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Sample records for noncoding repeat expansions

  1. Modeling diseases of noncoding unstable repeat expansions using mutant pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yanovsky-Dagan, Shira; Mor-Shaked, Hagar; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations involving DNA repeat expansions are responsible for over 20 different neuronal and neuromuscular diseases. All result from expanded tracts of repetitive DNA sequences (mostly microsatellites) that become unstable beyond a critical length when transmitted across generations. Nearly all are inherited as autosomal dominant conditions and are typically associated with anticipation. Pathologic unstable repeat expansions can be classified according to their length, repeat sequence, gene location and underlying pathologic mechanisms. This review summarizes the current contribution of mutant pluripotent stem cells (diseased human embryonic stem cells and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells) to the research of unstable repeat pathologies by focusing on particularly large unstable noncoding expansions. Among this class of disorders are Fragile X syndrome and Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, myotonic dystrophy type 1 and myotonic dystrophy type 2, Friedreich ataxia and C9 related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia, Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy and potentially more. Common features that are typical to this subclass of conditions are RNA toxic gain-of-function, epigenetic loss-of-function, toxic repeat-associated non-ATG translation and somatic instability. For each mechanism we summarize the currently available stem cell based models, highlight how they contributed to better understanding of the related mechanism, and discuss how they may be utilized in future investigations. PMID:26131313

  2. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  3. SMRT Sequencing of Long Tandem Nucleotide Repeats in SCA10 Reveals Unique Insight of Repeat Expansion Structure

    PubMed Central

    Landrian, Ivette; Godiska, Ronald; Shanker, Savita; Yu, Fahong; Farmerie, William G.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    A large, non-coding ATTCT repeat expansion causes the neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10). In a subset of SCA10 patients, interruption motifs are present at the 5’ end of the expansion and strongly correlate with epileptic seizures. Thus, interruption motifs are a predictor of the epileptic phenotype and are hypothesized to act as a phenotypic modifier in SCA10. Yet, the exact internal sequence structure of SCA10 expansions remains unknown due to limitations in current technologies for sequencing across long extended tracts of tandem nucleotide repeats. We used the third generation sequencing technology, Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing, to obtain full-length contiguous expansion sequences, ranging from 2.5 to 4.4 kb in length, from three SCA10 patients with different clinical presentations. We obtained sequence spanning the entire length of the expansion and identified the structure of known and novel interruption motifs within the SCA10 expansion. The exact interruption patterns in expanded SCA10 alleles will allow us to further investigate the potential contributions of these interrupting sequences to the pathogenic modification leading to the epilepsy phenotype in SCA10. Our results also demonstrate that SMRT sequencing is useful for deciphering long tandem repeats that pose as “gaps” in the human genome sequence. PMID:26295943

  4. Stalled DNA Replication Forks at the Endogenous GAA Repeats Drive Repeat Expansion in Friedreich's Ataxia Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Bhalla, Angela D; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Puckett, James W; Dervan, Peter B; Rosenwaks, Zev; Napierala, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by the expansion of GAA repeats located in the Frataxin (FXN) gene. The GAA repeats continue to expand in FRDA patients, aggravating symptoms and contributing to disease progression. The mechanism leading to repeat expansion and decreased FXN transcription remains unclear. Using single-molecule analysis of replicated DNA, we detected that expanded GAA repeats present a substantial obstacle for the replication machinery at the FXN locus in FRDA cells. Furthermore, aberrant origin activation and lack of a proper stress response to rescue the stalled forks in FRDA cells cause an increase in 3'-5' progressing forks, which could enhance repeat expansion and hinder FXN transcription by head-on collision with RNA polymerases. Treatment of FRDA cells with GAA-specific polyamides rescues DNA replication fork stalling and alleviates expansion of the GAA repeats, implicating DNA triplexes as a replication impediment and suggesting that fork stalling might be a therapeutic target for FRDA. PMID:27425605

  5. GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72 compromises nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Freibaum, Brian D.; Lu, Yubing; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Kim, Nam Chul; Almeida, Sandra; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Badders, Nisha; Valentine, Marc; Miller, Bruce L.; Wong, Philip C.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Kim, Hong Joo; Gao, Fen-Biao; Taylor, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion in a noncoding region of C9ORF72 is the most common cause of sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD)1,2. The basis for pathogenesis is unknown. To capture the consequences of G4C2 repeat expansion in a tractable genetic system, we generated transgenic fly lines expressing 8, 28 or 58 G4C2 repeat-containing transcripts that do not have a translation start site (AUG) but contain an open-reading frame for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to detect repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation. These transgenic animals show dosage-dependent, repeat length-dependent degeneration in neuronal tissues and RAN translation of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins as observed in patients. This model was used in a large-scale, unbiased genetic screen ultimately leading to the identification of 18 genetic modifiers that encode components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) as well as the machinery that coordinates the export of nuclear RNA and the import of nuclear proteins. Consistent with these results we found morphological abnormalities in the architecture of the nuclear envelope in cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified a substantial defect in RNA export resulting in retention of RNA in the nuclei of Drosophila cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats and also in mammalian cells, including aged iPSC-derived neurons from C9ORF72 patients. These studies show that a primary consequence of G4C2 repeat expansion is the compromise of nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore, revealing a novel mechanism of neurodegeneration. PMID:26308899

  6. Conformational modulation mediated by polyglutamine expansion in CAG repeat expansion disease-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Verani, Margherita; Bustamante, Maria; Martufi, Paola; Daldin, Manuel; Cariulo, Cristina; Azzollini, Lucia; Fodale, Valentina; Puglisi, Francesca; Weiss, Andreas; Macdonald, Douglas; Petricca, Lara; Caricasole, Andrea

    2016-09-16

    We have previously reported TR-FRET based immunoassays to detect a conformational change imparted on huntingtin protein by the polyglutamine expansion, which we confirmed using biophysical methodologies. Using these immunoassays, we now report that polyglutamine expansion influences the conformational properties of other polyglutamine disease proteins, exemplified by the androgen receptor (associated with spinal bulbar muscular atrophy) and TATA binding protein (associated with spinocerebellar ataxia 17). Using artificial constructs bearing short or long polyglutamine expansions or a multimerized, unrelated epitope (mimicking the increase in anti-polyglutamine antibody epitopes present in polyglutamine repeats of increasing length) we confirmed that the conformational TR-FRET based immunoassay detects an intrinsic conformational property of polyglutamine repeats. The TR-FRET based conformational immunoassay may represent a rapid, scalable tool to identify modulators of polyglutamine-mediated conformational change in different proteins associated with CAG triplet repeat disorders. PMID:27520369

  7. Novel mutational mechanism in man: Expansion of trinucleotide repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Ilarioshkin, S.N.; Ivanova-Smolenskaya, I.A.; Markova, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    An analysis of a novel, recently discovered class of mutations in man - an expansion, i.e., an increase of the copy number of intragenic unstable trinucleotide repeats - is presented. The expansion of trinucleotide X chromosome syndrome (two separate variants of the disease - FRAXA and FRAXE), myotonic dystrophy, spinal and bulbar Kennedy`s amyotrophy, Huntington`s chorea, type 1 spinocerebellar ataxia, and dentatorubral-pallidolyusian atrophy. The discovery of triplet expansion allows a satisfactory explanation on the molecular level of a series of unusual clinical genetic phenomena, such as anticipation, the {open_quotes}paternal transmission{close_quotes} effect, the {open_quotes}Sherman paradox,{close_quotes} and others. The common properties and the distinctions of unstable trinucleotide mutations in the nosologic forms mentioned above are analyzed comprehensively. These features include the mechanism by which these mutations cause disease, the time of their appearance in ontogenesis, and various clinical genetic correlations. The evolutionary origin of this class of mutations and, in particular, the role of alleles with an {open_quotes}intermediate{close_quotes} triplet number, which are the persistent reservoir of mutations arising de novo in a population, are also discussed. The possible implication of unstable trinucleotide repeats for a series of other hereditary diseases, such as type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, essential tremor, schizophrenia, and others, is also suggested. 108 refs., 1 tab.

  8. CAG repeat expansions in bipolar and unipolar disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Oruc, L.; Verheyen, G.R.; Raeymaekers, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    1997-03-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies consistently have indicated that the familial aggregation of bipolar (BP) disorder and unipolar recurrent major depression (UPR) is accounted for largely by genetic factors. However, the mode of inheritance is complex. One of the possible explanations could be that a gene with variable penetrance and variable expression is involved. Recently there have been reports on a new class of genetic diseases caused by an abnormal trinucleotide-repeat expansion (TRE). In a number of genetic disorders, these dynamic mutations were proved to be the biological basis for the clinically observed phenomenon of anticipation. DNA consisting of repeated triplets of nucleotides becomes unstable and increases in size over generations within families, giving rise to an increased severity and/or an earlier onset of the disorder. It has been recognized for a long time that anticipation occurs in multiplex families transmitting mental illness. More recent studies also suggest that both BP disorder and UPR show features that are compatible with anticipation. Although the findings of anticipation in BP disorders and in UPR must be interpreted with caution because of the possible presence of numerous ascertainment biases, they support the hypothesis that pathological TREs are implicated in the transmission of these disorders. TRE combined with variable penetrance of expression could explain the complex transmission pattern observed in BP disorder. In view of this, the recent reports of an association between CAG-repeat length and BP disorder in a Belgian, Swedish, and British population are promising. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Unstable repeat expansion in major psychiatric disorders: two decades on, is dynamic DNA back on the menu?

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B

    2016-08-01

    For a period in the mid-1990s, soon after the discovery of the involvement of trinucleotide repeat expansions in fragile-X syndrome (both A and E), Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of hereditary ataxias, there was a clear sense that this new disease mechanism might provide answers for psychiatric disorders. Given the then failures to replicate initial genetic linkage findings for schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BD), a greater emphasis was placed on the role of complex and non-Mendelian mechanisms, and repeat instability appeared to have the potential to provide adequate explanations for numerous apparently non-Mendelian features such as anticipation, incomplete penetrance, sporadic occurrence, and nonconcordance of monozygotic twins. Initial molecular studies using a ligation-based amplification method (repeat expansion detection) appeared to support the involvement of CAG•CTG repeat expansion in SCZ and BD. However, subsequent studies that dissected the large repeats responsible for much of the positive signal showed that there were three main loci where CAG•CTG repeat expansion was occurring (on 13q21.33, 17q21.33-q22, and 18q21.2). None of the expansions at these loci appeared to segregate with SCZ or BD, and research into repeat expansions in psychiatric illness petered out in the early 2000s. The 13q expansion occurs within a noncoding RNA and appears to be associated with spinocerebellar ataxia 8 (SCA8), but with a still unexplained dichotomy in penetrance - either very high or very low. The 17q expansion occurs within an intron of the carbonic anhydrase-like gene, CA10. The 18q expansion is located within an intron of the TCF4 gene. Mutations in TCF4 are a known cause of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. Also, pertinently, genome-wide association studies have shown a well-replicated association between TCF4 and SCZ. Two decades on, in 2016, it appears to be an appropriate juncture to reflect on what we have learned, and, with the

  10. The C9orf72 repeat expansion disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Donnelly, Christopher J; Haeusler, Aaron R; Grima, Jonathan C; Machamer, James B; Steinwald, Peter; Daley, Elizabeth L; Miller, Sean J; Cunningham, Kathleen M; Vidensky, Svetlana; Gupta, Saksham; Thomas, Michael A; Hong, Ingie; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Huganir, Richard L; Ostrow, Lyle W; Matunis, Michael J; Wang, Jiou; Sattler, Rita; Lloyd, Thomas E; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE) GGGGCC (G4C2) in C9orf72 is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies support an HRE RNA gain-of-function mechanism of neurotoxicity, and we previously identified protein interactors for the G4C2 RNA including RanGAP1. A candidate-based genetic screen in Drosophila expressing 30 G4C2 repeats identified RanGAP (Drosophila orthologue of human RanGAP1), a key regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as a potent suppressor of neurodegeneration. Enhancing nuclear import or suppressing nuclear export of proteins also suppresses neurodegeneration. RanGAP physically interacts with HRE RNA and is mislocalized in HRE-expressing flies, neurons from C9orf72 ALS patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-derived neurons), and in C9orf72 ALS patient brain tissue. Nuclear import is impaired as a result of HRE expression in the fly model and in C9orf72 iPSC-derived neurons, and these deficits are rescued by small molecules and antisense oligonucleotides targeting the HRE G-quadruplexes. Nucleocytoplasmic transport defects may be a fundamental pathway for ALS and FTD that is amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26308891

  11. The C9ORF72 repeat expansion disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Haeusler, Aaron R.; Grima, Jonathan C.; Machamer, James B.; Steinwald, Peter; Daley, Elizabeth L.; Miller, Sean J.; Cunningham, Kathleen M.; Vidensky, Svetlana; Gupta, Saksham; Thomas, Michael A.; Hong, Ingie; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Huganir, Richard L.; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Matunis, Michael J.; Wang, Jiou; Sattler, Rita

    2016-01-01

    A GGGGCC (G4C2) hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE) in C9ORF72 is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies support an HRE RNA gain-of-function mechanism of neurotoxicity, and we previously identified protein interactors for the G4C2 RNA including RanGAP1. A candidate-based genetic screen in Drosophila expressing 30 G4C2 repeats identified RanGAP (Drosophila ortholog of human RanGAP1), a key regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as a potent suppressor of neurodegeneration. Enhancing nuclear import or suppressing nuclear export of proteins also suppresses neurodegeneration. RanGAP physically interacts with HRE RNA and is mislocalized in HRE-expressing flies, neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSNs), and in C9ORF72 patient brain tissue. Nuclear import is impaired as a result of HRE expression in the fly model and in C9ORF72 iPSNs, and these deficits are rescued by small molecules and antisense oligonucleotides targeting the HRE G-quadruplexes. Nucleocytoplasmic transport defects may be a fundamental pathway for ALS and FTD amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26308891

  12. Targeting RNA foci in iPSC-derived motor neurons from ALS patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansion

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, D.; O’Rourke, J. G.; Meera, P.; Muhammad, A.K.M.G.; Grant, S.; Simpkinson, M.; Bell, S.; Carmona, S.; Ornelas, L.; Sahabian, A.; Gendron, T.; Petrucelli, L.; Baughn, M.; Ravits, J.; Harms, M. B.; Rigo, F.; Bennett, C. F.; Otis, T. S.; Svendsen, C. N.; Baloh, R. H.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative condition characterized by loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene are the most common cause of the familial form of ALS (C9-ALS), as well as frontotemporal lobar degeneration and other neurological diseases. How the repeat expansion causes disease remains unclear, with both loss of function (haploinsufficiency) and gain of function (either toxic RNA or protein products) proposed. Here, we report a cellular model of C9-ALS with motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from ALS patients carrying the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. No significant loss of C9ORF72 expression was observed, and knockdown of the transcript was not toxic to cultured human motor neurons. Transcription of the repeat was increased leading to accumulation of GGGGCC repeat-containing RNA foci selectively in C9-ALS motor neurons. Repeat-containing RNA foci co-localized with hnRNPA1 and Pur-α, suggesting that they may be able to alter RNA metabolism. C9-ALS motor neurons showed altered expression of genes involved in membrane excitability including DPP6, and demonstrated a diminished capacity to fire continuous spikes upon depolarization compared to control motor neurons. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting the C9ORF72 transcript suppressed RNA foci formation and reversed gene expression alterations in C9-ALS motor neurons. These data show that patient-derived motor neurons can be used to delineate pathogenic events in ALS. PMID:24154603

  13. Tandem repeats discovery service (TReaDS) applied to finding novel cis-acting factors in repeat expansion diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandem repeats are multiple duplications of substrings in the DNA that occur contiguously, or at a short distance, and may involve some mutations (such as substitutions, insertions, and deletions). Tandem repeats have been extensively studied also for their association with the class of repeat expansion diseases (mostly affecting the nervous system). Comparative studies on the output of different tools for finding tandem repeats highlighted significant differences among the sets of detected tandem repeats, while many authors pointed up how critical it is the right choice of parameters. Results In this paper we present TReaDS - Tandem Repeats Discovery Service, a tandem repeat meta search engine. TReaDS forwards user requests to several state of the art tools for finding tandem repeats and merges their outcome into a single report, providing a global, synthetic, and comparative view of the results. In particular, TReaDS allows the user to (i) simultaneously run different algorithms on the same data set, (ii) choose for each algorithm a different setting of parameters, and (iii) obtain a report that can be downloaded for further, off-line, investigations. We used TReaDS to investigate sequences associated with repeat expansion diseases. Conclusions By using the tool TReaDS we discover that, for 27 repeat expansion diseases out of a currently known set of 29, long fuzzy tandem repeats are covering the expansion loci. Tests with control sets confirm the specificity of this association. This finding suggests that long fuzzy tandem repeats can be a new class of cis-acting elements involved in the mechanisms leading to the expansion instability. We strongly believe that biologists can be interested in a tool that, not only gives them the possibility of using multiple search algorithm at the same time, with the same effort exerted in using just one of the systems, but also simplifies the burden of comparing and merging the results, thus expanding our

  14. Statistical Enrichment of Epigenetic States Around Triplet Repeats that Can Undergo Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Essebier, Alexandra; Vera Wolf, Patricia; Cao, Minh Duc; Carroll, Bernard J.; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Bodén, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    More than 30 human genetic diseases are linked to tri-nucleotide repeat expansions. There is no known mechanism that explains repeat expansions in full, but changes in the epigenetic state of the associated locus has been implicated in the disease pathology for a growing number of examples. A comprehensive comparative analysis of the genomic features associated with diverse repeat expansions has been lacking. Here, in an effort to decipher the propensity of repeats to undergo expansion and result in a disease state, we determine the genomic coordinates of tri-nucleotide repeat tracts at base pair resolution and computationally establish epigenetic profiles around them. Using three complementary statistical tests, we reveal that several epigenetic states are enriched around repeats that are associated with disease, even in cells that do not harbor expansion, relative to a carefully stratified background. Analysis of over one hundred cell types reveals that epigenetic states generally tend to vary widely between genic regions and cell types. However, there is qualified consistency in the epigenetic signatures of repeats associated with disease suggesting that changes to the chromatin and the DNA around an expanding repeat locus are likely to be similar. These epigenetic signatures may be exploited further to develop models that could explain the propensity of repeats to undergo expansions. PMID:27013954

  15. Expansion of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) repeat in a patient with Sioux Native American ancestry.

    PubMed

    Bushara, Khalaf; Bower, Matthew; Liu, Jilin; McFarland, Karen N; Landrian, Ivette; Hutter, Diane; Teive, Hélio A G; Rasmussen, Astrid; Mulligan, Connie J; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, is caused by the expansion of the non-coding ATTCT pentanucleotide repeat in the ATAXIN 10 gene. To date, all cases of SCA10 are restricted to patients with ancestral ties to Latin American countries. Here, we report on a SCA10 patient with Sioux Native American ancestry and no reported Hispanic or Latino heritage. Neurological exam findings revealed impaired gait with mild, age-consistent cerebellar atrophy and no evidence of epileptic seizures. The age at onset for this patient, at 83 years of age, is the latest documented for SCA10 patients and is suggestive of a reduced penetrance allele in his family. Southern blot analysis showed an SCA10 expanded allele of 1400 repeats. Established SNPs surrounding the SCA10 locus showed a disease haplotype consistent with the previously described "SCA10 haplotype". This case suggests that the SCA10 expansion represents an early mutation event that possibly occurred during the initial peopling of the Americas. PMID:24278426

  16. Screening for novel hexanucleotide repeat expansions at ALS- and FTD-associated loci

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Jones, Julie M.; Figueroa-Romero, Claudia; Zhang, Dapeng; Feldman, Eva L.; Goutman, Stephen A.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Callaghan, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansions at loci other than C9orf72 serve as common causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: We assessed G4C2 repeat number in 28 genes near known ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) loci by repeat-primed PCR coupled with fluorescent fragment analysis in 199 patients with ALS (17 familial, 182 sporadic) and 136 healthy controls. We also obtained blood from patients with ALS4 for evaluation of repeats surrounding the SETX gene locus. C9orf72 expansions were evaluated in parallel. Results: Expansions of G4C2 repeats in C9orf72 explained 8.8% of sporadic and 47% of familial ALS cases analyzed. Repeat variance was observed at one other locus, RGS14, but no large expansions were observed, and repeat sizes were not different between cases and controls. No G4C2 repeat expansions were identified at other ALS or FTD risk loci or in ALS4 cases. Conclusions: G4C2 expansions near known ALS and FTD loci other than C9orf72 are not a common cause of ALS. PMID:27274540

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Srs2 DNA helicase selectively blocks expansions of trinucleotide repeats.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Saumitri; Lahue, Robert S

    2004-09-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) undergo frequent mutations in families afflicted with certain neurodegenerative disorders and in model organisms. TNR instability is modulated both by the repeat tract itself and by cellular proteins. Here we identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA helicase Srs2 as a potent and selective inhibitor of expansions. srs2 mutants had up to 40-fold increased expansion rates of CTG, CAG, and CGG repeats. The expansion phenotype was specific, as mutation rates at dinucleotide repeats, at unique sequences, or for TNR contractions in srs2 mutants were not altered. Srs2 is known to suppress inappropriate genetic recombination; however, the TNR expansion phenotype of srs2 mutants was largely independent of RAD51 and RAD52. Instead, Srs2 mainly functioned with DNA polymerase delta to block expansions. The helicase activity of Srs2 was important, because a point mutant lacking ATPase function was defective in blocking expansions. Purified Srs2 was substantially better than bacterial UvrD helicase at in vitro unwinding of a DNA substrate that mimicked a TNR hairpin. Disruption of the related helicase gene SGS1 did not lead to excess expansions, nor did wild-type SGS1 suppress the expansion phenotype of an srs2 strain. We conclude that Srs2 selectively blocks triplet repeat expansions through its helicase activity and primarily in conjunction with polymerase delta. PMID:15314145

  18. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C.; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation.

  19. Expansion of 50 CAG/CTG repeats excluded in schizophrenia by application of a highly efficient approach using repeat expansion detection and a PCR screening set

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, T.; Guy, C.; Speight, G.

    1996-10-01

    Studies of the transmission of schizophrenia in families with affected members in several generations have suggested that an expanded trinucleotide repeat mechanism may contribute to the genetic inheritance of this disorder. Using repeat expansion detection (RED), we and others have previously found that the distribution of CAG/CTG repeat size is larger in patients with schizophrenia than in controls. In an attempt to identify the specific expanded CAG/CTG locus or loci associated with schizophrenia, we have now used an approach based on a CAG/CTG PCR screening set combined with RED data. This has allowed us to minimize genotyping while excluding 43 polymorphic autosomal loci and 7 X-chromosomal loci from the screening set as candidates for expansion in schizophrenia with a very high degree of confidence. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein-protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  1. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein–protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  2. Nucleotide excision repair and the 26S proteasome function together to promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Concannon, Claire; Lahue, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underpins a number of inheritable neurological human disorders. Multiple mechanisms are thought to contribute to the expansion process. The incorrect processing of the repeat tract by DNA repair proteins can drive this mutation process forward, as expansions are suppressed following ablation of certain repair factors in mouse models and cell models of disease. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one repair pathway implicated in TNR instability, although most previous work focussed on TNR contractions, not expansions. Here we investigated the role of NER in modulating expansions of threshold-length (CTG·CAG) repeats in yeast. We show that both the global genome and transcription-coupled repair subpathways promote expansions of threshold-length TNRs. Furthermore, NER works with the 26S proteasome to drive expansions, based on analysis of double mutants defective in both pathways, and of Rad23, a protein involved in both NER and the shuttling of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome. This work provides the first evidence that both subpathways of NER can promote threshold-length TNR expansions and that NER interacts with the proteasome to drive expansions. PMID:24359926

  3. Drosha Inclusions Are New Components of Dipeptide-Repeat Protein Aggregates in FTLD-TDP and ALS C9orf72 Expansion Cases

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Sílvia; Kwong, Linda K.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are 2 neurodegenerative disorders that share clinical, genetic, and neuropathologic features. The presence of abnormal expansions of GGGGCC repeats (G4C2 repeats) in a noncoding region of the Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the major genetic cause of both FTLD and ALS. Transcribed G4C2 repeats can form nuclear RNA foci and recruit RNA-binding proteins, thereby inhibiting their normal function. Moreover, through a repeat-associated non-ATG translation mechanism, G4C2 repeats translation leads to dipeptide-repeat protein aggregation in the cytoplasm of neurons. Here, we identify Drosha protein as a new component of these dipeptide-repeat aggregates. In C9orf72 mutation cases of FTLD-TDP (c9FTLD-TDP) and ALS (c9ALS), but not in FTLD or ALS cases without C9orf72 mutation, Drosha is mislocalized to form neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. Further characterization of Drosha-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum revealed colocalization with p62 and ubiquilin-2, 2 pathognomonic signatures of c9FTLD-TDP and c9ALS cases; however, Drosha inclusions rarely colocalized with TDP-43 pathology. We conclude that Drosha may play a unique pathogenic role in the onset or progression of FTLD-TDP/ALS in patients with the C9orf72 mutation. PMID:25756586

  4. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Makoto K; Sanbonmatsu, Ryoko; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Yamasaki, Chisato; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Gojobori, Takashi; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27290643

  5. Photosensitivity in a patient with C9orf72 repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Paula; Houben, Mark; Hoff, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The phenotype of C9ORF72 repeat expansions is rapidly expanding. Originally found to be the major genetic cause of familial frontotemporal dementia with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, several other clinical characteristics have been described more recently. Here, we report on a family diagnosed with 'degenerative schizophrenia' and harbouring a C9ORF72 repeat expansion, in which at least the index patient and an uncle showed a photoparoxysmal response during electroencephalography. Whereas epilepsy has been described in several repeat expansion disorders, photosensitivity has thus far only been reported in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy. The photoparoxysmal response may therefore be a new clinical feature of C9ORF72 repeat expansion related disease. Our observation learns that a repeat expansion disorder like C9ORF72 should be considered in patients with a combination of young-onset dementia, psychiatric symptoms and/or photosensitive epilepsy. We advocate the occasional use of EEG in the dementia workup and in particular urge to consider provocative tests such as photic stimulation. PMID:26735706

  6. The expansion of amino-acid repeats is not associated to adaptive evolution in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The expansion of amino acid repeats is determined by a high mutation rate and can be increased or limited by selection. It has been suggested that recent expansions could be associated with the potential of adaptation to new environments. In this work, we quantify the strength of this association, as well as the contribution of potential confounding factors. Results Mammalian positively selected genes have accumulated more recent amino acid repeats than other mammalian genes. However, we found little support for an accelerated evolutionary rate as the main driver for the expansion of amino acid repeats. The most significant predictors of amino acid repeats are gene function and GC content. There is no correlation with expression level. Conclusions Our analyses show that amino acid repeat expansions are causally independent from protein adaptive evolution in mammalian genomes. Relaxed purifying selection or positive selection do not associate with more or more recent amino acid repeats. Their occurrence is slightly favoured by the sequence context but mainly determined by the molecular function of the gene. PMID:20021652

  7. Large domains of apparent delayed replication timing associated with triplet repeat expansion at FRAXA and FRAXE.

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, P. S.; Nelson, D. L.; Chinault, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions have been implicated in the causation of a number of neurodegenerative disorders. In the case of fragile X syndrome, full expansion of the FMR1 repeat element (CGG)n has also been correlated with replication timing delay of the locus and proximal flanking sequences in male lymphoblasts. To define more extensively this altered region of DNA replication, as well as to extend these studies to female cells containing premutant and mutant alleles, study of the replication timing properties of a >2-Mb zone in the FRAXA region (Xq27.3-q28) was undertaken by using a FISH technique. In this assay, relative times of replication of specific loci are inferred from the ratios of singlet and doublet hybridization signals in interphase nuclei. In all individuals with a full expansion of the trinucleotide repeat, a large (1-1.2-Mb) region of delayed timing was observed; the apparent timing of the earlier-replicating allele in female cells in this region was intermediate between normal and affected alleles in males, which is in accordance with expectations of a mixed population of cells resulting from random X inactivation. In addition, expansion of the nearby FRAXE locus also was found to correlate with replication timing delay, although the extent of the altered region was somewhat less. Trinucleotide repeat expansion thus may be acting in the Xq27.3-q28 region to alter long-range chromatin structure that could influence transcription of gene sequences within the affected domain. PMID:8755928

  8. A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 causes familial and sporadic ALS in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Paio; Soong, Bing-Wen; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Lin, Kon-Ping; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Lu, Yi-Chun; Lee, I-Hui; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2012-09-01

    A GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene was recently identified as an important cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia in Caucasian populations. The role of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in ALS in Chinese populations has received little attention. We therefore performed mutation analyses in a Taiwanese cohort of 22 unrelated familial ALS (FALS) patients and 102 sporadic ALS patients of Han Chinese descent. The C9ORF72 mutation was found in 4 FALS (18.2%; 4/22) and 2 sporadic ALS patients (2.0%; 2/102). The C9ORF72 repeat numbers in the 300 healthy controls and the 118 ALS patients without the C9ORF72 mutation ranged from 3 to 15. Needle biopsy in the left frontal cortex of 1 patient with FALS-frontotemporal dementia revealed numerous cytoplasmic TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusions and minimal neuritis, consistent with type B frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) pathology. This study clearly demonstrates the existence and importance of the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a Taiwanese ALS cohort of Chinese origin, and supports the global presence of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in ALS. PMID:22673113

  9. A novel GAA-repeat-expansion-based mouse model of Friedreich’s ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Ezzatizadeh, Vahid; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Sandi, Madhavi; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Chutake, Yogesh; Pook, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene, resulting in reduced levels of frataxin protein. We have previously reported the generation of human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) transgenic FRDA mouse models containing 90–190 GAA repeats, but the presence of multiple GAA repeats within these mice is considered suboptimal. We now describe the cellular, molecular and behavioural characterisation of a newly developed YAC transgenic FRDA mouse model, designated YG8sR, which we have shown by DNA sequencing to contain a single pure GAA repeat expansion. The founder YG8sR mouse contained 120 GAA repeats but, due to intergenerational expansion, we have now established a colony of YG8sR mice that contain ~200 GAA repeats. We show that YG8sR mice have a single copy of the FXN transgene, which is integrated at a single site as confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We have identified significant behavioural deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8sR FRDA mice compared with control Y47R and wild-type (WT) mice. We have also detected increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the brain and cerebellum of YG8sR mice, together with significantly reduced expression of FXN, FAST-1 and frataxin, and reduced aconitase activity, compared with Y47R mice. Furthermore, we have confirmed the presence of pathological vacuoles within neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of YG8sR mice. These novel GAA-repeat-expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mice, which exhibit progressive FRDA-like pathology, represent an excellent model for the investigation of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy. PMID:25681319

  10. The C9orf72 repeat expansion itself is methylated in ALS and FTLD patients.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhengrui; Zhang, Ming; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele G; Colao, Rosanna; Fratta, Pietro; Polke, James M; Sweeney, Mary G; Mudanohwo, Ese; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Galimberti, Daniela; Surace, Ezequiel I; McGoldrick, Philip; McKeever, Paul; Moreno, Danielle; Sato, Christine; Liang, Yan; Keith, Julia; Zinman, Lorne; Robertson, Janice; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2015-05-01

    The most common cause of both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a G4C2-repeat expansion in C9orf72. However, the lower limit for pathological repeats has not been established and expansions with different sizes could have different pathological consequences. One of the implicated disease mechanisms is haploinsufficiency. Previously, we identified expansion-specific hypermethylation at the 5' CpG-island near the G4C2-repeat, but only in a fraction of carriers (up to 36 %). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the G4C2-repeat itself could be the main site of methylation. To evaluate (G4C2)n -methylation, we developed a novel assay, which was validated by an independent methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme assay. Notably, both assays are qualitative but not quantitative. Blood DNA was available for 270 unrelated individuals, including 71 expansion carriers. In addition, we investigated blood DNA from family members of 16 probands, and 38 DNA samples from multiple tissues of 10 expansion carriers. Finally, we tested DNA from different tissues of an ALS patient carrying a somatically unstable 90-repeat. We demonstrated that the G4C2-expansion is generally methylated in unrelated carriers of alleles >50 repeats (97 %), while small (<22 repeats) or intermediate (22-90 repeats) alleles were completely unmethylated. The presence of (G4C2)n -methylation does not separate the C9orf72-phenotypes (ALS vs. ALS/FTLD vs. FTLD), but has the potential to predict large vs. intermediate repeat length. Our results suggest that (G4C2)n -methylation might sometimes spread to the 5'-upstream region, but not vice versa. It is stable over time, since (G4C2)n -methylation was detected in carriers with a wide range of ages (24-74 years). It was identified in both blood and brain tissues for the same individual, implying its potential use as a biomarker. Furthermore, our findings may open up new perspectives for studying disease mechanisms

  11. Targeting RNA foci in iPSC-derived motor neurons from ALS patients with a C9ORF72 repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Dhruv; O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Meera, Pratap; Muhammad, A K M G; Grant, Sharday; Simpkinson, Megan; Bell, Shaughn; Carmona, Sharon; Ornelas, Loren; Sahabian, Anais; Gendron, Tania; Petrucelli, Leonard; Baughn, Michael; Ravits, John; Harms, Matthew B; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Otis, Thomas S; Svendsen, Clive N; Baloh, Robert H

    2013-10-23

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative condition characterized by loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene are the most common cause of the familial form of ALS (C9-ALS), as well as frontotemporal lobar degeneration and other neurological diseases. How the repeat expansion causes disease remains unclear, with both loss of function (haploinsufficiency) and gain of function (either toxic RNA or protein products) proposed. We report a cellular model of C9-ALS with motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from ALS patients carrying the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. No significant loss of C9ORF72 expression was observed, and knockdown of the transcript was not toxic to cultured human motor neurons. Transcription of the repeat was increased, leading to accumulation of GGGGCC repeat-containing RNA foci selectively in C9-ALS iPSC-derived motor neurons. Repeat-containing RNA foci colocalized with hnRNPA1 and Pur-α, suggesting that they may be able to alter RNA metabolism. C9-ALS motor neurons showed altered expression of genes involved in membrane excitability including DPP6, and demonstrated a diminished capacity to fire continuous spikes upon depolarization compared to control motor neurons. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting the C9ORF72 transcript suppressed RNA foci formation and reversed gene expression alterations in C9-ALS motor neurons. These data show that patient-derived motor neurons can be used to delineate pathogenic events in ALS. PMID:24154603

  12. TCF4 Triplet Repeat Expansion and Nuclear RNA Foci in Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mootha, V. Vinod; Hussain, Imran; Cunnusamy, Khrishen; Graham, Eric; Gong, Xin; Neelam, Sudha; Xing, Chao; Kittler, Ralf; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Expansion of the intronic CTG18.1 triplet repeat locus within TCF4 contributes significant risk to the development of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) in Eurasian populations, but the mechanisms by which the expanded repeats result in degeneration of the endothelium have been hitherto unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine FECD endothelial samples for the presence of RNA nuclear foci, the hallmark of toxic RNA, as well as evidence of haploinsufficiency of TCF4. Methods. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we examined for the presence of nuclear RNA foci containing expanded CUG transcripts in corneal endothelial samples from FECD subjects with CTG18.1 expansion. We also examined for any changes in expression levels of TCF4 by quantitative real-time PCR. Results. Numerous discrete nuclear RNA foci were identified in endothelial samples of FECD subjects (n = 8) harboring the CTG18.1 expansion, but not in controls lacking the expansion (n = 5) (P = 7.8 × 10−4). Percentage of cells with foci in expansion-positive endothelial samples ranged from 33% to 88%. RNA foci were absent in endothelial samples from an FECD subject without CTG18.1 expansion and a subject with endothelial dysfunction without FECD. Expression of the constitutive TCF4 exon encoding the basic helix-loop-helix domain was unaltered with CTG18.1 expansion. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the RNA nuclear foci are pathognomonic for CTG18.1 expansion-mediated endothelial disease. The RNA nuclear foci have been previously found only in rare neurodegenerative disorders caused by repeat expansions. Our detection of abundant ribonuclear foci in FECD implicates a role for toxic RNA in this common disease. PMID:25722209

  13. Trinucleotide repeat expansion in the FRAXE locus is not common among institutionalized individuals with non-specific developmental disabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A.; Julien-Inalsingh, C.; Fidler, K.

    1996-08-09

    Expansion of a polymorphic GCC-repeat at the FRAXE locus has been associated with expression of chromosome fragility at this site and cognitive impairment in some individuals previously testing negative for CGG-repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) gene. To determine the frequency of FRAXE triplet repeat expansion among persons with developmental disability, 396 individuals from two institutions were studied, all of whom were negative for FMR1 repeat expansion. Clinically, there was a wide range of mental impairment, with the majority (61.1%) being severely to profoundly affected. The distribution of FRAXE GCC-repeat numbers in the study population was 5-38:28 (5.6%) with 10-14 repeats; 366 (73.8%) with 15-19 repeats; 74 (14.9%) with 20-24 repeats; 20 (4.0%) with 25-29 repeats; and 5 (1.0%) with 30-38 repeats, with no individuals demonstrating repeat expansion. One profoundly retarded male was found to have a deletion of about 40 bp. Southern blots of HindIII-digested DNAs from individuals with {ge}26 repeats all showed normal patterns. These results suggest that FRAXE GCC-repeat expansion is not a common cause of developmental disability in institutionalized persons with mild to profound mental retardation. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Large-scale assessment of polyglutamine repeat expansions in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lisa; Aasly, Jan O.; Annesi, Grazia; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Carr, Jonathan; Chung, Sun J.; Clarke, Carl; Crosiers, David; Deutschländer, Angela; Eckstein, Gertrud; Farrer, Matthew J.; Goldwurm, Stefano; Garraux, Gaetan; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hattori, Nobutaka; Klein, Christine; Jeon, Beom; Kim, Yun J.; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Juei-Jueng; Lynch, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Lang, Anthony E.; Mok, Vincent; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Mellick, George D.; Morrison, Karen E.; Opala, Grzegorz; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Park, Sung S.; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Ross, Owen A.; Stefanis, Leonidas; Stockton, Joanne D.; Silburn, Peter A.; Theuns, Jessie; Tan, Eng K.; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Toft, Mathias; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Yueh, Kuo-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Gasser, Thomas; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Krüger, Rejko

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aim to clarify the pathogenic role of intermediate size repeat expansions of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 as risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We invited researchers from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium to participate in the study. There were 12,346 cases and 8,164 controls genotyped, for a total of 4 repeats within the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes. Fixed- and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary risk estimates for the genes. We investigated between-study heterogeneity and heterogeneity between different ethnic populations. Results: We did not observe any definite pathogenic repeat expansions for SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes in patients with idiopathic PD from Caucasian and Asian populations. Furthermore, overall analysis did not reveal any significant association between intermediate repeats and PD. The effect estimates (odds ratio) ranged from 0.93 to 1.01 in the overall cohort for the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 loci. Conclusions: Our study did not support a major role for definite pathogenic repeat expansions in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes for idiopathic PD. Thus, results of this large study do not support diagnostic screening of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 gene repeats in the common idiopathic form of PD. Likewise, this largest multicentered study performed to date excludes the role of intermediate repeats of these genes as a risk factor for PD. PMID:26354989

  15. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansion and Guam Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis–Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex

    PubMed Central

    Dombroski, Beth A.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Mata, Ignacio F.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Craig, Ulla-Katrina; Garruto, Ralph M.; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2013-01-01

    Importance High-prevalence foci of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) exist in Japanese on the Kii Peninsula of Japan and in the Chamorros of Guam. Clinical and neuropathologic similarities suggest that the disease in these 2 populations may be related. Recent findings showed that some of the Kii Peninsula ALS cases had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a genotype that causes ALS in Western populations. Objectives To perform genotyping among Guam residents to determine if the C9orf72 expanded repeat allele contributes to ALS-PDC in this population and to evaluate LRRK2 for mutations in the same population. Design and Setting Case-control series from neurodegenerative disease research programs on Guam that screened residents for ALS, PDC, and dementia. Participants Study participants included 24 with ALS and 22 with PDC and 43 older control subjects with normal cognition ascertained between 1956 and 2006. All but one participant were Chamorro, the indigenous people of Guam. A single individual of white race/ethnicity with ALS was ascertained on Guam during the study. Main Outcomes and Measures Participants were screened for C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat length. Participants with repeat numbers in great excess of 30 were considered to have pathogenic repeat expansions. LRRK2 was screened for point mutations by DNA sequencing. Results We found a single individual with an expanded pathogenic hexanucleotide repeat. This individual of white race/ethnicity with ALS was living on Guam at the time of ascertainment but had been born in the United States. All Chamorro participants with ALS and PDC and control subjects had normal repeats, ranging from 2 to 17 copies. No pathogenic LRRK2 mutations were found. Conclusions and Relevance Unlike participants with ALS from the Kii Peninsula, C9orf72 expansions do not cause ALS-PDC in Chamorros. Likewise, LRRK2 mutations do not cause Guam ALS-PDC. PMID:23588498

  16. Novel clinical associations with specific C9ORF72 transcripts in patients with repeat expansions in C9ORF72.

    PubMed

    van Blitterswijk, Marka; Gendron, Tania F; Baker, Matthew C; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Finch, NiCole A; Brown, Patricia H; Daughrity, Lillian M; Murray, Melissa E; Heckman, Michael G; Jiang, Jie; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Edbauer, Dieter; Cleveland, Don W; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Petrucelli, Leonard; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Rademakers, Rosa

    2015-12-01

    The loss of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) expression, associated with C9ORF72 repeat expansions, has not been examined systematically. Three C9ORF72 transcript variants have been described thus far; the GGGGCC repeat is located between two non-coding exons (exon 1a and exon 1b) in the promoter region of transcript variant 2 (NM_018325.4) or in the first intron of variant 1 (NM_145005.6) and variant 3 (NM_001256054.2). We studied C9ORF72 expression in expansion carriers (n = 56) for whom cerebellum and/or frontal cortex was available. Using quantitative real-time PCR and digital molecular barcoding techniques, we assessed total C9ORF72 transcripts, variant 1, variant 2, variant 3, and intron containing transcripts [upstream of the expansion (intron 1a) and downstream of the expansion (intron 1b)]; the latter were correlated with levels of poly(GP) and poly(GA) proteins aberrantly translated from the expansion as measured by immunoassay (n = 50). We detected a decrease in expansion carriers as compared to controls for total C9ORF72 transcripts, variant 1, and variant 2: the strongest association was observed for variant 2 (quantitative real-time PCR cerebellum: median 43 %, p = 1.26e-06, and frontal cortex: median 58 %, p = 1.11e-05; digital molecular barcoding cerebellum: median 31 %, p = 5.23e-10, and frontal cortex: median 53 %, p = 5.07e-10). Importantly, we revealed that variant 1 levels greater than the 25th percentile conferred a survival advantage [digital molecular barcoding cerebellum: hazard ratio (HR) 0.31, p = 0.003, and frontal cortex: HR 0.23, p = 0.0001]. When focusing on intron containing transcripts, analysis of the frontal cortex revealed an increase of potentially truncated transcripts in expansion carriers as compared to controls [digital molecular barcoding frontal cortex (intron 1a): median 272 %, p = 0.003], with the highest levels in patients pathologically diagnosed with frontotemporal lobar degeneration

  17. Sequestration of multiple RNA recognition motif-containing proteins by C9orf72 repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Walsh, Matthew J; Higginbottom, Adrian; Robin Highley, J; Dickman, Mark J; Edbauer, Dieter; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B; Wilson, Stuart A; Kirby, Janine; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Shaw, Pamela J

    2014-07-01

    GGGGCC repeat expansions of C9orf72 represent the most common genetic variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration, but the mechanism of pathogenesis is unclear. Recent reports have suggested that the transcribed repeat might form toxic RNA foci that sequester various RNA processing proteins. Consensus as to the identity of the binding partners is missing and whole neuronal proteome investigation is needed. Using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization we first identified nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA foci in peripheral and central nervous system biosamples from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72+), but not from those patients without a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72-) or control subjects. Moreover, in the cases examined, the distribution of foci-positive neurons correlated with the clinical phenotype (t-test P < 0.05). As expected, RNA foci are ablated by RNase treatment. Interestingly, we identified foci in fibroblasts from an asymptomatic C9orf72+ carrier. We next performed pulldown assays, with GGGGCC5, in conjunction with mass spectrometry analysis, to identify candidate binding partners of the GGGGCC repeat expansion. Proteins containing RNA recognition motifs and involved in splicing, messenger RNA nuclear export and/or translation were significantly enriched. Immunohistochemistry in central nervous system tissue from C9orf72+ patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis demonstrated co-localization of RNA foci with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F, ALYREF and hnRNP A1 in cerebellar granule cells and with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F and ALYREF in motor neurons, the primary target of pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Direct binding of proteins to GGGGCC repeat RNA was confirmed in vitro by ultraviolet-crosslinking assays. Co-localization was only detected in a small proportion of RNA foci, suggesting dynamic sequestration rather than irreversible binding. Additional immunohistochemistry

  18. Trinucleotide repeat expansion and DRPLA (Smith`s disease): Molecular characterization of atrophin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.L.; Li, S.H.; Li, X.J.; Ross, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Smith`s disease (also known as dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy or DRPLA) is a rare, progressive, fatal neuropsychiatric disorder similar to Huntington`s disease (HD). Smith`s disease is characterized by ataxia, choreoathetosis, myoclonic epilepsy, dementia, and genetic anticipation. Neuropathological findings include prominent cell loss in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum, the globus pallidus, the red nucleus, and the subthalamic nucleus. An expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding polyglutamine in a gene originally identified in our laboratory as part of a program to clone candidate genes for disorders with anticipation has recently been found to cause this disorder. We have identified two families that demonstrate the pathological and genetic features (expanded CAG repeat and anticipation) of this disease. Northern analysis indicates that the gene, which we have termed atrophin-1, is widely expressed as a 5 kb mRNA in normal human brain and peripheral tissues. Brain expression is highest in the cerebellum. The developmental expression of the rat homologues of IT-15 (the gene in which a CAG expansion causes HD) and atrophin-1 were compared. Atrophin-1 was most highly expressed in early rat embryo brain (E16), whereas the greatest expression of IT-15 was in the adult rat brain. Cloning and sequencing of the open reading frame from inserts contained in brain cDNA libraries is in progress. In addition to the CAG repeat, the ORF contains an unusual region of alternating acidic and basic amino acids. Further characterization of atrophin-1, and comparison of it to other genes in which trinucleotide repeat expansion leads to neuropsychiatric disorders, should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology by which CAG repeat expansion causes human disease.

  19. FRA2A is a CGG repeat expansion associated with silencing of AFF3.

    PubMed

    Metsu, Sofie; Rooms, Liesbeth; Rainger, Jacqueline; Taylor, Martin S; Bengani, Hemant; Wilson, David I; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Morrison, Harris; Vandeweyer, Geert; Reyniers, Edwin; Douglas, Evelyn; Thompson, Geoffrey; Haan, Eric; Gecz, Jozef; Fitzpatrick, David R; Kooy, R Frank

    2014-04-01

    Folate-sensitive fragile sites (FSFS) are a rare cytogenetically visible subset of dynamic mutations. Of the eight molecularly characterized FSFS, four are associated with intellectual disability (ID). Cytogenetic expression results from CGG tri-nucleotide-repeat expansion mutation associated with local CpG hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. The best studied is the FRAXA site in the FMR1 gene, where large expansions cause fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited ID syndrome. Here we studied three families with FRA2A expression at 2q11 associated with a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes. We identified a polymorphic CGG repeat in a conserved, brain-active alternative promoter of the AFF3 gene, an autosomal homolog of the X-linked AFF2/FMR2 gene: Expansion of the AFF2 CGG repeat causes FRAXE ID. We found that FRA2A-expressing individuals have mosaic expansions of the AFF3 CGG repeat in the range of several hundred repeat units. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing both suggest AFF3 promoter hypermethylation. cSNP-analysis demonstrates monoallelic expression of the AFF3 gene in FRA2A carriers thus predicting that FRA2A expression results in functional haploinsufficiency for AFF3 at least in a subset of tissues. By whole-mount in situ hybridization the mouse AFF3 ortholog shows strong regional expression in the developing brain, somites and limb buds in 9.5-12.5dpc mouse embryos. Our data suggest that there may be an association between FRA2A and a delay in the acquisition of motor and language skills in the families studied here. However, additional cases are required to firmly establish a causal relationship. PMID:24763282

  20. FRA2A Is a CGG Repeat Expansion Associated with Silencing of AFF3

    PubMed Central

    Metsu, Sofie; Rooms, Liesbeth; Rainger, Jacqueline; Taylor, Martin S.; Bengani, Hemant; Wilson, David I.; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Morrison, Harris; Vandeweyer, Geert; Reyniers, Edwin; Douglas, Evelyn; Thompson, Geoffrey; Haan, Eric; Gecz, Jozef; FitzPatrick, David R.; Kooy, R. Frank

    2014-01-01

    Folate-sensitive fragile sites (FSFS) are a rare cytogenetically visible subset of dynamic mutations. Of the eight molecularly characterized FSFS, four are associated with intellectual disability (ID). Cytogenetic expression results from CGG tri-nucleotide-repeat expansion mutation associated with local CpG hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. The best studied is the FRAXA site in the FMR1 gene, where large expansions cause fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited ID syndrome. Here we studied three families with FRA2A expression at 2q11 associated with a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes. We identified a polymorphic CGG repeat in a conserved, brain-active alternative promoter of the AFF3 gene, an autosomal homolog of the X-linked AFF2/FMR2 gene: Expansion of the AFF2 CGG repeat causes FRAXE ID. We found that FRA2A-expressing individuals have mosaic expansions of the AFF3 CGG repeat in the range of several hundred repeat units. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing both suggest AFF3 promoter hypermethylation. cSNP-analysis demonstrates monoallelic expression of the AFF3 gene in FRA2A carriers thus predicting that FRA2A expression results in functional haploinsufficiency for AFF3 at least in a subset of tissues. By whole-mount in situ hybridization the mouse AFF3 ortholog shows strong regional expression in the developing brain, somites and limb buds in 9.5–12.5dpc mouse embryos. Our data suggest that there may be an association between FRA2A and a delay in the acquisition of motor and language skills in the families studied here. However, additional cases are required to firmly establish a causal relationship. PMID:24763282

  1. Comparison of CTG repeat length expansion and clinical progression of myotonic dystrophy over a five year period.

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, L; Martinez, J M; Carey, N; Johnson, K; Baiget, M

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is associated with an underlying CTG trinucleotide repeat expansion at a locus on chromosome 19q13.3. We have determined the repeat length in 23 DM patients with varying clinical severity of symptoms and various sizes of repeat amplification. We confirm that as in previous studies there is no strong correlation between repeat length and clinical symptoms but find that the repeat length in peripheral blood cells of patients increases over a time span of five years indicating continuing mitotic instability of the repeat throughout life. Repeat length progression does not appear to be indicative of clinical progression but age probably is. The degree of expansion correlates with the initial repeat size and 50% of the patients with continuing expansions showed clinical progression of their disease symptoms over the five year study period. Images PMID:7473648

  2. Friedreich ataxia is not only a GAA repeats expansion disorder: implications for molecular testing and counselling.

    PubMed

    Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Mazurczak, Tomasz; Zajkowski, Tomasz; Tataj, Renata; Górka-Skoczylas, Paulina; Połatyńska, Katarzyna; Kępczyński, Łukasz; Stasiołek, Mariusz; Bal, Jerzy

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia. It is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the FXN gene, mainly the biallelic expansion of the (GAA)n repeats in its first intron. Heterozygous expansion/point mutations or deletions are rare; no patients with two point mutations or a point mutation/deletion have been described, suggesting that loss of the FXN gene product, frataxin, is lethal. This is why routine FRDA molecular diagnostics is focused on (GAA)n expansion analysis. Additional tests are considered only in cases of heterozygous expansion carriers and an atypical clinical picture. Analyses of the parent's carrier status, together with diagnostic tests, are performed in rare cases, and, because of that, we may underestimate the frequency of deletions. Even though FXN deletions are characterised as 'exquisitely rare,' we were able to identify one case (2.4 %) of a (GAA)n expansion/exonic deletion in a group of 41 probands. This was a patient with very early onset of disease with rapid progression of gait instability and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We compared the patient's clinical data to expansion/deletion carriers available in the literature and suggest that, in clinical practice, the FXN deletion test should be taken into account in patients with early-onset, rapid progressive ataxia and severe scoliosis. PMID:26906906

  3. Searching for Grendel: origin and global spread of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion

    PubMed Central

    Pliner, Hannah A.; Mann, David M.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances are uncovering more and more of the genetic architecture underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative condition that affects ~6,000 Americans annually. Chief among these was the discovery that a large repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is responsible for an unprecedented portion of familial and sporadic ALS cases. Much has been published on how this expansion disrupts neuronal homeostasis and how gene-based therapy might be an effective treatment in the future. Nevertheless, it is instructive to look back at the origins of this important mutation. In this opinion piece, we attempt to answer three key questions concerning C9ORF72. First, how many times did the expansion occur throughout human history? Second, how old is the expansion? And finally and perhaps most importantly, how did the expansion spread throughout Europe? We speculate that the expansion occurred only once in the past, that this event took place in the Finnish population and that the Vikings and their descendants were responsible for disseminating this mutation throughout the rest of the continent. PMID:24496499

  4. Searching for Grendel: origin and global spread of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Pliner, Hannah A; Mann, David M; Traynor, Bryan J

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances are uncovering more and more of the genetic architecture underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative condition that affects ~6,000 Americans annually. Chief among these was the discovery that a large repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is responsible for an unprecedented portion of familial and sporadic ALS cases. Much has been published on how this expansion disrupts neuronal homeostasis and how gene-based therapy might be an effective treatment in the future. Nevertheless, it is instructive to look back at the origins of this important mutation. In this opinion piece, we attempt to answer three key questions concerning C9ORF72. First, how many times did the expansion occur throughout human history? Second, how old is the expansion? And finally and perhaps most importantly, how did the expansion spread throughout Europe? We speculate that the expansion occurred only once in the past, that this event took place in the Finnish population and that the Vikings and their descendants were responsible for disseminating this mutation throughout the rest of the continent. PMID:24496499

  5. Human C9ORF72 Hexanucleotide Expansion Reproduces RNA Foci and Dipeptide Repeat Proteins but Not Neurodegeneration in BAC Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Owen M; Cabrera, Gabriela Toro; Tran, Helene; Gendron, Tania F; McKeon, Jeanne E; Metterville, Jake; Weiss, Alexandra; Wightman, Nicholas; Salameh, Johnny; Kim, Juhyun; Sun, Huaming; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis; Kennedy, Zachary; Lin, Ziqiang; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Daughrity, Lillian; Jung, Chris; Gao, Fen-Biao; Sapp, Peter C; Horvitz, H Robert; Bosco, Daryl A; Brown, Solange P; de Jong, Pieter; Petrucelli, Leonard; Mueller, Christian; Brown, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    A non-coding hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To investigate the pathological role of C9ORF72 in these diseases, we generated a line of mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome containing exons 1 to 6 of the human C9ORF72 gene with approximately 500 repeats of the GGGGCC motif. The mice showed no overt behavioral phenotype but recapitulated distinctive histopathological features of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD, including sense and antisense intranuclear RNA foci and poly(glycine-proline) dipeptide repeat proteins. Finally, using an artificial microRNA that targets human C9ORF72 in cultures of primary cortical neurons from the C9BAC mice, we have attenuated expression of the C9BAC transgene and the poly(GP) dipeptides. The C9ORF72 BAC transgenic mice will be a valuable tool in the study of ALS/FTD pathobiology and therapy. PMID:26637797

  6. The expanding biology of the C9orf72 nucleotide repeat expansion in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, Aaron R; Donnelly, Christopher J; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2016-06-01

    A nucleotide repeat expansion (NRE) within the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene was the first of this type of mutation to be linked to multiple neurological conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The pathogenic mechanisms through which the C9orf72 NRE contributes to these disorders include loss of C9orf72 function and gain-of-function mechanisms of C9orf72 driven by toxic RNA and protein species encoded by the NRE. These mechanisms have been linked to several cellular defects - including nucleocytoplasmic trafficking deficits and nuclear stress - that have been observed in both patients and animal models. PMID:27150398

  7. Mimosoid legume plastome evolution: IR expansion, tandem repeat expansions, and accelerated rate of evolution in clpP

    PubMed Central

    Dugas, Diana V.; Hernandez, David; Koenen, Erik J.M.; Schwarz, Erika; Straub, Shannon; Hughes, Colin E.; Jansen, Robert K.; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Staats, Martijn; Trujillo, Joshua T.; Hajrah, Nahid H.; Alharbi, Njud S.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Bailey, C. Donovan

    2015-01-01

    The Leguminosae has emerged as a model for studying angiosperm plastome evolution because of its striking diversity of structural rearrangements and sequence variation. However, most of what is known about legume plastomes comes from few genera representing a subset of lineages in subfamily Papilionoideae. We investigate plastome evolution in subfamily Mimosoideae based on two newly sequenced plastomes (Inga and Leucaena) and two recently published plastomes (Acacia and Prosopis), and discuss the results in the context of other legume and rosid plastid genomes. Mimosoid plastomes have a typical angiosperm gene content and general organization as well as a generally slow rate of protein coding gene evolution, but they are the largest known among legumes. The increased length results from tandem repeat expansions and an unusual 13 kb IR-SSC boundary shift in Acacia and Inga. Mimosoid plastomes harbor additional interesting features, including loss of clpP intron1 in Inga, accelerated rates of evolution in clpP for Acacia and Inga, and dN/dS ratios consistent with neutral and positive selection for several genes. These new plastomes and results provide important resources for legume comparative genomics, plant breeding, and plastid genetic engineering, while shedding further light on the complexity of plastome evolution in legumes and angiosperms. PMID:26592928

  8. Mimosoid legume plastome evolution: IR expansion, tandem repeat expansions, and accelerated rate of evolution in clpP.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Diana V; Hernandez, David; Koenen, Erik J M; Schwarz, Erika; Straub, Shannon; Hughes, Colin E; Jansen, Robert K; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Staats, Martijn; Trujillo, Joshua T; Hajrah, Nahid H; Alharbi, Njud S; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Sabir, Jamal S M; Bailey, C Donovan

