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Sample records for nonessential domain ii

  1. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... aerosol product or other pressurized dispenser which contains a class II substance: (1) Including but...

  2. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  3. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  4. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  5. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  6. Resistance domain in type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1980-01-05

    We show that traveling domains with a finite resistance can exist in type II superconductors in the presence of a transport current. An experiment in which this effect generates an alternating electric field and current is proposed.

  7. The PR/SET Domain Zinc Finger Protein Prdm4 Regulates Gene Expression in Embryonic Stem Cells but Plays a Nonessential Role in the Developing Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A. J.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F.; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2013-01-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal. PMID:23918801

  8. The PR/SET domain zinc finger protein Prdm4 regulates gene expression in embryonic stem cells but plays a nonessential role in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A J; Nelson, Andrew C; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Bikoff, Elizabeth K

    2013-10-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal. PMID:23918801

  9. Elongation factor TFIIS contains three structural domains: solution structure of domain II.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, P E; Awrey, D E; Edwards, A M; Arrowsmith, C H

    1996-01-01

    Transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II is regulated by the general elongation factor TFIIS. This factor stimulates RNA polymerase II to transcribe through regions of DNA that promote the formation of stalled ternary complexes. Limited proteolytic digestion showed that yeast TFIIS is composed of three structural domains, termed I, II, and III. The two C-terminal domains (II and III) are required for transcription activity. The structure of domain III has been solved previously by using NMR spectroscopy. Here, we report the NMR-derived structure of domain II: a three-helix bundle built around a hydrophobic core composed largely of three tyrosines protruding from one face of the C-terminal helix. The arrangement of known inactivating mutations of TFIIS suggests that two surfaces of domain II are critical for transcription activity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855225

  10. Rsp5 WW domains interact directly with the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Chang, A; Cheang, S; Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    2000-07-01

    RSP5 is an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was recently shown to form a physical and functional complex with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II). The amino-terminal half of Rsp5 consists of four domains: a C2 domain, which binds membrane phospholipids; and three WW domains, which are protein interaction modules that bind proline-rich ligands. The carboxyl-terminal half of Rsp5 contains a HECT (homologous to E6-AP carboxyl terminus) domain that catalytically ligates ubiquitin to proteins and functionally classifies Rsp5 as an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. The C2 and WW domains are presumed to act as membrane localization and substrate recognition modules, respectively. We report that the second (and possibly third) Rsp5 WW domain mediates binding to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA pol II large subunit. The CTD comprises a heptamer (YSPTSPS) repeated 26 times and a PXY core that is critical for interaction with a specific group of WW domains. An analysis of synthetic peptides revealed a minimal CTD sequence that is sufficient to bind to the second Rsp5 WW domain (Rsp5 WW2) in vitro and in yeast two-hybrid assays. Furthermore, we found that specific "imperfect" CTD repeats can form a complex with Rsp5 WW2. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of this minimal CTD sequence on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues acts as a negative regulator of the Rsp5 WW2-CTD interaction. In view of the recent data pertaining to phosphorylation-driven interactions between the RNA pol II CTD and the WW domain of Ess1/Pin1, we suggest that CTD dephosphorylation may be a prerequisite for targeted RNA pol II degradation. PMID:10781604

  11. 40 CFR 82.66 - Nonessential Class I products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 82, appendix A to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential, and subject to..., industrial, automotive and pesticide uses, (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii... propelled by a chlorofluorocarbon, including but not limited to— (1) String confetti; (2) Marine...

  12. 40 CFR 82.66 - Nonessential Class I products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 82, appendix A to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential, and subject to..., industrial, automotive and pesticide uses, (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii... propelled by a chlorofluorocarbon, including but not limited to— (1) String confetti; (2) Marine...

  13. 40 CFR 82.66 - Nonessential Class I products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 82, appendix A to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential, and subject to..., industrial, automotive and pesticide uses, (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii... propelled by a chlorofluorocarbon, including but not limited to— (1) String confetti; (2) Marine...

  14. 40 CFR 82.66 - Nonessential Class I products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 82, appendix A to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential, and subject to..., industrial, automotive and pesticide uses, (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii... propelled by a chlorofluorocarbon, including but not limited to— (1) String confetti; (2) Marine...

  15. 40 CFR 82.66 - Nonessential Class I products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 82, appendix A to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential, and subject to..., industrial, automotive and pesticide uses, (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii... propelled by a chlorofluorocarbon, including but not limited to— (1) String confetti; (2) Marine...

  16. Genetic exploration of interactive domains in RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Okamura, S; Young, R

    1990-01-01

    The two large subunits of RNA polymerase II, RPB1 and RPB2, contain regions of extensive homology to the two large subunits of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These homologous regions may represent separate protein domains with unique functions. We investigated whether suppressor genetics could provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of RPB1 and RPB2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A plasmid shuffle method was used to screen thoroughly for mutations in RPB2 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, which is located in region H of RPB1. All six RPB2 mutations that suppress rpb1-1 were clustered in region I of RPB2. The location of these mutations and the observation that they were allele specific for suppression of rpb1-1 suggests an interaction between region H of RPB1 and region I of RPB2. A similar experiment was done to isolate and map mutations in RPB1 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb2-2, which occurs in region I of RPB2. These suppressor mutations were not clustered in a particular region. Thus, fine structure suppressor genetics can provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of two proteins, but the results of this type of analysis can depend on the conditional mutation to be suppressed. Images PMID:2183012

  17. An Unusual Cation-Binding Site and Distinct Domain-Domain Interactions Distinguish Class II Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate Synthases.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Krishna, Sankar N; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) catalyzes a critical step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. An essential prokaryotic enzyme and the molecular target of the herbicide glyphosate, EPSPSs are the subject of both pharmaceutical and commercial interest. Two EPSPS classes that exhibit low sequence homology, differing substrate/glyphosate affinities, and distinct cation activation properties have previously been described. Here, we report structural studies of the monovalent cation-binding class II Coxiella burnetii EPSPS (cbEPSPS). Three cbEPSPS crystal structures reveal that the enzyme undergoes substantial conformational changes that alter the electrostatic potential of the active site. A complex with shikimate-3-phosphate, inorganic phosphate (Pi), and K(+) reveals that ligand induced domain closure produces an unusual cation-binding site bordered on three sides by the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and the product Pi. A crystal structure of the class I Vibrio cholerae EPSPS (vcEPSPS) clarifies the basis of differential class I and class II cation responsiveness, showing that in class I EPSPSs a lysine side chain occupies the would-be cation-binding site. Finally, we identify distinct patterns of sequence conservation at the domain-domain interface and propose that the two EPSPS classes have evolved to differently optimize domain opening-closing dynamics. PMID:26813771

  18. Characterization of the Igf-II Binding Site of the IGF-II/MAN-6-P Receptor Extracellular Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmroudi, Farideh

    1995-01-01

    In mammals, insulin-like growth factor II (IGF -II) and glycoproteins bearing the mannose 6-phosphate (Man -6-P) recognition marker bind with high affinity to the same receptor. The functional consequences of IGF-II binding to the receptor at the cell surface are not clear. In these studies, we sought to broaden our understanding of the functional regions of the receptor regarding its IGF -II binding site. The IGF-II binding/cross-linking domain of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor was mapped by sequencing receptor fragments covalently attached to IGF-II. Purified rat placental or bovine liver receptors were affinity-labeled, with ^{125}I-IGF-II and digested with endoproteinase Glu-C. Analysis of digests by gel electrophoresis revealed a major radiolabeled band of 18 kDa, which was purified by gel filtration chromatography followed by reverse-phase HPLC and electroblotting. Sequence analysis revealed that, the peptide S(H)VNSXPMF, located within extracellular repeat 10 and beginning with serine 1488 of the bovine receptor, was the best candidate for the IGF-II cross-linked peptide. These data indicated that residues within repeats 10-11 were important for IGF -II binding. To define the location of the IGF-II binding site further, a nested set of six human receptor cDNA constructs was designed to produce epitope-tagged fusion proteins encompassing the region between repeats 8 and 11 of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor extracellular domain. These truncated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, immunoprecipitated and analyzed for their abilities to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. All of the constructs were capable of binding/cross-linking to IGF-II, except for the 9.0-11 construct. Displacement curve analysis indicated that the truncated receptors were approximately equivalent in IGF-II binding affinity, but were of 5- to 10-fold lower affinity than full-length receptors. Sequencing of the 9.0-11 construct indicated the presence of a point mutation

  19. STRUCTURAL FOLD, CONSERVATION AND FE(II) BINDING OF THE INTRACELLULAR DOMAIN OF PROKARYOTE FEOB

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-01-01

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain’s two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function. PMID:20123128

  20. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  1. Nonessential region of bacteriophage P4: DNA sequence, transcription, gene products, and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Ghisotti, D; Finkel, S; Halling, C; Dehò, G; Sironi, G; Calendar, R

    1990-01-01

    We sequenced the leftmost 2,640 base pairs of bacteriophage P4 DNA, thus completing the sequence of the 11,627-base-pair P4 genome. The newly sequenced region encodes three nonessential genes, which are called gop, beta, and cII (in order, from left to right). The gop gene product kills Escherichia coli when the beta protein is absent; the gop and beta genes are transcribed rightward from the same promoter. The cII gene is transcribed leftward to a rho-independent terminator. Mutation of this terminator creates a temperature-sensitive phenotype, presumably owing to a defect in expression of the beta gene. Images PMID:2403440

  2. Stretching Actin Filaments within Cells Enhances their Affinity for the Myosin II Motor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, Taro Q. P.; Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Nagasaki, Akira; Yumura, Shigehiko

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the myosin II motor domain (S1) preferentially binds to specific subsets of actin filaments in vivo, we expressed GFP-fused S1 with mutations that enhanced its affinity for actin in Dictyostelium cells. Consistent with the hypothesis, the GFP-S1 mutants were localized along specific portions of the cell cortex. Comparison with rhodamine-phalloidin staining in fixed cells demonstrated that the GFP-S1 probes preferentially bound to actin filaments in the rear cortex and cleavage furrows, where actin filaments are stretched by interaction with endogenous myosin II filaments. The GFP-S1 probes were similarly enriched in the cortex stretched passively by traction forces in the absence of myosin II or by external forces using a microcapillary. The preferential binding of GFP-S1 mutants to stretched actin filaments did not depend on cortexillin I or PTEN, two proteins previously implicated in the recruitment of myosin II filaments to stretched cortex. These results suggested that it is the stretching of the actin filaments itself that increases their affinity for the myosin II motor domain. In contrast, the GFP-fused myosin I motor domain did not localize to stretched actin filaments, which suggests different preferences of the motor domains for different structures of actin filaments play a role in distinct intracellular localizations of myosin I and II. We propose a scheme in which the stretching of actin filaments, the preferential binding of myosin II filaments to stretched actin filaments, and myosin II-dependent contraction form a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stabilization of cell polarity and to the responsiveness of the cells to external mechanical stimuli. PMID:22022566

  3. Shape and oligomerization state of the cytoplasmic domain of the phototaxis transducer II from Natronobacterium pharaonis

    PubMed Central

    Budyak, Ivan L.; Pipich, Vitaliy; Mironova, Olga S.; Schlesinger, Ramona; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2006-01-01

    Phototaxis allows archaea to adjust flagellar motion in response to light. In the photophobic response of Natronobacterium pharaonis, light-activated sensory rhodopsin II causes conformational changes in the transducer II protein (pHtrII), initiating the two-component signaling system analogous to bacterial chemotaxis. pHtrII’s cytoplasmic domain (pHtrII-cyt) is homologous to the cytoplasmic domains of eubacterial chemotaxis receptors. Chemotaxis receptors require dimerization for activity and are in vivo-organized in large clusters. In this study we investigated the oligomerization and aggregation states of pHtrII-cyt by using chemical cross-linking, analytical gel-filtration chromatography, and small-angle neutron scattering. We show that pHtrII-cyt is monomeric in dilute buffers, but forms dimers in 4 M KCl, the physiological salt concentration for halophilic archaea. At high ammonium sulfate concentration, the protein forms higher-order aggregates. The monomeric protein has a rod-like shape, 202 Å in length and 14.4 Å in diameter; upon dimerization the length increases to 248 Å and the diameter to 18.2 Å. These results suggest that under high salt concentration the shape and oligomerization state of pHtrII-cyt are comparable to those of chemotaxis receptors. PMID:17032755

  4. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor.

    PubMed

    Reimann, T; Mühlbauer, S; Schulz, M; Betz, B; Kaestner, A; Pipich, V; Böni, P; Grünzweig, C

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice. PMID:26522610

  5. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, T.; Mühlbauer, S.; Schulz, M.; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Pipich, V.; Böni, P.; Grünzweig, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice. PMID:26522610

  6. Positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 silences class II transactivator expression in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, N; Gyory, I; Wright, G; Wood, J; Wright, K L

    2001-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) acts as a master switch to activate expression of the genes required for MHC-II antigen presentation. During B-cell to plasma cell differentiation, MHC-II expression is actively silenced, but the mechanism has been unknown. In plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma the repression of MHC-II is associated with the loss of CIITA. We have identified that positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), a transcriptional repressor, inhibits CIITA expression in multiple myeloma cell lines. Repression of CIITA depends on the DNA binding activity of PRDI-BF1 and its specific binding site in the CIITA promoter. Deletion of a histone deacetylase recruitment domain in PRDI-BF1 does not inhibit repression of CIITA nor does blocking histone deacetylase activity. This is in contrast to PRDI-BF1 repression of the c-myc promoter. Repression of CIITA requires either the N-terminal acidic and conserved PR motif or the proline-rich domain. PRDI-BF1 has been shown to be a key regulator of B-cell and macrophage differentiation. These findings now indicate that PRDI-BF1 has at least two mechanisms of repression whose function is dependent on the nature of the target promoter. Importantly, PRDI-BF1 is defined as the key molecule in silencing CIITA and thus MHC-II in multiple myeloma cells. PMID:11279146

