Science.gov

Sample records for nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation

  1. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Amyloid fibril disruption by ultrasonic cavitation: nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G

    2014-07-30

    We describe the disruption of amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptides by ultrasonic cavitation. For this purpose, we performed nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with sinusoidal pressure and visualized the process with movies. When the pressure is negative, a bubble is formed, usually at hydrophobic residues in the transmembrane region. Most β-strands maintain their secondary structures in the bubble. When the pressure becomes positive, the bubble collapses, and water molecules crash against the hydrophilic residues in the nontransmembrane region to disrupt the amyloid. Shorter amyloids require longer sonication times for disruption because they do not have enough hydrophobic residues to serve as a nucleus to form a bubble. These results agree with experiments in which monodispersed amyloid fibrils were obtained by ultrasonication. PMID:24987794

  3. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  4. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  5. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of the central force model of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresme, Fernando

    2001-10-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of the central force model of water (CFM) [Lemberg and Stillinger, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1677 (1975)] are presented. We consider a model based on a functional form introduced in theoretical studies of associating systems employing integral equations [F. Bresme, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 4505 (1998)]. Results on thermodynamic, dynamic, dielectric, and coexistence properties are presented. The central force model shows satisfactory agreement with the experimental results in all these cases. In addition, nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations show that the CFM predicts a decrease of the thermal conductivity with temperature, as observed in the experiment, but this dependence is reproduced qualitatively at temperatures characteristic of supercooled states. These results emphasize the need for further studies of the heat conduction and properties of water in these conditions. Overall the present potential should provide a basis for further theoretical and simulation studies of complex systems where water is present.

  6. Constant-pH Hybrid Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulation Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2015-08-11

    A computational method is developed to carry out explicit solvent simulations of complex molecular systems under conditions of constant pH. In constant-pH simulations, preidentified ionizable sites are allowed to spontaneously protonate and deprotonate as a function of time in response to the environment and the imposed pH. The method, based on a hybrid scheme originally proposed by H. A. Stern (J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 164112), consists of carrying out short nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (neMD) switching trajectories to generate physically plausible configurations with changed protonation states that are subsequently accepted or rejected according to a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) criterion. To ensure microscopic detailed balance arising from such nonequilibrium switches, the atomic momenta are altered according to the symmetric two-ends momentum reversal prescription. To achieve higher efficiency, the original neMD-MC scheme is separated into two steps, reducing the need for generating a large number of unproductive and costly nonequilibrium trajectories. In the first step, the protonation state of a site is randomly attributed via a Metropolis MC process on the basis of an intrinsic pKa; an attempted nonequilibrium switch is generated only if this change in protonation state is accepted. This hybrid two-step inherent pKa neMD-MC simulation method is tested with single amino acids in solution (Asp, Glu, and His) and then applied to turkey ovomucoid third domain and hen egg-white lysozyme. Because of the simple linear increase in the computational cost relative to the number of titratable sites, the present method is naturally able to treat extremely large systems. PMID:26300709

  7. A localized momentum constraint for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2015-02-21

    A method which controls momentum evolution in a sub-region within a molecular dynamics simulation is derived from Gauss's principle of least constraint. The technique for localization is founded on the equations by Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)] expressed in a weak form according to the control volume (CV) procedure derived by Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. E. 85, 056705 (2012)]. A term for the advection of molecules appears in the derived constraint and is shown to be essential in order to exactly control the time evolution of momentum in the subvolume. The numerical procedure converges the total momentum in the CV to the target value to within machine precision in an iterative manner. The localized momentum constraint can prescribe essentially arbitrary flow fields in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology also forms a rigorous mathematical framework for introducing coupling constraints at the boundary between continuum and discrete systems. This functionality is demonstrated with a boundary-driven flow test case. PMID:25702005

  8. Periodic boundary conditions for long-time nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a generalization of the Kraynik-Reinelt (KR) boundary conditions for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. In the simulation of steady, homogeneous flows with periodic boundary conditions, the simulation box deforms with the flow, and it is possible for image particles to become arbitrarily close, causing a breakdown in the simulation. The KR boundary conditions avoid this problem for planar elongational flow and general planar mixed flow [T. A. Hunt, S. Bernardi, and B. D. Todd, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154116 (2010)] through careful choice of the initial simulation box and by periodically remapping the simulation box in a way that conserves image locations. In this work, the ideas are extended to a large class of three-dimensional flows by using multiple remappings for the simulation box. The simulation box geometry is no longer time-periodic (which was shown to be impossible for uniaxial and biaxial stretching flows in the original work by Kraynik and Reinelt [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 18, 1045 (1992)]. The presented algorithm applies to all flows with nondefective flow matrices, and in particular, to uniaxial and biaxial flows.

  9. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water transport through carbon nanotube membranes at low pressurea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at low pressures (5.0 MPa) typical of real nanofiltration (NF) systems. The CNT membrane is modeled as a simplified NF membrane with smooth surfaces, and uniform straight pores of typical NF pore sizes. A NEMD simulation system is constructed to study the effects of the membrane structure (pores size and membrane thickness) on the pure water transport properties. All simulations are run under operating conditions (temperature and pressure difference) similar to a real NF processes. Simulation results are analyzed to obtain water flux, density, and velocity distributions along both the flow and radial directions. Results show that water flow through a CNT membrane under a pressure difference has the unique transport properties of very fast flow and a non-parabolic radial distribution of velocities which cannot be represented by the Hagen-Poiseuille or Navier-Stokes equations. Density distributions along radial and flow directions show that water molecules in the CNT form layers with an oscillatory density profile, and have a lower average density than in the bulk flow. The NEMD simulations provide direct access to dynamic aspects of water flow through a CNT membrane and give a view of the pressure-driven transport phenomena on a molecular scale.

  10. Plasticity induced by shock waves in nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.

    1998-03-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock waves in single crystals have shown that, above a threshold strength, strongly shocked crystals deform in a very simple way. Rather than experiencing massive deformation, a simple slippage occurs at the shock front, relieving the peak shear stress, and leaving behind a stacking fault. Later calculations quantified the apparent threshold strength, namely the yield strength of the perfect crystal. Subsequently, pulsed x-ray experiments on shocked single crystals showed relative shifts in diffraction peaks, confirming the authors NEMD observations of stacking faults produced by shockwave passage. With the advent of massively parallel computers, the authors have been able to simulate shock waves in 10-million atom crystals with cross sectional dimensions of 100 x 100 fcc unit cells (compared to earlier 6 x 6 systems). They have seen that the increased cross-section allows the system to slip along all of the available {l_brace}111{r_brace} slip planes, in different places along the now non-planar shock front. These simulations conclusively eliminate the worry that the kind of slippage they have observed is somehow an artifact of transverse periodic boundary conditions. Moreover, they have introduced a piston face that is no longer perfectly flat, mimicking a line or surface inhomogeneity in the unshocked material, and show that for weaker shock waves (below the perfect crystal yield strength), stacking faults can be nucleated by preexisting extended defects.

  11. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  12. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of the unstirred layer in the osmotically driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Keito; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Masako

    2015-11-01

    We studied the solvent flows driven by the osmotic pressure difference across the semi-permeable membrane. The flow penetrating from the low concentration side transports away solutes adjacent of the membrane, so that the concentration is reduced significantly only at the vicinity of the membrane. It is expected that the relatively low solute concentration develops into a thin boundary layer in the vicinity of the membrane in the case of absence of external stirring process, which is termed as un-stirred layer (USL). To investigate concentration distribution in USL, we carried out non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The flows driven by th osmotic pressure are idealized as 2 dimensional hard disk model, which is composed of solvent and solute molecules. The membrane is modeled as a medium composed of stationary parallel rods distributed by a spatial interval, which is less than the diameter of the solute molecules. The following results were obtained from the numerical simulation. First, the thickness of USL, which was estimated from the obtained concentration distribution, is on the order of a length determined by mean free path. Second, USL was semicircle the center of which is on the end of pore of membrane.

  13. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  14. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  15. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  16. Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Organic Friction Modifiers Adsorbed on Iron Oxide Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ewen, James P; Gattinoni, Chiara; Morgan, Neal; Spikes, Hugh A; Dini, Daniele

    2016-05-10

    For the successful development and application of lubricants, a full understanding of the nanoscale behavior of complex tribological systems is required, but this is difficult to obtain experimentally. In this study, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations to examine the atomistic structure and friction properties of commercially relevant organic friction modifier (OFM) monolayers adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces and lubricated by a thin, separating layer of hexadecane. Specifically, acid, amide, and glyceride OFMs, with saturated and Z-unsaturated hydrocarbon tail groups, are simulated at various surface coverages and sliding velocities. At low and medium coverage, the OFMs form liquidlike and amorphous monolayers, respectively, which are significantly interdigitated with the hexadecane lubricant, resulting in relatively high friction coefficients. At high coverage, solidlike monolayers are formed for all of the OFMs, which, during sliding, results in slip planes between well-defined OFM and hexadecane layers, yielding a marked reduction in the friction coefficient. When present at equal surface coverage, OFMs with saturated and Z-unsaturated tail groups are found to yield similar structure and friction behavior. OFMs with glyceride head groups yield significantly lower friction coefficients than amide and particularly carboxylic acid head groups. For all of the OFMs and coverages simulated, the friction coefficient is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of sliding velocity; however, the gradient of this increase depends on the coverage. The structure and friction details obtained from these simulations agree well with experimental results and also shed light on the relative tribological performance of these OFMs through nanoscale structural variations. This has important implications in terms of the applicability of NEMD to aid the development of new formulations to control friction. PMID:27064962

  17. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases. PMID:27071540

  18. Thermal Conductivity of GaN Nanotubes Simulated by Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Crocombette, J.-P.; Zu, Xiaotao; Yang, Li; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-15

    Thermal conductivity of GaN nanotubes along the tube axis is investigated over the temperature range of 600K-2300K using homogeneous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. In general, the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is smaller than that for the bulk GaN single crystal. The thermal conductivity is also found to decrease with temperature and increase with increasing wall thickness of the nanotubes. The change of phonon spectrum and surface inelastic scattering may account for the reduction of thermal conductivity in the nanotubes, while thermal softening and high frequency phonon interactions at high temperatures may provide an explanation for its decrease with increasing temperature.

  19. Shear viscosity of a supercooled polymer melt via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnik, F.; Binder, K.

    2002-10-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we compute the shear viscosity, ηs, of a glass forming polymer melt at temperatures ranging from the normal liquid state down to the supercooled state. For this purpose, the polymer melt is confined between two solid walls and a constant force pointing in direction parallel to the walls is applied on each monomer thus giving rise to a Poiseuille flow. It is shown that ηs(T) does not exhibit an Arrhenius-type behavior but can be described both by a power law (mode coupling theory) and by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law. A similar behavior is observed in recent experiments above the glass transition temperature. The diffusion coefficient is computed using the mean square displacements in direction perpendicular to the flow. Combined with the knowledge of ηs(T), it is then shown that the Stokes-Einstein relation is valid at high temperatures, whereas deviations are observed in the supercooled regime in agreement with experiments. Moreover, the local viscosity, η(z), is also computed and its reliability is discussed. Using the sharp rise of η(z) close to the wall, we estimate zwall, the effective position of the wall. It is found that zwall moves towards the film center at lower T thus leading to a decrease of the (hydrodynamic) width of the system. Furthermore, we observe that the curves for η(z)/ηs at various temperatures superimpose if the data are depicted versus z-zwall(T). This suggests that the spatial and temperature dependence of the local viscosity separate if the effective position of the wall is chosen as a new reference plane.

  20. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  1. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of nanojet injection with adaptive-spatial decomposition parallel algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Ho; Yoon, Woong-Sup

    2008-07-01

    An Adaptive-Spatial Decomposition parallel algorithm was developed to increase computation efficiency for molecular dynamics simulations of nano-fluids. Injection of a liquid argon jet with a scale of 17.6 molecular diameters was investigated. A solid annular platinum injector was also solved simultaneously with the liquid injectant by adopting a solid modeling technique which incorporates phantom atoms. The viscous heat was naturally discharged through the solids so the liquid boiling problem was avoided with no separate use of temperature controlling methods. Parametric investigations of injection speed, wall temperature, and injector length were made. A sudden pressure drop at the orifice exit causes flash boiling of the liquid departing the nozzle exit with strong evaporation on the surface of the liquids, while rendering a slender jet. The elevation of the injection speed and the wall temperature causes an activation of the surface evaporation concurrent with reduction in the jet breakup length and the drop size. PMID:19051924

  2. Non-equilibrium dynamics in disordered materials: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Yao, Makoto; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2015-08-17

    The dynamic properties of liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under pressure and highly-charged bromophenol molecule are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). Diffusion properties of covalent liquids under high pressure are very interesting in the sense that they show unexpected pressure dependence. It is found from our simulation that the magnitude relation of diffusion coefficients for boron and oxygen in liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows the anomalous pressure dependence. The simulation clarified the microscopic origin of the anomalous diffusion properties. Our simulation also reveals the dissociation mechanism in the coulomb explosion of the highly-charged bromophenol molecule. When the charge state n is 6, hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl group dissociates at times shorter than 20 fs while all hydrogen atoms dissociate when n is 8. After the hydrogen dissociation, the carbon ring breaks at about 100 fs. There is also a difference on the mechanism of the ring breaking depending on charge states, in which the ring breaks with expanding (n = 6) or shrink (n = 8)

  3. Quantitatively analyzing phonon spectral contribution of thermal conductivity based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. I. From space Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    Probing detailed spectral dependence of phonon transport properties in bulk materials is critical to improve the function and performance of structures and devices in a diverse spectrum of technologies. Currently, such information can only be provided by the phonon spectral energy density (SED) or equivalently, time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) methods in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD), but has not been realized in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) so far. In this paper we generate a scheme directly based on NEMD and lattice dynamics theory, called the time domain direct decomposition method (TDDDM), to predict the phonon mode specific thermal conductivity. Two benchmark cases of Lennard-Jones (LJ) argon and Stillinger-Weber (SW) Si are studied by TDDDM to characterize contributions of individual phonon modes to overall thermal conductivity and the results are compared with that predicted using SED and TDNMA. Similar trends are found for both cases, which indicate that our TDDDM approach captures the major phonon properties in NEMD run. The biggest advantage of TDDDM is that it can be used to investigate the size effect of individual phonon modes in NEMD simulations, which cannot be tackled by SED and TDNMA in EMD simulations currently. We found that the phonon modes with mean free path larger than the system size are truncated in NEMD and contribute little to the overall thermal conductivity. The TDDDM provides direct physical origin for the well-known strong size effects in thermal conductivity prediction by NEMD. Moreover, the well-known common sense of the zero thermal conductivity contribution from the Γ point is rigorously proved by TDDDM. Since TDDDM inherently possesses the nature of both NEMD simulations and lattice dynamics, we anticipate that TDDDM is particularly useful for offering a deep understanding of phonon behaviors in nanostructures or under strong confinement, especially when the

  4. Quantitatively analyzing phonon spectral contribution of thermal conductivity based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. II. From time Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    From a nanoscale heat transfer point of view, currently one of the most interesting and challenging tasks is to quantitatively analyze phonon mode specific transport properties in solid materials, which plays a vital role in many emerging and diverse technological applications. It has not been long that such information can be provided by the phonon spectral energy density (SED) or equivalently time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) methods in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. However, few methods have been developed for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations [Phys. Rev. B 91, 115426 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.115426], the other widely used computational method for calculating thermal transport of materials in addition to EMD. In this work, a computational scheme based on time Fourier transform of atomistic heat current, called the frequency domain direct decomposed method (FDDDM), is proposed to analyze the contributions of frequency dependent thermal conductivity in NEMD simulations. The FDDDM results of Lennard-Jones argon and Stillinger-Weber Si are compared with the TDNMA method from EMD simulation. Similar trends are found for both cases, which confirm the validity of our FDDDM approach. Benefiting from the inherent nature of NEMD and the theoretical formula that does not require any temperature assumption, the FDDDM can be directly used to investigate the size and temperature effect. Moreover, the unique advantage of FDDDM prior to previous methods (such as SED and TDNMA) is that it can be straightforwardly used to characterize the phonon frequency dependent thermal conductivity of disordered systems, such as amorphous materials. The FDDDM approach can also be a good candidate to be used to understand the phonon behaviors and thus provides useful guidance for designing efficient structures for advanced thermal management.

  5. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with a backward-forward trajectories sampling for multidimensional infrared spectroscopy of molecular vibrational modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Taisuke; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2008-02-01

    A full molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach to calculate multidimensional third-order infrared (IR) signals of molecular vibrational modes is proposed. Third-order IR spectroscopy involves three-time intervals between three excitation and one probe pulses. The nonequilibrium MD (NEMD) simulation allows us to calculate molecular dipoles from nonequilibrium MD trajectories for different pulse configurations and sequences. While the conventional NEMD approach utilizes MD trajectories started from the initial equilibrium state, our approach does from the intermediate state of the third-order optical process, which leads to the doorway-window decomposition of nonlinear response functions. The decomposition is made before the second pump excitation for a two-dimensional case of IR photon echo measurement, while it is made after the second pump excitation for a three-dimensional case of three-pulse IR photon echo measurement. We show that the three-dimensional IR signals are efficiently calculated by using the MD trajectories backward and forward in time for the doorway and window functions, respectively. We examined the capability of the present approach by evaluating the signals of two- and three-dimensional IR vibrational spectroscopies for liquid hydrogen fluoride. The calculated signals might be explained by anharmonic Brownian model with the linear-linear and square-linear system-bath couplings which was used to discuss the inhomogeneous broadening and dephasing mechanism of vibrational motions. The predicted intermolecular librational spectra clearly reveal the unusually narrow inhomogeneous linewidth due to the one-dimensional character of HF molecule and the strong hydrogen bond network.

  6. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube—polyamide-6,6 nanocomposites: Reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

    2011-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of composites of carbon nanotubes and polyamide-6,6 has been investigated using reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution. It is found, in line with experiments, that the composites have thermal conductivities, which are only moderately larger than that of pure polyamide. The composite conductivities are orders of magnitude less than what would be expected from naïve additivity arguments. This means that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of isolated nanotubes, which exceed the best-conducting metals, cannot be harnessed for heat transport, when the nanotubes are embedded in a polymer matrix. The main reason is the high interfacial thermal resistance between the nanotubes and the polymer, which was calculated in addition to the total composite thermal conductivity as well as that of the subsystem. It hinders heat to be transferred from the slow-conducting polymer into the fast-conducting nanotubes and back into the polymer. This interpretation is in line with the majority of recent simulation works. An alternative explanation, namely, the damping of the long-wavelength phonons in nanotubes by the polymer matrix is not supported by the present calculations. These modes provide most of the polymers heat conduction. An additional minor effect is caused by the anisotropic structure of the polymer phase induced by the nearby nanotube surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the polymer matrix increases slightly in the direction parallel to the nanotubes, whereas it decreases perpendicular to it.

  7. Anisotropic heat transport in nanoconfined polyamide-6,6 oligomers: atomistic reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Hossein; Mohammadzadeh, Laila; Mehdipour, Nargess

    2012-03-14

    While polymers are known as thermal insulators, recent studies show that stretched single chains of polymers have a very high thermal conductivity. In this work, our new simulation scheme for simulation of heat flow in nanoconfined fluids [H. Eslami, L. Mohammadzadeh, and N. Mehdipour, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064703 (2011)] is employed to study the effect of chain ordering (stretching) on the rate of heat transfer in polyamide-6,6 nanoconfined between graphene surfaces. Our results for the heat flow in the parallel direction (the plane of surfaces) show that the coefficient of thermal conductivity depends on the intersurface distance and is much higher than that of the bulk polymer. A comparison of results in this work with our former findings on the heat flow in the perpendicular direction, with the coefficient of heat conductivity less than the bulk sample, reveal that well-organized polymer layers between the confining surfaces show an anisotropic heat conduction; the heat conduction in the direction parallel to the surfaces is much higher than that in the perpendicular direction. The origin of such anisotropy in nanometric heat flow is shown to be the dramatic anisotropy in chain conformations (chain stretching) beside the confining surfaces. The results indicate that the coefficients of heat conductivity in both directions, normal and parallel to the surfaces, depend on the degree of polymer layering between the surfaces and the pore width. PMID:22423855

  8. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1993-08-01

    Gingold, Lucy, and Monaghan invented a grid-free version of continuum mechanics ``smoothed-particle hydrodynamics,`` in 1977. It is a likely contributor to ``hybrid`` simulations combining atomistic and continuum simulations. We describe applications of this particle-based continuum technique from the closely-related standpoint of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We compare chaotic Lyapunov spectra for atomistic solids and fluids with those which characterize a two-dimensional smoothed-particle fluid system.

  9. The director and molecular dynamics of the field-induced alignment of a Gay-Berne nematic phase: An isothermal-isobaric nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckhurst, Geoffrey R.; Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2010-05-01

    Isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for the generic Gay-Berne (GB) mesogen, GB(4.4, 20.0, 1, 1), to investigate director and molecular rotational motion during the field-induced alignment of a nematic. The alignment process for the director is discussed within the context of a hydrodynamic analysis based on the Ericksen-Leslie theory and this is found to predict the simulated behavior well. The dependence of the relaxation time for the alignment on the field strength is also in good accord with the theory. The rotational viscosity coefficient estimated from the simulation is smaller than that typically observed for real nematics and the possible reasons for this are discussed. However, the simulation results are found to follow not only the theory but also the experiments, at least qualitatively. No significant variation in the local and long-range structure of the nematic phase is found during the field-induced alignment process. In addition, we have explored the molecular dynamics in the nematic phase in the presence of the field using the first- and second-rank time autocorrelation functions. More importantly we are able to show that the director relaxation time is longer than that for molecular rotation. It is also possible to use the two orientational correlation times to explore the relationship between the rotational viscosity coefficient and the rotational diffusion constant. The diffusion constants determined from the orientational correlation times, based on the short-time expansion of the autocorrelation functions, are found to be significantly different. In consequence it is not possible to test, unambiguously, the relationship between the rotational viscosity coefficient and the rotational diffusion constant. However, it would seem that the second-rank rotational correlation time provides the most reliable route to the rotational viscosity coefficient.