    2015-01-01

    The Leguminosae has emerged as a model for studying angiosperm plastome evolution because of its striking diversity of structural rearrangements and sequence variation. However, most of what is known about legume plastomes comes from few genera representing a subset of lineages in subfamily Papilionoideae. We investigate plastome evolution in subfamily Mimosoideae based on two newly sequenced plastomes (Inga and Leucaena) and two recently published plastomes (Acacia and Prosopis), and discuss the results in the context of other legume and rosid plastid genomes. Mimosoid plastomes have a typical angiosperm gene content and general organization as well as a generally slow rate of protein coding gene evolution, but they are the largest known among legumes. The increased length results from tandem repeat expansions and an unusual 13 kb IR-SSC boundary shift in Acacia and Inga. Mimosoid plastomes harbor additional interesting features, including loss of clpP intron1 in Inga, accelerated rates of evolution in clpP for Acacia and Inga, and dN/dS ratios consistent with neutral and positive selection for several genes. These new plastomes and results provide important resources for legume comparative genomics, plant breeding, and plastid genetic engineering, while shedding further light on the complexity of plastome evolution in legumes and angiosperms. PMID:26592928

  9. Large C9orf72 repeat expansions are seen in Chinese patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongping; Lin, Ziqiang; Chen, Xueping; Cao, Bei; Wei, Qianqian; Ou, Ruwei; Zhao, Bi; Song, Wei; Wu, Ying; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2016-02-01

    An intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene was considered as the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia in Caucasian populations. Using repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction analysis and Southern blotting methods, we assessed the frequency and size of hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a cohort of 918 sporadic ALS (SALS) patients and 632 control individuals of Han Chinese origin. We identified 8 (0.87%) of the SALS patients and none of control individuals as carriers of C9orf72 expansions with 700-3500 repeats. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was conducted on 4 expansion-positive ALS patients, where 3 patients were found to have cognitive impairment. All expansion-positive patients were genotyped for the previously reported 20 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk haplotypes on chromosome 9p21. Among them, 13 SNP risk haplotypes were shared in all expansion carriers, suggesting a common founder from European ancestry. Further meta-analysis demonstrated that the intermediate expansion size with 24-30 repeats, rare in both patients and controls, were significantly associated with the risk for ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a proportion of Chinese SALS patients carrying this pathologic expansion of up to ∼3500 repeats and to completely elaborate the 20-SNP risk haplotypes in Chinese expansion-positive patients, providing indispensable evidence for the origin, geographical range, and population prevalence of the C9orf72-associated ALS. PMID:26725464

  10. Evaluating the prevalence of polyglutamine repeat expansions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T.; Li, Y.R.; Chesi, A.; Hart, M.P.; Ramos, D.; Jethava, N.; Hosangadi, D.; Epstein, J.; Hodges, B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Given the recent finding of an association between intermediate-length polyglutamine (polyQ) expansions in ataxin 2 and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we sought to determine whether expansions in other polyQ disease genes were associated with ALS. Methods: We assessed the polyQ lengths of ataxin 1, ataxin 3, ataxin 6, ataxin 7, TBP, atrophin 1, and huntingtin in several hundred patients with sporadic ALS and healthy controls. Results: Other than ataxin 2, we did not identify a significant association with the other polyQ genes and ALS. Conclusions: These data indicate that the effects of ataxin 2 polyQ expansions on ALS risk are likely to be rooted in the biology of ataxin 2 or ataxin 2-specific interactions, rather than the presence of an expanded polyQ repeat per se. These findings have important consequences for understanding the role of ataxin 2 in ALS pathogenesis and provide a framework for future mechanistic studies. PMID:21562248

  11. RNAe: an effective method for targeted protein translation enhancement by artificial non-coding RNA with SINEB2 repeat

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Jin, Shouhong; Long, Haizhou; Yu, Yingting; Zhang, Zhenming; Cheng, Ge; Xu, Chengwei; Ding, Yan; Guan, Qian; Li, Ning; Fu, Suneng; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Hanshuo; Tong, Pei; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Fu, Shushu; Li, Juan; He, Guang-Jun; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a universal protein expression enhancement RNA tool, termed RNAe, was developed by modifying a recently discovered natural long non-coding RNA. At the moment, RNAe is the only technology for gene expression enhancement, as opposed to silencing, at the post-transcriptional level. With this technology, an expression enhancement of 50–1000% is achievable, with more than 200% enhancement achieved in most cases. This work identified the sufficient and necessary element for RNAe function, which was found to be merely 300 nucleotides long and was named minRNAe. It contains a 72-nt 5' pairing sequence which determines the specificity, a 167-nt short non-pairing interspersed nuclear element (SINE) B2 sequence which enhances ribosome recruitment to the target mRNA, and a poly(A) tail, provided together on a plasmid bearing the appropriate sequences. Cellular delivery of RNAe was achieved using routine transfection. The RNAe platform was validated in several widely-used mammalian cell lines. It was proven to be efficient and flexible in specifically enhancing the expression of various endogenous and exogenous proteins of diverse functions in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the expression-inhibitory tool RNAi, the RNAe tool has a comparable effect size, with an enhancing as opposed to inhibitory effect. One may predict that this brand new technology for enhancing the production of proteins will find wide applications in both research and biopharmaceutical production. PMID:25722369

  12. Two novel DXZ4-associated long noncoding RNAs show developmental changes in expression coincident with heterochromatin formation at the human (Homo sapiens) macrosatellite repeat.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Debbie M; Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2015-12-01

    On the male X and female active X chromosome (Xa), the macrosatellite repeat (MSR) DXZ4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin characterized by CpG methylation and histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine-9 (H3K9me3). In contrast, DXZ4 on the female inactive X chromosome (Xi), is packaged into euchromatin, is bound by the architectural protein CCCTC-binding factor, and mediates Xi-specific long-range cis contact with similarly packaged tandem repeats on the Xi. In cancer, male DXZ4 can inappropriately revert to a Xi-like state and other MSRs have been reported to adopt alternate chromatin configurations in response to disease. Given this plasticity, we sought to identify factors that might control heterochromatin at DXZ4. In human embryonic stem cells, we found low levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at DXZ4 and that this mark is lost upon differentiation as H3K9me3 is acquired. We identified two previously undescribed DXZ4 associated noncoding transcripts (DANT1 and DANT2) that are transcribed toward DXZ4 from promoters flanking the array. Each generates transcript isoforms that traverse the MSR. However, upon differentiation, enhancer of Zeste-2 silences DANT1, and DANT2 transcription terminates prior to entering DXZ4. These data support a model wherein DANT1 and/or DANT2 may function to regulate constitutive heterochromatin formation at this MSR. PMID:26188586

  13. Repeat Length and RNA Expression Level Are Not Primary Determinants in CUG Expansion Toxicity in Drosophila Models

    PubMed Central

    Le Mée, Gwenn; Ezzeddine, Nader; Capri, Michèle; Aït-Ahmed, Ounissa

    2008-01-01

    Evidence for an RNA gain-of-function toxicity has now been provided for an increasing number of human pathologies. Myotonic dystrophies (DM) belong to a class of RNA-dominant diseases that result from RNA repeat expansion toxicity. Specifically, DM of type 1 (DM1), is caused by an expansion of CUG repeats in the 3′UTR of the DMPK protein kinase mRNA, while DM of type 2 (DM2) is linked to an expansion of CCUG repeats in an intron of the ZNF9 transcript (ZNF9 encodes a zinc finger protein). In both pathologies the mutant RNA forms nuclear foci. The mechanisms that underlie the RNA pathogenicity seem to be rather complex and not yet completely understood. Here, we describe Drosophila models that might help unravelling the molecular mechanisms of DM1-associated CUG expansion toxicity. We generated transgenic flies that express inducible repeats of different type (CUG or CAG) and length (16, 240, 480 repeats) and then analyzed transgene localization, RNA expression and toxicity as assessed by induced lethality and eye neurodegeneration. The only line that expressed a toxic RNA has a (CTG)240 insertion. Moreover our analysis shows that its level of expression cannot account for its toxicity. In this line, (CTG)240.4, the expansion inserted in the first intron of CG9650, a zinc finger protein encoding gene. Interestingly, CG9650 and (CUG)240.4 expansion RNAs were found in the same nuclear foci. In conclusion, we suggest that the insertion context is the primary determinant for expansion toxicity in Drosophila models. This finding should contribute to the still open debate on the role of the expansions per se in Drosophila and in human pathogenesis of RNA-dominant diseases. PMID:18213375

  14. A MutSβ-Dependent Contribution of MutSα to Repeat Expansions in Fragile X Premutation Mice?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Lokanga, Rachel; Allette, Kimaada; Gazy, Inbal; Wu, Di; Usdin, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The fragile X-related disorders result from expansion of a CGG/CCG microsatellite in the 5’ UTR of the FMR1 gene. We have previously demonstrated that the MSH2/MSH3 complex, MutSβ, that is important for mismatch repair, is essential for almost all expansions in a mouse model of these disorders. Here we show that the MSH2/MSH6 complex, MutSα also contributes to the production of both germ line and somatic expansions as evidenced by the reduction in the number of expansions observed in Msh6-/- mice. This effect is not mediated via an indirect effect of the loss of MSH6 on the level of MSH3. However, since MutSβ is required for 98% of germ line expansions and almost all somatic ones, MutSα is apparently not able to efficiently substitute for MutSβ in the expansion process. Using purified human proteins we demonstrate that MutSα, like MutSβ, binds to substrates with loop-outs of the repeats and increases the thermal stability of the structures that they form. We also show that MutSα facilitates binding of MutSβ to these loop-outs. These data suggest possible models for the contribution of MutSα to repeat expansion. In addition, we show that unlike MutSβ, MutSα may also act to protect against repeat contractions in the Fmr1 gene. PMID:27427765

  15. Sex-dependent mechanisms for expansions and contractions of the CAG repeat on affected Huntington disease chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, B.; Theilmann, J.; Spence, N.

    1995-08-01

    A total of 254 affected parent-child pairs with Huntington disease (HD) and 440 parent-child pairs with CAG size in the normal range were assessed to determine the nature and frequency of intergenerational CAG changes in the HD gene. Intergenerational CAG changes are extremely rare (3/440 [0.68%]) on normal chromosomes. In contrast, on HD chromosomes, changes in CAG size occur in {approximately}70% of meioses on HD chromosomes, with expansions accounting for 73% of these changes. These intergenerational CAG changes make a significant but minor contribution to changes in age at onset (r{sup 2}=.19). The size of the CAG repeat influenced larger intergenerational expansions (>7 CAG repeats), but the likelihood of smaller expansions or contractions was not influenced by CAG size. Large expansions (>7 CAG repeats) occur almost exclusively through paternal transmission (0.96%; P<10{sub -7}), while offspring of affected mothers are more likely to show no change (P=.01) or contractions in CAG size (P=.002). This study demonstrates that sex of the transmitting parent is the major determinant for CAG intergenerational changes in the HD gene. Similar paternal sex effects are seen in the evolution of new mutations for HD from intermediate alleles and for large expansions on affected chromosomes. Affected mothers almost never transmit a significantly expanded CAG repeat, despite the fact that many have similar large-sized alleles, compared with affected fathers. The sex-dependent effects of major expansion and contractions of the CAG repeat in the HD gene implicate different effects of gametogenesis, in males versus females, on intergenerational CAG repeat stability. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Altered network connectivity in frontotemporal dementia with C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suzee E; Khazenzon, Anna M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Guo, Christine C; Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Sha, Sharon J; Takada, Leonel T; Karydas, Anna M; Block, Nikolas R; Coppola, Giovanni; Pribadi, Mochtar; Geschwind, Daniel H; Rademakers, Rosa; Fong, Jamie C; Weiner, Michael W; Boxer, Adam L; Kramer, Joel H; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2014-11-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 represents the most common genetic cause of familial and sporadic behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Previous studies show that some C9orf72 carriers with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia exhibit distinctive atrophy patterns whereas others show mild or undetectable atrophy despite severe behavioural impairment. To explore this observation, we examined intrinsic connectivity network integrity in patients with or without the C9orf72 expansion. We studied 28 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, including 14 C9orf72 mutation carriers (age 58.3 ± 7.7 years, four females) and 14 non-carriers (age 60.8 ± 6.9 years, four females), and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Both patient groups included five patients with comorbid motor neuron disease. Neuropsychological data, structural brain magnetic resonance imaging, and task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging were obtained. Voxel-based morphometry delineated atrophy patterns, and seed-based intrinsic connectivity analyses enabled group comparisons of the salience, sensorimotor, and default mode networks. Single-patient analyses were used to explore network imaging as a potential biomarker. Despite contrasting atrophy patterns in C9orf72 carriers versus non-carriers, patient groups showed topographically similar connectivity reductions in the salience and sensorimotor networks. Patients without C9orf72 expansions exhibited increases in default mode network connectivity compared to controls and mutation carriers. Across all patients, behavioural symptom severity correlated with diminished salience network connectivity and heightened default mode network connectivity. In C9orf72 carriers, salience network connectivity reduction correlated with atrophy in the left medial pulvinar thalamic nucleus, and this region further showed diminished connectivity with key salience network hubs. Single-patient analyses revealed salience

  17. NRF2/Long Noncoding RNA ROR Signaling Regulates Mammary Stem Cell Expansion and Protects against Estrogen Genotoxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongshu; Xia, Jixiang; Li, Qinglin; Yao, Yuan; Eades, Gabriel; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Duru, Nadire; Kensler, Thomas W.; Zhou, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of gene expression in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and differentiation. In ESCs, lncRNAs are regulated at the genetic level via transcription factor binding to lncRNA gene promoters. Here we demonstrate that the key cytoprotective transcription factor NRF2 controls lncRNA expression in mammary stem cells. By profiling lncRNAs in wild-type and NRF2 knockdown mammary stem cells, we demonstrate that the lncRNA ROR, a regulator of embryonic stem cell pluripotency, is overexpressed upon NRF2 knockdown. We performed promoter analyses and examined predicted NRF2 binding elements in the ROR promoter using luciferase reporter constructs of a ROR promoter deletion series. Our studies revealed that NRF2 binds to two specific NRF2 response elements flanking the ROR promoter and that these two NRF2 response elements are equally important to suppress ROR transcription. In addition, we identified associated H3K27me3 chromatin modification and EZH2 binding at the ROR promoter that was dependent on NRF2 binding. We observed that NRF2 knockdown or ROR overexpression leads to increased stem cell self-renewal in mammary stem cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate Nrf2 regulation of the mammary stem cell population in vivo. These observations provide further evidence for the critical role of NRF2 in maintaining normal stem cell subpopulations in mammary epithelium. PMID:25231996

  18. NRF2/long noncoding RNA ROR signaling regulates mammary stem cell expansion and protects against estrogen genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongshu; Xia, Jixiang; Li, Qinglin; Yao, Yuan; Eades, Gabriel; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Duru, Nadire; Kensler, Thomas W; Zhou, Qun

    2014-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of gene expression in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and differentiation. In ESCs, lncRNAs are regulated at the genetic level via transcription factor binding to lncRNA gene promoters. Here we demonstrate that the key cytoprotective transcription factor NRF2 controls lncRNA expression in mammary stem cells. By profiling lncRNAs in wild-type and NRF2 knockdown mammary stem cells, we demonstrate that the lncRNA ROR, a regulator of embryonic stem cell pluripotency, is overexpressed upon NRF2 knockdown. We performed promoter analyses and examined predicted NRF2 binding elements in the ROR promoter using luciferase reporter constructs of a ROR promoter deletion series. Our studies revealed that NRF2 binds to two specific NRF2 response elements flanking the ROR promoter and that these two NRF2 response elements are equally important to suppress ROR transcription. In addition, we identified associated H3K27me3 chromatin modification and EZH2 binding at the ROR promoter that was dependent on NRF2 binding. We observed that NRF2 knockdown or ROR overexpression leads to increased stem cell self-renewal in mammary stem cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate Nrf2 regulation of the mammary stem cell population in vivo. These observations provide further evidence for the critical role of NRF2 in maintaining normal stem cell subpopulations in mammary epithelium. PMID:25231996

  19. Characterization of frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with the GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72.

    PubMed

    Boeve, Bradley F; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Knopman, David S; Pedraza, Otto; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Lowe, Val; Murray, Melissa E; Dickson, Dennis W; Josephs, Keith A; Rush, Beth K; Machulda, Mary M; Fields, Julie A; Ferman, Tanis J; Baker, Matthew; Rutherford, Nicola J; Adamson, Jennifer; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Adeli, Anahita; Savica, Rodolfo; Boot, Brendon; Kuntz, Karen M; Gavrilova, Ralitza; Reeves, Andrew; Whitwell, Jennifer; Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R; Parisi, Joseph E; Lucas, John A; Petersen, Ronald C; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and their affected relatives who have been evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester or Mayo Clinic Florida in whom the hexanucleotide repeat expansion were found. Forty-three probands and 10 of their affected relatives with DNA available (total 53 subjects) were shown to carry the hexanucleotide repeat expansion. Thirty-six (84%) of the 43 probands had a familial disorder, whereas seven (16%) appeared to be sporadic. Among examined subjects from the 43 families (n = 63), the age of onset ranged from 33 to 72 years (median 52 years) and survival ranged from 1 to 17 years, with the age of onset <40 years in six (10%) and >60 in 19 (30%). Clinical diagnoses among examined subjects included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with or without parkinsonism (n = 30), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 18), frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with or without parkinsonism (n = 12), and other various syndromes (n = 3). Parkinsonism was present in 35% of examined subjects, all of whom had behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as the dominant clinical phenotype. No subject with a diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia was identified with this mutation. Incomplete penetrance was suggested in two kindreds, and the youngest generation had significantly earlier age of onset (>10 years) compared with the next oldest generation in 11 kindreds. Neuropsychological testing showed a profile of slowed processing speed, complex attention/executive dysfunction, and impairment in rapid word retrieval. Neuroimaging studies showed bilateral frontal abnormalities

  20. Characterization of frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with the GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Knopman, David S.; Pedraza, Otto; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Lowe, Val; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Josephs, Keith A.; Rush, Beth K.; Machulda, Mary M.; Fields, Julie A.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Baker, Matthew; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Adamson, Jennifer; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Adeli, Anahita; Savica, Rodolfo; Boot, Brendon; Kuntz, Karen M.; Gavrilova, Ralitza; Reeves, Andrew; Whitwell, Jennifer; Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Lucas, John A.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and their affected relatives who have been evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester or Mayo Clinic Florida in whom the hexanucleotide repeat expansion were found. Forty-three probands and 10 of their affected relatives with DNA available (total 53 subjects) were shown to carry the hexanucleotide repeat expansion. Thirty-six (84%) of the 43 probands had a familial disorder, whereas seven (16%) appeared to be sporadic. Among examined subjects from the 43 families (n = 63), the age of onset ranged from 33 to 72 years (median 52 years) and survival ranged from 1 to 17 years, with the age of onset <40 years in six (10%) and >60 in 19 (30%). Clinical diagnoses among examined subjects included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with or without parkinsonism (n = 30), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 18), frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with or without parkinsonism (n = 12), and other various syndromes (n = 3). Parkinsonism was present in 35% of examined subjects, all of whom had behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as the dominant clinical phenotype. No subject with a diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia was identified with this mutation. Incomplete penetrance was suggested in two kindreds, and the youngest generation had significantly earlier age of onset (>10 years) compared with the next oldest generation in 11 kindreds. Neuropsychological testing showed a profile of slowed processing speed, complex attention/executive dysfunction, and impairment in rapid word retrieval. Neuroimaging studies showed bilateral

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex promotes trinucleotide repeat expansions independently of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanfang; Kirkham-McCarthy, Lucy; Lahue, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are tandem arrays of three nucleotides that can expand in length to cause at least 17 inherited human diseases. Somatic expansions in patients can occur in differentiated tissues where DNA replication is limited and cannot be a primary source of somatic mutation. Instead, mouse models of TNR diseases have shown that both inherited and somatic expansions can be suppressed by the loss of certain DNA repair factors. It is generally believed that these repair factors cause misprocessing of TNRs, leading to expansions. Here we extend this idea to show that the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a causative factor in expansions of short TNRs. Mutations that eliminate MRX subunits led to significant suppression of expansions whereas mutations that inactivate Rad51 had only a minor effect. Coupled with previous evidence, this suggests that MRX drives expansions of short TNRs through a process distinct from homologous recombination. The nuclease function of Mre11 was dispensable for expansions, suggesting that expansions do not occur by Mre11-dependent nucleolytic processing of the TNR. Epistasis between MRX and post-replication repair (PRR) was tested. PRR protects against expansions, so a rad5 mutant gave a high expansion rate. In contrast, the mre11 rad5 double mutant gave a suppressed expansion rate, indistinguishable from the mre11 single mutant. This suggests that MRX creates a TNR substrate for PRR. Protein acetylation was also tested as a mechanism regulating MRX activity in expansions. Six acetylation sites were identified in Rad50. Mutation of all six lysine residues to arginine gave partial bypass of a sin3 HDAC mutant, suggesting that Rad50 acetylation is functionally important for Sin3-mediated expansions. Overall we conclude that yeast MRX helps drive expansions of short TNRs by a mechanism distinct from its role in homologous recombination and independent of the nuclease function of Mre11. PMID:27173583

  2. Lack of C9ORF72 coding mutations supports a gain of function for repeat expansions in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew B.; Cady, Janet; Zaidman, Craig; Cooper, Paul; Bali, Taha; Allred, Peggy; Cruchaga, Carlos; Baughn, Michael; Pestronk, Alan; Goate, Alison; Ravits, John; Baloh, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 are a common cause of familial and apparently sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontal temporal dementia (FTD). The mechanism by which expansions cause neurodegeneration is unknown, but current evidence supports both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mechanisms. We used pooled next-generation sequencing of the C9ORF72 gene in 389 ALS patients to look for traditional loss-of-function mutations. Although rare variants were identified, none were likely to be pathogenic, suggesting that mutations other than the repeat expansion are not a common cause of ALS, and providing supportive evidence for a gain-of-function mechanism. We also show by repeat-primed PCR genotyping that the C9ORF72 expansion frequency varies by geographical region within the United States, with an unexpectedly high frequency in the Mid-West. Finally we also show evidence of somatic instability of the expansion size by Southern blot, with the largest expansions occurring in brain tissue. PMID:23597494

  3. CRISPR Screens to Discover Functional Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jason B; Sanjana, Neville E

    2016-09-01

    A major challenge in genomics is to identify functional elements in the noncoding genome. Recently, pooled clustered regularly interspersed palindromic repeat (CRISPR) mutagenesis screens of noncoding regions have emerged as a novel method for finding elements that impact gene expression and phenotype/disease-relevant biological processes. Here we review and compare different approaches for high-throughput dissection of noncoding elements. PMID:27423542

  4. Accumulation of dipeptide repeat proteins predates that of TDP‐43 in frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 gene

    PubMed Central

    Baborie, Atik; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Jaros, Evelyn; Perry, Robert; McKeith, Ian G.; Burn, David J.; Masuda‐Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; Rollinson, Sara; Pickering‐Brown, Stuart; Robinson, Andrew C.; Davidson, Yvonne S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and motor neurone disease are linked by the possession of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72, and both show neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions within cerebellar and hippocampal neurones which are TDP‐43 negative but immunoreactive for p62 and dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR), these being generated by a non‐ATG RAN translation of the expanded region of the gene. Methods Twenty‐two cases of FTLD from Newcastle were analysed for an expansion in C9ORF72 by repeat primed PCR and Southern blot. Detailed case note analysis was performed, and blinded retrospective clinical impressions were achieved by review of clinical histories. Sections from all major brain regions were immunostained for TDP‐43, p62 and DPR. The extent of TDP‐43 and DPR pathology in expansion bearers was compared with that in 13 other previously identified cases from the Manchester Brain Bank with established disease. Results Three Newcastle patients bearing an expansion in C9ORF72 were identified. These three patients died prematurely, two from bronchopneumonia within 10 months and 3 years of onset, and one from myocardial infarction 3 years after onset. In all three, DPR were plentiful throughout all cerebral cortical regions, hippocampus and cerebellum, but TDP‐43 pathological changes were sparse. The severity of DPR pathological changes in these three patients was similar to that in the Manchester series, although the extent of TDP‐43 pathology was significantly less. Conclusion Widespread accumulation of DPR within nerve cells may occur much earlier than that of TDP‐43 in patients with FTLD bearing expansion in C9ORF72. PMID:25185840

  5. Conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion regulates Rap phosphatase quorum-sensing signal receptors.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Jeffrey, Philip D; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC), a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComA(C) crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds for the

  6. C9orf72 repeat expansions are restricted to the ALS-FTD spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ticozzi, Nicola; Tiloca, Cinzia; Calini, Daniela; Gagliardi, Stella; Altieri, Alessandra; Colombrita, Claudia; Cereda, Cristina; Ratti, Antonia; Pezzoli, Gianni; Borroni, Barbara; Goldwurm, Stefano; Padovani, Alessandro; Silani, Vincenzo

    2014-04-01

    Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat (RE) in the C9orf72 gene has been recently reported as the main genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Given the growing evidence of genetic and clinicopathologic overlap among ALS, FTD, and other neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the occurrence of RE in a subset of 9 patients with ALS-plus syndromes, including Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal syndrome (CBS), and multiple system atrophy. We identified RE in 2 ALS-plus individuals (22.2%) displaying PSP and CBS features. On the basis of this finding, we extended our analysis to a cohort composed of 190 PD, 103 CBS, 107 PSP, and 177 Alzheimer's disease cases. We did not identify any RE in these patients, indicating that C9orf72 is in all probability not involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. However, the high frequency of C9orf72 RE in patients with ALS-plus syndromes suggests that, similar to ALS-FTD patients, individuals with combined motor neuron and extrapyramidal features should be screened for RE, independent of their family history. PMID:24169076

  7. Anticipation and CAG*CTG repeat expansion in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Fortune, M Teresa; Kennedy, James L; Vincent, John B

    2003-06-01

    The genetic contribution to the etiologies of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) has been considered for many decades, with twin, family, and adoption studies indicating consistently that the familial clustering of affected individuals is accounted for mainly by genetic factors. Despite the strong evidence for a genetic component, very little is understood about the underlying genetic and molecular mechanisms for schizophrenia and BPAD. In the early 1990s, after the discovery of "dynamic mutation" or "unstable DNA" as a molecular basis for the genetic anticipation observed in Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, and many others, and the recently rediscovered, albeit still controversial, evidence for genetic anticipation in major psychoses, the genetic epidemiology of schizophrenia and BPAD was re-evaluated to demonstrate strong endorsement for the unstable DNA model. Many of the non-Mendelian genetic features of schizophrenia and BPAD could be explained by the behaviour of unstable DNA, and several molecular genetic approaches became available for testing the unstable DNA hypothesis. However, despite promising findings in the mid-1990s, no trinucleotide repeat expansion has yet been identified as a cause of idiopathic schizophrenia or BPAD. PMID:12685994

  8. Htt CAG repeat expansion confers pleiotropic gains of mutant huntingtin function in chromatin regulation

    PubMed Central

    Biagioli, Marta; Ferrari, Francesco; Mendenhall, Eric M.; Zhang, Yijing; Erdin, Serkan; Vijayvargia, Ravi; Vallabh, Sonia M.; Solomos, Nicole; Manavalan, Poornima; Ragavendran, Ashok; Ozsolak, Fatih; Lee, Jong Min; Talkowski, Michael E.; Gusella, James F.; Macdonald, Marcy E.; Park, Peter J.; Seong, Ihn Sik

    2015-01-01

    The CAG repeat expansion in the Huntington's disease gene HTT extends a polyglutamine tract in mutant huntingtin that enhances its ability to facilitate polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). To gain insight into this dominant gain of function, we mapped histone modifications genome-wide across an isogenic panel of mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) and neuronal progenitor cell (NPC) lines, comparing the effects of Htt null and different size Htt CAG mutations. We found that Htt is required in ESC for the proper deposition of histone H3K27me3 at a subset of ‘bivalent’ loci but in NPC it is needed at ‘bivalent’ loci for both the proper maintenance and the appropriate removal of this mark. In contrast, Htt CAG size, though changing histone H3K27me3, is prominently associated with altered histone H3K4me3 at ‘active’ loci. The sets of ESC and NPC genes with altered histone marks delineated by the lack of huntingtin or the presence of mutant huntingtin, though distinct, are enriched in similar pathways with apoptosis specifically highlighted for the CAG mutation. Thus, the manner by which huntingtin function facilitates PRC2 may afford mutant huntingtin with multiple opportunities to impinge upon the broader machinery that orchestrates developmentally appropriate chromatin status. PMID:25574027

  9. Pericentromeric satellite repeat expansions through RNA-derived DNA intermediates in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Francesca; Lee, Eunjung; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Xu, Andrew W.; Liu, Mingzhu; Xega, Kristina; MacKenzie, Olivia C.; Brannigan, Brian W.; Wittner, Ben S.; Jung, Hyunchul; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Park, Peter J.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Ting, David T.; Haber, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant transcription of the pericentromeric human satellite II (HSATII) repeat is present in a wide variety of epithelial cancers. In deriving experimental systems to study its deregulation, we observed that HSATII expression is induced in colon cancer cells cultured as xenografts or under nonadherent conditions in vitro, but it is rapidly lost in standard 2D cultures. Unexpectedly, physiological induction of endogenous HSATII RNA, as well as introduction of synthetic HSATII transcripts, generated cDNA intermediates in the form of DNA/RNA hybrids. Single molecule sequencing of tumor xenografts showed that HSATII RNA-derived DNA (rdDNA) molecules are stably incorporated within pericentromeric loci. Suppression of RT activity using small molecule inhibitors reduced HSATII copy gain. Analysis of whole-genome sequencing data revealed that HSATII copy number gain is a common feature in primary human colon tumors and is associated with a lower overall survival. Together, our observations suggest that cancer-associated derepression of specific repetitive sequences can promote their RNA-driven genomic expansion, with potential implications on pericentromeric architecture. PMID:26575630

  10. Cascade Screening for Fragile X Syndrome/CGG Repeat Expansions in Children Attending Special Education in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Samuel S.; Rajan-Babu, Indhu-Shree

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the commonest cause of inherited mental retardation and clinically presents with learning, emotional and behaviour problems. FXS is caused by expansion of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) repeats present in the 5’ untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The aim of this study was to screen children attending special education institutions in Sri Lanka to estimate the prevalence of CGG repeat expansions. The study population comprised a representative national sample of 850 children (540 males, 310 females) with 5 to 18 years of age from moderate to severe mental retardation of wide ranging aetiology. Screening for CGG repeat expansion was carried out on DNA extracted from buccal cells using 3’ direct triplet primed PCR followed by melting curve analysis. To identify the expanded status of screened positive samples, capillary electrophoresis, methylation specific PCR and Southern hybridization were carried out using venous blood samples. Prevalence of CGG repeat expansions was 2.2%. Further classification of the positive samples into FXS full mutation, pre-mutation and grey zone gave prevalence of 1.3%, 0.8% and 0.1% respectively. All positive cases were male. No females with FXS were detected in our study may have been due to the small sample size. PMID:26694146

  11. C9orf72 repeat expansions cause neurodegeneration in Drosophila through arginine-rich proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ridler, Charlotte E.; Clayton, Emma L.; Devoy, Anny; Moens, Thomas; Norona, Frances E.; Woollacott, Ione O.C.; Pietrzyk, Julian; Cleverley, Karen; Nicoll, Andrew J.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Dols, Jacqueline; Cabecinha, Melissa; Hendrich, Oliver; Fratta, Pietro; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Partridge, Linda; Isaacs, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    An expanded GGGGCC repeat in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A fundamental question is whether toxicity is driven by the repeat RNA itself and/or by dipeptide repeat proteins generated by repeat-associated, non-ATG translation. To address this question we developed in vitro and in vivo models to dissect repeat RNA and dipeptide repeat protein toxicity. Expression of pure repeats in Drosophila caused adult-onset neurodegeneration attributable to poly-(glycine-arginine) proteins. Thus expanded repeats promoted neurodegeneration through neurotoxic proteins. Expression of individual dipeptide repeat proteins with a non-GGGGCC RNA sequence showed both poly-(glycine-arginine) and poly-(proline-arginine) proteins caused neurodegeneration. These findings are consistent with a dual toxicity mechanism, whereby both arginine-rich proteins and repeat RNA contribute to C9orf72-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:25103406

  12. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Patients with Huntington’s Disease Show CAG Repeat Expansion Associated Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mattis, Virginia B; Svendsen, Soshana P; Ebert, Allison; Svendsen, Clive N; King, Alvin R; Casale, Malcolm; Winokur, Sara T; Batugedara, Gayani; Vawter, Marquis; Donovan, Peter J; Lock, Leslie F; Thompson, Leslie M; Zhu, Yu; Fossale, Elisa; Singh Atwal, Ranjit; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Li, Jian-hong; Seong, IhnSik; Shen, Yiping; Chen, Xiaoli; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F; Akimov, Sergey; Arbez, Nicolas; Juopperi, Tarja; Ratovitski, Tamara; Chiang, Jason H; Kim, Woon Roung; Chighladze, Eka; Watkin, Erin; Zhong, Chun; Makri, Georgia; Cole, Robert N; Margolis, Russell L; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guoli; Ross, Christopher A; Kaye, Julia A; Daub, Aaron; Sharma, Punita; Mason, Amanda R; Finkbeiner, Steven; Yu, Junying; Thomson, James A; Rushton, David; Brazier, Stephen P; Battersby, Alysia A; Redfern, Amanda; Tseng, Hsui-Er; Harrison, Alexander W; Kemp, Paul J; Allen, Nicholas D; Onorati, Marco; Castiglioni, Valentina; Cattaneo, Elena; Arjomand, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded stretch of CAG trinucleotide repeats that results in neuronal dysfunction and death. Here, the HD consortium reports the generation and characterization of 14 induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from HD patients and controls. Microarray profiling revealed CAG expansion-associated gene expression patterns that distinguish patient lines from controls, and early onset versus late onset HD. Differentiated HD neural cells showed disease associated changes in electrophysiology, metabolism, cell adhesion, and ultimately cell death for lines with both medium and longer CAG repeat expansions. The longer repeat lines were however the most vulnerable to cellular stressors and BDNF withdrawal using a range of assays across consortium laboratories. The HD iPSC collection represents a unique and well-characterized resource to elucidate disease mechanisms in HD and provides a novel human stem cell platform for screening new candidate therapeutics. PMID:22748968

  13. Can ALS-Associated C9orf72 Repeat Expansions Be Diagnosed on a Blood DNA Test Alone?

    PubMed Central

    Pamphlett, Roger; Cheong, Pak Leng; Trent, Ronald J.; Yu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Gene mutations that preferentially affect the CNS have been implicated in a number of neurological disorders. This leads to the possibility that a disease-causing mutation present only in CNS tissues could be missed if it were tested in a blood DNA sample only. The commonest mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an expansion of the hexanucleotide repeats of C9orf72. To find out if CNS-specific mutations of this gene could cause some cases of ALS we looked for differences in the size of C9orf72 repeats between DNA from the CNS and from white blood cells (WBCs) of 38 sporadic ALS patients, using a repeat-primed PCR screening test. We also looked for differences in C9orf72 repeats in WBC DNA from 6 ALS-discordant and 1 ALS-concordant monozygotic twins. Abnormally expanded C9orf72 repeats were found in 13% of the ALS CNS samples, as well as in their paired WBC DNA. The 87% of ALS CNS samples with normal-sized C9orf72 repeats had the same number of repeats in paired WBC samples. All ALS-discordant twins had the same normal numbers of WBC C9orf72 repeats. Although previous work suggests some tissue mosaicism in C9orf72 repeat size is probably present, this study indicates that this is not likely to be of sufficient magnitude to result in a normal C9orf72 repeat length in blood but an abnormally expanded repeat length in the CNS. This suggests that a blood DNA test alone will usually be sufficient to make a diagnosis of C9orf72 repeat-related ALS. PMID:23894576

  14. Molecular phylogeny of the kelch-repeat superfamily reveals an expansion of BTB/kelch proteins in animals

    PubMed Central

    Prag, Soren; Adams, Josephine C

    2003-01-01

    -widespread family of β-propeller domain-containing proteins. Expansion of the family during the evolution of multicellular animals is mainly accounted for by a major expansion of the BTB/kelch domain architecture. BTB/kelch proteins constitute 72 % of the kelch-repeat superfamily of H. sapiens and form three subgroups, one of which appears the most-conserved during evolution. Distinctions in propeller blade organisation between subgroups 1 and 2 were identified that could provide new direction for biochemical and functional studies of novel kelch-repeat proteins. PMID:13678422

  15. Expansion of the CGG repeat in fragile X in the FRM1 gene depends on the sex of the offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, D.Z.; Huggins, R.; Petrovic, V.

    1995-12-01

    Analysis of 139 mother-to-offspring transmissions of fragile X CGG triplet repeats revealed that the repeat expansion is enhanced in mother-to-son transmissions compared with mother-to-daughter transmissions. Evidence has been based on analysis of mother-offspring differences in the size of repeat (in kb), as well as on comparisons between proportions of male and female offspring with premutations, and full mutations, inherited from mothers carrying a premutation. Mean difference in the repeat size from mother-son transmissions was 1.45 kb, compared with mother-daughter transmissions of 0.76 kb. The difference is due primarily to a greater proportion of male than female offspring with full mutation from the premutation mothers and also to a higher frequency of reduction in repeat size from mothers to daughters than from mothers to sons. Our findings suggest the possibility of an interaction of the normal X homologue in a female zygote with the FMR1 sequence on the fragile X during replication to account for the lower level of expansion in mother-to-daughter transmissions relative to mother-to-son transmissions. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Early onset behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia due to the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion: psychiatric clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Arighi, Andrea; Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Jacini, Francesca; Fenoglio, Chiara; Ghezzi, Laura; Pietroboni, Anna M; De Riz, Milena; Serpente, Maria; Ridolfi, Elisa; Bonsi, Rossana; Bresolin, Nereo; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 has been shown to be responsible for a high number of familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or frontotemporal lobar degeneration with or without concomitant motor neuron disease phenotype and TDP-43 based pathology. Here, we report on three cases carrying the hexanucleotide repeat expansion with an atypical presentation consisting in the development of psychiatric symptoms. Patient #1, a 53 year old man with positive family history for dementia, presented with mood deflection, characterized by apathy, social withdraw, and irritability in the last two years. He was diagnosed with "mild cognitive impairment due to depressive syndrome" six months later and subsequently with Alzheimer's disease. Patient #2, a woman with positive family history for dementia, developed behavioral disturbances, aggressiveness, and swearing at 57 years of age. Patient #3 presented, in the absence of brain atrophy, with mystical delirium with auditory hallucinations at 44 years of age, and did not present neurological symptoms over a 7-year follow up. The description of these cases underlines that the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 could be associated with early onset psychiatric presentations. PMID:22571983

  17. Scanning for unstable trinucleotide repeats in neuropsychiatric disorders: Detection of a large CTG expansion in a schizophrenic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Sirugo, G.; Haaf, T.; Kidd, K.K.

    1994-09-01

    Expansion of unstable trinucleotide repeats have been associated so far with seven human genetic disorders including fragile X, myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease. This newly discovered class of genetic mutations is almost invariably associated with genetic anticipation. Anticipation has been recently reported in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia pedigrees, suggesting a possible implication of genes with unstable triplets in these disorders. To explore this hypothesis we have analyzed large schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder kindreds by means of the Repeat Expansion Detection Method (RED) described by Schalling and modified in our laboratory. This method uses genomic DNA as a template for the annealing and ligation of repeat-specific oligonucleotides. The reactions were subjected to denaturing PAGE and then transferred onto nylon membrane by capillary transfer. The multimers were revealed after hybridization with an oligoprobe and 5 hours exposure on film. To date the kindreds have been screened for the presence of unstable (CTG)n. CTG multimers ranging from 51 to 119 CTG units were detected in both affected and normal individuals corresponding to a normal variation in length of one or more CTG loci. Although our results indicate that (CTG)n expansions are not the mechanism causing schziophrenia or bipolar affective disorder, in one schizophrenia patient we have detected a large (CTG)n constituted by at least 204 CTG units. The incomplete structure of the family does not allow us to determine if this large repeat segregates with the disease. Localization of this expanded locus by in situ hybridization is underway. Similar in situ studies using PCR-generated CCA multimers up to 1 kb in length as a probe have revealed the presence of long tracts of CCA repeats at discrete sites in the human genome. This shows the feasibility of the in situ approach to localize large arrays of triplets in the human genome.

  18. A noncoding expansion in EIF4A3 causes Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome, a craniofacial disorder associated with limb defects.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Francine P; Alvizi, Lucas; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Bertola, Debora; Felix, Temis M; de Souza, Josiane; Raskin, Salmo; Twigg, Stephen R F; Weiner, Andrea M J; Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Calcaterra, Nora B; Andersen, Gregers R; McGowan, Simon J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; de Almeida, Maria L G; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome is an autosomal-recessive acrofacial dysostosis characterized by mandibular median cleft associated with other craniofacial anomalies and severe limb defects. Learning and language disabilities are also prevalent. We mapped the mutated gene to a 122 kb region at 17q25.3 through identity-by-descent analysis in 17 genealogies. Sequencing strategies identified an expansion of a region with several repeats of 18- or 20-nucleotide motifs in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of EIF4A3, which contained from 14 to 16 repeats in the affected individuals and from 3 to 12 repeats in 520 healthy individuals. A missense substitution of a highly conserved residue likely to affect the interaction of eIF4AIII with the UPF3B subunit of the exon junction complex in trans with an expanded allele was found in an unrelated individual with an atypical presentation, thus expanding mutational mechanisms and phenotypic diversity of RCPS. EIF4A3 transcript abundance was reduced in both white blood cells and mesenchymal cells of RCPS-affected individuals as compared to controls. Notably, targeting the orthologous eif4a3 in zebrafish led to underdevelopment of several craniofacial cartilage and bone structures, in agreement with the craniofacial alterations seen in RCPS. Our data thus suggest that RCPS is caused by mutations in EIF4A3 and show that EIF4A3, a gene involved in RNA metabolism, plays a role in mandible, laryngeal, and limb morphogenesis. PMID:24360810

  19. Problems and solutions for the analysis of somatic CAG repeat expansion and their relationship to Huntington's disease toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Budworth, Helen; McMurray, Cynthia T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Huntington's Disease is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. Whether somatic expansion contributed to toxicity was unknown. From extensive work from multiple laboratories, it has been made clear that toxicity depended on length of the inherited allele, but whether preventing or delaying somatic repeat expansion in vivo would be beneficial was unknown, since the inherited disease allele was still expressed. In Budworth et al., we provided definitive evidence that suppressing the somatic expansion in mice substantially delays disease onset in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. This key discovery opens the door for therapeutic approaches targeted at stopping or shortening the CAG tract during life. The analysis was difficult and, at times, non-standard. Here, we take the opportunity to discuss the challenges, the analytical solutions, and to address some controversial issues with respect to expansion biology. PMID:27141411

  20. Crosstalk between MSH2–MSH3 and polβ promotes trinucleotide repeat expansion during base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yanhao; Budworth, Helen; Beaver, Jill M.; Chan, Nelson L. S.; Zhang, Zunzhen; McMurray, Cynthia T.; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Studies in knockout mice provide evidence that MSH2–MSH3 and the BER machinery promote trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion, yet how these two different repair pathways cause the mutation is unknown. Here we report the first molecular crosstalk mechanism, in which MSH2–MSH3 is used as a component of the BER machinery to cause expansion. On its own, pol β fails to copy TNRs during DNA synthesis, and bypasses them on the template strand to cause deletion. Remarkably, MSH2–MSH3 not only stimulates pol β to copy through the repeats but also enhances formation of the flap precursor for expansion. Our results provide direct evidence that MMR and BER, operating together, form a novel hybrid pathway that changes the outcome of TNR instability from deletion to expansion during the removal of oxidized bases. We propose that cells implement crosstalk strategies and share machinery when a canonical pathway is ineffective in removing a difficult lesion. PMID:27546332

  1. Dnmt1 deficiency promotes CAG repeat expansion in the mouse germline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expanded CAG repeat tracts are the cause of at least a dozen neurodegenerative disorders. In humans, long CAG repeats tend to expand during transmissions from parent to offspring, leading to an earlier age of disease onset and more severe symptoms in subsequent generations. Here, we show that the ma...

  2. Intrachromosomal tandem duplication and repeat expansion during attempts to inactivate the subtelomeric essential gene GSH1 in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Angana; Langston, Lance D.; Ouellette, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase encoded by GSH1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glutathione and trypanothione in Leishmania. Attempts to generate GSH1 null mutants by gene disruption failed in Leishmania infantum. Removal of even a single allele invariably led to the generation of an extra copy of GSH1, maintaining two intact wild-type alleles. In the second and even third round of inactivation, the markers integrated at the homologous locus but always preserved two intact copies of GSH1. We probed into the mechanism of GSH1 duplication. GSH1 is subtelomeric on chromosome 18 and Southern blot analysis indicated that a 10-kb fragment flanked by 466-bp direct repeated sequences was duplicated in tandem on the same chromosomal allele each time GSH1 was targeted. Polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing confirmed the generation of novel junctions created at the level of the 466-bp repeats consequent to locus duplication. In loss of heterozygosity attempts, the same repeated sequences were utilized for generating extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Our results are consistent with break-induced replication as a mechanism for the generation of this regional polyploidy to compensate for the inactivation of an essential gene. This chromosomal repeat expansion through repeated sequences could be implicated in locus duplication in Leishmania. PMID:21693561

  3. A Noncoding Expansion in EIF4A3 Causes Richieri-Costa-Pereira Syndrome, a Craniofacial Disorder Associated with Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Francine P.; Alvizi, Lucas; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Bertola, Debora; Felix, Temis M.; de Souza, Josiane; Raskin, Salmo; Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Weiner, Andrea M.J.; Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Calcaterra, Nora B.; Andersen, Gregers R.; McGowan, Simon J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; de Almeida, Maria L.G.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome is an autosomal-recessive acrofacial dysostosis characterized by mandibular median cleft associated with other craniofacial anomalies and severe limb defects. Learning and language disabilities are also prevalent. We mapped the mutated gene to a 122 kb region at 17q25.3 through identity-by-descent analysis in 17 genealogies. Sequencing strategies identified an expansion of a region with several repeats of 18- or 20-nucleotide motifs in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of EIF4A3, which contained from 14 to 16 repeats in the affected individuals and from 3 to 12 repeats in 520 healthy individuals. A missense substitution of a highly conserved residue likely to affect the interaction of eIF4AIII with the UPF3B subunit of the exon junction complex in trans with an expanded allele was found in an unrelated individual with an atypical presentation, thus expanding mutational mechanisms and phenotypic diversity of RCPS. EIF4A3 transcript abundance was reduced in both white blood cells and mesenchymal cells of RCPS-affected individuals as compared to controls. Notably, targeting the orthologous eif4a3 in zebrafish led to underdevelopment of several craniofacial cartilage and bone structures, in agreement with the craniofacial alterations seen in RCPS. Our data thus suggest that RCPS is caused by mutations in EIF4A3 and show that EIF4A3, a gene involved in RNA metabolism, plays a role in mandible, laryngeal, and limb morphogenesis. PMID:24360810

  4. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.-M.; Ramos, E.M.; Lee, J.-H.; Gillis, T.; Mysore, J.S.; Hayden, M.R.; Warby, S.C.; Morrison, P.; Nance, M.; Ross, C.A.; Margolis, R.L.; Squitieri, F.; Orobello, S.; Di Donato, S.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Ayuso, C.; Suchowersky, O.; Trent, R.J.A.; McCusker, E.; Novelletto, A.; Frontali, M.; Jones, R.; Ashizawa, T.; Frank, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M.H.; Hersch, S.M.; Rosas, H.D.; Lucente, D.; Harrison, M.B.; Zanko, A.; Abramson, R.K.; Marder, K.; Sequeiros, J.; Paulsen, J.S.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Myers, R.H.; MacDonald, M.E.; Durr, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Adam; Frati, Luigi; Perlman, Susan; Conneally, Patrick M.; Klimek, Mary Lou; Diggin, Melissa; Hadzi, Tiffany; Duckett, Ayana; Ahmed, Anwar; Allen, Paul; Ames, David; Anderson, Christine; Anderson, Karla; Anderson, Karen; Andrews, Thomasin; Ashburner, John; Axelson, Eric; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Roger A.; Barth, Katrin; Barton, Stacey; Baynes, Kathleen; Bea, Alexandra; Beall, Erik; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Biglan, Kevin; Bjork, Kristine; Blanchard, Steve; Bockholt, Jeremy; Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy; Brossman, Bradley; Burrows, Maggie; Calhoun, Vince; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chesire, Amy; Chiu, Edmond; Chua, Phyllis; Connell, R.J.; Connor, Carmela; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Craufurd, David; Cross, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette; Santos, Rachelle Dar; Davis, Jennifer; Decolongon, Joji; DiPietro, Anna; Doucette, Nicholas; Downing, Nancy; Dudler, Ann; Dunn, Steve; Ecker, Daniel; Epping, Eric A.; Erickson, Diane; Erwin, Cheryl; Evans, Ken; Factor, Stewart A.; Farias, Sarah; Fatas, Marta; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Fullam, Ruth; Furtado, Sarah; Garde, Monica Bascunana; Gehl, Carissa; Geschwind, Michael D.; Goh, Anita; Gooblar, Jon; Goodman, Anna; Griffith, Jane; Groves, Mark; Guttman, Mark; Hamilton, Joanne; Harrington, Deborah; Harris, Greg; Heaton, Robert K.; Helmer, Karl; Henneberry, Machelle; Hershey, Tamara; Herwig, Kelly; Howard, Elizabeth; Hunter, Christine; Jankovic, Joseph; Johnson, Hans; Johnson, Arik; Jones, Kathy; Juhl, Andrew; Kim, Eun Young; Kimble, Mycah; King, Pamela; Klimek, Mary Lou; Klöppel, Stefan; Koenig, Katherine; Komiti, Angela; Kumar, Rajeev; Langbehn, Douglas; Leavitt, Blair; Leserman, Anne; Lim, Kelvin; Lipe, Hillary; Lowe, Mark; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Mallonee, William M.; Mans, Nicole; Marietta, Jacquie; Marshall, Frederick; Martin, Wayne; Mason, Sarah; Matheson, Kirsty; Matson, Wayne; Mazzoni, Pietro; McDowell, William; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Miller, Michael; Mills, James; Miracle, Dawn; Montross, Kelsey; Moore, David; Mori, Sasumu; Moser, David J.; Moskowitz, Carol; Newman, Emily; Nopoulos, Peg; Novak, Marianne; O'Rourke, Justin; Oakes, David; Ondo, William; Orth, Michael; Panegyres, Peter; Pease, Karen; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Peterson, Asa; Phillips, Michael; Pierson, Ron; Potkin, Steve; Preston, Joy; Quaid, Kimberly; Radtke, Dawn; Rae, Daniela; Rao, Stephen; Raymond, Lynn; Reading, Sarah; Ready, Rebecca; Reece, Christine; Reilmann, Ralf; Reynolds, Norm; Richardson, Kylie; Rickards, Hugh; Ro, Eunyoe; Robinson, Robert; Rodnitzky, Robert; Rogers, Ben; Rosenblatt, Adam; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Price, Kathy; Price, Kathy; Ryan, Pat; Salmon, David; Samii, Ali; Schumacher, Jamy; Schumacher, Jessica; Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz; Shear, Paula; Sheinberg, Alanna; Shpritz, Barnett; Siedlecki, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A.; Singer, Adam; Smith, Jim; Smith, Megan; Smith, Glenn; Snyder, Pete; Song, Allen; Sran, Satwinder; Stephan, Klaas; Stober, Janice; Sü?muth, Sigurd; Suter, Greg; Tabrizi, Sarah; Tempkin, Terry; Testa, Claudia; Thompson, Sean; Thomsen, Teri; Thumma, Kelli; Toga, Arthur; Trautmann, Sonja; Tremont, Geoff; Turner, Jessica; Uc, Ergun; Vaccarino, Anthony; van Duijn, Eric; Van Walsem, Marleen; Vik, Stacie; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Vuletich, Elizabeth; Warner, Tom; Wasserman, Paula; Wassink, Thomas; Waterman, Elijah; Weaver, Kurt; Weir, David; Welsh, Claire; Werling-Witkoske, Chris; Wesson, Melissa; Westervelt, Holly; Weydt, Patrick; Wheelock, Vicki; Williams, Kent; Williams, Janet; Wodarski, Mary; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Wood, Jessica; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Wu, Shuhua; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Zimbelman, Janice; Zschiegner, Roland; Aaserud, Olaf; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Andrews, Thomasin; Andrich, Jurgin; Antczak, Jakub; Arran, Natalie; Artiga, Maria J. Saiz; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof; di Poggio, Monica Bandettini; Bandmann, Oliver; Barbera, Miguel A.; Barker, Roger A.; Barrero, Francisco; Barth, Katrin; Bas, Jordi; Beister, Antoine; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Bertini, Elisabetta; Biunno, Ida; Bjørgo, Kathrine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. Methods: We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. Results: An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Conclusions: Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695 PMID:22323755

  5. A pathogenic progranulin mutation and C9orf72 repeat expansion in a family with frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lashley, Tammaryn; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Mahoney, Colin; Gordon, Elizabeth; Beck, Jon; Mead, Simon; Warren, Jason; Rossor, Martin; Revesz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Aims Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and is the second most common form of young onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance is present in around 25–50% of FTLD cases indicating a strong genetic component. Major pathogenic mutations of FTLD have been demonstrated independently in the progranulin (GRN) gene and the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion repeat. In this study we present a family that have been identified as carrying both a GRN Cys31fs mutation and the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion repeat. Methods In the present study we describe the clinical and genetic details of family members and pathological features of two family members that have come to post-mortem. Results The mean age at disease onset was 57 years (48–61 years) and mean duration 4 years (2–7 years). The most common presenting syndrome was behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Brain imaging from available cases showed a symmetrical pattern of atrophy particularly affecting the frontal and temporal lobes. Pathologically two cases were classified as FTLD-TDP type A with TDP-43 positive inclusions, with additional p62-positive ‘star-like’ inclusions found in the hippocampal formation and cerebellum. Conclusions The type and distribution of the pathological lesions in these two cases were in keeping with FTLD cases carrying only the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat. However the driving force of the pathological process may be either pathogenic mutation or a combination of both converging on a singular mechanism. PMID:24286341

  6. Analysis of C9orf72 repeat expansions in a large series of clinically and pathologically diagnosed cases with atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Schottlaender, Lucia V; Polke, James M; Ling, Helen; MacDoanld, Nicola D; Tucci, Arianna; Nanji, Tina; Pittman, Alan; de Silva, Rohan; Holton, Janice L; Revesz, Tamas; Sweeney, Mary G; Singleton, Andy B; Lees, Andrew J; Bhatia, Kailash P; Houlden, Henry

    2015-02-01

    A GGGGCC repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene was recently identified as a major cause of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. There is suggestion that these expansions may be a rare cause of parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Screening the C9orf72 gene in 37 patients with features of corticobasal syndrome (CBS) detected an expansion in 3 patients, confirmed by Southern blotting. In a series of 22 patients with clinically diagnosed PSP, we found 1 patient with an intermediate repeat length. We also screened for the C9orf72 expansion in a large series of neuropathologically confirmed samples with MSA (n = 96), PSP (n = 177), and CBD (n = 18). Patients were found with no more than 22 GGGGCC repeats. Although these results still need to be confirmed in a larger cohort of CBS and/or CBD patients, these data suggest that in the presence of a family history and/or motor neuron disease features, patients with CBS or clinical PSP should be screened for the C9orf72 repeat expansion. In addition, we confirm that the C9orf72 expansions are not associated with pathologically confirmed MSA, PSP, or CBD in a large series of cases. PMID:25308964

  7. The analysis of C9orf72 repeat expansions in a large series of clinically and pathologically diagnosed cases with atypical parkinsonism☆

    PubMed Central

    Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Polke, James M.; Ling, Helen; MacDoanld, Nicola D.; Tucci, Arianna; Nanji, Tina; Pittman, Alan; de Silva, Rohan; Holton, Janice L.; Revesz, Tamas; Sweeney, Mary G.; Singleton, Andy B.; Lees, Andrew J.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    A GGGGCC repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene was recently identified as a major cause of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. There is suggestion that these expansions may be a rare cause of parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Screening the C9orf72 gene in 37 patients with features of corticobasal syndrome (CBS) detected an expansion in 3 patients, confirmed by Southern blotting. In a series of 22 patients with clinically diagnosed PSP, we found 1 patient with an intermediate repeat length. We also screened for the C9orf72 expansion in a large series of neuropathologically confirmed samples with MSA (n = 96), PSP (n = 177), and CBD (n = 18). Patients were found with no more than 22 GGGGCC repeats. Although these results still need to be confirmed in a larger cohort of CBS and/or CBD patients, these data suggest that in the presence of a family history and/or motor neuron disease features, patients with CBS or clinical PSP should be screened for the C9orf72 repeat expansion. In addition, we confirm that the C9orf72 expansions are not associated with pathologically confirmed MSA, PSP, or CBD in a large series of cases. PMID:25308964

  8. Neurodegeneration. C9ORF72 repeat expansions in mice cause TDP-43 pathology, neuronal loss, and behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Chew, Jeannie; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Lee, Chris W; Jansen-West, Karen; Kurti, Aishe; Murray, Melissa E; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bauer, Peter O; Whitelaw, Ena C; Rousseau, Linda; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Stetler, Caroline; Daughrity, Lillian M; Perkerson, Emilie A; Desaro, Pamela; Johnston, Amelia; Overstreet, Karen; Edbauer, Dieter; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Fryer, John D; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    The major genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a G4C2 repeat expansion in C9ORF72. Efforts to combat neurodegeneration associated with "c9FTD/ALS" are hindered by a lack of animal models recapitulating disease features. We developed a mouse model to mimic both neuropathological and clinical c9FTD/ALS phenotypes. We expressed (G4C2)66 throughout the murine central nervous system by means of somatic brain transgenesis mediated by adeno-associated virus. Brains of 6-month-old mice contained nuclear RNA foci, inclusions of poly(Gly-Pro), poly(Gly-Ala), and poly(Gly-Arg) dipeptide repeat proteins, as well as TDP-43 pathology. These mouse brains also exhibited cortical neuron and cerebellar Purkinje cell loss, astrogliosis, and decreased weight. (G4C2)66 mice also developed behavioral abnormalities similar to clinical symptoms of c9FTD/ALS patients, including hyperactivity, anxiety, antisocial behavior, and motor deficits. PMID:25977373

  9. Tau pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Murray, Melissa E; Rutherford, Nicola J; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Liesinger, Amanda M; Baker, Matthew C; Boylan, Kevin B; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W

    2013-02-01

    An expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 is the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with TDP-43 pathology (FTLD-TDP). In addition to TDP-43-positive neuronal and glial inclusions, C9ORF72-linked FTLD-TDP has characteristic TDP-43-negative neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions as well as dystrophic neurites in the hippocampus and cerebellum. These lesions are immunopositive for ubiquitin and ubiquitin-binding proteins, such as sequestosome-1/p62 and ubiquilin-2. Studies examining the frequency of the C9ORF72 mutation in clinically probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) have found a small proportion of AD cases with the mutation. This prompted us to systematically explore the frequency of Alzheimer-type pathology in a series of 17 FTLD-TDP cases with mutations in C9ORF72 (FTLD-C9ORF72). We identified four cases with sufficient Alzheimer-type pathology to meet criteria for intermediate-to-high-likelihood AD. We compared AD pathology in the 17 FTLD-C9ORF72 to 13 cases of FTLD-TDP linked to mutations in the gene for progranulin (FTLD-GRN) and 36 cases of sporadic FTLD (sFTLD). FTLD-C9ORF72 cases had higher Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage than FTLD-GRN. Increased tau pathology in FTLD-C9ORF72 was assessed with thioflavin-S fluorescent microscopy-based neurofibrillary tangle counts and with image analysis of tau burden in temporal cortex and hippocampus. FTLD-C9ORF72 had significantly more neurofibrillary tangles and higher tau burden compared with FTLD-GRN. The differences were most marked in limbic regions. On the other hand, sFTLD and FTLD-C9ORF72 had a similar burden of tau pathology. These results suggest FTLD-C9ORF72 has increased propensity for tau pathology compared to FTLD-GRN, but not sFTLD. The accumulation of tau as well as lesions immunoreactive for ubiquitin and ubiquitin-binding proteins (p62 and ubiquilin-2) suggests that mutations in C9ORF72 may involve disrupted

  10. Clinical and neuropathologic heterogeneity of c9FTD/ALS associated with hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Melissa E.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Duara, Ranjan; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ferman, Tanis; Josephs, Keith A.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are part of a disease spectrum associated with TDP-43 pathology. Strong evidence supporting this is the existence of kindreds with family members affected by FTD, ALS or mixed features of FTD and ALS, referred to as FTD-MND. Some of these families have linkage to chromosome 9, with hexanucleotide expansion mutation in a noncoding region of C9ORF72. Discovery of the mutation defines c9FTD/ALS. Prior to discovery of mutations in C9ORF72, it was assumed that TDP-43 pathology in c9FTD/ALS was uniform. In this study, we examined the neuropathology and clinical features of 20 cases of c9FTD/ALS from a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders. Included are six patients clinically diagnosed with ALS, eight FTD, one FTD-MND and four Alzheimer type dementia. Clinical information was unavailable for one patient. Pathologically, the cases all had TDP-43 pathology, but there were three major pathologic groups: ALS, FTLD-MND and FTLD-TDP. The ALS cases were morphologically similar to typical sporadic ALS with almost no extramotor TDP-43 pathology; all had oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions. The FTLD-MND showed predominantly Mackenzie Type 3 TDP-43 pathology, and all had ALS-like pathology in motor neurons, but more extensive extramotor pathology, with oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions and infrequent hippocampal sclerosis. The FTLD-TDP cases had several features similar to FTLD-TDP due to mutations in the gene for progranulin, including Mackenzie Type 1 TDP-43 pathology with neuronal intranuclear inclusions and hippocampal sclerosis. FTLD-TDP patients were older and some were thought to have Alzheimer type dementia. In addition to the FTD and ALS clinical presentations, the present study shows that c9FTD/ALS can have other presentations, possibly related to age of onset and presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Moreover, there is pathologic heterogeneity not only between ALS and FTLD, but within the

  11. Hypermethylation of the CpG-island near the C9orf72 G₄C₂-repeat expansion in FTLD patients.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhengrui; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele G; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Galimberti, Daniela; Surace, Ezequiel I; Zheng, Yonglan; Moreno, Danielle; Sato, Christine; Liang, Yan; Zhou, Ye; Robertson, Janice; Zinman, Lorne; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2014-11-01

    The G₄C₂-repeat expansion in C9orf72 is a common cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). C9orf72 transcription is reduced in expansion carriers implicating haploinsufficiency as one of the disease mechanisms. Indeed, our recent ALS study revealed that the expansion was associated with hypermethylation of the CpG-island (5'of the repeat) in DNA samples obtained from different tissues (blood, brain and spinal cord). However, the link between FTLD and methylation of the CpG-island is unknown. Hence, we investigated the methylation profile of the same CpG-island by bisulfite sequencing of DNA obtained from blood of 34 FTLD expansion carriers, 166 FTLD non-carriers and 103 controls. Methylation level was significantly higher in FTLD expansion carriers than non-carriers (P = 7.8E-13). Our results were confirmed by two methods (HhaI-assay and sequencing of cloned bisulfite PCR products). Hypermethylation occurred only in carriers of an allele with >50 repeats, and was not detected in non-carriers or individuals with an intermediate allele (22-43 repeats). As expected, the position/number of methylated CpGs was concordant between the sense and anti-sense DNA strand, suggesting that it is a stable epigenetic modification. Analysis of the combined ALS and FTLD datasets (82 expansion carriers) revealed that the degree of methylation of the entire CpG-island or contribution of specific CpGs (n = 26) is similar in both syndromes, with a trend towards a higher proportion of ALS patients with a high methylation level (P = 0.09). In conclusion, we demonstrated that hypermethylation of the CpG-island 5'of the G₄C₂-repeat is expansion-specific, but not syndrome-specific (ALS versus FTLD). PMID:24908669

  12. Cerebellar c9RAN proteins associate with clinical and neuropathological characteristics of C9ORF72 repeat expansion carriers.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Tania F; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Bieniek, Kevin F; Daughrity, Lillian M; Jiang, Jie; Rush, Beth K; Pedraza, Otto; Lucas, John A; Murray, Melissa E; Desaro, Pamela; Robertson, Amelia; Overstreet, Karen; Thomas, Colleen S; Crook, Julia E; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Rousseau, Linda; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Rademakers, Rosa; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Edbauer, Dieter; Cleveland, Don W; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard; Boylan, Kevin B

    2015-10-01

    Clinical and neuropathological characteristics associated with G4C2 repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia, are highly variable. To gain insight on the molecular basis for the heterogeneity among C9ORF72 mutation carriers, we evaluated associations between features of disease and levels of two abundantly expressed "c9RAN proteins" produced by repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation of the expanded repeat. For these studies, we took a departure from traditional immunohistochemical approaches and instead employed immunoassays to quantitatively measure poly(GP) and poly(GA) levels in cerebellum, frontal cortex, motor cortex, and/or hippocampus from 55 C9ORF72 mutation carriers [12 patients with ALS, 24 with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and 19 with FTLD with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND)]. We additionally investigated associations between levels of poly(GP) or poly(GA) and cognitive impairment in 15 C9ORF72 ALS patients for whom neuropsychological data were available. Among the neuroanatomical regions investigated, poly(GP) levels were highest in the cerebellum. In this same region, associations between poly(GP) and both neuropathological and clinical features were detected. Specifically, cerebellar poly(GP) levels were significantly lower in patients with ALS compared to patients with FTLD or FTLD-MND. Furthermore, cerebellar poly(GP) associated with cognitive score in our cohort of 15 patients. In the cerebellum, poly(GA) levels similarly trended lower in the ALS subgroup compared to FTLD or FTLD-MND subgroups, but no association between cerebellar poly(GA) and cognitive score was detected. Both cerebellar poly(GP) and poly(GA) associated with C9ORF72 variant 3 mRNA expression, but not variant 1 expression, repeat size, disease onset, or survival after onset. Overall, these data indicate that cerebellar abnormalities, as

  13. Low-pass shotgun sequencing of the barley genome facilitates rapid identification of genes, conserved non-coding sequences and novel repeats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Barley has one of the largest and most complex genomes of all economically important food crops. The rise of new short read sequencing technologies such as Illumina/Solexa permits such large genomes to be effectively sampled at relatively low costs. An MDR (Mathematically Defined Repeat)...