  7. Domain II plays a crucial role in the function of ribosome recycling factor

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    RRF (ribosome recycling factor) consists of two domains, and in concert with EF-G (elongation factor-G), triggers dissociation of the post-termination ribosomal complex. However, the function of the individual domains of RRF remains unclear. To clarify this, two RRF chimaeras, EcoDI/TteDII and TteDI/EcoDII, were created by domain swaps between the proteins from Escherichia coli and Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis. The ribosome recycling activity of the RRF chimaeras was compared with their wild-type RRFs by using in vivo and in vitro activity assays. Like wild-type TteRRF (T. tengcongensis RRF), the EcoDI/TteDII chimaera is non-functional in E. coli, but both wild-type TteRRF, and EcoDI/TteDII can be activated by coexpression of T. tengcongensis EF-G in E. coli. By contrast, like wild-type E. coli RRF (EcoRRF), TteDI/EcoDII is fully functional in E. coli. These findings suggest that domain II of RRF plays a crucial role in the concerted action of RRF and EF-G for the post-termination complex disassembly, and the specific interaction between RRF and EF-G on ribosomes mainly depends on the interaction between domain II of RRF and EF-G. This study provides direct genetic and biochemical evidence for the function of the individual domains of RRF. PMID:16262604

  8. Identification of novel targets of MYC whose transcription requires the essential MbII domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-yong; DeSalle, Lauren M; McMahon, Steven B

    2006-02-01

    The MYC oncoprotein is among the most potent regulators of cell cycle progression and malignant transformation in human cells. Current models suggest that much of MYC's role in these processes is related to its ability to regulate the transcription of downstream target genes that encode the ultimate effector proteins. In addition to its carboxy-terminal DNA binding and dimerization domains, an enigmatic motif in the amino terminus termed MbII is required for all of MYC's biological activities. In spite of historical observations demonstrating the absolute requirement for MbII in these biological functions, clues implicating this domain in target gene transcription have only recently appeared. Based on this emerging link between MbII and transcriptional activation, we hypothesized that the identification of individual MYC targets whose transactivation requires MbII would help define the essential downstream effectors of MYC in transformation and cell cycle progression. In hopes of directly identifying new MbII-dependent MYC target genes, an expression profiling screen was conducted. This screen resulted in our identification of ten novel downstream targets of MYC. As a proof of principle, we recently demonstrated using RNAi-mediated depletion that one of these targets, the metastasis regulator MTA1, is absolutely required for MYC mediated transformation. Here we report the identity of these previously uncharacterized MYC targets and discuss their potential roles in MYC function. In addition, we attempt to reconcile the historical and contemporary evidence linking MbII to transcriptional activation. PMID:16434883

  9. Domain inversion and electrochromism in congruent RuO II:LiNbO 3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Ya'nan; Liu, De'an; Qu, Weijuan; Zhou, Yu; Chai, Zhifang; Luan, Zhu; Liu, Liren

    2006-08-01

    The domain inversion and electrochromism in congruent RuO II:LiNbO 3 crystals are investigated at room temperature, and the relations between them are proposed. During electric poling process, the electrochromism accompanies the ferroelectric domain inversion simultaneously, and is localized to the same region with domain inversion. As domain inversion, the electrochromism is completely reversible when the domain is inverted from the reverse direction. The properties, coincidence and localization, between domain inversion and electrochromism are proved solidly by the digital holographic interferometry, the real-time measurement of optical transmittance change and poling current, and the micrographic analysis after being etched in hydrofluoric acid. The influences of annealing conditions on electrochromism are also discussed. We provide the reasonable assumptions and analyses that the charge redistribution within the crystal caused by domain inversion is the source for electrochemically oxidation and reduction of Ru ion, and the intervalence electron transference between Ru 4+ and Ru 3+ plays a key role in the spectrum shift within different spectral range by the change of the photon absorption.

  10. Crystal structure of group II intron domain 1 reveals a template for RNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of large noncoding RNAs is increasingly appreciated, our understanding of their structures and architectural dynamics remains limited. In particular, we know little about RNA folding intermediates and how they facilitate the productive assembly of RNA tertiary structures. Here, we report the crystal structure of an obligate intermediate that is required during the earliest stages of group II intron folding. Comprised of intron domain 1 from the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group II intron (D1, 266 nts), this intermediate retains native-like features but adopts a compact conformation in which the active-site cleft is closed. Transition between this closed and open (native) conformation is achieved through discrete rotations of hinge motifs in two regions of the molecule. The open state is then stabilized by sequential docking of downstream intron domains, suggesting a “first comes, first folds” strategy that may represent a generalizable pathway for assembly of large RNA and ribonucleoprotein structures. PMID:26502156

  11. Crystal structure of group II intron domain 1 reveals a template for RNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-12-01

    Although the importance of large noncoding RNAs is increasingly appreciated, our understanding of their structures and architectural dynamics remains limited. In particular, we know little about RNA folding intermediates and how they facilitate the productive assembly of RNA tertiary structures. Here, we report the crystal structure of an obligate intermediate that is required during the earliest stages of group II intron folding. Composed of domain 1 from the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group II intron (266 nucleotides), this intermediate retains native-like features but adopts a compact conformation in which the active site cleft is closed. Transition between this closed and the open (native) conformation is achieved through discrete rotations of hinge motifs in two regions of the molecule. The open state is then stabilized by sequential docking of downstream intron domains, suggesting a 'first come, first folded' strategy that may represent a generalizable pathway for assembly of large RNA and ribonucleoprotein structures. PMID:26502156

  12. The 5 A projection structure of the transmembrane domain of the mannitol transporter enzyme II.

    PubMed

    Koning, R I; Keegstra, W; Oostergetel, G T; Schuurman-Wolters, G; Robillard, G T; Brisson, A

    1999-04-16

    The uptake of mannitol in Escherichia coli is controlled by the phosphoenolpyruvate dependent phosphotransferase system. Enzyme II mannitol (EIIMtl) is part of the phosphotransferase system and consists of three covalently bound domains. IICMtl, the integral membrane domain of EIIMtl, is responsible for mannitol transport across the cytoplasmic membrane. In order to understand this molecular process, two-dimensional crystals of IICMtl were grown by reconstitution into lipid bilayers and their structure was investigated by cryo-electron crystallography. The IICMtl crystals obey p22121 symmetry and have a unit cell of 125 Ax65 A, gamma=90 degrees. A projection structure was determined at 5 A resolution using both electron images and electron diffractograms. The unit cell contains two IICMtl dimers with a size of about 40 Ax90 A, which are oriented up and down in the crystal. Each monomer exhibits six domains of high density which most likely correspond to transmembrane alpha-helices and cytoplasmic loops. PMID:10222194

  13. 78 FR 35719 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision To the Nonessential Experimental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... established a Mexican wolf nonessential experimental population (63 FR 1752, January 12, 1998) (1998 Final... Mexican wolf nonessential experimental population in 1998 (63 FR 1752, January 12, 1998), it corresponded... endangered subspecies in 1976 (41 FR 17736, April 28, 1976). In 1978, the Service listed the entire gray...

  14. The C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA topoisomerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Caron, P R; Watt, P; Wang, J C

    1994-01-01

    A set of carboxy-terminal deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA topoisomerase II were constructed for studying the functions of the carboxyl domain in vitro and in vivo. The wild-type yeast enzyme is a homodimer with 1,429 amino acid residues in each of the two polypeptides; truncation of the C terminus to Ile-1220 has little effect on the function of the enzyme in vitro or in vivo, whereas truncations extending beyond Gln-1138 yield completely inactive proteins. Several mutant enzymes with C termini in between these two residues were found to be catalytically active but unable to complement a top2-4 temperature-sensitive mutation. Immunomicroscopy results suggest that the removal of a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminal domain is likely to contribute to the physiological dysfunction of these proteins; the ability of these mutant proteins to relax supercoiled DNA in vivo shows, however, that at least some of the mutant proteins are present in the nuclei in a catalytically active form. In contrast to the ability of the catalytically active mutant proteins to relax supercoiled intracellular DNA, all mutants that do not complement the temperature-dependent lethality and high frequency of chromosomal nondisjunction of top2-4 were found to lack decatenation activity in vivo. The plausible roles of the DNA topoisomerase II C-terminal domain, in addition to providing a signal for nuclear localization, are discussed in the light of these results. Images PMID:8164675

  15. Functional Studies of the Carboxy-Terminal Repeat Domain of Drosophila RNA Polymerase II in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brickey, W. J.; Greenleaf, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    To understand the in vivo function of the unique and conserved carboxy-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RpII215), we have studied RNA polymerase II biosynthesis, activity and genetic function in Drosophila RpII215 mutants that possessed all (C4), half (W81) or none (IIt) of the CTD repeats. We have discovered that steady-state mRNA levels from transgenes encoding a fully truncated, CTD-less subunit (IIt) are essentially equal to wild-type levels, whereas the levels of the CTD-less subunit itself and the amount of polymerase harboring it (Pol IIT) are significantly lower than wild type. In contrast, for the half-CTD mutant (W81), steady-state mRNA levels are somewhat lower than for wild type or IIt, while W81 subunit and polymerase amounts are much less than wild type. Finally, we have tested genetically the ability of CTD mutants to complement (rescue) partially functional RpII215 alleles and have found that IIt fails to complement whereas W81 complements partially to completely. These results suggest that removal of the entire CTD renders polymerase completely defective in vivo, whereas eliminating half of the CTD results in a polymerase with significant in vivo activity. PMID:7498740

  16. Structure-Based Functional Analyses of Domains II and III of Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein H

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Sebastian W.; Eckroth, Elisa; Backovic, Marija; Klupp, Barbara G.; Rey, Felix A.; Fuchs, Walter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enveloped viruses utilize membrane fusion for entry into, and release from, host cells. For entry, members of the Herpesviridae require at least three envelope glycoproteins: the homotrimeric gB and a heterodimer of gH and gL. The crystal structures of three gH homologues, including pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH, revealed four conserved domains. Domain II contains a planar β-sheet (“fence”) and a syntaxin-like bundle of three α-helices (SLB), similar to those found in eukaryotic fusion proteins, potentially executing an important role in gH function. To test this hypothesis, we introduced targeted mutations into the PrV gH gene, which either disrupt the helices of the SLB by introduction of proline residues or covalently join them by artificial intramolecular disulfide bonds between themselves, to the adjacent fence region, or to domain III. Disruption of either of the three α-helices of the SLB (A250P, V275P, V298P) severely affected gH function in in vitro fusion assays and replication of corresponding PrV mutants. Considerable defects in fusion activity of gH, as well as in penetration kinetics and cell-to-cell spread of PrV mutants, were also observed after disulfide linkage of two α-helices within the SLB (A284C-S291C) or between SLB and domain III (H251C-L432C), as well as by insertions of additional cysteine pairs linking fence, SLB, and domain III. In vitro fusion activity of mutated gH could be partly restored by reduction of the artificial disulfide bonds. Our results indicate that the structure and flexibility of the SLB are relevant for the function of PrV gH in membrane fusion. IMPORTANCE Mutational analysis based on crystal structures of proteins is a powerful tool to understand protein function. Here, we continued our study of pseudorabies virus gH, a part of the core fusion machinery of herpesviruses. We previously showed that the “flap” region in domain IV of PrV gH is important for its function. We now demonstrate that mutations

  17. Genetic identification of essential indels and domains in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Ristuccia, Jessica G.; Bzik, David J.

    2013-01-01

    New treatments need to be developed for the significant human diseases of toxoplasmosis and malaria to circumvent problems with current treatments and drug resistance. Apicomplexan parasites causing these lethal diseases are deficient in pyrimidine salvage suggesting that selective inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis can lead to a severe loss of UMP and dTMP pools thereby inhibiting parasite RNA and DNA synthesis. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) induces a severe uracil auxotrophy with no detectable parasite replication in vitro and complete attenuation of virulence in mice. Here we show that a CPSII cDNA minigene efficiently complements the uracil auxotrophy of CPSII deficient mutants restoring parasite growth and virulence. Our complementation assays reveal that engineered mutations within or proximal to the catalytic triad of the N-terminal glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) domain inactivate the complementation activity of T. gondii CPSII and demonstrate a critical dependence on the apicomplexan CPSII GATase domain in vivo. Surprisingly, indels present within the T. gondii CPSII GATase domain as well as the C-terminal allosteric regulatory domain are found to be essential. In addition several mutations directed at residues implicated in allosteric regulation in Escherichia coli CPS either abolish or markedly suppress complementation and further define the functional importance of the allosteric regulatory region. Collectively, these findings identify novel features of T. gondii CPSII as potential parasite-selective targets for drug development. PMID:18992249

  18. Genetic identification of essential indels and domains in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Ristuccia, Jessica G; Bzik, David J

    2009-04-01

    New treatments need to be developed for the significant human diseases of toxoplasmosis and malaria to circumvent problems with current treatments and drug resistance. Apicomplexan parasites causing these lethal diseases are deficient in pyrimidine salvage, suggesting that selective inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis can lead to a severe loss of uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) and thymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) pools, thereby inhibiting parasite RNA and DNA synthesis. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) induces a severe uracil auxotrophy with no detectable parasite replication in vitro and complete attenuation of virulence in mice. Here we show that a CPSII cDNA minigene efficiently complements the uracil auxotrophy of CPSII-deficient mutants, restoring parasite growth and virulence. Our complementation assays reveal that engineered mutations within, or proximal to, the catalytic triad of the N-terminal glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) domain inactivate the complementation activity of T. gondii CPSII and demonstrate a critical dependence on the apicomplexan CPSII GATase domain in vivo. Surprisingly, indels present within the T. gondii CPSII GATase domain as well as the C-terminal allosteric regulatory domain are found to be essential. In addition, several mutations directed at residues implicated in allosteric regulation in Escherichia coli CPS either abolish or markedly suppress complementation and further define the functional importance of the allosteric regulatory region. Collectively, these findings identify novel features of T. gondii CPSII as potential parasite-selective targets for drug development. PMID:18992249

  19. On the computational ability of the RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain has long been known to play an important role in the control of eukaryotic transcription. This role is mediated, at least in part, through complex post-translational modifications that take place on specific residues within the heptad repeats of the domain. In this addendum, a speculative, but formal mathematical conceptualization of this biological phenomenon (in the form of a semi-Thue string rewriting system) is presented. Since the semi-Thue formalism is known to be Turing complete, this raises the possibility that the CTD – in association with the regulatory pathways controlling its post-translational modification – functions as a biological incarnation of a universal computing machine. PMID:25371772

  20. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  1. Cooperative activation of the T-type CaV3.2 channel: interaction between Domains II and III.

