; Fertleman, Michael; Malik, Iqbal; Mikhail, Ghada W

    2015-05-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the commonest encountered valvular pathology and a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of severe stenosis. Definitive treatment has traditionally been offered in the form of surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with an acceptable surgical risk and more recently with the less invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in those where surgery is not a viable option. Prior to the introduction of TAVI, inoperable patients were treated medically and where appropriate with balloon aortic valvuloplasty, a procedure which although effective only provided short-term relief and was associated with high complication rates especially during its infancy. Here we discuss whether balloon aortic valvuloplasty continues to have a role in contemporary clinical practice in an era where significant advances have been achieved in the fields of surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI and postoperative care. PMID:25865236

  18. Renal Artery Embolization - A First Line Treatment Option For End-Stage Hydronephrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Kakali; Prabhudesai, Vikramaditya; James, R. Lester; Jones, Robert W. A.; French, Michael E.; Cowling, Mark; West, David J.

    2004-09-15

    Conventionally poorly functioning hydronephrotic kidneys have been removed if they are symptomatic. In our unit, patients are offered renal artery embolization as an alternative treatment option. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients (11 male, 4 female) with a mean age of 32.9 yr (20-51 yrs) have undergone renal artery embolization for symptomatic hydronephrosis with poor function. Mean follow-up was 64.13 weeks (range 14-200). All patients had loin pain and hydronephrosis. Twelve patients had primary pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO). Two patients had poorly functioning hydronephrotic kidneys secondary to chronic calculous obstruction. One patient had chronic pain in an obstructed but reasonably functioning kidney following a previous pyeloplasty for PUJO which demanded intervention. Mean split function on renography was 11% (range 0-46%). Selective renal artery embolization was carried out under antibiotic cover using a 7 Fr balloon occlusion catheter and absolute alcohol, steel coils, and polyvinyl alcohol particles.Results: Nine patients developed post-embolization syndrome of self-limiting pain and pyrexia with no evidence of sepsis. One patient required readmission with this condition. One patient developed a hematoma at the puncture site. Mean hospital stay was 2.3 days. Fourteen patients are happy with the result and are completely pain free. One patient has minor discomfort but is delighted with the result. Nine patients have had follow-up ultrasound confirming resolution of the hydronephrosis. Conclusion: Renal artery embolization is an effective, safe, well-tolerated minimally invasive treatment option in end-stage hydronephrosis and we routinely offer it as an alternative to nephrectomy.

  19. [Novel therapeutic options in the treatment of BCR/ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Dhner, K; Stegelmann, F; Schlenk, R F; Griesshammer, M

    2012-10-01

    Since the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and myelofibrosis (MF) in 2005, the field of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) experiences a significant gain of knowledge. Based on the novel insights in the molecular pathomechanisms of MPN many innovative drugs have been developed that are currently under investigation in clinical trials. Most data are available on the JAK inhibitors, the so called "ATP mimetics" for the treatment of MF. Recent data from two large phase-III studies showed that the JAK1?/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib is very effective in the reduction of spleen size and the improvement of quality of life in MF patients. Beside JAK inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs (IMiD) are currently under investigation. Here, pomalidomide showed significant activity in several phase-II studies in MF patients. In addition, other kinase inhibitors as well as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and inhibitors of the mTOR signalling pathway are currently evaluated in clinical trials. Based on their potential synergistic action combination therapy of these substances represents another option for MPN therapy.In this review the most recently published studies using innovative treatment strategies in MPN patients are reported, and some future aspects for MPN treatment are adressed. PMID:23055361

  20. HER2-directed therapy: current treatment options for HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Sami, Amer; Xiang, Jim

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, the management of HER2-positive breast cancer has evolved dramatically. In addition to advances in screening, genetic testing, imaging, surgical and radiation techniques, innovations in medical therapy including widespread use of HER2-directed therapy in early and advanced breast cancer have revolutionized breast cancer care and changed the natural history of HER2-positive breast cancer. A substantial number of HER2-targeted agents are being developed including monoclonal antibodies, small molecule inhibitors, and antibody drug conjugates. Trastuzumab is the prototype HER2-directed therapy that was introduced in the late 1990s for the management of metastatic breast cancer and later showed efficacy in early stage disease. Despite the practice changing impact of trastuzumab and improvement in outcomes of women with HER2-positive breast cancer resistance to trrastuzumab is a major clinical issue, occurring in both early stage and advanced disease, and new treatment strategies are clearly required. Combining HER2-targeted agents and dual HER2 blockade has been successful in early and advanced breast cancer. Furthermore, selected delivery of potent chemotherapeutic agent coupled with HER2 inhibition promises new treatment options. This review is focused on current HER2-directed treatments for women with HER2-positive breast cancer including monoclonal antibodies, small molecule inhibitors, and antibody drug conjugates. PMID:25634227