  14. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF

  15. Gain of Toxicity from ALS/FTD-Linked Repeat Expansions in C9ORF72 Is Alleviated by Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting GGGGCC-Containing RNAs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Zhu, Qiang; Gendron, Tania F; Saberi, Shahram; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Seelman, Amanda; Stauffer, Jennifer E; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Drenner, Kevin; Schulte, Derek; Chun, Seung; Sun, Shuying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Myers, Brian; Engelhardt, Jeffery; Katz, Melanie; Baughn, Michael; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Marsala, Martin; Watt, Andy; Heyser, Charles J; Ard, M Colin; De Muynck, Louis; Daughrity, Lillian M; Swing, Deborah A; Tessarollo, Lino; Jung, Chris J; Delpoux, Arnaud; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Hedrick, Stephen M; de Jong, Pieter J; Edbauer, Dieter; Van Damme, Philip; Petrucelli, Leonard; Shaw, Christopher E; Bennett, C Frank; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Cleveland, Don W; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde

    2016-05-01

    Hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72 are the most frequent genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Disease mechanisms were evaluated in mice expressing C9ORF72 RNAs with up to 450 GGGGCC repeats or with one or both C9orf72 alleles inactivated. Chronic 50% reduction of C9ORF72 did not provoke disease, while its absence produced splenomegaly, enlarged lymph nodes, and mild social interaction deficits, but not motor dysfunction. Hexanucleotide expansions caused age-, repeat-length-, and expression-level-dependent accumulation of RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins synthesized by AUG-independent translation, accompanied by loss of hippocampal neurons, increased anxiety, and impaired cognitive function. Single-dose injection of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target repeat-containing RNAs but preserve levels of mRNAs encoding C9ORF72 produced sustained reductions in RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins, and ameliorated behavioral deficits. These efforts identify gain of toxicity as a central disease mechanism caused by repeat-expanded C9ORF72 and establish the feasibility of ASO-mediated therapy. PMID:27112497

  16. Gonosomal mosaicism in myotonic dystrophy patients: Involvement of mitotic events in (CTG)[sub n] repeat variation and selection against extreme expansion in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, G.; Coerwinkel, M.; Wieringa, B.; Nillesen, W.; Smeets, H.; Brunner, H.; Wieringa, B. ); Willems, P.; Vits, L. ); Hoeweler, C. )

    1994-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by abnormal expansion of a polymorphic (CTG)[sub n] repeat, located in the DM protein kinase gene. The authors determined the (CTG)[sub n] repeat lengths in a broad range of tissue DNAs from patients with mild, classical, or congenital manifestation of DM. Differences in the repeat length were seen in somatic tissues from single DM individuals and twins. Repeats appeared to expand to a similar extent in tissues originating from the same embryonal origin. In most male patients carrying intermediate- or small-sized expansions in blood, the repeat lengths covered a markedly wider range in sperm. In contrast, male patients with large allele expansions in blood (>700 CTGs) had similar or smaller repeats in sperm, when detectable. Sperm alleles with >1,000 CTGs were not seen. The authors conclude that DM patients can be considered gonosomal mosaics, i.e., combined somatic and germ-line tissue mosaics. Most remarkably, they observed multiple cases where the length distributions of intermediate- or small-sized alleles in fathers' sperm were significantly different from that in their offspring's blood. The combined findings indicate that intergenerational length changes in the unstable CTG repeat are most likely to occur during early embryonic mitotic divisions in both somatic and germ-line tissue formation. Both the initial CTG length, the overall number of cell divisions involved in tissue formation, and perhaps a specific selection process in spermatogenesis may influence the dynamics of this process. A model explaining mitotic instability and sex-dependent segregation phenomena in DM manifestation is discussed. 59 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Frequency of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Majounie, Elisa; Renton, Alan E; Mok, Kin; Dopper, Elise GP; Waite, Adrian; Rollinson, Sara; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; van Swieten, John C; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Johnson, Janel O; Sendtner, Michael; Pamphlett, Roger; Orrell, Richard W; Mead, Simon; Sidle, Katie C; Houlden, Henry; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Morrison, Karen E; Pall, Hardev; Talbot, Kevin; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G; Arepalli, Sampath; Sabatelli, Mario; Mora, Gabriele; Corbo, Massimo; Giannini, Fabio; Calvo, Andrea; Englund, Elisabet; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Remes, Anne M; Laaksovirta, Hannu; McCluskey, Leo; Trojanowski, John Q; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Nalls, Michael A; Drory, Vivian E; Lu, Chin-Song; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Tsuji, Shoji; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis; Drepper, Carsten; Williams, Nigel; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela; Hardy, John; Tienari, Pentti J; Heutink, Peter; Morris, Huw R; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Traynor, Bryan J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We aimed to accurately estimate the frequency of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 that has been associated with a large proportion of cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods We screened 4448 patients diagnosed with ALS (El Escorial criteria) and 1425 patients with FTD (Lund-Manchester criteria) from 17 regions worldwide for the GGGGCC hexanucleotide expansion using a repeat-primed PCR assay. We assessed familial disease status on the basis of self-reported family history of similar neurodegenerative diseases at the time of sample collection. We compared haplotype data for 262 patients carrying the expansion with the known Finnish founder risk haplotype across the chromosomal locus. We calculated age-related penetrance using the Kaplan-Meier method with data for 603 individuals with the expansion. Findings In patients with sporadic ALS, we identified the repeat expansion in 236 (7·0%) of 3377 white individuals from the USA, Europe, and Australia, two (4·1%) of 49 black individuals from the USA, and six (8·3%) of 72 Hispanic individuals from the USA. The mutation was present in 217 (39·3%) of 552 white individuals with familial ALS from Europe and the USA. 59 (6·0%) of 981 white Europeans with sporadic FTD had the mutation, as did 99 (24·8%) of 400 white Europeans with familial FTD. Data for other ethnic groups were sparse, but we identified one Asian patient with familial ALS (from 20 assessed) and two with familial FTD (from three assessed) who carried the mutation. The mutation was not carried by the three Native Americans or 360 patients from Asia or the Pacific Islands with sporadic ALS who were tested, or by 41 Asian patients with sporadic FTD. All patients with the repeat expansion had (partly or fully) the founder haplotype, suggesting a one-off expansion occurring about 1500 years ago. The pathogenic expansion was non-penetrant in individuals younger than 35 years, 50

  18. Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansion in C9ORF72 Is Not Detected in the Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia Patients of Chinese Han

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijia; Xie, Shiping; Shi, Xiaomeng; Lv, Jie; Tang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaolan; Lu, Shuiping; Wang, Mingzhong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Sun, Jing; Yao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in C9ORF72 (HRE) causes frontotemporal lobar degeneration, frontotemporal dementia–amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. HRE was also seen in the genomes of patients suffering from several other degenerative diseases. However, whether it is present in the treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients remains unknown. Genotyping 386 patients suffering from treatment-resistant schizophrenia using the method of Repeat-Primed PCR, we reported here that no HRE was detected in the patients of Chinese Han. PMID:26691640

  19. Gender and cell-type specific effects of the transcription coupled repair protein, ERCC6/CSB, on repeat expansion in a mouse model of the Fragile X-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Usdin, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Repeat Expansion Diseases (REDs) are human genetic disorders that arise from expansion of a tandem repeat tract. The Fragile X-related disorders are members of this disease group in which the repeat unit is CGG/CCG and is located in the 5′ untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. Affected individuals often show mosaicism with respect to repeat number resulting from both expansion and contraction of the repeat tract, however, the mechanism responsible for these changes in repeat number are unknown. Work from a variety of model systems suggests that Transcription Coupled Repair (TCR) may contribute to repeat instability in diseases resulting from CAG/CTG-repeat expansion. To test whether TCR could contribute to repeat instability in the Fragile X-related disorders, we tested the effect of mutations in Csb (Cockayne Syndrome group B), a gene essential for TCR, in a knock-in mouse model of these disorders. We found that the loss of CSB affects expansions in a gender and cell type-specific manner. Our data also show an unanticipated gender difference in instability even in Csb+/+ animals that may have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of repeat expansion in the FX mouse model and perhaps for humans as well. PMID:24352881

  20. Treatment of neuroblastoma in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome with a PHOX2B polyalanine repeat expansion mutation: New twist on a neurocristopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Mian, Amir; Maris, John M; Batra, Vandana; Gosiengfiao, Yasmin; Reichek, Jennifer; Madonna, Mary Beth; Bush, Jonathan W; Shore, Richard M; Walterhouse, David O

    2015-11-01

    Neuroblastoma in patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) as part of a neurocristopathy syndrome is a rare finding and has only been associated with paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B) non-polyalanine-repeat-expansion mutations. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of a child with CCHS and Hirschsprung disease who had a PHOX2B polyalanine-repeat-expansion mutation (PARM) (genotype 20/33) and developed high-risk neuroblastoma. We further describe his treatment including chemotherapy and therapeutic I(131) -metaiodobenzylguanidine. This case highlights the need to consider neuroblastoma in patients with CCHS and the longest PHOX2B PARMs and to individualize treatment based on co-morbidities. PMID:26011159

  1. A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the cause of chromosome 9p21-linked ALS-FTD

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Alan E.; Majounie, Elisa; Waite, Adrian; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Rollinson, Sara; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Schymick, Jennifer C.; Laaksovirta, Hannu; van Swieten, John C.; Myllykangas, Liisa; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Remes, Anne M.; Kaganovich, Alice; Scholz, Sonja W.; Duckworth, Jamie; Ding, Jinhui; Harmer, Daniel W.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Johnson, Janel O.; Mok, Kin; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Danyah; Guerreiro, Rita J.; Orrell, Richard W.; Neal, James; Murray, Alex; Pearson, Justin; Jansen, Iris E.; Sondervan, David; Seelaar, Harro; Blake, Derek; Young, Kate; Halliwell, Nicola; Callister, Janis; Toulson, Greg; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alex; Snowden, Julie; Mann, David; Neary, David; Nalls, Michael A.; Peuralinna, Terhi; Jansson, Lilja; Isoviita, Veli-Matti; Kaivorinne, Anna-Lotta; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Ikonen, Elina; Sulkava, Raimo; Benatar, Michael; Wuu, Joanne; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Borghero, Giuseppe; Sabatelli, Mario; Heckerman, David; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Sendtner, Michael; Drepper, Carsten; Eichler, Evan E.; Alkan, Can; Abdullaev, Zied; Pack, Svetlana D.; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Williams, Nigel M.; Heutink, Peter; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Morris, Huw R.; Tienari, Pentti J.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    The chromosome 9p21 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) locus contains one of the last major unidentified autosomal dominant genes underlying these common neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously shown that a founder haplotype, covering the MOBKL2b, IFNK and C9ORF72 genes, is present in the majority of cases linked to this region. Here we show that there is a large hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 on the affected haplotype. This repeat expansion segregates perfectly with disease in the Finnish population, underlying 46.0% of familial ALS and 21.1% of sporadic ALS in that population. Taken together with the D90A SOD1 mutation, 87% of familial ALS in Finland is now explained by a simple monogenic cause. The repeat expansion is also present in one third of familial ALS cases of outbred European descent making it the most common genetic cause of these fatal neurodegenerative diseases identified to date. PMID:21944779

  2. The Replication of Frataxin Gene Is Assured by Activation of Dormant Origins in the Presence of a GAA-Repeat Expansion.

    PubMed

    Stevanoni, Martina; Palumbo, Elisa; Russo, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that DNA replication affects the stability of several trinucleotide repeats, but whether replication profiles of human loci carrying an expanded repeat differ from those of normal alleles is poorly understood in the endogenous context. We investigated this issue using cell lines from Friedreich's ataxia patients, homozygous for a GAA-repeat expansion in intron 1 of the Frataxin gene. By interphase, FISH we found that in comparison to the normal Frataxin sequence the replication of expanded alleles is slowed or delayed. According to molecular combing, origins never fired within the normal Frataxin allele. In contrast, in mutant alleles dormant origins are recruited within the gene, causing a switch of the prevalent fork direction through the expanded repeat. Furthermore, a global modification of the replication profile, involving origin choice and a differential distribution of unidirectional forks, was observed in the surrounding 850 kb region. These data provide a wide-view of the interplay of events occurring during replication of genes carrying an expanded repeat. PMID:27447727

  3. The Replication of Frataxin Gene Is Assured by Activation of Dormant Origins in the Presence of a GAA-Repeat Expansion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that DNA replication affects the stability of several trinucleotide repeats, but whether replication profiles of human loci carrying an expanded repeat differ from those of normal alleles is poorly understood in the endogenous context. We investigated this issue using cell lines from Friedreich’s ataxia patients, homozygous for a GAA-repeat expansion in intron 1 of the Frataxin gene. By interphase, FISH we found that in comparison to the normal Frataxin sequence the replication of expanded alleles is slowed or delayed. According to molecular combing, origins never fired within the normal Frataxin allele. In contrast, in mutant alleles dormant origins are recruited within the gene, causing a switch of the prevalent fork direction through the expanded repeat. Furthermore, a global modification of the replication profile, involving origin choice and a differential distribution of unidirectional forks, was observed in the surrounding 850 kb region. These data provide a wide-view of the interplay of events occurring during replication of genes carrying an expanded repeat. PMID:27447727

  4. Chloroplast DNA Phylogeography Reveals Repeated Range Expansion in a Widespread Aquatic Herb Hippuris vulgaris in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and Adjacent Areas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shan-Shan; Gituru, Robert Wahiti; Wang, Qing-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) is one of the most extensive habitats for alpine plants in the world. Climatic oscillations during the Quaternary ice age had a dramatic effect on species ranges on the QTP and the adjacent areas. However, how the distribution ranges of aquatic plant species shifted on the QTP in response to Quaternary climatic changes remains almost unknown. Methodology and Principal Findings We studied the phylogeography and demographic history of the widespread aquatic herb Hippuris vulgaris from the QTP and adjacent areas. Our sampling included 385 individuals from 47 natural populations of H. vulgaris. Using sequences from four chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) non-coding regions, we distinguished eight different cpDNA haplotypes. From the cpDNA variation in H. vulgaris, we found a very high level of population differentiation (GST = 0.819) but the phylogeographical structure remained obscure (NST = 0.853>GST = 0.819, P>0.05). Phylogenetic analyses revealed two main cpDNA haplotype lineages. The split between these two haplotype groups can be dated back to the mid-to-late Pleistocene (ca. 0.480 Myr). Mismatch distribution analyses showed that each of these had experienced a recent range expansion. These two expansions (ca. 0.12 and 0.17 Myr) might have begun from the different refugees before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Conclusions/Significance This study initiates a research on the phylogeography of aquatic herbs in the QTP and for the first time sheds light on the response of an alpine aquatic seed plant species in the QTP to Quaternary climate oscillations. PMID:23565290

  5. Defining the association of TMEM106B variants among frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with GRN mutations and C9orf72 repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Galimberti, Daniela; Serpente, Maria; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Camuzat, Agnès; Clot, Fabienne; Fenoglio, Chiara; Scarpini, Elio; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2014-11-01

    TMEM106B was identified as a risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD) with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa inclusions. It has been reported that variants in this gene are genetic modifiers of the disease and that this association is stronger in patients carrying a GRN mutation or a pathogenic expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene. Here, we investigated the contribution of TMEM106B polymorphisms in cohorts of FTD and FTD with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients from France and Italy. Patients carrying the C9orf72 expansion (n = 145) and patients with GRN mutations (n = 76) were compared with a group of FTD patients (n = 384) negative for mutations and to a group of healthy controls (n = 552). In our cohorts, the presence of the C9orf72 expansion did not correlate with TMEM106B genotypes but the association was very strong in individuals with pathogenic GRN mutations (p = 9.54 × 10(-6)). Our data suggest that TMEM106B genotypes differ in FTD patient cohorts and strengthen the protective role of TMEM106B in GRN carriers. Further studies are needed to determine whether TMEM106B polymorphisms are associated with other genetic causes for FTD, including C9orf72 repeat expansions. PMID:25085782

  6. DNA Methylation Leads to DNA Repair Gene Down-Regulation and Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion in Patient-Derived Huntington Disease Cells.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Peter A; Reid, John A; Ogle, Roy C; Sachs, Patrick C; Bruno, Robert D

    2016-07-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that exhibits genetic anticipation of affected progeny due to expansions of a trinucleotide repeat (TNR) region within the HTT gene. DNA repair machinery is a known effector of TNR instability; however, the specific defects in HD cells that lead to TNR expansion are unknown. We hypothesized that HD cells would be deficient in DNA repair gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression of select DNA repair genes involved in mismatch/loop-out repair (APEX1, BRCA1, RPA1, and RPA3) in patient-derived HD cells and found each was consistently down-regulated relative to wild-type samples taken from unaffected individuals in the same family. Rescue of DNA repair gene expression by 5-azacytidine treatment identified DNA methylation as a mediator of DNA repair gene expression deficiency. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed hypermethylation of the APEX1 promoter region in HD cells relative to control, as well as 5-azacytidine-induced hypomethylation. 5-Azacytidine treatments also resulted in stabilization of TNR expansion within the mutant HTT allele during long-term culture of HD cells. Our findings indicate that DNA methylation leads to DNA repair down-regulation and TNR instability in mitotically active HD cells and offer a proof of principle that epigenetic interventions can curb TNR expansions. PMID:27182645

  7. Molecular-intelligence correlations in young fragile X males with a mild CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Steyaert, J.; Borghgraef, M.; Legius, E.

    1996-08-09

    Several mechanisms can explain the occurrence of full-mutation fragile X males with an IQ level above -2 SD below mean, also called {open_quotes}high-functioning fragile X males.{close_quotes} Incomplete methylation of the CpG island at the 5{prime} end of the FMR1 gene is one of these mechanisms. The present study describes the physical and behavior phenotypes in 7 fragile X boys with CGG repeat insertions in the FMR1 gene between 600-2,400 base pairs. The degree of methylation at the FMR1-associated CpG island ranges in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 0-95%. Subjects with a low degree of methylation at this site have mild or absent physical characteristics of the fragile X syndrome, while subjects with a high degree of methylation at this site have more severe physical characteristics. In this range of CGG repeat insertion (600-2,400 base pairs), the degree of methylation at the FMR1-associated CpG island is a good predictor of intelligence, while CGG repeat insertion length is not. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Defining the Performance Parameters of a Rapid Screening Tool for FMR1 CGG-Repeat Expansions Based on Direct Triplet-Primed PCR and Melt Curve Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajan-Babu, Indhu-Shree; Lian, Mulias; Tran, Anh H; Dang, Truong T; Le, Huong T-M; Thanh, Minh N; Lee, Caroline G; Chong, Samuel S

    2016-09-01

    Population-based screening for CGG-repeat expansions in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene that cause fragile X syndrome can now be performed more cost-effectively and simply by combining direct triplet-primed PCR (dTP-PCR) with melting curve analysis (MCA). We have now performed a detailed technical validation to define the operational parameters for achieving robust and reliable performance of the FMR1 dTP-PCR MCA assay. We compared the assay's performance on 2 real-time PCR platforms and determined its analytic sensitivity and specificity. We also assessed the assay's performance on DNA isolated from different sources, the effect of differences in CGG-repeat length and AGG-interruption pattern on melt peak temperature (Tm), and the effect of common substances found in DNA solutions on Tms. The assay performed well in distinguishing normal from expansion-carrying samples. The assay had detection sensitivity down to 1 ng and an analytical specificity beyond 150 ng. In addition to peripheral blood DNA, analysis could also be performed on DNA from saliva, buccal swabs, and dried blood spots. Salt increased Tms, glycogen contamination had minimal effect, whereas AGG interruptions lowered Tms. The FMR1 dTP-PCR MCA screening assay is highly sensitive and specific, performs well using DNA from different sources, and is robust and reproducible when reagent concentrations are maintained across all tested samples. PMID:27375073

  9. Expansion of GA Dinucleotide Repeats Increases the Density of CLAMP Binding Sites on the X-Chromosome to Promote Drosophila Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Siggers, Trevor; Boor, Sonia; Bliss, Jacob; Liu, Wei; Jogl, Gerwald; Rohs, Remo; Singh, Nadia D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Larschan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation is an essential process that equalizes transcript levels of X-linked genes between sexes by forming a domain of coordinated gene expression. Throughout the evolution of Diptera, many different X-chromosomes acquired the ability to be dosage compensated. Once each newly evolved X-chromosome is targeted for dosage compensation in XY males, its active genes are upregulated two-fold to equalize gene expression with XX females. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CLAMP zinc finger protein links the dosage compensation complex to the X-chromosome. However, the mechanism for X-chromosome identification has remained unknown. Here, we combine biochemical, genomic and evolutionary approaches to reveal that expansion of GA-dinucleotide repeats likely accumulated on the X-chromosome over evolutionary time to increase the density of CLAMP binding sites, thereby driving the evolution of dosage compensation. Overall, we present new insight into how subtle changes in genomic architecture, such as expansions of a simple sequence repeat, promote the evolution of coordinated gene expression. PMID:27414415

  10. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Tobar-Tosse, Fabián; Rodríguez, Adrián C; Vélez, Patricia E; Zambrano, María M; Moreno, Pedro A

    2013-01-01

    Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C) content, Codon Usage (Cd), Trinucleotide Usage (Tn), and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS) in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment. PMID:23536879

  11. Exploration of Noncoding Sequences in Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Tobar-Tosse, Fabián; Rodríguez, Adrián C.; Vélez, Patricia E.; Zambrano, María M.; Moreno, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C) content, Codon Usage (Cd), Trinucleotide Usage (Tn), and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS) in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment. PMID:23536879

  12. Repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 alleles of the TATA-box binding protein gene: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Tomiuk, Jürgen; Bachmann, Lutz; Bauer, Claudia; Rolfs, Arndt; Schöls, Ludger; Roos, Christian; Zischler, Hans; Schuler, Mathias M; Bruntner, Silke; Riess, Olaf; Bauer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The variability and mutational changes of the CAG microsatellite in the TATA-box binding protein gene (TBP) were studied. We sequenced the microsatellite of the TBP gene of 25 unrelated individuals from northern Germany (10 SCA17 patients and 15 unaffected control individuals). In addition, the microsatellites were sequenced from individuals of 10 northern German families with at least one family member affected by SCA17. To study also the evolutionary history of this CAG/CAA microsatellite in nonhuman primates, the homologous regions were analysed from Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, P. abellii, Hylobates lar, Nomascus leucogenys, Symphalangus syndactylus, Macaca mulatta, Papio hamadryas, Colobus polykomos and Callithrix jacchus. Three major conclusions were drawn: (i) Patterns of synonymous CAA interruptions in the microsatellite are characteristic and likely to result from selection for stabilizing the repetitive region; (ii) Interspecific comparisons indicate that SCA17 is likely to be a human trait. The most common allele in humans (37 repeats) is close to the threshold value upon which neurodegenerative changes can occur and may act as a repository for expanded, pathogenic alleles; (iii) The cassette-like structure of five out of 17 expanded alleles can be attributed to unequal crossing over. This can explain the rare and sporadic de novo generation of SCA17 alleles. PMID:17033685

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of the plastid inverted repeat: the effects of expansion, contraction, and loss on substitution rates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andan; Guo, Wenhu; Gupta, Sakshi; Fan, Weishu; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2016-03-01

    Rates of nucleotide substitution were previously shown to be several times slower in the plastid inverted repeat (IR) compared with single-copy (SC) regions, suggesting that the IR provides enhanced copy-correction activity. To examine the generality of this synonymous rate dependence on the IR, we compared plastomes from 69 pairs of closely related species representing 52 families of angiosperms, gymnosperms, and ferns. We explored the breadth of IR boundary shifts in land plants and demonstrate that synonymous substitution rates are, on average, 3.7 times slower in IR genes than in SC genes. In addition, genes moved from the SC into the IR exhibit lower synonymous rates consistent with other IR genes, while genes moved from the IR into the SC exhibit higher rates consistent with other SC genes. Surprisingly, however, several plastid genes from Pelargonium, Plantago, and Silene have highly accelerated synonymous rates despite their IR localization. Together, these results provide strong evidence that the duplicative nature of the IR reduces the substitution rate within this region. The anomalously fast-evolving genes in Pelargonium, Plantago, and Silene indicate localized hypermutation, potentially induced by a higher level of error-prone double-strand break repair in these regions, which generates substitutional rate variation. PMID:26574731

  14. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy and chromosome 9p repeat expansion in C9ORF72: clinicopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Bigio, Eileen H; Weintraub, Sandra; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Ahmadian, Saman S; Rademaker, Alfred; Weitner, Bing Bing; Mao, Qinwen; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Mishra, Manjari; Ganti, Rakhee A; Mesulam, M-Marsel

    2013-04-01

    Mutations in C9ORF72 resulting in expanded hexanucleotide repeats were recently reported to be the underlying genetic abnormality in chromosome 9p-linked frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kD (TDP-43) proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND). Several subsequent publications described the neuropathology as being similar to that of FTLD-TDP and ALS without C9ORF72 mutations, except that cases with mutations have p62 and ubiquitin positive, TDP-43 negative inclusions in cerebellum, hippocampus, neocortex, and basal ganglia. The identity of this protein is as yet unknown, and its significance is unclear. With the goal of potentially uncovering the significance of these inclusions, we compared the clinical, pathologic and genetic characteristics in cases with C9ORF72 mutations to those without. We confirmed the apparent specificity of p62 positive, TDP-43 negative inclusions to cases with C9ORF72 mutations. In hippocampus, these inclusions correlated with hippocampal atrophy. No additional correlations were uncovered. However, this is the first report to show that although most cases with C9ORF72 mutations were TDP type B, some of the pathologic characteristics in these cases were more similar to TDP types A and C than to type B cases. These include greater cortical and hippocampal atrophy, greater ventricular dilatation, more neuronal loss and gliosis in temporal lobe and striatum, and TDP-43 positive fine neuritic profiles in the hippocampus, implying that the C9ORF72 mutation modifies the pathologic phenotype of FTLD-TDP type B. PMID:22702520

  15. Mixed tau, TDP-43 and p62 pathology in FTLD associated with a C9ORF72 repeat expansion and p.Ala239Thr MAPT (tau) variant.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; Smith, Bradley N; Maekawa, Satomi; Iovino, Mariangela; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Shaw, Christopher E

    2013-02-01

    A massive intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has recently been identified as the most common cause of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We have previously demonstrated that C9ORF72 mutant cases have a specific pathological profile with abundant p62-positive, TDP-43-negative cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions within cerebellar granular cells of the cerebellum and pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in addition to classical TDP-43 pathology. Here, we report mixed tau and TDP-43 pathology in a woman with behavioural variant FTLD who had the C9ORF72 mutation, and the p.Ala239Thr variant in MAPT (microtubule associated protein tau) gene not previously associated with tau pathology. Two of her brothers, who carried the C9ORF72 mutation, but not the MAPT variant, developed classical ALS without symptomatic cognitive changes. The dominant neuropathology in this woman with FTLD was a tauopathy with Pick's disease-like features. TDP-43 labelling was mainly confined to Pick bodies, but p62-positive, TDP-43-negative inclusions, characteristic of C9ORF72 mutations, were present in the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mixed pathology to this degree is unusual. One might speculate that the presence of the C9ORF72 mutation might influence tau deposition in what was previously thought to be a "benign" variant in MAPT in addition to the aggregation of TDP-43 and other as yet unidentified proteins decorated with ubiquitin and p62. PMID:23053136

  16. Genetic counseling for FTD/ALS caused by the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are related but distinct neurodegenerative diseases. The identification of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a noncoding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene as a common cause of FTD/ALS, familial FTD, and familial ALS marks the culmination of many years of investigation. This confirms the linkage of disease to chromosome 9 in large, multigenerational families with FTD and ALS, and it promotes deeper understanding of the diseases' shared molecular FTLD-TDP pathology. The discovery of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion has significant implications not only for familial FTD and ALS, but also for sporadic disease. Clinical and pathological correlates of the repeat expansion are being reported but remain to be refined, and a genetic test to detect the expansion has only recently become clinically available. Consequently, individuals and their families who are considering genetic testing for the C9ORF72 expansion should receive genetic counseling to discuss the risks, benefits, and limitations of testing. The following review aims to describe genetic counseling considerations for individuals at risk for a C9ORF72 repeat expansion. PMID:22808918

  17. RAN translation and frameshifting as translational challenges at simple repeats of human neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowska, Marzena; Olejniczak, Marta; Galka-Marciniak, Paulina; Jazurek, Magdalena; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2014-01-01

    Repeat-associated disorders caused by expansions of short sequences have been classified as coding and noncoding and are thought to be caused by protein gain-of-function and RNA gain-of-function mechanisms, respectively. The boundary between such classifications has recently been blurred by the discovery of repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation reported in spinocerebellar ataxia type 8, myotonic dystrophy type 1, fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome and C9ORF72 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This noncanonical translation requires no AUG start codon and can initiate in multiple frames of CAG, CGG and GGGGCC repeats of the sense and antisense strands of disease-relevant transcripts. RNA structures formed by the repeats have been suggested as possible triggers; however, the precise mechanism of the translation initiation remains elusive. Templates containing expansions of microsatellites have also been shown to challenge translation elongation, as frameshifting has been recognized across CAG repeats in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and Huntington's disease. Determining the critical requirements for RAN translation and frameshifting is essential to decipher the mechanisms that govern these processes. The contribution of unusual translation products to pathogenesis needs to be better understood. In this review, we present current knowledge regarding RAN translation and frameshifting and discuss the proposed mechanisms of translational challenges imposed by simple repeat expansions. PMID:25217582

  18. Simple sequence repeat variations expedite phage divergence: Mechanisms of indels and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao-Yin

    2016-07-01

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities and influence prokaryotic communities on Earth. Comparing closely related genomes sheds light on molecular events shaping phage evolution. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) variations impart over half of the genomic changes between T7M and T3, indicating an important role of SSRs in accelerating phage genetic divergence. Differences in coding and noncoding regions of phages infecting different hosts, coliphages T7M and T3, Yersinia phage ϕYeO3-12, and Salmonella phage ϕSG-JL2, frequently arise from SSR variations. Such variations modify noncoding and coding regions; the latter efficiently changes multiple amino acids, thereby hastening protein evolution. Four classes of events are found to drive SSR variations: insertion/deletion of SSR units, expansion/contraction of SSRs without alteration of genome length, changes of repeat motifs, and generation/loss of repeats. The categorization demonstrates the ways SSRs mutate in genomes during phage evolution. Indels are common constituents of genome variations and human diseases, yet, how they occur without preexisting repeat sequence is less understood. Non-repeat-unit-based misalignment-elongation (NRUBME) is proposed to be one mechanism for indels without adjacent repeats. NRUBME or consecutive NRUBME may also change repeat motifs or generate new repeats. NRUBME invoking a non-Watson-Crick base pair explains insertions that initiate mononucleotide repeats. Furthermore, NRUBME successfully interprets many inexplicable human di- to tetranucleotide repeat generations. This study provides the first evidence of SSR variations expediting phage divergence, and enables insights into the events and mechanisms of genome evolution. NRUBME allows us to emulate natural evolution to design indels for various applications. PMID:27133219

  19. Retention of stemness and vasculogenic potential of human umbilical cord blood stem cells after repeated expansions on PES-nanofiber matrices.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Matthew; Das, Manjusri; Kanji, Suman; Lu, Jingwei; Aggarwal, Reeva; Chakroborty, Debanjan; Sarkar, Chandrani; Yu, Hongmei; Mao, Hai-Quan; Basu, Sujit; Pompili, Vincent J; Das, Hiranmoy

    2014-10-01

    Despite recent advances in cardiovascular medicine, ischemic diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Although stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of ischemic diseases show great promise, limited availability of biologically functional stem cells mired the application of stem cell-based therapies. Previously, we reported a PES-nanofiber based ex vivo stem cell expansion technology, which supports expansion of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD133(+)/CD34(+) progenitor cells ∼225 fold. Herein, we show that using similar technology and subsequent re-expansion methods, we can achieve ∼5 million-fold yields within 24 days of the initial seeding. Interestingly, stem cell phenotype was preserved during the course of the multiple expansions. The high level of the stem cell homing receptor, CXCR4 was expressed in the primary expansion cells, and was maintained throughout the course of re-expansions. In addition, re-expanded cells preserved their multi-potential differential capabilities in vitro, such as, endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. Moreover, biological functionality of the re-expanded cells was preserved and was confirmed by a murine hind limb ischemia model for revascularization. These cells could also be genetically modified for enhanced vasculogenesis. Immunohistochemical evidences support enhanced expression of angiogenic factors responsible for this enhanced neovascularization. These data further confirms that nanofiber-based ex-vivo expansion technology can generate sufficient numbers of biologically functional stem cells for potential clinical applications. PMID:25002260

  20. Crosstalking noncoding RNAs contribute to cell-specific neurodegeneration in SCA7

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jennifer Y.; Sirey, Tamara; Watson, Lauren M.; Curtis, Helen J.; Marinello, Martina; Alves, Sandro; Steinkraus, Bruno; Cooper, Sarah; Nesterova, Tatyana; Brockdorff, Neil; Fulga, Tudor; Brice, Alexis; Sittler, Annie; Oliver, Peter L.; Wood, Matthew J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Marques, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    What causes the tissue-specific pathology of diseases resulting from mutations in housekeeping genes? Specifically, in Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in ATXN7- an essential component of the mammalian transcription co-activation complex, STAGA- the factors underlying the characteristic progressive cerebellar and retinal degeneration observed in patients were unknown. We found that STAGA is required for the transcription initiation of miR-124, which in turn mediates the post-transcriptional crosstalk between lnc-SCA7, a conserved long noncoding RNA, and ATXN7. In SCA7, mutations in ATXN7 disrupt these regulatory interactions and result in a neuron-specific increase in ATXN7 abundance. Strikingly in mouse, this increase is most prominent in the SCA7 disease-relevant tissues, namely the retina and cerebellum. Our results illustrate how noncoding RNA-mediated feedback regulation of a ubiquitously expressed housekeeping gene may contribute to specific neurodegeneration. PMID:25306109

  1. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example. PMID:27117425

  2. The long non-coding RNA FMR4 promotes proliferation of human neural precursor cells and epigenetic regulation of gene expression in trans.

    PubMed

    Peschansky, Veronica J; Pastori, Chiara; Zeier, Zane; Wentzel, Katya; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Magistri, Marco; Silva, José P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2016-07-01

    Triplet repeat expansions in the Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene cause either intellectual disability and autism, or adult-onset neurodegeneration, with poorly understood variability in presentation. Previous studies have identified several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) at the FMR1 locus, including FMR4. Similarly to FMR1, FMR4 is silenced by large-repeat expansions that result in enrichment of DNA and histone methylation within the shared promoter and repeat sequence, suggesting a possible role for this noncoding RNA in the pathophysiology of Fragile X. We therefore assessed the functional role of FMR4 to gain further insight into the molecular processes in Fragile X-associated disorders. Previous work showed that FMR4 does not exhibit cis-regulation of FMR1. Here, we found that FMR4 is a chromatin-associated transcript and, using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, showed that FMR4 alters the chromatin state and the expression of several hundred genes in trans. Among the genes regulated by FMR4, we found enrichment for those involved in neural development and cellular proliferation. S-phase marker assays further demonstrated that FMR4 may promote cellular proliferation, rather than differentiation, of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs). By establishing this novel function for FMR4 in hNPCs, we lend support to existing evidence of the epigenetic involvement of lncRNA in nervous system development, and increase our understanding of the complex pathogenesis underlying neurological disorders associated with FMR1 repeat expansions. PMID:27001315

  3. Long noncoding RNAs in hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Hu, Wenqian

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian development is under tight control to ensure precise gene expression. Recent studies reveal a new layer of regulation of gene expression mediated by long noncoding RNAs. These transcripts are longer than 200nt that do not have functional protein coding capacity. Interestingly, many of these long noncoding RNAs are expressed with high specificity in different types of cells, tissues, and developmental stages in mammals, suggesting that they may have functional roles in diverse biological processes. Here, we summarize recent findings of long noncoding RNAs in hematopoiesis, which is one of the best-characterized mammalian cell differentiation processes. Then we provide our own perspectives on future studies of long noncoding RNAs in this field. PMID:27508063

  4. Lack of expansion of triplet repeats in the FMR1, FRAXE, and FRAXF loci in male multiplex families with autism and pervasive developmental disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A.; Julien-Inalsingh, C.; Wing, M.

    1996-08-09

    Sib, twin, and family studies have shown that a genetic cause exists in many cases of autism, with a portion of cases associated with a fragile X chromosome. Three folate-sensitive fragile sites in the Xq27{r_arrow}Xq28 region have been cloned and found to have polymorphic trinucleotide repeats at the respective sites; these repeats are amplified and methylated in individuals who are positive for the different fragile sites. We have tested affected boys and their mothers from 19 families with two autistic/PDD boys for amplification and/or instability of the triplet repeats at these loci and concordance of inheritance of alleles by affected brothers. In all cases, the triplet repeat numbers were within the normal range, with no individuals having expanded or premutation-size alleles. For each locus, there was no evidence for an increased frequency of concordance, indicating that mutations within these genes are unlikely to be responsible for the autistic/PDD phenotypes in the affected boys. Thus, we think it is important to retest those autistic individuals who were cytogenetically positive for a fragile X chromosome, particularly cases where there is no family history of the fragile X syndrome, using the more accurate DNA-based testing procedures. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Noncoding RNAs and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Mozhgan Moslemi; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2009-01-01

    The eukaryotic complexity involves the expression and regulation of genes via RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA, DNA-protein and RNA-protein interactions. Recently, the role of RNA molecules in the regulation of genes in higher organisms has become more evident, especially with the discovery that about 97% of the transcriptional output in higher organisms are represented as noncoding RNAs: rRNA, snoRNAs, tRNA, transposable elements, 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions, introns, intergenic regions and microRNAs. MicroRNAs function by negatively regulating gene expression via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs and thus participate in a wide variety of physiological and pathological cellular processes including: development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis pathways. MicroRNA expression profiles in many types of cancers have been identified. Recent reports have revealed that the expression profiles of microRNAs change in various human cancers and appear to function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Abnormal microRNA expression has increasingly become a common feature of human cancers. In this review, we summarize the latest progress on the involvement of microRNAs in different types of cancer and their potential use as potential diagnostic and prognostic tumor biomarkers in the future. PMID:23407615

  6. EBV Noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Rebecca L; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-01-01

    EBV expresses a number of viral noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) during latent infection, many of which have known regulatory functions and can post-transcriptionally regulate viral and/or cellular gene expression. With recent advances in RNA sequencing technologies, the list of identified EBV ncRNAs continues to grow. EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) , the BamHI-A rightward transcripts (BARTs) , a small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) , and viral microRNAs (miRNAs) are all expressed during EBV infection in a variety of cell types and tumors. Recently, additional novel EBV ncRNAs have been identified. Viral miRNAs, in particular, have been under extensive investigation since their initial identification over ten years ago. High-throughput studies to capture miRNA targets have revealed a number of miRNA-regulated viral and cellular transcripts that tie into important biological networks. Functions for many EBV ncRNAs are still unknown; however, roles for many EBV miRNAs in latency and in tumorigenesis have begun to emerge. Ongoing mechanistic studies to elucidate the functions of EBV ncRNAs should unravel additional roles for ncRNAs in the viral life cycle. In this chapter, we will discuss our current knowledge of the types of ncRNAs expressed by EBV, their potential roles in viral latency, and their potential involvement in viral pathogenesis. PMID:26428375

  7. Novel neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in a patient carrying SCA8 expansion mutation.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Teruo; Ishiyama, Miyako; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Uchihara, Toshiki; Yagishita, Saburo

    2014-02-01

    It has been reported that abnormal processing of pre-mRNA is caused by abnormal triplet expansion. Non-coding triplet expansions produce toxic RNA to alter RNA splicing activities. However, there has been no report on the globular RNA aggregation in neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) up to now. We herein report on an autopsy case (genetically determined as spinocerebellar atrophy 8 (SCA8)) with hitherto undescribed NCIs throughout the brain. NCIs were chiefly composed of small granular particles, virtually identical to ribosomes. Neurological features are comparable to the widespread lesions of the brain, including the spinal cord. Although 1C2-positivity of NCIs might be induced by reverse transcription of the CTG expansion, it remains to be clarified how abnormal aggregations of ribosome and extensive brain degeneration are related to the reverse or forward transcripts of the expanded repeat. PMID:23711133

  8. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity. PMID:27376738

  9. Noncoding RNAs in Growth and Death of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anfei; Liu, Shanrong

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian genomes are mostly comprised of noncoding genes. And mammalian genomes are characterized by pervasive expression of different types of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). In sharp contrast to previous collections, these ncRNAs show strong purifying selection evolutionary conservation. Previous studies indicated that only a small fraction of the mammalian genome codes for messenger RNAs destined to be translated into peptides or proteins, and it is generally assumed that a large portion of transcribed sequences-including pseudogenes and several classes of ncRNAs-do not give rise to peptides or proteins. However, ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be noncoding. Moreover, these observations highlight a potentially large and complex set of biologically regulated translational events from transcripts formerly thought to lack coding potential. Furthermore, accumulating evidence from previous studies has suggested that the novel translation products exhibit temporal regulation similar to that of proteins known to be involved in many biological activity processes. In this review, we focus on the coding potential of noncoding genes and ncRNAs. We also sketched the possible mechanisms for their coding activities. Overall, our review provides new insights into the word of central dogma and is an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research. At last, the outcome of the majority of the translation events and their potential biological purpose remain an intriguing topic for future investigation. PMID:27376734

  10. Noncoding RNAs in Endocrine Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kentwell, Jessica; Gundara, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Only recently has it been uncovered that the mammalian transcriptome includes a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that play a variety of important regulatory roles in gene expression and other biological processes. Among numerous kinds of ncRNAs, short noncoding RNAs, such as microRNAs, have been extensively investigated with regard to their biogenesis, function, and importance in carcinogenesis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have only recently been implicated in playing a key regulatory role in cancer biology. The deregulation of ncRNAs has been demonstrated to have important roles in the regulation and progression of cancer development. In this review, we describe the roles of both short noncoding RNAs (including microRNAs, small nuclear RNAs, and piwi-interacting RNAs) and lncRNAs in carcinogenesis and outline the possible underlying genetic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on clinical applications. The focus of our review includes studies from the literature on ncRNAs in traditional endocrine-related cancers, including thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal gland, and gastrointestinal neuroendocrine malignancies. The current and potential future applications of ncRNAs in clinical cancer research is also discussed, with emphasis on diagnosis and future treatment. PMID:24718512

  11. Scaling features of noncoding DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.

    1999-01-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing noncoding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, base pairs thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene, and utilize this fact to build a Coding Sequence Finder Algorithm, which uses statistical ideas to locate the coding regions of an unknown DNA sequence. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work adapting to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts, and the Shannon approach to quantifying the "redundancy" of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function, and reporting that noncoding regions in eukaryotes display a larger redundancy than coding regions. Specifically, we consider the possibility that this result is solely a consequence of nucleotide concentration differences as first noted by Bonhoeffer and his collaborators. We find that cytosine-guanine (CG) concentration does have a strong "background" effect on redundancy. However, we find that for the purine-pyrimidine binary mapping rule, which is not affected by the difference in CG concentration, the Shannon redundancy for the set of analyzed sequences is larger for noncoding regions compared to coding regions.

  12. Noncoding RNAs in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Xipeng; Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Zhou, Qun

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian transcriptome has recently been revealed to encompass a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that play a variety of important regulatory roles in gene expression and other biological processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), the best studied of the short noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), have been extensively characterized with regard to their biogenesis, function and importance in tumorigenesis. Another class of sncRNAs called piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) has also gained attention recently in cancer research owing to their critical role in stem cell regulation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) of >200 nucleotides in length have recently emerged as key regulators of developmental processes, including mammary gland development. lncRNA dysregulation has also been implicated in the development of various cancers, including breast cancer. In this review, we describe and discuss the roles of sncRNAs (including miRNAs and piRNAs) and lncRNAs in the initiation and progression of breast tumorigenesis, with a focus on outlining the molecular mechanisms of oncogenic and tumor-suppressor ncRNAs. Moreover, the current and potential future applications of ncRNAs to clinical breast cancer research are also discussed, with an emphasis on ncRNA-based diagnosis, prognosis and future therapeutics. PMID:26685283

  13. C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia forms RNA G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Fratta, Pietro; Mizielinska, Sarah; Nicoll, Andrew J.; Zloh, Mire; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Parkinson, Gary; Isaacs, Adrian M.

    2012-01-01

    Large expansions of a non-coding GGGGCC-repeat in the first intron of the C9orf72 gene are a common cause of both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). G-rich sequences have a propensity for forming highly stable quadruplex structures in both RNA and DNA termed G-quadruplexes. G-quadruplexes have been shown to be involved in a range of processes including telomere stability and RNA transcription, splicing, translation and transport. Here we show using NMR and CD spectroscopy that the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion can form a stable G-quadruplex, which has profound implications for disease mechanism in ALS and FTD. PMID:23264878

  14. Viral noncoding RNAs: more surprises

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Guo, Yang Eric; Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Vallery, Tenaya K.; Xie, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells produce several classes of long and small noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Many DNA and RNA viruses synthesize their own ncRNAs. Like their host counterparts, viral ncRNAs associate with proteins that are essential for their stability, function, or both. Diverse biological roles—including the regulation of viral replication, viral persistence, host immune evasion, and cellular transformation—have been ascribed to viral ncRNAs. In this review, we focus on the multitude of functions played by ncRNAs produced by animal viruses. We also discuss their biogenesis and mechanisms of action. PMID:25792595

  15. Coding DNA repeated throughout intergenic regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome: Evolutionary footprints of RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyknons are non-random sequence patterns significantly repeated throughout non-coding genomic DNA that also appear at least once among genes. They are interesting because they portend an unforeseen connection between coding and non-coding DNA. Pyknons have only been discovered in the human genome,...