  10. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  11. Shear thinning and shear dilatancy of liquid n-hexadecane via equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations: Temperature, pressure, and density effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Chang; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2008-07-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed in both isochoric-isothermal (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensemble systems. Under steady state shearing conditions, thermodynamic states and rheological properties of liquid n-hexadecane molecules have been studied. Between equilibrium and nonequilibrium states, it is important to understand how shear rates (γ˙) affect the thermodynamic state variables of temperature, pressure, and density. At lower shear rates of γ˙<1×1011s-1, the relationships between the thermodynamic variables at nonequilibrium states closely approximate those at equilibrium states, namely, the liquid is very near its Newtonian fluid regime. Conversely, at extreme shear rates of γ˙>1×1011s-1, specific behavior of shear dilatancy is observed in the variations of nonequilibrium thermodynamic states. Significantly, by analyzing the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and density on shear flow system, we report a variety of rheological properties including the shear thinning relationship between viscosity and shear rate, zero-shear-rate viscosity, rotational relaxation time, and critical shear rate. In addition, the flow activation energy and the pressure-viscosity coefficient determined through Arrhenius and Barus equations acceptably agree with the related experimental and MD simulation results.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alder, B.J.

    1985-07-01

    The molecular dynamics computer simulation discovery of the slow decay of the velocity autocorrelation function in fluids is briefly reviewed in order to contrast that long time tail with those observed for the stress autocorrelation function in fluids and the velocity autocorrelation function in the Lorentz gas. For a non-localized particle in the Lorentz gas it is made plausible that even if it behaved quantum mechanically its long time tail would be the same as the classical one. The generalization of Fick's law for diffusion for the Lorentz gas, necessary to avoid divergences due to the slow decay of correlations, is presented. For fluids, that generalization has not yet been established, but the region of validity of generalized hydrodynamics is discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Nonlinearity and slip behavior of n-hexadecane in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Chieh; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2012-03-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is used to investigate the viscoelastic properties of n-hexadecane under oscillatory shear flow. Rheometric simulations of an ultra-thin molecular film are studied and compared with the results of a bulk simulation. Strain amplitude sweep tests at a fixed frequency show that strain thinning (the dynamic modulus monotonically decreases with increasing strain amplitude) exists at extreme strain for both bulk and thin film systems. Fourier analysis is performed to characterize the nonlinear behavior of the viscoelasticity. No even harmonic was found in our study even though wall slip occurs. Furthermore, we show that a Fourier series with odd harmonics can be used to perfectly describe the simulation results by plotting Lissajous loops. Shear wave propagation appears when the frequency is larger than a certain value. Moreover, the molecular orientation and molecular potential energies, including those for bonding potential, intra- and intermolecular van der Waals interactions are plotted against the strain amplitude to examine the changes in the microscopic structures with respect to the macroscopic thermodynamic states.

  14. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited state molecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission.

  15. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated. PMID:24600690

  16. Non-equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of free and tethered DNA molecules in nanochannel shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan M.; Sandberg, William C.

    2007-04-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanical and dynamical behaviour of free and tethered short chains of ss/ds DNA molecules in flow, and in parallel to investigate the properties of long chain molecules in flow fields, we have developed a series of quantum and molecular methods to extend the well developed equilibrium software CHARMM to handle non-equilibrium dynamics. These methods have been applied to cases of DNA molecules in shear flows in nanochannels. Biomolecules, both free and wall-tethered, have been simulated in the all-atom style in solvent-filled nanochannels. The new methods were demonstrated by carrying out NEMD simulations of free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules of 21 bases as well as double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules of 21 base pairs tethered on gold surfaces in an ionic water shear flow. The tethering of the linker molecule (6-mercapto-1-hexanol) to perfect Au(111) surfaces was parametrized based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Force field parameters were incorporated into the CHARMM database. Gold surfaces are simulated in a Lennard-Jones style model that was fitted to the Morse potential model of bulk gold. The bonding force of attachment of the DNA molecules to the gold substrate linker molecule was computed to be up to a few nN when the DNA molecules are fully stretched at high shear rates. For the first time, we calculated the relaxation time of DNA molecules in picoseconds (ps) and the hydrodynamic force up to a few nanoNewtons (nN) per base pair in a nanochannel flow. The velocity profiles in the solvent due to the presence of the tethered DNA molecules were found to be nonlinear only at high shear flow rates. Free ssDNA molecules in a shear flow were observed to behave differently from each other depending upon their initial orientation in the flow field. Both free and tethered DNA molecules are clearly observed to be stretching, rotating and relaxing. Methods developed in this initial work can be incorporated

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shock Induced Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Min

    2004-07-01

    This research focuses on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of shock induced detonation in Fe2O3+Al thermite mixtures. A MD model is developed to simulate non-equilibrium stress-induced reactions. The focus is on establishing a criterion for reaction initiation, energy content and rate of energy release as functions of mixture and reinforcement characteristics. A cluster functional potential is proposed for this purpose. The potential uses the electronegativity equalization to account for changes in the charge of different species according to local environment. Parameters in the potential are derived to fit to the properties of Fe, Al, Fe2O3, and Al2O3. NPT MD simulations are carried out to qualitatively check the energetics of the forward (Fe2O3+Al) as well as backward (Al2O3+Fe) thermite reactions. The results show that the potential can account for the energetics of thermite reactions.

  18. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bjorgaard, J A; Velizhanin, K A; Tretiak, S

    2016-04-21

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited statemolecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited statemolecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission. PMID:27389206

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular potentials and a few models of intermolecular interaction in liquid benzene are tested by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ 12-6) potential is too hard, which yields incorrect results. The exp-6 potential with a too hard repulsive term is also often used. Therefore, we took an expa-6 potential with a small Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This allows to modify the curvature of the potential. The MD simulations are carried out in the temperature range 280-352 K under normal pressure and at experimental density. The Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light is used for comparison. The results of MD simulations are comparable with the experimental values.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been undertaken in this work to explore structures and properties of polyethylene (PE), polyisobutylene (PIB), atactic polypropylene (aPP) and atactic polystyrene (aPS). This work has not only demonstrated the reliability of MD simulations by comparing results with available experiments, but more importantly has revealed structure-property relationships on a molecular level for these selected polymers. Structures of these amorphous polymers were characterized by radial distribution functions (RDFs) or scattering profiles, and properties of the polymers studied were pressure-volume -temperature (PVT) equation of state, enthalpy, cohesive energy, the diffusion coefficient of methane in the polymer, and glass transition temperature. Good agreement was found for these structures and properties between simulation and experiment. More importantly, the scientific understanding of structure-property relationships was established on a molecular level. In the order of aPP (PE), PIB and aPS, with the chain surface separation or free volume decreasing, the density increases and the diffusion coefficient decreases. Therefore, the effects of changes or modifications in the chemical structure of monomer molecules (substituting pendent hydrogen with methyl or phenyl) on polymeric materials performance were attributed to the effects of molecular chain structure on packing structure, which, in turn, affects the properties of these polymers. Local chain dynamics and relaxation have been studied for bulk PE and aPS. Cooperative transitions occur at second-neighbor bonds for PE, and first-neighbor bonds for aPS due to the role of side groups. The activation energy is a single torsional barrier for overall conformational transitions, and is single torsional barrier plus locally "trapped" barrier for relaxation. Temperature dependence is Arrhenius for transition time, and is WLF for relaxation time. The mean correlation times derived from

  1. Reduced thermal conductivity of a nanoparticle decorated nanowire: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnoon, Ahmed Shafkat; Bipasha, Ferdaushi Alam; Morshed, A. K. M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of nanoparticles decoration on the thermal conductivity of a nanowire is studied using Non Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulation. The simulation was conducted using simplified molecular model with Lennard-Jones potential. Argon-like solid was used as the material for both the nanowire and nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were placed on the surface of the nanowire and also embedded inside the structure. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was conducted by imposing temperature gradient along the length of the nanowire and thermal conductivity of the nanowire was calculated. Nanowire without any nanoparticles was used as the baseline data. Due to presence of nanoparticles thermal conductivity of the nanowire was observed to decrease and up to 40% reduction in thermal conductivity was observed. With the increase in number of the nanoparticles, thermal conductivity was observed to decrease; however size of nanoparticles has little effect.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  3. Computer simulation of nonequilibrium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, D.C.

    1985-07-01

    The underlying concepts of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, and of irreversible thermodynamics, will be described. The question at hand is then, how are these concepts to be realize in computer simulations of many-particle systems. The answer will be given for dissipative deformation processes in solids, on three hierarchical levels: heterogeneous plastic flow, dislocation dynamics, an molecular dynamics. Aplication to the shock process will be discussed.

  4. Symmetry-adapted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of chiral carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Amin; Dayal, Kaushik

    2011-06-01

    We report on non-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations of chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes using the framework of Objective Structures. This enables us to adapt molecular dynamics to the symmetry of chiral nanotubes and efficiently simulate these systems with small unit cells. We outline the method and the adaptation of a conventional thermostat and barostat to this setting. We then apply the method in order to examine the behavior of nanotubes with various chiralities subject to a constant extensional strain rate. We examine the effects of temperature, strain rate, and pre-compression/pre-tension. We find a range of failure mechanisms, including the formation of Stone-Wales defects, the opening of voids, and the motion of atoms out of the cross-section.

  5. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material. PMID:26262672

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of large macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Perilla, Juan R.; Goh, Boon Chong; Cassidy, C. Keith; Liu, Bo; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Rudack, Till; Yu, Hang; Wu, Zhe; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Connecting dynamics to structural data from diverse experimental sources, molecular dynamics simulations permit the exploration of biological phenomena in unparalleled detail. Advances in simulations are moving the atomic resolution descriptions of biological systems into the million-to-billion atom regime, in which numerous cell functions reside. In this opinion, we review the progress, driven by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, in the study of viruses, ribosomes, bioenergetic systems, and other diverse applications. These examples highlight the utility of molecular dynamics simulations in the critical task of relating atomic detail to the function of supramolecular complexes, a task that cannot be achieved by smaller-scale simulations or existing experimental approaches alone. PMID:25845770

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular polymer rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Djohari, Hadrian; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2010-11-01

    Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the equilibrium and rheological properties of dilute and semidilute solutions of head-to-tail associating polymers. In our simulation model, a spontaneous complementary reversible association between the donor and the acceptor groups at the ends of oligomers was achieved by introducing a combination of truncated pseudo-Coulombic attractive potential and Lennard Jones repulsive potential between donor, acceptor, and neighboring groups. We have calculated the equilibrium properties of supramolecular polymers, such as the ring/chain equilibrium, average molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution of self-assembled chains and rings, which all agree well with previous analytical and computer modeling results. We have investigated shear thinning of solutions of 8- and 20-bead associating oligomers with different association energies at different temperatures and oligomer volume fractions. All reduced viscosity data for a given oligomer length can be collapsed into one master curve, exhibiting two power-law regions of shear-thinning behavior with an exponent of -0.55 at intermediate ranges of the reduced shear rate β and -0.8 (or -0.9) at larger shear rates. The equilibrium viscosity of supramolecular solutions with different oligomer lengths and associating energies is found to obey a power-law scaling dependence on oligomer volume fraction with an exponent of 1.5, in agreement with the experimental observations for several dilute or semidilute solutions of supramolecular polymers. This implies that dilute and semidilute supramolecular polymer solutions exhibit high polydispersity but may not be sufficiently entangled to follow the reptation mechanism of relaxation.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed.

  10. The "Collisions Cube" Molecular Dynamics Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John J.; Smith, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a molecular dynamics simulator that employs ping-pong balls as the atoms or molecules and is suitable for either large lecture halls or small classrooms. Discusses its use in illustrating many of the fundamental concepts related to molecular motion and dynamics and providing a three-dimensional perspective of molecular motion. (JRH)

  11. Optimizing Water Transport through Graphene-Based Membranes: Insights from Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Jordan; Jaeger, Frederike; Matar, Omar K; Müller, Erich A

    2016-05-18

    Recent experimental results suggest that stacked layers of graphene oxide exhibit strong selective permeability to water. To construe this observation, the transport mechanism of water permeating through a membrane consisting of layered graphene sheets is investigated via nonequilibrium and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of sheet geometry is studied by changing the offset between the entrance and exit slits of the membrane. The simulation results reveal that the permeability is not solely dominated by entrance effects; the path traversed by water molecules has a considerable impact on the permeability. We show that contrary to speculation in the literature, water molecules do not pass through the membrane as a hydrogen-bonded chain; instead, they form well-mixed fluid regions confined between the graphene sheets. The results of the present work are used to provide guidelines for the development of graphene and graphene oxide membranes for desalination and solvent separation. PMID:27121070

  12. Disorder-driven nonequilibrium melting studied by electron diffraction, brillouis scattering, and molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, P. R.; Lam, N. Q.; Grimsditch, M.

    1999-12-21

    In the present paper, a brief overview of the electron diffraction, Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics studies of radiation-induced amorphization of ordered intermetallic compounds is presented. In these studies, measured changes in the velocity of surface acoustic phonons, lattice constant, and the Bragg-Williams long-range order parameter induced by irradiation were compared with the results of computer simulations of defect-induced amorphization. The results indicate that progressive chemical disordering of the superlattice structure during irradiation is accompanied by an expansion of the lattice and a large change in sound velocity corresponding to a {approximately} 50% decrease in the average shear modulus. The onset of amorphization occurs when the average shear modulus of the crystalline compound becomes equal to that of the amorphous phase. This elastic softening criterion for the onset of amorphization and the dependence of the average shear modulus on the long-range-order parameter are in excellent agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. Both the experimental observations and computer simulations confirm the predictions of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion which stipulates that thermodynamic melting of a defective crystal occurs when the sum of the dynamic and static mean-square atomic displacements reaches a critical value identical to that for melting of the defect-free crystal. In this broader view of melting, the crystal-to-glass transformation is a disorder-driven nonequilibrium melting process occurring at temperatures below the Kauzmann isentropic glass-transition temperature.

  13. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies. PMID:24073784

  14. ADAPTIVE MULTILEVEL SPLITTING IN MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS*

    PubMed Central

    Aristoff, David; Lelièvre, Tony; Mayne, Christopher G.; Teo, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive Multilevel Splitting (AMS) is a replica-based rare event sampling method that has been used successfully in high-dimensional stochastic simulations to identify trajectories across a high potential barrier separating one metastable state from another, and to estimate the probability of observing such a trajectory. An attractive feature of AMS is that, in the limit of a large number of replicas, it remains valid regardless of the choice of reaction coordinate used to characterize the trajectories. Previous studies have shown AMS to be accurate in Monte Carlo simulations. In this study, we extend the application of AMS to molecular dynamics simulations and demonstrate its effectiveness using a simple test system. Our conclusion paves the way for useful applications, such as molecular dynamics calculations of the characteristic time of drug dissociation from a protein target. PMID:26005670

  15. Nanoindentation of Zr by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu (芦子哲), Zizhe; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation are used to study the deformation behaviors of single crystal Zr for four different surface orientations. The comparison of results for two different potentials, an embedded atom method potential and a charged optimized many body potential, reveals the influence of stable and unstable stacking fault energy on dislocation behaviors under nanoindentation. The load-displacement curve, hardness and deformation behaviors of the various surface orientations Zr are compared and the elastic and plastic deformation behaviors are analyzed.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of ice XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Cummings, Peter T.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the newly discovered metastable ice XII. This new crystalline ice phase [C. Lobban, J.L. Finney, W.F. Kuhs, Nature (London) 391 (1998) 268] is proton-disordered. Thus 90 possible configurations of the unit cell can be constructed which differ only in the orientations of the water molecules. The simulation used the TIP4P potential model for water at constant temperature and density. About one-quarter of the initial configurations did not melt in the course of the simulation. This result is supportive of the experimental structure and also demonstrates the ability of this water model to study ice phases.

  17. Novel procedure for thermal equilibration in molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco T; Grant, Barry J; Teodoro, Miguel L; Melton, Julia; Cieplak, Piotr; Phillips, George N; Stec, Boguslaw

    2009-04-01

    We describe a simple novel procedure for achieving thermal equilibration between a protein and a surrounding solvent during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The method uniquely defines the length of simulation time required to achieve thermal equilibrium over a broad range of parameters, thus removing ambiguities associated with the traditional heuristic approaches. The proposed protocol saves simulation time and avoids bias introduced by the inclusion of non-equilibrium events. The key element of the procedure involves coupling only the solvent atoms to a standard heat bath. Measuring progress towards thermal equilibration involves simply monitoring the difference in temperature between the solvent and the protein. Here, we report that the results of MD simulations using the above procedure are measurably improved relative to the traditional approaches in terms of root-mean-square deviations and principal components analysis both indicating significantly less undesirable divergence. PMID:25125797

  18. Novel procedure for thermal equilibration in molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Marco T.; Grant, Barry J.; Teodoro, Miguel L.; Melton, Julia; Cieplak, Piotr; Phillips, George N.; Stec, Boguslaw

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple novel procedure for achieving thermal equilibration between a protein and a surrounding solvent during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The method uniquely defines the length of simulation time required to achieve thermal equilibrium over a broad range of parameters, thus removing ambiguities associated with the traditional heuristic approaches. The proposed protocol saves simulation time and avoids bias introduced by the inclusion of non-equilibrium events. The key element of the procedure involves coupling only the solvent atoms to a standard heat bath. Measuring progress towards thermal equilibration involves simply monitoring the difference in temperature between the solvent and the protein. Here, we report that the results of MD simulations using the above procedure are measurably improved relative to the traditional approaches in terms of root-mean-square deviations and principal components analysis both indicating significantly less undesirable divergence. PMID:25125797

  19. Molecular dynamics study of CO2 hydrate dissociation: Fluctuation-dissipation and non-equilibrium analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Clarke, Elaine T.

    2013-09-01

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate thermal-driven break-up of planar CO2 hydrate interfaces in liquid water at 300-320 K. Different guest compositions, at 85%, 95%, and 100% of maximum theoretical occupation, led to statistically-significant differences in the observed initial dissociation rates. The melting temperatures of each interface were estimated, and dissociation rates were observed to be strongly dependent on temperature, with higher dissociation rates at larger over-temperatures vis-à-vis melting. A simple coupled mass and heat transfer model developed previously was applied to fit the observed dissociation profiles, and this helps to identify clearly two distinct régimes of break-up; a second well-defined region is essentially independent of composition and temperature, in which the remaining nanoscale, de facto two-dimensional system's lattice framework is intrinsically unstable. From equilibrium MD of the two-phase systems at their melting point, the relaxation times of the auto-correlation functions of fluctuations in number of enclathrated guest molecules were used as a basis for comparison of the variation in the underlying, non-equilibrium, thermal-driven dissociation rates via Onsager's hypothesis, and statistically significant differences were found, confirming the value of a fluctuation-dissipation approach in this case.

  20. Thermostability of Enzymes from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zeiske, Tim; Stafford, Kate A; Palmer, Arthur G

    2016-06-14

    Thermodynamic stability is a central requirement for protein function, and one goal of protein engineering is improvement of stability, particularly for applications in biotechnology. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are used to predict in vitro thermostability of members of the bacterial ribonuclease HI (RNase H) family of endonucleases. The temperature dependence of the generalized order parameter, S, for four RNase H homologues, from psychrotrophic, mesophilic, and thermophilic organisms, is highly correlated with experimentally determined melting temperatures and with calculated free energies of folding at the midpoint temperature of the simulations. This study provides an approach for in silico mutational screens to improve thermostability of biologically and industrially relevant enzymes. PMID:27123810

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  2. Shockwave-induced plasticity via large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.

    1998-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of shock waves in single crystals have shown that, above a threshold strength, strongly shocked crystals deform in a very simple way. Rather than experiencing massive deformation, a simple slippage occurs at the shock front, relieving the peak shear stress, and leaving behind a stacking fault. Later calculations quantified the apparent threshold strength, namely the yield strength of the perfect crystal. Subsequently, pulsed x-ray experiments on shocked single crystals showed relative shifts in diffraction peaks, confirming our MD observations of stacking faults produced by shockwave passage. With the advent of massively parallel computers, we have been able to simulate shock waves in 10-million atom crystals with cross-sectional dimensions of 100{times}100 fcc unit cells (compared to earlier 6{times}6 systems). We have seen that the increased cross-section allows the system to slip along all of the available {l_brace}111{r_brace} slip planes, in different places along the now non-planar shock front. These simulations conclusively eliminate the worry that the kind of slippage we have observed is somehow an artifact of transverse periodic boundary conditions. Thus, future simulations are much more likely to show that weak-shock plasticity is nucleated by pre-existing extended defects embedded in the sample. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  4. Polymer Brushes under Shear: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Compared to Experiments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjesh K; Ilg, Patrick; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Kröger, Martin; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2015-04-28

    Surfaces coated with polymer brushes in a good solvent are known to exhibit excellent tribological properties. We have performed coarse-grained equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate dextran polymer brushes in an aqueous environment in molecular detail. In a first step, we determined simulation parameters and units by matching experimental results for a single dextran chain. Analyzing this model when applied to a multichain system, density profiles of end-tethered polymer brushes obtained from equilibrium MD simulations compare very well with expectations based on self-consistent field theory. Simulation results were further validated against and correlated with available experimental results. The simulated compression curves (normal force as a function of surface separation) compare successfully with results obtained with a surface forces apparatus. Shear stress (friction) obtained via nonequilibrium MD is contrasted with nanoscale friction studies employing colloidal-probe lateral force microscopy. We find good agreement in the hydrodynamic regime and explain the observed leveling-off of the friction forces in the boundary regime by means of an effective polymer-wall attraction. PMID:25830715

  5. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  6. Molecular-dynamics simulations of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.