  1. Depression and Cerebrovascular Disease: Could Vortioxetine Represent a Valid Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Pala, Andrea Norcini; Finco, Gabriele; Musu, Mario; Moro, Maria Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Depression and cerebrovascular atherosclerosis often occur in comorbidity showing neuropsychological impairment and poor response to antidepressant treatment. Objective is to evaluate if new antidepressant vortioxetine may be a potential treatment option. Mechanism of Action : Vortioxetine has 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D antagonists, 5-HT1B partial agonist and a 5-HT1A agonist and serotonin transporter inhibitor property. Efficacy and safety in Major Depressive Disorders and in cognitive impairment : The majority of trials (one of them in older people) showed efficacy for vortioxetine against placebo and no differences against other active treatments. The Adverse Effects ranged from 15.8% more to 10.8% less than placebo. In the elderly, only nausea was found higher than placebo. Effects on arterial blood pressure and cardiac parameters including the ECG-QT segment were similar to placebo. Elderly depressive patients on vortioxetine showed improvement versus placebo and other active comparators in Auditory Verbal Learning Test and Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores. The inclusion criteria admitted cases with middle cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion : The mechanism of action, the efficacy on depression and safety profile and early data on cognitive impairment make Vortioxetine a strong candidate for use in depression associated with cerebrovascular disease. This information must be supported by future randomized controlled trials. PMID:25893002

  2. Life cycle assessment of wastewater treatment options for small and decentralized communities.

    PubMed

    Machado, A P; Urbano, L; Brito, A G; Janknecht, P; Salas, J J; Nogueira, R

    2007-01-01

    Sustainability has strong implications on the practice of engineering. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an appropriate methodology for assessing the sustainability of a wastewater treatment plant design. The present study used a LCA approach for comparing alternative wastewater treatment processes for small and decentralised rural communities. The assessment was focused on two energy-saving systems (constructed wetland and slow rate infiltration) and a conventional one (activated sludge process). The low environmental impact of the energy-saving wastewater treatment plants was demonstrated, the most relevant being the global warming indicator. Options for reduction of life cycle impacts were assessed including materials used in construction and operational lifetime of the systems. A 10% extension of operation lifetime of constructed wetland and slow rate infiltration systems led to a 1% decrease in CO2 emissions, in both systems. The decrease in the abiotic depletion was 5 and 7%, respectively. Also, replacing steel with HDPE in the activated sludge tank resulted in a 1% reduction in CO2 emission and 1% in the abiotic depletion indicator. In the case of the Imhoff tank a 1% reduction in CO2 emissions and 5% in the abiotic depletion indicator were observed when concrete was replaced by HDPE. PMID:17802833

  3. Management of multiple sclerosis in adolescents – current treatment options and related adherence issues

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K; Thannhauser, Jennifer E

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that is increasingly recognized in children and adolescents. This realization comes with additional concerns about existing therapeutic options and the impact of the disease on health-related outcomes of adolescents with MS. This five-part review provides an update on management strategies relevant to the pediatric MS population. The first section gives an overview on the epidemiology and natural history of early onset MS. The second section outlines currently available MS treatments, including medications during acute relapses and long-term immunomodulatory therapies. The third section highlights adherence issues pertaining to MS, including the challenges uniquely faced by adolescents. The fourth section provides a summary of research into quality of life and psychosocial consequences of pediatric onset MS. Attention is drawn to the grief experience of affected adolescents and the importance of peer relationships. Finally, the family resilience framework is presented as a conceptual model to facilitate optimal adaptation of adolescents with MS. Healthcare professionals can promote resilience and treatment adherence by ensuring that these individuals and their families are sufficiently informed about available MS treatments, providing instrumental support for managing potential medication side effects, and addressing age-appropriate developmental needs. PMID:24600259