  16. Noncoding Regulatory RNAs in Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, M; Goodell, M A

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a dynamic process in which blood cells are continuously generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The regulatory mechanisms controlling HSC fate have been studied extensively over the past several decades. Although many protein-coding genes have been shown to regulate hematopoietic differentiation, additional levels of HSC regulation are not well studied. Advances in deep sequencing have revealed many new classes of regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), such as enhancer RNAs and antisense ncRNAs. Functional analysis of some of these ncRNAs has provided insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate hematopoietic development and disease. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of functional regulatory ncRNAs associated with hematopoietic self-renewal and differentiation, as well as those dysregulated ncRNAs involved in hematologic malignancies. PMID:27137659

  17. Noncoding RNPs of Viral Origin

    PubMed Central

    Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host’s response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

  18. Noncoding RNPs of viral origin.

    PubMed

    Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

    2011-03-01

    Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host's response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

  19. Nuclear accumulation of mRNAs underlies G4C2-repeat-induced translational repression in a cellular model of C9orf72 ALS.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Simona; Serrano, Alessia; Gerbino, Valeria; Giorgi, Alessandra; Di Francesco, Laura; Nencini, Monica; Bozzo, Francesca; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Bagni, Claudia; Cestra, Gianluca; Carrì, Maria Teresa; Achsel, Tilmann; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    A common feature of non-coding repeat expansion disorders is the accumulation of RNA repeats as RNA foci in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of affected cells. These RNA foci can be toxic because they sequester RNA-binding proteins, thus affecting various steps of post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, the precise step that is affected by C9orf72 GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion, the major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is still poorly defined. In this work, we set out to characterise these mechanisms by identifying proteins that bind to C9orf72 RNA. Sequestration of some of these factors into RNA foci was observed when a (G4C2)31 repeat was expressed in NSC34 and HeLa cells. Most notably, (G4C2)31 repeats widely affected the distribution of Pur-alpha and its binding partner fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP, also known as FMR1), which accumulate in intra-cytosolic granules that are positive for stress granules markers. Accordingly, translational repression is induced. Interestingly, this effect is associated with a marked accumulation of poly(A) mRNAs in cell nuclei. Thus, defective trafficking of mRNA, as a consequence of impaired nuclear mRNA export, might affect translation efficiency and contribute to the pathogenesis of C9orf72 ALS. PMID:25788698

  20. Linguistic features of noncoding DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, R. N.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C.-K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-12-01

    We extend the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts to the statistical study of DNA base pair sequences, and find that the noncoding regions are more similar to natural languages than the coding regions. We also adapt the Shannon approach to quantifying the ``redundancy'' of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function, and demonstrate that noncoding regions in eukaryotes display a smaller entropy and larger redundancy B than coding regions, supporting the possibility that noncoding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  1. Noncoding RNAs: Emerging Players in Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The fascinating world of noncoding RNAs has recently come to light, thanks to the development of powerful sequencing technologies, revealing a variety of RNA molecules playing important regulatory functions in most, if not all, cellular processes. Many noncoding RNAs have been implicated in regulatory networks that are determinant for skeletal muscle differentiation and disease. In this review, we outline the noncoding RNAs involved in physiological mechanisms of myogenesis and those that appear dysregulated in muscle dystrophies, also discussing their potential use as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24729974

  2. A Polymerase Chain Reaction, Nuclease Digestion, and Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for the Trinucleotide Repeat Status of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Eric D.; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Paul J.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    CGG repeat expansions in the 5′ non-coding region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) give rise to both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative human diseases depending on the length of the expansion. Expansions beyond 200 repeats (full mutation) generally result in gene silencing and fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading heritable form of cognitive impairment and autism. Smaller expansions (55-200 CGG repeats; “premutation”) give rise to the neurodegenerative disorder fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) through an entirely distinct, toxic mRNA gain-of-function mechanism. A rapid means for both high-risk and newborn screening for allele size would provide greater opportunity for early intervention and family counseling, as well as furnish critical data on repeat size distribution and expanded allele frequencies. In the current work, we propose a novel mass spectrometry (MS) based method for the rapid identification of expanded CGG repeats to complement a recently described polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for large population screening. In this combined approach, the optimized PCR method is used to amplify the relevant region of FMR1, followed by extensive non-specific nuclease digestion. The resulting oligonucleotides are analyzed by MS in a manner that provides the relative proportion of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in seconds per sample. This assay enables swift and reproducible detection of expanded CGG alleles using a single blood spot, and in principle is suitable for large scale studies and newborn screening. Moreover, this analytical scheme establishes a unique new intersection of MS with molecular biology, with potential for significant interdisciplinary impact. PMID:19514725

  3. Long noncoding RNAs as regulators of Toll-like receptor signaling and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael B; Medvedev, Andrei E

    2016-06-01

    Sensing of microbial pathogens and endogenous "alarmins" by macrophages and dendritic cells is reliant on pattern recognition receptors, including membrane-associated TLRs, cytosolic nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain leucine-rich repeat-containing receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors, and absent in melanoma 2-like receptors. Engagement of TLRs elicits signaling pathways that activate inflammatory genes whose expression is regulated by chromatin-modifying complexes and transcription factors. Long noncoding RNAs have emerged as new regulators of inflammatory mediators in the immune system. They are expressed in macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, NK cells, and T- and B-lymphocytes and are involved in immune cell differentiation and activation. Long noncoding RNAs act via repression or activation of transcription factors, modulation of stability of mRNA and microRNA, regulation of ribosome entry and translation of mRNAs, and controlling components of the epigenetic machinery. In this review, we focus on recent advances in deciphering the mechanisms by which long noncoding RNAs regulate TLR-driven responses in macrophages and dendritic cells and discuss the involvement of long noncoding RNAs in endotoxin tolerance, autoimmune, and inflammatory diseases. The dissection of the role of long noncoding RNAs will improve our understanding of the mechanisms of regulation of inflammation and may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26965636

  4. NONCODE 2016: an informative and valuable data source of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Li, Hui; Fang, Shuangsang; Kang, Yue; wu, Wei; Hao, Yajing; Li, Ziyang; Bu, Dechao; Sun, Ninghui; Zhang, Michael Q.; Chen, Runsheng

    2016-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an interactive database that aims to present the most complete collection and annotation of non-coding RNAs, especially long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The recently reduced cost of RNA sequencing has produced an explosion of newly identified data. Revolutionary third-generation sequencing methods have also contributed to more accurate annotations. Accumulative experimental data also provides more comprehensive knowledge of lncRNA functions. In this update, NONCODE has added six new species, bringing the total to 16 species altogether. The lncRNAs in NONCODE have increased from 210 831 to 527,336. For human and mouse, the lncRNA numbers are 167,150 and 130,558, respectively. NONCODE 2016 has also introduced three important new features: (i) conservation annotation; (ii) the relationships between lncRNAs and diseases; and (iii) an interface to choose high-quality datasets through predicted scores, literature support and long-read sequencing method support. NONCODE is also accessible through http://www.noncode.org/. PMID:26586799

  5. Noncoding RNAs and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan-Fei; Zhuang, Yan-Yan; Huang, Feng-Ting; Zhang, Shi-Neng

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are short, approximately 22-nucleotide sequences of RNA of approximately 22-nucleotide in length that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs can function as master gene regulators, impacting a variety of cellular pathways important to normal cellular functions as well as cancer development and progression. In addition to miRNAs, long ncRNAs, which are transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides, have recently emerged as novel drivers of tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation and function, and the significance of other ncRNAs such as piwi-interacting RNAs in pancreas carcinogenesis are largely unknown. This review summarizes the growing body of evidence supporting the vital roles of ncRNAs in pancreatic cancer, focusing on their dysregulation through both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, and highlighting the promise of ncRNAs in diagnostic and therapeutic applications of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811626

  6. Long noncoding RNAs and neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a disease that affects infants and despite intense multimodal therapy, high-risk patients have low survival rates (<50%). In recent years long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have become the cutting edge of cancer research with inroads made in understanding their roles in multiple cancer types, including prostate and breast cancers. The roles of lncRNAs in neuroblastoma have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarises where we are with regards to lncRNAs in neuroblastoma. The known mechanistic roles of lncRNAs during neuroblastoma pathogenesis are discussed, as well as the relationship between lncRNA expression and the differentiation capacity of neuroblastoma cells. We speculate about the use of some of these lncRNAs, such as those mapping to the 6p22 hotspot, as biomarkers for neuroblastoma prognosis and treatment. This novel way of thinking about both neuroblastoma and lncRNAs brings a new perspective to the prognosis and treatment of high-risk patients. PMID:26087192

  7. New insights into the genetic instability in CCTG repeats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pei; Lam, Sik Lok

    2015-10-01

    Tetranucleotide CCTG repeat expansion is associated with myotonic dystrophy type 2, which is an inherited and progressive muscle degeneration disease. Yet, no cure is available and the molecular mechanism of repeat expansion remains elusive. In this study, we used high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to reveal a mini-dumbbell structure formed by two CCTG repeats. Upon slippage in the nascent strand during DNA replication, the formation of the mini-dumbbell provides a possible pathway for a two-repeat expansion. In addition, fast exchange between two competing mini-dumbbells among three repeats results in a mini-loop structure that accounts for one-repeat expansion. These mini-dumbbell and mini-loop intermediates can also co-exist at multiple sites in CCTG repeats, leading to three or larger size repeat expansions. PMID:26384951

  8. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: mechanisms and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunlai; Yang, Liuqing; Lin, Chunru

    2014-01-01

    A large proportion of the control of gene expression in humans is mediated by noncoding elements in the genome. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as a new class of pivotal regulatory components, orchestrating extensive cellular processes and connections. LncRNAs play various roles from chromatin modification to alternative splicing and post-transcriptional processing and are involved in almost all aspects of eukaryotic regulation. LncRNA-based mechanisms modulate cell fates during development, and their dysregulation underscores many human disorders, especially cancer, through chromosomal translocation, deletion, and nucleotide expansions. Recent studies demonstrate that multiple prostate cancer risk loci are associated with lncRNAs and that ectopic expression of these transcripts triggers a cascade of cellular events driving tumor initiation and progression. The recent increased rate of discovery of lncRNAs has been leveraged for application in clinical strategies such as novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Despite this potential, many issues remain to be addressed in this fast-growing field. PMID:27308347

  9. Repeating thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, R. A.

    1985-06-04

    Disclosed herein is a repeating use thermocouple assembly and method of making the same in which a cavity adjacent the tip of the thermocouple is filled with a thermosetting foundry sand and baked in place to provide support for the thermocouple tube without causing stresses during use which could cause breakage of the thermocouple tube.

  10. Sequence analysis of the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hamlyn, P H; Gillam, S; Smith, M; Milstein, C

    1977-01-01

    Using an oligonucleotide d(pT10-C-A) as primer, cDNA has been transcribed from the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain mRNA and sequenced by a modification1 of the 'plus-minus' gel method2. The sequence obtained has partially corrected and extended a previously obtained sequence3. The new data contains an unusual sequence in which a trinucleotide is repeated seven times. Images PMID:405661

  11. Noncoding RNAs in Beta Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Ruth A.; Arnes, Luis; Sussel, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The identification and characterization of essential islet transcription factors have improved our understanding of β cell development, provided insights into many of the cellular dysfunctions related to diabetes, and facilitated the successful generation of β cells from alternative cell sources. Recently, noncoding RNAs have emerged as a novel set of molecules that may represent missing components of the known islet regulatory pathways. The purpose of this review is to highlight studies that have implicated noncoding RNAs as important regulators of pancreas cell development and β cell function. Recent Findings Disruption of essential components of the microRNA processing machinery, in addition to misregulation of individual miRNAs, has revealed the importance of microRNAs in pancreas development and β cell function. Furthermore, over 1000 islet-specific long noncoding RNAs have been identified in mouse and human islets, suggesting that this class of noncoding molecules will also play important functional roles in the β cell. Summary The analysis of noncoding RNAs in the pancreas will provide important new insights into pancreatic regulatory processes that will improve our ability to understand and treat diabetes and may facilitate the generation of replacement β cells from alternative cell sources. PMID:25692923

  12. Systematic analysis of coding and noncoding DNA sequences using methods of statistical linguistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantegna, R. N.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We compare the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions in eukaryotic and viral DNA sequences by adapting two tests developed for the analysis of natural languages and symbolic sequences. The data set comprises all 30 sequences of length above 50 000 base pairs in GenBank Release No. 81.0, as well as the recently published sequences of C. elegans chromosome III (2.2 Mbp) and yeast chromosome XI (661 Kbp). We find that for the three chromosomes we studied the statistical properties of noncoding regions appear to be closer to those observed in natural languages than those of coding regions. In particular, (i) a n-tuple Zipf analysis of noncoding regions reveals a regime close to power-law behavior while the coding regions show logarithmic behavior over a wide interval, while (ii) an n-gram entropy measurement shows that the noncoding regions have a lower n-gram entropy (and hence a larger "n-gram redundancy") than the coding regions. In contrast to the three chromosomes, we find that for vertebrates such as primates and rodents and for viral DNA, the difference between the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions is not pronounced and therefore the results of the analyses of the investigated sequences are less conclusive. After noting the intrinsic limitations of the n-gram redundancy analysis, we also briefly discuss the failure of the zeroth- and first-order Markovian models or simple nucleotide repeats to account fully for these "linguistic" features of DNA. Finally, we emphasize that our results by no means prove the existence of a "language" in noncoding DNA.

  13. Viral Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Fu, Shujun; Sun, Lun-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Over 12 % of all human cancers are caused by oncoviruses, primarily including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV, respectively), and Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV). In addition to viral oncoproteins, a variety of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) produced by oncoviruses have been recognized as important cofactors that contribute to the oncogenic events. In this chapter, we will focus on the recent understanding of the long and short noncoding RNAs, as well as microRNAs of the viruses, and discuss their roles in the biology of multistep oncogenesis mediated by established human oncoviruses. PMID:27376743

  14. Long Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Pathways.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Adam M; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-04-11

    Genome-wide cancer mutation analyses are revealing an extensive landscape of functional mutations within the noncoding genome, with profound effects on the expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). While the exquisite regulation of lncRNA transcription can provide signals of malignant transformation, we now understand that lncRNAs drive many important cancer phenotypes through their interactions with other cellular macromolecules including DNA, protein, and RNA. Recent advancements in surveying lncRNA molecular mechanisms are now providing the tools to functionally annotate these cancer-associated transcripts, making these molecules attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in the fight against cancer. PMID:27070700

  15. Long Noncoding RNA: Recent Updates in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Zhu, Hongming; Ge, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs belong to a class of noncoding RNAs longer than 200 nucleotides with the epigenetic regulation potential. As a novel molecular regulator, lncRNAs are often dysregulated in various pathological conditions and display multiple functions in a wide range of biological processes. Given that recent studies have indicated that lncRNAs are involved in atherosclerosis-related smooth muscle cell, endothelial cell, macrophage and lipid metabolism regulation, it is pertinent to understand the potential function of lncRNAs in atherosclerosis development. This review will highlight the recent updates of lncRNAs in atherogenesis and also discuss their potential roles as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27314829

  16. The non-coding RNAs as riboregulators

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Volker A.; Barciszewska, Miroslawa Z.; Szymanski, Maciej; Hochberg, Abraham; Groot, Nathan de; Barciszewski, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The non-coding RNAs database (http://biobases.ibch.poznan.pl/ncRNA/) contains currently available data on RNAs, which do not have long open reading frames and act as riboregulators. Non-coding RNAs are involved in the specific recognition of cellular nucleic acid targets through complementary base pairing to control cell growth and differentiation. Some of them are connected with several well known developmental and neuro­behavioral disorders. We have divided them into four groups. This paper is a short introduction to the database and presents its latest, updated edition. PMID:11125087

  17. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  18. Non-coding RNAs Functioning in Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Daniele; Barraco, Nadia; Listì, Angela; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis of the presence of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs) has received a considerable support. This model suggested the existence of CSCs which, thanks to their self-renewal properties, are able to drive the expansion and the maintenance of malignant cell populations with invasive and metastatic potential in cancer. Increasing evidence showed the ability of such cells to acquire self-renewal, multipotency, angiogenic potential, immune evasion, symmetrical and asymmetrical divisions which, along with the presence of several DNA repair mechanisms, further enhance their oncogenic potential making them highly resistant to common anticancer treatments. The main signaling pathways involved in the homeostasis of colorectal (CRC) stem cells are the Wnt, Notch, Sonic Hedgehog, and Bone Morfogenic Protein (BMP) pathways, which are mostly responsible for all the features that have been widely referred to stem cells. The same pathways have been identified in colorectal cancer stem cells (CRCSCs), conferring a more aggressive phenotype compared to non-stem CRC cells. Recently, several evidences suggested that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) may play a crucial role in the regulation of different biological mechanisms in CRC, by modulating the expression of critical stem cell transcription factors that have been found active in CSCs. In this chapter, we will discuss the involvement of ncRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), in stemness acquisition and maintenance by CRCSCs, through the regulation of pathways modulating the CSC phenotype and growth, carcinogenesis, differentiation, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:27573896

  19. Solution structure of a DNA quadruplex containing ALS and FTD related GGGGCC repeat stabilized by 8-bromodeoxyguanosine substitution

    PubMed Central

    Brčić, Jasna; Plavec, Janez

    2015-01-01

    A prolonged expansion of GGGGCC repeat within non-coding region of C9orf72 gene has been identified as the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which are devastating neurodegenerative disorders. Formation of unusual secondary structures within expanded GGGGCC repeat, including DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes and R-loops was proposed to drive ALS and FTD pathogenesis. Initial NMR investigation on DNA oligonucleotides with four repeat units as the shortest model with the ability to form an unimolecular G-quadruplex indicated their folding into multiple G-quadruplex structures in the presence of K+ ions. Single dG to 8Br-dG substitution at position 21 in oligonucleotide d[(G4C2)3G4] and careful optimization of folding conditions enabled formation of mostly a single G-quadruplex species, which enabled determination of a high-resolution structure with NMR. G-quadruplex structure adopted by d[(G4C2)3GGBrGG] is composed of four G-quartets, which are connected by three edgewise C-C loops. All four strands adopt antiparallel orientation to one another and have alternating syn-anti progression of glycosidic conformation of guanine residues. One of the cytosines in every loop is stacked upon the G-quartet contributing to a very compact and stable structure. PMID:26253741

  20. Non-Coding RNAs in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Chia Ariel; Aravin, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing guided by small RNAs is a process conserved from protozoa to mammals. Small RNAs loaded into Argonaute family proteins direct repressive histone modifications or DNA cytosine methylation to homologous regions of the genome. Small RNA-mediated transcriptional silencing is required for many biological processes, including repression of transposable elements, maintaining the genome stability/integrity, and epigenetic inheritance of gene expression. Here we will summarize the current knowledge about small RNA biogenesis and mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in plants, Drosophila, C. elegans and mice. Furthermore, a rapidly growing number long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated as important players in transcription regulation. We will discuss current models for long non-coding RNA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:26120554

  1. Exploring the Secrets of Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Mingyang; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has revealed that the majority of RNAs have no capacity to encode protein. Among these non-coding transcripts, recent work has focused on the roles of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) of >200 nucleotides. Although many of their attributes, such as patterns of expression, remain largely unknown, lncRNAs have key functions in transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic gene regulation; Also, new work indicates their functions in scaffolding ribonuclear protein complexes. In plants, genome-wide identification of lncRNAs has been conducted in several species, including Zea mays, and recent research showed that lncRNAs regulate flowering time in the photoperiod pathway, and function in nodulation. In this review, we discuss the basic mechanisms by which lncRNAs regulate key cellular processes, using the large body of knowledge on animal and yeast lncRNAs to illustrate the significance of emerging work on lncRNAs in plants. PMID:25764159

  2. Relationship of long noncoding RNA and viruses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Zhong-Wang; Liu, Ya-Li; Shi, Chong-Xu; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yong-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Long noncoding (lnc)RNAs comprise a diverse group of transcripts including large intervening noncoding (linc)RNAs, natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and intronic lncRNAs. The functions and mechanisms of more than 200 lncRNAs have been studied in vitro and the results suggest that lncRNAs may be molecular markers of prognosis in cancer patients. Some lncRNAs can promote virus replication and allow escape from cytosolic surveillance to suppress antiviral immunity. For example, lncRNA can cause persistent infection by Theiler's virus, and microRNA (miR)-27a/b is important for efficient murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) replication. The available evidence suggests that lncRNAs may be potential targets of novel antiviral drugs. PMID:26826341

  3. Long noncoding RNAs in hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Malavé, Norma I; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery of several classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are indispensable for the regulation of cellular processes. Many of these RNAs are regulatory in nature with functions in gene expression regulation such as piwi-interacting RNAs, small interfering RNAs and micro RNAs. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) comprise the most recently characterized class. LncRNAs are involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, imprinting, splicing, and translation, among other critical functions in the cell. Recent studies have elucidated the importance of lncRNAs in hematopoietic development. Dysregulation of lncRNA expression is a feature of various diseases and cancers, and is also seen in hematopoietic malignancies. This article focuses on lncRNAs that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:26612601

  4. Conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Freeling, Michael; Subramaniam, Shabarinath

    2009-04-01

    Plant conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs)--a specific category of phylogenetic footprint--have been shown experimentally to function. No plant CNS is conserved to the extent that ultraconserved noncoding sequences are conserved in vertebrates. Plant CNSs are enriched in known transcription factor or other cis-acting binding sites, and are usually clustered around genes. Genes that encode transcription factors and/or those that respond to stimuli are particularly CNS-rich. Only rarely could this function involve small RNA binding. Some transcribed CNSs encode short translation products as a form of negative control. Approximately 4% of Arabidopsis gene content is estimated to be both CNS-rich and occupies a relatively long stretch of chromosome: Bigfoot genes (long phylogenetic footprints). We discuss a 'DNA-templated protein assembly' idea that might help explain Bigfoot gene CNSs. PMID:19249238

  5. Linking Long Noncoding RNA Localization and Function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have revealed the regulatory potential of many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Most lncRNAs, like mRNAs, are transcribed by RNA polymerase II and are capped, polyadenylated, and spliced. However, the subcellular fates of lncRNAs are distinct and the mechanisms of action are diverse. Investigating the mechanisms that determine the subcellular fate of lncRNAs has the potential to provide new insights into their biogenesis and specialized functions. PMID:27499234

  6. Function and evolution of local repeats in the Firre locus

    PubMed Central

    Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Shukla, Chinmay J.; Weiner, Catherine L.; Rinn, John L.

    2016-01-01

    More than half the human and mouse genomes are comprised of repetitive sequences, such as transposable elements (TEs), which have been implicated in many biological processes. In contrast, much less is known about other repeats, such as local repeats that occur in multiple instances within a given locus in the genome but not elsewhere. Here, we systematically characterize local repeats in the genomic locus of the Firre long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). We find a conserved function for the RRD repeat as a ribonucleic nuclear retention signal that is sufficient to retain an otherwise cytoplasmic mRNA in the nucleus. We also identified a repeat, termed R0, that can function as a DNA enhancer element within the intronic sequences of Firre. Collectively, our data suggest that local repeats can have diverse functionalities and molecular modalities in the Firre locus and perhaps more globally in other lncRNAs. PMID:27009974

  7. Non-coding RNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricciuti, Biagio; Mecca, Carmen; Crinò, Lucio; Baglivo, Sara; Cenci, Matteo; Metro, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that protein-coding genes represent less than 2% of all human genome, and the evidence that more than 90% of it is actively transcribed, changed the classical point of view of the central dogma of molecular biology, which was always based on the assumption that RNA functions mainly as an intermediate bridge between DNA sequences and protein synthesis machinery. Accumulating data indicates that non-coding RNAs are involved in different physiological processes, providing for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. They are important regulators of gene expression, cellular differentiation, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and stem cell maintenance. Alterations and disruptions of their expression or activity have increasingly been associated with pathological changes of cancer cells, this evidence and the prospect of using these molecules as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets, make currently non-coding RNAs among the most relevant molecules in cancer research. In this paper we will provide an overview of non-coding RNA function and disruption in lung cancer biology, also focusing on their potential as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. PMID:25593996

  8. Long Noncoding RNA Regulation of Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Ballarino, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent a unique kind of stem cell, as they are able to indefinitely self-renew and hold the potential to differentiate into any derivative of the three germ layers. As such, human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs) and human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) provide a unique opportunity for studying the earliest steps of human embryogenesis and, at the same time, are of great therapeutic interest. The molecular mechanisms underlying pluripotency represent a major field of research. Recent evidence suggests that a complex network of transcription factors, chromatin regulators, and noncoding RNAs exist in pluripotent cells to regulate the balance between self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Regulatory noncoding RNAs come in two flavors: short and long. The first class includes microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of cell cycle and differentiation in PSCs. Instead, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of long transcripts that regulate gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. In this review, we focus on the role played by lncRNAs in the maintenance of pluripotency, emphasizing the interplay between lncRNAs and other pivotal regulators in PSCs. PMID:26697072

  9. The dichotomy of p53 regulation by noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qipan; Becker, Lindsey; Ma, Xiaodong; Zhong, Xiaoming; Young, Ken; Ramos, Kenneth; Li, Yong

    2014-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is the most frequently mutated gene in cancer. Significant progress has been made to discern the importance of p53 in coordinating cellular responses to DNA damage, oncogene activation, and other stresses. Noncoding RNAs are RNA molecules functioning without being translated into proteins. In this work, we discuss the dichotomy of p53 regulation by noncoding RNAs with four unconventional questions. First, is overexpression of microRNAs responsible for p53 inactivation in the absence of p53 mutation? Second, are there somatic mutations in the noncoding regions of the p53 gene? Third, is there a germline mutant in the noncoding regions of the p53 gene that predisposes carriers to cancer? Fourth, can p53 activation mediated by a noncoding RNA mutation cause cancer? This work highlights the prominence of noncoding RNAs in p53 dysregulation and tumorigenesis. PMID:24706938

  10. PICSAR: Long Noncoding RNA in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yunhai; Morgan, Stefanie L; Wang, Kevin C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that long noncoding RNAs may play the roles of both oncogenes and tumor suppressors during cancer development. A new study from Piipponen et al. provides evidence that a long noncoding RNA, PICSAR, promotes cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma development through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling. Because specific inhibition of PICSAR suppresses tumor growth, this long noncoding RNA may serve as a useful diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27450499

  11. Trinucleotide Repeats: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Bruno; Fernandes, Sara; Abreu, Isabel A.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions are present in a wide range of genes involved in several neurological disorders, being directly involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis through modulation of gene expression and/or the function of the RNA or protein it encodes. Structural and functional information on the role of TNR sequences in RNA and protein is crucial to understand the effect of TNR expansions in neurodegeneration. Therefore, this review intends to provide to the reader a structural and functional view of TNR and encoded homopeptide expansions, with a particular emphasis on polyQ expansions and its role at inducing the self-assembly, aggregation and functional alterations of the carrier protein, which culminates in neuronal toxicity and cell death. Detail will be given to the Machado-Joseph Disease-causative and polyQ-containing protein, ataxin-3, providing clues for the impact of polyQ expansion and its flanking regions in the modulation of ataxin-3 molecular interactions, function, and aggregation. PMID:23801983

  12. Sizing up long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, Irina V.; Hennelly, Scott P.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2012-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a key role in many important areas of epigenetics, stem cell biology, cancer, signaling and brain function. This emerging class of RNAs constitutes a large fraction of the transcriptome, with thousands of new lncRNAs reported each year. The molecular mechanisms of these RNAs are not well understood. Currently, very little structural data exist. We review the available lncRNA sequence and secondary structure data. Since almost no tertiary information is available for lncRNAs, we review crystallographic structures for other RNA systems and discuss the possibilities for lncRNAs in the context of existing constraints. PMID:23267412

  13. A New Property of Repeating Decimals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arledge, Jane; Tekansik, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    As extended by Ginsberg, Midi's theorem says that if the repeated section of a decimal expansion of a prime is split into appropriate blocks and these are added, the result is a string of nines. We show that if the expansion of 1/p[superscript n+1] is treated the same way, instead of being a string of nines, the sum is related to the period of…

  14. Posttranscriptional gene regulation by long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells transcribe a vast number of noncoding RNA species. Among them, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, examples of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs are emerging. Through extended base-pairing, lncRNAs can stabilize or promote the translation of target mRNAs, while partial base-pairing facilitates mRNA decay or inhibits target mRNA translation. In the absence of complementarity, lncRNAs can suppress precursor mRNA splicing and translation by acting as decoys of RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs and can compete for microRNA-mediated inhibition leading to increased expression of the mRNA. Through these regulatory mechanisms, lncRNAs can elicit differentiation, proliferation, and cytoprotective programs, underscoring the rising recognition of lncRNA roles in human disease. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs identified until now. PMID:23178169

  15. Long Noncoding RNAs: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Johnny T. Y.; Colognori, David; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2013-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained widespread attention in recent years as a potentially new and crucial layer of biological regulation. lncRNAs of all kinds have been implicated in a range of developmental processes and diseases, but knowledge of the mechanisms by which they act is still surprisingly limited, and claims that almost the entirety of the mammalian genome is transcribed into functional noncoding transcripts remain controversial. At the same time, a small number of well-studied lncRNAs have given us important clues about the biology of these molecules, and a few key functional and mechanistic themes have begun to emerge, although the robustness of these models and classification schemes remains to be seen. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of the lncRNA field, discussing what is known about the genomic contexts, biological functions, and mechanisms of action of lncRNAs. We also reflect on how the recent interest in lncRNAs is deeply rooted in biology’s longstanding concern with the evolution and function of genomes. PMID:23463798

  16. Tackling Structures of Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, Irina V.; Hennelly, Scott P.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-01-01

    RNAs are important catalytic machines and regulators at every level of gene expression. A new class of RNAs has emerged called long non-coding RNAs, providing new insights into evolution, development and disease. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) predominantly found in higher eukaryotes, have been implicated in the regulation of transcription factors, chromatin-remodeling, hormone receptors and many other processes. The structural versatility of RNA allows it to perform various functions, ranging from precise protein recognition to catalysis and metabolite sensing. While major housekeeping RNA molecules have long been the focus of structural studies, lncRNAs remain the least characterized class, both structurally and functionally. Here, we review common methodologies used to tackle RNA structure, emphasizing their potential application to lncRNAs. When considering the complexity of lncRNAs and lack of knowledge of their structure, chemical probing appears to be an indispensable tool, with few restrictions in terms of size, quantity and heterogeneity of the RNA molecule. Probing is not constrained to in vitro analysis and can be adapted to high-throughput sequencing platforms. Significant efforts have been applied to develop new in vivo chemical probing reagents, new library construction protocols for sequencing platforms and improved RNA prediction software based on the experimental evidence. PMID:24304541

  17. Tackling structures of long noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Irina V; Hennelly, Scott P; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-01-01

    RNAs are important catalytic machines and regulators at every level of gene expression. A new class of RNAs has emerged called long non-coding RNAs, providing new insights into evolution, development and disease. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) predominantly found in higher eukaryotes, have been implicated in the regulation of transcription factors, chromatin-remodeling, hormone receptors and many other processes. The structural versatility of RNA allows it to perform various functions, ranging from precise protein recognition to catalysis and metabolite sensing. While major housekeeping RNA molecules have long been the focus of structural studies, lncRNAs remain the least characterized class, both structurally and functionally. Here, we review common methodologies used to tackle RNA structure, emphasizing their potential application to lncRNAs. When considering the complexity of lncRNAs and lack of knowledge of their structure, chemical probing appears to be an indispensable tool, with few restrictions in terms of size, quantity and heterogeneity of the RNA molecule. Probing is not constrained to in vitro analysis and can be adapted to high-throughput sequencing platforms. Significant efforts have been applied to develop new in vivo chemical probing reagents, new library construction protocols for sequencing platforms and improved RNA prediction software based on the experimental evidence. PMID:24304541

  18. Non-coding genome functions in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Inês; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the genetic variation associated with diabetes, through genome-wide association studies, does not reside in protein-coding regions, making the identification of functional variants and their eventual translation to the clinic challenging. In recent years, high-throughput sequencing-based methods have enabled genome-scale high-resolution epigenomic profiling in a variety of human tissues, allowing the exploration of the human genome outside of the well-studied coding regions. These experiments unmasked tens of thousands of regulatory elements across several cell types, including diabetes-relevant tissues, providing new insights into their mechanisms of gene regulation. Regulatory landscapes are highly dynamic and cell-type specific and, being sensitive to DNA sequence variation, can vary with individual genomes. The scientific community is now in place to exploit the regulatory maps of tissues central to diabetes etiology, such as pancreatic progenitors and adult islets. This giant leap forward in the understanding of pancreatic gene regulation is revolutionizing our capacity to discriminate between functional and non-functional non-coding variants, opening opportunities to uncover regulatory links between sequence variation and diabetes susceptibility. In this review, we focus on the non-coding regulatory landscape of the pancreatic endocrine cells and provide an overview of the recent developments in this field. PMID:26438568

  19. Non-coding RNA repertoires in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Leah; Finn, Stephen P; Cuffe, Sinead; Gray, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare malignancy, with extremely poor survival rates. There are limited treatment options, with no second line standard of care for those who fail first line chemotherapy. Recent advances have been made to characterise the underlying molecular mechanisms of mesothelioma, in the hope of providing new targets for therapy. With the discovery that non-coding regions of our DNA are more than mere junk, the field of research into non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has exploded in recent years. Non-coding RNAs have diverse and important roles in a variety of cellular processes, but are also implicated in malignancy. In the following review, we discuss two types of non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs, in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of MPM and their potential as both biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:26791801

  20. Quantitative Trait Loci Identify Functional Noncoding Variation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of noncoding alterations in cancer genomes presents an unresolved problem in cancer studies. While the impact of somatic variations in protein-coding regions is widely accepted, noncoding aberrations are mostly considered as passenger events. However, with the advance of genome-wide profiling strategies, alterations outside the coding context entered the focus, and multiple examples highlight the role of gene deregulation as cancer-driving events. This review describes the implication of noncoding alterations in oncogenesis and provides a theoretical framework for the identification of causal somatic variants using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Assuming that functional noncoding alterations affect quantifiable regulatory processes, somatic QTL studies constitute a valuable strategy to pinpoint cancer gene deregulation. Eventually, the comprehensive identification and interpretation of coding and noncoding alterations will guide our future understanding of cancer biology. PMID:26938653

  1. Towards structural classification of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2016-01-01

    While long non-coding RNAs play key roles in disease and development, few structural studies have been performed to date for this emerging class of RNAs. Previous structural studies are reviewed, and a pipeline is presented to determine secondary structures of long non-coding RNAs. Similar to riboswitches, experimentally determined secondary structures of long non-coding RNAs for one species, may be used to improve sequence/structure alignments for other species. As riboswitches have been classified according to their secondary structure, a similar scheme could be used to classify long non-coding RNAs. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26537437

  2. Comparison of simple sequence repeats in 19 Archaea.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, S

    2006-01-01

    All organisms that have been studied until now have been found to have differential distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with more SSRs in intergenic than in coding sequences. SSR distribution was investigated in Archaea genomes where complete chromosome sequences of 19 Archaea were analyzed with the program SPUTNIK to find di- to penta-nucleotide repeats. The number of repeats was determined for the complete chromosome sequences and for the coding and non-coding sequences. Different from what has been found for other groups of organisms, there is an abundance of SSRs in coding regions of the genome of some Archaea. Dinucleotide repeats were rare and CG repeats were found in only two Archaea. In general, trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant SSR motifs; however, pentanucleotide repeats are abundant in some Archaea. Some of the tetranucleotide and pentanucleotide repeat motifs are organism specific. In general, repeats are short and CG-rich repeats are present in Archaea having a CG-rich genome. Among the 19 Archaea, SSR density was not correlated with genome size or with optimum growth temperature. Pentanucleotide density had an inverse correlation with the CG content of the genome. PMID:17183484

  3. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  4. Nuclear Noncoding RNAs and Genome Stability.

    PubMed

    Khanduja, Jasbeer S; Calvo, Isabel A; Joh, Richard I; Hill, Ian T; Motamedi, Mo

    2016-07-01

    In modern molecular biology, RNA has emerged as a versatile macromolecule capable of mediating an astonishing number of biological functions beyond its role as a transient messenger of genetic information. The recent discovery and functional analyses of new classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have revealed their widespread use in many pathways, including several in the nucleus. This Review focuses on the mechanisms by which nuclear ncRNAs directly contribute to the maintenance of genome stability. We discuss how ncRNAs inhibit spurious recombination among repetitive DNA elements, repress mobilization of transposable elements (TEs), template or bridge DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during repair, and direct developmentally regulated genome rearrangements in some ciliates. These studies reveal an unexpected repertoire of mechanisms by which ncRNAs contribute to genome stability and even potentially fuel evolution by acting as templates for genome modification. PMID:27392145

  5. [SIGNIFICANCE OF NONCODING RNA IN BREAST CANCER].

    PubMed

    Sato, Fumiaki

    2015-11-01

    Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) has a crucial role in the molecular mechanisms of malignant features of breast cancer. This review outlines the biological and clinical significance of well-investigated microRNAs including let-7, miR-21, miR-200, miR-15/16, miR-155, and miR-221/222, and long ncRNAs such as H19, LSINCT5, HOTAIR, and GAS5. The biological roles of microRNAs secreted in the exosome are also described. Combined analysis of mRNA and ncRNA will help to develop the field of genetic diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:26845889

  6. Regulation of Transcription by Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a greater understanding of genomic complexity in eukaryotes ushered in by the immense technological advances in high-throughput sequencing of DNA and its corresponding RNA transcripts. This has resulted in the realization that beyond protein-coding genes, there are a large number of transcripts that do not encode for proteins and, therefore, may perform their function through RNA sequences and/or through secondary and tertiary structural determinants. This review is focused on the latest findings on a class of noncoding RNAs that are relatively large (>200 nucleotides), display nuclear localization, and use different strategies to regulate transcription. These are exciting times for discovering the biological scope and the mechanism of action for these RNA molecules, which have roles in dosage compensation, imprinting, enhancer function, and transcriptional regulation, with a great impact on development and disease. PMID:25251851

  7. Long noncoding RNAs in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play important roles in immune cell development and immune responses through different mechanisms, such as dosage compensation, imprinting, enhancer function, and transcriptional regulation. Although the functions of most lncRNAs are unclear, some lncRNAs have been found to control transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses via new methods of protein–protein interactions or pairing with DNA and RNA. Interestingly, increasing evidence has elucidated the importance of lncRNAs in the interaction between hosts and pathogens. In this review, an overview of the lncRNAs modes of action, as well as the important and diversified roles of lncRNAs in immunity, are provided, and an emerging paradigm of lncRNAs in regulating innate immune responses is highlighted. PMID:26277893

  8. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called ‘noncoder’. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de. PMID:23012263

  9. Noncoding RNAs in diabetes vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Cristina; Angelini, Timothy G; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder and is recognised as a dominant health threat of our time. Diabetes induces a widespread damage of the macro- and microvasculature in different organs and tissues and disrupts the endogenous vascular repair mechanisms, thus causing diffuse and severe complications. Moreover, diabetic patients respond poorly to surgical interventions aiming to "revascularise" (i.e., to restore blood flow supply) the ischemic myocardium or lower limbs. The molecular causes underpinning diabetes vascular complications are still underappreciated and druggable molecular targets for therapeutic interventions have not yet clearly emerged. Moreover, diabetes itself and diabetes complications are often silent killers, requiring new prognostic, diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for use in the clinical practice. Noncoding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) have opened the field capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focuses at the ncRNA roles in diabetes vascular complications. Furthermore, we discuss the potential value of ncRNAs as clinical biomarkers, and we examine the possibilities for therapeutic intervention targeting ncRNs in diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25536178

  10. The specificity of long noncoding RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Gloss, Brian S; Dinger, Marcel E

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as a fundamental molecular class whose members play pivotal roles in the regulation of the genome. The observation of pervasive transcription of mammalian genomes in the early 2000s sparked a revolution in the understanding of information flow in eukaryotic cells and the incredible flexibility and dynamic nature of the transcriptome. As a molecular class, distinct loci yielding lncRNAs are set to outnumber those yielding mRNAs. However, like many important discoveries, the road leading to uncovering this diverse class of molecules that act through a remarkable repertoire of mechanisms, was not a straight one. The same characteristic that most distinguishes lncRNAs from mRNAs, i.e. their developmental-stage, tissue-, and cell-specific expression, was one of the major impediments to their discovery and recognition as potentially functional regulatory molecules. With growing numbers of lncRNAs being assigned to biological functions, the specificity of lncRNA expression is now increasingly recognized as a characteristic that imbues lncRNAs with great potential as biomarkers and for the development of highly targeted therapeutics. Here we review the history of lncRNA research and how technological advances and insight into biological complexity have gone hand-in-hand in shaping this revolution. We anticipate that as increasing numbers of these molecules, often described as the dark matter of the genome, are characterized and the structure-function relationship of lncRNAs becomes better understood, it may ultimately be feasible to decipher what these non-(protein)-coding genes encode. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26297315

  11. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  12. Long noncoding RNAs: Lessons from genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been a great resource for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional-based gene regulation by long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). In this article, I overview the functional role of intergenic lncRNAs (H19, IPW, and MEG3), antisense lncRNAs (Kcnq1ot1, Airn, Nespas, Ube3a-ATS), and enhancer lncRNAs (IG-DMR eRNAs) to understand the diverse mechanisms being employed by them in cis and/or trans to regulate the parent-of-origin-specific expression of target genes. Recent evidence suggests that some of the lncRNAs regulate imprinting by promoting intra-chromosomal higher-order chromatin compartmentalization, affecting replication timing and subnuclear positioning. Whereas others act via transcriptional occlusion or transcriptional collision-based mechanisms. By establishing genomic imprinting of target genes, the lncRNAs play a critical role in important biological functions, such as placental and embryonic growth, pluripotency maintenance, cell differentiation, and neural-related functions such as synaptic development and plasticity. An emerging consensus from the recent evidence is that the imprinted lncRNAs fine-tune gene expression of the protein-coding genes to maintain their dosage in cell. Hence, lncRNAs from imprinted clusters offer insights into their mode of action, and these mechanisms have been the basis for uncovering the mode of action of lncRNAs in several other biological contexts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26004516

  13. Long noncoding RNAs: functional surprises from the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Wilusz, Jeremy E.; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Most of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, yielding a complex network of transcripts that includes tens of thousands of long noncoding RNAs with little or no protein-coding capacity. Although the vast majority of long noncoding RNAs have yet to be characterized thoroughly, many of these transcripts are unlikely to represent transcriptional “noise” as a significant number have been shown to exhibit cell type-specific expression, localization to subcellular compartments, and association with human diseases. Here, we highlight recent efforts that have identified a myriad of molecular functions for long noncoding RNAs. In some cases, it appears that simply the act of noncoding RNA transcription is sufficient to positively or negatively affect the expression of nearby genes. However, in many cases, the long noncoding RNAs themselves serve key regulatory roles that were assumed previously to be reserved for proteins, such as regulating the activity or localization of proteins and serving as organizational frameworks of subcellular structures. In addition, many long noncoding RNAs are processed to yield small RNAs or, conversely, modulate how other RNAs are processed. It is thus becoming increasingly clear that long noncoding RNAs can function via numerous paradigms and are key regulatory molecules in the cell. PMID:19571179

  14. Thermal Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    All solid materials, when cooled to low temperatures experience a change in physical dimensions which called "thermal contraction" and is typically lower than 1 % in volume in the 4-300 K temperature range. Although the effect is small, it can have a heavy impact on the design of cryogenic devices. The thermal contraction of different materials may vary by as much as an order of magnitude: since cryogenic devices are constructed at room temperature with a lot of different materials, one of the major concerns is the effect of the different thermal contraction and the resulting thermal stress that may occur when two dissimilar materials are bonded together. In this chapter, theory of thermal contraction is reported in Sect. 1.2 . Section 1.3 is devoted to the phenomenon of negative thermal expansion and its applications.

  15. Comparative and Transcriptome Analyses Uncover Key Aspects of Coding- and Long Noncoding RNAs in Flatworm Mitochondrial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Eric; Blair, David; Guerrero-Hernández, Carlos; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the conservation of various features of mitochondrial genomes has been instrumental in resolving phylogenetic relationships. Despite extensive sequence evidence, it has not previously been possible to conclusively resolve some key aspects of flatworm mitochondrial genomes, including generally conserved traits, such as start codons, noncoding regions, the full complement of tRNAs, and whether ATP8 is, or is not, encoded by this extranuclear genome. In an effort to address these difficulties, we sought to determine the mitochondrial transcriptomes and genomes of sexual and asexual taxa of freshwater triclads, a group previously poorly represented in flatworm mitogenomic studies. We have discovered evidence for an alternative start codon, an extended cox1 gene, a previously undescribed conserved open reading frame, long noncoding RNAs, and a highly conserved gene order across the large evolutionary distances represented within the triclads. Our findings contribute to the expansion and refinement of mitogenomics to address evolutionary issues in this diverse group of animals. PMID:26921295

  16. Comparative and Transcriptome Analyses Uncover Key Aspects of Coding- and Long Noncoding RNAs in Flatworm Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Eric; Blair, David; Guerrero-Hernández, Carlos; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the conservation of various features of mitochondrial genomes has been instrumental in resolving phylogenetic relationships. Despite extensive sequence evidence, it has not previously been possible to conclusively resolve some key aspects of flatworm mitochondrial genomes, including generally conserved traits, such as start codons, noncoding regions, the full complement of tRNAs, and whether ATP8 is, or is not, encoded by this extranuclear genome. In an effort to address these difficulties, we sought to determine the mitochondrial transcriptomes and genomes of sexual and asexual taxa of freshwater triclads, a group previously poorly represented in flatworm mitogenomic studies. We have discovered evidence for an alternative start codon, an extended cox1 gene, a previously undescribed conserved open reading frame, long noncoding RNAs, and a highly conserved gene order across the large evolutionary distances represented within the triclads. Our findings contribute to the expansion and refinement of mitogenomics to address evolutionary issues in this diverse group of animals. PMID:26921295

  17. Noncoding RNAs in Regulation of Cancer Metabolic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongdong; Sun, Linchong; Li, Zhaoyong; Gao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Since the description of the Warburg effect 90 years ago, metabolic reprogramming has been gradually recognized as a major hallmark of cancer cells. Mounting evidence now indicates that cancer is a kind of metabolic disease, quite distinct from conventional perception. While metabolic alterations in cancer cells have been extensively observed in glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolisms, its underlying regulatory mechanisms are still poorly understood. Noncoding RNA, also known as the "dark matter in life," functions through various mechanisms at RNA level regulating different biological pathways. The last two decades have witnessed the booming of noncoding RNA study on microRNA (miRNA), long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), circular RNA (circRNA), PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA), etc. In this chapter, we will discuss the regulatory roles of noncoding RNAs on cancer metabolism. PMID:27376736

  18. Circulating Non-coding RNA as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, Manuela; Lupini, Laura; Mangolini, Alessandra; Negrini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that colorectal cancer influences the types and quantity of nucleic acids - especially microRNAs - detected in the bloodstream. Concentration of circulating (cell-free) microRNAs, and possibly of other non-coding RNAs, could therefore serve as valuable colorectal cancer biomarker and could deliver insight into the disease process. This chapter addresses the recent discoveries on circulating microRNA and long non-coding RNA as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers in colorectal cancer. PMID:27573900

  19. Hypoxic regulation of the noncoding genome and NEAT1.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Hani; Mole, David R

    2016-05-01

    Activation of hypoxia pathways is both associated with and contributes to an aggressive phenotype across multiple types of solid cancers. The regulation of gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key element in this response. HIF directly upregulates the expression of many hundreds of protein-coding genes, which act to both improve oxygen delivery and to reduce oxygen demand. However, it is now becoming apparent that many classes of noncoding RNAs are also regulated by hypoxia, with several (e.g. micro RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and antisense RNAs) under direct transcriptional regulation by HIF. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding RNAs may act as effectors of the indirect response to HIF by acting on specific coding transcripts or by affecting generic RNA-processing pathways. In addition, noncoding RNAs may also act as modulators of the HIF pathway, either by integrating other physiological responses or, in the case of HIF-regulated, noncoding RNAs, by providing negative or positive feedback and feedforward loops that affect upstream or downstream components of the HIF cascade. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding transcripts play important roles in the aggressive hypoxic phenotype observed in cancer. PMID:26590207

  20. Functional roles of non-coding Y RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Madzia P.; Krude, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs are involved in a multitude of cellular processes but the biochemical function of many small non-coding RNAs remains unclear. The family of small non-coding Y RNAs is conserved in vertebrates and related RNAs are present in some prokaryotic species. Y RNAs are also homologous to the newly identified family of non-coding stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) in nematodes, for which potential physiological functions are only now emerging. Y RNAs are essential for the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in vertebrates and, when bound to the Ro60 protein, they are involved in RNA stability and cellular responses to stress in several eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. Additionally, short fragments of Y RNAs have recently been identified as abundant components in the blood and tissues of humans and other mammals, with potential diagnostic value. While the number of functional roles of Y RNAs is growing, it is becoming increasingly clear that the conserved structural domains of Y RNAs are essential for distinct cellular functions. Here, we review the biochemical functions associated with these structural RNA domains, as well as the functional conservation of Y RNAs in different species. The existing biochemical and structural evidence supports a domain model for these small non-coding RNAs that has direct implications for the modular evolution of functional non-coding RNAs. PMID:26159929

  1. A Machine Learning Approach for Accurate Annotation of Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Wang, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Searching genomes to locate noncoding RNA genes with known secondary structure is an important problem in bioinformatics. In general, the secondary structure of a searched noncoding RNA is defined with a structure model constructed from the structural alignment of a set of sequences from its family. Computing the optimal alignment between a sequence and a structure model is the core part of an algorithm that can search genomes for noncoding RNAs. In practice, a single structure model may not be sufficient to capture all crucial features important for a noncoding RNA family. In this paper, we develop a novel machine learning approach that can efficiently search genomes for noncoding RNAs with high accuracy. During the search procedure, a sequence segment in the searched genome sequence is processed and a feature vector is extracted to represent it. Based on the feature vector, a classifier is used to determine whether the sequence segment is the searched ncRNA or not. Our testing results show that this approach is able to efficiently capture crucial features of a noncoding RNA family. Compared with existing search tools, it significantly improves the accuracy of genome annotation. PMID:26357266

  2. Hypoxic regulation of the noncoding genome and NEAT1

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Activation of hypoxia pathways is both associated with and contributes to an aggressive phenotype across multiple types of solid cancers. The regulation of gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key element in this response. HIF directly upregulates the expression of many hundreds of protein-coding genes, which act to both improve oxygen delivery and to reduce oxygen demand. However, it is now becoming apparent that many classes of noncoding RNAs are also regulated by hypoxia, with several (e.g. micro RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and antisense RNAs) under direct transcriptional regulation by HIF. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding RNAs may act as effectors of the indirect response to HIF by acting on specific coding transcripts or by affecting generic RNA-processing pathways. In addition, noncoding RNAs may also act as modulators of the HIF pathway, either by integrating other physiological responses or, in the case of HIF-regulated, noncoding RNAs, by providing negative or positive feedback and feedforward loops that affect upstream or downstream components of the HIF cascade. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding transcripts play important roles in the aggressive hypoxic phenotype observed in cancer. PMID:26590207

  3. Noncoding RNAs, Emerging Regulators in Root Endosymbioses.

    PubMed

    Lelandais-Brière, Christine; Moreau, Jérémy; Hartmann, Caroline; Crespi, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Endosymbiosis interactions allow plants to grow in nutrient-deficient soil environments. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is an ancestral interaction between land plants and fungi, whereas nitrogen-fixing symbioses are highly specific for certain plants, notably major crop legumes. The signaling pathways triggered by specific lipochitooligosaccharide molecules involved in these interactions have common components that also overlap with plant root development. These pathways include receptor-like kinases, transcription factors (TFs), and various intermediate signaling effectors, including noncoding (nc)RNAs. These latter molecules have emerged as major regulators of gene expression and small ncRNAs, composed of micro (mi)RNAs and small interfering (si)RNAs, are known to control gene expression at transcriptional (chromatin) or posttranscriptional levels. In this review, we describe exciting recent data connecting variants of conserved si/miRNAs with the regulation of TFs, such as NSP2, NFY-A1, auxin-response factors, and AP2-like proteins, known to be involved in symbiosis. The link between hormonal regulations and these si- and miRNA-TF nodes is proposed in a model in which different feedback loops or regulations controlling endosymbiosis signaling are integrated. The diversity and emerging regulatory networks of young legume miRNAs are also highlighted. PMID:26894282

  4. Non-coding RNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, ~22 nucleotide (nt) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs control several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell, vascular smooth cell, and macrophage functions as well as lipoprotein metabolism. Apart from miRNAs, recently ncRNAs, especially long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important potential regulators of the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and function as well as significance of other ncRNAs such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) during atherogenesis is largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the importance of ncRNAs in atherosclerosis and discuss their potential use as therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:24623179

  5. Repeated Course Enrollments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    This report resents tables of repeated course enrollment data in Florida community colleges for the fall 1993 cohort. Overall, the percent of repeats in college preparatory courses was greater than that of college credit courses. Within ICS codes, the highest percentage of credit repeat enrollments was in mathematics; the second highest was in…

  6. Reptiles and Mammals Have Differentially Retained Long Conserved Noncoding Sequences from the Amniote Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Janes, D.E.; Chapus, C.; Gondo, Y.; Clayton, D.F.; Sinha, S.; Blatti, C.A.; Organ, C.L.; Fujita, M.K.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Edwards, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Many noncoding regions of genomes appear to be essential to genome function. Conservation of large numbers of noncoding sequences has been reported repeatedly among mammals but not thus far among birds and reptiles. By searching genomes of chicken (Gallus gallus), zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and green anole (Anolis carolinensis), we quantified the conservation among birds and reptiles and across amniotes of long, conserved noncoding sequences (LCNS), which we define as sequences ≥500 bp in length and exhibiting ≥95% similarity between species. We found 4,294 LCNS shared between chicken and zebra finch and 574 LCNS shared by the two birds and Anolis. The percent of genomes comprised by LCNS in the two birds (0.0024%) is notably higher than the percent in mammals (<0.0003% to <0.001%), differences that we show may be explained in part by differences in genome-wide substitution rates. We reconstruct a large number of LCNS for the amniote ancestor (ca. 8,630) and hypothesize differential loss and substantial turnover of these sites in descendent lineages. By contrast, we estimated a small role for recruitment of LCNS via acquisition of novel functions over time. Across amniotes, LCNS are significantly enriched with transcription factor binding sites for many developmental genes, and 2.9% of LCNS shared between the two birds show evidence of expression in brain expressed sequence tag databases. These results show that the rate of retention of LCNS from the amniote ancestor differs between mammals and Reptilia (including birds) and that this may reflect differing roles and constraints in gene regulation. PMID:21183607

  7. Expansion of Interstitial Telomeric Sequences in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Aksenova, Anna Y; Han, Gil; Shishkin, Alexander A; Volkov, Kirill V; Mirkin, Sergei M

    2015-11-24

    Telomeric repeats located within chromosomes are called interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs). They are polymorphic in length and are likely hotspots for initiation of chromosomal rearrangements that have been linked to human disease. Using our S. cerevisiae system to study repeat-mediated genome instability, we have previously shown that yeast telomeric (Ytel) repeats induce various gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCR) when their G-rich strands serve as the lagging strand template for replication (G orientation). Here, we show that interstitial Ytel repeats in the opposite C orientation prefer to expand rather than cause GCR. A tract of eight Ytel repeats expands at a rate of 4 × 10(-4) per replication, ranking them among the most expansion-prone DNA microsatellites. A candidate-based genetic analysis implicates both post-replication repair and homologous recombination pathways in the expansion process. We propose a model for Ytel repeat expansions and discuss its applications for genome instability and alternative telomere lengthening (ALT). PMID:26586439

  8. The Effects of Expansions, Questions and Cloze Procedures on Children's Conversational Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Tze-Peng; Moran, Catherine; Foster-Cohen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of expansion as a technique for facilitating children's language and conversational skills is well known (Scherer and Olswang, 1984). Expansion, however, can appear alone or in combination with other techniques. Using a repeated measures design, this study aimed to compare the effects of expansion alone (EA); expansion combined…

  9. Variable Glutamine-Rich Repeats Modulate Transcription Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gemayel, Rita; Chavali, Sreenivas; Pougach, Ksenia; Legendre, Matthieu; Zhu, Bo; Boeynaems, Steven; van der Zande, Elisa; Gevaert, Kris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Babu, M. Madan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excessive expansions of glutamine (Q)-rich repeats in various human proteins are known to result in severe neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and several ataxias. However, the physiological role of these repeats and the consequences of more moderate repeat variation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Q-rich domains are highly enriched in eukaryotic transcription factors where they act as functional modulators. Incremental changes in the number of repeats in the yeast transcriptional regulator Ssn6 (Cyc8) result in systematic, repeat-length-dependent variation in expression of target genes that result in direct phenotypic changes. The function of Ssn6 increases with its repeat number until a certain threshold where further expansion leads to aggregation. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that the Ssn6 repeats affect its solubility and interactions with Tup1 and other regulators. Thus, Q-rich repeats are dynamic functional domains that modulate a regulator’s innate function, with the inherent risk of pathogenic repeat expansions. PMID:26257283

  10. Noncoding RNAs, cytokines, and inflammation-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Marques-Rocha, José Luiz; Samblas, Mirian; Milagro, Fermin I; Bressan, Josefina; Martínez, J Alfredo; Marti, Amelia

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the onset and development of many diseases, including obesity, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, autoimmune and degenerative diseases, asthma, periodontitis, and cirrhosis. The inflammation process is mediated by chemokines, cytokines, and different inflammatory cells. Although the molecules and mechanisms that regulate this primary defense mechanism are not fully understood, recent findings offer a putative role of noncoding RNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs), in the progression and management of the inflammatory response. These noncoding RNAs are crucial for the stability and maintenance of gene expression patterns that characterize some cell types, tissues, and biologic responses. Several miRNAs, such as miR-126, miR-132, miR-146, miR-155, and miR-221, have emerged as important transcriptional regulators of some inflammation-related mediators. Additionally, little is known about the involvement of long noncoding RNAs, long intergenic noncoding RNAs, and circular RNAs in inflammation-mediated processes and the homeostatic imbalance associated with metabolic disorders. These noncoding RNAs are emerging as biomarkers with diagnosis value, in prognosis protocols, or in the personalized treatment of inflammation-related alterations. In this context, this review summarizes findings in the field, highlighting those noncoding RNAs that regulate inflammation, with emphasis on recognized mediators such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-18, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, VCAM-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. The down-regulation or antagonism of the noncoding RNAs and the administration of exogenous miRNAs could be, in the near future, a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. PMID:26065857

  11. Portraying breast cancers with long noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Van Grembergen, Olivier; Bizet, Martin; de Bony, Eric J; Calonne, Emilie; Putmans, Pascale; Brohée, Sylvain; Olsen, Catharina; Guo, Mingzhou; Bontempi, Gianluca; Sotiriou, Christos; Defrance, Matthieu; Fuks, François

    2016-09-01

    Evidence is emerging that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play a role in cancer development, but this role is not yet clear. We performed a genome-wide transcriptional survey to explore the lncRNA landscape across 995 breast tissue samples. We identified 215 lncRNAs whose genes are aberrantly expressed in breast tumors, as compared to normal samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of breast tumors on the basis of their lncRNAs revealed four breast cancer subgroups that correlate tightly with PAM50-defined mRNA-based subtypes. Using multivariate analysis, we identified no less than 210 lncRNAs prognostic of clinical outcome. By analyzing the coexpression of lncRNA genes and protein-coding genes, we inferred potential functions of the 215 dysregulated lncRNAs. We then associated subtype-specific lncRNAs with key molecular processes involved in cancer. A correlation was observed, on the one hand, between luminal A-specific lncRNAs and the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β pathways and, on the other hand, between basal-like-specific lncRNAs and the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent pathways and of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we showed that a specific lncRNA, which we called CYTOR, plays a role in breast cancer. We confirmed its predicted functions, showing that it regulates genes involved in the EGFR/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and is required for cell proliferation, cell migration, and cytoskeleton organization. Overall, our work provides the most comprehensive analyses for lncRNA in breast cancers. Our findings suggest a wide range of biological functions associated with lncRNAs in breast cancer and provide a foundation for functional investigations that could lead to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27617288

  12. Portraying breast cancers with long noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Van Grembergen, Olivier; Bizet, Martin; de Bony, Eric J.; Calonne, Emilie; Putmans, Pascale; Brohée, Sylvain; Olsen, Catharina; Guo, Mingzhou; Bontempi, Gianluca; Sotiriou, Christos; Defrance, Matthieu; Fuks, François

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play a role in cancer development, but this role is not yet clear. We performed a genome-wide transcriptional survey to explore the lncRNA landscape across 995 breast tissue samples. We identified 215 lncRNAs whose genes are aberrantly expressed in breast tumors, as compared to normal samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of breast tumors on the basis of their lncRNAs revealed four breast cancer subgroups that correlate tightly with PAM50-defined mRNA-based subtypes. Using multivariate analysis, we identified no less than 210 lncRNAs prognostic of clinical outcome. By analyzing the coexpression of lncRNA genes and protein-coding genes, we inferred potential functions of the 215 dysregulated lncRNAs. We then associated subtype-specific lncRNAs with key molecular processes involved in cancer. A correlation was observed, on the one hand, between luminal A–specific lncRNAs and the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor–β pathways and, on the other hand, between basal-like–specific lncRNAs and the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–dependent pathways and of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we showed that a specific lncRNA, which we called CYTOR, plays a role in breast cancer. We confirmed its predicted functions, showing that it regulates genes involved in the EGFR/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and is required for cell proliferation, cell migration, and cytoskeleton organization. Overall, our work provides the most comprehensive analyses for lncRNA in breast cancers. Our findings suggest a wide range of biological functions associated with lncRNAs in breast cancer and provide a foundation for functional investigations that could lead to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27617288

  13. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Expression of a Novel Intergenic Long Noncoding RNA in Adult rat Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-02-01

    Around 90% of the mammalian genome undergoes pervasive transcription into various types of small and long regulatory noncoding RNAs, whereas only ∼ 1.5% codes for proteins. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute diverse classes of sense- and antisense transcripts that are abundantly expressed in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) in cell type- and developmental stage-specific manners. They are implicated in brain development, differentiation, neuronal plasticity, and other cognitive functions. Mammalian brain requires the vitamin A metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) for its normal development, differentiation, and cell-fate determination. However, its role in adult brain function is less understood. Here, we report atRA-mediated transcriptional upregulation of endogenous expression of a novel long intergenic noncoding RNA-rat brain expressed (LINC-RBE) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons from adult rat. We have previously reported LINC-RBE as an intergenic, simple repeat sequence containing lncRNA highly expressed in the rat brain. This is a first-time report of involvement of atRA in transcriptional upregulation of lncRNA expression in rat hippocampal neurons. Therefore, it may be involved in regulation of brain function and disease. PMID:26572536

  14. The 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus RNAs – non-coding is not non-functional

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Jennifer L.; Chen, Rubing; Trobaugh, Derek W.; Diamond, Michael S.; Weaver, Scott C.; Klimstra, William B.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The non-coding regions found at the 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus genomes regulate viral gene expression, replication, translation and virus-host interactions, which have significant implications for viral evolution, host range, and pathogenesis. The functions of these non-coding regions are mediated by a combination of linear sequence and structural elements. The capped 5' untranslated region (UTR) contains promoter elements, translational regulatory sequences that modulate dependence on cellular translation factors, and structures that help to avoid innate immune defenses. The polyadenylated 3' UTR contains highly conserved sequence elements for viral replication, binding sites for cellular miRNAs that determine cell tropism, host range, and pathogenesis, and conserved binding regions for a cellular protein that influences viral RNA stability. Nonetheless, there are additional conserved elements in non-coding regions of the virus (e.g., the repeated sequence elements in the 3' UTR) whose function remains obscure. Thus, key questions remain as to the function of these short yet influential untranslated segments of alphavirus RNAs. PMID:25630058

  15. A-to-I editing of coding and non-coding RNAs by ADARs

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA. This A-to-I editing occurs not only in protein-coding regions of mRNAs, but also frequently in non-coding regions that contain inverted Alu repeats. Editing of coding sequences can result in the expression of functionally altered proteins that are not encoded in the genome, whereas the significance of Alu editing remains largely unknown. Certain microRNA (miRNA) precursors are also edited, leading to reduced expression or altered function of mature miRNAs. Conversely, recent studies indicate that ADAR1 forms a complex with Dicer to promote miRNA processing, revealing a new function of ADAR1 in the regulation of RNA interference. PMID:26648264

  16. Expression of a family of noncoding mitochondrial RNAs distinguishes normal from cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burzio, Verónica A; Villota, Claudio; Villegas, Jaime; Landerer, Eduardo; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L; Martínez, Ronny; Lopez, Constanza; Gaete, Fancy; Toro, Viviana; Rodriguez, Ximena; Burzio, Luis O

    2009-06-01

    We reported the presence in human cells of a noncoding mitochondrial RNA that contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 815 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5' end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). The transcript contains a stem-loop structure and is expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. Here, we demonstrate that, in addition to this transcript, normal human proliferating cells in culture express 2 antisense mitochondrial transcripts. These transcripts also contain stem-loop structures but strikingly they are down-regulated in tumor cell lines and tumor cells present in 17 different tumor types. The differential expression of these transcripts distinguishes normal from tumor cells and might contribute a unique vision on cancer biology and diagnostics. PMID:19470459

  17. Expression of a family of noncoding mitochondrial RNAs distinguishes normal from cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Burzio, Verónica A.; Villota, Claudio; Villegas, Jaime; Landerer, Eduardo; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Martínez, Ronny; Lopez, Constanza; Gaete, Fancy; Toro, Viviana; Rodriguez, Ximena; Burzio, Luis O.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the presence in human cells of a noncoding mitochondrial RNA that contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 815 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). The transcript contains a stem-loop structure and is expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. Here, we demonstrate that, in addition to this transcript, normal human proliferating cells in culture express 2 antisense mitochondrial transcripts. These transcripts also contain stem-loop structures but strikingly they are down-regulated in tumor cell lines and tumor cells present in 17 different tumor types. The differential expression of these transcripts distinguishes normal from tumor cells and might contribute a unique vision on cancer biology and diagnostics. PMID:19470459

  18. PVT1: a rising star among oncogenic long noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Teresa; Farina, Lorenzo; Macino, Giuseppe; Paci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that short and long noncoding RNAs critically participate in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and (mis)function. However, while the functional characterization of short non-coding RNAs has been reaching maturity, there is still a paucity of well characterized long noncoding RNAs, even though large studies in recent years are rapidly increasing the number of annotated ones. The long noncoding RNA PVT1 is encoded by a gene that has been long known since it resides in the well-known cancer risk region 8q24. However, a couple of accidental concurrent conditions have slowed down the study of this gene, that is, a preconception on the primacy of the protein-coding over noncoding RNAs and the prevalent interest in its neighbor MYC oncogene. Recent studies have brought PVT1 under the spotlight suggesting interesting models of functioning, such as competing endogenous RNA activity and regulation of protein stability of important oncogenes, primarily of the MYC oncogene. Despite some advancements in modelling the PVT1 role in cancer, there are many questions that remain unanswered concerning the precise molecular mechanisms underlying its functioning. PMID:25883951

  19. PVT1: A Rising Star among Oncogenic Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Teresa; Farina, Lorenzo; Macino, Giuseppe; Paci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that short and long noncoding RNAs critically participate in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and (mis)function. However, while the functional characterization of short non-coding RNAs has been reaching maturity, there is still a paucity of well characterized long noncoding RNAs, even though large studies in recent years are rapidly increasing the number of annotated ones. The long noncoding RNA PVT1 is encoded by a gene that has been long known since it resides in the well-known cancer risk region 8q24. However, a couple of accidental concurrent conditions have slowed down the study of this gene, that is, a preconception on the primacy of the protein-coding over noncoding RNAs and the prevalent interest in its neighbor MYC oncogene. Recent studies have brought PVT1 under the spotlight suggesting interesting models of functioning, such as competing endogenous RNA activity and regulation of protein stability of important oncogenes, primarily of the MYC oncogene. Despite some advancements in modelling the PVT1 role in cancer, there are many questions that remain unanswered concerning the precise molecular mechanisms underlying its functioning. PMID:25883951

  20. Functions of noncoding RNAs in neural development and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Shan; Sun, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The development of the central nervous system (CNS) relies on precisely orchestrated gene expression regulation. Dysregualtion of both genetic and environmental factors can affect proper CNS development and results in neurological diseases. Recent studies have shown that similar to protein coding genes, noncoding RNA molecules have a significant impact on normal CNS development and on causes and progression of human neurological disorders. In this review, we have highlighted discoveries of functions of noncoding RNAs, in particular microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in neural development and neurological diseases. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs play an essential role in many aspects of neural development, such as proliferation of neural stem cells and progenitors, neuronal differentiation, maturation and synaptogenesis. Misregulation of microRNAs is associated with some mental disorders and neurodegeneration diseases. In addition, long noncoding RNAs are found to play a role in neural development by regulating expression of protein coding genes. Therefore, examining noncoding RNA-mediated gene regulations has revealed novel mechanisms of neural development and provided new insights into the etiology of human neurological diseases. PMID:21969146

  1. Long non-coding RNA PVT1 and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming; You, Lei; Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-02-26

    Genome-wide sequencing technologies have led to the identification of many non-coding RNAs and revealed an important role for these molecules in cancer. Although there have been many studies on the role of short non-coding RNAs in cancer, much work remains to characterize the functions of long non-coding RNAs. PVT1, a long non-coding RNA encoded by the human PVT1 gene, is located in the well-known cancer-related region 8q24, also known as the 8q24 'gene desert.' PVT1 has three main molecular mechanisms of action: participating in DNA rearrangements, encoding microRNAs, and interacting with MYC. Studies on the association between PVT1 and cancer have shown that PVT1 is a potential oncogene in a variety of cancer types. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PVT1 in cancer remain unknown. Further studies of PVT1 will be required to test the utility of this molecule as a target for cancer diagnosis and therapy, and they should also increase our understanding of the role of long non-coding RNAs in tumorigenesis. PMID:26850852

  2. Mechanisms of trinucleotide repeat instability during human development

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Cynthia T.