    2001-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of nanometer-sized lead clusters have been performed using the Lim-Ong-Ercolessi glue potential [Surf. Sci. 269/270, 1109 (1992)]. The binding energies of clusters forming crystalline (fcc), decahedron and icosahedron structures are compared, showing that fcc cuboctahedra are the most energetically favored of these polyhedral model structures. However, simulations of the freezing of liquid droplets produced a characteristic form of surface-reconstructed ``shaved'' icosahedron, in which atoms are absent at the edges and apexes of the polyhedron. This arrangement is energetically favored for 600-4000 atom clusters. Larger clusters favor crystalline structures. Indeed, simulated freezing of a 6525-atom liquid droplet produced an imperfect fcc Wulff particle, containing a number of parallel stacking faults. The effects of temperature on the preferred structure of crystalline clusters below the melting point have been considered. The implications of these results for the interpretation of experimental data is discussed.

  7. Generalized Langevin equation: An efficient approach to nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, L.; Lorenz, C. D.; Kantorovich, L.

    2014-04-01

    The generalized Langevin equation (GLE) has been recently suggested to simulate the time evolution of classical solid and molecular systems when considering general nonequilibrium processes. In this approach, a part of the whole system (an open system), which interacts and exchanges energy with its dissipative environment, is studied. Because the GLE is derived by projecting out exactly the harmonic environment, the coupling to it is realistic, while the equations of motion are non-Markovian. Although the GLE formalism has already found promising applications, e.g., in nanotribology and as a powerful thermostat for equilibration in classical molecular dynamics simulations, efficient algorithms to solve the GLE for realistic memory kernels are highly nontrivial, especially if the memory kernels decay nonexponentially. This is due to the fact that one has to generate a colored noise and take account of the memory effects in a consistent manner. In this paper, we present a simple, yet efficient, algorithm for solving the GLE for practical memory kernels and we demonstrate its capability for the exactly solvable case of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a Debye bath.

  8. Effects of vacancy defects on thermal conductivity in crystalline silicon: A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongjin; Lee, Sangheon; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2011-03-01

    We examine the effects of vacancy defects on thermal conductivity in bulk crystalline silicon (c-Si) using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. While most vacancies are thought to remain in the form of clusters in bulk c-Si, recent theoretical studies have predicted that small vacancy clusters energetically prefer to be fourfold coordinated by nullifying dangling bonds. Hence, in this work, we consider three different-sized fourfold vacancy clusters, tetra- (V4), hexa- (V6), and dodeca-vacancy (V12), with particular interest in studying how phonon transport is affected by vacancy concentration and cluster size in association with fourfold coordination-induced lattice distortions. Our simulations show that thermal conductivity (κ) rapidly drops with vacancy concentration (nv) with an inverse power-law relation (κ∝nv-α, with α ≈ 0.7-1.1 depending on cluster size); the presence of 1.5% vacancies leads to a 95% reduction in κ as compared to the defect free c-Si. When nv is low (<1%), the reduction of κ with nv appears to be a function of cluster size, and the size effect becomes unimportant as nv increases above 1%. We discuss the correlation between phone scattering and cluster size, based on the relative rates of phonon-vacancy scattering associated with defect-induced strain fields. We also estimate the dependence of phonon mean free path on vacancy concentration and cluster size.

  9. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study of the rheology of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.A.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D. |

    1996-05-01

    We examine the rheological properties of four different alkanes: n-decane, n-hexadecane, n-tetracosane, and squalane. Simulations of Couette flow are performed for a range of shear rates with 100 molecules in each case using a replicated data version of our code. Number of interaction sites ranges from 1000 to 3000. We have performed extremely long simulations required to obtain acceptable statistics at low shear rates. The alkanes show a transition from non-Newtonian to Newtonian behavior as the shear rate decreases to low values. 1 tab, 1 fig, 17 refs.

  10. Ionic conductivity in Gd-doped CeO2: Ab initio color-diffusion nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Johan O.; Vekilova, Olga Yu.; Hellman, Olle; Klarbring, Johan; Simak, Sergei I.; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2016-01-01

    A first-principles nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) study employing the color-diffusion algorithm has been conducted to obtain the bulk ionic conductivity and the diffusion constant of gadolinium-doped cerium oxide (GDC) in the 850-1150 K temperature range. Being a slow process, ionic diffusion in solids usually requires simulation times that are prohibitively long for ab initio equilibrium molecular dynamics. The use of the color-diffusion algorithm allowed us to substantially speed up the oxygen-ion diffusion. The key parameters of the method, such as field direction and strength as well as color-charge distribution, have been investigated and their optimized values for the considered system have been determined. The calculated ionic conductivity and diffusion constants are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.; Nicolai, Adrien

    2013-01-01

    We use quantum mechanical calculations to develop a full set of force field parameters in order to perform molecular dynamics simulations to understand and optimize the molecular storage properties inside Graphene Oxide Frameworks (GOFs). A set of boron-related parameters for commonly used empirical force fields is determined to describe the non-bonded and bonded interactions between linear boronic acid linkers and graphene sheets of GOF materials. The transferability of the parameters is discussed and their validity is quantified by comparing quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical structural and vibrational properties. The application of the model to the dynamics of water inside the GOFs reveals significant variations in structural flexibility of GOF depending on the linker density, which is shown to be usable as a tuning parameter for desired diffusion properties.

  12. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chengyuan; Grest, Gary; Cheng, Shengfeng

    2015-03-01

    The evaporation of water from the liquid/vapor interface is studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for systems of more than a million atoms at 550K and 600K. The TIP4P-2005 water model whose liquid/vapor surface tension is in excellent agreement with experiments is used. Evaporative cooling at the interface is observed from temperature profiles determined from both translational and rotational kinetic energy. During evaporation, the density of water is slightly enhanced near the liquid-vapor interface. The velocity distribution of water molecules in the vapor phase during evaporation at various distances relative to the interface fit a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. While our results indicate an imbalance between evaporating and condensing water molecules, local thermal equilibrium is found to hold in addition to mechanical equilibrium. Department of Physics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of weak detonations.

    PubMed

    Am-Shallem, Morag; Zeiri, Yehuda; Zybin, Sergey V; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2011-12-01

    Detonation of a three-dimensional reactive nonisotropic molecular crystal is modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. The detonation process is initiated by an impulse, followed by the creation of a stable fast reactive shock wave. The terminal shock velocity is independent of the initiation conditions. Further analysis shows supersonic propagation decoupled from the dynamics of the decomposed material left behind the shock front. The dependence of the shock velocity on crystal nonlinear compressibility resembles solitary behavior. These properties categorize the phenomena as a weak detonation. The dependence of the detonation wave on microscopic potential parameters was investigated. An increase in detonation velocity with the reaction exothermicity reaching a saturation value is observed. In all other respects the model crystal exhibits typical properties of a molecular crystal. PMID:22304055

  15. Nonlinear rheological behavior associated with structural transitions in block copolymer solutions via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rychkov, Igor; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2004-02-15

    The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulation method was used to study microsegregated block copolymer systems in a selective solvent under a shear flow field. Two polymer concentrations were considered, 0.3 and 0.4, corresponding to the body centered cubic spherical and hexagonal cylindrical zero-shear phases, respectively. As the shear rate increased, both systems exhibited two-stage shear thinning, a peak in the scalar pressure, and normal stress differences. Microscopic connections were investigated by calculating the gyration and bond orientation tensors and the interaction energies per particle. At high shear rates, polymer chains elongate and orient along the direction of shear, and this is accompanied by the breaking-up of domains. The structure-rheology relation was discussed with regard to the morphological changes reported in our last study for the same systems. In particular, the structurally relevant critical values of the shear rate were found to delimit different behaviors of the shear rate-dependencies obtained in this work. PMID:15268506

  16. Investigation of tensile response and thermal conductivity of boron-nitride nanosheets using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Rémond, Yves

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we employed classical molecular dynamics simulations using the Tersoff potential for the evaluation of thermal conductivity and tensile response of single-layer boron-nitride sheets (SBNS). By carrying out uniaxial tension simulations, the elastic moduli of SBNS structures are predicted to be close to those of boron-nitride nanotubes in a range between 0.8 and 0.85 TPa for different chirality directions. Performing non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal conductivity of SBNS is predicted to be around 80 W/m-K, which is shown to be independent of chirality directions.

  17. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of the shock-induced chemistry of phenylacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Cawkwell, M. J. Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.

    2015-02-14

    The initial chemical events that occur during the shock compression of liquid phenylacetylene have been investigated using self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism enabled us to compute microcanonical trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy. Our simulations revealed that the first density-increasing step under shock compression arises from the polymerization of phenylacetylene molecules at the acetylene moiety. The application of electronic structure-based molecular dynamics with long-term conservation of the total energy enabled us to identify electronic signatures of reactivity via monitoring changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, and to capture directly adiabatic shock heating, transient non-equilibrium states, and changes in temperature arising from exothermic chemistry in classical molecular dynamics trajectories.

  18. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  19. Local Refinements in Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackeldey, Konstantin; Weber, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Quantum mechanics provide a detailed description of the physical and chemical behavior of molecules. However, with increasing size of the system the complexity rises exponentially, which is prohibitive for efficient dynamical simulation. In contrast, classical molecular dynamics procure a coarser description by using less degrees of freedom. Thus, it seems natural to seek for an adequate trade-off between accurateness and computational feasibility in the simulation of molecules. Here, we propose a novel method, which combines classical molecular simulations with quantum mechanics for molecular systems. For this we decompose the state space of the respective molecule into subsets, by employing a meshfree partition of unity. We show, that this partition allows us to localize an empirical force field and to run locally constrained classical trajectories. Within each subset, we compute the energy on the quantum level for a fixed number of spatial states (ab initio points). With these energy values from the ab initio points we have a local scattered data problem, which can be solved by the moving least squares method.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2006-05-01

    A previously proposed model for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of liquid sulfur dioxide, SO(2), has been reviewed. Thermodynamic, structural, and dynamical properties were calculated for a large range of thermodynamic states. Predicted (P,V,T) of simulated system agrees with an elaborated equation of state recently proposed for liquid SO(2). Calculated heat capacity, expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility are also in good agreement with experimental data. Calculated equilibrium structure agrees with X-ray and neutron scattering measurements on liquid SO(2). The model also predicts the same (SO(2))(2) dimer structure as previously determined by ab initio calculations. Detailed analysis of equilibrium structure of liquid SO(2) is provided, indicating that, despite the rather large dipole moment of the SO(2) molecule, the structure is mainly determined by the Lennard-Jones interactions. Both single-particle and collective dynamics are investigated. Temperature dependency of dynamical properties is given. The MD results are compared with previous findings obtained from the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering spectra of liquid SO(2), including wave-vector dependent structural relaxation, tau(k), and viscosity, eta(k). PMID:16640437

  1. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins under asymmetric ionic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Khalili-Araghi, Fatemeh; Ziervogel, Brigitte; Gumbart, James C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational method is developed to allow molecular dynamics simulations of biomembrane systems under realistic ionic gradients and asymmetric salt concentrations while maintaining the conventional periodic boundary conditions required to minimize finite-size effects in an all-atom explicit solvent representation. The method, which consists of introducing a nonperiodic energy step acting on the ionic species at the edge of the simulation cell, is first tested with illustrative applications to a simple membrane slab model and a phospholipid membrane bilayer. The nonperiodic energy-step method is then used to calculate the reversal potential of the bacterial porin OmpF, a large cation-specific β-barrel channel, by simulating the I-V curve under an asymmetric 10:1 KCl concentration gradient. The calculated reversal potential of 28.6 mV is found to be in excellent agreement with the values of 26–27 mV measured from lipid bilayer experiments, thereby demonstrating that the method allows realistic simulations of nonequilibrium membrane transport with quantitative accuracy. As a final example, the pore domain of Kv1.2, a highly selective voltage-activated K+ channel, is simulated in a lipid bilayer under conditions that recreate, for the first time, the physiological K+ and Na+ concentration gradients and the electrostatic potential difference of living cells. PMID:24081985

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  4. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations of multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dawei; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Bellaiche, L

    2012-08-10

    A first-principles-based approach is developed to simulate dynamical properties, including complex permittivity and permeability in the GHz-THz range, of multiferroics at finite temperatures. It includes both structural degrees of freedom and magnetic moments as dynamic variables in Newtonian and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations within molecular dynamics, respectively, with the couplings between these variables being incorporated. The use of a damping coefficient and of the fluctuation field in the LLG equations is required to obtain equilibrated magnetic properties at any temperature. No electromagnon is found in the spin-canted structure of BiFeO3. On the other hand, two magnons with very different frequencies are predicted via the use of this method. The smallest-in-frequency magnon corresponds to oscillations of the weak ferromagnetic vector in the basal plane being perpendicular to the polarization while the second magnon corresponds to magnetic dipoles going in and out of this basal plane. The large value of the frequency of this second magnon is caused by static couplings between magnetic dipoles with electric dipoles and oxygen octahedra tiltings. PMID:23006300

  5. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dawei; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Bellaiche, L.

    2012-08-01

    A first-principles-based approach is developed to simulate dynamical properties, including complex permittivity and permeability in the GHz-THz range, of multiferroics at finite temperatures. It includes both structural degrees of freedom and magnetic moments as dynamic variables in Newtonian and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations within molecular dynamics, respectively, with the couplings between these variables being incorporated. The use of a damping coefficient and of the fluctuation field in the LLG equations is required to obtain equilibrated magnetic properties at any temperature. No electromagnon is found in the spin-canted structure of BiFeO3. On the other hand, two magnons with very different frequencies are predicted via the use of this method. The smallest-in-frequency magnon corresponds to oscillations of the weak ferromagnetic vector in the basal plane being perpendicular to the polarization while the second magnon corresponds to magnetic dipoles going in and out of this basal plane. The large value of the frequency of this second magnon is caused by static couplings between magnetic dipoles with electric dipoles and oxygen octahedra tiltings.

  6. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion. PMID:27431975

  7. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Disordered Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2004-02-27

    The melting of zircon and the amorphous state produced by quenching from the melt were simulated by molecular dynamics using a new partial charge model combined with the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential. The model has been established for the description of the crystalline and aperiodic structures of zircon in order to be used for the simulation of displacement cascades. It provides an excellent fit to the structure, and accounts with convenient precision the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of zircon. The calculated melting temperature is about 2100 K. The activation energy for self-diffusion of ions in the liquid state was determined to be 190-200 kJ/mole. Melt quenching was employed to produce two different disordered states with distinct densities and structures. In the high density disordered state, the zircon structure is intact but the bond angle distributions are broader, 4% of the Si units are polymerized, and the volume swelling is about 8%. In the low density amorphous state, the Zr and Si coordination numbers are lower, and the Zr-O and Si-O bond lengths are shorter than corresponding values for the crystal. In addition, a highly polymerized Si network, with average connectivity of two, is observed in the low density amorphous state. These features have all been experimentally observed in natural metamict zircon. The present findings, when considered in light of experimental radiation effects studies, suggest that the swelling in zircon arises initially from disorder in the zircon crystal, and at high doses the disordered crystal is unable to accommodate the volume expansion and transforms to the amorphous state.

  9. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted using an assembly consisting of 105 indomethacin (IMC) molecules and 12 water molecules to investigate the underlying dynamic (e.g., rotational and translational diffusivities and conformation relaxation rates) and structural properties (e.g., conformation, hydrogen-bonding distributions, and interactions of water with IMC) of amorphous IMC. These properties may be important in predicting physical stability of this metastable material. The IMC model was constructed using X-ray diffraction data with the force-field parameters mostly assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03 and atomic charges calculated with the B3LYP/ccpVTZ30, IEFPCM, and RESP models. The assemblies were initially equilibrated in their molten state and cooled through the glass transition temperature to form amorphous solids. Constant temperature dynamic runs were then carried out above and below the T(g) (i.e., at 600 K (10 ns), 400 K (350 ns), and 298 K (240 ns)). The density (1.312 ± 0.003 g/cm(3)) of the simulated amorphous solid at 298 K was close to the experimental value (1.32 g/cm(3)) while the estimated T(g) (384 K) was ~64 degrees higher than the experimental value (320 K) due to the faster cooling rate. Due to the hindered rotation of its amide bond, IMC can exist in different diastereomeric states. Different IMC conformations were sufficiently sampled in the IMC melt or vapor, but transitions occurred rarely in the glass. The hydrogen-bonding patterns in amorphous IMC are more complex in the amorphous state than in the crystalline polymorphs. Carboxylic dimers that are dominant in α- and γ-crystals were found to occur at a much lower probability in the simulated IMC glasses while hydrogen-bonded IMC chains were more easily identified patterns in the simulated amorphous solids. To determine molecular diffusivity, a novel analytical method is proposed to deal with the non-Einsteinian behavior, in which the temporal

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermal Induced Chemistry in TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenneville, Jason; Germann, Timothy

    2006-03-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of high explosives can provide important information on their thermal decomposition by helping to characterize processes with timescales that are much longer than those attainable with non-equilibrium MD shock studies. A reactive force field is used with MD to probe the chemisty induced by intense heating (`cook-off') of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). The force field (ReaxFF) was developed by van Duin, Goddard and coworkers^ at CalTech and has already shown promise in predicting the chemistry in small samples of RDX under either shock compression or intense heat. Large-system simulations are desired for TATB because of the high degree of carbon clustering expected in this material. We will show results of 100,000-particle simulations at several temperatures, carried out with the massively parallel GRASP MD software developed at Sandia National Lab. Finally, we will compare the reactions and reaction timescales with those of RDX and HMX. ^ A. C. T. Van Duin, et al, J. Phys. Chem. A, 1005, 9396 (2001).

  12. Thermal Transport in Fullerene Derivatives Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Wang, Xiaojia; Kumar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effects of alkyl chain on the thermal properties of fullerene derivatives, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the thermal conductivity of fullerene (C60) and its derivative phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The results of non-equilibrium MD simulations show a length-dependent thermal conductivity for C60 but not for PCBM. The thermal conductivity of C60, obtained from the linear extrapolation of inverse conductivity vs. inverse length curve, is 0.2  W m−1 K−1 at room temperature, while the thermal conductivity of PCBM saturates at ~0.075  W m−1 K−1 around 20 nm. The different length-dependence behavior of thermal conductivity indicates that the long-wavelength and low-frequency phonons have large contribution to the thermal conduction in C60. The decrease in thermal conductivity of fullerene derivatives can be attributed to the reduction in group velocities, the decrease of the frequency range of acoustic phonons, and the strong scattering of low-frequency phonons with the alkyl chains due to the significant mismatch of vibrational density of states in low frequency regime between buckyball and alkyl chains in PCBM. PMID:26238607

  13. Hydrogen bond perturbation in hen egg white lysozyme by external electromagnetic fields: A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomentsev, Gleb Y.; English, Niall J.; Mooney, Damian A.

    2010-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a charge-neutral mutant of hen egg white lysozyme have been performed at 300 K and 1 bar in the presence of external microwave fields (2.45 to 100 GHz) of an rms electric field intensity of 0.05 V Å-1. A systematic study was carried out of the distributions of persistence times and energies of each intraprotein hydrogen bond in between breakage and reformation, in addition to overall persistence over 20 ns simulations, vis-à-vis equilibrium, zero-field conditions. It was found that localized translational motion for formally charged residues led to greater disruption of associated hydrogen bonds, although induced rotational motion of strongly dipolar residues also led to a degree of hydrogen bond perturbation. These effects were most apparent in the solvent exposed exterior of hen egg white lysozyme, in which the intraprotein hydrogen bonds tend to be weaker.

  14. Shockwave-Induced Plasticity Via Large-Scale Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holian, Brad Lee

    1997-07-01

    In nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of shock waves in single crystals, carried out in 1979 at Los Alamos,(B.L. Holian and G.K. Straub, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43), 1598 (1979). we discovered that, above a threshold strength, strongly shocked crystals deform in a very simple way. Rather than experiencing massive deformation, a simple slippage occurs at the shock front, relieving the peak shear stress, and leaving behind a stacking fault. We realized, of course, that real materials could yield at much lower thresholds, and speculated then that pre-existing defects could nucleate plastic flow at lower shock strengths than those characteristic of pure single crystals. (Historical note: at about the same time as our earliest dynamical shockwave simulations, Mogilevsky, working independently in the Soviet Union, carried out relaxation MD calculations under uniaxial strain, and observed spontaneous production of dislocations.(M.A. Mogilevsky, in Shock Waves and High Strain Rate Phenomena in Metals) (Plenum, New York, 1981), p.531.) Further Los Alamos calculations, carried out nearly a decade later in five-times larger systems (up to 10,000 atoms), confirmed this observation and quantified the threshold strength, namely the yield strength of the perfect crystal.(B.L. Holian, Phys. Rev. A 37), 2562 (1988); for a review, see B.L. Holian, Shock Waves 5, 149 (1995). Subsequently, Zaretskii and co-workers,(E.B. Zaretskii, G.I. Kanel, P.A. Mogilevskii, and V.E. Fortov, Sov. Phys. Dokl. 36), 76 (1991). using x-ray diffraction of shocked single crystals, confirmed our MD observations of stacking faults produced by shockwave passage. With the advent of massively parallel computers, we have recently studied systems with over six-times larger cross-sectional area and four-times longer distance of run to the steady state (approximately 270,000 atoms). We have seen that the increased cross-section allows the system to slip along both available forward slip systems, in

  15. Thermodiffusion in model nanofluids by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliero, G.; Volz, S.

    2008-02-01

    In this work, a new algorithm is proposed to compute single particle (infinite dilution) thermodiffusion using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations through the estimation of the thermophoretic force that applies on a solute particle. This scheme is shown to provide consistent results for model nanofluids in the liquid state (spherical nonmetallic nanoparticles+Lennard-Jones fluid) where it appears that thermodiffusion amplitude, as well as thermal conductivity, decreases with nanoparticle concentration. Then, by changing the nature of the nanoparticle (size, mass, and internal stiffness) and that of the solvent (quality and viscosity), various trends are exhibited. In all cases, the single particle thermodiffusion is positive, i.e., the nanoparticle tends to migrate toward the cold area. The single particle thermal diffusion coefficient is shown to be independent of the size of the nanoparticle (diameter of 0.8-4nm), whereas it increases with the quality of the solvent and is inversely proportional to the viscosity of the fluid. In addition, this coefficient is shown to be independent of the mass of the nanoparticle and to increase with the stiffness of the nanoparticle internal bonds. Besides, for these configurations, the mass diffusion coefficient behavior appears to be consistent with a Stokes-Einstein-like law.