  4. Current Treatment Options for Patients with Endocarditis: The Evolving Indications for Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cabell, Christopher H; Wang, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a serious and deadly disease. Despite medical advances over the past half century, more than one half of patients with IE suffer a serious complication, and the mortality rate remains approximately 20% during the initial hospitalization and approaches 40% at 1 year. In patients with documented IE, the treatment centers on two main aspects: effective antibiotic therapy and consideration of surgical therapy. Effective antibiotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment and focuses on sustained bactericidal concentrations tailored specifically to the causative microorganism. Surgical therapy is also an important option for many patients with IE. The goals of surgical therapy are to eradicate the focus of infection, to repair endocardial destruction, and to prevent the development of complications and relapse of infection. Ideally, surgical therapy should offer a survival advantage over medical therapy alone. Recent evidence supports the survival benefit of surgery in patients with IE, specifically in those with heart failure and complicated, left-sided IE. Future therapeutic strategies may include broader indications for surgery, as well as new treatments such as immune-modulating agents. PMID:15496261

  5. Management of multiple sclerosis in adolescents - current treatment options and related adherence issues.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K; Thannhauser, Jennifer E

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that is increasingly recognized in children and adolescents. This realization comes with additional concerns about existing therapeutic options and the impact of the disease on health-related outcomes of adolescents with MS. This five-part review provides an update on management strategies relevant to the pediatric MS population. The first section gives an overview on the epidemiology and natural history of early onset MS. The second section outlines currently available MS treatments, including medications during acute relapses and long-term immunomodulatory therapies. The third section highlights adherence issues pertaining to MS, including the challenges uniquely faced by adolescents. The fourth section provides a summary of research into quality of life and psychosocial consequences of pediatric onset MS. Attention is drawn to the grief experience of affected adolescents and the importance of peer relationships. Finally, the family resilience framework is presented as a conceptual model to facilitate optimal adaptation of adolescents with MS. Healthcare professionals can promote resilience and treatment adherence by ensuring that these individuals and their families are sufficiently informed about available MS treatments, providing instrumental support for managing potential medication side effects, and addressing age-appropriate developmental needs. PMID:24600259

  6. Overview of Pharmacological Treatment Options for Pediatric Patients with Refractory Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saneeymehri, Seyyedeh; Baker, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an autoimmune disease found predominantly in children under the age of 5 years. Its incidence is higher in those who live in Asian countries or are of Asian descent. Kawasaki disease is characterized as an acute inflammation of the vasculature bed affecting mainly the skin, eyes, lymph nodes, and mucosal layers. Although the disease is usually self-limiting, patients may develop cardiac abnormalities that can lead to death. The exact cause of the disease is unknown; however, researchers hypothesize that an infectious agent is responsible for causing Kawasaki disease. Initial treatment options with intravenous immune globulin and aspirin are sufficient to cure most patients who acquire this disease. Unfortunately, in up to one-quarter of patients, the disease will be refractory to initial therapy and will require further management with corticosteroid, immunomodulatory, or cytotoxic agents. The lack of randomized, controlled trials makes treatment of refractory disease difficult to manage. Until larger randomized, controlled trials are published to give more guidance on therapy for this stage of disease, clinicians should use the data available from observational studies and case reports in conjunction with their clinical expertise to make treatment decisions. PMID:26170768

  7. Non-surgical factors influencing lymph node yield in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Patrick; Peirce, Colin; Mulsow, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous factors which can affect the lymph node (LN) yield in colon cancer specimens. The aim of this paper was to identify both modifiable and non-modifiable factors that have been demonstrated to affect colonic resection specimen LN yield and to summarise the pertinent literature on these topics. A literature review of PubMed was performed to identify the potential factors which may influence the LN yield in colon cancer resection specimens. The terms used for the search were: LN, lymphadenectomy, LN yield, LN harvest, LN number, colon cancer and colorectal cancer. Both non-modifiable and modifiable factors were identified. The review identified fifteen non-surgical factors: (13 non-modifiable, 2 modifiable) which may influence LN yield. LN yield is frequently reduced in older, obese patients and those with male sex and increased in patients with right sided, large, and poorly differentiated tumours. Patient ethnicity and lower socioeconomic class may negatively influence LN yield. Pre-operative tumour tattooing appears to increase LN yield. There are many factors that potentially influence the LN yield, although the strength of the association between the two varies greatly. Perfecting oncological resection and pathological analysis remain the cornerstones to achieving good quality and quantity LN yields in patients with colon cancer. PMID:27190586