    2011-01-01

    Trinucleotide expansion underlies several human diseases. Expansion occurs during multiple stages of human development in different cell types, and is sensitive to the gender of the parent who transmits the repeats. Repair and replication models for expansions have been described, but we do not know whether the pathway involved is the same under all conditions and for all repeat tract lengths, which differ among diseases. Currently, researchers rely on bacteria, yeast and mice to study expansion, but these models differ substantially from humans. We need now to connect the dots among human genetics, pathway biochemistry and the appropriate model systems to understand the mechanism of expansion as it occurs in human disease. PMID:20953213

  3. Virulence phenotypes of Legionella pneumophila associated with noncoding RNA lpr0035.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Deepak; Early, Julie V; Steinman, Howard M

    2012-12-01

    The Philadelphia-1 strain of Legionella pneumophila, the causative organism of Legionnaires' disease, contains a recently discovered noncoding RNA, lpr0035. lpr0035 straddles the 5' chromosomal junction of a 45-kbp mobile genetic element, pLP45, which can exist as an episome or integrated in the bacterial chromosome. A 121-bp deletion was introduced in strain JR32, a Philadelphia-1 derivative. The deletion inactivated lpr0035, removed the 49-bp direct repeat at the 5' junction of pLP45, and locked pLP45 in the chromosome. Intracellular multiplication of the deletion mutant was decreased by nearly 3 orders of magnitude in Acanthamoeba castellanii amoebae and nearly 2 orders of magnitude in J774 mouse macrophages. Entry of the deletion mutant into amoebae and macrophages was decreased by >70%. The level of entry in both hosts was restored to that in strain JR32 by plasmid copies of two open reading frames immediately downstream of the 5' junction and plasmid lpr0035 driven by its endogenous promoter. When induced from a tac promoter, plasmid lpr0035 completely reversed the intracellular multiplication defect in macrophages but was without effect in amoebae. These data are the first evidence of a role for noncoding RNA lpr0035, which has homologs in six other Legionella genomes, in entry of L. pneumophila into amoebae and macrophages and in host-specific intracellular multiplication. The data also demonstrate that deletion of a direct-repeat sequence restricts the mobility of pLP45 and is a means of studying the role of pLP45 mobility in Legionella virulence phenotypes. PMID:22966048

  4. The non-coding RNA TERRA is a natural ligand and direct inhibitor of human telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Redon, Sophie; Reichenbach, Patrick; Lingner, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Telomeres, the physical ends of eukaryotes chromosomes are transcribed into telomeric repeat containing RNA (TERRA), a large non-coding RNA of unknown function, which forms an integral part of telomeric heterochromatin. TERRA molecules resemble in sequence the telomeric DNA substrate as they contain 5′-UUAGGG-3′ repeats near their 3′-end which are complementary to the template sequence of telomerase RNA. Here we demonstrate that endogenous TERRA is bound to human telomerase in cell extracts. Using in vitro reconstituted telomerase and synthetic TERRA molecules we demonstrate that the 5′-UUAGGG-3′ repeats of TERRA base pair with the RNA template of the telomerase RNA moiety (TR). In addition TERRA contacts the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein subunit independently of hTR. In vitro studies further demonstrate that TERRA is not used as a telomerase substrate. Instead, TERRA acts as a potent competitive inhibitor for telomeric DNA in addition to exerting an uncompetitive mode of inhibition. Our data identify TERRA as a telomerase ligand and natural direct inhibitor of human telomerase. Telomerase regulation by the telomere substrate may be mediated via its transcription. PMID:20460456

  5. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:26659490

  6. Long Noncoding RNAs: Fresh Perspectives into the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Froberg, John E.; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2014-01-01

    Large scale mapping of transcriptomes has revealed significant levels of transcriptional activity within both unannotated and annotated regions of the genome. Interestingly, many of the novel transcripts demonstrate tissue-specific expression and some level of sequence conservation across species, but most have low protein-coding potential. Here we describe progress in identifying and characterizing long noncoding RNAs and review how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules to regulate diverse cellular processes. We also preview emerging techniques that will help advance the discovery and characterization of novel transcripts. Finally, we discuss the role of long non-coding RNAs in disease and therapeutics. PMID:24290031

  7. Non-coding RNA in neural function, disease, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Kirk; Abraham, Karan J.; Mekhail, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Declining brain and neurobiological function is arguably one of the most common features of human aging. The study of conserved aging processes as well as the characterization of various neurodegenerative diseases using different genetic models such as yeast, fly, mouse, and human systems is uncovering links to non-coding RNAs. These links implicate a variety of RNA-regulatory processes, including microRNA function, paraspeckle formation, RNA–DNA hybrid regulation, nucleolar RNAs and toxic RNA clearance, amongst others. Here we highlight these connections and reveal over-arching themes or questions related to recently appreciated roles of non-coding RNA in neural function and dysfunction across lifespan. PMID:25806046

  8. Progress and prospects of long noncoding RNAs in lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel group of universally present, non-coding RNAs (>200 nt) that are increasingly recognized as key regulators of many physiological and pathological processes. Scope of review Recent publications have shown that lncRNAs influence lipid homeostasis by controlling lipid metabolism in the liver and by regulating adipogenesis. lncRNAs control lipid metabolism-related gene expression by either base-pairing with RNA and DNA or by binding to proteins. Major conclusions The recent advances and future prospects in understanding the roles of lncRNAs in lipid homeostasis are discussed. PMID:26977388

  9. Repeat instability during DNA repair: Insights from model systems

    PubMed Central

    Usdin, Karen; House, Nealia C. M.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of repeated sequences is the cause of over 30 inherited genetic diseases, including Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy (types 1 and 2), fragile X syndrome, many spinocerebellar ataxias, and some cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Repeat expansions are dynamic, and disease inheritance and progression are influenced by the size and the rate of expansion. Thus, an understanding of the various cellular mechanisms that cooperate to control or promote repeat expansions is of interest to human health. In addition, the study of repeat expansion and contraction mechanisms has provided insight into how repair pathways operate in the context of structure-forming DNA, as well as insights into non-canonical roles for repair proteins. Here we review the mechanisms of repeat instability, with a special emphasis on the knowledge gained from the various model systems that have been developed to study this topic. We cover the repair pathways and proteins that operate to maintain genome stability, or in some cases cause instability, and the cross-talk and interactions between them. PMID:25608779

  10. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  11. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity. PMID:24622844

  12. Promoter-bound trinucleotide repeat mRNA drives epigenetic silencing in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colak, Dilek; Zaninovic, Nikica; Cohen, Michael S; Rosenwaks, Zev; Yang, Wang-Yong; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Disney, Matthew D; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-02-28

    Epigenetic gene silencing is seen in several repeat-expansion diseases. In fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic form of mental retardation, a CGG trinucleotide-repeat expansion adjacent to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene promoter results in its epigenetic silencing. Here, we show that FMR1 silencing is mediated by the FMR1 mRNA. The FMR1 mRNA contains the transcribed CGG-repeat tract as part of the 5' untranslated region, which hybridizes to the complementary CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene to form an RNA·DNA duplex. Disrupting the interaction of the mRNA with the CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene prevents promoter silencing. Thus, our data link trinucleotide-repeat expansion to a form of RNA-directed gene silencing mediated by direct interactions of the trinucleotide-repeat RNA and DNA. PMID:24578575

  13. Promoter-Bound Trinucleotide Repeat mRNA Drives Epigenetic Silencing in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Dilek; Zaninovic, Nikica; Cohen, Michael S.; Rosenwaks, Zev; Yang, Wang-Yong; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Disney, Matthew D.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing is seen in several repeat-expansion diseases. In fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic form of mental retardation, a CGG trinucleotide–repeat expansion adjacent to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene promoter results in its epigenetic silencing. Here, we show that FMR1 silencing is mediated by the FMR1 mRNA. The FMR1 mRNA contains the transcribed CGG-repeat tract as part of the 5′ untranslated region, which hybridizes to the complementary CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene to form an RNA·DNA duplex. Disrupting the interaction of the mRNA with the CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene prevents promoter silencing. Thus, our data link trinucleotide-repeat expansion to a form of RNA-directed gene silencing mediated by direct interactions of the trinucleotide-repeat RNA and DNA. PMID:24578575

  14. The puzzle of the triple repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, V.

    1993-06-04

    Two years ago, when researchers discovered the gene that causes a hereditary form of mental retardation known as fragile-X syndrome, they also turned up a mutation so unexpected geneticists are still scratching their heads over it. The defect, which makes genes balloon in size by adding extra copies of a three base-pair repeated sequence of DNA, was the first of its kind. Despite decades of study, nothing like it had ever been seen in any of the species that laid the foundations for modern genetics: bacteria, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the mouse. The mutations caused by these expanding trinucleotide repeats turned out be common causes of human disease. In the past 2 years, they have been fingered as the culprits in three hereditary disorders besides fragile-X syndrome: myotronic dystrophy, spinobullar muscular atrophy (also known as Kennedy's disease), and just this March-Huntington's disease. The FMR-1 gene, which is the one at fault in fragile-X syndrome, shows just how much the trinucleotide repeats can expand. The normal gene carries at most 50 copies of the CGG trinucleotide. But in children who inherit the gene from these carriers and actually develop mental retardation and the other fragile-X symptoms, the FMR-1 gene may have hundreds to thousands of CGG repeats. Huge expansions of another trinucleotide repeat (CTG) can also occur from one generation to the next in the gene that causes myotonic dystrophy (DM), while smaller, although no less devastating, expansions in the CAG trinucleotide repeat lead to Huntington's and Kennedy's diseases.

  15. Quantum repeated games revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckiewicz, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2 × 2 games based on Marinatto and Weber’s approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study the twice repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma game. We show that results not available in the classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games proposed by Iqbal and Toor. We point out the drawbacks that make their results unacceptable.

  16. Incredible RNA: Dual Functions of Coding and Noncoding.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jin-Wu; Choi, Seo-Won; You, Bo-Hyun

    2016-05-31

    Since the RNA world hypothesis was proposed, a large number of regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been identified in many species, ranging from microorganisms to mammals. During the characterization of these newly discovered RNAs, RNAs having both coding and noncoding functions were discovered, and these were considered bifunctional RNAs. The recent use of computational and high-throughput experimental approaches has revealed increasing evidence of various sources of bifunctional RNAs, such as protein-coding mRNAs with a noncoding isoform and long ncRNAs bearing a small open reading frame. Therefore, the genomic diversity of Janus-faced RNA molecules that have dual characteristics of coding and noncoding indicates that the functional roles of RNAs have to be revisited in cells on a genome-wide scale. Such studies would allow us to further understand the complex gene-regulatory network in cells. In this review, we discuss three major genomic sources of bifunctional RNAs and present a handful of examples of bifunctional RNA along with their functional roles. PMID:27137091

  17. Incredible RNA: Dual Functions of Coding and Noncoding

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jin-Wu; Choi, Seo-Won; You, Bo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Since the RNA world hypothesis was proposed, a large number of regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been identified in many species, ranging from microorganisms to mammals. During the characterization of these newly discovered RNAs, RNAs having both coding and noncoding functions were discovered, and these were considered bifunctional RNAs. The recent use of computational and high-throughput experimental approaches has revealed increasing evidence of various sources of bifunctional RNAs, such as protein-coding mRNAs with a noncoding isoform and long ncRNAs bearing a small open reading frame. Therefore, the genomic diversity of Janus-faced RNA molecules that have dual characteristics of coding and noncoding indicates that the functional roles of RNAs have to be revisited in cells on a genome-wide scale. Such studies would allow us to further understand the complex gene-regulatory network in cells. In this review, we discuss three major genomic sources of bifunctional RNAs and present a handful of examples of bifunctional RNA along with their functional roles. PMID:27137091

  18. Non-coding RNAs in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Sharma, Sambad; Venkat, Suresh; Liu, Keqin; Zhou, Xiaobo; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2016-01-01

    More than 90% of cancer death is attributed to metastatic disease, and the brain is one of the major metastatic sites of melanoma, colon, renal, lung and breast cancers. Despite the recent advancement of targeted therapy for cancer, the incidence of brain metastasis is increasing. One reason is that most therapeutic drugs can't penetrate blood-brain-barrier and tumor cells find the brain as sanctuary site. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of brain metastases to introduce the latest understandings of metastatic brain malignancies. This review also particularly focuses on non-coding RNAs and their roles in cancer brain metastasis. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of the extracellular vesicles as they are known to transport information between cells to initiate cancer cell-microenvironment communication. The potential clinical translation of non-coding RNAs as a tool for diagnosis and for treatment is also discussed in this review. At the end, the computational aspects of non-coding RNA detection, the sequence and structure calculation and epigenetic regulation of non-coding RNA in brain metastasis are discussed. PMID:26709907

  19. Beyond the proteome: non-coding regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Maciej; Barciszewski, Jan

    2002-01-01

    A variety of RNA molecules have been found over the last 20 years to have a remarkable range of functions beyond the well-known roles of messenger, ribosomal and transfer RNAs. Here, we present a general categorization of all non-coding RNAs and briefly discuss the ones that affect transcription, translation and protein function. PMID:12049667

  20. Noncoding RNAs, Emerging Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Development and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Mao; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Liu, Jianming; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    A healthy and independent life requires skeletal muscles to maintain optimal function throughout the lifespan, which is in turn dependent on efficient activation of processes that regulate muscle development, homeostasis, and metabolism. Thus, identifying mechanisms that modulate these processes is of crucial priority. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as a class of previously unrecognized transcripts whose importance in a wide range of biological processes and human disease is only starting to be appreciated. In this review, we summarize the roles of recently identified miRNAs and lncRNAs during skeletal muscle development and pathophysiology. We also discuss several molecular mechanisms of these noncoding RNAs. Undoubtedly, further systematic understanding of these noncoding RNAs' functions and mechanisms will not only greatly expand our knowledge of basic skeletal muscle biology, but also significantly facilitate the development of therapies for various muscle diseases, such as muscular dystrophies, cachexia, and sarcopenia. PMID:26258142

  1. Uncovering RNA Editing Sites in Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Gallo, Angela; Montalvo, Antonio; Pesole, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    RNA editing is an important co/post-transcriptional molecular process able to modify RNAs by nucleotide insertions/deletions or substitutions. In human, the most common RNA editing event involves the deamination of adenosine (A) into inosine (I) through the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA proteins. Although A-to-I editing can occur in both coding and non-coding RNAs, recent findings, based on RNA-seq experiments, have clearly demonstrated that a large fraction of RNA editing events alter non-coding RNAs sequences including untranslated regions of mRNAs, introns, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and low molecular weight RNAs (tRNA, miRNAs, and others). An accurate detection of A-to-I events occurring in non-coding RNAs is of utmost importance to clarify yet unknown functional roles of RNA editing in the context of gene expression regulation and maintenance of cell homeostasis. In the last few years, massive transcriptome sequencing has been employed to identify putative RNA editing changes at genome scale. Despite several efforts, the computational prediction of A-to-I sites in complete eukaryotic genomes is yet a challenging task. We have recently developed a software package, called REDItools, in order to simplify the detection of RNA editing events from deep sequencing data. In the present work, we show the potential of our tools in recovering A-to-I candidates from RNA-Seq experiments as well as guidelines to improve the RNA editing detection in non-coding RNAs, with specific attention to the lncRNAs. PMID:25538940

  2. Non-coding RNAs: Therapeutic Strategies and Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed into RNA molecules that do not code for proteins, which could be small ones approximately 20 nucleotide in length, known as microRNAs, or transcripts longer than 200 bp, defined as long noncoding RNAs. The prevalent deregulation of microRNAs in human cancers prompted immediate interest on the therapeutic value of microRNAs as drugs and drug targets. Many features of microRNAs such as well-defined mechanisms, and straightforward oligonucleotide design further make them attractive candidates for therapeutic development. The intensive efforts of exploring microRNA therapeutics are reflected by the large body of preclinical studies using oligonucleotide-based mimicking and blocking, culminated by the recent entry of microRNA therapeutics in clinical trial for several human diseases including cancer. Meanwhile, microRNA therapeutics faces the challenge of effective and safe delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics into the target site. Various chemical modifications of nucleic acids and delivery systems have been developed to increase targeting specificity and efficacy, and reduce the associated side effects including activation of immune response. Recently, long noncoding RNAs become attractive targets for therapeutic intervention because of their association with complex and delicate phenotypes, and their unconventional pharmaceutical activities such as capacity of increasing output of proteins. Here I discuss the general therapeutic strategies targeting noncoding RNAs, review delivery systems developed to maximize noncoding RNA therapeutic efficacy, and offer perspectives on the future development of noncoding RNA targeting agents for colorectal cancer. PMID:27573903

  3. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  4. Distinguishing the immunostimulatory properties of noncoding RNAs expressed in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tanne, Antoine; Muniz, Luciana R; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Leonova, Katerina I; Gudkov, Andrei V; Ting, David T; Monasson, Rémi; Cocco, Simona; Levine, Arnold J; Bhardwaj, Nina; Greenbaum, Benjamin D

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated abundant transcription of a set of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) preferentially within tumors as opposed to normal tissue. Using an approach from statistical physics, we quantify global transcriptome-wide motif use for the first time, to our knowledge, in human and murine ncRNAs, determining that most have motif use consistent with the coding genome. However, an outlier subset of tumor-associated ncRNAs, typically of recent evolutionary origin, has motif use that is often indicative of pathogen-associated RNA. For instance, we show that the tumor-associated human repeat human satellite repeat II (HSATII) is enriched in motifs containing CpG dinucleotides in AU-rich contexts that most of the human genome and human adapted viruses have evolved to avoid. We demonstrate that a key subset of these ncRNAs functions as immunostimulatory "self-agonists" and directly activates cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system to produce proinflammatory cytokines. These ncRNAs arise from endogenous repetitive elements that are normally silenced, yet are often very highly expressed in cancers. We propose that the innate response in tumors may partially originate from direct interaction of immunogenic ncRNAs expressed in cancer cells with innate pattern recognition receptors, and thereby assign a previously unidentified danger-associated function to a set of dark matter repetitive elements. These findings potentially reconcile several observations concerning the role of ncRNA expression in cancers and their relationship to the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26575629

  5. Thermal expansion behaviour of thermoplastic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, J.A.; Simms, I.J.; Farrow, G.J.; Jackson, D.; Wostenholm, G. Salford Univ. )

    1990-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of a number of commercially available and experimental continuous fiber-reinforced PEEK composites is assessed. The thermal expansion characteristics of Hercules AS4 reinforced PEEK (APC-2/AS4, ICI Fiberite) are reported in some detail, and it is shown that behavior is both reasonable and predictable. Further, it is found that repeated thermal cycling between -160 C and +120 C has no effect on the behavior of unidirectional laminates, and that the inherent characteristics of the composite are likely to promote such insensitivity. 16 refs.

  6. Cis-elements governing trinucleotide repeat instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rolfsmeier, M L; Dixon, M J; Pessoa-Brandão, L; Pelletier, R; Miret, J J; Lahue, R S

    2001-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) instability in humans is governed by unique cis-elements. One element is a threshold, or minimal repeat length, conferring frequent mutations. Since thresholds have not been directly demonstrated in model systems, their molecular nature remains uncertain. Another element is sequence specificity. Unstable TNR sequences are almost always CNG, whose hairpin-forming ability is thought to promote instability by inhibiting DNA repair. To understand these cis-elements further, TNR expansions and contractions were monitored by yeast genetic assays. A threshold of approximately 15--17 repeats was observed for CTG expansions and contractions, indicating that thresholds function in organisms besides humans. Mutants lacking the flap endonuclease Rad27p showed little change in the expansion threshold, suggesting that this element is not altered by the presence or absence of flap processing. CNG or GNC sequences yielded frequent mutations, whereas A-T rich sequences were substantially more stable. This sequence analysis further supports a hairpin-mediated mechanism of TNR instability. Expansions and contractions occurred at comparable rates for CTG tract lengths between 15 and 25 repeats, indicating that expansions can comprise a significant fraction of mutations in yeast. These results indicate that several unique cis-elements of human TNR instability are functional in yeast. PMID:11290713

  7. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  8. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  9. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  10. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    PubMed

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives. PMID:26869213

  11. Identification of a large noncoding RNA in extremophilic eubacteria

    PubMed Central

    Puerta-Fernandez, Elena; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Roth, Adam; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2006-01-01

    We have discovered a large and highly conserved RNA motif that typically resides in a noncoding section of a multigene messenger RNA in extremophilic Gram-positive eubacteria. RNAs of this class adopt an ornate secondary structure, are large compared with most other noncoding RNAs, and have been identified only in certain extremophilic bacteria. These ornate, large, extremophilic (OLE) RNAs have a length of ≈610 nucleotides, and the 35 representatives examined exhibit extraordinary conservation of nucleotide sequence and base pairing. Structural probing of the OLE RNA from Bacillus halodurans corroborates a complex secondary structure model predicted from comparative sequence analysis. The patterns of structural conservation, and its unique phylogenetic distribution, suggest that OLE RNA carries out a complex and critical function only in certain extremophilic bacteria. PMID:17164334

  12. Circulating long noncoding RNAs as novel biomarkers of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoying; Lei, Ronghui; Ning, Qilan

    2016-07-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a kind of noncoding RNAs which are longer than ˜200 nucleotides, lacking of protein-encoding capacity and are implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Recently, it was demonstrated that lncRNAs could be released into the circulation and be stable in blood. Circulating lncRNAs have been reported to have potential in distinguishing patients from healthy individuals. Therefore, the detection of circulating lncRNAs may be valuable for improving the diagnosis and prognosis of various diseases. This review summarized the current understanding of circulating lncRNAs as novel biomarkers of various human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, nervous system diseases and other diseases, which highlighted the significance of circulating lncRNAs as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of human diseases. PMID:27347748

  13. Structure and Gene-Silencing Mechanisms of Small Noncoding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Ying; Rana, Tariq M.

    Small (19-31-nucleotides) noncoding RNAs were identified in the past 10 years for their distinct function in gene silencing. The best known gene-silencing phenomenon, RNA interference (RNAi), is triggered in a sequence-specific manner by endogenously produced or exogenously introduced small doubled-stranded RNAs. As knowledge of the structure and function of the RNAi machinery has expanded, this phenomenon has become a powerful tool for biochemical research; it has enormous potential for therapeutics. This chapter summarizes significant aspects of three major classes of small noncoding, regulatory RNAs: small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Here, we focus on the biogenesis of these small RNAs, their structural features and coupled effectors as well as the mechanisms of each small regulatory RNA pathway which reveal fascinating ways by which gene silencing is controlled and fine-tuned at an epigenetic level.

  14. Long non-coding RNAs and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YU, FU-JUN; ZHENG, JIAN-JIAN; DONG, PEI-HONG; FAN, XIAO-MING

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technology in transcriptome analysis have helped identify numerous non-coding RNAs. The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is commonly defined as an RNA molecule with a length of 200 bp-100 kbp that lacks protein-coding potential. LncRNAs play a critical role in the regulation of gene expression, including chromatin modification, transcription and post-transcriptional processing. It has been confirmed that dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with a number of human diseases, particularly tumors. In this study, we focused on the most extensively investigated lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The biological functions and molecular mechanisms of the majority of lncRNAs have yet to be investigated. The improved knowledge on lncRNAs in HCC may help identify lncRNAs that may be used as novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:25469263

  15. A Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Sister Chromatid Cohesion.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Francesco P; Grossi, Elena; Marín-Béjar, Oskar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Raimondi, Ivan; González, Jovanna; Martínez-Herrera, Dannys Jorge; Athie, Alejandro; Amadoz, Alicia; Brosh, Robert M; Huarte, Maite

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in diverse cellular processes through multiple mechanisms. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized human lncRNA, CONCR (cohesion regulator noncoding RNA), that is transcriptionally activated by MYC and is upregulated in multiple cancer types. The expression of CONCR is cell cycle regulated, and it is required for cell-cycle progression and DNA replication. Moreover, cells depleted of CONCR show severe defects in sister chromatid cohesion, suggesting an essential role for CONCR in cohesion establishment during cell division. CONCR interacts with and regulates the activity of DDX11, a DNA-dependent ATPase and helicase involved in DNA replication and sister chromatid cohesion. These findings unveil a direct role for an lncRNA in the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion by modulating DDX11 enzymatic activity. PMID:27477908

  16. Functional annotation of non-coding sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Dunham, Ian; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functionally relevant variants against the background of ubiquitous genetic variation is a major challenge in human genetics. For variants that fall in protein-coding regions our understanding of the genetic code and splicing allow us to identify likely candidates, but interpreting variants that fall outside of genic regions is more difficult. Here we present a new tool, GWAVA, which supports prioritisation of non-coding variants by integrating a range of annotations. PMID:24487584

  17. Oncogenic long noncoding RNA FAL1 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaomin; Hu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are defined as RNA transcripts larger than 200 nucleotides that do not appear to have protein-coding potential. Accumulating evidence indicates that lncRNAs are involved in tumorigenesis. Our work reveals that lncRNA FAL1 (focally amplified lncRNA on chromosome 1) is frequently and focally amplified in human cancers and mediates oncogenic functions. PMID:27308441

  18. Transcription control by long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs have been found to regulate many cellular processes and thus expand the functional genetic repertoire contained within the genome. With the recent advent of genomic tools, it is now evident that these RNA molecules play central regulatory roles in many transcriptional programs. Here we discuss how they are targeted to promoters in several cases and how they operate at specific points in the transcription cycle to precisely control gene expression. PMID:22414755

  19. Dysregulation of non-coding RNAs in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Ren-Wen; Sui, Peng-Cheng; He, Hai-Tao; Ding, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common cancers in the world and a significant threat to the health of patients, especially those from China and Japan. The prognosis for patients with late stage GC receiving the standard of care treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, remains poor. Developing novel treatment strategies, identifying new molecules for targeted therapy, and devising screening techniques to detect this cancer in its early stages are needed for GC patients. The discovery of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), helped to elucidate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, diagnosis and treatment of GC. Recently, significant research has been conducted on non-coding RNAs and how the regulatory dysfunction of these RNAs impacts the tumorigenesis of GC. In this study, we review papers published in the last five years concerning the dysregulation of non-coding RNAs, especially miRNAs and lncRNAs, in GC. We summarize instances of aberrant expression of the ncRNAs in GC and their effect on survival-related events, including cell cycle regulation, AKT signaling, apoptosis and drug resistance. Additionally, we evaluate how ncRNA dysregulation affects the metastatic process, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cells, transcription factor activity, and oncogene and tumor suppressor expression. Lastly, we determine how ncRNAs affect angiogenesis in the microenvironment of GC. We further discuss the use of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers for use in clinical screening, early diagnosis and prognosis of GC. At present, no ideal ncRNAs have been identified as targets for the treatment of GC. PMID:26494954

  20. Right ventricular long noncoding RNA expression in human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Su, Yan Ru; Clark, Travis; Brittain, Evan; Absi, Tarek; Maltais, Simon; Hemnes, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart failure (HF) has not been widely studied. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we compared lncRNA expression in 22 explanted human HF hearts with lncRNA expression in 5 unused donor human hearts. We used Cufflinks to identify isoforms and DESeq to identify differentially expressed genes. We identified the noncoding RNAs by cross-reference to Ensembl release 73 (Genome Reference Consortium human genome build 37) and explored possible functional roles using a variety of online tools. In HF hearts, RNA-Seq identified 84,793 total messenger RNA coding and noncoding different transcripts, including 13,019 protein-coding genes, 2,085 total lncRNA genes, and 1,064 pseudogenes. By Ensembl noncoding RNA categories, there were 48 lncRNAs, 27 pseudogenes, and 30 antisense RNAs for a total of 105 differentially expressed lncRNAs in HF hearts. Compared with donor hearts, HF hearts exhibited differential expression of 7.7% of protein-coding genes, 3.7% of lncRNAs (including pseudogenes), and 2.5% of pseudogenes. There were not consistent correlations between antisense lncRNAs and parent genes and between pseudogenes and parent genes, implying differential regulation of expression. Exploratory in silico functional analyses using online tools suggested a variety of possible lncRNA regulatory roles. By providing a comprehensive profile of right ventricular polyadenylated messenger RNA transcriptome in HF, RNA-Seq provides an inventory of differentially expressed lncRNAs, including antisense transcripts and pseudogenes, for future mechanistic study. PMID:25992278

  1. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  2. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  3. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  4. Noncoding RNAs as regulators of cardiomyocyte proliferation and death.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Maria-Teresa; Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Thum, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease, in particular, is responsible for the majority of cardiac-related deaths. Given the negligible regenerative potential of the human myocardium, there is a strong need for therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancing cardiomyocyte survival and proliferation following injury or at inhibiting their death. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules regulating gene expression at a post-transcriptional level with important functions in cardiovascular physiology and disease. It has been demonstrated that miRNAs can influence the ability of cardiomyocytes to enter the cell cycle and/or escape from death pathways. Additionally, long non coding-RNAs could be involved in such pathways. This review summarizes recent evidences on noncoding RNAs regulating proliferation and death of cardiomyocytes representing a future therapeutic for the treatment of heart diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25665459

  5. Dissecting noncoding and pathogen RNA–protein interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan A.; Martin, Lance; Spitale, Robert C.; Do, Brian T.; Sagan, Selena M.; Zarnegar, Brian; Qu, Kun; Khavari, Paul A.; Quake, Stephen R.; Sarnow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA–protein interactions are central to biological regulation. Cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP)-seq is a powerful tool for genome-wide interrogation of RNA–protein interactomes, but current CLIP methods are limited by challenging biochemical steps and fail to detect many classes of noncoding and nonhuman RNAs. Here we present FAST-iCLIP, an integrated pipeline with improved CLIP biochemistry and an automated informatic pipeline for comprehensive analysis across protein coding, noncoding, repetitive, retroviral, and nonhuman transcriptomes. FAST-iCLIP of Poly-C binding protein 2 (PCBP2) showed that PCBP2-bound CU-rich motifs in different topologies to recognize mRNAs and noncoding RNAs with distinct biological functions. FAST-iCLIP of PCBP2 in hepatitis C virus-infected cells enabled a joint analysis of the PCBP2 interactome with host and viral RNAs and their interplay. These results show that FAST-iCLIP can be used to rapidly discover and decipher mechanisms of RNA–protein recognition across the diversity of human and pathogen RNAs. PMID:25411354

  6. Long noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-03-01

    Aging is the universal, intrinsic, genetically-controlled, evolutionarily-conserved and time-dependent intricate biological process characterised by the cumulative decline in the physiological functions and their coordination in an organism after the attainment of adulthood resulting in the imbalance of neurological, immunological and metabolic functions of the body. Various biological processes and mechanisms along with altered levels of mRNAs and proteins have been reported to be involved in the progression of aging. It is one of the major risk factors in the patho-physiology of various diseases and disorders. Recently, the discovery of pervasive transcription of a vast pool of heterogeneous regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including small ncRNAs (sncRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), in the mammalian genome have provided an alternative way to study and explore the missing links in the aging process, its mechanism(s) and related diseases in a whole new dimension. The involvement of small noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases have been extensively studied and recently reviewed. However, lncRNAs, whose function is far less explored in relation to aging, have emerged as a class of major regulators of genomic functions. Here, we have described some examples of known as well as novel lncRNAs that have been implicated in the progression of the aging process and age-related diseases. This may further stimulate research on noncoding RNAs and the aging process. PMID:26655093

  7. Interpreting noncoding genetic variation in complex traits and human disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lucas D; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-11-01

    Association studies provide genome-wide information about the genetic basis of complex disease, but medical research has focused primarily on protein-coding variants, owing to the difficulty of interpreting noncoding mutations. This picture has changed with advances in the systematic annotation of functional noncoding elements. Evolutionary conservation, functional genomics, chromatin state, sequence motifs and molecular quantitative trait loci all provide complementary information about the function of noncoding sequences. These functional maps can help with prioritizing variants on risk haplotypes, filtering mutations encountered in the clinic and performing systems-level analyses to reveal processes underlying disease associations. Advances in predictive modeling can enable data-set integration to reveal pathways shared across loci and alleles, and richer regulatory models can guide the search for epistatic interactions. Lastly, new massively parallel reporter experiments can systematically validate regulatory predictions. Ultimately, advances in regulatory and systems genomics can help unleash the value of whole-genome sequencing for personalized genomic risk assessment, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23138309

  8. The Landscape of long non-coding RNA classification

    PubMed Central

    St Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the depth and quality of transcriptome sequencing have revealed many new classes of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNA classification has mushroomed to accommodate these new findings, even though the real dimensions and complexity of the non-coding transcriptome remain unknown. Although evidence of functionality of specific lncRNAs continues to accumulate, conflicting, confusing, and overlapping terminology has fostered ambiguity and lack of clarity in the field in general. The lack of fundamental conceptual un-ambiguous classification framework results in a number of challenges in the annotation and interpretation of non-coding transcriptome data. It also might undermine integration of the new genomic methods and datasets in an effort to unravel function of lncRNA. Here, we review existing lncRNA classifications, nomenclature, and terminology. Then we describe the conceptual guidelines that have emerged for their classification and functional annotation based on expanding and more comprehensive use of large systems biology-based datasets. PMID:25869999

  9. The tumour hypoxia induced non-coding transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Hani; Harris, Adrian L; McIntyre, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations have highlighted the importance of the non-coding genome in regions of hypoxia in tumours. Such regions are frequently found in solid tumours, and are associated with worse patient survival and therapy resistance. Hypoxia stabilises the transcription factors, hypoxia inducible factors (HIF1α and HIF2α) which coordinate transcriptomic changes that occur in hypoxia. The changes in gene expression induced by HIF1α and HIF2α contribute to many of the hallmarks of cancer phenotypes and enable tumour growth, survival and invasion in the hypoxic tumour microenvironment. Non-coding RNAs, in particular microRNAs (miRNAs), which regulate mRNA stability and translation, and long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which have diverse functions including chromatin modification and transcriptional regulation, are also important in enabling the key hypoxia regulated processes. They have roles in the regulation of metabolism, angiogenesis, autophagy, invasion and metastasis in the hypoxic microenvironment. Furthermore, HIF1α and HIF2α expression and stabilisation are also regulated by both miRNAs and lncRNAs. Here we review the recent developments in the expression, regulation and functions of miRNAs, lncRNAs and other non-coding RNA classes in tumour hypoxia. PMID:26806607

  10. The Unstable Repeats - Three Evolving Faces of Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David L.; Orr, Harry T.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Disorders characterized by expansion of an unstable nucleotide repeat account for a number of inherited neurological diseases. Here, we review examples of unstable repeat disorders that nicely illustrate the three of the major pathogenic mechanisms associated with these diseases: loss-of-function typically by disrupting transcription of the mutated gene, RNA toxic gain-of-function, and protein toxic gain-of-function. In addition to providing insight into the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurological disorders, the study of these unstable microsatellite repeat disorders has provided insight into very basic aspects of neuroscience. PMID:23473314

  11. Mechanisms of RNA-induced toxicity in CAG repeat disorders.

    PubMed

    Nalavade, R; Griesche, N; Ryan, D P; Hildebrand, S; Krauss, S

    2013-01-01

    Several inherited neurodegenerative disorders are caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansions, which can be located either in the coding region or in the untranslated region (UTR) of the respective genes. Polyglutamine diseases (polyQ diseases) are caused by an expansion of a stretch of CAG repeats within the coding region, translating into a polyQ tract. The polyQ tract expansions result in conformational changes, eventually leading to aggregate formation. It is widely believed that the aggregation of polyQ proteins is linked with disease development. In addition, in the last couple of years, it has been shown that RNA-mediated mechanisms also have a profound role in neurotoxicity in both polyQ diseases and diseases caused by elongated CAG repeat motifs in their UTRs. Here, we review the different molecular mechanisms assigned to mRNAs with expanded CAG repeats. One aspect is the mRNA folding of CAG repeats. Furthermore, pathogenic mechanisms assigned to CAG repeat mRNAs are discussed. First, we discuss mechanisms that involve the sequestration of the diverse proteins to the expanded CAG repeat mRNA molecules. As a result of this, several cellular mechanisms are aberrantly regulated. These include the sequestration of MBNL1, leading to misregulated splicing; sequestration of nucleolin, leading to reduced cellular rRNA; and sequestration of proteins of the siRNA machinery, resulting in the production of short silencing RNAs that affect gene expression. Second, we discuss the effect of expanded CAG repeats on the subcellular localization, transcription and translation of the CAG repeat mRNA itself. Here we focus on the MID1 protein complex that triggers an increased translation of expanded CAG repeat mRNAs and a mechanism called repeat-associated non-ATG translation, which leads to proteins aberrantly translated from CAG repeat mRNAs. In addition, therapeutic approaches for CAG repeat disorders are discussed. Together, all the findings summarized here show that

  12. Mechanisms of RNA-induced toxicity in CAG repeat disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nalavade, R; Griesche, N; Ryan, D P; Hildebrand, S; Krauß, S

    2013-01-01

    Several inherited neurodegenerative disorders are caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansions, which can be located either in the coding region or in the untranslated region (UTR) of the respective genes. Polyglutamine diseases (polyQ diseases) are caused by an expansion of a stretch of CAG repeats within the coding region, translating into a polyQ tract. The polyQ tract expansions result in conformational changes, eventually leading to aggregate formation. It is widely believed that the aggregation of polyQ proteins is linked with disease development. In addition, in the last couple of years, it has been shown that RNA-mediated mechanisms also have a profound role in neurotoxicity in both polyQ diseases and diseases caused by elongated CAG repeat motifs in their UTRs. Here, we review the different molecular mechanisms assigned to mRNAs with expanded CAG repeats. One aspect is the mRNA folding of CAG repeats. Furthermore, pathogenic mechanisms assigned to CAG repeat mRNAs are discussed. First, we discuss mechanisms that involve the sequestration of the diverse proteins to the expanded CAG repeat mRNA molecules. As a result of this, several cellular mechanisms are aberrantly regulated. These include the sequestration of MBNL1, leading to misregulated splicing; sequestration of nucleolin, leading to reduced cellular rRNA; and sequestration of proteins of the siRNA machinery, resulting in the production of short silencing RNAs that affect gene expression. Second, we discuss the effect of expanded CAG repeats on the subcellular localization, transcription and translation of the CAG repeat mRNA itself. Here we focus on the MID1 protein complex that triggers an increased translation of expanded CAG repeat mRNAs and a mechanism called repeat-associated non-ATG translation, which leads to proteins aberrantly translated from CAG repeat mRNAs. In addition, therapeutic approaches for CAG repeat disorders are discussed. Together, all the findings summarized here show that

  13. GFP-Based Fluorescence Assay for CAG Repeat Instability in Cultured Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Beatriz A.; Moye, Christopher; Mittelman, David; Wilson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries. PMID:25423602

  14. Bidirectional transcripts of the expanded C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Arzberger, Thomas; Grässer, Friedrich A; Gijselinck, Ilse; May, Stephanie; Rentzsch, Kristin; Weng, Shih-Ming; Schludi, Martin H; van der Zee, Julie; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Haass, Christian; Edbauer, Dieter

    2013-12-01

    Massive GGGGCC repeat expansion in the first intron of the gene C9orf72 is the most common known cause of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Despite its intronic localization and lack of an ATG start codon, the repeat region is translated in all three reading frames into aggregating dipeptide-repeat (DPR) proteins, poly-(Gly-Ala), poly-(Gly-Pro) and poly-(Gly-Arg). We took an antibody-based approach to further validate the translation of DPR proteins. To test whether the antisense repeat RNA transcript is also translated, we raised antibodies against the predicted products, poly-(Ala-Pro) and poly-(Pro-Arg). Both antibodies stained p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions throughout the cerebellum and hippocampus indicating that not only sense but also antisense strand repeats are translated into DPR proteins in the absence of ATG start codons. Protein products of both strands co-aggregate suggesting concurrent translation of both strands. Moreover, an antibody targeting the putative carboxyl terminus of DPR proteins can detect inclusion pathology in C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers suggesting that the non-ATG translation continues through the entire repeat and beyond. A highly sensitive monoclonal antibody against poly-(Gly-Arg), visualized abundant inclusion pathology in all cortical regions and some inclusions also in motoneurons. Together, our data show that the GGGGCC repeat is bidirectionally translated into five distinct DPR proteins that co-aggregate in the characteristic p62-positive TDP-43 negative inclusions found in FTLD/ALS cases with C9orf72 repeat expansion. Novel monoclonal antibodies against poly-(Gly-Arg) will facilitate pathological diagnosis of C9orf72 FTLD/ALS. PMID:24132570

  15. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  16. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term "junk DNA" has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  17. Defining Genetic Factors That Modulate Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonil; van Jaarsveld, Marijn T. M.; Shieh, Shin-Yi; Xu, Kexiang; Bonini, Nancy M.

    2011-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat instability underlies >20 human hereditary disorders. These diseases include many neurological and neurodegenerative situations, such as those caused by pathogenic polyglutamine (polyQ) domains encoded by expanded CAG repeats. Although mechanisms of instability have been intensely studied, our knowledge remains limited in part due to the lack of unbiased genome-wide screens in multicellular eukaryotes. Drosophila melanogaster displays triplet repeat instability with features that recapitulate repeat instability seen in patients with disease. Here we report an enhanced fly model with substantial instability based on a noncoding 270 CAG (UAS–CAG270) repeat construct under control of a germline-specific promoter. We find that expression of pathogenic polyQ protein modulates repeat instability of CAG270 in trans, indicating that pathogenic-length polyQ proteins may globally modulate repeat instability in the genome in vivo. We further performed an unbiased genetic screen for novel modifiers of instability. These studies indicate that different aspects of repeat instability are under independent genetic control, and identify CG15262, a protein with a NOT2/3/5 conserved domain, as a modifier of CAG repeat instability in vivo. PMID:21041558

  18. Non-coding RNAs and disease: the classical ncRNAs make a comeback.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rogerio Alves; Fraczek, Marcin G; Parker, Steven; Delneri, Daniela; O'Keefe, Raymond T

    2016-08-15

    Many human diseases have been attributed to mutation in the protein coding regions of the human genome. The protein coding portion of the human genome, however, is very small compared with the non-coding portion of the genome. As such, there are a disproportionate number of diseases attributed to the coding compared with the non-coding portion of the genome. It is now clear that the non-coding portion of the genome produces many functional non-coding RNAs and these RNAs are slowly being linked to human diseases. Here we discuss examples where mutation in classical non-coding RNAs have been attributed to human disease and identify the future potential for the non-coding portion of the genome in disease biology. PMID:27528754

  19. An expanding universe of noncoding RNAs between the poles of basic science and clinical investigations.

    PubMed

    Weil, Patrick P; Hensel, Kai O; Weber, David; Postberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer', Keystone, CO, USA, 7-12 June 2015 Since the discovery of RNAi, great efforts have been undertaken to unleash the potential biomedical applicability of small noncoding RNAs, mainly miRNAs, involving their use as biomarkers for personalized diagnostics or their usability as active agents or therapy targets. The research's focus on the noncoding RNA world is now slowly moving from a phase of basic discoveries into a new phase, where every single molecule out of many hundreds of cataloged noncoding RNAs becomes dissected in order to investigate these molecules' biomedical relevance. In addition, RNA classes neglected before, such as long noncoding RNAs or circular RNAs attract more attention. Numerous timely results and hypotheses were presented at the 2015 Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer'. PMID:26418087

  20. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  1. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  2. A Molecular Chipper technology for CRISPR sgRNA library generation and functional mapping of noncoding regions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jijun; Roden, Christine A.; Pan, Wen; Zhu, Shu; Baccei, Anna; Pan, Xinghua; Jiang, Tingting; Kluger, Yuval; Weissman, Sherman M.; Guo, Shangqin; Flavell, Richard A.; Ding, Ye; Lu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly-interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based genetic screens using single-guide-RNA (sgRNA) libraries have proven powerful to identify genetic regulators. Applying CRISPR screens to interrogate functional elements in noncoding regions requires generating sgRNA libraries that are densely covering, and ideally inexpensive, easy to implement and flexible for customization. Here we present a Molecular Chipper technology for generating dense sgRNA libraries for genomic regions of interest, and a proof-of-principle screen that identifies novel cis-regulatory domains for miR-142 biogenesis. The Molecular Chipper approach utilizes a combination of random fragmentation and a type III restriction enzyme to derive a densely covering sgRNA library from input DNA. Applying this approach to 17 microRNAs and their flanking regions and with a reporter for miR-142 activity, we identify both the pre-miR-142 region and two previously unrecognized cis-domains important for miR-142 biogenesis, with the latter regulating miR-142 processing. This strategy will be useful for identifying functional noncoding elements in mammalian genomes. PMID:27025950

  3. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G L; Fletcher-Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cowley, Sally A; Talbot, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC-derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca(2+) homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC-derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063-2078. PMID:27097283

  4. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell‐Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G.L.; Fletcher‐Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R.; Wade‐Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC‐derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca2+ homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl‐2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC‐derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063–2078 PMID:27097283

  5. [Role of non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids in chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Heinz, G A; Mashreghi, M-F

    2016-05-01

    Non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids (RNA), including microRNA, long non-coding RNA and circular RNA, can influence the expression of genes mediating inflammatory processes and therefore affect the course and progression of chronic inflammatory diseases. Recent studies using antisense oligonucleotides suggest that such non-coding regulatory RNAs are suitable as novel therapeutic target molecules for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:27115697

  6. DNA Instability Maintains the Repeat Length of the Yeast RNA Polymerase II C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Summer A; Exner, Alexandra E; Babokhov, Michael; Reinfeld, Bradley I; Fuchs, Stephen M

    2016-05-27

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes is comprised of tandemly repeating units of a conserved seven-amino acid sequence. The number of repeats is, however, quite variable across different organisms. Furthermore, previous studies have identified evidence of rearrangements within the CTD coding region, suggesting that DNA instability may play a role in regulating or maintaining CTD repeat number. The work described here establishes a clear connection between DNA instability and CTD repeat number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae First, analysis of 36 diverse S. cerevisiae isolates revealed evidence of numerous past rearrangements within the DNA sequence that encodes the CTD. Interestingly, the total number of CTD repeats was relatively static (24-26 repeats in all strains), suggesting a balancing act between repeat expansion and contraction. In an effort to explore the genetic plasticity within this region, we measured the rates of repeat expansion and contraction using novel reporters and a doxycycline-regulated expression system for RPB1 In efforts to determine the mechanisms leading to CTD repeat variability, we identified the presence of DNA secondary structures, specifically G-quadruplex-like DNA, within the CTD coding region. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutating PIF1, a G-quadruplex-specific helicase, results in increased CTD repeat length polymorphisms. We also determined that RAD52 is necessary for CTD repeat expansion but not contraction, identifying a role for recombination in repeat expansion. Results from these DNA rearrangements may help explain the CTD copy number variation seen across eukaryotes, as well as support a model of CTD expansion and contraction to maintain CTD integrity and overall length. PMID:27026700

  7. DNA Instability Maintains the Repeat Length of the Yeast RNA Polymerase II C-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Summer A.; Exner, Alexandra E.; Babokhov, Michael; Reinfeld, Bradley I.