  16. Shear thinning behavior of linear polymer melts under shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2014-05-01

    The properties of both untangled and entangled linear polymer melts under shear flow are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the dependence of shear viscosity η on shear rate dot{γ }, expressed by η ˜ dot{γ }^{-n}, exhibits three distinct regimes. The first is the well-known Newtonian regime, namely, η independent of shear rate at small shear rates dot{γ }<τ 0^{-1} (where τ0 is the longest polymer relaxation time at equilibrium). In the non-Newtonian regime (dot{γ }>τ 0^{-1}), the shear dependence of viscosity exhibits a crossover at a critical shear rate dot{γ }c dividing this regime into two different regimes, shear thinning regime I (ST-I) and II (ST-II), respectively. In the ST-I regime (τ ^{-1}_0dot{γ }c) a universal power law η ˜ dot{γ }^{-0.37} is found for considered chain lengths. Furthermore, the longer the polymer chain is, the smaller the shear viscosity for a given shear rate in the ST-II regime. The simulation also shows that a characteristic chain length, below which dot{γ }c will be equal to τ 0^{-1}, lies in the interval 30 < N < 50. For all considered chain lengths in the ST-II regime, we also find that the first and second normal stress differences N1 and N2 follow power laws of N1 ˜ dot{γ }^{2/3} and N2 ˜ dot{γ }^{0.82}, respectively; the orientation resistance parameter mG follows the relation mG ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75} and the tumbling frequency ftb follows f_{tb} ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75}. These results imply that the effects of entanglement on the shear dependences of these properties may be negligible in the ST-II regime. These findings may shed some light on the nature of shear thinning in flexible linear polymer melts.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of pressure shocks in liquid phase nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNatt, Michael David

    The dynamic energy transfer processes present in liquid nitromethane (NM) under pressure shock loading conditions have been investigated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods using a previously developed, fully flexible NM force field (Sorescu, D. C.; Rice, B. M.; Thompson, D. L. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 8406). Generally good qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental values was found for sound speeds (C) as a function of temperature. This is true as well for the PVT Hugoniot data calculated for the shock compressed zones behind our simulated shock fronts. The predicted C( T) are, however, ˜13--30% higher than experiment (Lysne, P. C.; Hardesty, D. R. J. Chem. Phys. 1973, 59, 6512) and our predicted densities for the shock compressed area behind fronts are consistently 4--10% lower than experiment (Winey, J. M.; Duvall, G. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Gupta, Y. M. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 113, 7492). Accurate Hugoniot pressures are predicted by our simulations at all three initial temperatures (T i) studied. The Ti simulated for this work (255, 300, 350 K) span virtually the entire experimental ambient pressure liquid temperature range of NM (˜ 244--373 K). Thus combining and comparing our results with those of Winey et al. based on empirical equations of state work, opens up a considerable range of possible further tests and developments of our NM force field. This is particularly important in regards to the intermolecular force field due to its intended purpose of being applicable to a wide range of nitro and nitramine energetic compounds. Also, within the timeframes of our simulations (< 10 ps) the kinetic energy behind our shock fronts does not achieve equilibrium conditions as determined by the classical theory of equipartition.

  18. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed. PMID:27067383

  19. Near-microsecond human aquaporin 4 gating dynamics in static and alternating external electric fields: Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    English, Niall J; Garate, José-A

    2016-08-28

    An extensive suite of non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation has been performed for ∼0.85-0.9 μs of human aquaporin 4 in the absence and presence of externally applied static and alternating electric fields applied along the channels (in both axial directions in the static case, taken as the laboratory z-axis). These external fields were of 0.0065 V/Å (r.m.s.) intensity (of the same order as physiological electrical potentials); alternating fields ranged in frequency from 2.45 to 500 GHz. In-pore gating dynamics was studied, particularly of the relative propensities for "open" and "closed" states of the conserved arginines in the arginine/aromatic area (itself governed in no small part by external-field response of the dipolar alignment of the histidine-201 residue in the selectivity filter). In such a manner, the intimate connection of field-response governing "two-state" histidine states was established statistically and mechanistically. Given the appreciable size of the energy barriers for histidine-201 alignment, we have also performed non-equilibrium metadynamics/local-elevation of static fields applied along both directions to construct the free-energy landscape thereof in terms of external-field direction, elucidating the importance of field direction on energetics. We conclude from direct measurement of deterministic molecular dynamics in conjunction with applied-field metadynamics that the intrinsic electric field within the channel points along the +z-axis, such that externally applied static fields in this direction serve to "open" the channel in the selectivity-filter and the asparagine-proline-alanine region. PMID:27586951

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of water permeation across Nafion membrane interfaces.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kevin B; Benziger, Jay B; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-07-24

    Permeation of water across the membrane/vapor and membrane/liquid-water interfaces of Nafion is studied using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations, providing direct calculations of mass-transfer resistance. Water mass transfer within one nanometer of the vapor interface is shown to be 2 orders of magnitude slower than at any other point within the membrane, in qualitative agreement with permeation experiments. This interfacial resistance is much stronger than the resistance suggested by prior simulation work calculating self-diffusivity near the interface. The key difference between the prior approach and the NEMD approach is that the NEMD approach implicitly incorporates changes in solubility in the direction normal to the interface. Water is shown to be very insoluble near the vapor interface, which is rich in hydrophobic perfluorocarbon chains, in agreement with advancing contact angle experiments. Hydrophilic side chains are buried beneath this hydrophobic layer and aligned toward the interior of the membrane. Hydrophilic pores are not exposed to the vapor interface as proposed in prior theoretical work. At the membrane/liquid-water interface, highly swollen polymer chains extend into the liquid-water phase, forming a nanoscopically rough interface that is consistent with atomic force microscopy experiments. In these swollen conformations, hydrophilic side chains are exposed to the liquid-water phase, suggesting that the interface is hydrophilic, in agreement with receding contact angle experiments. The mass-transfer resistance of this interface is negligible compared to that of the bulk, in qualitative agreement with permeation experiments. The water activity at the vapor and liquid-water interfaces are nearly the same, yet large conformational and transport differences are observed, consistent with a mass-transfer-based understanding of Schroeder's paradox for Nafion. PMID:24971638

  1. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  2. Studying Interactions by Molecular Dynamics Simulations at High Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Toppo, Stefano; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.; Viglino, Paolo; Ursini, Fulvio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study molecular encounters and recognition. In recent works, simulations using high concentration of interacting molecules have been performed. In this paper, we consider the practical problems for setting up the simulation and to analyse the results of the simulation. The simulation of beta 2-microglobulin association and the simulation of the binding of hydrogen peroxide by glutathione peroxidase are provided as examples. PMID:22500085

  3. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations at the Petascale (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, A.

    2013-12-01

    We are developing a divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic framework into a metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallelization scheme to perform large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The scheme has achieved parallel efficiency well over 0.9 on 786,432 IBM BlueGene/Q processors for 8.5 trillion-atom molecular dynamics and 1.9 trillion electronic degrees-of-freedom quantum molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory. Simulation results reveal intricate interplay between photoexcitation, mechanics, flow, and chemical reactions at the nanoscale. Specifically, we will discuss atomistic mechanisms of: (1) rapid hydrogen production from water using metallic alloy nanoparticles; (2) molecular control of charge transfer, charge recombination, and singlet fission for efficient solar cells; and (3) mechanically enhanced reaction kinetics in nanobubbles and nanojets.

  4. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  5. In Silico Determination of Gas Permeabilities by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics: CO2 and He through PIM-1

    PubMed Central

    Frentrup, Hendrik; Hart, Kyle E.; Colina, Coray M.; Müller, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the permeation dynamics of helium and carbon dioxide through an atomistically detailed model of a polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. This work presents the first explicit molecular modeling of gas permeation through a high free-volume polymer sample, and it demonstrates how permeability and solubility can be obtained coherently from a single simulation. Solubilities in particular can be obtained to a very high degree of confidence and within experimental inaccuracies. Furthermore, the simulations make it possible to obtain very specific information on the diffusion dynamics of penetrant molecules and yield detailed maps of gas occupancy, which are akin to a digital tomographic scan of the polymer network. In addition to determining permeability and solubility directly from NEMD simulations, the results shed light on the permeation mechanism of the penetrant gases, suggesting that the relative openness of the microporous topology promotes the anomalous diffusion of penetrant gases, which entails a deviation from the pore hopping mechanism usually observed in gas diffusion in polymers. PMID:25764366

  6. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  7. Modelling transient heat conduction in solids at multiple length and time scales: A coupled non-equilibrium molecular dynamics/continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Kenny; Gill, Simon P.A.

    2009-10-20

    A method for controlling the thermal boundary conditions of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations is presented. The method is simple to implement into a conventional molecular dynamics code and independent of the atomistic model employed. It works by regulating the temperature in a thermostatted boundary region by feedback control to achieve the desired temperature at the edge of an inner region where the true atomistic dynamics are retained. This is necessary to avoid intrinsic boundary effects in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Three thermostats are investigated: the global deterministic Nose-Hoover thermostat and two local stochastic thermostats, Langevin and stadium damping. The latter thermostat is introduced to avoid the adverse reflection of phonons that occurs at an abrupt interface. The method is then extended to allow atomistic/continuum models to be thermally coupled concurrently for the analysis of large steady state and transient heat conduction problems. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated for the example of heat flow down a three-dimensional atomistic rod of uniform cross-section subjected to a variety of boundary conditions.

  8. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  9. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  11. Self-interstitial clusters in radiation damage accumulation: coupled molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasterio, Paul R.; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz, Bilge

    2013-04-01

    Self-interstitial interactions causing volume expansion in bcc Fe are studied through an idealized microstructure evolution model in which only self-interstial atoms (SIAs) are inserted. Using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and a metadynamics algorithm, meta-stable SIA clusters are observed to nucleate and grow into dislocation loops or localized amorphous phases, both contributing to swelling behavior persisting well beyond the atomistic time scale. A non-monotonic local density variation with dose rate is found and attributed to competing evolutions of different defective structures.

  12. Solvent-Driven Preferential Association of Lignin with Regions of Crystalline Cellulose in Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Schulz, Roland; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    The precipitation of lignin onto cellulose after pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is an obstacle to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. Here, 750 ns nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are reported of a system of lignin and cellulose in aqueous solution. Lignin is found to strongly associate with itself and the cellulose. However, noncrystalline regions of cellulose are observed to have a lower tendency to associate with lignin than crystalline regions, and this is found to arise from stronger hydration of the noncrystalline chains. The results suggest that the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to hydrolysis arises not only from the inaccessibility of inner fibers but also due to the promotion of lignin adhesion.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  14. Multi-petaflop/s quantum and reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    We have developed a divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic framework for large quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations. The algorithms have achieved parallel efficiency over 0.98 on 786,432 IBM Blue Gene/Q processors for 39.8 trillion electronic degrees-of-freedom QMD in the framework of density functional theory and 67.6 billion-atom RMD. We will discuss several applications including (1) 16,616-atom QMD simulation of rapid hydrogen production from water using metallic alloy nanoparticles, (2) 6,400-atom nonadiabatic QMD simulation of exciton dynamics for efficient solar cells, and (3) 112 million-atom RMD simulation of nanocarbon synthesis by high temperature oxidation of SiC nanoparticles.

  15. Improving the performance of molecular dynamics simulations on parallel clusters.

    PubMed

    Borstnik, Urban; Hodoscek, Milan; Janezic, Dusanka

    2004-01-01

    In this article a procedure is derived to obtain a performance gain for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on existing parallel clusters. Parallel clusters use a wide array of interconnection technologies to connect multiple processors together, often at different speeds, such as multiple processor computers and networking. It is demonstrated how to configure existing programs for MD simulations to efficiently handle collective communication on parallel clusters with processor interconnections of different speeds. PMID:15032512

  16. Studying the unfolding kinetics of proteins under pressure using long molecular dynamic simulation runs.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Grigera, José Raúl; McCarthy, Andrés N

    2007-12-01

    The usefulness of computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation has been extensively established for studying systems in equilibrium. Nevertheless, its application to complex non-equilibrium biological processes such as protein unfolding has been generally regarded as producing results which cannot be interpreted straightforwardly. In the present study, we present results for the kinetics of unfolding of apomyoglobin, based on the analysis of long simulation runs of this protein in solution at 3 kbar (1 atm = 1.01325, bar = 101,325 Pa). We hereby demonstrate that the analysis of the data collected within a simulated time span of 0.18 mus suffices for producing results, which coincide remarkably with the available unfolding kinetics experimental data. This not only validates molecular dynamics simulation as a valuable alternative for studying non-equilibrium processes, but also enables a detailed analysis of the actual structural mechanism which underlies the unfolding process of proteins under elusive denaturing conditions such as high pressure. PMID:19669536

  17. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  18. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Claire A.; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Todd, Billy D.; Daivis, Peter J.; Hansen, Jesper S.

    2015-06-01

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear are investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity, normal stress differences, and pressure of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid at all temperatures. In addition, the Cooee model is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules in bitumen. These nanoaggregates are immersed in a solvent of saturated hydrocarbon molecules. At a fixed temperature, the shear-shinning behavior is related not only to the inter- and intramolecular alignments of the solvent molecules but also to the decrease of the average size of the nanoaggregates at high shear rates. The variation of the viscosity with temperature at different shear rates is also related to the size and relative composition of the nanoaggregates. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified. Finally, the position of bitumen mixtures in the broad literature of complex systems such as colloidal suspensions, polymer solutions, and associating polymer networks is discussed.

  19. Nonequilibrium-molecular-dynamics measurement of the Leslie coefficients of a Gay-Berne nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tiezheng

    2007-03-01

    We carried out nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the six Leslie coefficients of a nematic liquid crystal composed of molecules interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. In the presence of a simple shear flow, an external field is applied to control the molecular orientation, and a uniform director is stabilized in the central region of the channel in which the liquid crystal is confined and sheared. With the director tuned by varying the applied field, a number of orientational states are stabilized in the presence of a shear flow, and various viscous stress components are measured in these states of different directors. The six Leslie coefficients αi are determined by interpreting the MD measurement data for viscous stress according to the constitutive relations in the Ericksen-Leslie-Parodi (ELP) theory. The Parodi relation α2+α3=α6-α5 is well satisfied. Given the values of the Leslie coefficients, liquid crystal orientations are evaluated for different field directions and shear rates. Comparison with those directly measured in MD simualtions demonstrates a quantitative agreement, showing that in the Gay-Berne nematic liquid crystal, the viscous stress and the coupling between orientation and flow are well described by the ELP theory.

  20. Nonequilibrium phenomena in N{sub 2}-cluster-surface collisions: A molecular-dynamics study of fragmentation, lateral jetting, and nonequilibrium energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Steffen; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2006-12-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the impact of (N{sub 2}){sub 2869} clusters on a flat rigid wall. We study the cluster fragmentation process, the formation of lateral jets, the energy redistribution among the resulting fragments, and the ratio of internal and translational energy of the emerging free molecules as a function of cluster impact energy in the range of 0.076-1520 meV/molecule. We find the fragmentation threshold energy to be in agreement with that found previously for (N{sub 2}){sub 13} clusters; the (scaled) number of fragments, however, increases more slowly with impact energy. Also the energy redistribution of the cluster impact energy among the internal and translational energy of the fragments is similar to that found for the small cluster. This means in particular that free molecules show a strong nonequilibrium energy partitioning in which the internal degrees of freedom are considerably less excited than the translational degrees of freedom. We also find that at impact energies above the fragmentation threshold the angular distribution of fragments is peaked parallel to the surface--i.e., the formation of lateral surface jets.

  1. Computer simulation of nonequilibrium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Moran, B.; Holian, B.L.; Posch, H.A.; Bestiale, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent atomistic simulations of irreversible macroscopic hydrodynamic flows are illustrated. An extension of Nose's reversible atomistic mechanics makes it possible to simulate such non-equilibrium systems with completely reversible equations of motion. The new techniques show that macroscopic irreversibility is a natural inevitable consequence of time-reversible Lyapunov-unstable microscopic equations of motion.

  2. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work. PMID:19449821

  3. Time series analysis of molecular dynamics simulation using wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Mikito

    2012-08-01

    A new method is presented to extract nonstationary features of slow collective motion toward time series data of molecular dynamics simulation for proteins. The method consists of the following two steps: (1) the wavelet transformation and (2) the singular value decomposition (SVD). The wavelet transformation enables us to characterize time varying features of oscillatory motions and SVD enables us to reduce the degrees of freedom of the movement. We apply the method to molecular dynamics simulation of various proteins such as Adenylate Kinase from Escherichia coli (AKE) and Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase (TLL). Moreover, we introduce indexes to characterize collective motion of proteins. These indexes provide us with information of nonstationary deformation of protein structures. We discuss future prospects of our study involving "intrinsically disordered proteins".

  4. Extrapolated gradientlike algorithms for molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, I P

    2006-09-01

    A class of symplectic algorithms is introduced to integrate the equations of motion in many-body systems. The algorithms are derived on the basis of an advanced gradientlike decomposition approach. Its main advantage over the standard gradient scheme is the avoidance of time-consuming evaluations of force gradients by force extrapolation without any loss of precision. As a result, the efficiency of the integration improves significantly. The algorithms obtained are analyzed and optimized using an error-function theory. The best among them are tested in actual molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations for comparison with well-known nongradient and gradient algorithms such as the Störmer-Verlet, Runge-Kutta, Cowell-Numerov, Forest-Ruth, Suzuki-Chin, and others. It is demonstrated that for moderate and high accuracy, the extrapolated algorithms should be considered as the most efficient for the integration of motion in molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:17025782

  5. Nonholonomic Hamiltonian Method for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Reacting Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric; Bass, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Conventional molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks employ a holonomic Hamiltonian formulation: the breaking and forming of covalent bonds is described by potential functions. In general these potential functions: (a) are algebraically complex, (b) must satisfy strict smoothness requirements, and (c) contain many fitted parameters. In recent research the authors have developed a new noholonomic formulation of reacting molecular dynamics. In this formulation bond orders are determined by rate equations and the bonding-debonding process need not be described by differentiable functions. This simplifies the representation of complex chemistry and reduces the number of fitted model parameters. Example applications of the method show molecular level shock to detonation simulations in nitromethane and RDX. Research supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  6. Annihilation of craters: Molecular dynamic simulations on a silver surface

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksson, K. O. E.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2007-12-15

    The ability of silver cluster ions containing 13 atoms to fill in a preexisting crater with a radius of about 28 A ring on a silver (001) target has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and the molecular-dynamics-Monte Carlo corrected effective medium potential. The largest lateral distance r between crater and ion was about three times the radius of the preexisting crater, namely, 75 A ring . The results reveal that when r<20 A ring and r>60 A ring the preexisting crater is partially filled in, and for other distances there is a net growth of the crater. The lattice damage created by the cluster ions, the total sputtering yield, the cluster sputtering yield, and simulated transmission electron microscopy images of the irradiated targets are also presented.

  7. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  8. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  9. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  10. Molecular dynamic simulation of non-melt laser annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liren, Yan; Dai, Li; Wei, Zhang; Zhihong, Liu; Wei, Zhou; Quan, Wang

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is performed to study the process of material annealing caused by a 266 nm pulsed laser. A micro-mechanism describing behaviors of silicon and impurity atoms during the laser annealing at a non-melt regime is proposed. After ion implantation, the surface of the Si wafer is acted by a high energy laser pulse, which loosens the material and partially frees both Si and impurity atoms. While the residual laser energy is absorbed by valence electrons, these atoms are recoiled and relocated to finally form a crystal. Energy-related movement behavior is observed by using the molecular dynamic method. The non-melt laser anneal appears to be quite sensitive to the energy density of the laser, as a small excess energy may causes a significant impurity diffusion. Such a result is also supported by our laser anneal experiment.

  11. Using collective variables to drive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorin, Giacomo; Klein, Michael L.; Hénin, Jérôme

    2013-12-01

    A software framework is introduced that facilitates the application of biasing algorithms to collective variables of the type commonly employed to drive massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The modular framework that is presented enables one to combine existing collective variables into new ones, and combine any chosen collective variable with available biasing methods. The latter include the classic time-dependent biases referred to as steered MD and targeted MD, the temperature-accelerated MD algorithm, as well as the adaptive free-energy biases called metadynamics and adaptive biasing force. The present modular software is extensible, and portable between commonly used MD simulation engines.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of threshold displacement energies in zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Yu, Jianguo; Weber, William J.

    2009-10-15

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to examine the displacement threshold energy (Ed) surface for Zr, Si and O in zircon using two different interatomic potentials. For each sublattice, the simulation was repeated from different initial conditions to estimate the uncertainty in the calculated value of Ed. The displacement threshold energies vary considerably with crystallographic direction and sublattice. The average displacement energy calculated with a recently developed transferable potential is about 120 and 60 eV for cations and anions, respectively. The oxygen displacement energy shows good agreement with experimental estimates in ceramics.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  14. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  15. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-10-28

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  16. The molecular dynamics simulation of ion-induced ripple growth

    SciTech Connect

    Suele, P.; Heinig, K.-H.