  8. Comparison of healing rate in diabetes-related foot ulcers with low frequency ultrasonic debridement versus non-surgical sharps debridement: a randomised trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Foot ulceration has been reported as the leading cause of hospital admission and amputation in individuals with diabetes. Diabetes-related foot ulcers require multidisciplinary management and best practice care, including debridement, offloading, dressings, management of infection, modified footwear and management of extrinsic factors. Ulcer debridement is a commonly applied management approach involving removal of non-viable tissue from the ulcer bed. Different methods of debridement have been reported in the literature including autolytic debridement via moist wound healing, mechanical debridement utilising wet to dry dressings, theatre based sharps debridement, biological debridement, non-surgical sharps debridement and newer technology such as low frequency ultrasonic debridement. Methods People with diabetes and a foot ulcer, referred to and treated by the Podiatry Department at Monash Health and who meet the inclusion criteria will be invited to participate in this randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomly and equally allocated to either the non-surgical sharps debridement (control) or low frequency ultrasonic debridement (intervention) group (n = 322 ulcers/n = 108 participants). Where participants have more than one ulcer, only the participant will be randomised, not the ulcer. An investigator not involved in participant recruitment or assessment will be responsible for preparing the random allocation sequence and envelopes. Each participant will receive weekly treatment for six months including best practice podiatric management. Each ulcer will be measured on a weekly basis by calculating total area in centimetres squared. Measurement will be undertaken by a trained research assistant to ensure outcomes are blinded from the treating podiatrist. Another member of the research team will assess the final primary outcome. Discussion The primary aim of this study is to compare healing rates for diabetes-related foot ulcers using non-surgical sharps debridement versus low frequency ultrasonic debridement over a six month period. The primary outcome measure for this study is the proportion of ulcers healed by the six month follow-up period. Secondary outcomes will include a quality of life measure, assessment of pain and health care resource use between the two treatment modalities. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12612000490875. PMID:24423411

  9. Functional outcomes of acutely infected knee arthroplasty: a comparison of different surgical treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Dzaja, Ivan; Howard, James; Somerville, Lyndsay; Lanting, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background An infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be treated with irrigation and dbridement with polyethylene exchange (IDPE) or a 2-staged revision (2SR). Although research has examined infection eradication rates of both treatments, patient outcomes have not been reported. We examined patient-reported outcomes following treatment compared with matched, noninfected controls. Methods We retrospectively identified patients with infected TKAs who had undergone the index procedure between May 1991 and November 2011. Patient-reported outcomes included the 12-item Short Form Health Survey, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, and Knee Society Scores as well as range of motion. Patients with noninfected primary TKAs matched by age and age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index score were used as controls. Intention-to-treat groups of 2SR and IDPE were used, with the IDPE group subdivided into successful and unsuccessful groups. Results We included 145 patients with infected TKAs with mean follow-up of 64.2 months and 145 controls with a mean follow-up of 35.4 months in our analysis. Outcomes of the controls and the successful IDPE groups were equivalent. The 2SR cohort had lower scores in all categories than controls. There was a 39% success rate in eradicating infection with IDPE. Patients in whom IDPE failed had lower scores in all categories than controls. There was no difference between the failed IDPE group and the 2SR group. Conclusion Controversy regarding treatment options for acutely infected TKA has been focused on infection eradication. However, functional outcomes following treatment need to be taken into consideration. Patients whose infections were successfully treated with IDPE had equivalent outcomes to controls. PMID:26574832

  10. Options for reducing oil content of sludge from a petroleum wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Soon; Lee, Jae-Young

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants at petroleum refineries often produce substantial quantities of sludge with relatively high concentrations of oil. Disposal of this waste is costly, in part because the high oil content requires use of secure disposal methods akin to handling of hazardous wastes. This article examines the properties of oily sludge and evaluates optional methods for reducing the oil content of this sludge to enable use of lower cost disposal methods. To reduce the oil content or break the structure of oily sludge, preliminary lab-scale experiments involving mechanical treatment, surfactant extraction, and oxidation are conducted. By applying surfactants, approximately 36% to 45% of oils are extracted from oily sludge. Of this, about 33% of oils are rapidly oxidised via radiation by an electron beam within 10 s of exposure. The Fenton reaction is effective for destruction of oily sludge. It is also found that 56% of oils were removed by reacting oily sludge with water containing ozone of 0.5 mg l(-1) over a period of 24 h. Oxidation using ozone thus can also be effectively used as a pretreatment for oily sludge. PMID:26261236