    PubMed

    Demers-Giroux, Pierre-Olivier; Bourdin, Benoîte; Sauvé, Rémy; Parent, Lucie

    2013-10-11

    T-type CaV3 channels are important mediators of Ca(2+) entry near the resting membrane potential. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for channel activation. Homology models based upon the high-resolution structure of bacterial NaV channels predict interaction between the S4-S5 helix of Domain II (IIS4-S5) and the distal S6 pore region of Domain II (IIS6) and Domain III (IIIS6). Functional intra- and inter-domain interactions were investigated with a double mutant cycle analysis. Activation gating and channel kinetics were measured for 47 single mutants and 20 pairs of mutants. Significant coupling energies (ΔΔG(interact) ≥ 1.5 kcal mol(-1)) were measured for 4 specific pairs of mutants introduced between IIS4-S5 and IIS6 and between IIS4-S5 and IIIS6. In agreement with the computer based models, Thr-911 in IIS4-S5 was functionally coupled with Ile-1013 in IIS6 during channel activation. The interaction energy was, however, found to be stronger between Val-907 in IIS4-S5 and Ile-1013 in IIS6. In addition Val-907 was significantly coupled with Asn-1548 in IIIS6 but not with Asn-1853 in IVS6. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the S4-S5 and S6 helices from adjacent domains are energetically coupled during the activation of a low voltage-gated T-type CaV3 channel. PMID:23970551

  2. Heparin II domain of fibronectin mediates contractility through an α4β1 co-signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schwinn, Marie K.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gabelt, B’Ann T.; Sheibani, Nader; Kaufman, Paul L.; Peters, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    In the trabecular meshwork (TM) of the eye, regulation of tissue contractility by the PPRARI sequence within the Heparin II (HepII) domain of fibronectin is believed to control the movement of aqueous humor and dictate the level of intraocular pressure. This study shows that the HepII domain utilizes activated α4β1 integrin and collagen to mediate a co-signaling pathway that down-regulates contractility in TM cells. siRNA silencing of α4β1 integrin blocked the actin disrupting effects of both PPRARI and the HepII domain. The down-regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and contractility did not involve syndecan-4 or other heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) since siRNA silencing of syndecan-4 expression or heparitinase removal of cell surface HSPGs did not prevent the HepII-mediated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. HepII-mediated disruption of the cytoskeleton depended upon the presence of collagen in the extracellular matrix, and cell binding studies indicated that HepII signaling involved cross-talk between α41β1 and α1/α2β1 integrins. This is the first time that the PPRARI sequence in the HepII domain has been shown to serve as a physiological α4β1 ligand, suggesting that α4β1 integrin may be a key regulator of tissue contractility. PMID:20302860

  3. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  4. Protein Folding Mechanism of the Dimeric AmphiphysinII/Bin1 N-BAR Domain

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Tobias; Balbach, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The human AmphyphisinII/Bin1 N-BAR domain belongs to the BAR domain superfamily, whose members sense and generate membrane curvatures. The N-BAR domain is a 57 kDa homodimeric protein comprising a six helix bundle. Here we report the protein folding mechanism of this protein as a representative of this protein superfamily. The concentration dependent thermodynamic stability was studied by urea equilibrium transition curves followed by fluorescence and far-UV CD spectroscopy. Kinetic unfolding and refolding experiments, including rapid double and triple mixing techniques, allowed to unravel the complex folding behavior of N-BAR. The equilibrium unfolding transition curve can be described by a two-state process, while the folding kinetics show four refolding phases, an additional burst reaction and two unfolding phases. All fast refolding phases show a rollover in the chevron plot but only one of these phases depends on the protein concentration reporting the dimerization step. Secondary structure formation occurs during the three fast refolding phases. The slowest phase can be assigned to a proline isomerization. All kinetic experiments were also followed by fluorescence anisotropy detection to verify the assignment of the dimerization step to the respective folding phase. Based on these experiments we propose for N-BAR two parallel folding pathways towards the homodimeric native state depending on the proline conformation in the unfolded state. PMID:26368922

  5. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual SFs. SF retraction dynamics associated with MIIA and MIIB suppression qualitatively phenocopy our earlier measurements in the setting of Rho kinase (ROCK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibition, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging and photobleaching recovery reveal that MIIA and MIIB are enriched in and more stably localize to ROCK- and MLCK-controlled central and peripheral SFs, respectively. Additional domain-mapping studies surprisingly reveal that deletion of the head domain speeds SF retraction, which we ascribe to reduced drag from actomyosin crosslinking and frictional losses. We propose a model in which ROCK/MIIA and MLCK/MIIB functionally regulate common pools of SFs, with MIIA crosslinking and motor functions jointly contributing to SF retraction dynamics and cellular traction forces. PMID:26336830

  6. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual SFs. SF retraction dynamics associated with MIIA and MIIB suppression qualitatively phenocopy our earlier measurements in the setting of Rho kinase (ROCK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibition, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging and photobleaching recovery reveal that MIIA and MIIB are enriched in and more stably localize to ROCK- and MLCK-controlled central and peripheral SFs, respectively. Additional domain-mapping studies surprisingly reveal that deletion of the head domain speeds SF retraction, which we ascribe to reduced drag from actomyosin crosslinking and frictional losses. We propose a model in which ROCK/MIIA and MLCK/MIIB functionally regulate common pools of SFs, with MIIA crosslinking and motor functions jointly contributing to SF retraction dynamics and cellular traction forces. PMID:26336830

  7. Transcription initiation complexes and upstream activation with RNA polymerase II lacking the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Buratowski, S; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II assembles with other factors on the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter to generate pairs of transcription initiation complexes resolvable by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. The pairing of the complexes is caused by the presence or absence of the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit. This domain is not required for transcription stimulation by the major late transcription factor in vitro. Images PMID:2398901

  8. TFIIH kinase places bivalent marks on the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Sohail; Heidemann, Martin; Tietjen, Joshua; Zhang, David; Chapman, Rob D.; Eick, Dirk; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-translational modifications of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) specify a molecular recognition code that is deciphered by proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. The CTD is comprised of a repeating heptapeptide (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7). Recently, phosphorylation of Serine7 was shown to be important for co-transcriptional processing of two snRNAs in mammalian cells. Here, we report that Kin28/Cdk7, a subunit of the evolutionarily conserved TFIIH complex, is a Ser7 kinase. The ability of Kin28/Cdk7 to phosphorylate Ser7 is particularly surprising because this kinase functions at promoters of protein-coding genes, rather than being restricted to promoter-distal regions of snRNA genes. Kin28/Cdk7 is also known to phosphorylate Ser5 residues of the CTD at gene promoters. Taken together, our results implicate the TFIIH kinase in placing bivalent Ser5 and Ser7 marks early in gene transcription. These bivalent CTD marks, in concert with cues within nascent transcripts, specify the co-transcriptional engagement of the relevant RNA processing machinery. PMID:19450536

  9. Intragenic and Extragenic Suppressors of Mutations in the Heptapeptide Repeat Domain of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Nonet, M. L.; Young, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II contains a repeated heptapeptide sequence at its carboxy terminus. Yeast mutants with certain partial deletions of the carboxy-terminal repeat (CTR) domain are temperature-sensitive, cold-sensitive and are inositol auxotrophs. Intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the cold-sensitive phenotype of CTR domain deletion mutants were isolated and studied to investigate the function of this domain. Two types of intragenic suppressing mutations suppress the temperature-sensitivity, cold-sensitivity and inositol auxotrophy of CTR domain deletion mutants. Most intragenic mutations enlarge the repeat domain by duplicating various portions of the repeat coding sequence. Other intragenic suppressing mutations are point mutations in a conserved segment of the large subunit. An extragenic suppressing mutation (SRB2-1) was isolated that strongly suppresses the conditional and auxotrophic phenotypes of CTR domain mutations. The SRB2 gene was isolated and mapped, and an SRB2 partial deletion mutation (srb2Δ10) was constructed. The srb2Δ10 mutants are temperature-sensitive, cold-sensitive and are inositol auxotrophs. These phenotypes are characteristic of mutations in genes encoding components of the transcription apparatus. We propose that the SRB2 gene encodes a factor that is involved in RNA synthesis and may interact with the CTR domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. PMID:2693207

  10. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  11. The RNA Polymerase II CTD: The Increasing Complexity of a Low-Complexity Protein Domain.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Collin, Pierre; Robert, François

    2016-06-19

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) that plays key roles in coordinating transcription with co-transcriptional events. The heptapeptide repeats that form the CTD are dynamically phosphorylated on serine, tyrosine and threonine residues during the various steps of transcription, thereby regulating the recruitment of various proteins involved in gene expression. In this "Perspective," we review the recent literature related to the function of the CTD, to CTD kinases (Kin28, CDK7, CDK9, CDK12, ERK1/2 and DYRK1A) and to CTD phosphatases (Rtr1, RPAP2, Ssu72, Fcp1 and Gcl7). We discuss unresolved and controversial issues and try to provide constructive suggestions. This review also highlights emerging themes in the CTD field, such as crosstalk and feedback mechanisms, as well as gene-specific and tissue-specific functions of the CTD. Finally, promising therapeutic avenues for a recently developed CTD kinase inhibitor are discussed. PMID:26876604

  12. The type II pullulanase of Thermococcus hydrothermalis: molecular characterization of the gene and expression of the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Erra-Pujada, M; Debeire, P; Duchiron, F; O'Donohue, M J

    1999-05-01

    The gene encoding a hyperthermostable type II pullulanase produced by Thermococcus hydrothermalis (Th-Apu) has been isolated. Analysis of a total of 5.2 kb of genomic DNA has revealed the presence of three open reading frames, one of which (apuA) encodes the pullulanase. This enzyme is composed of 1,339 amino acid residues and exhibits a multidomain structure. In addition to a typical N-terminal signal peptide, Th-Apu possesses a catalytic domain, a domain bearing S-layer homology-like motifs, a Thr-rich region, and a potential C-terminal transmembrane domain. The presence of these noncatalytic domains suggests that Th-Apu may be anchored to the cell surface and be O glycosylated. PMID:10322035

  13. DNA Instability Maintains the Repeat Length of the Yeast RNA Polymerase II C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Summer A; Exner, Alexandra E; Babokhov, Michael; Reinfeld, Bradley I; Fuchs, Stephen M

    2016-05-27

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes is comprised of tandemly repeating units of a conserved seven-amino acid sequence. The number of repeats is, however, quite variable across different organisms. Furthermore, previous studies have identified evidence of rearrangements within the CTD coding region, suggesting that DNA instability may play a role in regulating or maintaining CTD repeat number. The work described here establishes a clear connection between DNA instability and CTD repeat number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae First, analysis of 36 diverse S. cerevisiae isolates revealed evidence of numerous past rearrangements within the DNA sequence that encodes the CTD. Interestingly, the total number of CTD repeats was relatively static (24-26 repeats in all strains), suggesting a balancing act between repeat expansion and contraction. In an effort to explore the genetic plasticity within this region, we measured the rates of repeat expansion and contraction using novel reporters and a doxycycline-regulated expression system for RPB1 In efforts to determine the mechanisms leading to CTD repeat variability, we identified the presence of DNA secondary structures, specifically G-quadruplex-like DNA, within the CTD coding region. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutating PIF1, a G-quadruplex-specific helicase, results in increased CTD repeat length polymorphisms. We also determined that RAD52 is necessary for CTD repeat expansion but not contraction, identifying a role for recombination in repeat expansion. Results from these DNA rearrangements may help explain the CTD copy number variation seen across eukaryotes, as well as support a model of CTD expansion and contraction to maintain CTD integrity and overall length. PMID:27026700

  14. DNA Instability Maintains the Repeat Length of the Yeast RNA Polymerase II C-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Summer A.; Exner, Alexandra E.; Babokhov, Michael; Reinfeld, Bradley I.

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes is comprised of tandemly repeating units of a conserved seven-amino acid sequence. The number of repeats is, however, quite variable across different organisms. Furthermore, previous studies have identified evidence of rearrangements within the CTD coding region, suggesting that DNA instability may play a role in regulating or maintaining CTD repeat number. The work described here establishes a clear connection between DNA instability and CTD repeat number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, analysis of 36 diverse S. cerevisiae isolates revealed evidence of numerous past rearrangements within the DNA sequence that encodes the CTD. Interestingly, the total number of CTD repeats was relatively static (24–26 repeats in all strains), suggesting a balancing act between repeat expansion and contraction. In an effort to explore the genetic plasticity within this region, we measured the rates of repeat expansion and contraction using novel reporters and a doxycycline-regulated expression system for RPB1. In efforts to determine the mechanisms leading to CTD repeat variability, we identified the presence of DNA secondary structures, specifically G-quadruplex-like DNA, within the CTD coding region. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutating PIF1, a G-quadruplex-specific helicase, results in increased CTD repeat length polymorphisms. We also determined that RAD52 is necessary for CTD repeat expansion but not contraction, identifying a role for recombination in repeat expansion. Results from these DNA rearrangements may help explain the CTD copy number variation seen across eukaryotes, as well as support a model of CTD expansion and contraction to maintain CTD integrity and overall length. PMID:27026700

  15. An enlarged largest subunit of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II defines conserved and variable RNA polymerase domains.