    2009-11-28

    The wavelength-dependence of ion-sputtering induced growth of repetitive nanostructures, such as ripples has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in Si. The early stage of the ion erosion driven development of ripples has been simulated on prepatterned Si stripes with a wavy surface. The time evolution of the height function and amplitude of the sinusoidal surface profile has been followed by simulated ion-sputtering. According to Bradley-Harper (BH) theory, we expect correlation between the wavelength of ripples and the stability of them. However, we find that in the small ripple wavelength ({lambda}) regime BH theory fails to reproduce the results obtained by molecular dynamics. We find that at short wavelengths ({lambda}<35 nm) the adatom yield drops hence no surface diffusion takes place which is sufficient for ripple growth. The MD simulations predict that the growth of ripples with {lambda}>35 nm is stabilized in accordance with the available experimental results. According to the simulations, few hundreds of ion impacts in {lambda} long and few nanometers wide Si ripples are sufficient for reaching saturation in surface growth for for {lambda}>35 nm ripples. In another words, ripples in the long wavelength limit seems to be stable against ion-sputtering. A qualitative comparison of our simulation results with recent experimental data on nanopatterning under irradiation is attempted.

  17. Dynamic molecules: molecular dynamics for everyone. An internet-based access to molecular dynamic simulations: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin; Gutbrod, Peter; Hassayoun, Chokri; von Der Lieth, Claus-W

    2003-10-01

    Molecular dynamics is a rapidly developing field of science and has become an established tool for studying the dynamic behavior of biomolecules. Although several high quality programs for performing molecular dynamic simulations are freely available, only well-trained scientists are currently able to make use of the broad scientific potential that molecular dynamic simulations offer to gain insight into structural questions at an atomic level. The "Dynamic Molecules" approach is the first internet portal that provides an interactive access to set up, perform and analyze molecular dynamic simulations. It is completely based on standard web technologies and uses only publicly available software. The aim is to open molecular dynamics techniques to a broader range of users including undergraduate students, teachers and scientists outside the bioinformatics field. The time-limiting factors are the availability of free capacity on the computing server to run the simulations and the time required to transport the history file through the internet for the animation mode. The interactive access mode of the portal is acceptable for animations of molecules having up to about 500 atoms. PMID:12908101

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of triclinic lysozyme in a crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Liu, Chunmei; Deckman, Jason; Case, David A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals can enlighten interpretation of experimental X-ray crystallography data and elucidate structural dynamics and heterogeneity in biomolecular crystals. Furthermore, because of the direct comparison against experimental data, they can inform assessment of molecular dynamics methods and force fields. We present microsecond scale results for triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme in a supercell consisting of 12 independent unit cells using four contemporary force fields (Amber ff99SB, ff14ipq, ff14SB, and CHARMM 36) in crystalline and solvated states (for ff14SB only). We find the crystal simulations consistent across multiple runs of the same force field and robust to various solvent equilibration schemes. However, convergence is slow compared with solvent simulations. All the tested force fields reproduce experimental structural and dynamic properties well, but Amber ff14SB maintains structure and reproduces fluctuations closest to the experimental model: its average backbone structure differs from the deposited structure by 0.37Å; by contrast, the average backbone structure in solution differs from the deposited by 0.65Å. All the simulations are affected by a small progressive deterioration of the crystal lattice, presumably due to imperfect modeling of hydrogen bonding and other crystal contact interactions; this artifact is smallest in ff14SB, with average lattice positions deviating by 0.20Å from ideal. Side-chain disorder is surprisingly low with fewer than 30% of the nonglycine or alanine residues exhibiting significantly populated alternate rotamers. Our results provide helpful insight into the methodology of biomolecular crystal simulations and indicate directions for future work to obtain more accurate energy models for molecular dynamics. PMID:26013419

  19. Setting up and running molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kandt, Christian; Ash, Walter L; Tieleman, D Peter

    2007-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have become a popular and powerful technique to study lipids and membrane proteins. We present some general questions and issues that should be considered prior to embarking on molecular dynamics simulation studies of membrane proteins and review common simulation methods. We suggest a practical approach to setting up and running simulations of membrane proteins, and introduce two new (related) methods to embed a protein in a lipid bilayer. Both methods rely on placing lipids and the protein(s) on a widely spaced grid and then 'shrinking' the grid until the bilayer with the protein has the desired density, with lipids neatly packed around the protein. When starting from a grid based on a single lipid structure, or several potentially different lipid structures (method 1), the bilayer will start well-packed but requires more equilibration. When starting from a pre-equilibrated bilayer, either pure or mixed, most of the structure of the bilayer stays intact, reducing equilibration time (method 2). The main advantages of these methods are that they minimize equilibration time and can be almost completely automated, nearly eliminating one time consuming step in MD simulations of membrane proteins. PMID:17367719

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide. PMID:26358333

  1. Modeling and Computer Simulation: Molecular Dynamics and Kinetic Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B.D.; Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    2000-10-10

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous advances in the realistic multiscale simulation of complex physical phenomena, such as irradiation and aging effects of materials, made possible by the enormous progress achieved in computational physics for calculating reliable, yet tractable interatomic potentials and the vast improvements in computational power and parallel computing. As a result, computational materials science is emerging as an important complement to theory and experiment to provide fundamental materials science insight. This article describes the atomistic modeling techniques of molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC), and an example of their application to radiation damage production and accumulation in metals. It is important to note at the outset that the primary objective of atomistic computer simulation should be obtaining physical insight into atomic-level processes. Classical molecular dynamics is a powerful method for obtaining insight about the dynamics of physical processes that occur on relatively short time scales. Current computational capability allows treatment of atomic systems containing as many as 10{sup 9} atoms for times on the order of 100 ns (10{sup -7}s). The main limitation of classical MD simulation is the relatively short times accessible. Kinetic Monte Carlo provides the ability to reach macroscopic times by modeling diffusional processes and time-scales rather than individual atomic vibrations. Coupling MD and KMC has developed into a powerful, multiscale tool for the simulation of radiation damage in metals.

  2. Massively Parallel Reactive and Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, Priya

    2015-03-01

    In this talk I will discuss two simulations: Cavitation bubbles readily occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163,840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate chemical and mechanical damages caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near silica surface. Collapse of an empty nanobubble generates high-speed nanojet, resulting in the formation of a pit on the surface. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and consequently the damage on the silica surface is mitigated. Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations are performed on 786,432-processor Blue Gene/Q to study on-demand production of hydrogen gas from water using Al nanoclusters. QMD simulations reveal rapid hydrogen production from water by an Al nanocluster. We find a low activation-barrier mechanism, in which a pair of Lewis acid and base sites on the Aln surface preferentially catalyzes hydrogen production. I will also discuss on-demand production of hydrogen gas from water using and LiAl alloy particles. Research reported in this lecture was carried in collaboration with Rajiv Kalia, Aiichiro Nakano and Ken-ichi Nomura from the University of Southern California, and Fuyuki Shimojo and Kohei Shimamura from Kumamoto University, Japan.

  3. A reduced basis method for molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent-Finley, Rachel Elisabeth

    In this dissertation, we develop a method for molecular simulation based on principal component analysis (PCA) of a molecular dynamics trajectory and least squares approximation of a potential energy function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a computational tool used to study molecular systems as they evolve through time. With respect to protein dynamics, local motions, such as bond stretching, occur within femtoseconds, while rigid body and large-scale motions, occur within a range of nanoseconds to seconds. To capture motion at all levels, time steps on the order of a femtosecond are employed when solving the equations of motion and simulations must continue long enough to capture the desired large-scale motion. To date, simulations of solvated proteins on the order of nanoseconds have been reported. It is typically the case that simulations of a few nanoseconds do not provide adequate information for the study of large-scale motions. Thus, the development of techniques that allow longer simulation times can advance the study of protein function and dynamics. In this dissertation we use principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the dominant characteristics of an MD trajectory and to represent the coordinates with respect to these characteristics. We augment PCA with an updating scheme based on a reduced representation of a molecule and consider equations of motion with respect to the reduced representation. We apply our method to butane and BPTI and compare the results to standard MD simulations of these molecules. Our results indicate that the molecular activity with respect to our simulation method is analogous to that observed in the standard MD simulation with simulations on the order of picoseconds.

  4. Analysis of motion features for molecular dynamics simulation of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Mayumi; Toda, Mikito; Sekijima, Masakazu; Takata, Masami; Joe, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a new method for time series analysis using the wavelet transformation has been proposed by Sakurai et al. We apply it to molecular dynamics simulation of Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase (TLL). Introducing indexes to characterize collective motion of the protein, we have obtained the following two results. First, time evolution of the collective motion involves not only the dynamics within a single potential well but also takes place wandering around multiple conformations. Second, correlation of the collective motion between secondary structures shows that collective motion exists involving multiple secondary structures. We discuss future prospects of our study involving 'disordered proteins'.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of hollow thick-walled cylinder collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The generation and evolution of plastic deformation in a hollow single-crystal cylinder under high-rate axisymmetric loading were studied. An advantage of the proposed loading scheme is that all loading modes are applied simultaneously within the chosen crystallographic plane of the cylinder base and different strain degrees are achieved along the specimen cross section. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to show that the achievement of a certain strain causes the formation of structural defects on the inner surface of the specimen. The obtained results can be used to explain the main plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline solids.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoidentation of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.; Omeltchenko, A.; Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, R.K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, P.

    1999-08-01

    This is a report of work in progress on 10 million atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoindentation of crystalline and amorphous silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Nanoindentation is used to determine mechanical properties of extremely thin films such as hardness and elastic moduli. The authors report load-displacement curves for several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} configurations using an idealized non-deformable indenter and analyze the local stress distributions in the vicinity of the indenter tip. Preliminary results for surface adhesion using Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} for both tip and substrate are also reported.

  7. Identifying the mechanisms of polymer friction through molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Minn, M; Satyanarayana, N; Sinha, Sujeet K; Tan, V B C

    2011-12-20

    Mechanisms governing the tribological behavior of polymer-on-polymer sliding were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Three main mechanisms governing frictional behavior were identified. Interfacial "brushing" of molecular chain ends over one another was observed as the key contribution to frictional forces. With an increase of the sliding speed, fluctuations in frictional forces reduced in both magnitude and periodicity, leading to dynamic frictional behavior. While "brushing" remained prevalent, two additional irreversible mechanisms, "combing" and "chain scission", of molecular chains were observed when the interfaces were significantly diffused. PMID:22044344

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of bicrystalline metal surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports the molecular dynamics simulation results on the behavior of a copper crystallite in local frictional contact. The crystallite has a perfect defect-free structure and contains a high-angle grain boundary of type Σ5. The influence of the initial structure on the specimen behavior under loading was analyzed. It is shown that nanoblocks are formed in the subsurface layer. The atomic mechanism of nanofragmentation was studied. A detailed analysis of atomic displacements in the blocks showed that the displacements are rotational. Calculations revealed that the misorientation angle of formed nanoblocks along different directions does not exceed 2 degrees.

  9. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mugnai, Mauro L.; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-07

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system—the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide.

  10. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  11. Tight-binding molecular-dynamics simulation of buckyball collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.L.; Wang, C.Z.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The collisions between C[sub 60] molecules are studied by tight-binding molecular-dynamics simulations. We observe three different regimes of behavior as the collisions become more and more energetic: bouncing, fusion, and fragmentation. The critical energies for fusion and fragmentation as well as details of the energy transfer during the collision process for the bouncing regime are investigated. The collisions at several specific energies and orientations produce interesting novel molecules, such as small baby cages, caps, and even a Russian-Doll molecule in which a small cage is trapped in a bigger one. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A sampling problem in molecular dynamics simulations of macromolecules.

    PubMed Central

    Clarage, J B; Romo, T; Andrews, B K; Pettitt, B M; Phillips, G N

    1995-01-01

    Correlations in low-frequency atomic displacements predicted by molecular dynamics simulations on the order of 1 ns are undersampled for the time scales currently accessible by the technique. This is shown with three different representations of the fluctuations in a macromolecule: the reciprocal space of crystallography using diffuse x-ray scattering data, real three-dimensional Cartesian space using covariance matrices of the atomic displacements, and the 3N-dimensional configuration space of the protein using dimensionally reduced projections to visualize the extent to which phase space is sampled. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7724554

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Of Nanometer-Scale Feature Etch

    SciTech Connect

    Vegh, J. J.; Graves, D. B.

    2008-09-23

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to examine fundamental etch limitations. Beams of Ar{sup +}, Ar{sup +}/F and CF{sub x}{sup +} (x = 2,3) with 2 nm diameter cylindrical confinement were utilized to mimic 'perfect' masks for small feature etching in silicon. The holes formed during etch exhibit sidewall damage and passivation as a result of ion-induced mixing. The MD results predict a minimum hole diameter of {approx}5 nm after post-etch cleaning of the sidewall.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of high speed rarefied gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongari, Nishanth; Zhang, Yonghao; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-11-01

    To understand the molecular behaviour of gases in high speed rarefied conditions, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) numerical experiments using the open source code Open FOAM. We use shear-driven Couette flows as test cases, where the two parallel plates are moving with a speed of Uw in opposite directions with their temperatures set to Tw. The gas rarefaction conditions vary from slip to transition, and compressibility conditions vary from low speed isothermal to hypersonic flow regimes, i.e. Knudsen number (Kn) from 0.01 to 1 and Mach number (Ma) from 0.05 to 10. We measure the molecular velocity distribution functions, the spatial variation of gas mean free path profiles and other macroscopic properties. Our MD results convey that flow properties in the near-wall non-equilibrium region do not merely depend on Kn, but they are also significantly affected by Ma. These results may yield new insight into diffusive transport in rarefied gases at high speeds.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  16. Molecular-dynamics simulation of a ceramide bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Sagar A.; Scott, H. Larry

    2006-01-01

    Ceramide is the simplest lipid in the biologically important class of glycosphingolipids. Ceramide is an important signaling molecule and a major component of the strateum corneum layer in the skin. In order to begin to understand the biophysical properties of ceramide, we have carried out a molecular-dynamics simulation of a hydrated 16:0 ceramide lipid bilayer at 368K (5° above the main phase transition). In this paper we describe the simulation and present the resulting properties of the bilayer. We compare the properties of the simulated ceramide bilayer to an earlier simulation of 18:0 sphingomyelin, and we discuss the results as they relate to experimental data for ceramide and other sphingolipids. The most significant differences arise at the lipid/water interface, where the lack of a large ceramide polar group leads to a different electron density and a different electrostatic potential but, surprisingly, not a different overall "dipole potential," when ceramide is compared to sphingomyelin.

  17. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Nanostructured Ceramic Materials on Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv

    2005-02-24

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to gain insight into: (1) sintering, structure, and mechanical behavior of nanophase SiC and SiO2; (2) effects of dynamic charge transfers on the sintering of nanophase TiO2; (3) high-pressure structural transformation in bulk SiC and GaAs nanocrystals; (4) nanoindentation in Si3N4; and (5) lattice mismatched InAs/GaAs nanomesas. In addition, we have designed a multiscale simulation approach that seamlessly embeds MD and quantum-mechanical (QM) simulations in a continuum simulation. The above research activities have involved strong interactions with researchers at various universities, government laboratories, and industries. 33 papers have been published and 22 talks have been given based on the work described in this report.

  18. Insights into Buforin II Membrane Translocation from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Buforin II is a histone-derived antimicrobial peptide that readily translocates across lipid membranes without causing significant membrane permeabilization. Previous studies showed that mutating the sole proline of buforin II dramatically decreases its translocation. As well, researchers have proposed that the peptide crosses membranes in a cooperative manner through forming transient toroidal pores. This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the structure of buforin II upon membrane entry and evaluate whether the peptide is able to form toroidal pore structures. These simulations showed a relationship between protein-lipid interactions and increased structural deformations of the buforin N-terminal region promoted by proline. Moreover, simulations with multiple peptides show how buforin II can embed deeply into membranes and potentially form toroidal pores. Together, these simulations provide structural insight into the translocation process for buforin II in addition to providing more general insight into the role proline can play in antimicrobial peptides. PMID:23022591

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations through GPU video games technologies

    PubMed Central

    Loukatou, Styliani; Papageorgiou, Louis; Fakourelis, Paraskevas; Filntisi, Arianna; Polychronidou, Eleftheria; Bassis, Ioannis; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Makałowski, Wojciech; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics is the scientific field that focuses on the application of computer technology to the management of biological information. Over the years, bioinformatics applications have been used to store, process and integrate biological and genetic information, using a wide range of methodologies. One of the most de novo techniques used to understand the physical movements of atoms and molecules is molecular dynamics (MD). MD is an in silico method to simulate the physical motions of atoms and molecules under certain conditions. This has become a state strategic technique and now plays a key role in many areas of exact sciences, such as chemistry, biology, physics and medicine. Due to their complexity, MD calculations could require enormous amounts of computer memory and time and therefore their execution has been a big problem. Despite the huge computational cost, molecular dynamics have been implemented using traditional computers with a central memory unit (CPU). A graphics processing unit (GPU) computing technology was first designed with the goal to improve video games, by rapidly creating and displaying images in a frame buffer such as screens. The hybrid GPU-CPU implementation, combined with parallel computing is a novel technology to perform a wide range of calculations. GPUs have been proposed and used to accelerate many scientific computations including MD simulations. Herein, we describe the new methodologies developed initially as video games and how they are now applied in MD simulations. PMID:27525251

  1. A multi-scale approach to molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, E J; Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Joannopoulos, J D

    2004-09-03

    Study of the propagation of shock waves in condensed matter has led to new discoveries ranging from new metastable states of carbon [1] to the metallic conductivity of hydrogen in Jupiter, [2] but progress in understanding the microscopic details of shocked materials has been extremely difficult. Complications can include the unexpected formation of metastable states of matter that determine the structure, instabilities, and time-evolution of the shock wave. [1,3] The formation of these metastable states can depend on the time-dependent thermodynamic pathway that the material follows behind the shock front. Furthermore, the states of matter observed in the shock wave can depend on the timescale on which observation is made. [4,1] Significant progress in understanding these microscopic details has been made through molecular dynamics simulations using the popular non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) approach to atomistic simulation of shock compression. [5] The NEMD method involves creating a shock at one edge of a large system by assigning some atoms at the edge a fixed velocity. The shock propagates across the computational cell to the opposite side. The computational work required by NEMD scales at least quadratically in the evolution time because larger systems are needed for longer simulations to prevent the shock wave from reflecting from the edge of the computational cell and propagating back into the cell. When quantum mechanical methods with poor scaling of computational effort with system size are employed, this approach to shock simulations rapidly becomes impossible.

  2. Transport properties of dense fluid mixtures using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. [Viscosity and thermal conductivity of continuous, or polydisperse mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Murad, S.

    1990-09-01

    This progress report covers research carried out during the period September 15, 1987--September 15, 1990. The main emphasis of the work was on dense fluid mixtures, although in some cases work had to be done on pure fluids before we could study mixtures in a meaningful way. A summary of our results is given. (1) An algorithm was developed and used to calculate the viscosity and thermal conductivity of continuous, or polydisperse mixtures with various distributions (e.g. linear, several gaussian distributions including unsymmetric, etc.) using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). (2) A method was developed to calculate the thermal conductivity of nonspherical (rigid) molecules using NEMD. (3) The NEMD method for thermal conductivity of nonspherical molecules was used to have a careful look at the contributions due to internal rotational degrees of freedom in linear compounds such as chlorine, nitrogen, etc. (4) It has long been speculated that polar fluids exhibit heat induced birefringence, i.e., the molecules will tend to align themselves along the direction of an external heat field. Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics we were able to conclusively confirm this. (5) We completed a preliminary study of the viscosity of homonuclear diatomics and their mixtures (e.g. N{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, etc.). (6) We completed a study of the various flexibility (vibrational) effects, such as bond bending, bond stretching etc., on linear and nonlinear model triatomics. To examine these effects in our preliminary study, we looked at the pressure second virial coefficients.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, J. A.; Gates. T. S.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of moisture on adhesives used in aerospace applications can be modeled with chemically specific techniques such as molecular dynamics simulation. In the present study, the surface energy and work of adhesion are calculated for epoxy surfaces and interfaces, respectively, by using molecular dynamics simulation. Modifications are made to current theory to calculate the work of adhesion at the epoxy-epoxy interface with and without water. Quantitative agreement with experimental values is obtained for the surface energy and work of adhesion at the interface without water. The work of adhesion agrees qualitatively with the experimental values for the interface with water: the magnitude is reduced 15% with respect to the value for the interface without water. A variation of 26% in the magnitude is observed depending on the water configuration at a concentration of 1.6 wt%. The methods and modifications to the method that are employed to obtain these values are expected to be applicable for other epoxy adhesives to determine the effects of moisture uptake on their work of adhesion.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of gold cluster growth during sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. W.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation scheme that we apply to study the time evolution of the self-organized growth process of metal cluster assemblies formed by sputter-deposited gold atoms on a planar surface. The simulation model incorporates the characteristics of the plasma-assisted deposition process and allows for an investigation over a wide range of deposition parameters. It is used to obtain data for the cluster properties which can directly be compared with recently published experimental data for gold on polystyrene [M. Schwartzkopf et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 7, 13547 (2015)]. While good agreement is found between the two, the simulations additionally provide valuable time-dependent real-space data of the surface morphology, some of whose details are hidden in the reciprocal-space scattering images that were used for the experimental analysis.

  7. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of a lithium/sodium carbonate mixture.