  11. Current Scenario of HIV/AIDS, Treatment Options, and Major Challenges with Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative organism of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the inability of modern medicine to find a cure for it has placed HIV as one of the most dreaded pathogens of the 21(st) century. With millions of people infected with HIV, it was once thought to result in "medical apocalypse". However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is now possible to control HIV. Adherence to ART helps to keep the viral load under control and prolong the time of progression to AIDS, resulting in near normal life expectancy. Even with the introduction of ART, a substantial number of patients fail to adhere due to a variety of reasons, including adverse side effects, drug abuse, mental disorders, socioeconomic status, literacy, and social stigma. With the availability of so many options for HIV treatment at each stage of the disease progression, physicians can switch between the treatment regimens to avoid and/or minimize the adverse effects of drugs. Close monitoring, major social reforms, and adequate counselling should also be implemented to circumvent other challenges. PMID:27054050

  12. Improving care and treatment options for women and girls with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Roshni

    2015-12-01

    Women and girls may experience increased bleeding symptoms as carriers of haemophilia. They can also be affected by other hereditary bleeding diatheses such as von Willebrand disease, platelet dysfunction defects or deficiencies of coagulation factors (F) such as FI, FII, FV, FVII, FX, FXI and FXIII. In addition to general bleeding symptoms, such disorders pose unique problems for women due to their impact on reproductive health. Women and adolescent girls with undiagnosed bleeding disorders frequently experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB; menorrhagia), leading to impairment of daily activities. Other gynaecological and obstetric manifestations, for example miscarriage, bleeding during pregnancy and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), can occur. Treatment for HMB should consider patient wishes relating to preservation of fertility, and management options include hormonal measures, desmopressin, antifibrinolytics, platelet concentrate transfusions and clotting factor therapy. During pregnancy, monitoring clotting factor levels informs the need for prophylactic therapy; subsequent haemostatic cover can minimise PPH. Under-recognition of bleeding disorders in females may lead to inappropriate, or lack of, treatment. This may be avoided by increased disease awareness, prompt and accurate diagnosis, and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. This review considers the range of hereditary bleeding disorders that may affect women and adolescent girls, and their evaluation and management. PMID:26679392

  13. A new optional recycled water pre-treatment system prior to use in the household laundry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Pham, Thi Thu Nga; Lim, Richard; Wang, Xiaochang C; Miechel, Clayton; Halloran, Kelly O'; Listowski, Andrzej; Corby, Nigel

    2014-04-01

    With a constantly growing population, water scarcity becomes the limiting factor for further social and economic growth. To achieve a partial reduction in current freshwater demands and lessen the environmental loadings, an increasing trend in the water market tends to adopt recycled water for household laundries as a new recycled water application. The installation of a small pre-treatment unit for water purification can not only further improve the recycled water quality, but also be viable to enhance the public confidence and acceptance level on recycled water consumption. Specifically, this paper describes column experiments conducted using a 550 mm length bed of zeolite media as a one-dimensional flow reactor. The results show that the zeolite filter system could be a simple low-cost pre-treatment option which is able to significantly reduce the total hardness level of recycled water via effective ion exchange. Additionally, depending on the quality of recycled water required by end users, a new by-pass controller using a three-level operation switching mechanism is introduced. This approach provides householders sufficient flexibility to respond to different levels of desired recycled water quality and increase the reliability of long-term system operation. These findings could be beneficial to the smooth implementation of new end uses and expansion of the potential recycled water market. The information could also offer sound suggestions for future research on sustainable water management and governance. PMID:24496024

  14. Current Scenario of HIV/AIDS, Treatment Options, and Major Challenges with Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative organism of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the inability of modern medicine to find a cure for it has placed HIV as one of the most dreaded pathogens of the 21st century. With millions of people infected with HIV, it was once thought to result in “medical apocalypse”. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is now possible to control HIV. Adherence to ART helps to keep the viral load under control and prolong the time of progression to AIDS, resulting in near normal life expectancy. Even with the introduction of ART, a substantial number of patients fail to adhere due to a variety of reasons, including adverse side effects, drug abuse, mental disorders, socioeconomic status, literacy, and social stigma. With the availability of so many options for HIV treatment at each stage of the disease progression, physicians can switch between the treatment regimens to avoid and/or minimize the adverse effects of drugs. Close monitoring, major social reforms, and adequate counselling should also be implemented to circumvent other challenges. PMID:27054050