    PubMed Central

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Gu, H M; Tanaka, M; Fox, B A; Inselburg, J

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II from Plasmodium falciparum. The RPII gene is expressed in the asexual erythrocytic stages of the parasite as a 9 kb mRNA, and is present as a single copy gene located on chromosome 3. The P. falciparum RPII subunit is the largest (2452 amino acids) eukaryotic RPII subunit, and it contains enlarged variable regions that clearly separate and define five conserved regions of the eukaryotic RPII largest subunits. A distinctive carboxyl-terminal domain contains a short highly conserved heptapeptide repeat domain which is bounded on its 5' side by a highly diverged heptapeptide repeat domain, and is bounded on its 3' side by a long carboxyl-terminal extension. Images PMID:2690004

  16. An enlarged largest subunit of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II defines conserved and variable RNA polymerase domains.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Gu, H M; Tanaka, M; Fox, B A; Inselburg, J

    1989-12-11

    We have isolated the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II from Plasmodium falciparum. The RPII gene is expressed in the asexual erythrocytic stages of the parasite as a 9 kb mRNA, and is present as a single copy gene located on chromosome 3. The P. falciparum RPII subunit is the largest (2452 amino acids) eukaryotic RPII subunit, and it contains enlarged variable regions that clearly separate and define five conserved regions of the eukaryotic RPII largest subunits. A distinctive carboxyl-terminal domain contains a short highly conserved heptapeptide repeat domain which is bounded on its 5' side by a highly diverged heptapeptide repeat domain, and is bounded on its 3' side by a long carboxyl-terminal extension. PMID:2690004

  17. A serine/arginine-rich nuclear matrix cyclophilin interacts with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, J P; Stagljar, I; Meier, P; Moosmann, P; Silke, J; Baechi, T; Georgiev, O; Schaffner, W

    1997-01-01

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II shows a striking difference in the degree of phosphorylation, depending on its functional state: initiating and elongating polymerases are unphosphorylated and highly phosphorylated respectively. Phosphorylation mostly occurs at the C-terminal domain (CTD), which consists of a repetitive heptapeptide structure. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have selected for mammalian proteins that interact with the phosphorylated CTD of mammalian RNA polymerase II. A prominent isolate, designated SRcyp/CASP10, specifically interacts with the CTD not only in vivo but also in vitro . It contains a serine/arginine-rich (SR) domain, similar to that found in the SR protein family of pre-mRNA splicing factors, which is required for interaction with the CTD. Most remarkably, the N-terminal region of SRcyp includes a peptidyl-prolyl cis - trans isomerase domain characteristic of immunophilins/cyclophilins (Cyp), a protein family implicated in protein folding, assembly and transport. SRcyp is a nuclear protein with a characteristic distribution in large irregularly shaped nuclear speckles and co-localizes perfectly with the SR domain-containing splicing factor SC35. Recent independent investigations have provided complementary data, such as an association of the phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II with the nuclear speckles, impaired splicing in a CTD deletion background and inhibition of in vitro splicing by CTD peptides. Taken together, these data indicate that factors directly or indirectly involved in splicing are associated with the elongating RNA polymerases, from where they might translocate to the nascent transcripts to ensure efficient splicing, concomitant with transcription. PMID:9153302

  18. Identification of the Active Site in the Heparin II Domain of Fibronectin that Increases Outflow Facility in Cultured Monkey Anterior Segments

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jose M.; Hu, Yujie; Gabelt, B’Ann T.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Peters, Donna M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the active site in the Heparin II (HepII) domain of fibronectin that regulates outflow facility in cultured anterior segments and disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in transformed human trabecular meshwork (TM-1) cells. METHODS Outflow facility was determined by two-level, constant-pressure perfusion in cultured anterior segments of rhesus and cynomolgus monkey eyes. One segment from each pair was exchanged with either the HepII domain or an integrin/syndecan binding peptide (IDAPS or PPRARI) from the HepII domain. To assay changes in the actin cytoskeleton, TM-1 cells were incubated for 24 hours with or without the HepII domain, PPRARI, or IDAPS. Changes were monitored with phase and immunofluorescence microscopy. RESULTS HepII domain (100 µg/mL) and PPRARI (500 µg/mL) increased outflow facility by 31% ± 13% (n = 9, P < 0.05) and 24% ± 9% (n = 8, P < 0.05), respectively in cultured anterior segments after an overnight infusion. Perfusion with IDAPS (500 µg/mL) had no effect on outflow facility. In TM-1 cultures, 250 µg/mL of the HepII domain or 4 mg/mL of PPRARI disrupted the assembly of actin filaments. A lower concentration of PPRARI (2 mg/mL) disrupted the actin cytoskeleton when used in combination with a nondisrupting concentration of the HepII domain (30–60 µg/mL). In contrast, IDAPS did not disrupt the actin cytoskeleton under any condition tested. CONCLUSIONS The active site in the HepII domain that regulates outflow facility in cultured anterior segments and disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in TM-1 cells is the syndecan/integrin binding sequence, PPRARI. PMID:18757505

  19. Distributive O-GlcNAcylation on the Highly Repetitive C-Terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Fan, Dacheng; Hu, Chia-Wei; Worth, Matthew; Ma, Zhi-Xiong; Jiang, Jiaoyang

    2016-02-23

    O-GlcNAcylation is a nutrient-responsive glycosylation that plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation. Human RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is extensively modified by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on its unique C-terminal domain (CTD), which consists of 52 heptad repeats. One approach to understanding the function of glycosylated Pol II is to determine the mechanism of dynamic O-GlcNAcylation on the CTD. Here, we discovered that the Pol II CTD can be extensively O-GlcNAcylated in vitro and in cells. Efficient glycosylation requires a minimum of 20 heptad repeats of the CTD and more than half of the N-terminal domain of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT). Under conditions of saturated sugar donor, we monitored the attachment of more than 20 residues of O-GlcNAc to the full-length CTD. Surprisingly, glycosylation on the periodic CTD follows a distributive mechanism, resulting in highly heterogeneous glycoforms. Our data suggest that initial O-GlcNAcylation can take place either on the proximal or on the distal region of the CTD, and subsequent glycosylation occurs similarly over the entire CTD with nonuniform distributions. Moreover, removal of O-GlcNAc from glycosylated CTD is also distributive and is independent of O-GlcNAcylation level. Our results suggest that O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes can employ a similar mechanism to react with other protein substrates on multiple sites. Distributive O-GlcNAcylation on Pol II provides another regulatory mechanism of transcription in response to fluctuating cellular conditions. PMID:26807597

  20. Structural and functional analysis of two di-domain aromatase/cyclases from type II polyketide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Caldara-Festin, Grace; Jackson, David R.; Barajas, Jesus F.; Valentic, Timothy R.; Patel, Avinash B.; Aguilar, Stephanie; Nguyen, MyChi; Vo, Michael; Khanna, Avinash; Sasaki, Eita; Liu, Hung-wen; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic polyketides make up a large class of natural products with diverse bioactivity. During biosynthesis, linear poly-β-ketone intermediates are regiospecifically cyclized, yielding molecules with defined cyclization patterns that are crucial for polyketide bioactivity. The aromatase/cyclases (ARO/CYCs) are responsible for regiospecific cyclization of bacterial polyketides. The two most common cyclization patterns are C7–C12 and C9–C14 cyclizations. We have previously characterized three monodomain ARO/CYCs: ZhuI, TcmN, and WhiE. The last remaining uncharacterized class of ARO/CYCs is the di-domain ARO/CYCs, which catalyze C7–C12 cyclization and/or aromatization. Di-domain ARO/CYCs can further be separated into two subclasses: “nonreducing” ARO/CYCs, which act on nonreduced poly-β-ketones, and “reducing” ARO/CYCs, which act on cyclized C9 reduced poly-β-ketones. For years, the functional role of each domain in cyclization and aromatization for di-domain ARO/CYCs has remained a mystery. Here we present what is to our knowledge the first structural and functional analysis, along with an in-depth comparison, of the nonreducing (StfQ) and reducing (BexL) di-domain ARO/CYCs. This work completes the structural and functional characterization of mono- and di-domain ARO/CYCs in bacterial type II polyketide synthases and lays the groundwork for engineered biosynthesis of new bioactive polyketides. PMID:26631750

  1. "Fibrinogen Tokyo II". An abnormal fibrinogen with an impaired polymerization site on the aligned DD domain of fibrin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, M; Baba, M; Morimoto, K; Nakamikawa, C

    1983-01-01

    A hereditary dysfibrinogenemia associated with defective aggregation of fibrin monomers was found in a 39-yr-old female and in the members of her immediate family, who had all been asymptomatic. The abnormality was probably due to an impaired polymerization site exposed in the DD domain of two adjacent fibrin molecules, because plasmic fragment DD derived from the propositus' cross-linked fibrin bound far less tightly to insolubilized normal fragment E than that from the normal one. Its complementary polymerization site in the E domain of fibrin, which was exposed by thrombin cleavage, and the polymerization site in the D domain of fibrinogen, which was available without activation by thrombin, were both found to be normal. More anodal migration of the abnormal fragment DD than the normal one, as shown by immunoelectrophoresis, seemed to support our concept that the mutation most likely resides in the D domain of the abnormal fibrinogen molecule at or near a region closely related to the polymerization site that is exposed when two fibrin molecules are linearly aligned. The work of others on the polymerization of normal fibrin with different techniques yielded results consistent with our conclusions. We tentatively designate this type of abnormal fibrinogen "fibrinogen Tokyo II," but its possible identity with other abnormalities of fibrinogen reported heretofore is not excluded. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:6886002

  2. Admit One: How Essential and Nonessential Metals Gain Entrance into the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Fretham, Stephanie; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals can have a number of detrimental or beneficial effects in the cell, but first they must get in. Organisms have evolved transport mechanisms to get metals that are required, or essential into the cell. Nonessential metals often enter the cell through use of the machinery provided for essential metals. Much work has been done to advance our understanding of how these metals are transported across the plasma and organelle membranes. This review provides an overview of these metal transport processes. PMID:22337135

  3. Preferential DNA repair of 3-alkyladenine sites in essential and nonessential genes of human astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lapcevich, R.K.; Weiss, R.B.; Gallagher, P.E. )

    1991-03-11

    In recent years, numbers of studies examining excision rates of DNA damaged lesions in defined, subgenomic sequences have shown that DNA repair is not a uniform process throughout the genome. Here, the authors report data on the preferential, in vivo DNA repair of alkylation-induced lesions within specific DNA sequences of essential and nonessential genes. The formation and rate of removal of 3-alkyladenine were studied in these DNA fragments following treatment of human astrocytes with dimethyl sulfate. The distribution and quantitation of this damaged lesion in the isolated DNA from these cells were determined by a polymerase chain reaction assay. The results indicate that alkyladenines are more efficiently repaired in DNA fragments of essential genes than in comparable fragments of nonessential genes. In subsequent experiments, the repair rate of 3-alkyladenine was examined in DNA isolated from alkylation-treated human astrocytes, grown in serum-free medium to inhibit proliferation. The rate of repair of alkylation-induced lesions in essential and nonessential gene fragments also differed in actively growing and quiescent human astrocytes. The results of this study indicate that transcription plays an important role in the efficient removal of 3-alkyladenine by DNA repair systems.

  4. Hierarchical crack pattern as formed by successive domain divisions. II. From disordered to deterministic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, S.; Platkiewicz, J.; Andreotti, B.; Adda-Bedia, M.; Couder, Y.

    2005-04-01

    Hierarchical crack patterns, such as those formed in the glaze of ceramics or in desiccated layers of mud or gel, can be understood as a successive division of two-dimensional domains. We present an experimental study of the division of a single rectangular domain in drying starch and show that the dividing fracture essentially depends on the domain size, rescaled by the thickness of the cracking layer e . Utilizing basic assumptions regarding the conditions of crack nucleation, we show that the experimental results can be directly inferred from the equations of linear elasticity. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on hierarchical crack patterns, and in particular the existence of a transition from disordered cracks at large scales—the first ones—to a deterministic behavior at small scales—the last cracks.

  5. Moving toward a precise nutrition: preferential loading of seeds with essential nutrients over non-essential toxic elements

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mather A.; Castro-Guerrero, Norma; Mendoza-Cozatl, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and seeds are the main source of essential nutrients for humans and livestock. Many advances have recently been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which plants take up and accumulate micronutrients such as iron, zinc, copper and manganese. Some of these mechanisms, however, also facilitate the accumulation of non-essential toxic elements such as cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As). In humans, Cd and As intake has been associated with multiple disorders including kidney failure, diabetes, cancer and mental health issues. Recent studies have shown that some transporters can discriminate between essential metals and non-essential elements. Furthermore, sequestration of non-essential elements in roots has been described in several plant species as a key process limiting the translocation of non-essential elements to aboveground edible tissues, including seeds. Increasing the concentration of bioavailable micronutrients (biofortification) in grains while lowering the accumulation of non-essential elements will likely require the concerted action of several transporters. This review discusses the most recent advances on mineral nutrition that could be used to preferentially enrich seeds with micronutrients and also illustrates how precision breeding and transport engineering could be used to enhance the nutritional value of crops by re-routing essential and non-essential elements to separate sink tissues (roots and seeds). PMID:24600463

  6. Membrane insertion of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin: single mutation in domain II block partitioning of the toxin into the brush border membrane.

    PubMed

    Nair, Manoj S; Liu, Xinyan Sylvia; Dean, Donald H

    2008-05-27

    The umbrella and penknife models hypothesize that insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins partition into the apical membrane of the insect midgut by insertion of only two alpha-helices from domain I of the protein, alpha-helices 4 and 5 in the case of the umbrella model and alpha-helices 5 and 6 in the case of the penknife model. Neither model envisages membrane partitioning by domains II and III. In this study, we present data suggesting that mutations in the domain II residue, F371, affect insertion of the whole toxin into Manduca sexta brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs). Using steady state fluorescence measurements combined with a proteinase K protection assay, we show that mutants of F371 have lost their ability to insert into the BBMV, even though binding to cadherin is almost unaffected. The study also identifies a difference in partitioning of toxins into artificial lipid vesicles (SUVs) as opposed to native BBMVs. While the F371 mutations block insertion of domains I and II into BBMVs, they only block domain II insertion into SUVs. Bioassay and voltage clamping of midguts also confirm the fluorescence data that the noninserting mutants are nontoxic. Our study leads us to propose that, in contrast to previous models of individual free helices inserting into the membrane, the toxin enters into the membrane as a whole molecule or oligomers of the molecule, wherein the domain II residue F371 has a vital role to play in membrane insertion. PMID:18457427

  7. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen β and α chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both β and α) gene products, respectively, all of which being ˜90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to β2-microglobulin (β2M). The membraneembedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II α chains than to class II β chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a β2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  8. Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1 mediates repression of the MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) type IV promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Hudson, John A.; Bolick, Sophia C.; Wright, Kenneth L.; Piskurich, Janet F.