    PubMed

    Ottochian, Alistar; Ricca, Chiara; Labat, Frederic; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    The diffusion and ionic conductivity of Li x Na1-x CO3 salt mixtures were studied by means of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, using the Janssen and Tissen model (Janssen and Tissen, Mol Simul 5:83-98; 1990). These salts have received particular attention due to their central role in fuel cells technology, and reliable numerical methods that could perform as important interpretative tool of experimental data are thus required but still lacking. The chosen computational model nicely reproduces the main structural behaviour of the pure Li2CO3, Na2CO3 and K2CO3 carbonates, but also of their Li/K and Li/Na mixtures. However, it fails to accurately describe dynamic properties such as activation energies of diffusion and conduction processes, outlining the need to develop more accurate models for the simulation of molten salt carbonates. PMID:26897519

  9. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  10. Dynamic Shear Modulus of Polymers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byutner, Oleksiy; Smith, Grant

    2001-03-01

    In this work we describe the methodology for using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) simulations to obtain the viscoelastic properties of polymers in the glassy regime. Specifically we show how the time dependent shear stress modulus and frequency dependent complex shear modulus in the high-frequency regime can be determined from the off-diagonal terms of the stress-tensor autocorrelation function obtained from MD trajectories using the Green-Kubo method and appropriate Fourier transforms. In order to test the methodology we have performed MD simulations of a low-molecular-weight polybutadiene system using quantum chemistry based potential functions. Values of the glassy modulus and the maximum loss frequency were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for polybutadiene at 298 K.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Temperature Equilibration in Dense Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M; Benedict, L; Hau-Riege, S; Langdon, A; London, R

    2008-02-14

    The temperature equilibration rate in dense hydrogen (for both T{sub i} > T{sub e} and T{sub i} < T{sub e}) has been calculated with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for temperatures between 10 and 300 eV and densities between 10{sup 20}/cc to 10{sup 24}/cc. Careful attention has been devoted to convergence of the simulations, including the role of semiclassical potentials. We find that for Coulomb logarithms L {approx}> 1, Brown-Preston-Singleton [Brown et al., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] with the sub-leading corrections and the fit of Gericke-Murillo-Schlanges [Gericke et al., PRE 65, 036418 (2003)] to the T-matrix evaluation of the collision operator, agrees with the MD data to within the error bars of the simulation. For more strongly-coupled plasmas where L {approx}< 1, our numerical results are consistent with the fit of Gericke-Murillo-Schlanges.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Iron — A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, C. P.; Liu, Wenqing; Xu, Yongbing; Zhou, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is a technique of atomistic simulation which has facilitated scientific discovery of interactions among particles since its advent in the late 1950s. Its merit lies in incorporating statistical mechanics to allow for examination of varying atomic configurations at finite temperatures. Its contributions to materials science from modeling pure metal properties to designing nanowires is also remarkable. This review paper focuses on the progress of MD in understanding the behavior of iron — in pure metal form, in alloys, and in composite nanomaterials. It also discusses the interatomic potentials and the integration algorithms used for simulating iron in the literature. Furthermore, it reveals the current progress of MD in simulating iron by exhibiting some results in the literature. Finally, the review paper briefly mentions the development of the hardware and software tools for such large-scale computations.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electrophoresis of a Telehelic Polymer Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2002-08-01

    We report the conformational and the dynamical properties of an end-labeled polymer chain embedded in a porous medium made of randomly distributed immobile spherical obstacles using a stochastic Molecular Dynamic(MD) simulation method for several obstacle densities and for various bias strenghts applied only to one end of the chain. First, various properties of the chain are studied when the external bias is set to zero. We then extend the stochastic MD simulation to study the electrophresis of a polymer chain driven by (i) a steady and (ii) a time dependent electric field. These studies are relevant for various time dependent gel electrophoresis methods widely used to separate DNA molecules. The qualitative features are compared with experiments, analytic theories, and recent Monte Carlo Simulation results.

  14. Implementation of the force decomposition machine for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Borštnik, Urban; Miller, Benjamin T; Brooks, Bernard R; Janežič, Dušanka

    2012-09-01

    We present the design and implementation of the force decomposition machine (FDM), a cluster of personal computers (PCs) that is tailored to running molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the distributed diagonal force decomposition (DDFD) parallelization method. The cluster interconnect architecture is optimized for the communication pattern of the DDFD method. Our implementation of the FDM relies on standard commodity components even for networking. Although the cluster is meant for DDFD MD simulations, it remains general enough for other parallel computations. An analysis of several MD simulation runs on both the FDM and a standard PC cluster demonstrates that the FDM's interconnect architecture provides a greater performance compared to a more general cluster interconnect. PMID:23085166

  15. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of detonation on the roadrunner supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mniszewski, Susan; Cawkwell, Marc; Germann, Timothy C.

    2012-03-01

    The temporal and spatial scales intrinsic to a real detonating explosive are extremely difficult to capture using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Nevertheless, MD remains very attractive since it allows for the resolution of dynamic phenomena at the atomic scale. Large-scale reactive MD simulations in three dimensions require immense computational resources even when simple reactive force fields are employed. We focus on the REBO force field for 'AB' since it has been shown to support a detonation while being simple, analytic, and short-ranged. The transition from two-to three- dimensional simulations is being facilitated by the port of the REBO force field in the parallel MD code SPaSM to LANL's petaflop supercomputer 'Roadrunner'. We provide a detailed discussion of the challenges associated with computing interatomic forces on a hybrid Opteron/Cell BE computational architecture.

  17. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil : a new parallel computing environment for a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Kimizuka, Hajime; Kaburaki, Hideo

    2002-08-01

    A new parallel computing environment, called as ``Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil'', has been developed to carry out a large-scale short-range molecular dynamics simulation of solids. The stencil is written in C language using MPI for parallelization and designed successfully to separate and conceal parts of the programs describing cutoff schemes and parallel algorithms for data communication. This has been made possible by introducing the concept of image atoms. Therefore, only a sequential programming of the force calculation routine is required for executing the stencil in parallel environment. Typical molecular dynamics routines, such as various ensembles, time integration methods, and empirical potentials, have been implemented in the stencil. In the presentation, the performance of the stencil on parallel computers of Hitachi, IBM, SGI, and PC-cluster using the models of Lennard-Jones and the EAM type potentials for fracture problem will be reported.

  18. Thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HyŻorek, Krzysztof; Tretiakov, Konstantin V.

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels has been calculated over a wide range of densities using two independent methods—the Green-Kubo approach in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Müller-Plathe method in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The Lennard-Jones potential was used to model interatomic interactions. The influence of transversal size and shape of a nanochannel on the thermal conductivity of liquid argon along the length of the channel has been investigated. The transversal size of nanochannel varied from 2.25 nm to 15 nm. The simulations revealed that the thermal conductivity weakly depends on the shape (square vs circular) of channel and scales with a cross-sectional area of nanochannel. It has been observed that thermal conductivity increases with an increase of the transversal size of the channel. Also, it reaches bulk values for some characteristic size of channel that depends strongly on density. Good agreement of the computed thermal conductivities of liquid argon over a wide density range with the experimental data allowed the value of the characteristic size of channel as a function of density to be estimated. This value depends on density and varies from 5 nm to 11 nm.

  19. Thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hyżorek, Krzysztof; Tretiakov, Konstantin V

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels has been calculated over a wide range of densities using two independent methods-the Green-Kubo approach in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Müller-Plathe method in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The Lennard-Jones potential was used to model interatomic interactions. The influence of transversal size and shape of a nanochannel on the thermal conductivity of liquid argon along the length of the channel has been investigated. The transversal size of nanochannel varied from 2.25 nm to 15 nm. The simulations revealed that the thermal conductivity weakly depends on the shape (square vs circular) of channel and scales with a cross-sectional area of nanochannel. It has been observed that thermal conductivity increases with an increase of the transversal size of the channel. Also, it reaches bulk values for some characteristic size of channel that depends strongly on density. Good agreement of the computed thermal conductivities of liquid argon over a wide density range with the experimental data allowed the value of the characteristic size of channel as a function of density to be estimated. This value depends on density and varies from 5 nm to 11 nm. PMID:27208958

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen diffusion in aluminum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, X. W.; El Gabaly, F.; Stavila, V.; Allendorf, M. D.

    2016-03-23

    In this study, hydrogen diffusion impacts the performance of solid-state hydrogen storage materials and contributes to the embrittlement of structural materials under hydrogen-containing environments. In atomistic simulations, the diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated using molecular statics simulations where a nudged elastic band method is used to constrain a path connecting the two end points of an atomic jump. This approach requires prior knowledge of the “end points”. For alloy and defective systems, the number of possible atomic jumps with respect to local atomic configurations is tremendous. Even when these jumps can be exhaustively studied, it is still unclear howmore » they can be combined to give an overall diffusion behavior seen in experiments. Here we describe the use of molecular dynamics simulations to determine the overall diffusion energy barrier from the Arrhenius equation. This method does not require information about atomic jumps, and it has additional advantages, such as the ability to incorporate finite temperature effects and to determine the pre-exponential factor. As a test case for a generic method, we focus on hydrogen diffusion in bulk aluminum. We find that the challenge of this method is the statistical variation of the results. However, highly converged energy barriers can be achieved by an appropriate set of temperatures, output time intervals (for tracking hydrogen positions), and a long total simulation time. Our results help elucidate the inconsistencies of the experimental diffusion data published in the literature. The robust approach developed here may also open up future molecular dynamics simulations to rapidly study diffusion properties of complex material systems in multidimensional spaces involving composition and defects.« less

  1. A molecular dynamics simulation study of defect production in vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, K. |; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1995-01-23

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the process of defect production in pure vanadium. The interaction of atoms was described by the EAM interatomic potential modified at short range to merge smoothly with the universal potential for description of the high energy recoils in cascades. The melting point of this EAM model of vanadium was found to be consistent with the experimental melting temperature. The threshold energies of displacement events in the model system are also consistent with experimental minimum threshold in vanadium, and its average was found to be 44 eV. We evaluated the efficiencies of defect production in the displacement events initiated by recoils with kinetic energy up to 5 keV, and found that the probability of cluster formation is smaller than that of simulated events in fcc metals reported in the literature.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Phospholipid Bilayers with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Hofsäß, Christofer; Lindahl, Erik; Edholm, Olle

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the microscopic interactions between cholesterol and lipids in biological membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of large membranes with different levels of cholesterol content. The simulations extend to 10 ns, and were performed with hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. The bilayers contain 1024 lipids of which 0–40% were cholesterol and the rest DPPC. The effects of cholesterol on the structure and mesoscopic dynamics of the bilayer were monitored as a function of cholesterol concentration. The main effects observed are a significant ordering of the DPPC chains (as monitored by NMR type order parameters), a reduced fraction of gauche bonds, a reduced surface area per lipid, less undulations—corresponding to an increased bending modulus for the membrane, smaller area fluctuations, and a reduced lateral diffusion of DPPC-lipids as well as cholesterols. PMID:12668428

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of field emission from a planar nanodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Torfason, Kristinn; Valfells, Agust; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-03-15

    High resolution molecular dynamics simulations with full Coulomb interactions of electrons are used to investigate field emission in planar nanodiodes. The effects of space-charge and emitter radius are examined and compared to previous results concerning transition from Fowler-Nordheim to Child-Langmuir current [Y. Y. Lau, Y. Liu, and R. K. Parker, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2082 (1994) and Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 073105 (2006)]. The Fowler-Nordheim law is used to determine the current density injected into the system and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to find a favourable point of emission on the emitter surface. A simple fluid like model is also developed and its results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations.

  4. Phase transitions in electrorheological fluids using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Maizza, Giovanni; Palmieri, Antonio; Boretto, Gianmarco; Debenedetti, Massimo

    1999-10-01

    A parametric study of the properties of electrorheological fluids is conducted using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD model is based on the solution of the Langevin equation for a number of suspended particles. The equations of motion include inertial effects, polarization forces, Stokes' drag, short range repulsion, and Brownian forces. Different polarization forces are considered to include the effect of enhancements at short range due to multipole moments induced by the suspended particles and other effects. The model is used to investigate the structural changes induced by external electric fields and by shear strains imposed on the system. The response times are studied as a function of two characteristic parameters describing the physical status of the system (temperature and external electric field). Finally, the stress-strain characteristics are studied and the yield stress is calculated as a function of the external electric field. The simulated response is compared with experimental findings.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of dislocation instability in a stress gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Selinger, Robin L.

    2003-04-01

    We present simulation studies of a morphological instability arising in dislocation dynamics. When an initially straight dislocation line is driven by a stress whose magnitude grows along the direction of dislocation motion, vibrational modes of the dislocation line with wavelength above a threshold value become linearly unstable. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of screw dislocations in Al demonstrate the onset of the instability during dislocation pair annihilation and annihilation at a crack tip. The wavelength of the unstable vibrational mode observed in each case agrees with the predictions of theoretical analysis. We discuss the role of temperature in nucleating the instability and speculate about how instabilities in dislocation motion could affect the density of threading dislocations during growth of heteroepitaxial thin films.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of MgSiO3 Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin-xiang, Zhou; L, Zhou X.; J, Hardy R.; Xin, Xu; X, Xu

    1998-06-01

    Using molecular dynamics to simulate MgSiO3 perovskite is performed to investigate its phase transitions and superionicity. These simulations has used parameter-free Gordon-Kim potentials and a novel technique to monitor the motion of ions which clearly demonstrates the sublattice melting of ions O2- and the rotations of SiO6 octahedra. MgSiO3 has to undergo a few of phase transitions, then enter into the cubic phase. In particular, there is a transitional phase between orthorhombic phase and cubic phase. There are a superionic phase and the cubic phase in magnesium-rich silicate perovskite. This superionic phase occurs after the onset of cubic phase before the melting point. The onset temparature Tc for superionicity is about 200-700 K below the melting point Tm, Tc / Tm similar 0.92.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, J. T.; Robinson, M.; Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K.; Marks, N. A.

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  8. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Homogeneous Crystallization in Polymer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth from the melt of polyethylene-like polymer were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The crystallinity was determined by using the site order parameter method (SOP), which described local order degree around an atom. Snapshots of the simulations showed evolution of the nucleation and the crystal growth through SOP images clearly. The isothermal crystallization kinetics was determined at different temperatures. The rate of crystallization, Kc, and the Avrami exponents, n, were determined as a function of temperature. The forming of nucleis was traced to reveal that the nucleis were formed with more ordered cores and less ordered shells. A detailed statistical analysis of the MD snapshots and trajectories suggested conformations of the polymer chains changed smoothly from random coil to chain folded lamella in the crystallization processes.

  10. Quantum Thermal Bath for Path Integral Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Brieuc, Fabien; Dammak, Hichem; Hayoun, Marc

    2016-03-01

    The quantum thermal bath (QTB) method has been recently developed to account for the quantum nature of the nuclei by using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. QTB-MD is an efficient but approximate method when dealing with strongly anharmonic systems, while path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) gives exact results but in a huge amount of computation time. The QTB and PIMD methods have been combined in order to improve the PIMD convergence or correct the failures of the QTB-MD technique. Therefore, a new power spectral density of the random force within the QTB has been developed. A modified centroid-virial estimator of the kinetic energy, especially adapted to QTB-PIMD, has also been proposed. The method is applied to selected systems: a one-dimensional double-well system, a ferroelectric phase transition, and the position distribution of an hydrogen atom in a fuel cell material. The advantage of the QTB-PIMD method is its ability to give exact results with a more reasonable computation time for strongly anharmonic systems. PMID:26799437

  11. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kouichi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi

    2013-11-21

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of α-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the α-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  12. Study on the thermal resistance in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Qiu, L. E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zheng, X. H. E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W.

    2014-09-07

    In this article, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the heat transport in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel. The two adjacent particles as the basic heat transport unit were modelled to characterize the heat transfer through the calculation of thermal resistance and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The total thermal resistance of two contact particles was predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). The defects were formed by deleting atoms in the system randomly first and performing heating and quenching process afterwards to achieve the DLCA (diffusive limited cluster-cluster aggregation) process. This kind of treatment showed a very reasonable prediction of thermal conductivity for the silica aerogels compared with the experimental values. The heat transport was great suppressed as the contact length increased or defect concentration increased. The constrain effect of heat transport was much significant when contact length fraction was in the small range (<0.5) or the defect concentration is in the high range (>0.5). Also, as the contact length increased, the role of joint thermal resistance played in the constraint of heat transport was increasing. However, the defect concentration did not affect the share of joint thermal resistance as the contact length did. VDOS of the system was calculated by numerical method to characterize the heat transport from atomic vibration view. The smaller contact length and greater defect concentration primarily affected the longitudinal acoustic modes, which ultimately influenced the heat transport between the adjacent particles.

  13. Temperature Dependence Study of Noncontact Afm Images Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Meghdari, Ali

    The effect of temperature on the noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) surface imaging is investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) analysis based on the Sutton-Chen (SC) interatomic potential. Particular attention is devoted to the tip and sample flexibility at different temperatures. When a gold coated probe is brought close to the Au (001) surface at high temperatures, the tip and surface atoms are pulled together and their distance becomes smaller. The tip and sample atoms displacement varies in the different environment temperatures and this leads to the different interaction forces. Along this line, to study the effect of temperature on the resulting images, we have employed the well-known NC-AFM model and carried out realistic non-equilibrium MD 3D simulations of atomic scale imaging at different close approach positions to the surface.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in GaAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2010-04-01

    The quantification of the production of primary defects via displacement cascades is an important ingredient in the prediction of the influence of radiation on the performance of electronic components in radiation environments. Molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades are performed for GaAs The interatomic interactions are described using a recently proposed Bond Order Potential, and a simple model of electronic stopping is incorporated. The production of point defects is quantified as a function of recoil energy and recoil species. Correlations in the point defects are examined. There are a large number of anti-site defects nearest-neighbor pairs as well as di-vacancies and larger order vacancy clusters. Radiation damage and ion implantation in materials have been studied via molecular dynamics for many years. A significant challenge in these simulations is the detailed identification and quantification of the primary defect production. For the present case of a compound semiconductor, GaAs, there are a larger number of possible point defects compared to elemental materials; two types of vacancies, two types of interstitials and antisite defects. This is further complicated by the fact that, in addition to the formation of point defects, amorphous zones may also be created. The goal of the current work is to quantify the production of primary defects in GaAs due to radiation exposures. This information will be used as part of an effort to predict the influence of radiation environments on the performance of electronic components and circuits. The data provide the initial state for continuum-level analysis of the temporal evolution of defect populations. For this initial state, it is important to know both the number of the various point defects that may be produced as well as the initial spatial correlations between the primary defects. The molecular dynamics simulations employ a recently developed Bond Order Potential (BOP) for GaAs. The analysis

  15. Thermal conductivity of model zeolites: molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashov, Vladimir V.

    1999-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of model zeolites was investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations. This type of calculation was found to overestimate the thermal conductivity of low-density silica polymorphs. A better reproduction of the experimental results was found for zeolites, and this was related to the lower phonon mean free path. The thermal conductivity of framework silicates was shown to be determined primarily by the vibrations of the continuous oxygen sublattice. Thus, the most drastic suppression of the heat transfer was related to alterations of the O-O distances; for example, a sixfold reduction in thermal conductivity compared to that of siliceous LTA zeolite was found for LTA-A1PO4. Framework cations were shown to affect the heat transfer by changing the vibrational modes of the structural building units of the framework and non-framework counter-cations, by disturbing the oxygen sublattice locally and acting as Rayleigh and resonant scatterers. A model assuming the heat transfer to be due only to non-dispersive acoustic phonons failed to reproduce the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the mass of the cations and the unit-cell dimension, thus suggesting a more sophisticated mechanism of heat transfer to be operative in framework materials. The effect of non-framework non-ionic species on the thermal conductivity was shown to be determined by their effect on the characteristics of the oxygen framework vibrations. Thus, repulsive interactions between the oxygen sublattice and Xe8 clusters, reducing the anisotropy and anharmonicity of the oxygen vibrations, give rise to enhanced heat transfer in LTA-SiO2 at ambient conditions.

  16. Theoretical studies of lipid bilayer electroporation using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary Alan

    Computer simulations of physical, chemical, and biological systems have improved tremendously over the past five decades. From simple studies of liquid argon in the 1960s to fully atomistic simulations of entire viruses in the past few years, recent advances in high-performance computing have continuously enabled simulations to bridge the gap between scientific theory and experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations in particular have allowed for the direct observation of spatial and temporal events which are at present inaccessible to experiments. For this dissertation I employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transient, electric field-induced poration (or electroporation) of phospholipid bilayers at MV/m electric fields. Phospholipid bilayers are the dominant constituents of cell membranes and act as both a barrier and gatekeeper to the cell interior. This makes their structural integrity and susceptibility to external perturbations an important topic for study, especially as the density of electromagnetic radiation in our environment is increasing steadily. The primary goal of this dissertation is to understand the specific physical and biological mechanisms which facilitate electroporation, and to connect our simulated observations to experiments with live cells and to continuum models which seek to describe the underlying biological processes of electroporation. In Chapter 1 I begin with a brief introduction to phospholipids and phospholipid bilayers, followed by an extensive overview of electroporation and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The following chapters will then focus on peer-reviewed and published work we performed, or on existing projects which are currently being prepared for submission. Chapter 2 looks at how external electric fields affect both oxidized and unoxidized lipid bilayers as a function of oxidation concentration and oxidized lipid type. Oxidative damage to cell membranes represents a physiologically relevant

  17. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green's function reaction dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  18. A random rotor molecule: Vibrational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Shi, Xing-Qiang; Lin, Zijing; Van Hove, Michel A.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular structures that permit intramolecular rotational motion have the potential to function as molecular rotors. We have employed density functional theory and vibrational frequency analysis to study the characteristic structure and vibrational behavior of the molecule (4',4″″-(bicyclo[2,2,2]octane-1,4-diyldi-4,1-phenylene)-bis-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine. IR active vibrational modes were found that favor intramolecular rotation. To demonstrate the rotor behavior of the isolated single molecule, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures were carried out. This molecular rotor is expected to be thermally triggered via excitation of specific vibrational modes, which implies randomness in its direction of rotation.

  19. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing themore » electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.« less

  20. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing the electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.