  15. Selenium contaminated waters: An overview of analytical methods, treatment options and recent advances in sorption methods.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sílvia; Ungureanu, Gabriela; Boaventura, Rui; Botelho, Cidália

    2015-07-15

    Selenium is an essential trace element for many organisms, including humans, but it is bioaccumulative and toxic at higher than homeostatic levels. Both selenium deficiency and toxicity are problems around the world. Mines, coal-fired power plants, oil refineries and agriculture are important examples of anthropogenic sources, generating contaminated waters and wastewaters. For reasons of human health and ecotoxicity, selenium concentration has to be controlled in drinking-water and in wastewater, as it is a potential pollutant of water bodies. This review article provides firstly a general overview about selenium distribution, sources, chemistry, toxicity and environmental impact. Analytical techniques used for Se determination and speciation and water and wastewater treatment options are reviewed. In particular, published works on adsorption as a treatment method for Se removal from aqueous solutions are critically analyzed. Recent published literature has given particular attention to the development and search for effective adsorbents, including low-cost alternative materials. Published works mostly consist in exploratory findings and laboratory-scale experiments. Binary metal oxides and LDHs (layered double hydroxides) have presented excellent adsorption capacities for selenium species. Unconventional sorbents (algae, agricultural wastes and other biomaterials), in raw or modified forms, have also led to very interesting results with the advantage of their availability and low-cost. Some directions to be considered in future works are also suggested. PMID:25847169

  16. Quantitative MRI in a non-surgical model of cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Oakden, Wendy; Kwiecien, Jacek M; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Dabrowski, Wojciech; Whyne, Cari; Finkelstein, Joel; Hynynen, Kullervo; Stanisz, Greg J

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative T2 (qT2), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and histology were used to investigate a cervical model of spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat. While quantitative MRI can significantly increase the specificity in the presence of pathology, it must be validated for each type of injury or disease. In the case of traumatic SCI most models are difficult to image, either due to the location of the injury, or as a result of damage to surrounding tissues resulting from invasive surgical procedures. In this study a non-surgical cervical model of SCI, produced using a combination of focused ultrasound and microbubbles, was used to produce pathology similar to that seen in models of contusive and compressive injuries. qT2 and DTI were performed at 24 h and 1 and 2 weeks following injury, and compared with H&E and luxol fast blue histology. In the injured spinal cord, in addition to intra/extracellular (I/E) water and myelin water in white matter, qT2 revealed a large component with very short T2 of about 3 ms, which was highly correlated with the presence of hemorrhage in both gray and white matter at 24 h, and with the presence of hemosiderin in gray matter at 2 weeks following injury. The T2 of the I/E water peak was also elevated at 24 h in both gray and white matter, which was correlated with the presence of vacuolation/edema on histology. Cystic cavities were only seen at the 1 or 2 week timepoints, and were correlated with the presence of a water peak with T2  > 250 ms. No significant changes in diffusivity parameters were observed. Pathologies were often co-occurring, with opposite effects on the average T2 in a given voxel, reducing the visibility of injured tissue on standard T2 -weighted MR images. PMID:26053102

  17. Non surgical predicting factors for patient satisfaction after third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2016-01-01

    Background In the third molar surgery, it is important to focus not only on surgical skills, but also on patient satisfaction. Classically studies have been focused on surgery and surgeon’s empathy, but there are non-surgical factors that may influence patient satisfaction. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed on 100 patients undergoing surgical extractions of impacted mandibular third molars treated from October 2013 to July 2014 in the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia. A questionnaire (20 questions) with a 10-point Likert scale was provided. The questionnaire assessed the ease to find the center, the ease to get oriented within the center, the burocratic procedures, the time from the first visit to the date of surgical intervention, waiting time in the waiting room, the comfort at the waiting room, the administrative staff (kindness and efficiency to solve formalities), medical staff (kindness, efficiency, reliability, dedication), personal data care, clarity in the information received (about the surgery, postoperative care and resolution of the doubts), available means and state of facilities. Outcome variables were overall satisfaction, and recommendation of the center. Statistical analysis was made using the multiple linear regression analysis. Results Significant correlations were found between all variables and overall satisfaction. The multiple regression model showed that the efficiency of the surgeon and the clarity of the information were statistically significant to overall satisfaction and recommendation of the center. The kindness of the administrative staff, available means, the state of facilities and the comfort at the waiting room were statistically significant to the recommendation of the center. Conclusions Patient satisfaction directly depends on the efficiency of the surgeon and clarity of the clinical information received about the procedure. Appreciation of these predictive factors may help clinicians to provide optimal care for impacted third molar surgery patients. Key words:Patient satisfaction, third molar, questionnaire. PMID:26827054