    2006-01-01

    MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), a co-activator that controls MHC class II (MHC II) transcription, functions as the master regulator of MHC II expression. Persistent activity of the CIITA type III promoter (pIII), one of the four potential promoters of this gene, is responsible for constitutive expression of MHC II by B lymphocytes. In addition, IFN-γ induces expression of CIITA in these cells through the type IV promoter (pIV). Positive regulatory domain 1-binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), called B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) in mice, represses the expression of CIITA pIII in plasma and multiple myeloma cells. To investigate regulation of CIITA pIV expression by PRDI-BF1 in the B lymphocyte lineage, protein/DNA binding studies, and functional promoter analyses were performed. PRDI-BF1 bound to the IRF-E site in CIITA pIV. Ectopic expression of either PRDI-BF1 or Blimp-1 repressed this promoter in B lymphocytes. In vitro binding and functional analyses of CIITA pIV demonstrated that the IFN regulatory factor-element (IRF-E) is the target of this repression. In vivo genomic footprint analysis demonstrated protein binding at the IRF-E site of CIITA pIV in U266 myeloma cells, which express PRDI-BF1. PRDI-BF1β, a truncated form of PRDI-BF1 that is co-expressed in myeloma cells, also bound to the IRF-E site and repressed CIITA pIV. These findings demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to silencing expression of CIITA pIII in B lymphocytes, PRDI-BF1 is capable of binding and suppressing CIITA pIV. PMID:16765445

  9. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  10. Nonlinear polarization spectroscopy in the frequency domain of light-harvesting complex II: absorption band substructure and exciton dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lokstein, H; Leupold, D; Voigt, B; Nowak, F; Ehlert, J; Hoffmann, P; Garab, G

    1995-01-01

    Spectral substructure and ultrafast excitation dynamics have been investigated in the chlorophyll (Chl) a and b Qy region of isolated plant light-harvesting complex II (LHC II). We demonstrate the feasibility of Nonlinear Polarization Spectroscopy in the frequency domain, a novel photosynthesis research laser spectroscopic technique, to determine not only ultrafast population relaxation (T1) and dephasing (T2) times, but also to reveal the complex spectral substructure in the Qy band as well as the mode(s) of absorption band broadening at room temperature (RT). The study gives further direct evidence for the existence of up to now hypothetical "Chl forms". Of particular interest is the differentiated participation of the Chl forms in energy transfer in trimeric and aggregated LHC II. Limits for T2 are given in the range of a few ten fs. Inhomogeneous broadening does not exceed the homogeneous widths of the subbands at RT. The implications of the results for the energy transfer mechanisms in the antenna are discussed. PMID:8534824

  11. Flexibility of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Phototaxis Transducer II from Natronomonas pharaonis

    PubMed Central

    Budyak, Ivan L.; Mironova, Olga S.; Yanamala, Naveena; Manoharan, Vijayalaxmi; Büldt, Georg; Schlesinger, Ramona; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Chemo- and phototaxis systems in bacteria and archaea serve as models for more complex signal transduction mechanisms in higher eukaryotes. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic fragment of the phototaxis transducer (pHtrII-cyt) from the halophilic archaeon Natronomonas pharaonis showed that it takes the shape of a monomeric or dimeric rod under low or high salt conditions, respectively. CD spectra revealed only approximately 24% helical structure, even in 4 M KCl, leaving it an open question how the rod-like shape is achieved. Here, we conducted CD, FTIR, and NMR spectroscopic studies under different conditions to address this question. We provide evidence that pHtrII-cyt is highly dynamic with strong helical propensity, which allows it to change from monomeric to dimeric helical coiled-coil states without undergoing dramatic shape changes. A statistical analysis of predicted disorder for homologous sequences suggests that structural flexibility is evolutionarily conserved within the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein family. PMID:20107574

  12. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domains confer multiple forms of Mg2+-dependent cooperativity to family II pyrophosphatases.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Anu; Anashkin, Viktor A; Lahti, Matti; Tuominen, Heidi K; Lahti, Reijo; Baykov, Alexander A

    2014-08-15

    Regulated family II pyrophosphatases (CBS-PPases) contain a nucleotide-binding insert comprising a pair of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domains, termed a Bateman module. By binding with high affinity to the CBS domains, AMP and ADP usually inhibit the enzyme, whereas ATP activates it. Here, we demonstrate that AMP, ADP, and ATP bind in a positively cooperative manner to CBS-PPases from four bacteria: Desulfitobacterium hafniense, Clostridium novyi, Clostridium perfringens, and Eggerthella lenta. Enzyme interaction with substrate as characterized by the Michaelis constant (Km) also exhibited positive catalytic cooperativity that decreased in magnitude upon nucleotide binding. The degree of both types of cooperativity increased with increasing concentration of the cofactor Mg(2+) except for the C. novyi PPase where Mg(2+) produced the opposite effect on kinetic cooperativity. Further exceptions from these general rules were ADP binding to C. novyi PPase and AMP binding to E. lenta PPase, neither of which had any effect on activity. A genetically engineered deletion variant of D. hafniense PPase lacking the regulatory insert was fully active but differed from the wild-type enzyme in that it was insensitive to nucleotides and bound substrate non-cooperatively and with a smaller Km value. These results indicate that the regulatory insert acts as an internal inhibitor and confers dual positive cooperativity to CBS domain-containing PPases, making them highly sensitive regulators of the PPi level in response to the changes in cell energy status that control adenine nucleotide distribution. These regulatory features may be common among other CBS domain-containing proteins. PMID:24986864

  13. Solution NMR Structure of Lin0431 Protein from Listeria innocua Reveals High Structural Similarity with Domain II of Bacterial Transcription Antitermination Protein NusG

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Xiao, Rong; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Janjua, Haleema; Lee, Dong Yup; Everett, John K.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Acton, Thomas B.; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2010-01-01

    Lin0431 protein from Listeria innocua (UniProtKB/TrEMBL ID Q92EM7/Q92EM7_LISIN) was selected as a target of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (target ID: LkR112). Here, we present the high-quality NMR solution structure of this protein which is the first representative for a member of DUF1312 domain family. Lin0431 protein exhibits a β-sandwich topology. Four anti-parallel β-strands form one face of the sandwich and the other three anti-parallel β-strands together with a short α-helix form the other face of the sandwich. Structure alignment by Dali reveals an unexpected structural similarity with domain II of NusG from Aquifex aeolicus. Analyses of the electrostatic protein surface potential and searches for protein surface cavities reveal the conserved basic charged surface cavities of both the Lin0431 and domain II of AaeNusG, suggesting they may bind the negatively charged nucleic acids and/or and other binding partners. The high structural similarity and similar surface features, despite the lack of recognizable sequence similarity, between Lin0431 and AaeNusG domain II suggest that the domain II of NusG and DUF1312 domains have a homologous relationship and may share similar biochemical functions. PMID:20602357

  14. TCR-like antibodies distinguish conformational and functional differences in two- versus four-domain auto reactive MHC class II-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Rony; Tabul, Moran; Chou, Yuan K; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Ferro, Adolph J; Burrows, Gregory G; Offner, Halina; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Reiter, Yoram

    2011-05-01

    Antigen-presenting cell-associated four-domain MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in activating autoreactive CD4(+) T cells involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). In contrast, two-domain MHC-II structures with the same covalently attached self-peptide (recombinant T-cell receptor ligands (RTLs)) can regulate pathogenic CD4(+) T cells and reverse clinical signs of experimental autoimmune diseases. RTL1000, which is composed of the β1α1 domains of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR2 linked to the encephalitogenic human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-35-55 peptide, was recently shown to be safe and well tolerated in a phase I clinical trial in MS. To evaluate the opposing biological effects of four- versus two-domain MHC-II structures, we screened phage Fab antibodies (Abs) for the neutralizing activity of RTL1000. Five different TCR-like Abs were identified that could distinguish between the two- versus four-domain MHC-peptide complexes while the cognate TCR was unable to make such a distinction. Moreover, Fab detection of native two-domain HLA-DR structures in human plasma implies that there are naturally occurring regulatory MHC-peptide complexes. These results demonstrate for the first time distinct conformational determinants characteristic of activating versus tolerogenic MHC-peptide complexes involved in human autoimmunity. PMID:21469129

  15. Computational models of music perception and cognition II: Domain-specific music processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Grachten, Maarten; Herrera, Perfecto; Hazan, Amaury; Marxer, Ricard; Serra, Xavier

    2008-09-01

    In Part I [Purwins H, Herrera P, Grachten M, Hazan A, Marxer R, Serra X. Computational models of music perception and cognition I: The perceptual and cognitive processing chain. Physics of Life Reviews 2008, in press, doi:10.1016/j.plrev.2008.03.004], we addressed the study of cognitive processes that underlie auditory perception of music, and their neural correlates. The aim of the present paper is to summarize empirical findings from music cognition research that are relevant to three prominent music theoretic domains: rhythm, melody, and tonality. Attention is paid to how cognitive processes like category formation, stimulus grouping, and expectation can account for the music theoretic key concepts in these domains, such as beat, meter, voice, consonance. We give an overview of computational models that have been proposed in the literature for a variety of music processing tasks related to rhythm, melody, and tonality. Although the present state-of-the-art in computational modeling of music cognition definitely provides valuable resources for testing specific hypotheses and theories, we observe the need for models that integrate the various aspects of music perception and cognition into a single framework. Such models should be able to account for aspects that until now have only rarely been addressed in computational models of music cognition, like the active nature of perception and the development of cognitive capacities from infancy to adulthood.

  16. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities II: fracturing of colliding walls

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2015-08-26

    We study collisions between nearly planar domain walls including the effects of small initial nonplanar fluctuations. These perturbations represent the small fluctuations that must exist in a quantum treatment of the problem. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that at the linear level a subset of these fluctuations experience parametric amplification as a result of their coupling to the planar symmetric background. Here we study the full three-dimensional nonlinear dynamics using lattice simulations, including both the early time regime when the fluctuations are well described by linear perturbation theory as well as the subsequent stage of fully nonlinear evolution. We find that the nonplanar fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the overall evolution of the system. Specifically, once these fluctuations begin to interact nonlinearly the split into a planar symmetric part of the field and the nonplanar fluctuations loses its utility. At this point the colliding domain walls dissolve, with the endpoint of this being the creation of a population of oscillons in the collision region. The original (nearly) planar symmetry has been completely destroyed at this point and an accurate study of the system requires the full three-dimensional simulation.

  17. Dietary essentiality of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" for animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongqing; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-08-01

    Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids (AA) had traditionally been classified as nutritionally essential (indispensable) or non-essential (dispensable) for animals and humans. Nutritionally essential AA (EAA) are defined as either those AA whose carbon skeletons cannot be synthesized de novo in animal cells or those that normally are insufficiently synthesized de novo by the animal organism relative to its needs for maintenance, growth, development, and health and which must be provided in the diet to meet requirements. In contrast, nutritionally non-essential AA (NEAA) are those AA which can be synthesized de novo in adequate amounts by the animal organism to meet requirements for maintenance, growth, development, and health and, therefore, need not be provided in the diet. Although EAA and NEAA had been described for over a century, there are no compelling data to substantiate the assumption that NEAA are synthesized sufficiently in animals and humans to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. NEAA play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling pathways, digestion and absorption of dietary nutrients, DNA and protein synthesis, proteolysis, metabolism of glucose and lipids, endocrine status, men and women fertility, acid-base balance, antioxidative responses, detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites, neurotransmission, and immunity. Emerging evidence indicates dietary essentiality of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" for animals and humans to achieve their full genetic potential for growth, development, reproduction, lactation, and resistance to metabolic and infectious diseases. This concept represents a new paradigm shift in protein nutrition to guide the feeding of mammals (including livestock), poultry, and fish. PMID:26041391

  18. The prosegment catalyzes native folding of Plasmodium falciparum plasmepsin II.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Ahmad Haniff; Xiao, Huogen; Dee, Derek R; Bryksa, Brian C; Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-10-01

    Plasmepsin II is a malarial pepsin-like aspartic protease produced as a zymogen containing an N-terminal prosegment domain that is removed during activation. Despite structural similarities between active plasmepsin II and pepsin, their prosegments adopt different conformations in the respective zymogens. In contrast to pepsinogen, the proplasmepsin II prosegment is 80 residues longer, contains a transmembrane region and is non-essential for recombinant expression in an active form, thus calling into question the prosegment's precise function. The present study examines the role of the prosegment in the folding mechanism of plasmepsin II. Both a shorter (residues 77-124) and a longer (residues 65-124) prosegment catalyze plasmepsin II folding at rates more than four orders of magnitude faster compared to folding without prosegment. Native plasmepsin II is kinetically trapped and requires the prosegment both to catalyze folding and to shift the folding equilibrium towards the native conformation. Thus, despite low sequence identity and distinct zymogen conformations, the folding landscapes of plasmepsin II and pepsin, both with and without prosegment, are qualitatively identical. These results imply a conserved and unusual feature of the pepsin-like protease topology that necessitates prosegment-assisted folding. PMID:27378574

  19. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  20. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant Jerdonitin, a P-II class snake venom metalloproteinase comprising metalloproteinase and disintegrin domains.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lili; Yuan, Cai; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Wanyu; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-01-01

    Jerdonitin is a P-II class snake venom metalloproteinase comprising metalloproteinase and disintegrin domains. In this study, we established a high-level expression system in Pichia pastoris and developed a purification strategy for the recombinant Jerdonitin. This recombinant Jerdonitin degraded fibrinogen at a level of activity comparable with its wild type. The effects of recombinant Jerdonitin on inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation were in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 248nM. In addition, we reported here that Jerdonitin can significantly inhibit the growth of several cell lines, including human liver cancer cells (Bel7402), human leukemia cells (K562) and human gastric carcinoma cells (BGC823). This study offers recombinant Jerdonitin that will be valuable for further functional and structural studies of Jerdonitin. PMID:19732785

  1. Dengue virus envelope protein domain I/II hinge determines long-lived serotype-specific dengue immunity.

    PubMed

    Messer, William B; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Yount, Boyd L; Royal, Scott R; Huynh, Jeremy P; Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E; Doranz, Benjamin J; Kahle, Kristen M; Pfaff, Jennifer M; White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2014-02-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes, DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4, are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, with an estimated 390 million acute infections annually. Infection confers long-term protective immunity against the infecting serotype, but secondary infection with a different serotype carries a greater risk of potentially fatal severe dengue disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The single most effective measure to control this threat to global health is a tetravalent DENV vaccine. To date, attempts to develop a protective vaccine have progressed slowly, partly because the targets of type-specific human neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), which are critical for long-term protection, remain poorly defined, impeding our understanding of natural immunity and hindering effective vaccine development. Here, we show that the envelope glycoprotein domain I/II hinge of DENV-3 and DENV-4 is the primary target of the long-term type-specific NAb response in humans. Transplantation of a DENV-4 hinge into a recombinant DENV-3 virus showed that the hinge determines the serotype-specific neutralizing potency of primary human and nonhuman primate DENV immune sera and that the hinge region both induces NAbs and is targeted by protective NAbs in rhesus macaques. These results suggest that the success of live dengue vaccines may depend on their ability to stimulate NAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein domain I/II hinge region. More broadly, this study shows that complex conformational antibody epitopes can be transplanted between live viruses, opening up similar possibilities for improving the breadth and specificity of vaccines for influenza, HIV, hepatitis C virus, and other clinically important viral pathogens. PMID:24385585

  2. Evaluation of regional climate simulations over the CORDEX-EA-II domain using the COSMO-CLM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weidan; Tang, Jianping; Wang, Xueyuan; Wang, Shuyu; Niu, Xiaorui; Wang, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The COSMO-CLM (CCLM) model is applied to perform regional climate simulation over the second phase of CORDEX-East Asia (CORDEX-EA-II) domain in this study. Driven by the ERAInterim reanalysis data, the model was integrated from 1988 to 2010 with a high resolution of 0.22°. The model's ability to reproduce mean climatology and climatic extremes is evaluated based on various aspects. The CCLM model is capable of capturing the basic features of the East Asia climate, including the seasonal mean patterns, interannual variations, annual cycles and climate extreme indices for both surface air temperature and precipitation. Some biases are evident in certain areas and seasons. Warm and wet biases appear in the arid and semi-arid areas over the northwestern and northern parts of the domain. The simulated climate over the Tibetan Plateau is colder and wetter than the observations, while South China, East China, and India are drier. The model biases may be caused by the simulated anticyclonic and cyclonic biases in low-level circulations, the simulated water vapor content biases, and the inadequate physical parameterizations in the CCLM model. A parallel 0.44° simulation is conducted and the comparison results show some added value introduced by the higher resolution 0.22° simulation. As a result, the CCLM model could be an adequate member for the next stage of the CORDEX-EA project, while further studies should be encouraged.