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes is comprised of tandemly repeating units of a conserved seven-amino acid sequence. The number of repeats is, however, quite variable across different organisms. Furthermore, previous studies have identified evidence of rearrangements within the CTD coding region, suggesting that DNA instability may play a role in regulating or maintaining CTD repeat number. The work described here establishes a clear connection between DNA instability and CTD repeat number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, analysis of 36 diverse S. cerevisiae isolates revealed evidence of numerous past rearrangements within the DNA sequence that encodes the CTD. Interestingly, the total number of CTD repeats was relatively static (24–26 repeats in all strains), suggesting a balancing act between repeat expansion and contraction. In an effort to explore the genetic plasticity within this region, we measured the rates of repeat expansion and contraction using novel reporters and a doxycycline-regulated expression system for RPB1. In efforts to determine the mechanisms leading to CTD repeat variability, we identified the presence of DNA secondary structures, specifically G-quadruplex-like DNA, within the CTD coding region. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutating PIF1, a G-quadruplex-specific helicase, results in increased CTD repeat length polymorphisms. We also determined that RAD52 is necessary for CTD repeat expansion but not contraction, identifying a role for recombination in repeat expansion. Results from these DNA rearrangements may help explain the CTD copy number variation seen across eukaryotes, as well as support a model of CTD expansion and contraction to maintain CTD integrity and overall length. PMID:27026700

  8. Small and Long Non-Coding RNAs: Novel Targets in Perspective Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han Li, Chi; Chen, Yangchao

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNA refers to a large group of endogenous RNA molecules that have no protein coding capacity, while having specialized cellular and molecular functions. They possess wide range of functions such as the regulation of gene transcription and translation, post-transcriptional modification, epigenetic landscape establishment, protein scaffolding and cofactors recruitments. They are further divided into small non-coding RNAs with size < 200nt (e.g. miRNA, piRNA) and long non-coding RNAs with size >= 200nt (e.g. lincRNA, NAT). Increasing evidences suggest that both non-coding RNAs groups play important roles in cancer development, progression and pathology. Clinically, non-coding RNAs aberrations show high diagnostic and prognostic values. With improved understanding of the nature and roles of non-coding RNAs, it is believed that we can develop therapeutic treatment against cancer via the modulation of these RNA molecules. Advances in nucleic acid drug technology and computational simulation prompt the development of agents to intervene the malignant effects of non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of non-coding RNAs in cancer, and evaluate the potential of non-coding RNA-based cancer therapies. PMID:27047252

  9. Reduced hnRNPA3 increases C9orf72 repeat RNA levels and dipeptide-repeat protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhou, Qihui; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hermann, Andreas; Hanisch, Frank; Kamp, Frits; Nuscher, Brigitte; Orozco, Denise; Edbauer, Dieter; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Intronic hexanucleotide (G4C2) repeat expansions in C9orf72 are genetically associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat RNA accumulates within RNA foci but is also translated into disease characterizing dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR). Repeat-dependent toxicity may affect nuclear import. hnRNPA3 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which specifically binds to the G4C2 repeat RNA We now report that a reduction of nuclear hnRNPA3 leads to an increase of the repeat RNA as well as DPR production and deposition in primary neurons and a novel tissue culture model that reproduces features of the C9orf72 pathology. In fibroblasts derived from patients carrying extended C9orf72 repeats, nuclear RNA foci accumulated upon reduction of hnRNPA3. Neurons in the hippocampus of C9orf72 patients are frequently devoid of hnRNPA3. Reduced nuclear hnRNPA3 in the hippocampus of patients with extended C9orf72 repeats correlates with increased DPR deposition. Thus, reduced hnRNPA3 expression in C9orf72 cases leads to increased levels of the repeat RNA as well as enhanced production and deposition of DPR proteins and RNA foci. PMID:27461252

  10. Incorporating Non-Coding Annotations into Rare Variant Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The success of collapsing methods which investigate the combined effect of rare variants on complex traits has so far been limited. The manner in which variants within a gene are selected prior to analysis has a crucial impact on this success, which has resulted in analyses conventionally filtering variants according to their consequence. This study investigates whether an alternative approach to filtering, using annotations from recently developed bioinformatics tools, can aid these types of analyses in comparison to conventional approaches. Methods & Results We conducted a candidate gene analysis using the UK10K sequence and lipids data, filtering according to functional annotations using the resource CADD (Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion) and contrasting results with ‘nonsynonymous’ and ‘loss of function’ consequence analyses. Using CADD allowed the inclusion of potentially deleterious intronic variants, which was not possible when filtering by consequence. Overall, different filtering approaches provided similar evidence of association, although filtering according to CADD identified evidence of association between ANGPTL4 and High Density Lipoproteins (P = 0.02, N = 3,210) which was not observed in the other analyses. We also undertook genome-wide analyses to determine how filtering in this manner compared to conventional approaches for gene regions. Results suggested that filtering by annotations according to CADD, as well as other tools known as FATHMM-MKL and DANN, identified association signals not detected when filtering by variant consequence and vice versa. Conclusion Incorporating variant annotations from non-coding bioinformatics tools should prove to be a valuable asset for rare variant analyses in the future. Filtering by variant consequence is only possible in coding regions of the genome, whereas utilising non-coding bioinformatics annotations provides an opportunity to discover unknown causal variants in non-coding

  11. Expression of a novel non-coding mitochondrial RNA in human proliferating cells

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Veronica; Villota, Claudio; Landerer, Eduardo; Martinez, Ronny; Santander, Marcela; Martinez, Rodrigo; Pinto, Rodrigo; Vera, María I.; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Burzio, Luis O.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported the presence in mouse cells of a mitochondrial RNA which contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 121 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). Here, we report the structure of an equivalent transcript of 2374 nt which is over-expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. The transcript contains a hairpin structure comprising an IR of 815 nt linked to the 5′ end of the 16S mtrRNA and forming a long double-stranded structure or stem and a loop of 40 nt. The stem is resistant to RNase A and can be detected and isolated after digestion with the enzyme. This novel transcript is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) and several evidences suggest that the transcript is synthesized in mitochondria. The expression of this transcript can be induced in resting lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Moreover, aphidicolin treatment of DU145 cells reversibly blocks proliferation and expression of the transcript. If the drug is removed, the cells re-assume proliferation and over-express the ncmtRNA. These results suggest that the expression of the ncmtRNA correlates with the replicative state of the cell and it may play a role in cell proliferation. PMID:17962305

  12. Noncoding origins of anthropoid traits and a new null model of transposon functionalization.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Rayan, Nirmala Arul; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about novel genetic elements that drove the emergence of anthropoid primates. We exploited the sequencing of the marmoset genome to identify 23,849 anthropoid-specific constrained (ASC) regions and confirmed their robust functional signatures. Of the ASC base pairs, 99.7% were noncoding, suggesting that novel anthropoid functional elements were overwhelmingly cis-regulatory. ASCs were highly enriched in loci associated with fetal brain development, motor coordination, neurotransmission, and vision, thus providing a large set of candidate elements for exploring the molecular basis of hallmark primate traits. We validated ASC192 as a primate-specific enhancer in proliferative zones of the developing brain. Unexpectedly, transposable elements (TEs) contributed to >56% of ASCs, and almost all TE families showed functional potential similar to that of nonrepetitive DNA. Three L1PA repeat-derived ASCs displayed coherent eye-enhancer function, thus demonstrating that the "gene-battery" model of TE functionalization applies to enhancers in vivo. Our study provides fundamental insights into genome evolution and the origins of anthropoid phenotypes and supports an elegantly simple new null model of TE exaptation. PMID:25043600

  13. Identification of new noncoding RNAs in Listeria monocytogenes and prediction of mRNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Mandin, Pierre; Repoila, Francis; Vergassola, Massimo; Geissmann, Thomas; Cossart, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    To identify noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we analyzed the intergenic regions (IGRs) of strain EGD-e by in silico-based approaches. Among the twelve ncRNAs found, nine are novel and specific to the Listeria genus, and two of these ncRNAs are expressed in a growth-dependent manner. Three of the ncRNAs are transcribed in opposite direction to overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), suggesting that they act as antisense on the corresponding mRNAs. The other ncRNA genes appear as single transcription units. One of them displays five repeats of 29 nucleotides. Five of these new ncRNAs are absent from the non-pathogenic species L. innocua, raising the possibility that they might be involved in virulence. To predict mRNA targets of the ncRNAs, we developed a computational method based on thermodynamic pairing energies and known ncRNA–mRNA hybrids. Three ncRNAs, including one of the putative antisense ncRNAs, were predicted to have more than one mRNA targets. Several of them were shown to bind efficiently to the ncRNAs suggesting that our in silico approach could be used as a general tool to search for mRNA targets of ncRNAs. PMID:17259222

  14. The RNA-centred view of the synapse: non-coding RNAs and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2014-01-01

    If mRNAs were the only RNAs made by a neuron, there would be a simple mapping of mRNAs to proteins. However, microRNAs and other non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs; endo-siRNAs, piRNAs, BC1, BC200, antisense and long ncRNAs, repeat-related transcripts, etc.) regulate mRNAs via effects on protein translation as well as transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Not only are genes ON or OFF, but their ability to be translated can be turned ON or OFF at the level of synapses, supporting an enormous increase in information capacity. Here, I review evidence that ncRNAs are expressed pervasively within dendrites in mammalian brain; that some are activity-dependent and highly enriched near synapses; and that synaptic ncRNAs participate in plasticity responses including learning and memory. Ultimately, ncRNAs can be viewed as the post-it notes of the neuron. They have no literal meaning of their own, but derive their functions from where (and to what) they are stuck. This may explain, in part, why ncRNAs differ so dramatically from protein-coding genes, both in terms of the usual indicators of functionality and in terms of evolutionary constraints. ncRNAs do not appear to be direct mediators of synaptic transmission in the manner of neurotransmitters or receptors, yet they orchestrate synaptic plasticity—and may drive species-specific changes in cognition. PMID:25135965

  15. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  16. Noncoding origins of anthropoid traits and a new null model of transposon functionalization

    PubMed Central

    del Rosario, Ricardo C.H.; Rayan, Nirmala Arul

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about novel genetic elements that drove the emergence of anthropoid primates. We exploited the sequencing of the marmoset genome to identify 23,849 anthropoid-specific constrained (ASC) regions and confirmed their robust functional signatures. Of the ASC base pairs, 99.7% were noncoding, suggesting that novel anthropoid functional elements were overwhelmingly cis-regulatory. ASCs were highly enriched in loci associated with fetal brain development, motor coordination, neurotransmission, and vision, thus providing a large set of candidate elements for exploring the molecular basis of hallmark primate traits. We validated ASC192 as a primate-specific enhancer in proliferative zones of the developing brain. Unexpectedly, transposable elements (TEs) contributed to >56% of ASCs, and almost all TE families showed functional potential similar to that of nonrepetitive DNA. Three L1PA repeat-derived ASCs displayed coherent eye-enhancer function, thus demonstrating that the “gene-battery” model of TE functionalization applies to enhancers in vivo. Our study provides fundamental insights into genome evolution and the origins of anthropoid phenotypes and supports an elegantly simple new null model of TE exaptation. PMID:25043600

  17. Evolutionary dynamics and tissue specificity of human long noncoding RNAs in six mammals.

    PubMed

    Washietl, Stefan; Kellis, Manolis; Garber, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) play diverse regulatory roles in human development and disease, but little is known about their evolutionary history and constraint. Here, we characterize human lincRNA expression patterns in nine tissues across six mammalian species and multiple individuals. Of the 1898 human lincRNAs expressed in these tissues, we find orthologous transcripts for 80% in chimpanzee, 63% in rhesus, 39% in cow, 38% in mouse, and 35% in rat. Mammalian-expressed lincRNAs show remarkably strong conservation of tissue specificity, suggesting that it is selectively maintained. In contrast, abundant splice-site turnover suggests that exact splice sites are not critical. Relative to evolutionarily young lincRNAs, mammalian-expressed lincRNAs show higher primary sequence conservation in their promoters and exons, increased proximity to protein-coding genes enriched for tissue-specific functions, fewer repeat elements, and more frequent single-exon transcripts. Remarkably, we find that ∼20% of human lincRNAs are not expressed beyond chimpanzee and are undetectable even in rhesus. These hominid-specific lincRNAs are more tissue specific, enriched for testis, and faster evolving within the human lineage. PMID:24429298

  18. An HIV-Encoded Antisense Long Noncoding RNA Epigenetically Regulates Viral Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena; Ackley, Amanda; Turner, Anne-Marie W; Famiglietti, Marylinda; Bosque, Alberto; Clemson, Matthew; Planelles, Vicente; Morris, Kevin V

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and their wide range of functional roles in human cells are fast becoming realized. Importantly, lncRNAs have been identified as epigenetic modulators and consequently play a pivotal role in the regulation of gene expression. A human immunodeficiency virus-encoded antisense RNA transcript has recently been reported and we sought to characterize this RNA and determine its potential role in viral transcription regulation. The intrinsic properties of this human immunodeficiency virus-expressed lncRNA were characterized and the data presented here suggest that it functions as an epigenetic brake to modulate viral transcription. Suppression of this long antisense transcript with small single-stranded antisense RNAs resulted in the activation of viral gene expression. This lncRNA was found to localize to the 5′ long-term repeats (LTR) and to usurp components of endogenous cellular pathways that are involved in lncRNA directed epigenetic gene silencing. Collectively, we find that this viral expressed antisense lncRNA is involved in modulating human immunodeficiency virus gene expression and that this regulatory effect is due to an alteration in the epigenetic landscape at the viral promoter. PMID:24576854

  19. Non-Coding RNAs in Primary Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghidini, Michele; Braconi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Over the past few years, many studies have evaluated the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. ncRNAs were shown to have diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential in HCC. In this manuscript, we review the latest major discoveries concerning microRNAs and long ncRNAs in HCC pathogenesis, and discuss the potentials and the limitations for their use in clinical practice. PMID:26131450

  20. Long noncoding RNAs: fresh perspectives into the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Froberg, John E; Lee, Jeannie T

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale mapping of transcriptomes has revealed significant levels of transcriptional activity within both unannotated and annotated regions of the genome. Interestingly, many of the novel transcripts demonstrate tissue-specific expression and some level of sequence conservation across species, but most have low protein-coding potential. Here, we describe progress in identifying and characterizing long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and review how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules to regulate diverse cellular processes. We also preview emerging techniques that will help advance the discovery and characterization of novel transcripts. Finally, we discuss the role of lncRNAs in disease and therapeutics. PMID:24290031

  1. Non-Coding RNAs in Primary Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghidini, Michele; Braconi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Over the past few years, many studies have evaluated the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. ncRNAs were shown to have diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential in HCC. In this manuscript, we review the latest major discoveries concerning microRNAs and long ncRNAs in HCC pathogenesis, and discuss the potentials and the limitations for their use in clinical practice. PMID:26131450

  2. Long noncoding RNAs and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are typically defined as transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. lncRNAs can regulate gene expression at epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. Recent studies have shown that lncRNAs are involved in many neurological diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions, and genetic disorders. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease, which accounts for >80% of dementia in elderly subjects. In this review, we will highlight recent studies investigating the role of lncRNAs in Alzheimer’s disease and focus on some specific lncRNAs that may underlie Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology and therefore could be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27418812

  3. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  4. Thermal Expansion "Paradox."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakhruddin, Hasan

    1993-01-01

    Describes a paradox in the equation for thermal expansion. If the calculations for heating a rod and subsequently cooling a rod are determined, the new length of the cool rod is shorter than expected. (PR)

  5. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  6. Distinguishing the immunostimulatory properties of noncoding RNAs expressed in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanne, Antoine; Muniz, Luciana R.; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Leonova, Katerina I.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Ting, David T.; Monasson, Rémi; Cocco, Simona; Levine, Arnold J.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Greenbaum, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated abundant transcription of a set of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) preferentially within tumors as opposed to normal tissue. Using an approach from statistical physics, we quantify global transcriptome-wide motif use for the first time, to our knowledge, in human and murine ncRNAs, determining that most have motif use consistent with the coding genome. However, an outlier subset of tumor-associated ncRNAs, typically of recent evolutionary origin, has motif use that is often indicative of pathogen-associated RNA. For instance, we show that the tumor-associated human repeat human satellite repeat II (HSATII) is enriched in motifs containing CpG dinucleotides in AU-rich contexts that most of the human genome and human adapted viruses have evolved to avoid. We demonstrate that a key subset of these ncRNAs functions as immunostimulatory “self-agonists” and directly activates cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system to produce proinflammatory cytokines. These ncRNAs arise from endogenous repetitive elements that are normally silenced, yet are often very highly expressed in cancers. We propose that the innate response in tumors may partially originate from direct interaction of immunogenic ncRNAs expressed in cancer cells with innate pattern recognition receptors, and thereby assign a previously unidentified danger-associated function to a set of dark matter repetitive elements. These findings potentially reconcile several observations concerning the role of ncRNA expression in cancers and their relationship to the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26575629

  7. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  8. Repeated measures with zeros.

    PubMed

    Berk, K N; Lachenbruch, P A

    2002-08-01

    Consider repeated measures data with many zeros. For the case with one grouping factor and one repeated measure, we examine several models, assuming that the nonzero data are roughly lognormal. One of the simplest approaches is to model the zeros as left-censored observations from the lognormal distribution. A random effect is assumed for subjects. The censored model makes a strong assumption about the relationship between the zeros and the nonzero values. To check on this, you can instead assume that some of the zeros are 'true' zeros and model them as Bernoulli. Then the other values are modeled with a censored lognormal. A logistic model is used for the Bernoulli p, the probability of a true nonzero. The fit of the pure left-censored lognormal can be assessed by testing the hypothesis that p is 1, as described by Moulton and Halsey. The model can also be simplified by omitting the censoring, leaving a logistic model for the zeros and a lognormal model for the nonzero values. This is approximately equivalent to modeling the zero and nonzero values separately, a two-part model. In contrast to the censored model, this model assumes only a slight relationship (a covariance component) between the occurrence of zeros and the size of the nonzero values. The models are compared in terms of an example with data from children's private speech. PMID:12197298

  9. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  10. Non-canonical RAN Translation of CGG Repeats Has Canonical Requirements.

    PubMed

    Cox, Diana C; Cooper, Thomas A

    2016-04-21

    Repeat expansions cause dominantly inherited neurological disorders. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Kearse et al. (2016) examine the requirements for RAN translation of the CGG repeats that cause fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, revealing similarities and differences with canonical translation. PMID:27105111

  11. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  12. Noncoding RNAs in Tumor Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Lin, Pei-Ying; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-derived tumor cells acquire the capacity for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which enables them to invade adjacent tissues and/or metastasize to distant organs. Cancer metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related death. Molecular mechanisms involved in the switch from an epithelial phenotype to mesenchymal status are complicated and are controlled by a variety of signaling pathways. Recently, a set of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), were found to modulate gene expressions at either transcriptional or posttranscriptional levels. These ncRNAs are involved in EMT through their interplay with EMT-related transcription factors (EMT-TFs) and EMT-associated signaling. Reciprocal regulatory interactions between lncRNAs and miRNAs further increase the complexity of the regulation of gene expression and protein translation. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding EMT-regulating ncRNAs and their associated signaling pathways involved in cancer progression. PMID:26989421

  13. Non-coding RNAs: Classification, Biology and Functioning.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Sonja; Kretz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-standing principles of molecular biology is that DNA acts as a template for transcription of messenger RNAs, which serve as blueprints for protein translation. A rapidly growing number of exceptions to this rule have been reported over the past decades: they include long known classes of RNAs involved in translation such as transfer RNAs and ribosomal RNAs, small nuclear RNAs involved in splicing events, and small nucleolar RNAs mainly involved in the modification of other small RNAs, such as ribosomal RNAs and transfer RNAs. More recently, several classes of short regulatory non-coding RNAs, including piwi-associated RNAs, endogenous short-interfering RNAs and microRNAs have been discovered in mammals, which act as key regulators of gene expression in many different cellular pathways and systems. Additionally, the human genome encodes several thousand long non-protein coding RNAs >200 nucleotides in length, some of which play crucial roles in a variety of biological processes such as epigenetic control of chromatin, promoter-specific gene regulation, mRNA stability, X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting. In this chapter, we will introduce several classes of short and long non-coding RNAs, describe their diverse roles in mammalian gene regulation and give examples for known modes of action. PMID:27573892

  14. "Reverse Genomics" Predicts Function of Human Conserved Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Marcovitz, Amir; Jia, Robin; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-05-01

    Evolutionary changes in cis-regulatory elements are thought to play a key role in morphological and physiological diversity across animals. Many conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) function as cis-regulatory elements, controlling gene expression levels in different biological contexts. However, determining specific associations between CNEs and related phenotypes is a challenging task. Here, we present a computational "reverse genomics" approach that predicts the phenotypic functions of human CNEs. We identify thousands of human CNEs that were lost in at least two independent mammalian lineages (IL-CNEs), and match their evolutionary profiles against a diverse set of phenotypes recently annotated across multiple mammalian species. We identify 2,759 compelling associations between human CNEs and a diverse set of mammalian phenotypes. We discuss multiple CNEs, including a predicted ear element near BMP7, a pelvic CNE in FBN1, a brain morphology element in UBE4B, and an aquatic adaptation forelimb CNE near EGR2, and provide a full list of our predictions. As more genomes are sequenced and more traits are annotated across species, we expect our method to facilitate the interpretation of noncoding mutations in human disease and expedite the discovery of individual CNEs that play key roles in human evolution and development. PMID:26744417

  15. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  16. Long non-coding RNA expression in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mirsafian, Hoda; Manda, Srinivas Srikanth; Mitchell, Christopher J; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Merican, Amir Feisal; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-07-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to possess a wide range of functions in both cellular and developmental processes including cancers. Although some of the lncRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of the immune response, the exact function of the large majority of lncRNAs still remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the lncRNAs in human primary monocytes, an essential component of the innate immune system. We performed RNA sequencing of monocytes from four individuals and combined our data with eleven other publicly available datasets. Our analysis led to identification of ~8000 lncRNAs of which >1000 have not been previously reported in monocytes. PCR-based validation of a subset of the identified novel long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) revealed distinct expression patterns. Our study provides a landscape of lncRNAs in monocytes, which could facilitate future experimental studies to characterize the functions of these molecules in the innate immune system. PMID:26778813

  17. Peptides Used in the Delivery of Small Noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous process in which small noncoding RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions. In general, siRNA and miRNA/miRNA mimics are similar in nature and activity except their origin and specificity. Although both siRNAs and miRNAs have been extensively studied as novel therapeutics for a wide range of diseases, the large molecular weight, anionic surface charges, instability in blood circulation, and intracellular trafficking to the RISC after cellular uptake have hindered the translation of these RNAs from bench to clinic. As a result, a great variety of delivery systems have been investigated for safe and effective delivery of small noncoding RNAs. Among these systems, peptides, especially cationic peptides, have emerged as a promising type of carrier due to their inherent ability to condense negatively charged RNAs, ease of synthesis, controllable size, and tunable structure. In this review, we will focus on three major types of cationic peptides, including poly(l-lysine) (PLL), protamine, and cell penetrating peptides (CPP), as well as peptide targeting ligands that have been extensively used in RNA delivery. The delivery strategies, applications, and limitations of these cationic peptides in siRNA/miRNA delivery will be discussed. PMID:25157701

  18. Viroids, infectious long non-coding RNAs with autonomous replication.

    PubMed

    Gago-Zachert, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome deep-sequencing studies performed during the last years confirmed that the vast majority of the RNAs transcribed in higher organisms correspond to several types of non-coding RNAs including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The study of lncRNAs and the identification of their functions, is still an emerging field in plants but the characterization of some of them indicate that they play an important role in crucial regulatory processes like flowering regulation, and responses to abiotic stress and plant hormones. A second group of lncRNAs present in plants is formed by viroids, exogenous infectious subviral plant pathogens well known since many years. Viroids are composed of circular RNA genomes without protein-coding capacity and subvert enzymatic activities of their hosts to complete its own biological cycle. Different aspects of viroid biology and viroid-host interactions have been elucidated in the last years and some of them are the main topic of this review together with the analysis of the state-of-the-art about the growing field of endogenous lncRNAs in plants. PMID:26319312

  19. Non-coding RNAs: the architects of eukaryotic complexity.

    PubMed

    Mattick, J S

    2001-11-01

    Around 98% of all transcriptional output in humans is non-coding RNA. RNA-mediated gene regulation is widespread in higher eukaryotes and complex genetic phenomena like RNA interference, co-suppression, transgene silencing, imprinting, methylation, and possibly position-effect variegation and transvection, all involve intersecting pathways based on or connected to RNA signaling. I suggest that the central dogma is incomplete, and that intronic and other non-coding RNAs have evolved to comprise a second tier of gene expression in eukaryotes, which enables the integration and networking of complex suites of gene activity. Although proteins are the fundamental effectors of cellular function, the basis of eukaryotic complexity and phenotypic variation may lie primarily in a control architecture composed of a highly parallel system of trans-acting RNAs that relay state information required for the coordination and modulation of gene expression, via chromatin remodeling, RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. This system has interesting and perhaps informative analogies with small world networks and dataflow computing. PMID:11713189

  20. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  1. Structure Prediction: New Insights into Decrypting Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kun; Arfat, Yasir; Li, Dijie; Zhao, Fan; Chen, Zhihao; Yin, Chong; Sun, Yulong; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Tuanmin; Qian, Airong

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which form a diverse class of RNAs, remain the least understood type of noncoding RNAs in terms of their nature and identification. Emerging evidence has revealed that a small number of newly discovered lncRNAs perform important and complex biological functions such as dosage compensation, chromatin regulation, genomic imprinting, and nuclear organization. However, understanding the wide range of functions of lncRNAs related to various processes of cellular networks remains a great experimental challenge. Structural versatility is critical for RNAs to perform various functions and provides new insights into probing the functions of lncRNAs. In recent years, the computational method of RNA structure prediction has been developed to analyze the structure of lncRNAs. This novel methodology has provided basic but indispensable information for the rapid, large-scale and in-depth research of lncRNAs. This review focuses on mainstream RNA structure prediction methods at the secondary and tertiary levels to offer an additional approach to investigating the functions of lncRNAs. PMID:26805815

  2. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Charlotte; Wurmthaler, Lena A; Li, Yuanhao; Frickey, Tancred; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc), Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac), and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana). In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs) and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria. PMID:26695179

  3. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Charlotte; Wurmthaler, Lena A.; Li, Yuanhao; Frickey, Tancred; Hartig, Jörg S.

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1–5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6–9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc), Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac), and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana). In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs) and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria. PMID:26695179

  4. Evolutionary Footprints of Short Tandem Repeats in Avian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hideaki; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) or microsatellites are well-known sequence elements that may change the spacing between transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in promoter regions by expansion or contraction of repetitive units. Some of these mutations have the potential to contribute to phenotypic diversity by altering patterns of gene expression. To explore how repetitive sequence motifs within promoters have evolved in avian lineages under mutation-selection balance, more than 400 evolutionary conserved STRs (ecSTRs) were identified in this study by comparing the 2 kb upstream promoter sequences of chicken against those of other birds (turkey, duck, zebra finch, and flycatcher). The rate of conservation was significantly higher in AG dinucleotide repeats than in AC or AT repeats, with the expansion of AG motifs being noticeably constrained in passerines. Analysis of the relative distance between ecSTRs and TFBSs revealed a significantly higher rate of conserved TFBSs in the vicinity of ecSTRs in both chicken-duck and chicken-passerine comparisons. Our comparative study provides a novel insight into which intrinsic factors have influenced the degree of constraint on repeat expansion/contraction during avian promoter evolution. PMID:26766026

  5. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  6. Non-coding RNAs in Development and Disease: Background, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Beermann, Julia; Piccoli, Maria-Teresa; Viereck, Janika; Thum, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Advances in RNA-sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of thousands of non-coding transcripts with unknown function. There are several types of non-coding linear RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNA) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), as well as circular RNAs (circRNA) consisting of a closed continuous loop. This review guides the reader through important aspects of non-coding RNA biology. This includes their biogenesis, mode of actions, physiological function, as well as their role in the disease context (such as in cancer or the cardiovascular system). We specifically focus on non-coding RNAs as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:27535639

  7. Bistability in self-activating genes regulated by non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNA molecules are able to regulate gene expression and play an essential role in cells. On the other hand, bistability is an important behaviour of genetic networks. Here, we propose and study an ODE model in order to show how non-coding RNA can produce bistability in a simple way. The model comprises a single gene with positive feedback that is repressed by non-coding RNA molecules. We show how the values of all the reaction rates involved in the model are able to control the transitions between the high and low states. This new model can be interesting to clarify the role of non-coding RNA molecules in genetic networks. As well, these results can be interesting in synthetic biology for developing new genetic memories and biomolecular devices based on non-coding RNAs.

  8. Long non-coding RNAs as emerging regulators of differentiation, development, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Bijan K; Mueller, Adam C; Dutta, Anindya

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of the mammalian genome encodes numerous transcripts that are not translated into proteins, termed long non-coding RNAs. Initial studies identifying long non-coding RNAs inferred these RNA sequences were a consequence of transcriptional noise or promiscuous RNA polymerase II activity. However, the last decade has seen a revolution in the understanding of regulation and function of long non-coding RNAs. Now it has become apparent that long non-coding RNAs play critical roles in a wide variety of biological processes. In this review, we describe the current understanding of long non-coding RNA-mediated regulation of cellular processes: differentiation, development, and disease. PMID:25483404

  9. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  10. Muscular myopathies other than myotonic dystrophy also associated with (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vasavi; Ahuja, Y. R.; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Assess triplet repeat expansion (CTG)n at the ‘dystrophia-myotonica protein kinase’ (DMPK) locus in muscular myopathies to elucidate its role in myopathic symptoms and enable genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in families. Methods and Results: Individuals with symptoms of myopathy, hypotonia and controls selected randomly from the population were evaluated for triplet repeat expansion of (CTG)n repeats in the 3’untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK gene, the causative mutation in myotonic dystrophy (DM). DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 40 individuals; they presented symptoms of muscle myopathy (n = 11), muscle hypotonia (n = 4), members of their families (n = 5) and control individuals from random population (n = 20). Molecular analysis of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the DMPK gene encompassing the triplet repeat expansion, showed that all controls (n = 20) gave a 2.1 kb band indicating normal triplet repeat number. Three out of 11 cases (two clinically diagnosed DM and one muscular dystrophy) had an expansion of the (CTG)n repeat in the range of 1000-2100 repeats corresponding to the repeat number in cases of severe DM. Other two of these 11 cases, showed a mild expansion of ~ 66 repeats. Three samples, which included two cases of hypotonia and the father of a subject with muscular dystrophy, also gave a similar repeat expansion (~66 repeats). Conclusion: Results suggest a role of (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus in unexplained hypotonias and muscular myopathies other than DM. This calls for screening of the triplet repeat expansion at the DMPK locus in cases of idiopathic myopathies and hypotonia. PMID:23560000

  11. Distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles at tandem repeat microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L. |; Zhong, Y.; Chakraborty, R.

    1994-09-01

    PCR-based assays of tandemly repeated microsatellite loci detect genetic variation from which alleles may be scored by their repeat unit lengths. Comparison of allele sizes from such data yields a probability distribution (P{sub k}) of repeat unit differences (k) between alleles segregating in a population. We show that this distribution (P{sub k}; k = 0, 1,2,...) provides insight regarding the mechanism of production of new alleles at such loci and the demographic history of populations, far better than that obtained from other summary measures (e.g., heterozygosity, number of alleles, and the range of allele sizes). The distributions of P{sub k} under multi-step stepwise models of mutation are analytically derived, which show that when a population is at equilibrium under the mutation-drift balance, the distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles is positively skewed with a mode larger than zero. However, when the heterozygosity at a locus is low (say, less than 40%), P{sub k} is a monotonically decreasing function of k. Applications of this theory to data on repeat unit sizes at over 1,240 microsatellite loci from the Caucasians, categorized by the average heterozygosity of loci, indicate that at most microsatellite loci new alleles are produced by stepwise mutations, and this is consistent with the replication slippage mechanism of mutations. The repeat size changes of mutants are probably within one or two units of alleles from which the mutants arise. Distributions of P{sub k} at microsatellite loci located within genes show evidence of allele size constraints. No significant evidence of recent expansion of population sizes in the Caucasians is detected by the distribution of P{sub k}.

  12. NONCODEv4: exploring the world of long non-coding RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoyong; Yuan, Jiao; Li, Hui; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guoguang; Bu, Dechao; Zhu, Weimin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been implied in diseases and identified to play important roles in various biological processes. Since NONCODE version 3.0 was released 2 years ago, discovery of novel ncRNAs has been promoted by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). In this update of NONCODE, we expand the ncRNA data set by collection of newly identified ncRNAs from literature published in the last 2 years and integration of the latest version of RefSeq and Ensembl. Particularly, the number of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has increased sharply from 73 327 to 210 831. Owing to similar alternative splicing pattern to mRNAs, the concept of lncRNA genes was put forward to help systematic understanding of lncRNAs. The 56 018 and 46 475 lncRNA genes were generated from 95 135 and 67 628 lncRNAs for human and mouse, respectively. Additionally, we present expression profile of lncRNA genes by graphs based on public RNA-seq data for human and mouse, as well as predict functions of these lncRNA genes. The improvements brought to the database also include an incorporation of an ID conversion tool from RefSeq or Ensembl ID to NONCODE ID and a service of lncRNA identification. NONCODE is also accessible through http://www.noncode.org/. PMID:24285305

  13. Thermal expansion in nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancardo Viotti, Agustín; Monastra, Alejandro G.; Moreno, Mariano F.; Florencia Carusela, M.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by some recent experiments and numerical works related to nanoresonators, we perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal expansion and the ability of the device to act as a strain sensor assisted by thermally-induced vibrations. The proposed model consists in a chain of atoms interacting anharmonically with both ends clamped to thermal reservoirs. We analyze the thermal expansion and resonant frequency shifts as a function of temperature and the applied strain. For the transversal modes the shift is approximately linear with strain. We also present analytical results from canonical calculations in the harmonic approximation showing that thermal expansion is uniform along the device. This prediction also works when the system operates in a nonlinear oscillation regime at moderate and high temperatures.

  14. Novel Foraminal Expansion Technique

    PubMed Central

    Senturk, Salim; Ciplak, Mert; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Sasani, Mehdi; Egemen, Emrah; Yaman, Onur; Suzer, Tuncer

    2016-01-01

    The technique we describe was developed for cervical foraminal stenosis for cases in which a keyhole foraminotomy would not be effective. Many cervical stenosis cases are so severe that keyhole foraminotomy is not successful. However, the technique outlined in this study provides adequate enlargement of an entire cervical foraminal diameter. This study reports on a novel foraminal expansion technique. Linear drilling was performed in the middle of the facet joint. A small bone graft was placed between the divided lateral masses after distraction. A lateral mass stabilization was performed with screws and rods following the expansion procedure. A cervical foramen was linearly drilled medially to laterally, then expanded with small bone grafts, and a lateral mass instrumentation was added with surgery. The patient was well after the surgery. The novel foraminal expansion is an effective surgical method for severe foraminal stenosis. PMID:27559460

  15. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1989-10-10

    SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansionmore » configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.« less

  16. Novel Foraminal Expansion Technique.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ali Fahir; Senturk, Salim; Ciplak, Mert; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Sasani, Mehdi; Egemen, Emrah; Yaman, Onur; Suzer, Tuncer

    2016-08-01

    The technique we describe was developed for cervical foraminal stenosis for cases in which a keyhole foraminotomy would not be effective. Many cervical stenosis cases are so severe that keyhole foraminotomy is not successful. However, the technique outlined in this study provides adequate enlargement of an entire cervical foraminal diameter. This study reports on a novel foraminal expansion technique. Linear drilling was performed in the middle of the facet joint. A small bone graft was placed between the divided lateral masses after distraction. A lateral mass stabilization was performed with screws and rods following the expansion procedure. A cervical foramen was linearly drilled medially to laterally, then expanded with small bone grafts, and a lateral mass instrumentation was added with surgery. The patient was well after the surgery. The novel foraminal expansion is an effective surgical method for severe foraminal stenosis. PMID:27559460

  17. Long Tract of Untranslated CAG Repeats Is Deleterious in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min-Jon; Li, Chui-Yen; Wang, Li-Chun; Chen, Luen-Kui; Pan, Huichin

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent trinucleotide repeat found in human disorders is the CAG sequence. Expansion of CAG repeats is mostly found in coding regions and is thought to cause diseases through a protein mechanism. Recently, expanded CAG repeats were shown to induce toxicity at the RNA level in Drosophila and C. elegans. These findings raise the possibility that CAG repeats may trigger RNA-mediated pathogenesis in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing EGFP transcripts with long CAG repeats in the 3′ untranslated region develop pathogenic features. Expression of the transgene was directed to the muscle in order to compare the resulting phenotype to that caused by the CUG expansion, as occurs in myotonic dystrophy. Transgenic mice expressing 200, but not those expressing 0 or 23 CAG repeats, showed alterations in muscle morphology, histochemistry and electrophysiology, as well as abnormal behavioral phenotypes. Expression of the expanded CAG repeats in testes resulted in reduced fertility due to defective sperm motility. The production of EGFP protein was significantly reduced by the 200 CAG repeats, and no polyglutamine-containing product was detected, which argues against a protein mechanism. Moreover, nuclear RNA foci were detected for the long CAG repeats. These data support the notion that expanded CAG repeat RNA can cause deleterious effects in mammals. They also suggest the possible involvement of an RNA mechanism in human diseases with long CAG repeats. PMID:21283659

  18. Transcription-induced DNA toxicity at trinucleotide repeats

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John H

    2011-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a blessing and a curse. In coding regions, where they are enriched, short repeats offer the potential for continuous, rapid length variation with linked incremental changes in the activity of the encoded protein, a valuable source of variation for evolution. But at the upper end of these benign and beneficial lengths, trinucleotide repeats become very unstable, with a dangerous bias toward continual expansion, which can lead to neurological diseases in humans. The mechanisms of expansion are varied and the links to disease are complex. Where they have been delineated, however, they have often revealed unexpected, fundamental aspects of the underlying cell biology. Nowhere is this more apparent than in recent studies, which indicate that expanded CAG repeats can form toxic sites in the genome, which can, upon interaction with normal components of DNA metabolism, trigger cell death. Here we discuss the phenomenon of TNR-induced DNA toxicity, with special emphasis on the role of transcription. Transcription-induced DNA toxicity may have profound biological consequences, with particular relevance to repeat-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21293182

  19. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael S; Sallee, Floyd R; Park, Edwards A; Parker, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks. PMID:26636029

  20. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Michael S.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Park, Edwards A.; Parker, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks. PMID:26636029

  1. RNA FISH for detecting expanded repeats in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a widely used technique for detecting transcripts in fixed cells and tissues. Many variants of RNA FISH have been proposed to increase signal strength, resolution and target specificity. The current variants of this technique facilitate the detection of the subcellular localization of transcripts at a single molecule level. Among the applications of RNA FISH are studies on nuclear RNA foci in diseases resulting from the expansion of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats present in different single genes. The partial or complete retention of mutant transcripts forming RNA aggregates within the nucleoplasm has been shown in multiple cellular disease models and in the tissues of patients affected with these atypical mutations. Relevant diseases include, among others, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) with CUG repeats, Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) with CAG repeats, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) with CGG repeats, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) with CCUG repeats, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) with GGGGCC repeats and spinocerebellar ataxia type 32 (SCA32) with GGCCUG. In this article, we summarize the results obtained with FISH to examine RNA nuclear inclusions. We provide a detailed protocol for detecting RNAs containing expanded CAG and CUG repeats in different cellular models, including fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells and murine and human neuronal progenitors. We also present the results of the first single-molecule FISH application in a cellular model of polyglutamine disease. PMID:26615955

  2. RNA as a fundamental component of interphase chromosomes: could repeats prove key?

    PubMed

    Hall, Lisa L; Lawrence, Jeanne B

    2016-04-01

    Beginning with the precedent of XIST RNA as a 'chromosomal RNA' (cRNA), there is growing interest in the possibility that a diversity of non-coding RNAs may function in chromatin. We review findings which lead us to suggest that RNA is essentially a widespread component of interphase chromosomes. Further, RNA likely contributes to architecture and regulation, with repeat-rich 'junk' RNA in euchromatin (ecRNA) promoting a more open chromatin state. Thousands of low-abundance nuclear RNAs have been reported, however it remains a challenge to determine which of these may function in chromatin. Recent findings indicate that repetitive sequences are enriched in chromosome-associated non-coding RNAs, and repeat-rich RNA shows unusual properties, including localization and stability, with similarities to XIST RNA. We suggest two frontiers in genome biology are emerging and may intersect: the broad contribution of RNA to interphase chromosomes and the distinctive properties of repeat-rich intronic or intergenic junk sequences that may play a role in chromosome structure and regulation. PMID:27218204

  3. Srs2 helicase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectively unwinds triplet repeat DNA.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Saumitri; Lahue, Robert S

    2005-09-30

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are the mutational cause of at least 15 genetic diseases. In vitro, single-stranded triplet repeat DNA forms highly stable hairpins, depending on repeat sequence, and a strong correlation exists between hairpin-forming ability and the risk of expansion in vivo. Hairpins are viewed, therefore, as likely mutagenic precursors to expansions. If a helicase unwinds the hairpin, it would be less likely to expand. Previous work indicated that yeast Srs2 DNA helicase selectively blocks expansions in vivo (Bhattacharyya, S., and Lahue, R. S. (2004) Mol. Cell. Biol. 24, 7324-7330). For example, srs2 mutants, including an ATPase-defective point mutant, exhibit substantially higher expansion rates than wild type controls. In contrast, mutation of another helicase gene, SGS1, had little effect on expansion rates. These findings prompted the idea that Srs2 might selectively unwind triplet repeat hairpins. In this study, DNA helicase assays were performed with purified Srs2, Sgs1, and Escherichia coli UvrD (DNA helicase II). Srs2 shows substantially faster unwinding than Sgs1 or UvrD on partial duplex substrates containing (CTG) x (CTG) sequences, provided that Srs2 encounters the triplet repeat DNA immediately on entering the duplex. Srs2 was also faster at unwinding (CAG) x (CAG)- and (CCG) x (CCG)-containing substrates and an intramolecular (CTG) x (CTG) hairpin. In contrast, all three enzymes unwind about equally well control substrates with either Watson-Crick base pairs or mismatched substrates with non-CNG repeats. Overall, the selective unwinding activity of Srs2 on triplet repeat hairpin DNA helps explain the genetic evidence that Srs2, not the RecQ homolog Sgs1, is a preferred helicase for preventing expansions. PMID:16085654

  4. Replication stalling and heteroduplex formation within CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats by mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, David; Michoud, Grégoire; Mosbach, Valentine; Dujon, Bernard; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2016-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded. PMID:27045900

  5. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  6. Functions and mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenzi; Zhang, Chunfang; Duan, Chaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is a lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as an important set of molecules because of their roles in various key pathophysiological pathways, including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. We review the current knowledge of the lncRNAs in lung cancer. In-depth analyses of lncRNAs in lung cancer have increased the number of potential effective biomarkers, thus providing options to increase the therapeutic benefit. In this review, we summarize the functions, mechanisms, and regulatory networks of lncRNAs in lung cancer, providing a basis for further research in this field. PMID:27499635

  7. Long noncoding RNAs in gastric cancer: functions and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiajun; Sun, Jingxu; Wang, Jun; Song, Yongxi; Gao, Peng; Shi, Jinxin; Chen, Ping; Wang, Zhenning

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, genome-wide studies have revealed that only a small fraction of the human genome encodes proteins; long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) account for 98% of the total genome. These RNA molecules, which are >200 nt in length, play important roles in diverse biological processes, including the immune response, stem cell pluripotency, cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, invasion, and metastasis by regulating gene expression at the epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying lncRNA function are only partially understood. Recent studies showed that many lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer (GC) tissues, gastric juice, plasma, and cells, and these alterations are linked to the occurrence, progression, and outcome of GC. Here, we review the current knowledge of the biological functions and clinical aspects of lncRNAs in GC. PMID:26929639

  8. Mechanisms of long noncoding RNA function in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Sandra U; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G

    2016-07-01

    Since decades it has been known that non-protein-coding RNAs have important cellular functions. Deep sequencing recently facilitated the discovery of thousands of novel transcripts, now classified as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. LncRNAs are involved in a wide range of cellular mechanisms, from almost all aspects of gene expression to protein translation and stability. Recent findings implicate lncRNAs as key players of cellular differentiation, cell lineage choice, organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Moreover, lncRNAs are involved in pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, and therefore provide novel biomarkers and pharmaceutical targets. Here we discuss examples illustrating the versatility of lncRNAs in gene control, development and differentiation, as well as in human disease. PMID:27007508

  9. Non-coding RNAs in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunhua; Lu, Xiongbin

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide studies have revealed that human and other mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed and produce thousands of regulatory non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including miRNAs, siRNAs, piRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Emerging evidences suggest that these ncRNAs also play a pivotal role in genome integrity and stability via the regulation of DNA damage response (DDR). In this review, we discuss the recent finding on the interplay of ncRNAs with the canonical DDR signaling pathway, with a particular emphasis on miRNAs and lncRNAs. While the expression of ncRNAs is regulated in the DDR, the DDR is also subjected to regulation by those DNA damage-responsive ncRNAs. In addition, the roles of those Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs produced in the vicinity of double-strand breaks sites are also described. PMID:23226613

  10. Regulatory Roles of Non-Coding RNAs in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Song, Yong-Xi; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jia-Jun; Sun, Jing-Xu; Chen, Xiao-Wan; Zhao, Jun-Hua; Yang, Yu-Chong; Wang, Zhen-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have recently gained attention because of their involvement in different biological processes. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that mutations or abnormal expression of ncRNAs are closely associated with various diseases including cancer. The present review is a comprehensive examination of the aberrant regulation of ncRNAs in colorectal cancer (CRC) and a summary of the current findings on ncRNAs, including long ncRNAs, microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs, small nuclear RNAs, Piwi-interacting RNAs, and circular RNAs. These ncRNAs might become novel biomarkers and targets as well as potential therapeutic tools for the treatment of CRC in the near future and this review may provide important clues for further research on CRC and for the selection of effective therapeutic targets. PMID:26307974

  11. Transcription of Inflammatory Genes: Long Noncoding RNA and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system must coordinate elaborate signaling pathways to turn on expression of hundreds of genes to provide protection against pathogens and resolve acute inflammation. Multiple genes within distinct functional categories are coordinately and temporally regulated by transcriptional on and off switches in response to distinct external stimuli. Three classes of transcription factors act together with transcriptional coregulators and chromatin-modifying complexes to control these programs. In addition, newer studies implicate long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) as additional regulators of these responses. LncRNAs promote, fine-tune, and restrain the inflammatory program. In this study, we provide an overview of gene regulation and the emerging importance of lncRNAs in the immune system. PMID:25250698

  12. Challenges in the analysis of long noncoding RNA functionality.

    PubMed

    Leone, Sergio; Santoro, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) are emerging as important regulators of diverse biological functions. Although mechanistic models are starting to emerge, it is also clear that the lncRNA field needs appropriate model systems in order to better elucidate the functions of lncRNA and their roles in both physiological and pathological conditions. The field of lncRNA is new, and the biochemical and genetic methods used to address function and mechanisms of lncRNA have only recently been developed or adapted from techniques used to investigate protein-coding genes. In this review, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of available techniques for the analysis of chromatin-associated lncRNA and emerging models for the recruitment to specific genomic sites such as triple-helix, RNA-protein-DNA recognition and proximity-guided search models. PMID:27417130

  13. Noncoding RNAs in gastric cancer: Research progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Du, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have attracted much attention in cancer research field. They are involved in cellular development, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The dysregulation of ncRNAs has been reported in tumor initiation, progression, invasion and metastasis in various cancers, including gastric cancer (GC). In the past few years, an accumulating body of evidence has deepened our understanding of ncRNAs, and several emerging ncRNAs have been identified, such as PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and circular RNAs (circRNAs). The competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) networks include mRNAs, microRNAs, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) and circRNAs, which play critical roles in the tumorigenesis of GC. This review summarizes the recent hotspots of ncRNAs involved in GC pathobiology and their potential applications in GC. Finally, we briefly discuss the advances in the ceRNA network in GC. PMID:27547004

  14. A long noncoding RNA associated with susceptibility to celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Kratchmarov, Radomir; Luo, Xiaobing; Bhagat, Govind; Green, Peter H R; Schneider, Robert; Kiledjian, Megerditch; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Ghosh, Sankar

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have implicated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as regulators of many important biological processes. Here we report on the identification and characterization of a lncRNA, lnc13, that harbors a celiac disease-associated haplotype block and represses expression of certain inflammatory genes under homeostatic conditions. Lnc13 regulates gene expression by binding to hnRNPD, a member of a family of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Upon stimulation, lnc13 levels are reduced, thereby allowing increased expression of the repressed genes. Lnc13 levels are significantly decreased in small intestinal biopsy samples from patients with celiac disease, which suggests that down-regulation of lnc13 may contribute to the inflammation seen in this disease. Furthermore, the lnc13 disease-associated variant binds hnRNPD less efficiently than its wild-type counterpart, thus helping to explain how these single-nucleotide polymorphisms contribute to celiac disease. PMID:27034373

  15. From Transcriptome to Noncoding RNAs: Implications in ALS Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Stella; Milani, Pamela; Sardone, Valentina; Pansarasa, Orietta; Cereda, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, numerous studies have focused on understanding the metabolism of RNA and its implication in disease processes but abnormal RNA metabolism is still unknown. RNA plays a central role in translating genetic information into proteins and in many other catalytic and regulatory tasks. Recent advances in the study of RNA metabolism revealed complex pathways for the generation and maintenance of functional RNA in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Interestingly, perturbations in RNA processing have been described in ALS at various levels such as gene transcription, mRNA stabilization, transport, and translational regulations. In this paper, we will discuss the alteration of RNA profile in ALS disease, starting from transcription, the first step leading to gene expression, through the posttranscriptional regulation, including RNA/DNA binding proteins and aberrant exon splicing to protein noncoding RNAs, as lncRNA and microRNA. PMID:22778949

  16. Making a long story short: noncoding RNAs and chromosome change

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J D; Mitchell, S E; O'Neill, R J

    2012-01-01

    As important as the events that influence selection for specific chromosome types in the derivation of novel karyotypes, are the events that initiate the changes in chromosome number and structure between species, and likewise polymorphisms, variants and disease states within species. Although once thought of as transcriptional ‘noise', noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are now recognized as important mediators of epigenetic regulation and chromosome stability. Here we highlight recent work that illustrates the influence short and long ncRNAs have as participants in the function and stability of chromosome regions such as centromeres, telomeres, evolutionary breakpoints and fragile sites. We summarize recent evidence that ncRNAs can facilitate chromosome change and present mechanisms by which ncRNAs create DNA breaks. Finally, we present hypotheses on how they may create novel karyotypes and thus affect chromosome evolution. PMID:22072070

  17. Noncoding RNAs: Regulators of the Mammalian Transcription Machinery.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Tess M; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2016-06-19

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is required to produce mRNAs and some noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) within mammalian cells. This coordinated process is precisely regulated by multiple factors, including many recently discovered ncRNAs. In this perspective, we will discuss newly identified ncRNAs that facilitate DNA looping, regulate transcription factor binding, mediate promoter-proximal pausing of Pol II, and/or interact with Pol II to modulate transcription. Moreover, we will discuss new roles for ncRNAs, as well as a novel Pol II RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that regulates an ncRNA inhibitor of transcription. As the multifaceted nature of ncRNAs continues to be revealed, we believe that many more ncRNA species and functions will be discovered. PMID:26920110

  18. Non-coding RNAs in mammalian sexual development.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, L; Wilhelm, D

    2009-01-01

    The present decade is witnessing a paradigm shift in our understanding of gene regulation. RNA, once relegated to an intermediary between DNA and protein, has emerged as a key contributor in the coordination of complex developmental pathways. For sexually reproducing organisms, propagation of the species is accomplished via an elaborate sexual phenotype. In mammals this consists of a highly complex cell lineage that has the capacity for intricate self-differentiation whilst maintaining the potential to generate all cell types upon fertilization. In addition, mammals possess a diverse range of somatic reproductive tissues and organs that often undergo dynamic morphological changes in response to a variety of external and internal cues. Although the protein component required to mediate these processes continues to be vigorously investigated, it is becoming increasingly apparent that an understanding of the non-coding RNA (ncRNA) component is required to develop a comprehensive picture of mammalian sexual development. PMID:20197714

  19. A Special Trinomial Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author takes up the special trinomial (1 + x + x[squared])[superscript n] and shows that the coefficients of its expansion are entries of a Pascal-like triangle. He also shows how to calculate these entries recursively and explicitly. This article could be used in the classroom for enrichment. (Contains 1 table.)

  20. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOEpatents

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  1. Urban Expansion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Under an Egyptian government contract, PADCO studies urban growth in the Nile Area. They were assisted by LANDSAT survey maps and measurements provided by TAC. TAC had classified the raw LANDSAT data and processed it into various categories to detail urban expansion. PADCO crews spot checked the results, and correlations were established.

  2. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  3. Expansion of Pannes

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the Long Island, New Jersey, and southern New England region, one facet of marsh drowning as a result of accelerated sea level rise is the expansion of salt marsh ponds and pannes. Over the past century, marsh ponds and pannes have formed and expanded in areas of poor drainag...

  4. ALDB: A Domestic-Animal Long Noncoding RNA Database

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aimin; Zhang, Junying; Zhou, Zhongyin; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yujuan; Liu, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Background Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted significant attention in recent years due to their important roles in many biological processes. Domestic animals constitute a unique resource for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic variation and are ideal models relevant to diverse areas of biomedical research. With improving sequencing technologies, numerous domestic-animal lncRNAs are now available. Thus, there is an immediate need for a database resource that can assist researchers to store, organize, analyze and visualize domestic-animal lncRNAs. Results The domestic-animal lncRNA database, named ALDB, is the first comprehensive database with a focus on the domestic-animal lncRNAs. It currently archives 12,103 pig intergenic lncRNAs (lincRNAs), 8,923 chicken lincRNAs and 8,250 cow lincRNAs. In addition to the annotations of lincRNAs, it offers related data that is not available yet in existing lncRNA databases (lncRNAdb and NONCODE), such as genome-wide expression profiles and animal quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of domestic animals. Moreover, a collection of interfaces and applications, such as the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), the Generic Genome Browser (GBrowse) and flexible search functionalities, are available to help users effectively explore, analyze and download data related to domestic-animal lncRNAs. Conclusions ALDB enables the exploration and comparative analysis of lncRNAs in domestic animals. A user-friendly web interface, integrated information and tools make it valuable to researchers in their studies. ALDB is freely available from http://res.xaut.edu.cn/aldb/index.jsp. PMID:25853886

  5. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  6. Noncoding RNAs in human intervertebral disc degeneration: An integrated microarray study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Xie, Yan-Ke; Hu, Qing-Jie; Ma, Chi-Jiao; Pei, Yan-Jun; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Fan, Li-Ying; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that noncoding RNAs play important roles in a multitude of biological processes. The striking findings of miRNAs (microRNAs) and lncRNAs (long noncoding RNAs) as members of noncoding RNAs open up an exciting era in the studies of gene regulation. More recently, the reports of circRNAs (circular RNAs) add fuel to the noncoding RNAs research. Human intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a main cause of low back pain as a disabling spinal disease. We have addressed the expression profiles if miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs in IDD (Wang et al., J Pathology, 2011 and Wan et al., Arthritis Res Ther, 2014). Furthermore, we thoroughly analysed noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs in IDD using the very same samples. Here we delineate in detail the contents of the aforementioned microarray analyses. Microarray and sample annotation data were deposited in GEO under accession number GSE67567 as SuperSeries. The integrated analyses of these noncoding RNAs will shed a novel light on coding-noncoding regulatory machinery. PMID:26484230

  7. Noncoding RNAs in human intervertebral disc degeneration: An integrated microarray study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Xie, Yan-Ke; Hu, Qing-Jie; Ma, Chi-Jiao; Pei, Yan-Jun; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Fan, Li-Ying; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that noncoding RNAs play important roles in a multitude of biological processes. The striking findings of miRNAs (microRNAs) and lncRNAs (long noncoding RNAs) as members of noncoding RNAs open up an exciting era in the studies of gene regulation. More recently, the reports of circRNAs (circular RNAs) add fuel to the noncoding RNAs research. Human intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a main cause of low back pain as a disabling spinal disease. We have addressed the expression profiles if miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs in IDD (Wang et al., J Pathology, 2011 and Wan et al., Arthritis Res Ther, 2014). Furthermore, we thoroughly analysed noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs in IDD using the very same samples. Here we delineate in detail the contents of the aforementioned microarray analyses. Microarray and sample annotation data were deposited in GEO under accession number GSE67567 as SuperSeries. The integrated analyses of these noncoding RNAs will shed a novel light on coding-noncoding regulatory machinery. PMID:26484230

  8. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  9. Identification and analysis of mouse non-coding RNA using transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuhui; Liu, Wanfei; Zeng, Jingyao; Liu, Shoucheng; Tan, Xinyu; Aljohi, Hasanawad; Hu, Songnian

    2016-06-01

    Transcripts are expressed spatially and temporally and they are very complicated, precise and specific; however, most studies are focused on protein-coding related genes. Recently, massively parallel cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has emerged to be a new and promising tool for transcriptome research, and numbers of non-coding RNAs, especially lincRNAs, have been widely identified and well characterized as important regulators of diverse biological processes. In this study, we used ultra-deep RNA-seq data from 15 mouse tissues to study the diversity and dynamic of non-coding RNAs in mouse. Using our own criteria, we identified totally 16,249 non-coding genes (21,569 non-coding RNAs) in mouse. We annotated these non-coding RNAs by diverse properties and found non-coding RNAs are generally shorter, have fewer exons, express in lower level and are more strikingly tissue-specific compared with protein-coding genes. Moreover, these non-coding RNAs show significant enrichment with transcriptional initiation and elongation signals including histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3 and H3K36me3), RNAPII binding sites and CAGE tags. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) result revealed several sets of lincRNAs associated with diverse biological processes such as immune effector process, muscle development and sexual reproduction. Taken together, this study provides a more comprehensive annotation of mouse non-coding RNAs and gives an opportunity for future functional and evolutionary study of mouse non-coding RNAs. PMID:26944582

  10. Effect of trinucleotide repeat length and parental sex on phenotypic variation in spinocerebellar ataxia I

    SciTech Connect

    Jodice, C.; Malaspina, P.; Persichetti, F.; Novelletto, A.; Terrenato, L. ); Spadaro, M.; Morocutti, C. ); Giunti, P. Institute of Neurology, London ); Harding, A.E. ); Frontali, M. )

    1994-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been found in 64 subjects from 19 families: 57 patients with SCA1 and 7 subjects predicted, by haplotype analysis, to carry the mutation. Comparison with a large set of normal chromosomes shows two distinct distributions, with a much wider variation among expanded chromosomes. The sex of transmitting parent plays a major role in the size distribution of expanded alleles, those with >54 repeats being transmitted by affected fathers exclusively. The data suggest that alleles with >54 repeats have a reduced chance of survival; these appear to be replaced in each generation by further expansion of alleles in the low- to medium-expanded repeat range, preferentially in male transmission. Detailed clinical follow-up of a subset of patients demonstrates significant relationships between increasing repeat number on expanded chromosomes and earlier age at onset, faster progression of the disease, and earlier age at death.