  1. Measuring kinetic coefficients by molecular dynamics simulation of zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestini, Franck; Debierre, Jean-Marc

    2002-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to measure the kinetic coefficient at the solid-liquid interface in pure gold. Results are obtained for the (111), (100), and (110) orientations. Both Au(100) and Au(110) are in reasonable agreement with the law proposed for collision-limited growth. For Au(111), stacking fault domains form, as first reported by Burke, Broughton, and Gilmer [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 1030 (1988)]. The consequence on the kinetics of this interface is dramatic: the measured kinetic coefficient is three times smaller than that predicted by collision-limited growth. Finally, crystallization and melting are found to be always asymmetrical and here again the effect is much more pronounced for the (111) orientation.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations on the melting of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Feng, Haijun; Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is employed to study the melting of bulk gold and gold nanoparticles. PCFF, Sutton-Chen and COMPASS force fields are adopted to study the melting point of bulk gold and we find out that the Sutton-Chen force field is the most accurate model in predicting the melting point of bulk gold. Consequently, the Sutton-Chen force field is applied to study the melting points of spherical gold nanoparticles with different diameters. Variations of diffusion coefficient, potential energy and translational order parameter with temperature are analyzed. The simulated melting points of gold nanoparticles are between 615∼1115 K, which are much lower than that of bulk gold (1336 K). As the diameter of gold nanoparticle drops, the melting point also descends. The melting mechanism is also analyzed for gold nanoparticles.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of annealed ZnO surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    The effect of thermally annealing a slab of wurtzite ZnO, terminated by two surfaces, (0001) (which is oxygen-terminated) and (0001{sup ¯}) (which is Zn-terminated), is investigated via molecular dynamics simulation by using reactive force field (ReaxFF). We found that upon heating beyond a threshold temperature of ∼700 K, surface oxygen atoms begin to sublimate from the (0001) surface. The ratio of oxygen leaving the surface at a given temperature increases as the heating temperature increases. A range of phenomena occurring at the atomic level on the (0001) surface has also been explored, such as formation of oxygen dimers on the surface and evolution of partial charge distribution in the slab during the annealing process. It was found that the partial charge distribution as a function of the depth from the surface undergoes a qualitative change when the annealing temperature is above the threshold temperature.

  4. "Like-charge attraction" between anionic polyelectrolytes: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Ferenc; Rieger, Jens

    2005-01-18

    "Like-charge attraction" is a phenomenon found in many biological systems containing DNA or proteins, as well as in polyelectrolyte systems of industrial importance. "Like-charge attraction" between polyanions is observed in the presence of mobile multivalent cations. At a certain limiting concentration of cations, the negatively charged macroions cease to repel each other and even an attractive force between the anions is found. With classical molecular dynamics simulations it is possible to elucidate the processes that govern the attractive behavior with atomistic resolution. As an industrially relevant example we study the interaction of negatively charged carboxylate groups of sodium polyacrylate molecules with divalent cationic Ca2+ counterions. Here we show that Ca2+ ions initially associate with single chains of polyacrylates and strongly influence sodium ion distribution; shielded polyanions approach each other and eventually "stick" together (precipitate), contrary to the assumption that precipitation is initially induced by intermolecular Ca2+ bridging. PMID:15641856

  5. Orientation Dependence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Germann, Timothy C.; Holian, Brad Lee; Lomdahl, Peter S.; Ravelo, Ramon

    2000-06-05

    We use multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study shock wave propagation in fcc crystals. As shown recently, shock waves along the <100> direction form intersecting stacking faults by slippage along {l_brace}111{r_brace} close-packed planes at sufficiently high shock strengths. We find even more interesting behavior of shocks propagating in other low-index directions: for the <111> case, an elastic precursor separates the shock front from the slipped (plastic) region. Shock waves along the <110> direction generate a leading solitary wave train, followed (at sufficiently high shock speeds) by an elastic precursor, and then a region of complex plastic deformation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Gas adsorption and accumulation on hydrophobic surfaces: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qing-Qun; Yang, Jie-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations show that the gas dissolved in water can be adsorbed at a hydrophobic interface and accumulates thereon. Initially, a water depletion layer appears on the hydrophobic interface. Gas molecules then enter the depletion layer and form a high-density gas-enriched layer. Finally, the gas-enriched layer accumulates to form a nanobubble. The radian of the nanobubble increases with time until equilibrium is reached. The equilibrium state arises through a Brenner-Lohse dynamic equilibrium mechanism, whereby the diffusive outflux is compensated by an influx near the contact line. Additionally, supersaturated gas also accumulates unsteadily in bulk water, since it can diffuse back into the water and is gradually adsorbed by a solid substrate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21376161).

  7. Erbium Implantation in Silica Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jincheng; Corrales, Louis R.

    2007-02-01

    Defect formation induced by erbium implantation in silica glass and cristobalite was studied using molecular dynamics simulations employing a partial charge model in combination with the ZBL potential. The results show that the number of displaced atoms generated at the same PKA energy is similar in silica and cristobalite but the number of coordination defects created is much lower in the cristobalite than in silica glass. In both cases, the erbium ion is able to create an optimal coordination environment at the end of the collision cascade. Subsequent thermal annealing causes the relaxation of the silicon oxygen network structure along with a reduction of silicon and oxygen defects. This research is supported by the Divisions of Materials Sciences and Engineering and Chemical Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation on Stability of Insulin on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Li-jun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Shen, Jia-wei; Kang, Yu

    2009-12-01

    The adsorption dynamics of a model protein (the human insulin) onto graphene surfaces with different sizes was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. During the adsorption, it has different effect on the stability of the model protein in the fixed and non-fixed graphene systems. The tertiary structure of the protein was destroyed or partially destroyed, and graphene surfaces shows the selective protection for some α-helices in non-fixed systems but not in fixed systems by reason of the flexibility of graphene. As indicated by the interaction energy curve and trajectory animation, the conformation and orientation selection of the protein were induced by the properties and the texture of graphene surfaces. The knowledge of protein adsorption on graphene surfaces would be helpful to better understand stability of protein on graphene surfaces and facilitate potential applications of graphene in biotechnology.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of TATB-like Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, Filipp; Dremov, Vladimir; Derbenev, Ilya; Karavaev, Alexey; Soulard, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    A modification of REBO potential has been proposed for the molecular dynamics simulation of a TATB-like condensed explosive whose molecule initially consists of four different atoms. TATB-like means bulk properties of initial state and parameters at CJ point similar to those of real TATB. Parameters of the potential are subdivided into two groups that are responsible for CJ parameters and reaction zone width. The possibility of formation of intermediate detonation products allows variation of reaction zone characteristics without changing CJ parameters. Provided are a number of test MD calculations on the thermodynamic properties of both the original explosive and detonation products, parameters at CJ point, reactions rates and reaction zone width as dependent upon the potential parameters as well as the evaluation of critical diameter. Mechanism of the detonation initiation proper to heterogeneous explosives has been investigated.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tatb-Like Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Derbenev, I. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Soulard, L.

    2007-12-01

    A modification of REBO potential has been proposed for the molecular dynamics simulation of a TATB-like condensed explosive whose molecule initially consists of four different atoms. TATB-like means bulk properties of initial state and parameters at CJ point similar to those of real TATB. Parameters of the potential are subdivided into two groups that are responsible for CJ parameters and reaction zone width. The possibility of formation of intermediate detonation products allows variation of reaction zone characteristics without changing CJ parameters. Provided are a number of test MD calculations on the thermodynamic properties of both the original explosive and detonation products, parameters at CJ point, reactions rates and reaction zone width as dependent upon the potential parameters as well as the evaluation of critical diameter. Mechanism of the detonation initiation proper to heterogeneous explosives has been investigated.

  11. Micellar crystals in solution from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.; Lorenz, C.; Travesset, A.

    2008-05-14

    Polymers with both soluble and insoluble blocks typically self-assemble into micelles, which are aggregates of a finite number of polymers where the soluble blocks shield the insoluble ones from contact with the solvent. Upon increasing concentration, these micelles often form gels that exhibit crystalline order in many systems. In this paper, we present a study of both the dynamics and the equilibrium properties of micellar crystals of triblock polymers using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that equilibration of single micelle degrees of freedom and crystal formation occur by polymer transfer between micelles, a process that is described by transition state theory. Near the disordered (or melting) transition, bcc lattices are favored for all triblocks studied. Lattices with fcc ordering are also found but only at lower kinetic temperatures and for triblocks with short hydrophilic blocks. Our results lead to a number of theoretical considerations and suggest a range of implications to experimental systems with a particular emphasis on Pluronic polymers.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Energetic Uranium Recoil Damage in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-10-11

    Defect production and amorphization due to energetic uranium recoils in zircon (ZrSiO4), which is a promising ceramic nuclear waste form, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. An algorithm that distinguishes between undamaged crystal, crystalline defects and amorphous regions is used to develop a fundamental understanding of the primary damage state. The amorphous cascade core is separated from the surrounding crystal by a defect-rich region. Small, chemically inhomogeneous amorphous clusters are also produced around the core. The amorphous regions consist of under-coordinated Zr and polymerized Si leading to amorphization and phase separation on a nanometer scale into Zr- and Si-rich regions. This separation could play an important role in the experimentally observed formation of nanoscale ZrO2 in ZrSiO4 irradiated at elevated temperatures.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate using polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.N.; Jordan, K.D.; Taylor, C.E.

    2007-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate have been carried out using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 polarizable force fields. Properties examined include the temperature dependence of the lattice constant, the OC and OO radial distribution functions and the vibrational spectra. Both the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models are found to successfully account for the available experimental data, with overall slightly better agreement with experiment being found for the AMOEBA model. Several properties calculated using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models differ appreciable from the corresponding results obtained previously using the polarizable TIP4P-FQ model. This appears to be due to the inadequacy of the treatment of polarization, especially, the restriction of polarization to in-plane only, in the TIP4P-FQ model.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of impurities in nanocrystalline diamond grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, M.; Zapol, P.; Frauenheim, T.; Gruen, D. M.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2000-01-12

    Nanocrystalline diamond films grown on Si substrates at 800 C from hydrogen-poor plasmas have a number of highly desirable mechanical and electronic properties. Impurities were found by SIMS measurements to be uniformly distributed throughout the thickness of the films at a level of 10{sup 17}--10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. It is likely that the impurities are located at the grain boundaries, which play a crucial role in controlling important characteristics of the films, such as electrical conductivity and electron emission. Density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) molecular dynamics simulations were performed for diamond light-energy high-angle (100) twist grain boundaries with impurities such as N, Si and H.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of dislocations in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Paul; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Devincre, Benoît

    2013-11-01

    The plasticity of the fluorite structure in UO2 is investigated with molecular dynamics simulation and empirical potential. The stacking fault energies and the dislocation core structures with Burgers vector a2<110> are systematically calculated. All dislocation core structures show a significant increase of the oxygen sub-lattice disorder at temperatures higher than 1500 K. The threshold stress for dislocation glide is found to decrease with increasing temperature but its values is always very high, several GPa at 0 K and several hundred of MPa at 2000 K. A relation between the dislocation mobility dependence with temperature and the increase of the oxygen sub-lattice disorder in the dislocation cores is established.

  16. Molecular dynamics computer simulation of permeation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.I.; Heffelfinger, G.S.; Fisler, D.K.; Ford, D.M.

    1997-12-31

    In this work the authors simulate permeation of gases and cations in solid models using molecular mechanics and a dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics technique. The molecular sieving nature of microporous zeolites are discussed and compared with that for amorphous silica made by sol-gel methods. One mesoporous and one microporous membrane model are tested with Lennard-Jones gases corresponding to He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4}. The mesoporous membrane model clearly follows a Knudsen diffusion mechanism, while the microporous model having a hard-sphere cutoff pore diameter of {approximately}3.4 {angstrom} demonstrates molecular sieving of the methane ({sigma} = 3.8 {angstrom}) but anomalous behavior for Ar ({sigma} = 3.4 {angstrom}). Preliminary results of Ca{sup +} diffusion in calcite and He/H{sub 2} diffusion in polyisobutylene are also presented.

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of thermophysical properties of fluid ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Cong; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    We have performed first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory to study the thermophysical properties of ethane under extreme conditions. We present results for the equation of state of fluid ethane in the warm dense region. The optical conductivity is calculated via the Kubo-Greenwood formula from which the dc conductivity and optical reflectivity are derived. The close correlation between the nonmetal-metal transition of ethane and its decomposition, that ethane dissociates significantly into molecular and/or atomic hydrogen and some long alkane chains, has been systematically studied by analyzing the optical conductivity spectra, pair correlation functions, electronic density of states, and charge density distribution of fluid ethane.

  18. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning.

    PubMed

    Mugnai, Mauro L; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system-the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide. PMID:25573551

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate using polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.N.; Jordan, K.D.; Taylor, C.E.

    2007-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate have been carried out using the polarizable AMOEBA and COS/G2 force fields. Properties calculated include the temperature dependence of the lattice constant, the OC and OO radial distribution functions, and the vibrational spectra. Both the AMOEBA and COS/G2 force fields are found to successfully account for the available experimental data, with overall somewhat better agreement with experiment being found for the AMOEBA model. Comparison is made with previous results obtained using TIP4P and SPC/E effective two-body force fields and the polarizable TIP4P-FQ force field, which allows for in-plane polarization only. Significant differences are found between the properties calculated using the TIP4P-FQ model and those obtained using the other models, indicating an inadequacy of restricting explicit polarization to in-plane onl

  20. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms-1. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kngas=1.972 ), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Knliquid=0.01 for D =36 nm ) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm droplets.

  1. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble. PMID:20046980

  2. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble. PMID:20046980

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations: Parameter evaluation, application and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a theoretical technique for investigating the physical properties of a wide variety of molecules. This dissertation contains my studies on three important parts of the MD simulation: evaluation of parameters in empirical energy functions widely used in MD simulations, application of MD simulation on experimentally interested biological molecules and development of new methods for constraint dynamics simulations. All the work in this thesis made use of CHARMM as an MD simulation tool. The MD simulation uses empirical energy functions parameterized by a set of parameters. These parameters play an important role in the quality of the simulations. I evaluated nine parameter sets from Harvard University and Molecular Simulations, Inc. for protein simulations by the MD simulations of hydrated form of carboxy- myoglobin and interleukin-1/beta, which are rich in two typical protein structure motifs, helix and β sheet structures respectively. It is found that some sets are good at representing helical structure proteins while others are good at β sheet proteins. But all of them need improvement on representing motions at low temperature. Experimental evidence indicates that the 1A coiled-coil domains of the Intermediate Filament (IF) proteins consisting of coiled human keratins 1 and 10 (K1 and K10) are 'hot spots' for substitutional mutations. Some of these mutations are correlated to the human skin diseases-epidermolytic hyperkeratiosis (EH) and epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). The MD simulation technique is used here for the first time to model and simulate these proteins to elucidate the molecular-level effects of these mutations. Lacking the experimental crystal structures, the initial structure of 1A domain of the wild type Intermediate Filament protein and its mutants were modeled from scratch to reproduce the well- known properties of the proteins of this kind followed by identical MD simulations. The important result is

  4. Direct molecular dynamics simulation of liquid-solid phase equilibria for two-component plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Hughto, J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2012-06-01

    We determine the liquid-solid phase diagram for carbon-oxygen and oxygen-selenium plasma mixtures using two-phase molecular dynamics simulations. We identify liquid, solid, and interface regions using a bond angle metric. To study finite-size effects, we perform 27 648- and 55 296-ion simulations. To help monitor nonequilibrium effects, we calculate diffusion constants Di. For the carbon-oxygen system we find that DO for oxygen ions in the solid is much smaller than DC for carbon ions and that both diffusion constants are 80 or more times smaller than diffusion constants in the liquid phase. There is excellent agreement between our carbon-oxygen phase diagram and that predicted by Medin and Cumming. This suggests that errors from finite-size and nonequilibrium effects are small and that the carbon-oxygen phase diagram is now accurately known. The oxygen-selenium system is a simple two-component model for more complex rapid proton capture nucleosynthesis ash compositions for an accreting neutron star. Diffusion of oxygen, in a predominantly selenium crystal, is remarkably fast, comparable to diffusion in the liquid phase. We find a somewhat lower melting temperature for the oxygen-selenium system than that predicted by Medin and Cumming. This is probably because of electron screening effects.

  5. Direct molecular dynamics simulation of liquid-solid phase equilibria for two-component plasmas.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A S; Hughto, J; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2012-06-01

    We determine the liquid-solid phase diagram for carbon-oxygen and oxygen-selenium plasma mixtures using two-phase molecular dynamics simulations. We identify liquid, solid, and interface regions using a bond angle metric. To study finite-size effects, we perform 27,648- and 55,296-ion simulations. To help monitor nonequilibrium effects, we calculate diffusion constants D(i). For the carbon-oxygen system we find that D(O) for oxygen ions in the solid is much smaller than D(C) for carbon ions and that both diffusion constants are 80 or more times smaller than diffusion constants in the liquid phase. There is excellent agreement between our carbon-oxygen phase diagram and that predicted by Medin and Cumming. This suggests that errors from finite-size and nonequilibrium effects are small and that the carbon-oxygen phase diagram is now accurately known. The oxygen-selenium system is a simple two-component model for more complex rapid proton capture nucleosynthesis ash compositions for an accreting neutron star. Diffusion of oxygen, in a predominantly selenium crystal, is remarkably fast, comparable to diffusion in the liquid phase. We find a somewhat lower melting temperature for the oxygen-selenium system than that predicted by Medin and Cumming. This is probably because of electron screening effects. PMID:23005226

  6. Nitrile and thiocyanate IR probes: Molecular dynamics simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Han, Jae-Beom; Lee, Hochan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2008-04-01

    Nitrile- and thiocyanate-derivatized amino acids have been found to be useful IR probes for investigating their local electrostatic environments in proteins. To shed light on the CN stretch frequency shift and spectral lineshape change induced by interactions with hydrogen-bonding solvent molecules, we carried out both classical and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for MeCN and MeSCN in water. These QM/MM and conventional force field MD simulation results were found to be inconsistent with the experimental results as well as with the high-level ab initio calculation results of MeCN-water and MeSCN-water potential energies. Thus, a new set of atomic partial charges of MeCN and MeSCN is obtained. By using the MD simulation trajectories and the electrostatic potential model recently developed, the CN and SCN stretching mode frequency trajectories were obtained and used to simulate the IR spectra. The C N frequency blueshifts of MeCN and MeSCN in water are estimated to be 9.0 and 1.9cm-1, respectively, in comparison with those of gas phase values. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured IR spectra of MeCN, MeSCN, β-cyano-L-alanine, and cyanylated cysteine in water and other polar solvents.

  7. How to identify dislocations in molecular dynamics simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo; Wang, FengChao; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, YaPu

    2014-12-01

    Dislocations are of great importance in revealing the underlying mechanisms of deformed solid crystals. With the development of computational facilities and technologies, the observations of dislocations at atomic level through numerical simulations are permitted. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suggests itself as a powerful tool for understanding and visualizing the creation of dislocations as well as the evolution of crystal defects. However, the numerical results from the large-scale MD simulations are not very illuminating by themselves and there exist various techniques for analyzing dislocations and the deformed crystal structures. Thus, it is a big challenge for the beginners in this community to choose a proper method to start their investigations. In this review, we summarized and discussed up to twelve existing structure characterization methods in MD simulations of deformed crystal solids. A comprehensive comparison was made between the advantages and disadvantages of these typical techniques. We also examined some of the recent advances in the dynamics of dislocations related to the hydraulic fracturing. It was found that the dislocation emission has a significant effect on the propagation and bifurcation of the crack tip in the hydraulic fracturing.

  8. An undergraduate laboratory activity on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Spitznagel, Benjamin; Pritchett, Paige R; Messina, Troy C; Goadrich, Mark; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Vision and Change [AAAS, 2011] outlines a blueprint for modernizing biology education by addressing conceptual understanding of key concepts, such as the relationship between structure and function. The document also highlights skills necessary for student success in 21st century Biology, such as the use of modeling and simulation. Here we describe a laboratory activity that allows students to investigate the dynamic nature of protein structure and function through the use of a modeling technique known as molecular dynamics (MD). The activity takes place over two lab periods that are 3 hr each. The first lab period unpacks the basic approach behind MD simulations, beginning with the kinematic equations that all bioscience students learn in an introductory physics course. During this period students are taught rudimentary programming skills in Python while guided through simple modeling exercises that lead up to the simulation of the motion of a single atom. In the second lab period students extend concepts learned in the first period to develop skills in the use of expert MD software. Here students simulate and analyze changes in protein conformation resulting from temperature change, solvation, and phosphorylation. The article will describe how these activities can be carried out using free software packages, including Abalone and VMD/NAMD. PMID:26751047

  9. Surface Diffusion of Single Polymer Chain Using Molecular Dynamics SIMULATION*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tapan; Keblinski, Pawel; Kumar, Sanat; Granick, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Results of recent experiments on polymer chains adsorbed from dilute solution at solid-liquid interface show the power scaling law dependence of the chain diffusivity, D, as a function of the degree of polymerization, N, D ˜ N^3/2. By contrast, DNA molecules bound to fluid cationic lipid bilayers follows Rouse dynamics with D ˜ N^1. We used molecular dynamics simulations to gain an understanding of these dissimilar scaling behaviors. Our model systems contain chains comprised of N monomers connected by anharmonic springs described by the finite extendible nonlinear elastic, FENE potential, embedded into a solvent of N=1 monomers. Two types of simulations we performed: (i) the chain is confined to two dimensions, (ii) the three dimensional chain in the solvent is confined between two solids plates. With randomly placed impenetrable obstacles on the surface, the diffusion of 2D chains exhibits, D ˜ N^3/2 behavior, when the chain radius of gyration, Rg, is larger than half the distance between obstacles, and D ˜ N^1 for shorter chains. In the presence of an athermal solvent, the scaling exponent is 0.75 due to hydrodynamic forces, for the two-dimensional system. We will also discuss the nature of dynamic adsorption transition and effects of hydrodynamics forces on chain diffusion for the three-dimensional simulations.