  3. Possible regulation of caveolar endocytosis and flattening by phosphorylation of F-BAR domain protein PACSIN2/Syndapin II

    PubMed Central

    Senju, Yosuke; Suetsugu, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Caveolae are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The BAR domain proteins form crescent-shaped dimers, and their oligomeric filaments are considered to form spirals at the necks of invaginations, such as clathrin-coated pits and caveolae. PACSIN2/Syndapin II is one of the BAR domain-containing proteins, and is localized at the necks of caveolae. PACSIN2 is thought to function in the scission and stabilization of caveolae, through binding to dynamin-2 and EHD2, respectively. These two functions are considered to be switched by PACSIN2 phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) upon hypotonic stress and sheer stress. The phosphorylation decreases the membrane binding affinity of PACSIN2, leading to its removal from caveolae. The removal of the putative oligomeric spiral of PACSIN2 from caveolar membrane invaginations could lead to the deformation of caveolae. Indeed, PACSIN2 removal from caveolae is accompanied by the recruitment of dynamin-2, suggesting that the removal provides space for the function of dynamin-2. Otherwise, the removal of PACSIN2 decreases the stability of caveolae, which could result in the flattening of caveolae. In contrast, an increase in the amount of EHD2 restored caveolar stability. Therefore, PACSIN2 at caveolae stabilizes caveolae, but its removal by phosphorylation could induce both caveolar endocytosis and flattening. PMID:26745030

  4. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Selvin, Joseph; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Lipton, Anuj N.; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kiran, George S.

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules, such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid (AA) sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of AA sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogs still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species to correlate KS domain architecture and structural features. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products. PMID:26903957

  5. Interplay of positive and negative effectors in function of the C-terminal repeat domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Kornberg, R D

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II lacking a C-terminal domain (CTD) was active in transcription with purified proteins from yeast but failed to support transcription in a yeast extract. CTD dependence could be reconstituted in the purified system by addition of two fractions from the extract. An inhibitory fraction abolished transcription by both wild-type and CTD-less RNA polymerases; a stimulatory fraction restored activity of the wild-type polymerase but had a much lesser effect on the CTD-less enzyme. Parallel results were obtained with the use of a kinase inhibitor that prevents phosphorylation of the CTD by RNA polymerase II initiation factor b. The kinase inhibitor abolished transcription by wild-type polymerase in yeast extract but had no significant effect in the purified system. The requirement for both the CTD and kinase action for transcription in an extract indicates that CTD phosphorylation is involved in opposing the negative effector in the extract. Factor b must play a role(s) in addition to phosphorylation of the CTD because it was still required for transcription with polymerase lacking a CTD in the purified system. Images PMID:8134400

  6. RNA Polymerase II C-terminal Heptarepeat Domain Ser-7 Phosphorylation Is Established in a Mediator-dependent Fashion*

    PubMed Central

    Boeing, Stefan; Rigault, Caroline; Heidemann, Martin; Eick, Dirk; Meisterernst, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal heptarepeat domain (CTD) is subject to phosphorylation during initiation and elongation of transcription by RNA polymerase II. Here we study the molecular mechanisms leading to phosphorylation of Ser-7 in the human enzyme. Ser-7 becomes phosphorylated before initiation of transcription at promoter regions. We identify cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) as one responsible kinase. Phosphorylation of both Ser-5 and Ser-7 is fully dependent on the cofactor complex Mediator. A subform of Mediator associated with an active RNAPII is critical for preinitiation complex formation and CTD phosphorylation. The Mediator-RNAPII complex independently recruits TFIIB and CDK7 to core promoter regions. CDK7 phosphorylates Ser-7 selectively in the context of an intact preinitiation complex. CDK7 is not the only kinase that can modify Ser-7 of the CTD. ChIP experiments with chemical inhibitors provide evidence that other yet to be identified kinases further phosphorylate Ser-7 in coding regions. PMID:19901026

  7. Synergetic action of domain II and IV underlies persistent current generation in Nav1.3 as revealed by a tarantula toxin.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Zhang, Yunxiao; Xiao, Zhaohua; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Huang, Ying; Chen, Bo; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2015-01-01

    The persistent current (INaP) through voltage-gated sodium channels enhances neuronal excitability by causing prolonged depolarization of membranes. Nav1.3 intrinsically generates a small INaP, although the mechanism underlying its generation remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of the four domains of Nav1.3 in INaP generation was investigated using the tarantula toxin α-hexatoxin-MrVII (RTX-VII). RTX-VII activated Nav1.3 and induced a large INaP. A pre-activated state binding model was proposed to explain the kinetics of toxin-channel interaction. Of the four domains of Nav1.3, both domain II and IV might play important roles in the toxin-induced INaP. Domain IV constructed the binding site for RTX-VII, while domain II might not participate in interacting with RTX-VII but could determine the efficacy of RTX-VII. Our results based on the use of RTX-VII as a probe suggest that domain II and IV cooperatively contribute to the generation of INaP in Nav1.3. PMID:25784299

  8. Synergetic Action of Domain II and IV Underlies Persistent Current Generation in Nav1.3 as revealed by a tarantula toxin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Zhang, Yunxiao; xiao, Zhaohua; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Huang, Ying; Chen, Bo; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2015-01-01

    The persistent current (INaP) through voltage-gated sodium channels enhances neuronal excitability by causing prolonged depolarization of membranes. Nav1.3 intrinsically generates a small INaP, although the mechanism underlying its generation remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of the four domains of Nav1.3 in INaP generation was investigated using the tarantula toxin α-hexatoxin-MrVII (RTX-VII). RTX-VII activated Nav1.3 and induced a large INaP. A pre-activated state binding model was proposed to explain the kinetics of toxin-channel interaction. Of the four domains of Nav1.3, both domain II and IV might play important roles in the toxin-induced INaP. Domain IV constructed the binding site for RTX-VII, while domain II might not participate in interacting with RTX-VII but could determine the efficacy of RTX-VII. Our results based on the use of RTX-VII as a probe suggest that domain II and IV cooperatively contribute to the generation of INaP in Nav1.3. PMID:25784299

  9. TCR-like antibodies distinguish conformational and functional differences in two vs. four-domain auto-reactive MHC II-peptide complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Rony; Tabul, Moran; Chou, Yuan K.; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Ferro, Adolph J.; Burrows, Gregory G.; Offner, Halina; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Reiter, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Antigen presenting cell-associated four-domain MHC class-II molecules play a central role in activating autoreactive CD4+ T-cells involved in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). In contrast, two-domain MHC-II structures with the same covalently-attached self peptide (Recombinant T-cell receptor Ligands=RTLs) can regulate pathogenic CD4+ T-cells and reverse clinical signs of experimental autoimmune diseases. RTL1000, comprised of the β1α1 domains of HLA-DR2 linked to the encephalitogenic human MOG-35-55 peptide, was recently shown to be safe and well-tolerated in a Phase I clinical trial in MS. To evaluate the opposing biological effects of four- vs. two-domain class-II structures, we screened phage Fab antibodies (Abs) for neutralizing activity of RTL1000. . Five different TCR-like Abs were identified that could distinguish between the two- vs. four-domain MHC peptide complexes, while the cognate TCR was unable to make such a distinction. Moreover, Fab detection of native two-domain HLA-DR structures in human plasma implies that there are naturally-occurring regulatory MHC-peptide complexes. These results demonstrate for the first time distinct conformational determinants characteristic of activating vs. tolerogenic MHC-peptide complexes involved in human autoimmunity. PMID:21469129

  10. The VP8* Domain of Neonatal Rotavirus Strain G10P[11] Binds to Type II Precursor Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Sasirekha; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Smith, David F.; Kang, Gagandeep; Ramig, Robert F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses with a P[11] VP4 genotype exhibit a tropism for neonates. Interaction of the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4 with sialic acid was thought to be the key mediator for rotavirus infectivity. However, recent studies have indicated a role for nonsialylated glycoconjugates, including histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), in the infectivity of human rotaviruses. We sought to determine if the bovine rotavirus-derived VP8* of a reassortant neonatal G10P[11] virus interacts with hitherto uncharacterized glycans. In an array screen of >600 glycans, VP8* P[11] showed specific binding to glycans with the Galβ1-4GlcNAc motif, which forms the core structure of type II glycans and is the precursor of H type II HBGA. The specificity of glycan binding was confirmed through hemagglutination assays; GST-VP8* P[11] hemagglutinates type O, A, and B red blood cells as well as pooled umbilical cord blood erythrocytes. Further, G10P[11] infectivity was significantly enhanced by the expression of H type II HBGA in CHO cells. The bovine-origin VP4 was confirmed to be essential for this increased infectivity, using laboratory-derived reassortant viruses generated from sialic acid binding rotavirus SA11-4F and a bovine G10P[11] rotavirus, B223. The binding to a core glycan unit has not been reported for any rotavirus VP4. Core glycan synthesis is constitutive in most cell types, and modification of these glycans is thought to be developmentally regulated. These studies provide the first molecular basis for understanding neonatal rotavirus infections, indicating that glycan modification during neonatal development may mediate the age-restricted infectivity of neonatal viruses. PMID:23616650

  11. Music in the exercise domain: a review and synthesis (Part II).

    PubMed

    Karageorghis, Costas I; Priest, David-Lee

    2012-03-01

    Since a 1997 review by Karageorghis and Terry, which highlighted the state of knowledge and methodological weaknesses, the number of studies investigating musical reactivity in relation to exercise has swelled considerably. In this two-part review paper, the development of conceptual approaches and mechanisms underlying the effects of music are explicated (Part I), followed by a critical review and synthesis of empirical work (spread over Parts I and II). Pre-task music has been shown to optimise arousal, facilitate task-relevant imagery and improve performance in simple motoric tasks. During repetitive, endurance-type activities, self-selected, motivational and stimulative music has been shown to enhance affect, reduce ratings of perceived exertion, improve energy efficiency and lead to increased work output. There is evidence to suggest that carefully selected music can promote ergogenic and psychological benefits during high-intensity exercise, although it appears to be ineffective in reducing perceptions of exertion beyond the anaerobic threshold. The effects of music appear to be at their most potent when it is used to accompany self-paced exercise or in externally valid conditions. When selected according to its motivational qualities, the positive impact of music on both psychological state and performance is magnified. Guidelines are provided for future research and exercise practitioners. PMID:22577473

  12. Music in the exercise domain: a review and synthesis (Part II)

    PubMed Central

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Priest, David-Lee

    2011-01-01

    Since a 1997 review by Karageorghis and Terry, which highlighted the state of knowledge and methodological weaknesses, the number of studies investigating musical reactivity in relation to exercise has swelled considerably. In this two-part review paper, the development of conceptual approaches and mechanisms underlying the effects of music are explicated (Part I), followed by a critical review and synthesis of empirical work (spread over Parts I and II). Pre-task music has been shown to optimise arousal, facilitate task-relevant imagery and improve performance in simple motoric tasks. During repetitive, endurance-type activities, self-selected, motivational and stimulative music has been shown to enhance affect, reduce ratings of perceived exertion, improve energy efficiency and lead to increased work output. There is evidence to suggest that carefully selected music can promote ergogenic and psychological benefits during high-intensity exercise, although it appears to be ineffective in reducing perceptions of exertion beyond the anaerobic threshold. The effects of music appear to be at their most potent when it is used to accompany self-paced exercise or in externally valid conditions. When selected according to its motivational qualities, the positive impact of music on both psychological state and performance is magnified. Guidelines are provided for future research and exercise practitioners. PMID:22577473

  13. Quantitative spectral domain optical coherence tomography thickness parameters in type II diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gella, Laxmi; Raman, Rajiv; Sharma, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the changes in retinal thickness and individual layer thickness in subjects with diabetic retinopathy (DR) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Materials and Methods: A total of 251 eyes from 170 subjects were included in this study. The study sample was subdivided into nondiabetic subjects; subjects with diabetes but no DR; subjects with mild, moderate, and severe nonproliferative DR (NPDR); and proliferative DR. Various retinal thickness parameters were assessed using SDOCT. Results: The mean age of the study population was 55.34 ± 9.02 years (range: 32–80 years) and 56.6% of the subjects were males. Men had significantly greater central foveal thickness, central subfield thickness, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and retinal thickness in all the quadrants of 3 mm and 6 mm zones compared to women (P < 0.001). Superior (293.11 ± 25.46 vs. 285.25 ± 19.17; P = 0.044) and temporal (282.10 ± 25.26 vs. 272.46 ± 16.21; P = 0.011) quadrants showed an increased retinal thickness in any DR group when compared with diabetic subjects without DR. Photoreceptor layer thickness was significantly reduced in diabetic subjects with no DR when compared with nondiabetic subjects and also in cases of severe NPDR when compared with mild and moderate NPDR. Conclusion: Here, we analyze the quantitative retinal thickness parameters in diabetic subjects using SDOCT. Neuronal degenerative changes such as photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial thinning in case of DR are also reported. PMID:27013826

  14. Structure-function relationships in a self-splicing group II intron: a large part of domain II of the mitochondrial intron aI5 is not essential for self-splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kwakman, J H; Konings, D; Pel, H J; Grivell, L A

    1989-01-01

    An oligonucleotide-directed deletion of 156 nucleotides has been introduced into the yeast mitochondrial group II intron al5 (887 nt). The deletion comprises almost all of domain II, which is one of the six phylogenetically conserved structural elements of group II introns. This mutant displays reduced self-splicing activity, but results of chemical probing with dimethylsulphate suggest that sequences at the site of the deletion interfere with the normal folding of the intron. This is supported by computer analyses, which predict a number of alternative structures involving conserved intron sequences. Splicing activity could be restored by insertion of a 10-nucleotide palindromic sequence into the unique Smal site of the deletion mutant, resulting in the formation of a small stable stem-loop element at the position of domain II. These results provide a direct correlation between folding of the RNA and its activity. We conclude that at least a large part of domain II of the group II intron al5 is not required for self-splicing activity. This deletion mutant with a length of 731 nucleotides represents the smallest self-splicing group II intron so far known. Images PMID:2472604

  15. Binding Mechanism of the N-Terminal SH3 Domain of CrkII and Proline-Rich Motifs in cAbl.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Veer S; Zeng, Danyun; Krieger, Inna; Sacchettini, James C; Cho, Jae-Hyun

    2016-06-21

    The N-terminal Src homology 3 (nSH3) domain of a signaling adaptor protein, CT-10 regulator of kinase II (CrkII), recognizes proline-rich motifs (PRMs) of binding partners, such as cAbl kinase. The interaction between CrkII and cAbl kinase is involved in the regulation of cell spreading, microbial pathogenesis, and cancer metastasis. Here, we report the detailed biophysical characterizations of the interactions between the nSH3 domain of CrkII and PRMs in cAbl. We identified that the nSH3 domain of CrkII binds to three PRMs in cAbl with virtually identical affinities. Structural studies, by using x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, revealed that the binding modes of all three nSH3:PRM complexes are highly similar to each other. Van 't Hoff analysis revealed that nSH3:PRM interaction is associated with favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy change. The combination of experimentally determined thermodynamic parameters, structure-based calculations, and (15)N NMR relaxation analysis highlights the energetic contribution of conformational entropy change upon the complex formation, and water molecules structured in the binding interface of the nSH3:PRM complex. Understanding the molecular basis of nSH3:PRM interaction will provide, to our knowledge, new insights for the rational design of small molecules targeting the interaction between CrkII and cAbl. PMID:27332121

  16. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  17. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:26674152

  18. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Transportation/Automotive Mechanics. Volume II: Theory. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, James F., Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of transportation/automotive mechanics test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a test item…

  19. A Functional Interaction between the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II and Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Warren, Stephen L.