  18. Nonextraction treatment of a Class II deepbite malocclusion with severe mandibular crowding: visualized treatment objectives for selecting treatment options.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Sachiko; Al-Musaallam, Tahani; Handelman, Chester S

    2008-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl with Class II Division 2 malocclusion and a severe deepbite, retroclined incisors in both arches, and extreme crowding in the mandibular arch was treated by orthodontic residents, with supervision of the clinical faculty, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. A visualized treatment objective (VTO) was developed for the patient and used to select the best treatment alternative. PMID:18249299

  19. Left subclavian artery stenting: an option for the treatment of the coronary-subclavian steal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Bruno Lorenção; Kambara, Antonio Massamitsu; Rossi, Fabio Henrique; Moreira, Samuel Martins; de Oliveira, Eduardo Silva Jordao; Linhares Filho, Frederico Augusto de Carvalho; Metzger, Patrick Bastos; Passalacqua, Aldo Zampieri

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The subclavian steal syndrome is characterized by the vertebral artery flow inversion, due to a stenotic lesion in the origin of the subclavian artery. The Coronary-subclavian Steal Syndrome is a variation of the Subclavian Steal Syndrome and is characterized by inversion of flow in the Internal Thracic artery that has been used as conduct in a myocardial revascularization. Its diagnosis must be suspected in patients with difference in pulse and arterial pressure in the upper limbs, that present with angina pectoris and that have done a myocardial revascularization. Its treatment must be a surgical bypass or a transluminal angioplasty. Objective The objective is to show the left subclavian artery stenting as a safe and effective method to treat the coronary-subclavian steal syndrome. Methods Historical prospective, non-randomized trial, through revision of the hospital records of the patients treated with the stenting of the left subclavian artery, from January 2006 to September 2012. Results In the mentioned period, 4.291 miocardial revascularizations were performed with the use of the left mammary artery, and 16 patients were identified to have the Coronary-subclavian steal syndrome. All of them were submitted to endovascular treatment. The success rate was 100%; two patients experienced minor complications; none of them presented with major complications. Eleven of the 16 patients had ultrassonographic documentation of patent stent for at least one year; two patients lost follow up and other two died. Conclusion The stenting of the left subclavian artery is a good option for the treatment of the Coronary-subclavian Steal Syndrome, with high level of technical and clinical success. PMID:25140474

  20. Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischaemia - pharmacologic approach and alternative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Erbe, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The primary goal of therapy is to reduce the frequency and intensity of Raynaud's attacks and to minimize the related morbidity rather than to cure the underlying condition. Treatment strategies depend on whether Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is primary or secondary. All patients should be instructed about general measures to maintain body warmth and to avoid triggers of RP attacks. Pharmacologic intervention can be useful for patients with severe and frequent RP episodes that impair the patient's quality of life. Calcium channel blockers are currently the most prescribed and studied medications for this purpose. There has been limited evidence for the efficacy of alpha-1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, angiotensin receptor blockers, topical nitrates or fluoxetine to treat RP. The intravenously administered prostacyclin analogue iloprost can reduce the frequency and severity of RP attacks and is considered a second-line therapy in patients with markedly impaired quality of life, critical digital ischaemia and skin ulcers who are at risk for substantial tissue loss and amputation. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil) can also improve RP symptoms and ulcer healing whereas endothelin-1 receptor antagonists (e.g., bosentan) are mainly considered treatment options in secondary prevention for patients with digital skin ulcers related to systemic sclerosis. However, their use in clinical practice has been limited by their high cost. Antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin is recommended for all patients who suffer from secondary RP due to ischaemia caused by structural vessel damage. Anticoagulant therapy can be considered during the acute phase of digital ischaemia in patients with suspected vascular occlusive disease attributed to the occurrence of new thromboses. In patients with critical digital ischaemia, consideration should be given to hospitalisation, optimisation of medical treatment in accordance with the underlying disease and evaluation for a secondary, possibly reversible process that is causing or aggravating the clinical symptoms. PMID:27129065