  11. C9ORF72 Intermediate Repeat Copies Are a Significant Risk Factor for Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nuytemans, Karen; Bademci, Güney; Kohli, Martin M; Beecham, Gary W; Wang, Liyong; Young, Juan I; Nahab, Fatta; Martin, Eden R; Gilbert, John R; Benatar, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L; Scott, William K; Züchner, Stephan; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Vance, Jeffery M

    2013-01-01

    We set out to determine whether expansions in the C9ORF72 repeat found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) families are associated with Parkinson disease (PD). We determined the repeat size in a total of 889 clinically ascertained patients (including PD and essential tremor plus Parkinsonism (ETP)) and 1144 controls using a repeat-primed PCR assay. We found that large C9ORF72 repeat expansions (>30 repeats) were not contributing to PD risk. However, PD and ETP cases had a significant increase in intermediate (>20 to 30+) repeat copies compared to controls. Overall, 14 cases (13 PD, 1 ETP) and three controls had >20 repeat copies (Fisher's exact test p = 0.002). Further, seven cases and no controls had >23 repeat copies (p = 0.003). Our results suggest that intermediate copy numbers of the C9ORF72 repeat contribute to risk for PD and ETP. This also suggests that PD, ALS and FTD share some pathophysiological mechanisms of disease. Further studies are needed to elucidate the contribution of the C9ORF72 repeat in the overall PD population and to determine whether other common genetic risk factors exist between these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23845100

  12. Pathological repeat variation at the SCA17/TBP gene in south Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Lone, Waseem Gul; Khan, Imran Ali; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Meena, Angmuthu Kanikannan; Rao, Kaipa Prabhakar; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2015-12-15

    Despite the intense debate around the repeat instability reported on the large group of neurological disorders caused by trinucleotide repeat expansions, little is known about the mutation process underlying alleles in the normal range, diseases range, large normal alleles (LNAs). In this study, we assessed the CAG repeats at SCA17 in 188 clinical SCA patients and 100 individuals without any neurological signs. This highly polymorphic population displayed high variability in the CAG repeats and ranged from 19-38 CAG repeats in patients with mode of 20 and 19-32 CAG repeats in controls with mode of 24. The triplet repeat expansion was not detected in any of the 188 patients, as per the reference pathogenic range (>43 repeats); however, 2.7% of the patients had >33 CAG repeats with a clinical phenotype close to what is expected of SCA 17 patients. The findings of this study implicate a more sophisticated interpretation of SCA17 gene and raise the question about the diagnostic thresh hold between normal and expanded repeats in our population. PMID:26476771

  13. The Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO): a comprehensive resource for the unification of non-coding RNA biology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingshan; Eilbeck, Karen; Smith, Barry; Blake, Judith A; Dou, Dejing; Huang, Weili; Natale, Darren A; Ruttenberg, Alan; Huan, Jun; Zimmermann, Michael T; Jiang, Guoqian; Lin, Yu; Wu, Bin; Strachan, Harrison J; He, Yongqun; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Zixing; Borchert, Glen M; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, sequencing technologies have enabled the identification of a wide range of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Unfortunately, annotation and integration of ncRNA data has lagged behind their identification. Given the large quantity of information being obtained in this area, there emerges an urgent need to integrate what is being discovered by a broad range of relevant communities. To this end, the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) is being developed to provide a systematically structured and precisely defined controlled vocabulary for the domain of ncRNAs, thereby facilitating the discovery, curation, analysis, exchange, and reasoning of data about structures of ncRNAs, their molecular and cellular functions, and their impacts upon phenotypes. The goal of NCRO is to serve as a common resource for annotations of diverse research in a way that will significantly enhance integrative and comparative analysis of the myriad resources currently housed in disparate sources. It is our belief that the NCRO ontology can perform an important role in the comprehensive unification of ncRNA biology and, indeed, fill a critical gap in both the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Library and the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) BioPortal. Our initial focus is on the ontological representation of small regulatory ncRNAs, which we see as the first step in providing a resource for the annotation of data about all forms of ncRNAs. The NCRO ontology is free and open to all users, accessible at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ncro.owl. PMID:27152146

  14. CncRNAs: RNAs with both coding and non-coding roles in development.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Karuna; Ephrussi, Anne

    2016-04-15

    RNAs are known to regulate diverse biological processes, either as protein-encoding molecules or as non-coding RNAs. However, a third class that comprises RNAs endowed with both protein coding and non-coding functions has recently emerged. Such bi-functional 'coding and non-coding RNAs' (cncRNAs) have been shown to play important roles in distinct developmental processes in plants and animals. Here, we discuss key examples of cncRNAs and review their roles, regulation and mechanisms of action during development. PMID:27095489

  15. Jump from Pre-mutation to Pathologic Expansion in C9orf72

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Zhengrui; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Zhang, Ming; McGoldrick, Philip; McLean, Jesse R.; Yunusova, Yana; Knock, Erin; Moreno, Danielle; Sato, Christine; McKeever, Paul M.; Schneider, Raphael; Keith, Julia; Petrescu, Nicolae; Fraser, Paul; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Baker, Matthew C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Rademakers, Rosa; Robertson, Janice; Zinman, Lorne; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    An expanded G4C2 repeat in C9orf72 represents the most common known genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, the lower limit for pathological expansions is unknown (the suggested cutoff is 30 repeats). It has been proposed that the expansion might have occurred only once in human history and subsequently spread throughout the population. However, our present findings support a hypothesis of multiple origins for the expansion. We report a British-Canadian family in whom a ∼70-repeat allele from the father (unaffected by ALS or FTLD at age 89 years) expanded during parent-offspring transmission and started the first generation affected by ALS (four children carry an ∼1,750-repeat allele). Epigenetic and RNA-expression analyses further discriminated the offspring’s large expansions (which were methylated and associated with reduced C9orf72 expression) from the ∼70-repeat allele (which was unmethylated and associated with upregulation of C9orf72). Moreover, RNA foci were only detected in fibroblasts from offspring with large expansions, but not in the father, who has the ∼70-repeat allele. All family members with expansions were found to have an ancient known risk haplotype, although it was inherited on a unique 5-Mb genetic backbone. We conclude that small expansions (e.g., 70 repeats) might be considered “pre-mutations” to reflect their propensity to expand in the next generation. Follow-up studies might help explain the high frequency of ALS- or FTLD-affected individuals with an expansion but without a familial history (e.g., 21% among Finnish ALS subjects). PMID:26004200

  16. Jump from pre-mutation to pathologic expansion in C9orf72.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhengrui; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Zhang, Ming; McGoldrick, Philip; McLean, Jesse R; Yunusova, Yana; Knock, Erin; Moreno, Danielle; Sato, Christine; McKeever, Paul M; Schneider, Raphael; Keith, Julia; Petrescu, Nicolae; Fraser, Paul; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Baker, Matthew C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Mackenzie, Ian R; Rademakers, Rosa; Robertson, Janice; Zinman, Lorne; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2015-06-01

    An expanded G4C2 repeat in C9orf72 represents the most common known genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, the lower limit for pathological expansions is unknown (the suggested cutoff is 30 repeats). It has been proposed that the expansion might have occurred only once in human history and subsequently spread throughout the population. However, our present findings support a hypothesis of multiple origins for the expansion. We report a British-Canadian family in whom a ∼70-repeat allele from the father (unaffected by ALS or FTLD at age 89 years) expanded during parent-offspring transmission and started the first generation affected by ALS (four children carry an ∼1,750-repeat allele). Epigenetic and RNA-expression analyses further discriminated the offspring's large expansions (which were methylated and associated with reduced C9orf72 expression) from the ∼70-repeat allele (which was unmethylated and associated with upregulation of C9orf72). Moreover, RNA foci were only detected in fibroblasts from offspring with large expansions, but not in the father, who has the ∼70-repeat allele. All family members with expansions were found to have an ancient known risk haplotype, although it was inherited on a unique 5-Mb genetic backbone. We conclude that small expansions (e.g., 70 repeats) might be considered "pre-mutations" to reflect their propensity to expand in the next generation. Follow-up studies might help explain the high frequency of ALS- or FTLD-affected individuals with an expansion but without a familial history (e.g., 21% among Finnish ALS subjects). PMID:26004200

  17. Targeting Non-Coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas Technology is a Challenge yet Worth Accepting.

    PubMed

    Basak, Jolly; Nithin, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18-24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize, and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field. PMID:26635829

  18. Targeting Non-Coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas Technology is a Challenge yet Worth Accepting

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Jolly; Nithin, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18–24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize, and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field. PMID:26635829

  19. Non-coding roX RNAs prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatic regions.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Margarida L A; Kim, Maria; Philip, Philge; Allgardsson, Anders; Stenberg, Per; Larsson, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Long non-coding RNAs contribute to dosage compensation in both mammals and Drosophila by inducing changes in the chromatin structure of the X-chromosome. In Drosophila melanogaster, roX1 and roX2 are long non-coding RNAs that together with proteins form the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, which coats the entire male X-chromosome and mediates dosage compensation by increasing its transcriptional output. Studies on polytene chromosomes have demonstrated that when both roX1 and roX2 are absent, the MSL-complex becomes less abundant on the male X-chromosome and is relocated to the chromocenter and the 4th chromosome. Here we address the role of roX RNAs in MSL-complex targeting and the evolution of dosage compensation in Drosophila. We performed ChIP-seq experiments which showed that MSL-complex recruitment to high affinity sites (HAS) on the X-chromosome is independent of roX and that the HAS sequence motif is conserved in D. simulans. Additionally, a complete and enzymatically active MSL-complex is recruited to six specific genes on the 4th chromosome. Interestingly, our sequence analysis showed that in the absence of roX RNAs, the MSL-complex has an affinity for regions enriched in Hoppel transposable elements and repeats in general. We hypothesize that roX mutants reveal the ancient targeting of the MSL-complex and propose that the role of roX RNAs is to prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatin. PMID:25501352

  20. Genomic distribution of simple sequence repeats in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Pyo; Piao, Zhong Yun; Kang, Tae Wook; Batley, Jacqueline; Yang, Tae-Jin; Hur, Yoon-Kang; Bhak, Jong; Park, Beom-Seok; Edwards, David; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2007-06-30

    Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) represent short tandem duplications found within all eukaryotic organisms. To examine the distribution of SSRs in the genome of Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis, SSRs from different genomic regions representing 17.7 Mb of genomic sequence were surveyed. SSRs appear more abundant in non-coding regions (86.6%) than in coding regions (13.4%). Comparison of SSR densities in different genomic regions demonstrated that SSR density was greatest within the 5'-flanking regions of the predicted genes. The proportion of different repeat motifs varied between genomic regions, with trinucleotide SSRs more prevalent in predicted coding regions, reflecting the codon structure in these regions. SSRs were also preferentially associated with gene-rich regions, with peri-centromeric heterochromatin SSRs mostly associated with retrotransposons. These results indicate that the distribution of SSRs in the genome is non-random. Comparison of SSR abundance between B. rapa and the closely related species Arabidopsis thaliana suggests a greater abundance of SSRs in B. rapa, which may be due to the proposed genome triplication. Our results provide a comprehensive view of SSR genomic distribution and evolution in Brassica for comparison with the sequenced genomes of A. thaliana and Oryza sativa. PMID:17646709

  1. Expansion tube test time predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourlay, Christopher M.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of an interface between two gases and strong expansion is investigated and the effect on flow in an expansion tube is examined. Two mechanisms for the unsteady Pitot-pressure fluctuations found in the test section of an expansion tube are proposed. The first mechanism depends on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the driver-test gas interface in the presence of a strong expansion. The second mechanism depends on the reflection of the strong expansion from the interface. Predictions compare favorably with experimental results. The theory is expected to be independent of the absolute values of the initial expansion tube filling pressures.

  2. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease. PMID:26463209

  3. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene.

    PubMed

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-11-27

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease. PMID:26463209

  4. Bigravity from gradient expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasuho; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    We discuss how the ghost-free bigravity coupled with a single scalar field can be derived from a braneworld setup. We consider DGP two-brane model without radion stabilization. The bulk configuration is solved for given boundary metrics, and it is substituted back into the action to obtain the effective four-dimensional action. In order to obtain the ghost-free bigravity, we consider the gradient expansion in which the brane separation is supposed to be sufficiently small so that two boundary metrics are almost identical. The obtained effective theory is shown to be ghost free as expected, however, the interaction between two gravitons takes the Fierz-Pauli form at the leading order of the gradient expansion, even though we do not use the approximation of linear perturbation. We also find that the radion remains as a scalar field in the four-dimensional effective theory, but its coupling to the metrics is non-trivial.

  5. Analysis of de novo HOXA13 polyalanine expansions supports replication slippage without repair in their generation.

    PubMed

    Owens, Kailey M; Quinonez, Shane C; Thomas, Peedikayil E; Keegan, Catherine E; Lefebvre, Nanci; Roulston, Diane; Larsen, Christine A; Stadler, H Scott; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2013-05-01

    Polyalanine repeat expansion diseases are hypothesized to result from unequal chromosomal recombination, yet mechanistic studies are lacking. We identified two de novo cases of hand-foot-genital syndrome (HFGS) associated with polyalanine expansions in HOXA13 that afforded rare opportunities to investigate the mechanism. The first patient with HFGS was heterozygous for a de novo nine codon polyalanine expansion. Haplotype investigation showed that the expansion arose on the maternally inherited chromosome but not through unequal crossing over between homologs, leaving unequal sister chromatid exchange during mitosis or meiosis or slipped mispairing as possible explanations. The asymptomatic father of the second patient with HFGS was mosaic for a six codon polyalanine expansion. Multiple tissue PCR and clonal analysis of paternal fibroblasts showed only expansion/WT and WT/WT clones, and haplotype data showed that two unaffected offspring inherited the same paternal allele without the expansion, supporting a postzygotic origin. Absence of the contracted allele in the mosaic father does not support sister chromatid exchange in the origin of the expansion. Mosaicism for HOXA13 polyalanine expansions may be associated with a normal phenotype, making examination of parental DNA essential in apparently de novo HFGS cases to predict accurate recurrence risks. We could not find an example in the literature where unequal sister chromatid exchange has been proven for any polyalanine expansion, suggesting that the principal mechanism for polyalanine expansions (and contractions) is slipped mispairing without repair or that the true frequency of unequal sister chromatid exchange involving these repeats is low. PMID:23532960

  6. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  7. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  8. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  9. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  10. Estimating repeatability of egg size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Rockwell, R.F.; Sedinger, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Measures of repeatability have long been used to assess patterns of variation in egg size within and among females. We compared different analytical approaches for estimating repeatability of egg size of Black Brant. Separate estimates of repeatability for eggs of each clutch size and laying sequence number varied from 0.49 to 0.64. We suggest that using the averaging egg size within clutches results in underestimation of variation within females and thereby overestimates repeatability. We recommend a nested design that partitions egg-size variation within clutches, among clutches within females, and among females. We demonstrate little variation in estimates of repeatability resulting from a nested model controlling for egg laying sequence and a nested model in which we assumed laying sequence was unknown.

  11. Distributed parameter modeling of repeated truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Han-Ching

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to find homogeneous models for beam-like repeated flexible structures is proposed which conceptually involves two steps. The first step involves the approximation of 3-D non-homogeneous model by a 1-D periodic beam model. The structure is modeled as a 3-D non-homogeneous continuum. The displacement field is approximated by Taylor series expansion. Then, the cross sectional mass and stiffness matrices are obtained by energy equivalence using their additive properties. Due to the repeated nature of the flexible bodies, the mass, and stiffness matrices are also periodic. This procedure is systematic and requires less dynamics detail. The first step involves the homogenization from a 1-D periodic beam model to a 1-D homogeneous beam model. The periodic beam model is homogenized into an equivalent homogeneous beam model using the additive property of compliance along the generic axis. The major departure from previous approaches in literature is using compliance instead of stiffness in homogenization. An obvious justification is that the stiffness is additive at each cross section but not along the generic axis. The homogenized model preserves many properties of the original periodic model.

  12. China petrochemical expansion progressing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-05

    This paper reports on China's petrochemical expansion surge which is picking up speed. A worldscale petrochemical complex is emerging at Shanghai with an eye to expanding China's petrochemical exports, possibly through joint ventures with foreign companies, China Features reported. In other action, Beijing and Henan province have approved plans for a $1.2 billion chemical fibers complex at the proposed Luoyang refinery, China Daily reported.

  13. The Impact of Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Mark J.; Steinert, Yvonne

    1990-01-01

    Postgraduate training for family physicians has become increasingly centred on 2-year residency programs. The expansion of family medicine residency programs in Quebec raises challenges: to uphold program standards, to recruit and develop new teachers, to recognize and respect the needs of students, to balance program objectives with service requirements for house staff, and to adapt to change within family medicine centers and their affiliated hospitals. Imagesp2054-ap2057-a PMID:21233950

  14. Ultraprecise thermal expansion measurements of seven low expansion materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, J. W., III; Jacobs, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    We summarize a large number of ultraprecise thermal expansion measurements made on seven different low expansivity materials. Expansion coefficients in the -150-300 C temperature range are shown for Owens-Illinois Cer-Vit C-101, Corning ULE 7971 (titanium silicate) and fused silica 7940, Heraeus-Schott Zerodur low-expansion material and Homosil fused silica, Universal Cyclops Invar LR-35, and Simonds Saw and Steel Super Invar.

  15. Molecular mechanism of resolving trinucleotide repeat hairpin by helicases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yupeng; Niu, Hengyao; Vukovic, Lela; Sung, Patrick; Myong, Sua

    2015-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion is the root cause for many known congenital neurological and muscular disorders in human including Huntington's disease, fragile X syndrome, and Friedreich's ataxia. The stable secondary hairpin structures formed by TNR may trigger fork stalling during replication, causing DNA polymerase slippage and TNR expansion. Srs2 and Sgs1 are two helicases in yeast that resolve TNR hairpins during DNA replication and prevent genome expansion. Using single-molecule fluorescence, we investigated the unwinding mechanism by which Srs2 and Sgs1 resolves TNR hairpin and compared it with unwinding of duplex DNA. While Sgs1 unwinds both structures indiscriminately, Srs2 displays repetitive unfolding of TNR hairpin without fully unwinding it. Such activity of Srs2 shows dependence on the folding strength and the total length of TNR hairpin. Our results reveal a disparate molecular mechanism of Srs2 and Sgs1 that may contribute differently to efficient resolving of the TNR hairpin. PMID:26004439

  16. Recognition of hypermethylated triplet repeats in vitro by cationic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearheart, Latha A.; Caswell, Kimberlyn; Murphy, Catherine J.

    2001-04-01

    Genomic DNA contains many higher-order structural deviations from the Watson-Crick global average. The massive expansion and hypermethylation of the duplex triplet repeat (CCG)n(CGG)n has characteristic higher-order structures that are associated with the fragile X syndrome. We have used luminescent mineral nanoparticles of protein-sized cadmium sulfide in optical assays to detect anomalous DNA structures. The photoluminescence of these particles is sensitive to the presence and nature of adsorbates. We previously found that our nanoparticles bind the fragile X repeat well but do not bind to normal double-helical DNA. In this study, we have determined that these particles are also able to detect the hypermethylated forms of these triplet repeats. Therefore, these nanoparticles may form the basis for future optical assays of higher-order DNA structures, especially those associated with human disease.

  17. [Role of long non-coding RNA in diabetes mellitus and its complications].

    PubMed

    Li, Ailing; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Long non-coding RNA was initially identified as "noises" of gene transcriptions. However, with the developing researches of ENCODE, it was found that the long non-coding RNAs can regulate the genomic expressions in the form of RNAs in epigenetic, transcription, and post transcriptional levels, which is involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and has significant influences on occurrence and precaution of human diseases. This paper introduces functions and features of the long non-coding RNAs, and sums up the internal relation between long non-coding RNAs, diabetes and diabetic complications on the basis of existing researches. These advances can provide the basis for the further understanding of molecular medicine on occurrence and evolution of diabetes. PMID:27349111

  18. The Clinical Relevance of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andreia; Bullock, Marc; Calin, George

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs have long been associated with cancer development and progression, and since their earliest discovery, their clinical potential in identifying and characterizing the disease has been pursued. Long non-coding (lncRNAs), a diverse class of RNA transcripts >200 nucleotides in length with limited protein coding potential, has been only modestly studied relative to other categories of non-coding RNAs. However, recent data suggests they too may be important players in cancer. In this article, we consider the value of lncRNAs in the clinical setting, and in particular their potential roles as diagnostic and prognostic markers in cancer. Furthermore, we summarize the most significant studies linking lncRNA expression in human biological samples to cancer outcomes. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and validity of these non-coding RNA transcripts is compared in the various biological compartments in which they have been detected including tumor tissue, whole body fluids and exosomes. PMID:26516918

  19. The Regulatory Role of Long Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E; Leung, Euphemia; Finlay, Graeme; Baguley, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic and transcriptomic analysis has revealed that the majority of the human genome is transcribed as nonprotein-coding RNA. These transcripts, known as long noncoding RNA, have structures similar to those of mRNA. Many of these transcripts are now thought to have regulatory roles in different biological pathways which provide cells with an additional layer of regulatory complexity in gene expression and proteome function in response to stimuli. A wide variety of cellular functions may thus depend on the fine-tuning of interactions between noncoding RNAs and other key molecules in cell signaling networks. Deregulation of many noncoding RNAs is thought to occur in a variety of human diseases, including neoplasia and cancer drug resistance. Here we discuss recent findings on the molecular functions of long noncoding RNAs in cellular pathways mediating resistance to anticancer drugs. PMID:26910076

  20. Hodgkin Lymphoma Cells Have a Specific Long Noncoding RNA Expression Pattern.

    PubMed

    Anfossi, Simone; Calin, George A

    2016-09-01

    This commentary highlights the article by Tayari et al that suggests studying clinical implications of long noncoding RNAs as possible diagnostic and predictive biomarkers of Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27456130

  1. Targeting Several CAG Expansion Diseases by a Single Antisense Oligonucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Melvin M.; Pepers, Barry A.; van Deutekom, Judith C. T.; Mulders, Susan A. M.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUG)n triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG)7, also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well. PMID:21909428

  2. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Pepers, Barry A; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Mulders, Susan A M; den Dunnen, Johan T; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUG)n triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG)(7), also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well. PMID:21909428

  3. Studies on counterstreaming plasma expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies on counterstreaming plasma expansions are summarized. The basic phenomenon of plasma expansion is reviewed, and results from one-dimensional simulations of counterstreaming plasma expansion are discussed. Results from simulations based on an electrostatic particle-in-cell code, in which the dynamics of both the electrons and ions are exactly followed, are discussed. The formation of electrostatic shocks is addressed. Finally, results are presented on the ionospheric plasma expansion along the geomagnetic flux tubes by solving the hydrodynamic equations.

  4. Magnetic expansion of cosmic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wei-Hong

    1995-01-01

    Plasma expansion is common in many astrophysical phenomena. The understanding of the driving mechanism has usually been focused on the gas pressure that implies conversion of thermal energy into flow kinetic energy. However, 'cool' expansions have been indicated in stellar/solar winds and other expanding processes. Magnetic expansion may be the principal driving mechanism. Magnetic energy in the potential form can be converted into kinetic energy during global expansion of magnetized plasmas.

  5. Expansion: A Plan for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, A.P.

    This report provides selling brokers' guidelines for the successful expansion of their operations outlining a basic method of preparing an expansion plan. Topic headings are: The Pitfalls of Expansion (The Language of Business, Timely Financial Reporting, Regulatory Agencies of Government, Preoccupation with the Facade of Business, A Business Is a…

  6. Long noncoding RNAs in kidney and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Johan M; Thum, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Transcription of a large part of the human genome results in RNA transcripts that have limited or no protein-coding potential. These include long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are defined as being ≥200 nucleotides long. Unlike microRNAs, which have been extensively studied, little is known about the functional role of lncRNAs. However, studies over the past 5 years have shown that lncRNAs interfere with tissue homeostasis and have a role in pathological processes, including in the kidney and heart. The developmental expression of the microRNA sponge H19, for example, is altered in the kidneys of embryos carried by hyperglycaemic mothers, and the lncRNA Malat1 regulates hyperglycaemia-induced inflammation in endothelial cells. Putative roles for other lncRNAs have been identified in conditions such as heart failure, cardiac autophagy, hypertension, acute kidney injury, glomerular diseases, acute allograft rejection and renal cell carcinoma. This Review outlines our current understanding of the role and function of lncRNAs in kidney and cardiovascular disease as novel important regulators and potential therapeutic entry points of disease progression. PMID:27140855

  7. Long non-coding RNAs in cancer drug resistance development.

    PubMed

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    The presence or emergence of chemoresistance in tumor cells is a major burden in cancer therapy. While drug resistance is a multifactorial phenomenon arising from altered membrane transport of drugs, altered drug metabolism, altered DNA repair, reduced apoptosis rate and alterations of drug metabolism, it can also be linked to genetic and epigenetic factors. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important regulatory roles in many aspects of genome function including gene transcription, splicing, and epigenetics as well as biological processes involved in cell cycle, cell differentiation, development, and pluripotency. As such, it may not be surprising that some lncRNAs have been recently linked to carcinogenesis and drug resistance/sensitivity. Research is accelerating to decipher the exact molecular mechanism of lncRNA-regulated drug resistance and its therapeutic implications. In this article, we will review the structure, biogenesis, and mode of action of lncRNAs. Then, the involvement of lncRNAs in drug resistance will be discussed in detail. PMID:27427176

  8. Non-coding RNAs, the cutting edge of histone messages.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Marcel; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In metazoan the 3'-end processing of histone mRNAs is a conserved process involving the concerted action of many protein factors and the non-coding U7 snRNA. Recently, we identified that the processing of histone pre-mRNAs is promoted by an additional ncRNA, the Y3-derived Y3** RNA. U7 modulates the association of the U7 snRNP whereas Y3** promotes recruitment of CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor) proteins to nascent histone transcripts at histone locus bodies (HLBs) in mammals. This enhances the 3'-end cleavage of nascent histone pre-mRNAs and modulates HLB assembly. Here we discuss new insights in the role of ncRNAs in the spatiotemporal control of histone synthesis. We propose that ncRNAs scaffold the formation of functional protein-RNA complexes and their sequential deposition on nascent histone pre-mRNAs at HLBs. These findings add to the multiple roles of ncRNAs in controlling gene expression and may provide new avenues for targeting histone synthesis in cancer. PMID:26909464

  9. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Garitano-Trojaola, Andoni; Agirre, Xabier; Prósper, Felipe; Fortes, Puri

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are functional RNAs longer than 200 nucleotides in length. LncRNAs are as diverse as mRNAs and they normally share the same biosynthetic machinery based on RNA polymerase II, splicing and polyadenylation. However, lncRNAs have low coding potential. Compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs are preferentially nuclear, more tissue specific and expressed at lower levels. Most of the lncRNAs described to date modulate the expression of specific genes by guiding chromatin remodelling factors; inducing chromosomal loopings; affecting transcription, splicing, translation or mRNA stability; or serving as scaffolds for the organization of cellular structures. They can function in cis, cotranscriptionally, or in trans, acting as decoys, scaffolds or guides. These functions seem essential to allow cell differentiation and growth. In fact, many lncRNAs have been shown to exert oncogenic or tumor suppressor properties in several cancers including haematological malignancies. In this review, we summarize what is known about lncRNAs, the mechanisms for their regulation in cancer and their role in leukemogenesis, lymphomagenesis and hematopoiesis. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of lncRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and therapy in cancer, with special attention to haematological malignancies. PMID:23887658

  10. Wood identification with PCR targeting noncoding chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Guangjie; Ping, Liyan

    2011-12-01

    Wood identification is extremely important in the modern forest industry. It also has significant applications in forensics, as well as in archeology and ecological research. In this study, five universal primer pairs amplifying chloroplast noncoding sequences of 300-1,200 bp were designed. Sequencing these amplicons in combination can lead to reliable identification of logs and wood products to cultivar, ecotype, or even the falling population. These primer pairs work on both gymnosperms and angiosperm trees. They also are potentially applicable to accurately identify shrubs and herbaceous species. In addition, a wood DNA purification method is proposed in which N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) is used to increase the quality and quantity of extracted DNA. This method was first validated using air-dried timber disks from three different tree species that were felled 4 years ago. The sapwood and outer heartwood provided the best locations for DNA extraction. The method was also successfully applied to extract DNA from the recalcitrant processed white oak wood, randomly selected staves of wine barrels. The single nucleotide polymorphism detected on the oak DNA sequences showed correlation to their geographical origins. PMID:22038094

  11. Ageing and the Small, Non-Coding RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaomi; Slack, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs, a class of small, non-coding RNAs, are now widely known for their importance in many aspects of biology. These small regulatory RNAs have critical functions in diverse biological events, including development and disease. Recent findings show that microRNAs are essential for lifespan determination in the model organisms, C. elegans and Drosophila, suggesting that microRNAs are also involved in the complex process of ageing. Further, short RNA fragments derived from longer parental RNAs, such as transfer RNA cleavage fragments, have now emerged as a novel class of regulatory RNAs that inhibit translation in response to stress. In addition, the RNA editing pathway is likely to act in the double-stranded RNA-mediated silencing machinery to suppress unfavorable RNA interference activity in the ageing process. These multiple, redundant layers in gene regulatory networks may make it possible to both stably and flexibly regulate genetic pathways in ensuring robustness of developmental and ageing processes. PMID:22504407

  12. Community structure of non-coding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C

    2013-01-01

    Rapid technological advances have shown that the ratio of non-protein coding genes rises to 98.5% in humans, suggesting that current knowledge on genetic information processing might be largely incomplete. It implies that protein-coding sequences only represent a small fraction of cellular transcriptional information. Here, we examine the community structure of the network defined by functional interactions between non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and proteins related bio-macromolecules (PRMs) using a two-fold approach: modularity in bipartite network and k-clique community detection. First, the high modularity scores as well as the distribution of community sizes showing a scaling-law revealed manifestly non-random features. Second, the k-clique sub-graphs and overlaps show that the identified communities of the ncRNA molecules of H. sapiens can potentially be associated with certain functions. These findings highlight the complex modular structure of ncRNA interactions and its possible regulatory roles in the cell. PMID:23545211

  13. CANTATAdb: A Collection of Plant Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Szcześniak, Michał W.; Rosikiewicz, Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a class of potent regulators of gene expression that are found in a wide array of eukaryotes; however, our knowledge about these molecules in plants is still very limited. In particular, a number of model plant species still lack comprehensive data sets of lncRNAs and their annotations, and very little is known about their biological roles. To meet these shortcomings, we created an online database of lncRNAs in 10 model plant species. The lncRNAs were identified computationally using dozens of publicly available RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) libraries. Expression values, coding potential, sequence alignments as well as other types of data provide annotation for the identified lncRNAs. In order to better characterize them, we investigated their potential roles in splicing modulation and deregulation of microRNA functions. The data are freely available for searching, browsing and downloading from an online database called CANTATAdb (http://cantata.amu.edu.pl, http://yeti.amu.edu.pl/CANTATA/). PMID:26657895

  14. Molecular mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs on gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianwen; Mo, Xiaoyan; Fu, Liyun; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2016-02-23

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. Aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been found associated with gastric cancer, one of the most malignant tumors. By complementary base pairing with mRNAs or forming complexes with RNA binding proteins (RBPs), some lncRNAs including GHET1, MALAT1, and TINCR may mediate mRNA stability and splicing. Other lncRNAs, such as BC032469, GAPLINC, and HOTAIR, participate in the competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network. Under certain circumstances, ANRIL, GACAT3, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 exhibit their biological roles by associating with microRNAs (miRNAs). By recruiting histone-modifying complexes, ANRIL, FENDRR, H19, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and PVT1 may inhibit the transcription of target genes in cis or trans. Through these mechanisms, lncRNAs form RNA-dsDNA triplex. CCAT1, GAPLINC, GAS5, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 play oncogenic or tumor suppressor roles by correlated with tumor suppressor P53 or onco-protein c-Myc, respectively. In conclusion, interaction with DNA, RNA and proteins is involved in lncRNAs' participation in gastric tumorigenesis and development. PMID:26788991

  15. Dynamic Nature of Noncoding RNA Regulation of Adaptive Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Curtale, Graziella; Citarella, Franca

    2013-01-01

    Immune response plays a fundamental role in protecting the organism from infections; however, dysregulation often occurs and can be detrimental for the organism, leading to a variety of immune-mediated diseases. Recently our understanding of the molecular and cellular networks regulating the immune response, and, in particular, adaptive immunity, has improved dramatically. For many years, much of the focus has been on the study of protein regulators; nevertheless, recent evidence points to a fundamental role for specific classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in regulating development, activation and homeostasis of the immune system. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are the most comprehensive and well-studied, a number of reports suggest the exciting possibility that long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) could mediate host response and immune function. Finally, evidence is also accumulating that suggests a role for miRNAs and other small ncRNAs in autocrine, paracrine and exocrine signaling events, thus highlighting an elaborate network of regulatory interactions mediated by different classes of ncRNAs during immune response. This review will explore the multifaceted roles of ncRNAs in the adaptive immune response. In particular, we will focus on the well-established role of miRNAs and on the emerging role of lncRNAs and circulating ncRNAs, which all make indispensable contributions to the understanding of the multilayered modulation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:23975170

  16. Critical roles of long noncoding RNAs in Drosophila spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kejia; Yang, Lijuan; Xiong, Tuanlin; Di, Chao; Ma, Danhui; Wu, Menghua; Xue, Zhaoyu; Zhang, Xuedi; Long, Li; Zhang, Weimin; Zhang, Jiaying; Bi, Xiaolin; Dai, Junbiao; Zhang, Qiangfeng; Lu, Zhi John; Gao, Guanjun

    2016-09-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a recently discovered class of cellular RNAs, play important roles in the regulation of many cellular developmental processes. Although lncRNAs have been systematically identified in various systems, most of them have not been functionally characterized in vivo in animal models. In this study, we identified 128 testis-specific Drosophila lncRNAs and knocked out 105 of them using an optimized three-component CRISPR/Cas9 system. Among the lncRNA knockouts, 33 (31%) exhibited a partial or complete loss of male fertility, accompanied by visual developmental defects in late spermatogenesis. In addition, six knockouts were fully or partially rescued by transgenes in a trans configuration, indicating that those lncRNAs primarily work in trans Furthermore, gene expression profiles for five lncRNA mutants revealed that testis-specific lncRNAs regulate global gene expression, orchestrating late male germ cell differentiation. Compared with coding genes, the testis-specific lncRNAs evolved much faster. Moreover, lncRNAs of greater functional importance exhibited higher sequence conservation, suggesting that they are under constant evolutionary selection. Collectively, our results reveal critical functions of rapidly evolving testis-specific lncRNAs in late Drosophila spermatogenesis. PMID:27516619

  17. Non-coding RNA in Ovarian Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J Browning; George, Jitu; Christenson, Lane K

    2016-01-01

    The ovary's primary function is to produce the mature female gamete, the oocyte that, following fertilization, can develop into an embryo, implant within the uterus and ultimately allow the mother's genetic material to be passed along to subsequent generations. In addition to supporting the generation of the oocyte, the ovary and specific ephemeral tissues within it, follicles and corpora lutea, produce steroids that regulate all aspects of the reproductive system, including the hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the reproductive tract (uterus, oviduct, cervix), secondary sex characteristics all of which are also essential for pregnancy and subsequent nurturing of the offspring. To accomplish these critical roles, ovarian development and function are tightly regulated by a number of exogenous (hypothalamic/pituitary) and endogenous (intraovarian) hormones. Within ovarian cells, intricate signalling cascades and transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks respond to these hormonal influences to provide the exquisite control over all of the temporal and spatial events that must be synchronized to allow this organ to successfully complete its function. This book chapter will focus specifically on the role of non-coding RNAs, their identification and described functional roles within the ovary with respect to normal function and their possible involvement in diseases, which involve the ovary. PMID:26659488

  18. Identification of expressed and conserved human noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tehler, Disa; Vang, Søren; Sudzina, Frantisek; Hedegaard, Jakob; Nordentoft, Iver; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Lund, Anders H.; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has shown mammalian genomes to be pervasively transcribed and identified thousands of noncoding (nc) transcripts. It is currently unclear to what extent these transcripts are of functional importance, as experimental functional evidence exists for only a small fraction. Here, we characterize the expression and evolutionary conservation properties of 12,115 known and novel nc transcripts, including structural RNAs, long nc RNAs (lncRNAs), antisense RNAs, EvoFold predictions, ultraconserved elements, and expressed nc regions. Expression levels are evaluated across 12 human tissues using a custom-designed microarray, supplemented with RNAseq. Conservation levels are evaluated at both the base level and at the syntenic level. We combine these measures with epigenetic mark annotations to identify subsets of novel nc transcripts that show characteristics similar to known functional ncRNAs. Few novel nc transcripts show both high expression and conservation levels. However, overall, we observe a positive correlation between expression and both conservation and epigenetic annotations, suggesting that a subset of the expressed transcripts are under purifying selection and likely functional. The identified subsets of expressed and conserved novel nc transcripts may form the basis for further functional characterization. PMID:24344320

  19. Non-coding RNAs, the cutting edge of histone messages

    PubMed Central

    Köhn, Marcel; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In metazoan the 3′-end processing of histone mRNAs is a conserved process involving the concerted action of many protein factors and the non-coding U7 snRNA. Recently, we identified that the processing of histone pre-mRNAs is promoted by an additional ncRNA, the Y3-derived Y3** RNA. U7 modulates the association of the U7 snRNP whereas Y3** promotes recruitment of CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor) proteins to nascent histone transcripts at histone locus bodies (HLBs) in mammals. This enhances the 3′-end cleavage of nascent histone pre-mRNAs and modulates HLB assembly. Here we discuss new insights in the role of ncRNAs in the spatiotemporal control of histone synthesis. We propose that ncRNAs scaffold the formation of functional protein-RNA complexes and their sequential deposition on nascent histone pre-mRNAs at HLBs. These findings add to the multiple roles of ncRNAs in controlling gene expression and may provide new avenues for targeting histone synthesis in cancer. PMID:26909464

  20. Identification and function of long non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Carl; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding (lnc) RNAs are defined as non-protein coding RNAs distinct from housekeeping RNAs such as tRNAs, rRNAs, and snRNAs, and independent from small RNAs with specific molecular processing machinery such as micro- or piwi-RNAs. Recent studies of lncRNAs across different species have revealed a diverse population of RNA molecules of differing size and function. RNA sequencing studies suggest transcription throughout the genome, so there is a need to understand how sequence relates to functional and structural relationships amongst RNA molecules. Our synthesis of recent studies suggests that neither size, presence of a poly-A tail, splicing, direction of transcription, nor strand specificity are of importance to lncRNA function. Rather, relative genomic position in relation to a target is fundamentally important. In this review, we describe issues of key importance in functional assessment of lncRNA and how this might apply to lncRNAs important in neurodevelopment. PMID:24106460

  1. Smooth Muscle Enriched Long Noncoding RNA (SMILR) Regulates Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Margaret D.; Pinel, Karine; Dakin, Rachel; Vesey, Alex T.; Diver, Louise; Mackenzie, Ruth; Garcia, Raquel; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Hamilton, Graham; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Miano, Joseph M.; McBride, Martin W.; Newby, David E.; McDonald, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state is implicated in diverse vascular pathologies, including atherogenesis, plaque stabilization, and neointimal hyperplasia. However, very little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during this process. Here, we investigated a role for lncRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cell biology and pathology. Methods and Results— Using RNA sequencing, we identified >300 lncRNAs whose expression was altered in human saphenous vein vascular smooth muscle cells following stimulation with interleukin-1α and platelet-derived growth factor. We focused on a novel lncRNA (Ensembl: RP11-94A24.1), which we termed smooth muscle–induced lncRNA enhances replication (SMILR). Following stimulation, SMILR expression was increased in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was detected in conditioned media. Furthermore, knockdown of SMILR markedly reduced cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we noted that expression of genes proximal to SMILR was also altered by interleukin-1α/platelet-derived growth factor treatment, and HAS2 expression was reduced by SMILR knockdown. In human samples, we observed increased expression of SMILR in unstable atherosclerotic plaques and detected increased levels in plasma from patients with high plasma C-reactive protein. Conclusions— These results identify SMILR as a driver of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suggest that modulation of SMILR may be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce vascular pathologies. PMID:27052414

  2. Melanoma addiction to the long non-coding RNA SAMMSON.

    PubMed

    Leucci, Eleonora; Vendramin, Roberto; Spinazzi, Marco; Laurette, Patrick; Fiers, Mark; Wouters, Jasper; Radaelli, Enrico; Eyckerman, Sven; Leonelli, Carina; Vanderheyden, Katrien; Rogiers, Aljosja; Hermans, Els; Baatsen, Pieter; Aerts, Stein; Amant, Frederic; Van Aelst, Stefan; van den Oord, Joost; de Strooper, Bart; Davidson, Irwin; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Gevaert, Kris; Vandesompele, Jo; Mestdagh, Pieter; Marine, Jean-Christophe

    2016-03-24

    Focal amplifications of chromosome 3p13-3p14 occur in about 10% of melanomas and are associated with a poor prognosis. The melanoma-specific oncogene MITF resides at the epicentre of this amplicon. However, whether other loci present in this amplicon also contribute to melanomagenesis is unknown. Here we show that the recently annotated long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) gene SAMMSON is consistently co-gained with MITF. In addition, SAMMSON is a target of the lineage-specific transcription factor SOX10 and its expression is detectable in more than 90% of human melanomas. Whereas exogenous SAMMSON increases the clonogenic potential in trans, SAMMSON knockdown drastically decreases the viability of melanoma cells irrespective of their transcriptional cell state and BRAF, NRAS or TP53 mutational status. Moreover, SAMMSON targeting sensitizes melanoma to MAPK-targeting therapeutics both in vitro and in patient-derived xenograft models. Mechanistically, SAMMSON interacts with p32, a master regulator of mitochondrial homeostasis and metabolism, to increase its mitochondrial targeting and pro-oncogenic function. Our results indicate that silencing of the lineage addiction oncogene SAMMSON disrupts vital mitochondrial functions in a cancer-cell-specific manner; this silencing is therefore expected to deliver highly effective and tissue-restricted anti-melanoma therapeutic responses. PMID:27008969

  3. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Brazão, Tiago F.; Johnson, Jethro S.; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  4. Long non-coding RNAs in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xia; Tang, Bo; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Rui; Li, Bo-Sheng; Dong, Hui; Zhou, Jian-Yun; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms and treatment of CRC in recent years, the overall survival rate of CRC patients has not improved dramatically. The development of CRC is multifactor and multistep processes, in which abnormal gene expression may play an important role. With the advance of human tumor molecular biology, a series of studies have highlighted the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the development of CRC. CRC-related lncRNAs have been demonstrated to regulate the genes by various mechanisms, including epigenetic modifications, lncRNA-miRNA and lncRNA-protein interactions, and by their actions as miRNA precursors or pseudogenes. Since some lncRNAs can be detected in human body fluid and have good specificity and accessibility, they have been suggested to be used as novel potential biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and prognosis as well as in the prediction of the response to therapy. Therefore, in this review, we will focus on lncRNAs in CRC development, the mechanisms and biomarkers of lncRNAs in CRC. PMID:26637808

  5. Molecular mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs on gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianwen; Mo, Xiaoyan; Fu, Liyun; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. Aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been found associated with gastric cancer, one of the most malignant tumors. By complementary base pairing with mRNAs or forming complexes with RNA binding proteins (RBPs), some lncRNAs including GHET1, MALAT1, and TINCR may mediate mRNA stability and splicing. Other lncRNAs, such as BC032469, GAPLINC, and HOTAIR, participate in the competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network. Under certain circumstances, ANRIL, GACAT3, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 exhibit their biological roles by associating with microRNAs (miRNAs). By recruiting histone-modifying complexes, ANRIL, FENDRR, H19, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and PVT1 may inhibit the transcription of target genes in cis or trans. Through these mechanisms, lncRNAs form RNA-dsDNA triplex. CCAT1, GAPLINC, GAS5, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 play oncogenic or tumor suppressor roles by correlated with tumor suppressor P53 or onco-protein c-Myc, respectively. In conclusion, interaction with DNA, RNA and proteins is involved in lncRNAs’ participation in gastric tumorigenesis and development. PMID:26788991

  6. Associating schizophrenia, long non-coding RNAs and neurostructural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Veronica; Durand, Dante; Lescallette, Adam R.; Vrana, Kent E.; Hong, L. Elliot; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Bellon, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component. But the exact nature and functional role of this genetic component in the pathophysiology of this mental illness remains a mystery. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a recently discovered family of molecules that regulate gene transcription through a variety of means. Consequently, lncRNAs could help us bring together apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia; namely, genomic deficiencies on one side and neuroimaging, as well as postmortem results on the other. In fact, the most consistent finding in schizophrenia is decreased brain size together with enlarged ventricles. This anomaly appears to originate from shorter and less ramified dendrites and axons. But a decrease in neuronal arborizations cannot explain the complex pathophysiology of this psychotic disorder; however, dynamic changes in neuronal structure present throughout life could. It is well recognized that the structure of developing neurons is extremely plastic. This structural plasticity was thought to stop with brain development. However, breakthrough discoveries have shown that neuronal structure retains some degree of plasticity throughout life. What the neuroscientific field is still trying to understand is how these dynamic changes are regulated and lncRNAs represent promising candidates to fill this knowledge gap. Here, we present evidence that associates specific lncRNAs with schizophrenia. We then discuss the potential role of lncRNAs in neurostructural dynamics. Finally, we explain how dynamic neurostructural modifications present throughout life could, in theory, reconcile apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia. PMID:26483630

  7. Neighboring Gene Regulation by Antisense Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victoria E.; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation—pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional—through DNA–RNA, RNA–RNA or protein–RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. PMID:25654223

  8. Sequence and Structural Analyses for Functional Non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yasubumi; Sato, Kengo

    Analysis and detection of functional RNAs are currently important topics in both molecular biology and bioinformatics research. Several computational methods based on stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been developed for modeling and analysing functional RNA sequences. These grammatical methods have succeeded in modeling typical secondary structures of RNAs and are used for structural alignments of RNA sequences. Such stochastic models, however, are not sufficient to discriminate member sequences of an RNA family from non-members, and hence to detect non-coding RNA regions from genome sequences. Recently, the support vector machine (SVM) and kernel function techniques have been actively studied and proposed as a solution to various problems in bioinformatics. SVMs are trained from positive and negative samples and have strong, accurate discrimination abilities, and hence are more appropriate for the discrimination tasks. A few kernel functions that extend the string kernel to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures have been proposed. In this article, we give an overview of recent progress in SCFG-based methods for RNA sequence analysis and novel kernel functions tailored to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences and developed for use with support vector machines (SVM) in discriminating members of an RNA family from non-members.

  9. Loss of Conserved Noncoding RNAs in Genomes of Bacterial Endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Matelska, Dorota; Kurkowska, Malgorzata; Purta, Elzbieta; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw

    2016-02-01

    The genomes of intracellular symbiotic or pathogenic bacteria, such as of Buchnera, Mycoplasma, and Rickettsia, are typically smaller compared with their free-living counterparts. Here we showed that noncoding RNA (ncRNA) families, which are conserved in free-living bacteria, frequently could not be detected by computational methods in the small genomes. Statistical tests demonstrated that their absence is not an artifact of low GC content or small deletions in these small genomes, and thus it was indicative of an independent loss of ncRNAs in different endosymbiotic lineages. By analyzing the synteny (conservation of gene order) between the reduced and nonreduced genomes, we revealed instances of protein-coding genes that were preserved in the reduced genomes but lost cis-regulatory elements. We found that the loss of cis-regulatory ncRNA sequences, which regulate the expression of cognate protein-coding genes, is characterized by the reduction of secondary structure formation propensity, GC content, and length of the corresponding genomic regions. PMID:26782934

  10. Long noncoding RNA ceruloplasmin promotes cancer growth by altering glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Lee, Jaehyuk; Haemmerle, Monika; Ling, Hui; Previs, Rebecca A.; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry Y.; Ivan, Cristina; Ferracin, Manuela; Dennison, Jennifer B.; Zacharias Millward, Niki M.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; McGuire, Michael; Sam, Nidhin; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Sadaoui, Nouara C.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Calin, George A.; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Kovacs, Jeffery; Mills, Gordon B.; Zhang, Wei; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) significantly influence the development and regulation of genome expression in cells. Here, we demonstrate the role of lncRNA ceruloplasmin (NRCP) in cancer metabolism and elucidate functional effects leading to increased tumor progression. NRCP was highly upregulated in ovarian tumors and knockdown of NRCP resulted in significantly increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased glycolysis compared with control cancer cells. In an orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, siNRCP delivered via a liposomal carrier significantly reduced tumor growth compared with control treatment. We identified NRCP as an intermediate binding partner between STAT1 and RNA polymerase II, leading to increased expression of downstream target genes such as glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. Collectively, we report a unrecognized role of the lncRNA NRCP in modulating cancer metabolism. As demonstrated, DOPC nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA-mediated silencing of this lncRNA in vivo provides therapeutic avenue towards modulating lncRNAs in cancer. PMID:26686630

  11. Design of a small molecule against an oncogenic noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Cameron, Michael D; Haga, Christopher L; Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Duckett, Derek R; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    The design of precision, preclinical therapeutics from sequence is difficult, but advances in this area, particularly those focused on rational design, could quickly transform the sequence of disease-causing gene products into lead modalities. Herein, we describe the use of Inforna, a computational approach that enables the rational design of small molecules targeting RNA to quickly provide a potent modulator of oncogenic microRNA-96 (miR-96). We mined the secondary structure of primary microRNA-96 (pri-miR-96) hairpin precursor against a database of RNA motif-small molecule interactions, which identified modules that bound RNA motifs nearby and in the Drosha processing site. Precise linking of these modules together provided Targaprimir-96 (3), which selectively modulates miR-96 production in cancer cells and triggers apoptosis. Importantly, the compound is ineffective on healthy breast cells, and exogenous overexpression of pri-miR-96 reduced compound potency in breast cancer cells. Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-Down (Chem-CLIP), a small-molecule RNA target validation approach, shows that 3 directly engages pri-miR-96 in breast cancer cells. In vivo, 3 has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and decreases tumor burden in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Thus, rational design can quickly produce precision, in vivo bioactive lead small molecules against hard-to-treat cancers by targeting oncogenic noncoding RNAs, advancing a disease-to-gene-to-drug paradigm. PMID:27170187

  12. Loss of Conserved Noncoding RNAs in Genomes of Bacterial Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Matelska, Dorota; Kurkowska, Malgorzata; Purta, Elzbieta; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of intracellular symbiotic or pathogenic bacteria, such as of Buchnera, Mycoplasma, and Rickettsia, are typically smaller compared with their free-living counterparts. Here we showed that noncoding RNA (ncRNA) families, which are conserved in free-living bacteria, frequently could not be detected by computational methods in the small genomes. Statistical tests demonstrated that their absence is not an artifact of low GC content or small deletions in these small genomes, and thus it was indicative of an independent loss of ncRNAs in different endosymbiotic lineages. By analyzing the synteny (conservation of gene order) between the reduced and nonreduced genomes, we revealed instances of protein-coding genes that were preserved in the reduced genomes but lost cis-regulatory elements. We found that the loss of cis-regulatory ncRNA sequences, which regulate the expression of cognate protein-coding genes, is characterized by the reduction of secondary structure formation propensity, GC content, and length of the corresponding genomic regions. PMID:26782934

  13. Environmental Health and Long Non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    An individual's risk of developing a common disease typically depends on an interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Epigenetic research is uncovering novel ways through which environmental factors such as diet, air pollution, and chemical exposure can affect our genes. DNA methylation and histone modifications are the most commonly studied epigenetic mechanisms. The role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in epigenetic processes has been more recently highlighted. LncRNAs are defined as transcribed RNA molecules greater than 200 nucleotides in length with little or no protein-coding capability. While few functional lncRNAs have been well characterized to date, they have been demonstrated to control gene regulation at every level, including transcriptional gene silencing via regulation of the chromatin structure and DNA methylation. This review aims to provide a general overview of lncRNA function with a focus on their role as key regulators of health and disease and as biomarkers of environmental exposure. PMID:27234044

  14. Non-coding RNAs in epithelial immunity to Cryptosporidium infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Feng, Yaoyu; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryptosporidium spp. is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes diarrhoeal disease worldwide. It is one of the most common pathogens responsible for moderate to severe diarrhoea in children younger than 2 years. Because of the ‘minimally invasive’ nature of Cryptosporidium infection, mucosal epithelial cells are critical to the host’s anti-Cryptosporidium immunity. Gastrointestinal epithelial cells not only provide the first and most rapid defence against Cryptosporidium infection, they also mobilize immune effector cells to the infection site to activate adaptive immunity. Recent advances in genomic research have revealed the existence of a large number of non-protein-coding RNA transcripts, so called non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), in mammalian cells. Some ncRNAs may be key regulators for diverse biological functions, including innate immune responses. Specifically, ncRNAs may modulate epithelial immune responses at every step of the innate immune network following Cryptosporidium infection, including production of antimicrobial molecules, expression of cytokines/chemokines, release of epithelial cell-derived exosomes, and feedback regulation of immune homoeostasis. This review briefly summarizes the current science on ncRNA regulation of innate immunity to Cryptosporidium, with a focus on microRNA-associated epithelial immune responses. PMID:24828969

  15. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation.

    PubMed

    Brazão, Tiago F; Johnson, Jethro S; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-08-18

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  16. The most frequent short sequences in non-coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Subirana, Juan A; Messeguer, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the most frequent short sequences in non-coding DNA. They may play a role in maintaining the structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes. We present a simple method for the detection and analysis of such sequences in several genomes, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. We also study two chromosomes of man and mouse with a length similar to the whole genomes of the other species. We provide a list of the most common sequences of 9-14 bases in each genome. As expected, they are present in human Alu sequences. Our programs may also give a graph and a list of their position in the genome. Detection of clusters is also possible. In most cases, these sequences contain few alternating regions. Their intrinsic structure and their influence on nucleosome formation are not known. In particular, we have found new features of short sequences in C. elegans, which are distributed in heterogeneous clusters. They appear as punctuation marks in the chromosomes. Such clusters are not found in either A. thaliana or D. melanogaster. We discuss the possibility that they play a role in centromere function and homolog recognition in meiosis. PMID:19966278

  17. Biocomputational prediction of small non-coding RNAs in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Pánek, Josef; Bobek, Jan; Mikulík, Karel; Basler, Marek; Vohradský, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Background The first systematic study of small non-coding RNAs (sRNA, ncRNA) in Streptomyces is presented. Except for a few exceptions, the Streptomyces sRNAs, as well as the sRNAs in other genera of the Actinomyces group, have remained unstudied. This study was based on sequence conservation in intergenic regions of Streptomyces, localization of transcription termination factors, and genomic arrangement of genes flanking the predicted sRNAs. Results Thirty-two potential sRNAs in Streptomyces were predicted. Of these, expression of 20 was detected by microarrays and RT-PCR. The prediction was validated by a structure based computational approach. Two predicted sRNAs were found to be terminated by transcription termination factors different from the Rho-independent terminators. One predicted sRNA was identified computationally with high probability as a Streptomyces 6S RNA. Out of the 32 predicted sRNAs, 24 were found to be structurally dissimilar from known sRNAs. Conclusion Streptomyces is the largest genus of Actinomyces, whose sRNAs have not been studied. The Actinomyces is a group of bacterial species with unique genomes and phenotypes. Therefore, in Actinomyces, new unique bacterial sRNAs may be identified. The sequence and structural dissimilarity of the predicted Streptomyces sRNAs demonstrated by this study serve as the first evidence of the uniqueness of Actinomyces sRNAs. PMID:18477385

  18. Perspectives of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Eduardo M.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from intergenic and intronic regions of the human genome constitute a broad class of cellular transcripts that are under intensive investigation. While only a handful of lncRNAs have been characterized, their involvement in fundamental cellular processes that control gene expression highlights a central role in cell homeostasis. Not surprisingly, aberrant expression of regulatory lncRNAs has been increasingly documented in different types of cancer, where they can mediate both oncogenic or tumor suppressor effects. Interaction with chromatin remodeling complexes that promote silencing of specific genes or modulation of splicing factor proteins seem to be two general modes of lncRNA regulation, but it is conceivable that additional mechanisms of action are yet to be unveiled. LncRNAs show greater tissue specificity compared to protein-coding mRNAs making them attractive in the search of novel diagnostics/prognostics cancer biomarkers in body fluid samples. In fact, lncRNA prostate cancer antigen 3 can be detected in urine samples and has been shown to improve diagnosis of prostate cancer. We suggest that an unbiased screening of the presence of RNAs in easily accessible body fluids such as serum and urine might reveal novel circulating lncRNAs as potential biomarkers in many types of cancer. Annotation and functional characterization of the lncRNA complement of the cancer transcriptome will conceivably provide new venues for early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:22408643

  19. Long Non-Coding RNAs: Critical Players in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Bie, Beibei; Zhang, Shu; Yang, Jun; Li, Zongfang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease with multiple underlying pathogenic mechanisms caused by a variety of etiologic factors. Emerging evidence showed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), with size larger than 200 nucleotides (nt), play important roles in various types of cancer development and progression. In recent years, some dysregulated lncRNAs in HCC have been revealed and roles for several of them in HCC have been characterized. All these findings point to the potential of lncRNAs as prospective novel therapeutic targets in HCC. In this review, we summarize known dysregulated lncRNAs in HCC, and review potential biological roles and underlying molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in HCC. Additionally, we discussed prospects of lncRNAs as potential biomarker and therapeutic target for HCC. In conclusion, this paper will help us gain better understanding of molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs perform their function in HCC and also provide general strategies and directions for future research. PMID:25387074

  20. Expression Signatures of Long Noncoding RNAs in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Yang; Wang, Liang; Yu, Bin; Zhuang, Qian-yu; Wang, Yi-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the most common pediatric spinal deformity, is considered a complex genetic disease. Causing genes and pathogenesis of AIS are still unclear. This study was designed to identify differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) involving the pathogenesis of AIS. Methods. We first performed comprehensive screening of lncRNA and mRNA in AIS patients and healthy children using Agilent human lncRNA + mRNA Array V3.0 microarray. LncRNAs expression in different AIS patients was further evaluated using quantitative PCR. Results. A total of 139 lncRNAs and 546 mRNAs were differentially expressed between AIS patients and healthy control. GO and Pathway analysis showed that these mRNAs might be involved in bone mineralization, neuromuscular junction, skeletal system morphogenesis, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, and regulation of signal pathway. Four lncRNAs (ENST00000440778.1, ENST00000602322.1, ENST00000414894.1, and TCONS_00028768) were differentially expressed between different patients when grouped according to age, height, classification, severity of scoliosis, and Risser grade. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the abnormal expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in AIS, and the expression of some lncRNAs was related to clinical features. This study is helpful for further understanding of lncRNAs in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis of AIS. PMID:26421281

  1. Non-coding RNAs and complex distributed genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the mRNA-protein interplay can be dramatically influenced by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Although this new paradigm is now widely accepted, an understanding of the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks is lacking. To clarify what may happen in this case, we propose a mean-field kinetic model describing the influence of ncRNA on a complex genetic network with a distributed architecture including mutual protein-mediated regulation of many genes transcribed into mRNAs. ncRNA is considered to associate with mRNAs and inhibit their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Our results are indicative of the richness of the kinetics under consideration. The main complex features are found to be bistability and oscillations. One could expect to find kinetic chaos as well. The latter feature has however not been observed in our calculations. In addition, we illustrate the difference in the regulation of distributed networks by mRNA and ncRNA.