    1997-01-01

    In the preceding study we found that Sm snRNPs and SerArg (SR) family proteins co-immunoprecipitate with Pol II molecules containing a hyperphosphorylated CTD (Kim et al., 1997). The association between Pol IIo and splicing factors is maintained in the absence of pre-mRNA, and the polymerase need not be transcriptionally engaged (Kim et al., 1997). The latter findings led us to hypothesize that a phosphorylated form of the CTD interacts with pre-mRNA splicing components in vivo. To test this idea, a nested set of CTD-derived proteins was assayed for the ability to alter the nuclear distribution of splicing factors, and to interfere with splicing in vivo. Proteins containing heptapeptides 1-52 (CTD52), 1-32 (CTD32), 1-26 (CTD26), 1-13 (CTD13), 1-6 (CTD6), 1-3 (CTD3), or 1 (CTD1) were expressed in mammalian cells. The CTD-derived proteins become phosphorylated in vivo, and accumulate in the nucleus even though they lack a conventional nuclear localization signal. CTD52 induces a selective reorganization of splicing factors from discrete nuclear domains to the diffuse nucleoplasm, and significantly, it blocks the accumulation of spliced, but not unspliced, human β-globin transcripts. The extent of splicing factor disruption, and the degree of inhibition of splicing, are proportional to the number of heptapeptides added to the protein. The above results indicate a functional interaction between Pol II's CTD and pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:9008699

  20. Functions of the N- and C-Terminal Domains of Human RAP74 in Transcriptional Initiation, Elongation, and Recycling of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Ren, Delin; Finkelstein, Ann; Burton, Zachary F.

    1998-01-01

    Transcription factor IIF (TFIIF) cooperates with RNA polymerase II (pol II) during multiple stages of the transcription cycle including preinitiation complex assembly, initiation, elongation, and possibly termination and recycling. Human TFIIF appears to be an α2β2 heterotetramer of RNA polymerase II-associating protein 74- and 30-kDa subunits (RAP74 and RAP30). From inspection of its 517-amino-acid (aa) sequence, the RAP74 subunit appears to comprise separate N- and C-terminal domains connected by a flexible loop. In this study, we present functional data that strongly support this model for RAP74 architecture and further show that the N- and C-terminal domains and the central loop of RAP74 have distinct roles during separate phases of the transcription cycle. The N-terminal domain of RAP74 (minimally aa 1 to 172) is sufficient to deliver pol II into a complex formed on the adenovirus major late promoter with the TATA-binding protein, TFIIB, and RAP30. A more complete N-terminal domain fragment (aa 1 to 217) strongly stimulates both accurate initiation and elongation by pol II. The region of RAP74 between aa 172 and 205 and a subregion between aa 170 and 178 are critical for both accurate initiation and elongation, and mutations in these regions have similar effects on initiation and elongation. Based on these observations, RAP74 appears to have similar functions in initiation and elongation. The central region and the C-terminal domain of RAP74 do not contribute strongly to single-round accurate initiation or elongation stimulation but do stimulate multiple-round transcription in an extract system. PMID:9528785

  1. Glycine to serine substitution in the triple helical domain of pro-alpha 1 (II) collagen results in a lethal perinatal form of short-limbed dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Vissing, H; D'Alessio, M; Lee, B; Ramirez, F; Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1989-11-01

    Previous biochemical studies on cartilage tissue from a proband with Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis (Godfrey, M., and Hollister, D. W. (1988) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 43, 904-913) indicated heterozygosity for a structural abnormality in the triple helical domain of pro-alpha 1 (II) collagen. Here we demonstrate that the mutation in the type II procollagen gene is a single base change that converts the codon for glycine (GGC) at amino acid 943 of the alpha 1 (II) chain to a codon for serine (AGC). The substitution disrupts the invariant Gly-X-Y structural motif necessary for perfect triple helix formation and leads to extensive overmodification, intracellular retention, and reduced secretion of type II collagen. These findings confirm the proposal that new dominant mutations in the type II procollagen gene may account for some cases of Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. Since recent studies (Lee, B., Vissing, H., Ramirez, F., Rogers, D., and Rimoin, D. (1989) Science 244, 978-980) have identified a dominantly inherited type II procollagen gene deletion in a non-lethal form of skeletal dysplasia, namely spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, the data more generally demonstrate that different type II procollagen gene mutations eventuate in a wide and diverse spectrum of clinical phenotypes. PMID:2572591

  2. Identification of essential and non-essential genes in Ambystoma tigrinum virus.

    PubMed

    Aron, Mariah M; Allen, Alexander G; Kromer, Mathew; Galvez, Hector; Vigil, Brianna; Jancovich, James K

    2016-06-01

    Members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) are large double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses that are found world-wide infecting fish, amphibian and reptile ectothermic hosts. Ranavirus genomes range from 105 to 155kbp in length and they are predicted to encode around 90-125 genes. Currently, our knowledge of the function of ∼50% of these genes is known or inferred based on homology to orthologous genes characterized in other systems; however, the function of the remaining open reading frames (ORFS) is unknown. Therefore, in order to begin to uncover the function of unknown ORFs in ranaviruses we developed a standardized approach to generate a recombination cassette for any ORF in Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). Our standardized approach quickly and efficiently assembles recombination cassettes and recombinant ATV. We have used this approach to identify two essential, one semi-essential and two non-essential genes in ATV. PMID:27025572

  3. Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II

    PubMed Central

    Sakalar, Cagri; Mazumder, Suparna; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Jaini, Ritika; Aguilar, Robert; Prasad, Sathyamangla V. Naga; Connolly, Denise C.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor, type II (AMHR2), is a differentiation protein expressed in 90% of primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. We propose that AMHR2 may serve as a useful target for vaccination against EOC. To this end, we generated the recombinant 399-amino acid cytoplasmic domain of mouse AMHR2 (AMHR2-CD) and tested its efficacy as a vaccine target in inhibiting growth of the ID8 transplantable EOC cell line in C57BL/6 mice and in preventing growth of autochthonous EOCs that occur spontaneously in transgenic mice. We found that AMHR2-CD immunization of C57BL/6 females induced a prominent antigen-specific proinflammatory CD4+ T cell response that resulted in a mild transient autoimmune oophoritis that resolved rapidly with no detectable lingering adverse effects on ovarian function. AMHR2-CD vaccination significantly inhibited ID8 tumor growth when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically, and protection against EOC growth was passively transferred into naive recipients with AMHR2-CD-primed CD4+ T cells but not with primed B cells. In addition, prophylactic AMHR2-CD vaccination of TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mice significantly inhibited growth of autochthonous EOCs and provided a 41.7% increase in mean overall survival. We conclude that AMHR2-CD vaccination provides effective immunotherapy of EOC with relatively benign autoimmune complications. PMID:26618181

  4. A single-base change in the tyrosine kinase II domain of ovine FGFR3 causes hereditary chondrodysplasia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Beever, J E; Smit, M A; Meyers, S N; Hadfield, T S; Bottema, C; Albretsen, J; Cockett, N E

    2006-02-01

    Ovine hereditary chondrodysplasia, or spider lamb syndrome (SLS), is a genetic disorder that is characterized by severe skeletal abnormalities and has resulted in substantial economic losses for sheep producers. Here we demonstrate that a non-synonymous T>A transversion in the highly conserved tyrosine kinase II domain of a positional candidate gene, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), is responsible for SLS. We also demonstrate that the mutant FGFR3 allele has an additive effect on long-bone length, calling into question the long-standing belief that SLS is inherited as a strict monogenic, Mendelian recessive trait. Instead, we suggest that SLS manifestation is determined primarily by the presence of the mutant FGFR3 allele, but it is also influenced by an animal's genetic background. In contrast to FGFR3 mutations causing dwarfism in humans, this single-base change is the only known natural mutation of FGFR3 that results in a skeletal overgrowth phenotype in any species. PMID:16441300

  5. 78 FR 5162 - Designation of a Nonessential Experimental Population of Central Valley Spring-Run Chinook Salmon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ...On January 16, 2013, we, NMFS, published a proposed rule to designate a nonessential experimental population of Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act in portions of the San Joaquin River and a notice of availability for the draft environmental assessment associated with this action. The proposed rule contained incorrect dates for two of our......

  6. The NHERF1 PDZ1 domain and IRBIT interact and mediate the activation of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 by ANG II.

    PubMed

    He, Peijian; Zhao, Luqing; No, Yi Ran; Karvar, Serhan; Yun, C Chris

    2016-08-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE)3, a major Na(+) transporter in the luminal membrane of the proximal tubule, is subject to ANG II regulation in renal Na(+)/fluid absorption and blood pressure control. We have previously shown that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IRBIT) mediates ANG II-induced exocytosis of NHE3 in cultured proximal tubule epithelial cells. In searching for scaffold protein(s) that coordinates with IRBIT in NHE3 trafficking, we found that NHE regulatory factor (NHERF)1, NHE3, and IRBIT proteins were coexpressed in the same macrocomplexes and that loss of ANG II type 1 receptors decreased their expression in the renal brush-border membrane. We found that NHERF1 was required for ANG II-mediated forward trafficking and activation of NHE3 in cultured cells. ANG II induced a concomitant increase of NHERF1 interactions with NHE3 and IRBIT, which were abolished when the NHERF1 PDZ1 domain was removed. Overexpression of a yellow fluorescent protein-NHERF1 construct that lacks PDZ1, but not PDZ2, failed to exaggerate the ANG II-dependent increase of NHE3 expression in the apical membrane. Moreover, exogenous expression of PDZ1 exerted a dominant negative effect on NHE3 activation by ANG II. We further demonstrated that IRBIT was indispensable for the ANG II-provoked increase in NHERF1-NHE3 interactions and that phosphorylation of IRBIT at Ser(68) was necessary for the assembly of the NHEF1-IRBIT-NHE3 complex. Taken together, our findings suggest that NHERF1 mediates ANG II-induced activation of renal NHE3, which requires coordination between IRBIT and the NHERF1 PDZ1 domain in binding and transporting NHE3. PMID:27279487

  7. The role of water molecules in the binding of class I and II peptides to the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Camara-Artigas, Ana; Ortiz-Salmeron, Emilia; Andujar-Sánchez, Montserrrat; Bacarizo, Julio; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of proline-rich motifs with SH3 domains are present in signal transduction and other important cell processes. Analysis of structural and thermodynamic data suggest a relevant role of water molecules in these protein-protein interactions. To determine whether or not the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase shows the same behaviour, the crystal structures of its complexes with two high-affinity synthetic peptides, VSL12 and APP12, which are class I and II peptides, respectively, have been solved. In the class I complexes two water molecules were found at the binding interface that were not present in the class II complexes. The structures suggest a role of these water molecules in facilitating conformational changes in the SH3 domain to allow the binding of the class I or II peptides. In the third binding pocket these changes modify the cation-π and salt-bridge interactions that determine the affinity of the binding. Comparison of the water molecules involved in the binding of the peptides with previous reported hydration spots suggests a different pattern for the SH3 domains of the Src tyrosine kinase family. PMID:27599862

  8. Evaluation of tetravalent and conserved synthetic peptides vaccines derived from Dengue virus Envelope domain I and II.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Raissa Prado; Livonesi, Márcia Cristina; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Rodrigues, Naiara Ferreira; da Costa, Lauro César Felipe; Dos Santos, Michelle Cristina Silva Gomes; de Oliveira Rocha, Eliseu Soares; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2014-08-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus (DENV) serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients experiencing a secondary infection with a different serotype progress to the severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. In this study, the vaccine potential of three tetravalent and conserved synthetic peptides derived from DENV envelope domain I (named Pep01) and II (named Pep02 and Pep03) was evaluated. Human dengue IgM/IgG positive serum (n=16) showed reactivity against Pep01, Pep02 and Pep03 in different degrees. Mice immunization experiments showed that these peptides were able to induce a humoral response characterized by antibodies with low neutralizing activity. The spleen cells derived from mice immunized with the peptides showed a significant cytotoxic activity (only for Pep02 and Pep03), a high expression of IL-10 (P<0.01) and a reduced expression of TNF-α and IFN-gamma (P<0.001) compared to DENV-1 infected splenocytes. Thus these peptides, and specially the Pep03, can induce a humoral response characterized by antibodies with low neutralizing activities and probably a T cell response that could be beneficial to induce an effective immune response against all DENV serotypes and do not contributed to the immunopathogenesis. However, further studies in peptide sequence will be required to induce the production of neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes and also to improve immunogenicity of these peptides. PMID:24768848

  9. The cysteine, total sulfur amino acid, tyrosine, phenylalanine + tyrosine, and non-essential amino acid maintenance requirements of broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, R D; Mei, S J; Sakomura, N K; Coon, C N