  10. Naratriptan aggregation in lipid bilayers: perspectives from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Irene; Pickholz, Mónica

    2016-09-01

    In order to understand the interaction between naratriptan and a fully hydrated bilayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-choline (POPC), we carried out molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were performed considering neutral and protonated ionization states, starting from different initial conditions. At physiological pH, the protonated state of naratriptan is predominant. It is expected that neutral compounds could have larger membrane partition than charged compounds. However, for the specific case of triptans, it is difficult to study neutral species in membranes experimentally, making computer simulations an interesting tool. When the naratriptan molecules were originally placed in water, they partitioned between the bilayer/water interface and water phase, as has been described for similar compounds. From this condition, the drugs displayed low access to the hydrophobic environment, with no significant effects on bilayer organization. The molecules anchored in the interface, due mainly to the barrier function of the polar and oriented lipid heads. On the other hand, when placed inside the bilayer, both neutral and protonated naratriptan showed self-aggregation in the lipid tail environment. In particular, the protonated species exhibited a pore-like structure, dragging water through this environment. Graphical Abstract Different behaviour of Naratriptan and Sumatriptan, when the drugs were originally placed in the lipid core. PMID:27558798

  11. Displacement cascades in metals and ordered alloys. Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, N. V.; Vascon, R.

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the present Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is a better understanding of the mechanisms associated with defect production and atomic mixing occurring in displacement cascades in irradiated metals and alloys. The cascades of energy up to 30 keV were investigated by parallel MD simulations in crystals with a reasonably large size of the simulation box, containing up to 2 millions of atoms. In order to separate the effect of the mass of atoms from the chemical effect on the defect production and the disordering in alloys, cascades were generated in Ni 3Al and NiAl compounds where the Al atoms were artificially given the Ni mass. A series of artificial alloys FeAl, FeSb, FeAu, FeU were also investigated. Large interstitial clusters were found to be very mobile and a glide mechanism was pointed out. A sub-cascade formation mechanism was observed from cascades of energy equal to or higher than 5 keV and related to the quasi-channeling phenomenon.

  12. Large-scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubartt, Bradley; Liu, Xuejing; Amar, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    While a variety of methods have been developed to carry out atomistic simulations of thin-film growth at small deposition angles with respect to the substrate normal, due to the complex morphology as well as the existence of multiple scattering of depositing atoms by the growing thin-film, realistically modeling the deposition process for large deposition angles can be quite challenging. Accordingly, we have developed a computationally efficient method based on the use of a single graphical processing unit (GPU) to carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the deposition and growth of thin-films via glancing angle deposition. Using this method we have carried out large-scale MD simulations, based on an embedded-atom-method potential, of Cu/Cu(100) growth up to 20 monolayers for deposition angles ranging from 50° to 85° and for both random and fixed azimuthal angles. Our results for the thin-film porosity, roughness, lateral correlation length, and density vs height will be presented and compared with experiments. Results for the dependence of the microstructure, grain-size distribution, surface texture, and defect concentration on deposition angle will also be presented. Supported by NSF DMR-0907399

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ion Equilibration in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Nikola; Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; Killian, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Understanding transport and equilibration in strongly coupled plasmas is important for modeling plasmas found in extreme environments like inertial confinement fusion plasmas and interiors of gas-giant planets. We use molecular dynamics simulations of Yukawa one component plasmas under periodic boundary conditions to study the evolution of strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) at early times. Simulations provide access to observable quantities in strongly coupled plasmas, namely correlation functions. Experimentally, the average velocity of an ion subset with a skewed velocity profile has been used to measure velocity autocorrelation functions and provide access to diffusion coefficients and other transport processes in UNPs. Using the simulation, we verify the experimental measurements of average velocities of ion subsets in UNPs and confirm their agreement with the velocity autocorrelation function. Finally, we examine the collective mode behavior of the ions during their equilibration phase by calculating the longitudinal current correlation function at various times during equilibration. This allows us to study the collective mode coupling behavior of the equilibration of ions in UNPs and its dependence on screening parameter.

  14. Hybrid particle-field molecular dynamics simulation for polyelectrolyte systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Milano, Giuseppe; Shi, An-Chang; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-04-14

    To achieve simulations on large spatial and temporal scales with high molecular chemical specificity, a hybrid particle-field method was proposed recently. This method is developed by combining molecular dynamics and self-consistent field theory (MD-SCF). The MD-SCF method has been validated by successfully predicting the experimentally observable properties of several systems. Here we propose an efficient scheme for the inclusion of electrostatic interactions in the MD-SCF framework. In this scheme, charged molecules are interacting with the external fields that are self-consistently determined from the charge densities. This method is validated by comparing the structural properties of polyelectrolytes in solution obtained from the MD-SCF and particle-based simulations. Moreover, taking PMMA-b-PEO and LiCF3SO3 as examples, the enhancement of immiscibility between the ion-dissolving block and the inert block by doping lithium salts into the copolymer is examined by using the MD-SCF method. By employing GPU-acceleration, the high performance of the MD-SCF method with explicit treatment of electrostatics facilitates the simulation study of many problems involving polyelectrolytes. PMID:27001709

  15. Hemolytic mechanism of dioscin proposed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu; Wang, Renxiao

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are a class of compounds containing a triterpenoid or steroid core with some attached carbohydrate modules. Many saponins cause hemolysis. However, the hemolytic mechanism of saponins at the molecular level is not yet fully understood. In an attempt to explore this issue, we have studied dioscin-a saponin with high hemolytic activity-through extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, all-atom MD simulations of 8 ns duration were conducted to study the stability of the dioscin-cholesterol complex and the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in water and in decane, respectively. MM-GB/SA computations indicate that the dioscin-cholesterol complex is energetically more favorable than the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in a non-polar environment. Next, several coarse-grained MD simulations of 400 ns duration were conducted to directly observe the distribution of multiple dioscin molecules on a DPPC-POPC-PSM-CHOL lipid bilayer. Our results indicate that dioscin can penetrate into the lipid bilayer, accumulate in the lipid raft micro-domain, and then bind cholesterol. This leads to the destabilization of lipid raft and consequent membrane curvature, which may eventually result in the hemolysis of red cells. This possible mechanism of hemolysis can well explain some experimental observations on hemolysis. PMID:19513766

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of graphene bombardment with Si ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xin-Mao; Gao, Ting-Hong; Yan, Wan-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Tian; Xie, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff-Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark (Tersoff-ZBL) potential and adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) potential are performed to study the effect of irradiated graphene with silicon ion at several positions and energy levels of 0.1-1000 eV. The simulations reveal four processes: absorption, replacement, transmission and damage. At energies below 110 eV, the dominant process is absorption. For atom in group (a), the process that takes place is replacement, in which the silicon ion removes one carbon atom and occupies the place of the eliminated atom at the incident energy of 72-370 eV. Transmission is present at energies above 100 eV for atom in group (d). Damage is a very important process in current bombardment, and there are four types of defects: single vacancy, replacement-single vacancy, double vacancy and nanopore. The simulations provide a fundamental understanding of the silicon bombardment of graphene, and the parameters required to develop graphene-based devices by controlling defect formation.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of thionated hen egg white lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Eichenberger, Andreas P; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the driving forces of protein folding is a complex challenge because different types of interactions play a varying role. To investigate the role of hydrogen bonding involving the backbone, the effect of thio substitutions in a protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), was investigated through molecular dynamics simulations of native as well as partly (only residues in loops) and fully thionated HEWL using the GROMOS 54A7 force field. The results of the three simulations show that the structural properties of fully thionated HEWL clearly differ from those of the native protein, while for partly thionated HEWL they only changed slightly compared with native HEWL. The analysis of the torsional-angle distributions and hydrogen bonds in the backbone suggests that the α-helical segments of native HEWL tend to show a propensity to convert to 310-helical geometry in fully thionated HEWL. A comparison of the simulated quantities with experimental NMR data such as nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) atom–atom distance bounds and 3JHNHα-couplings measured for native HEWL illustrates that the information content of these quantities with respect to the structural changes induced by thionation of the protein backbone is rather limited. PMID:22653637

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of thionated hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Eichenberger, Andreas P; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-08-01

    Understanding of the driving forces of protein folding is a complex challenge because different types of interactions play a varying role. To investigate the role of hydrogen bonding involving the backbone, the effect of thio substitutions in a protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), was investigated through molecular dynamics simulations of native as well as partly (only residues in loops) and fully thionated HEWL using the GROMOS 54A7 force field. The results of the three simulations show that the structural properties of fully thionated HEWL clearly differ from those of the native protein, while for partly thionated HEWL they only changed slightly compared with native HEWL. The analysis of the torsional-angle distributions and hydrogen bonds in the backbone suggests that the α-helical segments of native HEWL tend to show a propensity to convert to 3(10)-helical geometry in fully thionated HEWL. A comparison of the simulated quantities with experimental NMR data such as nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) atom-atom distance bounds and (3)J((H)(N)(H)(α))-couplings measured for native HEWL illustrates that the information content of these quantities with respect to the structural changes induced by thionation of the protein backbone is rather limited. PMID:22653637

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of He bubble nucleation at grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Millett, Paul C; Tonks, Michael; Zhang, Liangzhe; Biner, Bulent

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation behavior of He bubbles in single-crystal (sc) and nano-grain body-centered-cubic (bcc) Mo is simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, focusing on the effects of the grain boundary (GB) structure. In sc Mo, the nucleation behavior of He bubbles depends on irradiation conditions. He bubbles nucleate by either clustering of He atoms with pre-existing vacancies or self-interstitial-atom (SIA) punching without initial vacancies. In nano-grain Mo, strong precipitation of He at the GBs is observed, and the density, size and spatial distribution of He bubbles vary with the GB structure. The corresponding He bubble density is higher in nano-grain Mo than that in sc Mo and the average bubble size is smaller. In the GB plane, He bubbles distribute along the dislocation cores for GBs consisting of GB dislocations and randomly for those without distinguishable dislocation structures. The simulation results in nano-grain Mo are in agreement with previous experiments in metal nano-layers, and they are further explained by the effect of excess volume associated with the GBs. PMID:22722319

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of He bubble nucleation at grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Millett, Paul C.; Tonks, Michael; Zhang, Liangzhe; Biner, Bulent

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation behavior of He bubbles in single-crystal (sc) and nano-grain body-centered-cubic (bcc) Mo is simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, focusing on the effects of the grain boundary (GB) structure. In sc Mo, the nucleation behavior of He bubbles depends on irradiation conditions. He bubbles nucleate by either clustering of He atoms with pre-existing vacancies or self-interstitial-atom (SIA) punching without initial vacancies. In nano-grain Mo, strong precipitation of He at the GBs is observed, and the density, size and spatial distribution of He bubbles vary with the GB structure. The corresponding He bubble density is higher in nano-grain Mo than that in sc Mo and the average bubble size is smaller. In the GB plane, He bubbles distribute along the dislocation cores for GBs consisting of GB dislocations and randomly for those without distinguishable dislocation structures. The simulation results in nano-grain Mo are in agreement with previous experiments in metal nano-layers, and they are further explained by the effect of excess volume associated with the GBs.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water: Hybrid density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Todorova, T; Seitsonen, A; Hutter, J; Kuo, W; Mundy, C

    2005-09-12

    The structure, dynamical and electronic properties of liquid water utilizing different hybrid density functionals were tested within the plane wave framework of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. The computational approach, which employs modified functionals with short-ranged Hartree-Fock exchange, was first tested in calculations of the structural and bonding properties of the water dimer and cyclic water trimer. Liquid water simulations were performed at the state point of 350 K at the experimental density. Simulations included three different hybrid functionals, a meta functional, four gradient corrected functionals, the local density and Hartree-Fock approximation. It is found that hybrid functionals are superior in reproducing the experimental structure and dynamical properties as measured by the radial distribution function and self diffusion constant when compared to the pure density functionals. The local density and Hartree-Fock approximations show strongly over- and under-structured liquids, respectively. Hydrogen bond analysis shows that the hybrid functionals give slightly smaller averaged numbers of hydrogen bonds and similar hydrogen bond populations as pure density functionals. The average molecular dipole moments in the liquid from the three hybrid functionals are lower than from the corresponding pure density functionals.

  2. Nonequilibrium radiative hypersonic flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, J. S.; Surzhikov, S. T.

    2012-08-01

    Nearly all the required scientific disciplines for computational hypersonic flow simulation have been developed on the framework of gas kinetic theory. However when high-temperature physical phenomena occur beneath the molecular and atomic scales, the knowledge of quantum physics and quantum chemical-physics becomes essential. Therefore the most challenging topics in computational simulation probably can be identified as the chemical-physical models for a high-temperature gaseous medium. The thermal radiation is also associated with quantum transitions of molecular and electronic states. The radiative energy exchange is characterized by the mechanisms of emission, absorption, and scattering. In developing a simulation capability for nonequilibrium radiation, an efficient numerical procedure is equally important both for solving the radiative transfer equation and for generating the required optical data via the ab-initio approach. In computational simulation, the initial values and boundary conditions are paramount for physical fidelity. Precise information at the material interface of ablating environment requires more than just a balance of the fluxes across the interface but must also consider the boundary deformation. The foundation of this theoretic development shall be built on the eigenvalue structure of the governing equations which can be described by Reynolds' transport theorem. Recent innovations for possible aerospace vehicle performance enhancement via an electromagnetic effect appear to be very attractive. The effectiveness of this mechanism is dependent strongly on the degree of ionization of the flow medium, the consecutive interactions of fluid dynamics and electrodynamics, as well as an externally applied magnetic field. Some verified research results in this area will be highlighted. An assessment of all these most recent advancements in nonequilibrium modeling of chemical kinetics, chemical-physics kinetics, ablation, radiative exchange

  3. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of heme reorientational motions in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, E R

    1993-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of 2-ns duration were performed on carbonmonoxymyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin in vacuo to study the reorientational dynamics of the heme group. The heme in both simulations undergoes reorientations of approximately 5 degrees amplitude on a subpicosecond time scale, which produce a rapid initial decay in the reorientational correlation function to about 0.99. The heme also experiences infrequent changes in average orientation of approximately 10 degrees amplitude, which lead to a larger slow decay of the reorientational correlation function over a period of hundreds of picoseconds. The simulations have not converged with respect to these infrequent transitions. However, an estimate of the order parameter for rapid internal motions of the heme from those orientations which are sampled by the simulations suggests that the subnanosecond orientational dynamics of the heme accounts for at least 30% of the unresolved initial anisotropy decay observed in the nanosecond time-resolved optical absorption experiments on myoglobin reported by Ansari et al. in a companion paper (Ansari, A., C.M. Jones, E.R. Henry, J. Hofrichter, and W.A. Eaton. 1992. Biophys. J. 64:852-868.). A more complete sampling of the accessible heme orientations would most likely increase this fraction further. The simulation of the liganded molecule also suggests that the conformational dynamics of the CO ligand may contribute significantly to discrepancies between the ligand conformation as probed by x-ray diffraction and by infrared-optical photoselection experiments. The protein back-bone explores multiple conformations during the simulations, with the largest structural changes appearing in the E and F helices, which are in contact with the heme. The variations in the heme orientation correlate with the conformational dynamics of the protein on a time scale of hundreds of picoseconds, suggesting that the heme orientation may provide a useful probe of dynamical processes

  5. Validating clustering of molecular dynamics simulations using polymer models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful technique for sampling the meta-stable and transitional conformations of proteins and other biomolecules. Computational data clustering has emerged as a useful, automated technique for extracting conformational states from MD simulation data. Despite extensive application, relatively little work has been done to determine if the clustering algorithms are actually extracting useful information. A primary goal of this paper therefore is to provide such an understanding through a detailed analysis of data clustering applied to a series of increasingly complex biopolymer models. Results We develop a novel series of models using basic polymer theory that have intuitive, clearly-defined dynamics and exhibit the essential properties that we are seeking to identify in MD simulations of real biomolecules. We then apply spectral clustering, an algorithm particularly well-suited for clustering polymer structures, to our models and MD simulations of several intrinsically disordered proteins. Clustering results for the polymer models provide clear evidence that the meta-stable and transitional conformations are detected by the algorithm. The results for the polymer models also help guide the analysis of the disordered protein simulations by comparing and contrasting the statistical properties of the extracted clusters. Conclusions We have developed a framework for validating the performance and utility of clustering algorithms for studying molecular biopolymer simulations that utilizes several analytic and dynamic polymer models which exhibit well-behaved dynamics including: meta-stable states, transition states, helical structures, and stochastic dynamics. We show that spectral clustering is robust to anomalies introduced by structural alignment and that different structural classes of intrinsically disordered proteins can be reliably discriminated from the clustering results. To our knowledge, our framework is the

  6. A combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven molecular dynamics algorithm for the simulation of shock waves in rarefied gases

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2009-12-10

    A novel combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven (ED/TD) algorithm to speed-up the Molecular Dynamics simulation of rarefied gases using realistic spherically symmetric soft potentials is presented. Due to the low density regime, the proposed method correctly identifies the time that must elapse before the next interaction occurs, similarly to Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics. However, each interaction is treated using Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics, thereby integrating Newton's Second Law using the sufficiently small time step needed to correctly resolve the atomic motion. Although infrequent, many-body interactions are also accounted for with a small approximation. The combined ED/TD method is shown to correctly reproduce translational relaxation in argon, described using the Lennard-Jones potential. For densities between {rho}=10{sup -4}kg/m{sup 3} and {rho}=10{sup -1}kg/m{sup 3}, comparisons with kinetic theory, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, and pure Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics demonstrate that the ED/TD algorithm correctly reproduces the proper collision rates and the evolution toward thermal equilibrium. Finally, the combined ED/TD algorithm is applied to the simulation of a Mach 9 shock wave in rarefied argon. Density and temperature profiles as well as molecular velocity distributions accurately match DSMC results, and the shock thickness is within the experimental uncertainty. For the problems considered, the ED/TD algorithm ranged from several hundred to several thousand times faster than conventional Time-Driven MD. Moreover, the force calculation to integrate the molecular trajectories is found to contribute a negligible amount to the overall ED/TD simulation time. Therefore, this method could pave the way for the application of much more refined and expensive interatomic potentials, either classical or first-principles, to Molecular Dynamics simulations of shock waves in rarefied gases, involving vibrational nonequilibrium and chemical reactivity.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation indicating cold denaturation of β-hairpins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2013-02-01

    The folding of a series of β-hairpin structured polypeptides, which share high sequence similarity but differ significantly in structure resistance to temperature decrease, was investigated in the present study using integrated-tempering-sampling molecular dynamics simulations on microsecond time scale. MrH3a is a single mutant (I16A) and MrH4a is a double mutant (Y3L/I16A) of the wild-type polypeptide MrH1. MrH3b and MrH4b have an additional mutation in the turn region (INGK → IDPGK) of MrH3a and MrH4a, respectively. It was observed in the present study that the cold denaturation tendency follows the order of MrH1 > MrH4a > MrH3a, while the folded structures of MrH3b and MrH4b have the enhanced stability and are not subject to cold denaturation. These observations are in good agreement with experimental results of Maynard et al. and Dyer et al. Comparative analysis of simulation results for the 5 polypeptides revealed potential mechanism of β-hairpin cold denaturation. The main determinant of cold denaturation tendency is likely the stability decrease of backbone hydrogen bonds at low temperatures, which in turn is affected by the packing manner of the hydrophobic core cluster of β-hairpin structures.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of ionic liquid nanodroplets in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiruppathi, Pavithra C.

    2011-12-01

    Ionic liquids are appropriate for the application of electrospray thruster propulsion due to their physical properties such as low volatility and high electrical conductivity. The behavior of ionic liquid droplets and resulting ion and cluster emission in the presence of an electric field impacts the efficiency and thrust of the electrospray thruster. The technique of molecular simulation allows for the study of ionic liquid nanodroplets in atomic detail which is a limitation in mass spectrometric experiments. This thesis discusses the investigation of nanodroplets of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3- methylimidaziolium bis(triuoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim+][Tf2n -]) in the presence of an electric field using molecular dynamics simulations. The ratio of the single ions to large clusters emitted from the droplet are observed and compared with experiment. The critical field strength required for ion emission from the droplet agrees with experiment. The critical field strength is also computed as a function of droplet size. The thermal stabilities, structural and dynamical properties are analyzed for the ([Emim +][Tf2n-]) nanodroplets.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex plasmas: interaction of nonlinear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durniak, Celine; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2008-11-01

    Complex plasmas consist of micron sized microspheres immersed into ordinary ion-electron plasmas. They exist in solid, liquid, gaseous states and exhibit a range of dynamic phenomena such as waves, solitons, phase transitions, heat transfer. These phenomena can be modelled in complex plasmas at the microscopic or ``molecular'' scale, which is almost impossible in ordinary solids and liquids. We simulate a monolayer complex plasma consisting of 3000 negatively-charged particles (or grains) with the help of molecular dynamics computer simulations. The equations of grain motion are solved using a 5^th order Runge Kutta method taking into account interaction of every grain with each other via a Yukawa potential. The grains are confined more strongly in the vertical direction than in the horizontal. After seeding the grains randomly the code is run until the equilibrium is reached as the grain kinetics energy reduces due to damping force equal to the neutral friction in the experiments and a monolayer crystal lattice is formed. Then we investigate interactions between nonlinear waves in a monolayer strongly coupled complex plasma moving in three dimensions. Different excitations are applied during a short time symmetrically on both sides of the lattice. Structural properties and nonlinear waves characteristics are examined as the pulses propagate across the complex plasma in opposite directions.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of He bubble nucleation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael Tonks; Liangzhe Zhang; Bulent Biner

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation behavior of He bubbles in nano-grained body-centered-cubic (BCC) Mo is simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a bicrystal model, focusing on the effect of grain boundary (GB) structure. Three types of GBs, the (100) twist S29, the ?110? symmetrical tilt (tilt angle of 10.1?), and the (112) twin boundaries, are studied as representatives of random GB, low angle GB with misfit dislocations, and special sigma boundaries. With the same amount of He, more He clusters form in nano-grained Mo with smaller average size compared to that in bulk. The effects of the GB structure originate from the excess volume in GBs. Trapping by excess volume results in reduction in mobility of He atoms, which enhances the nucleation with higher density of bubbles, and impedes the growth of He bubbles by absorption of mobile He atoms. Furthermore, the distribution of excess volume in GBs determines the distribution of He clusters. The effect of GBs becomes less pronounced with increasing vacancy concentration in the matrix.