  2. Long Noncoding RNA Ceruloplasmin Promotes Cancer Growth by Altering Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Lee, Jaehyuk; Haemmerle, Monika; Ling, Hui; Previs, Rebecca A; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry Y; Ivan, Cristina; Ferracin, Manuela; Dennison, Jennifer B; Millward, Niki M Zacharias; Nagaraja, Archana S; Gharpure, Kshipra M; McGuire, Michael; Sam, Nidhin; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Calin, George A; Drapkin, Ronny I; Kovacs, Jeffery; Mills, Gordon B; Zhang, Wei; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Bhattacharya, Pratip K; Sood, Anil K

    2015-12-22

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) significantly influence the development and regulation of genome expression in cells. Here, we demonstrate the role of lncRNA ceruloplasmin (NRCP) in cancer metabolism and elucidate functional effects leading to increased tumor progression. NRCP was highly upregulated in ovarian tumors, and knockdown of NRCP resulted in significantly increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased glycolysis compared with control cancer cells. In an orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, siNRCP delivered via a liposomal carrier significantly reduced tumor growth compared with control treatment. We identified NRCP as an intermediate binding partner between STAT1 and RNA polymerase II, leading to increased expression of downstream target genes such as glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. Collectively, we report a previously unrecognized role of the lncRNA NRCP in modulating cancer metabolism. As demonstrated, DOPC nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA-mediated silencing of this lncRNA in vivo provides therapeutic avenue toward modulating lncRNAs in cancer. PMID:26686630

  3. Noncoding RNAs and neurobehavioral mechanisms in psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    The human genome project has revolutionized our understanding of the underlying mechanisms in psychiatric disease. It is now abundantly clear that neurobehavioral phenotypes are epigenetically controlled by noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). The microRNA (miRNA) class of ncRNAs are ubiquitously expressed throughout the brain and govern all major neuronal pathways. The attractive therapeutic potential of miRNAs is underscored by their pleiotropic capacities, putatively targeting multiple pathways within a single neuron. Many psychiatric diseases stem from a multi-factorial origin, thus conventional drug targeting of single proteins may not prove most effective. In this exciting post-genome sequencing era, many new epigenetic targets are emerging for therapeutic investigation. Here we review the reported roles of miRNAs, as well as other ncRNA classes, in the pathology of psychiatric disorders; there are both common and unique ncRNA mechanisms that influence the various diagnoses. Collectively, these potent epigenetic regulators may clarify the disrupted signaling networks in psychiatric phenotypes. PMID:25824307

  4. Non-coding recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Puente, Xose S; Beà, Silvia; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Villamor, Neus; Gutiérrez-Abril, Jesús; Martín-Subero, José I; Munar, Marta; Rubio-Pérez, Carlota; Jares, Pedro; Aymerich, Marta; Baumann, Tycho; Beekman, Renée; Belver, Laura; Carrio, Anna; Castellano, Giancarlo; Clot, Guillem; Colado, Enrique; Colomer, Dolors; Costa, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Enjuanes, Anna; Estivill, Xavier; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Gelpí, Josep L; González, Blanca; González, Santiago; González, Marcos; Gut, Marta; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; López-Guerra, Mónica; Martín-García, David; Navarro, Alba; Nicolás, Pilar; Orozco, Modesto; Payer, Ángel R; Pinyol, Magda; Pisano, David G; Puente, Diana A; Queirós, Ana C; Quesada, Víctor; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M; Royo, Cristina; Royo, Romina; Rozman, María; Russiñol, Nuria; Salaverría, Itziar; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Tamborero, David; Terol, María J; Valencia, Alfonso; López-Bigas, Nuria; Torrents, David; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2015-10-22

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a frequent disease in which the genetic alterations determining the clinicobiological behaviour are not fully understood. Here we describe a comprehensive evaluation of the genomic landscape of 452 CLL cases and 54 patients with monoclonal B-lymphocytosis, a precursor disorder. We extend the number of CLL driver alterations, including changes in ZNF292, ZMYM3, ARID1A and PTPN11. We also identify novel recurrent mutations in non-coding regions, including the 3' region of NOTCH1, which cause aberrant splicing events, increase NOTCH1 activity and result in a more aggressive disease. In addition, mutations in an enhancer located on chromosome 9p13 result in reduced expression of the B-cell-specific transcription factor PAX5. The accumulative number of driver alterations (0 to ≥4) discriminated between patients with differences in clinical behaviour. This study provides an integrated portrait of the CLL genomic landscape, identifies new recurrent driver mutations of the disease, and suggests clinical interventions that may improve the management of this neoplasia. PMID:26200345

  5. Focusing on long noncoding RNA dysregulation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Xu, Midie; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Xia; Guo, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    As the discovery of functions of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR lifts ncRNA to new levels, large numbers of research have been demonstrated for the roles of lncRNAs in diverse biological processes, such as development, cellular differentiation, and a wide range of diseases including cancer. And, recent studies have discovered that lncRNAs can participate in almost every step in the life cycle of gene regulation, including chromosome dosage compensation, imprinting, epigenetic regulation, nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking, transcription, mRNA splicing, and translation, mainly in the four archetypes-signals, decoys, guides, and scaffolds. Unsurprisingly, accumulating studies have demonstrated that serious lncRNAs are dysregulated in gastric cancer (GC), one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and closely related to tumorigenesis, metastasis, or prognosis. In this review, we will discuss diverse functions of lncRNAs and highlight the growing evidence for the important roles of lncRNAs acting as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of GC, as indicators of GC prognosis, or even as therapeutic targets in GC. PMID:25501508

  6. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Maria A.; Bullock, Marc D.; Ling, Hui; Pichler, Martin; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC), the second most common form of gynaecological malignancy, can be divided into two distinct sub-types: Type I tumours arise from hyperplastic endometrium and typically effect women around the time of menopause, whereas type II tumours arise in postmenopausal women from atrophic endometrium. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of non-protein coding molecules that have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of many types of cancer including gynaecological tumours. Although they play critical physiological roles in cellular metabolism, their expression and function are deregulated in EC compared with paired normal tissue, indicating that they may also participate in tumour initiation and progression. For instance, the lncRNA MALAT-1 is down-regulated in EC samples compared to normal or hyperplastic endometrium, whereas the lncRNA OVAL is down-regulated in type II disease but up-regulated in type I disease. Other notatble lncRNAs such as HOTAIR, H19 and SRA become up-regulated with increasing EC tumour grade and other features associated with poor prognosis. In the current review, we will examine the growing body of evidence linking deregulated lncRNAs with specific biological functions of tumour cells in EC, we will highlight associations between lncRNAs and the molecular pathways implicated in EC tumourigenesis and we will identify critical knowledge gaps that remain to be addressed. PMID:26556343

  7. The Landscape of Long Noncoding RNAs in the Human Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Matthew K.; Niknafs, Yashar S.; Malik, Rohit; Singhal, Udit; Sahu, Anirban; Hosono, Yasuyuki; Barrette, Terrence R.; Prensner, John R.; Evans, Joseph R.; Zhao, Shuang; Poliakov, Anton; Cao, Xuhong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan R.; Beer, David G.; Feng, Felix Y.; Iyer, Hariharan K.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulators of tissue physiology and disease processes including cancer. In order to delineate genome-wide lncRNA expression, we curated 7,256 RNA-Seq libraries from tumors, normal tissues, and cell lines comprising over 43 terabases of sequence from 25 independent studies. We applied ab initio assembly methodology to this dataset, yielding a consensus human transcriptome of 91,013 expressed genes. Over 68% (58,648) of genes were classified as lncRNAs, of which 79% (48,952) were previously unannotated. About 1% (597) of the lncRNAs harbored ultraconserved elements and 7% (3,900) overlapped disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To prioritize lineage-specific, disease-associated lncRNA expression we employed non-parametric differential expression testing and nominated 7,942 lineage- or cancer-associated lncRNA genes. The lncRNA landscape characterized here may shed light into normal biology and cancer pathogenesis, and be valuable for future biomarker development. PMID:25599403

  8. Non-coding Y RNAs as tethers and gates

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Sandra L; Belair, Cedric; Boccitto, Marco; Chen, Xinguo; Sim, Soyeong; Taylor, David W; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) called Y RNAs are abundant components of both animal cells and a variety of bacteria. In all species examined, these ~100 nt RNAs are bound to the Ro 60 kDa (Ro60) autoantigen, a ring-shaped protein that also binds misfolded ncRNAs in some vertebrate nuclei. Although the function of Ro60 RNPs has been mysterious, we recently reported that a bacterial Y RNA tethers Ro60 to the 3′ to 5′ exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) to form RYPER (Ro60/Y RNA/PNPase Exoribonuclease RNP), a new RNA degradation machine. PNPase is a homotrimeric ring that degrades single-stranded RNA, and Y RNA-mediated tethering of Ro60 increases the effectiveness of PNPase in degrading structured RNAs. Single particle electron microscopy of RYPER suggests that RNA threads through the Ro60 ring into the PNPase cavity. Further studies indicate that Y RNAs may also act as gates to regulate entry of RNA substrates into the Ro60 channel. These findings reveal novel functions for Y RNAs and raise questions about how the bacterial findings relate to the roles of these ncRNAs in animal cells. Here we review the literature on Y RNAs, highlighting their close relationship with Ro60 proteins and the hypothesis that these ncRNAs function generally to tether Ro60 rings to diverse RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24036917

  9. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  10. Non-coding RNA: a new frontier in regulatory biology

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    A striking finding in the past decade is the production of numerous non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) from mammalian genomes. While it is entirely possible that many of those ncRNAs are transcription noises or by-products of RNA processing, increasing evidence suggests that a large fraction of them are functional and provide various regulatory activities in the cell. Thus, functional genomics and proteomics are incomplete without understanding functional ribonomics. As has been long suggested by the ‘RNA world’ hypothesis, many ncRNAs have the capacity to act like proteins in diverse biochemical processes. The enormous amount of information residing in the primary sequences and secondary structures of ncRNAs makes them particularly suited to function as scaffolds for molecular interactions. In addition, their functions appear to be stringently controlled by default via abundant nucleases when not engaged in specific interactions. This review focuses on the functional properties of regulatory ncRNAs in comparison with proteins and emphasizes both the opportunities and challenges in future ncRNA research. PMID:25821635

  11. Expansion in condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J.; Sajjad Zahir, M.

    1985-03-01

    We show that the product of local current operators in quantum chromodynamics (QCD), when expanded in terms of condensates, such as psi-barpsi, G/sup a//sub munu/ G/sup a//sub munu/, psi-barGAMMA psipsi-barGAMMApsi, f/sub a/bcG/sup a//sub munu/G/sup b//sub nualpha/ x G/sup c//sub alphamu/, etc., yields a series in Planck's constant. This, however, provides no hint that the higher terms in such an expansion may be less significant.

  12. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  13. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  14. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  15. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  16. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-04-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  17. Expansible quantum secret sharing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-08-01

    In the practical applications, member expansion is a usual demand during the development of a secret sharing network. However, there are few consideration and discussion on network expansibility in the existing quantum secret sharing schemes. We propose an expansible quantum secret sharing scheme with relatively simple and economical quantum resources and show how to split and reconstruct the quantum secret among an expansible user group in our scheme. Its trait, no requirement of any agent's assistant during the process of member expansion, can help to prevent potential menaces of insider cheating. We also give a discussion on the security of this scheme from three aspects.

  18. Phenotypic Characterization of Individuals with 30–40 CAG Repeats in the Huntington Disease (HD) Gene Reveals HD Cases with 36 Repeats and Apparently Normal Elderly Individuals with 36–39 Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsztein, David C.; Leggo, Jayne; Coles, Rhian; Almqvist, Elisabeth; Biancalana, Valerie; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Chotai, Kokila; Connarty, Margaret; Craufurd, David; Curtis, Anne; Curtis, Diana; Davidson, Mark J.; Differ, Anne-Marie; Dode, Catherine; Dodge, Alan; Frontali, Marina; Ranen, Neal G.; Stine, O. Colin; Sherr, Meeia; Abbott, Margaret H.; Franz, Mary L.; Graham, Colin A.; Harper, Peter S.; Hedreen, John C.; Jackson, Anthony; Kaplan, Jean-Claude; Losekoot, Monique; MacMillan, John C.; Morrison, Patrick; Trottier, Yvon; Novelletto, Andrea; Simpson, Sheila A.; Theilmann, Jane; Whittaker, Joanne L.; Folstein, Susan E.; Ross, Christopher A.; Hayden, Michael R.

    1996-01-01

    Abnormal CAG expansions in the IT-15 gene are associated with Huntington disease (HD). In the diagnostic setting it is necessary to define the limits of the CAG size ranges on normal and HD-associated chromosomes. Most large analyses that defined the limits of the normal and pathological size ranges employed PCR assays, which included the CAG repeats and a CCG repeat tract that was thought to be invariant. Many of these experiments found an overlap between the normal and disease size ranges. Subsequent findings that the CCG repeats vary by 8 trinucleotide lengths suggested that the limits of the normal and disease size ranges should be reevaluated with assays that exclude the CCG polymorphism. Since patients with between 30 and 40 repeats are rare, a consortium was assembled to collect such individuals. All 178 samples were reanalyzed in Cambridge by using assays specific for the CAG repeats. We have optimized methods for reliable sizing of CAG repeats and show cases that demonstrate the dangers of using PCR assays that include both the CAG and CCG polymorphisms. Seven HD patients had 36 repeats, which confirms that this allele is associated with disease. Individuals without apparent symptoms or signs of HD were found at 36 repeats (aged 74, 78, 79, and 87 years), 37 repeats (aged 69 years), 38 repeats (aged 69 and 90 years), and 39 repeats (aged 67, 90, and 95 years). The detailed case histories of an exceptional case from this series will be presented: a 95-year-old man with 39 repeats who did not have classical features of HD. The apparently healthy survival into old age of some individuals with 36–39 repeats suggests that the HD mutation may not always be fully penetrant. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:8659522

  19. Immediate versus chronic tissue expansion.

    PubMed

    Machida, B K; Liu-Shindo, M; Sasaki, G H; Rice, D H; Chandrasoma, P

    1991-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the effects on tissues is performed between chronic tissue expansion, intraoperative expansion, and load cycling in a guinea pig model. Intra-operative expansion, which was developed by Sasaki as a method of immediate tissue expansion for small- to medium-sized defects, and load cycling, which was described by Gibson as a method using intraoperative pull, are compared with chronic tissue expansion on the basis of the following four parameters: amount of skin produced, flap viability, intraoperative tissue pressures, and histological changes. The chronically expanded group, which included booster and nonbooster expansions, produced a 137% increase in surface area, or a 52% increase in flap arc length, whereas intraoperative expansion resulted in a 31% increase in surface area, or a 15% increase in flap arc length. The load-cycled group, however, resulted in an almost negligible amount of skin increase. All three techniques exhibit immediate postexpansion stretchback. Flap viability is not impaired by any of the three techniques, in spite of the elevated pressures observed during expansion. Therefore, intraoperative expansion is effective primarily for limited expansion of small defects, whereas chronic tissue expansion still provides the greatest amount of skin increase when compared with other techniques. PMID:2029132

  20. A Global Identification and Analysis of Small Nucleolar RNAs and Possible Intermediate-Sized Non-Coding RNAs in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Danmeng; Chen, Wei; Deng, Xing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are both widespread and functionally important in many eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we employed a special size fractionation and cDNA library construction method followed by 454 deep sequencing to systematically profile rice intermediate-size ncRNAs. Our analysis resulted in the identification of 1349 ncRNAs in total, including 754 novel ncRNAs of an unknown functional category. Chromosome distribution of all identified ncRNAs showed no strand bias, and displayed a pattern similar to that observed in protein-coding genes with few chromosome dependencies. More than half of the ncRNAs were centered around the plus-strand of the 5’ and 3’ termini of the coding regions. The majority of the novel ncRNAs were rice specific, while 78% of the small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) were conserved. Tandem duplication drove the expansion of over half of the snoRNA gene families. Furthermore, 90% of the snoRNA candidates were shown to produce small RNAs between 20–30 nt, 80% of which were associated with ARGONAUT proteins generally, and AGO1b in particular. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive view of an intermediate-size non-coding transcriptome in a monocot species, which will serve as a useful platform for an in-depth analysis of ncRNA functions. PMID:22986792

  1. Salamander Hox clusters contain repetitive DNA and expanded non-coding regions: a typical Hox structure for non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that regulate embryonic and post-embryonic developmental processes. The expression of Hox genes is regulated in part by the tight, spatial arrangement of conserved coding and non-coding sequences. The potential for evolutionary changes in Hox cluster structure is thought to be low among vertebrates; however, recent studies of a few non-mammalian taxa suggest greater variation than originally thought. Using next generation sequencing of large genomic fragments (>100 kb) from the red spotted newt (Notophthalamus viridescens), we found that the arrangement of Hox cluster genes was conserved relative to orthologous regions from other vertebrates, but the length of introns and intergenic regions varied. In particular, the distance between hoxd13 and hoxd11 is longer in newt than orthologous regions from vertebrate species with expanded Hox clusters and is predicted to exceed the length of the entire HoxD clusters (hoxd13–hoxd4) of humans, mice, and frogs. Many repetitive DNA sequences were identified for newt Hox clusters, including an enrichment of DNA transposon-like sequences relative to non-coding genomic fragments. Our results suggest that Hox cluster expansion and transposon accumulation are common features of non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates. PMID:23561734

  2. On the Applicability of Elastic Network Models for the Study of RNA CUG Trinucleotide Repeat Overexpansion

    PubMed Central

    González, Àlex L.; Teixidó, Jordi; Borrell, José I.; Estrada-Tejedor, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play a pivotal role in a number of diseases promoting an aberrant sequestration of nuclear RNA-binding proteins. In the particular case of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a multisystemic autosomal dominant disease, the formation of large non-coding CUG repeats set up long-tract hairpins able to bind muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL), which trigger the deregulation of several splicing events such as cardiac troponin T (cTNT) and insulin receptor’s, among others. Evidence suggests that conformational changes in RNA are determinant for the recognition and binding of splicing proteins, molecular modeling simulations can attempt to shed light on the structural diversity of CUG repeats and to understand their pathogenic mechanisms. Molecular dynamics (MD) are widely used to obtain accurate results at atomistic level, despite being very time consuming, and they contrast with fast but simplified coarse-grained methods such as Elastic Network Model (ENM). In this paper, we assess the application of ENM (traditionally applied on proteins) for studying the conformational space of CUG repeats and compare it to conventional and accelerated MD conformational sampling. Overall, the results provided here reveal that ANM can provide useful insights into dynamic rCUG structures at a global level, and that their dynamics depend on both backbone and nucleobase fluctuations. On the other hand, ANM fail to describe local U-U dynamics of the rCUG system, which require more computationally expensive methods such as MD. Given that several limitations are inherent to both methods, we discuss here the usefulness of the current theoretical approaches for studying highly dynamic RNA systems such as CUG trinucleotide repeat overexpansions. PMID:27010216

  3. Nonneutral evolution of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial DNA control region of lagomorphs.

    PubMed

    Casane, D; Dennebouy, N; de Rochambeau, H; Mounolou, J C; Monnerot, M

    1997-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) contains a tandem array of 153-bp repeats in the vicinity of the replication origin of the H-stand. Variation among molecules in the number of these repeats results in inter- and intraindividual length polymorphism (heteroplasmy). Generally, in an individual, one predominant molecular type is observed, the others representing a low percentage of the mtDNA content. At the tissue level, we observe a particular distribution of this polymorphism in the gonads compared with liver, kidneys, or brain, implying a relationship between the differentiation status of the cells and the types of new mtDNA molecules which appear and accumulate during lifetime. Similar tandem repeats were also found in the mtDNA noncoding region of European hares (Lepus europaeus), a cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus), and a pika (Ochotona rufescens). The lengths and the sequences of these units evolve rapidly and in a concerted way, but the number of repeats is maintained in a narrow range, and an internal 20-bp segment is highly conserved. Constraints restrict the evolution of the primary sequence of these repeated units, the number of which is probably controlled by a stabilizing selection. PMID:9254915

  4. The Diversity and Evolution of Wolbachia Ankyrin Repeat Domain Genes

    PubMed Central

    Siozios, Stefanos; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Klasson, Lisa; Andersson, Siv G. E.; Braig, Henk R.; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2013-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes are common in the eukaryotic and viral domains of life, but they are rare in bacteria, the exception being a few obligate or facultative intracellular Proteobacteria species. Despite having a reduced genome, the arthropod strains of the alphaproteobacterium Wolbachia contain an unusually high number of ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes ranging from 23 in wMel to 60 in wPip strain. This group of genes has attracted considerable attention for their astonishing large number as well as for the fact that ankyrin proteins are known to participate in protein-protein interactions, suggesting that they play a critical role in the molecular mechanism that determines host-Wolbachia symbiotic interactions. We present a comparative evolutionary analysis of the wMel-related ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes present in different Drosophila-Wolbachia associations. Our results show that the ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes change in size by expansion and contraction mediated by short directly repeated sequences. We provide examples of intra-genic recombination events and show that these genes are likely to be horizontally transferred between strains with the aid of bacteriophages. These results confirm previous findings that the Wolbachia genomes are evolutionary mosaics and illustrate the potential that these bacteria have to generate diversity in proteins potentially involved in the symbiotic interactions. PMID:23390535

  5. Long-noncoding RNAs in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G; Sand, Daniel; Gambichler, Thilo; Hahn, Stephan A; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Hessam, Schapoor

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are fundamental regulators of pre- and post-transcriptional gene regulation. Over 35,000 different lncRNAs have been described with some of them being involved in cancer formation. The present study was initiated to describe differentially expressed lncRNAs in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Patients with BCC (n = 6) were included in this study. Punch biopsies were harvested from the tumor center and nonlesional epidermal skin (NLES, control, n = 6). Microarray-based lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles were identified through screening for 30,586 lncRNAs and 26,109 protein-coding transcripts (mRNAs). The microarray data were validated by RT-PCR in a second set of BCC versus control samples. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analyses of mRNAs were performed to assess biologically relevant pathways. A total of 1851 lncRNAs were identified as being significantly up-regulated, whereas 2165 lncRNAs were identified as being significantly down-regulated compared to nonlesional skin (p < 0.05). Oncogenic and/or epidermis-specific lncRNAs, such as CASC15 or ANRIL, were among the differentially expressed sequences. GO analysis showed that the highest enriched GO targeted by up-regulated transcripts was "extracellular matrix." KEGG pathway analysis showed the highest enrichment scores in "Focal adhesion." BCC showed a significantly altered lncRNA and mRNA expression profile. Dysregulation of previously described lncRNAs may play a role in the molecular pathogenesis of BCC and should be subject of further analysis. PMID:26861560

  6. The central role of noncoding RNA in the brain.

    PubMed

    Guennewig, Boris; Cooper, Antony A

    2014-01-01

    Less than 3% of the human genome generates protein-coding transcripts; the majority, far from being strewn with evolutionary "junk," is dynamically transcribed into non(protein)-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These ncRNAs provide another provide another, previously hidden, level of regulatory information that appears to be involved in hard- and soft-wired epigentic processes. The extensive and intricate level of gene regulation provided by ncRNAs may be the major driver for the accelerated development of the human brain and its associated increase in complexity and cognition. Support for this is provided by the correlation between the evolutionary increase of complexity in the nonprotein-coding transcriptome paralleling cognitive evolution in primates, in contrast to the coincidently modest evolutionary changes of the protein-coding transcriptome. The essential role of these regulatory RNAs is reflected in almost every aspect in neuroscience, including chromatin modification, transcriptional regulation, alternative splicing, RNA editing and translation. Dissecting this plethora of regulatory networks and editing events, which are orchestrated through long and small noncoding RNAs, and their interaction with transcription factors, chromatin-modifying enzymes, and other protein effectors will provide essential insights into the transcriptional complexity and plasticity in the development and function of the human brain. Such complexity provides susceptibility to internal and external perturbations, which in rare cases might act as evolutionary catalysts, but in many cases could manifest as neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases. NcRNAs (especially lncRNAs) are therefore excellent candidates for both disease biomarkers and disease-ameliorating therapies. PMID:25172475

  7. In vivo analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans noncoding RNA promoter motifs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiantian; He, Housheng; Wang, Yunfei; Zheng, Haixia; Skogerbø, Geir; Chen, Runsheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play important roles in a variety of cellular processes. Characterizing the transcriptional activity of ncRNA promoters is therefore a critical step toward understanding the complex cellular roles of ncRNAs. Results Here we present an in vivo transcriptional analysis of three C. elegans ncRNA upstream motifs (UM1-3). Transcriptional activity of all three motifs has been demonstrated, and mutational analysis revealed differential contributions of different parts of each motif. We showed that upstream motif 1 (UM1) can drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), and utilized this for detailed analysis of temporal and spatial expression patterns of 5 SL2 RNAs. Upstream motifs 2 and 3 do not drive GFP expression, and termination at consecutive T runs suggests transcription by RNA polymerase III. The UM2 sequence resembles the tRNA promoter, and is actually embedded within its own short-lived, primary transcript. This is a structure which is also found at a few plant and yeast loci, and may indicate an evolutionarily very old dicistronic transcription pattern in which a tRNA serves as a promoter for an adjacent snoRNA. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that the three upstream motifs UM1-3 have promoter activity. The UM1 sequence can drive expression of GFP, which allows for the use of UM1::GFP fusion constructs to study temporal-spatial expression patterns of UM1 ncRNA loci. The UM1 loci appear to act in concert with other upstream sequences, whereas the transcriptional activities of the UM2 and UM3 are confined to the motifs themselves. PMID:18680611

  8. Systematic classification of non-coding RNAs by epigenomic similarity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Even though only 1.5% of the human genome is translated into proteins, recent reports indicate that most of it is transcribed into non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are becoming the subject of increased scientific interest. We hypothesized that examining how different classes of ncRNAs co-localized with annotated epigenomic elements could help understand the functions, regulatory mechanisms, and relationships among ncRNA families. Results We examined 15 different ncRNA classes for statistically significant genomic co-localizations with cell type-specific chromatin segmentation states, transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), and histone modification marks using GenomeRunner (http://www.genomerunner.org). P-values were obtained using a Chi-square test and corrected for multiple testing using the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure. We clustered and visualized the ncRNA classes by the strength of their statistical enrichments and depletions. We found piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) to be depleted in regions containing activating histone modification marks, such as H3K4 mono-, di- and trimethylation, H3K27 acetylation, as well as certain TFBSs. piRNAs were further depleted in active promoters, weak transcription, and transcription elongation regions, and enriched in repressed and heterochromatic regions. Conversely, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) were depleted in heterochromatin regions and strongly enriched in regions containing activating H3K4 di- and trimethylation marks, H2az histone variant, and a variety of TFBSs. Interestingly, regions containing CTCF insulator protein binding sites were associated with tRNAs. tRNAs were also enriched in the active, weak and poised promoters and, surprisingly, in regions with repetitive/copy number variations. Conclusions Searching for statistically significant associations between ncRNA classes and epigenomic elements permits detection of potential functional and/or regulatory relationships among ncRNA classes, and suggests cell

  9. Coding-noncoding gene expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Xie, Haiyang; Ling, Qi; Lu, Di; Lv, Zhen; Zhuang, Runzhou; Liu, Zhikun; Wei, Xuyong; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play crucial roles in human cancers. However, the function of lncRNAs and their downstream mechanisms are largely unknown in the molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). In the present study, we performed transcriptomic profiling of ICC and paired adjacent noncancerous tissues (N) by using lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) microarrays. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to validate the microarray results. We tested for correlations between the expression levels of lncRNAs and target genes. Clinicopathologic characteristics and overall survival were compared using the t test and the Kaplan-Meier method, respectively. A total of 2773 lncRNAs were significantly upregulated in ICC tissues compared with the noncancerous tissues, whereas 2392 lncRNAs were downregulated. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that most of the genes were involved in carcinogenesis, hepatic system diseases, and signal transductions. Positive correlations were found between 4 lncRNA-mRNA pairs (RNA43085 and SULF1, RNA47504 and KDM8, RNA58630 and PCSK6, and RNA40057 and CYP2D6). When the clinicopathologic characteristics were accounted for, the cumulative overall survival rate was found to be associated with low expression levels of CYP2D6 (P = 0.005) and PCSK6 (P = 0.038). Patients with high expression levels of CYP2D6 and RNA40057 had a better prognosis (P = 0.014). Our results suggested that the lncRNA expression profiling in ICC tissues is profoundly different from that in noncancerous tissues. Thus, lncRNA may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for ICC. Furthermore, the combined assessment of lncRNA and mRNA expressions might predict the survival of patients with ICC. PMID:26297049

  10. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  11. Cryogenic expansion machine

    DOEpatents

    Pallaver, Carl B.; Morgan, Michael W.

    1978-01-01

    A cryogenic expansion engine includes intake and exhaust poppet valves each controlled by a cam having adjustable dwell, the valve seats for the valves being threaded inserts in the valve block. Each cam includes a cam base and a ring-shaped cam insert disposed at an exterior corner of the cam base, the cam base and cam insert being generally circular but including an enlarged cam dwell, the circumferential configuration of the cam base and cam dwell being identical, the cam insert being rotatable with respect to the cam base. GI CONTRACTUAL ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION.

  12. DMPK-associated myotonic dystrophy and CTG repeats in Alabama African Americans.

    PubMed

    Acton, R T; Rivers, C A; Watson, B; Oh, S J

    2007-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a result of a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of the DMPK gene. DM1 is rare among African blacks who have fewer large CTG repeats in the normal range than other racial/ethnic groups. Neither the prevalence of DM1 nor the relationship of CTG expansion to clinical status in African Americans (AAs) is well documented. We describe two AA brothers with DM1, each of whom had CTG repeats of 5/639; their father was reported to have DM1 and had CTG repeats of 5/60. Other family members had CTG repeats of 5-14. An unrelated AA patient from a second kinship also had DM1; an analysis revealed CTG repeats of 27/191. In 161 Alabama AA control subjects, we observed 18 CTG alleles from 5 to 28 repeats; the most common allele had five CTG repeats. The frequency of CTG repeats >or=15 were greater (p < 0.0003) in Pygmy, Amhara Ethiopian, Ashkenazi Jewish, North African Jewish, Israeli Muslim Arab, European white, and Japanese populations than in the Alabama AA population. These data suggest that the risk for DM1 in AAs is intermediate between that of African blacks and whites of European descent. PMID:17877752

  13. Drosophila Females Undergo Genome Expansion after Interspecific Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Romero-Soriano, Valèria; Burlet, Nelly; Vela, Doris; Fontdevila, Antonio; Vieira, Cristina; García Guerreiro, María Pilar

    2016-03-01

    Genome size (or C-value) can present a wide range of values among eukaryotes. This variation has been attributed to differences in the amplification and deletion of different noncoding repetitive sequences, particularly transposable elements (TEs). TEs can be activated under different stress conditions such as interspecific hybridization events, as described for several species of animals and plants. These massive transposition episodes can lead to considerable genome expansions that could ultimately be involved in hybrid speciation processes. Here, we describe the effects of hybridization and introgression on genome size of Drosophila hybrids. We measured the genome size of two close Drosophila species, Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila koepferae, their F1 offspring and the offspring from three generations of backcrossed hybrids; where mobilization of up to 28 different TEs was previously detected. We show that hybrid females indeed present a genome expansion, especially in the first backcross, which could likely be explained by transposition events. Hybrid males, which exhibit more variable C-values among individuals of the same generation, do not present an increased genome size. Thus, we demonstrate that the impact of hybridization on genome size can be detected through flow cytometry and is sex-dependent. PMID:26872773

  14. Drosophila Females Undergo Genome Expansion after Interspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Soriano, Valèria; Burlet, Nelly; Vela, Doris; Fontdevila, Antonio; Vieira, Cristina; García Guerreiro, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Genome size (or C-value) can present a wide range of values among eukaryotes. This variation has been attributed to differences in the amplification and deletion of different noncoding repetitive sequences, particularly transposable elements (TEs). TEs can be activated under different stress conditions such as interspecific hybridization events, as described for several species of animals and plants. These massive transposition episodes can lead to considerable genome expansions that could ultimately be involved in hybrid speciation processes. Here, we describe the effects of hybridization and introgression on genome size of Drosophila hybrids. We measured the genome size of two close Drosophila species, Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila koepferae, their F1 offspring and the offspring from three generations of backcrossed hybrids; where mobilization of up to 28 different TEs was previously detected. We show that hybrid females indeed present a genome expansion, especially in the first backcross, which could likely be explained by transposition events. Hybrid males, which exhibit more variable C-values among individuals of the same generation, do not present an increased genome size. Thus, we demonstrate that the impact of hybridization on genome size can be detected through flow cytometry and is sex-dependent. PMID:26872773

  15. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  16. Contribution of ATXN2 intermediary polyQ expansions in a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lattante, Serena; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Stevanin, Giovanni; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Moigneu, Carine; Camuzat, Agnès; Da Barroca, Sandra; Mundwiller, Emeline; Couarch, Philippe; Salachas, François; Hannequin, Didier; Meininger, Vincent; Pasquier, Florence; Seilhean, Danielle; Couratier, Philippe; Danel-Brunaud, Véronique; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Tranchant, Christine; LeGuern, Eric; Brice, Alexis; Le Ber, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the frequency of ATXN2 polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in large cohorts of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and to evaluate whether ATXN2 could act as a modifier gene in patients carrying the C9orf72 expansion. Methods: We screened a large cohort of French patients (1,144 ALS, 203 FTD, 168 FTD-ALS, and 109 PSP) for ATXN2 CAG repeat length. We included in our cohort 322 carriers of the C9orf72 expansion (202 ALS, 63 FTD, and 57 FTD-ALS). Results: We found a significant association with intermediate repeat size (≥29 CAG) in patients with ALS (both familial and sporadic) and, for the first time, in patients with familial FTD-ALS. Of interest, we found the co-occurrence of pathogenic C9orf72 expansion in 23.2% of ATXN2 intermediate-repeat carriers, all in the FTD-ALS and familial ALS subgroups. In the cohort of C9orf72 carriers, 3.1% of patients also carried an intermediate ATXN2 repeat length. ATXN2 repeat lengths in patients with PSP and FTD were found to be similar to the controls. Conclusions: ATXN2 intermediary repeat length is a strong risk factor for ALS and FTD-ALS. Furthermore, we propose that ATXN2 polyQ expansions could act as a strong modifier of the FTD phenotype in the presence of a C9orf72 repeat expansion, leading to the development of clinical signs featuring both FTD and ALS. PMID:25098532

  17. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  18. Repeating seismic events in China.

    PubMed

    Schaff, David P; Richards, Paul G

    2004-02-20

    About 10% of seismic events in and near China from 1985 to 2000 were repeating events not more than about 1 kilometer from each other. We cross-correlated seismograms from approximately 14,000 earthquakes and explosions and measured relative arrival times to approximately 0.01 second, enabling lateral location precision of about 100 to 300 meters. Such precision is important for seismic hazard studies, earthquake physics, and nuclear test ban verification. Recognition and measurement of repeating signals in archived data and the resulting improvement in location specificity quantifies the inaccuracy of current procedures for picking onset times and locating events. PMID:14976310

  19. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  20. The mitochondrial genome of the banded guitarfish, Zapteryx exasperata (Jordan and Gilbert, 1880), possesses a non-coding duplication remnant region.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Páez, Ana; Del Río-Portilla, Miguel Angel; Oñate-González, Erick; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the banded guitarfish is 17,310 bp long and includes 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA, and 13 protein-coding genes, a replication origin and a control region (GenBank accession number KM370325). Gene arrangement is similar to that found in other batoids. An extra non-coding region was found between the genes coding for transfer RNA proline and threonine possessing a set of tandem repeat motifs pointing to its origin as a duplication remnant. Start codon ATG and stop codon TAA/T were found in most protein-coding genes. The base composition of the genome is 32.3% A, 30.2% T, 24.3% C and 13.1% G. PMID:25208175

  1. Impact of Nutrition on Non-Coding RNA Epigenetics in Breast and Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krakowsky, Rosanna H. E.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in females. According to the American Cancer Society, there are 327,660 new cases in breast and gynecological cancers estimated in 2014, placing emphasis on the need for cancer prevention and new cancer treatment strategies. One important approach to cancer prevention involves phytochemicals, biologically active compounds derived from plants. A variety of studies on the impact of dietary compounds found in cruciferous vegetables, green tea, and spices like curry and black pepper have revealed epigenetic changes in female cancers. Thus, an important emerging topic comprises epigenetic changes due to the modulation of non-coding RNA levels. Since it has been shown that non-coding RNAs such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer, and furthermore are linked to distinct cancer phenotypes, understanding the effects of dietary compounds and supplements on the epigenetic modulator non-coding RNA is of great interest. This article reviews the current findings on nutrition-induced changes in breast and gynecological cancers at the non-coding RNA level. PMID:26075205

  2. Non-coding RNAs as emerging molecular targets of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Tekcham, Dinesh Singh; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2016-08-15

    Gallbladder cancer is one of the most common cancers of biliary tract with aggressive pathophysiology, now emerging as a global health issue. Although minority of gallbladder cancer patients could receive such curative resection due to late diagnosis, this increases the survival rate. Lack of potential target molecule (s) for early diagnosis, better prognosis and effective therapy of gallbladder cancer has triggered investigators to look for novel technological or high throughput approaches to identify potential biomarker for gallbladder cancer. Intervention of non-coding RNAs in gallbladder cancer has been revealed recently. Non-coding RNAs are now widely implicated in cancer. Recent reports have revealed association of non-coding RNAs (microRNAs or miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs or lncRNAs) with gallbladder cancer. Here, we present an updated overview on the biogenesis, mechanism of action, role of non-coding RNAs, the identified cellular functions in gallbladder tumorigenesis, their prognostic & therapeutic potentials (efficacies) and future significance in developing effective biomarker(s), in future, for gallbladder. PMID:27131889

  3. [Support vector data description for finding non-coding RNA gene].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Wang, Zhengzhi

    2010-08-01

    In the field of computational molecule biology, there is still a challenging question of how to detect non-coding RNA gene in lots of unlabeled sequences. Generally, the methods of machine learning and classification are employed to answer this question. However, only a limited number of positive training samples and unlabeled samples are available. The negative samples are difficult to define appropriately, yet they are necessary for usual learning-then-classification method. The common way for most of the existing non-coding RNA gene finding methods is to produce a number of random sequences as negative samples, which may hold some characteristic of positive sample sequences. Consequently, the contrived uncertain factor was introduced and the performance of methods was not good enough. In this paper, Support Vector Data Description (SVDD) is in use for to learning and classification as well as for detecting non-coding RNA gene in lots of unlabeled sequences, and the k-means clustering algorithm is employed before SVDD training to deal with the high flase positive fault in the result of SVDD. The training samples (target samples) are non-coding RNA genes validated by experiment. Moreover, appropriate features were constructed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The effectiveness and performance of the method are demonstrated by testing the cases in NONCODE databases and E. coli genome. PMID:20842844

  4. LARVA: an integrative framework for large-scale analysis of recurrent variants in noncoding annotations

    PubMed Central

    Lochovsky, Lucas; Zhang, Jing; Fu, Yao; Khurana, Ekta; Gerstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In cancer research, background models for mutation rates have been extensively calibrated in coding regions, leading to the identification of many driver genes, recurrently mutated more than expected. Noncoding regions are also associated with disease; however, background models for them have not been investigated in as much detail. This is partially due to limited noncoding functional annotation. Also, great mutation heterogeneity and potential correlations between neighboring sites give rise to substantial overdispersion in mutation count, resulting in problematic background rate estimation. Here, we address these issues with a new computational framework called LARVA. It integrates variants with a comprehensive set of noncoding functional elements, modeling the mutation counts of the elements with a β-binomial distribution to handle overdispersion. LARVA, moreover, uses regional genomic features such as replication timing to better estimate local mutation rates and mutational hotspots. We demonstrate LARVA's effectiveness on 760 whole-genome tumor sequences, showing that it identifies well-known noncoding drivers, such as mutations in the TERT promoter. Furthermore, LARVA highlights several novel highly mutated regulatory sites that could potentially be noncoding drivers. We make LARVA available as a software tool and release our highly mutated annotations as an online resource (larva.gersteinlab.org). PMID:26304545

  5. Pure laparoscopic hepatectomy as repeat surgery and repeat hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Isetani, Masashi; Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess clinical outcomes of laparoscopic hepatectomy (LH) in patients with a history of upper abdominal surgery and repeat hepatectomy. METHODS: This study compared the perioperative courses of patients receiving LH at our institution that had or had not previously undergone upper abdominal surgery. Of the 80 patients who underwent LH, 22 had prior abdominal surgeries, including hepatectomy (n = 12), pancreatectomy (n = 3), cholecystectomy and common bile duct excision (n = 1), splenectomy (n = 1), total gastrectomy (n = 1), colectomy with the involvement of transverse colon (n = 3), and extended hysterectomy with extensive lymph-node dissection up to the upper abdomen (n = 1). Clinical indicators including operating time, blood loss, hospital stay, and morbidity were compared among the groups. RESULTS: Eighteen of the 22 patients who had undergone previous surgery had severe adhesions in the area around the liver. However, there were no conversions to laparotomy in this group. In the 58 patients without a history of upper abdominal surgery, the median operative time was 301 min and blood loss was 150 mL. In patients with upper abdominal surgical history or repeat hepatectomy, the operative times were 351 and 301 min, and blood loss was 100 and 50 mL, respectively. The median postoperative stay was 17, 13 and 12 d for patients with no history of upper abdominal surgery, patients with a history, and patients with repeat hepatectomy, respectively. There were five cases with complications in the group with no surgical history, compared to only one case in the group with a prior history. There were no statistically significant differences in the perioperative results between the groups with and without upper abdominal surgical history, or with repeat hepatectomy. CONCLUSION: LH is feasible and safe in patients with a history of upper abdominal surgery or repeat hepatectomy. PMID:25624731

  6. ChloroSSRdb: a repository of perfect and imperfect chloroplastic simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) of green plants

    PubMed Central

    Kapil, Aditi; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions in DNA sequence that contain repeating motifs of length 1–6 nucleotides. These repeats are ubiquitously present and are found in both coding and non-coding regions of genome. A total of 534 complete chloroplast genome sequences (as on 18 September 2014) of Viridiplantae are available at NCBI organelle genome resource. It provides opportunity to mine these genomes for the detection of SSRs and store them in the form of a database. In an attempt to properly manage and retrieve chloroplastic SSRs, we designed ChloroSSRdb which is a relational database developed using SQL server 2008 and accessed through ASP.NET. It provides information of all the three types (perfect, imperfect and compound) of SSRs. At present, ChloroSSRdb contains 124 430 mined SSRs, with majority lying in non-coding region. Out of these, PCR primers were designed for 118 249 SSRs. Tetranucleotide repeats (47 079) were found to be the most frequent repeat type, whereas hexanucleotide repeats (6414) being the least abundant. Additionally, in each species statistical analyses were performed to calculate relative frequency, correlation coefficient and chi-square statistics of perfect and imperfect SSRs. In accordance with the growing interest in SSR studies, ChloroSSRdb will prove to be a useful resource in developing genetic markers, phylogenetic analysis, genetic mapping, etc. Moreover, it will serve as a ready reference for mined SSRs in available chloroplast genomes of green plants. Database URL: www.compubio.in/chlorossrdb/ PMID:25380781

  7. ChloroSSRdb: a repository of perfect and imperfect chloroplastic simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) of green plants.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Aditi; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions in DNA sequence that contain repeating motifs of length 1-6 nucleotides. These repeats are ubiquitously present and are found in both coding and non-coding regions of genome. A total of 534 complete chloroplast genome sequences (as on 18 September 2014) of Viridiplantae are available at NCBI organelle genome resource. It provides opportunity to mine these genomes for the detection of SSRs and store them in the form of a database. In an attempt to properly manage and retrieve chloroplastic SSRs, we designed ChloroSSRdb which is a relational database developed using SQL server 2008 and accessed through ASP.NET. It provides information of all the three types (perfect, imperfect and compound) of SSRs. At present, ChloroSSRdb contains 124 430 mined SSRs, with majority lying in non-coding region. Out of these, PCR primers were designed for 118 249 SSRs. Tetranucleotide repeats (47 079) were found to be the most frequent repeat type, whereas hexanucleotide repeats (6414) being the least abundant. Additionally, in each species statistical analyses were performed to calculate relative frequency, correlation coefficient and chi-square statistics of perfect and imperfect SSRs. In accordance with the growing interest in SSR studies, ChloroSSRdb will prove to be a useful resource in developing genetic markers, phylogenetic analysis, genetic mapping, etc. Moreover, it will serve as a ready reference for mined SSRs in available chloroplast genomes of green plants. Database URL: www.compubio.in/chlorossrdb/ PMID:25380781

  8. A pan-European study of the C9orf72 repeat associated with FTLD: geographic prevalence, genomic instability, and intermediate repeats.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Sleegers, Kristel; Sieben, Anne; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Pimentel, José; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Santana, Isabel; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santiago, Beatriz; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Vom Hagen, Jennifer Müller; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Danek, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Testi, Silvia; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Theuns, Jessie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Firmo, Clara; Pimentel, José; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, Jose; Gelpi, Ellen; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Graff, Caroline; Kinhult Ståhlbom, Anne; Thonberg, Håkan; Nennesmo, Inger; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Bessi, Valentina; Piaceri, Irene; Santana, Isabel; Santiago, Beatriz; Santana, Isabel; Helena Ribeiro, Maria; Rosário Almeida, Maria; Oliveira, Catarina; Massano, João; Garret, Carolina; Pires, Paula; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Ivailo; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Danel, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Maria Fabrizi, Gian; Testi, Silvia; Ferrari, Sergio; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Cras, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    We assessed the geographical distribution of C9orf72 G(4) C(2) expansions in a pan-European frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cohort (n = 1,205), ascertained by the European Early-Onset Dementia (EOD) consortium. Next, we performed a meta-analysis of our data and that of other European studies, together 2,668 patients from 15 Western European countries. The frequency of the C9orf72 expansions in Western Europe was 9.98% in overall FTLD, with 18.52% in familial, and 6.26% in sporadic FTLD patients. Outliers were Finland and Sweden with overall frequencies of respectively 29.33% and 20.73%, but also Spain with 25.49%. In contrast, prevalence in Germany was limited to 4.82%. In addition, we studied the role of intermediate repeats (7-24 repeat units), which are strongly correlated with the risk haplotype, on disease and C9orf72 expression. In vitro reporter gene expression studies demonstrated significantly decreased transcriptional activity of C9orf72 with increasing number of normal repeat units, indicating that intermediate repeats might act as predisposing alleles and in favor of the loss-of-function disease mechanism. Further, we observed a significantly increased frequency of short indels in the GC-rich low complexity sequence adjacent to the G(4) C(2) repeat in C9orf72 expansion carriers (P < 0.001) with the most common indel creating one long contiguous imperfect G(4) C(2) repeat, which is likely more prone to replication slippage and pathological expansion. PMID:23111906

  9. PredcircRNA: computational classification of circular RNA from other long non-coding RNA using hybrid features.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Xiong, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Recently circular RNA (circularRNA) has been discovered as an increasingly important type of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), playing an important role in gene regulation, such as functioning as miRNA sponges. So it is very promising to identify circularRNA transcripts from de novo assembled transcripts obtained by high-throughput sequencing, such as RNA-seq data. In this study, we presented a machine learning approach, named as PredcircRNA, focused on distinguishing circularRNA from other lncRNAs using multiple kernel learning. Firstly we extracted different sources of discriminative features, including graph features, conservation information and sequence compositions, ALU and tandem repeats, SNP densities and open reading frames (ORFs) from transcripts. Secondly, to better integrate features from different sources, we proposed a computational approach based on a multiple kernel learning framework to fuse those heterogeneous features. Our preliminary 5-fold cross-validation result showed that our proposed method can classify circularRNA from other types of lncRNAs with an accuracy of 0.778, sensitivity of 0.781, specificity of 0.770, precision of 0.784 and MCC of 0.554 in our constructed gold-standard dataset, respectively. Our feature importance analysis based on Random Forest illustrated some discriminative features, such as conservation features and a GTAG sequence motif. Our PredcircRNA tool is available for download at . PMID:26028480

  10. Investigation of long noncoding RNAs expression profile as potential serum biomarkers in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Marwa M; Matboli, Marwa; Sallam, Maha; Montasser, Iman F; Saad, Amr S; El-Tawdi, Ahmed H F

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing interest in using long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as biomarkers in cancer. Predictive biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have great benefit in the choice of therapeutic modality for HCC. The aim of this study is to assess lncRNA-urothelial carcinoma associated-1 (lncRNA-UCA1) and WD repeat containing, antisense to TP53 (WRAP53) expression as novel noninvasive biomarkers for diagnosis of HCC in sera of HCC patients compared with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients and healthy volunteers and to analyze their relationship with respect to the clinicopathologic features. We retrieved HCC characteristic lncRNAs, lncRNA-UCA1 and lncRNA-WRAP53, based on the microarray signature profiling (released by LncRNADisease database). Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-qPCR) was then used to evaluate the expression of selected lncRNAs in the serum of 160 participants. Furthermore, in 20 of 82 HCC cases involved in the study, we examined the expression of lncRNA-UCA1 and lncRNA-WRAP53 in 20 HCC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues and analyzed its correlation with the serum level of these lncRNAs. The prognostic significance of the investigated parameters in HCC patients was explored. We found that lncRNA-UCA1 and lncRNA-WRAP53 were significantly higher in sera of HCC than those with chronic HCV infection or healthy volunteers. Our data suggested that the increased expression of UCA1 and WRAP53 was associated with advanced clinical parameters in HCC. Of note, tissue levels of the chosen lncRNAs strongly correlate with their sera level. The combination of both lncRNAs with serum alpha fetoprotein resulted in improved sensitivity to 100%. The median follow-up period was 21.5 months. LncRNA-WRAP53 was significant independent prognostic markers in relapse-free survival. LncRNA-UCA1 and lncRNA-WRAP53 upregulation may serve as novel serum biomarkers for HCC diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:26551349

  11. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Long Non-Coding RNAs in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuqian; Cheng, Tingcai; Liu, Chun; Liu, Duolian; Zhang, Quan; Long, Renwen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulators in various biological processes. However, to date, no systematic characterization of lncRNAs has been reported in the silkworm Bombyx mori. In the present study, we generated eighteen RNA-seq datasets with relatively high depth. Using an in-house designed lncRNA identification pipeline, 11,810 lncRNAs were identified for 5,556 loci. Among these lncRNAs, 474 transcripts were intronic lncRNAs (ilncRNAs), 6,250 transcripts were intergenic lncRNAs (lincRNAs), and 5,086 were natural antisense lncRNAs (lncNATs). Compared with protein-coding mRNAs, silkworm lncRNAs are shorter in terms of full length but longer in terms of exon and intron length. In addition, lncRNAs exhibit a lower level of sequence conservation, more repeat sequences overlapped and higher tissue specificity than protein-coding mRNAs in the silkworm. We found that 69 lncRNA transcripts from 33 gene loci may function as miRNA precursors, and 104 lncRNA transcripts from 72 gene loci may act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). In total, 49.47% of all gene loci (2,749/5,556) for which lncRNAs were identified showed sex-biased expression. Co-expression network analysis resulted in 19 modules, 12 of which revealed relatively high tissue specificity. The highlighted darkgoldenrod module was specifically associated with middle and posterior silk glands, and the hub lncRNAs within this module were co-expressed with proteins involved in translation, translocation, and secretory processes, suggesting that these hub lncRNAs may function as regulators of the biosynthesis, translocation, and secretion of silk proteins. This study presents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of silkworm lncRNAs and provides an invaluable resource for genetic, evolutionary, and genomic studies of B. mori. PMID:26771876

  12. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Long Non-Coding RNAs in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqian; Cheng, Tingcai; Liu, Chun; Liu, Duolian; Zhang, Quan; Long, Renwen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulators in various biological processes. However, to date, no systematic characterization of lncRNAs has been reported in the silkworm Bombyx mori. In the present study, we generated eighteen RNA-seq datasets with relatively high depth. Using an in-house designed lncRNA identification pipeline, 11,810 lncRNAs were identified for 5,556 loci. Among these lncRNAs, 474 transcripts were intronic lncRNAs (ilncRNAs), 6,250 transcripts were intergenic lncRNAs (lincRNAs), and 5,086 were natural antisense lncRNAs (lncNATs). Compared with protein-coding mRNAs, silkworm lncRNAs are shorter in terms of full length but longer in terms of exon and intron length. In addition, lncRNAs exhibit a lower level of sequence conservation, more repeat sequences overlapped and higher tissue specificity than protein-coding mRNAs in the silkworm. We found that 69 lncRNA transcripts from 33 gene loci may function as miRNA precursors, and 104 lncRNA transcripts from 72 gene loci may act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). In total, 49.47% of all gene loci (2,749/5,556) for which lncRNAs were identified showed sex-biased expression. Co-expression network analysis resulted in 19 modules, 12 of which revealed relatively high tissue specificity. The highlighted darkgoldenrod module was specifically associated with middle and posterior silk glands, and the hub lncRNAs within this module were co-expressed with proteins involved in translation, translocation, and secretory processes, suggesting that these hub lncRNAs may function as regulators of the biosynthesis, translocation, and secretion of silk proteins. This study presents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of silkworm lncRNAs and provides an invaluable resource for genetic, evolutionary, and genomic studies of B. mori. PMID:26771876

  13. Trinucleotide repeats at the FRAXF locus: Frequency and distribution in the general population

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A.; Walker, M.

    1996-08-09

    FRAXF the third X-chromosomal fragile site to be cloned, has been shown to harbor a polymorphic compound triplet array: (GC-CGTC){sub n} (GCC){sub n}. Expansion and methylation of the GCC-repeat and the neighboring CpG-rich region result in chromosomal fragility. DNAs from 500 anonymous consecutive newborn males were examined to determine the incidence of various repeat numbers. The range of repeats was from 10-38, with the most common alleles having 14 (52.7%), 12 (16.6%), 21 (9.0%), and 22 (5.2%) triplets. Based on the distribution of repeat numbers, we suggest that the 21-repeat allele resulted from hairpin formation involving 7 GCC-repeats in a 14-repeat allele, accompanied by polymerase slippage. Examination of dinucleotide repeats near the FRAXF repeat will be important in testing this hypothesis. Since the clinical phenotype, if any, of FRAXF is unknown, this database will also be valuable for comparisons with repeat numbers in individuals from special populations. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Characterization of conservative somatic instability of the CAG repeat region in Huntington`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, F.V.; Calikoglu, A.S.; Whetsell, L.H.

    1994-09-01

    Instability and enlargement of a CAG repeat region at the beginning of the huntingtin gene (IT-15) has been linked with Huntington`s disease. The CAG repeat size shows a highly significant correlation with age-of-onset of clinicial features in individuals with 40 or more repeats who have Huntington disease. The clinical status of nonsymptomatic individuals with 30 to 39 CAG repeats is considered ambiguous. In order to define more carefully the nature of the HD expansion instability, we examined patients in our HD population using a discriminating fluorescence-based PCR approach. The degree of somatic mutation increases with both earlier age of onset and the size of the inherited allele. A single prominent band one repeat larger than the index peak was typical in individuals with 40-41 CAG repeats. Three to four larger bands are typically discerned in individuals with 50 or more repeats. In an extreme example, an individual with approximately 95 repeats had at least 8 prominent bands. Plotting the degree of somatic mutation relative to the size of the HD allele shows somatic mutation activity increases with size. By this approach 40-60% of the alleles in a 40-41 CAG repeat HD loci is represented in the primary allele. In contrast, the primary allele represents a relatively minor proportion of the total alleles for expansions greater than 50 CAG repeats (10-20%). The limited range of somatic mutation suggest that the instability is restricted to very early stages of embryogenesis before tissue development diverges or that persistent somatic instability occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, the properties of somatic instability in Huntington`s disease have aspects that are both in common but also different from that found in other trinucleotide repeat expanding diseases such as myotonic muscular dystrophy and fragile X syndrome.

  15. Singularity Expansion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, Lloyd Stephen

    In this work the transient currents induced on an arbitrary system of thin linear scatterers by an electromagnetic plane wave are solved by using an electric field integral equation (EFIE) formulation. The transient analysis is carried out using the singularity expansion method (SEM). The general analysis developed here is useful for assessing the vulnerability of military aircraft to a nuclear generated electromagnetic pulse (EMP). It is also useful as a modal synthesis tool in the analysis and design of frequency selective surfaces (FSS). SEM parameters for a variety of thin cylindrical geometries have been computed. Specifically, SEM poles, modes, coupling coefficients, and transient currents are given for the two and three element planar array. Poles and modes for planar arrays with a larger number (as many as eight) of identical equally spaced elements are also considered. SEM pole-mode results are given for identical parallel elements with ends located at the vertices of a regular N-agon. Pole-mode patterns are found for symmetric (and slightly perturbed) single junction N-arm elements and for the five junction Jerusalem cross. The Jerusalem cross element has been used extensively in FSS.

  16. Do Twelfths Terminate or Repeat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Burnison, Erica

    2015-01-01

    When finding the decimal equivalent of a fraction with 12 in the denominator, will it terminate or repeat? This question came from a seventh grader in author Erica Burnison's class as the student was pondering a poster generated by one of her classmates. Not only was the question intriguing, but it also affirmed the belief in the power of…

  17. The Cipher Code of Simple Sequence Repeats in "Vampire Pathogens".

    PubMed

    Zou, Geng; Bello-Orti, Bernardo; Aragon, Virginia; Tucker, Alexander W; Luo, Rui; Ren, Pinxing; Bi, Dingren; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Blood inside mammals is a forbidden area for the majority of prokaryotic microbes; however, red blood cells tropism microbes, like "vampire pathogens" (VP), succeed in matching scarce nutrients and surviving strong immunity reactions. Here, we found VP of Mycoplasma, Rhizobiales, and Rickettsiales showed significantly higher counts of (AG)n dimeric simple sequence repeats (Di-SSRs) in the genomes, coding and non-coding regions than non Vampire Pathogens (N_VP). Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between GC content and the span of (AG)n-Di-SSR variation. Gene Ontology (GO) terms with abundance of (AG)3-Di-SSRs shared by the VP strains were associated with purine nucleotide metabolism (FDR < 0.01), indicating an adaptation to the limited availability of purine and nucleotide precursors in blood. Di-amino acids coded by (AG)n-Di-SSRs included all three six-fold code amino acids (Arg, Leu and Ser) and significantly higher counts of Di-amino acids coded by (AG)3, (GA)3, and (TC)3 in VP than N_VP. Furthermore, significant differences (P < 0.001) on the numbers of triplexes formed from (AG)n-Di-SSRs between VP and N_VP in Mycoplasma suggested the potential role of (AG)n-Di-SSRs in gene regulation. PMID:26215592

  18. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  19. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  20. Clinical implication of long noncoding RNA 91H expression profile in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wen-Kai; Lin, Qing-Feng; Shen, Dong; Liu, Zhi-Li; Su, Jun; Mao, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs have been documented as having widespread roles in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. However, roles of long noncoding RNAs in osteosarcoma remain unclear. This study is to investigate the clinical relevance and biological functions of long noncoding RNA 91H in osteosarcoma. Herein, we confirmed that 91H expression was notably increased in osteosarcoma patients and cell lines compared to healthy controls and normal human bone cell lines. High expression of 91H was significantly correlated with advanced clinical stage, chemotherapy after surgery, and tumor size >5 cm. Furthermore, 91H was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in osteosarcoma patients after treatments. Additionally, the knockdown of 91H expression inhibited osteosarcoma cells' proliferation and promoted their apoptosis in vitro. In summary, these findings indicate that 91H may be a novel biomarker for risk prognostication and also provide a clue to the molecular etiology of osteosarcoma. PMID:27555785