    2016-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty Cobb-Vantress broiler breeders were used to determine the maintenance requirement and efficiency of utilization of dietary Cys, Tyr, and non-essential amino acids (AA) in a 21-day experiment. The breeders were fed crystalline amino acid diets containing graded levels of Cys or Tyr representing 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40% of their suggested requirement level with all other amino acids maintained at 40% of their suggested requirement level. To determine the non-essential AA maintenance requirement, graded levels of non-essential AA were provided by glutamic acid to represent 12, 19, 26, 33, and 40% of the ideal level of glutamic acid with all other amino acids maintained at their maintenance requirement level. The total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) and Phe + Tyr requirements were calculated by combining Cys and Tyr results, respectively, with previously determined Met and Phe, respectively. The slope of Cys, Tyr, and non-essential AA accretion regression line indicated that 29% Cys, 24% TSAA, 21% Tyr, 20% Phe + Tyr, and 9% non-essential AA of crystalline amino acids were retained. The Cys requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 30.48 mg/d or 17.006 mg/ kgBW(0.75)/d or 75.426 mg/kgCP/d. The TSAA requirement for zero accretion was calculated to be 132.25 mg/b/d, 71.48 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d, and 307.55 mg/kgCP/d. The Tyr requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 65.907 mg/d or 37.233 mg/ kgBW(0.75)/d or 175.566 mg/kgCP/d. The Phe + Tyr requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 352.18 mg/b/d, 190.37 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d, and 749.33 mg/kgCP/d. The non-essential AA requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 3715.194 mg/d or 2003.155 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d or 9452.954 mg/kgCP/d. PMID:26994191

  10. Instability and Pattern Formation in Three-Species Food Chain Model via Holling Type II Functional Response on a Circular Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, Walid; Yafia, R.; Aziz Alaoui, M. A.; Bouhafa, H.; Abichou, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of food chain predator-prey model. This model is given by a reaction-diffusion system defined on a circular spatial domain, which includes three-state variables namely, prey and intermediate predator and top predator and incorporates the Holling type II and a modified Leslie-Gower functional response. The aim of this paper is to investigate theoretically and numerically the asymptotic behavior of the interior equilibrium of the model. The local and global stabilities of the positive steady-state solution and the conditions that enable the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation and Turing instability in the circular spatial domain are proved. In the end, we carry out numerical simulations to illustrate how biological processes can affect spatiotemporal pattern formation in a disc spatial domain and different types of spatial patterns with respect to different time steps and diffusion coefficients are obtained.

  11. Structure-function analysis of the human TFIIB-related factor II protein reveals an essential role for the C-terminal domain in RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashish; Ma, Beicong; Schramm, Laura; Hernandez, Nouria

    2005-11-01

    The transcription factors TFIIB, Brf1, and Brf2 share related N-terminal zinc ribbon and core domains. TFIIB bridges RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with the promoter-bound preinitiation complex, whereas Brf1 and Brf2 are involved, as part of activities also containing TBP and Bdp1 and referred to here as Brf1-TFIIIB and Brf2-TFIIIB, in the recruitment of Pol III. Brf1-TFIIIB recruits Pol III to type 1 and 2 promoters and Brf2-TFIIIB to type 3 promoters such as the human U6 promoter. Brf1 and Brf2 both have a C-terminal extension absent in TFIIB, but their C-terminal extensions are unrelated. In yeast Brf1, the C-terminal extension interacts with the TBP/TATA box complex and contributes to the recruitment of Bdp1. Here we have tested truncated Brf2, as well as Brf2/TFIIB chimeric proteins for U6 transcription and for assembly of U6 preinitiation complexes. Our results characterize functions of various human Brf2 domains and reveal that the C-terminal domain is required for efficient association of the protein with U6 promoter-bound TBP and SNAP(c), a type 3 promoter-specific transcription factor, and for efficient recruitment of Bdp1. This in turn suggests that the C-terminal extensions in Brf1 and Brf2 are crucial to specific recruitment of Pol III over Pol II. PMID:16227591

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of the Human TFIIB-Related Factor II Protein Reveals an Essential Role for the C-Terminal Domain in RNA Polymerase III Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ashish; Ma, Beicong; Schramm, Laura; Hernandez, Nouria

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factors TFIIB, Brf1, and Brf2 share related N-terminal zinc ribbon and core domains. TFIIB bridges RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with the promoter-bound preinitiation complex, whereas Brf1 and Brf2 are involved, as part of activities also containing TBP and Bdp1 and referred to here as Brf1-TFIIIB and Brf2-TFIIIB, in the recruitment of Pol III. Brf1-TFIIIB recruits Pol III to type 1 and 2 promoters and Brf2-TFIIIB to type 3 promoters such as the human U6 promoter. Brf1 and Brf2 both have a C-terminal extension absent in TFIIB, but their C-terminal extensions are unrelated. In yeast Brf1, the C-terminal extension interacts with the TBP/TATA box complex and contributes to the recruitment of Bdp1. Here we have tested truncated Brf2, as well as Brf2/TFIIB chimeric proteins for U6 transcription and for assembly of U6 preinitiation complexes. Our results characterize functions of various human Brf2 domains and reveal that the C-terminal domain is required for efficient association of the protein with U6 promoter-bound TBP and SNAPc, a type 3 promoter-specific transcription factor, and for efficient recruitment of Bdp1. This in turn suggests that the C-terminal extensions in Brf1 and Brf2 are crucial to specific recruitment of Pol III over Pol II. PMID:16227591

  13. Statistical Analysis of Hurst Exponents of Essential/Nonessential Genes in 33 Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Baojin; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Methods for identifying essential genes currently depend predominantly on biochemical experiments. However, there is demand for improved computational methods for determining gene essentiality. In this study, we used the Hurst exponent, a characteristic parameter to describe long-range correlation in DNA, and analyzed its distribution in 33 bacterial genomes. In most genomes (31 out of 33) the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the essential genes were significantly higher than for the corresponding full-gene-set, whereas the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the nonessential genes remained unchanged or increased only slightly. All of the Hurst exponents of essential genes followed a normal distribution, with one exception. We therefore propose that the distribution feature of Hurst exponents of essential genes can be used as a classification index for essential gene prediction in bacteria. For computer-aided design in the field of synthetic biology, this feature can build a restraint for pre- or post-design checking of bacterial essential genes. Moreover, considering the relationship between gene essentiality and evolution, the Hurst exponents could be used as a descriptive parameter related to evolutionary level, or be added to the annotation of each gene. PMID:26067107

  14. Concentration levels of essential and non-essential metals in Ethiopian khat (Catha edulis Forsk).

    PubMed

    Atlabachew, Minaleshewa; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Redi, Mesfin

    2010-12-01

    The levels of essential (Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu, and Co) and non-essential (Cd and Pb) metal in six different varieties of Ethiopian khat (Catha edulis Forsk, an evergreen stimulant plant) commonly consumed in the country and exported to the neighboring countries were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Known weight of oven-dried khat samples were wet-digested using 2 mL of (69-72%) HNO(3) and 2 mL of (70%) HClO(4) for 2 h and 30 min at variable temperature (120-270°C). The mineral contents in the digests were analyzed using flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The following concentrations ranges in fresh-weight basis were recorded in decreasing order: Ca (1,038-2,173 µg/g) > Mg (478.2-812.3 µg/g) > Fe (53.95-82.83 µg/g) >Zn (5.18-9.40 µg/g) >Mn (6.98-8.66 µg/g) >Cu (1.85-5.53 µg/g) > Cr (0.66-3.47 µg/g) >Co (0.41-0.80 µg/g). A wide variation in the mineral contents of khat from different region of Ethiopia was noticed. The toxic metals (Pb and Cd) were not detected in all the samples analyzed. PMID:20177815

  15. Report on audit of the US Department of Energy`s identification and disposal of nonessential land

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the results of an audit of four US DOE facilities to determine whether any land holdings are excess to current and anticipated future needs. Facilities audited were the Hanford Site, the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and the Brookhaven Laboratory. Audit findings were that 309,000 acres at the Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Idaho sites were not essential to carrying out current and foreseeable mission requirements. It is recommended that the DOE dispose of the nonessential land holdings, reevaluate requirements for remaining land holdings and dispose of any additional nonessential land, and reevaluate the policy of defining ecosystem management as a valid basis for retaining Department real property. 2 tabs.

  16. mRNA capping enzyme is recruited to the transcription complex by phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Jung; Takagi, Toshimitsu; Moore, Christine R.; Buratowski, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Capping of mRNA occurs shortly after transcription initiation, preceding other mRNA processing events such as mRNA splicing and polyadenylation. To determine the mechanism of coupling between transcription and capping, we tested for a physical interaction between capping enzyme and the transcription machinery. Capping enzyme is not stably associated with basal transcription factors or the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) holoenzyme. However, capping enzyme can directly and specifically interact with the phosphorylated form of the RNA polymerase carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). This association occurs in the context of the transcription initiation complex and is blocked by the CTD–kinase inhibitor H8. Furthermore, conditional truncation mutants of the Pol II CTD are lethal when combined with a capping enzyme mutant. Our results provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that capping enzyme is recruited to the transcription complex via phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase CTD. PMID:9407025

  17. Defining the Content Domain for the Praxis II Subject Assessment in Earth and Space Science: Knowledge Important for Beginning Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Richard J.

    A job analysis was conducted focusing on the knowledge important for beginning Earth and Space Science teachers. The results of the job analysis will be used to define the content domain of the subject assessment in Earth and Space Sciences for the Praxis series of professional assessments for beginning teachers. A domain of 292 knowledge…

  18. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  19. A motif shared by TFIIF and TFIIB mediates their interaction with the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase Fcp1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kobor, M S; Simon, L D; Omichinski, J; Zhong, G; Archambault, J; Greenblatt, J

    2000-10-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is accompanied by cyclic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal heptapeptide repeat domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. We have used deletion and point mutations in Fcp1p, a TFIIF-interacting CTD phosphatase, to show that the integrity of its BRCT domain, like that of its catalytic domain, is important for cell viability, mRNA synthesis, and CTD dephosphorylation in vivo. Although regions of Fcp1p carboxy terminal to its BRCT domain and at its amino terminus were not essential for viability, deletion of either of these regions affected the phosphorylation state of the CTD. Two portions of this carboxy-terminal region of Fcp1p bound directly to the first cyclin-like repeat in the core domain of the general transcription factor TFIIB, as well as to the RAP74 subunit of TFIIF. These regulatory interactions with Fcp1p involved closely related amino acid sequence motifs in TFIIB and RAP74. Mutating the Fcp1p-binding motif KEFGK in the RAP74 (Tfg1p) subunit of TFIIF to EEFGE led to both synthetic phenotypes in certain fcp1 tfg1 double mutants and a reduced ability of Fcp1p to activate transcription when it is artificially tethered to a promoter. These results suggest strongly that this KEFGK motif in RAP74 mediates its interaction with Fcp1p in vivo. PMID:11003641

  20. A Motif Shared by TFIIF and TFIIB Mediates Their Interaction with the RNA Polymerase II Carboxy-Terminal Domain Phosphatase Fcp1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kobor, Michael S.; Simon, Lisa D.; Omichinski, Jim; Zhong, Guoqing; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is accompanied by cyclic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal heptapeptide repeat domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. We have used deletion and point mutations in Fcp1p, a TFIIF-interacting CTD phosphatase, to show that the integrity of its BRCT domain, like that of its catalytic domain, is important for cell viability, mRNA synthesis, and CTD dephosphorylation in vivo. Although regions of Fcp1p carboxy terminal to its BRCT domain and at its amino terminus were not essential for viability, deletion of either of these regions affected the phosphorylation state of the CTD. Two portions of this carboxy-terminal region of Fcp1p bound directly to the first cyclin-like repeat in the core domain of the general transcription factor TFIIB, as well as to the RAP74 subunit of TFIIF. These regulatory interactions with Fcp1p involved closely related amino acid sequence motifs in TFIIB and RAP74. Mutating the Fcp1p-binding motif KEFGK in the RAP74 (Tfg1p) subunit of TFIIF to EEFGE led to both synthetic phenotypes in certain fcp1 tfg1 double mutants and a reduced ability of Fcp1p to activate transcription when it is artificially tethered to a promoter. These results suggest strongly that this KEFGK motif in RAP74 mediates its interaction with Fcp1p in vivo. PMID:11003641

  1. RNA-Free and Ribonucleoprotein-Associated Influenza Virus Polymerases Directly Bind the Serine-5-Phosphorylated Carboxyl-Terminal Domain of Host RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Hengrung, Narin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viruses subvert the transcriptional machinery of their hosts to synthesize their own viral mRNA. Ongoing transcription by cellular RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is required for viral mRNA synthesis. By a process known as cap snatching, the virus steals short 5′ capped RNA fragments from host capped RNAs and uses them to prime viral transcription. An interaction between the influenza A virus RNA polymerase and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of Pol II has been established, but the molecular details of this interaction remain unknown. We show here that the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex binds to the CTD of transcriptionally engaged Pol II. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the viral polymerase binds directly to the serine-5-phosphorylated form of the Pol II CTD, both in the presence and in the absence of viral RNA, and show that this interaction is conserved in evolutionarily distant influenza viruses. We propose a model in which direct binding of the viral RNA polymerase in the context of vRNPs to Pol II early in infection facilitates cap snatching, while we suggest that binding of free viral polymerase to Pol II late in infection may trigger Pol II degradation. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses cause yearly epidemics and occasional pandemics that pose a threat to human health, as well as represent a large economic burden to health care systems globally. Existing vaccines are not always effective, as they may not exactly match the circulating viruses. Furthermore, there are a limited number of antivirals available, and development of resistance to these is a concern. New measures to combat influenza are needed, but before they can be developed, it is necessary to better understand the molecular interactions between influenza viruses and their host cells. By providing further insights into the molecular details of how influenza viruses hijack the host transcriptional machinery, we aim to uncover novel targets for

  2. N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from oxygenic phototrophs: P(II) signal transduction across domains of life reveals novel insights in NAGK control.

    PubMed

    Beez, Sabine; Fokina, Oleksandra; Herrmann, Christina; Forchhammer, Karl

    2009-06-19

    N-Acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the first committed step in arginine biosynthesis in organisms that perform the cyclic pathway of ornithine synthesis. In eukaryotic and bacterial oxygenic phototrophs, the activity of NAGK is controlled by the P(II) signal transduction protein. Recent X-ray analysis of NAGK-P(II) complexes from a higher plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) and a cyanobacterium (Synechococcus elongatus) revealed that despite several differences, the overall structure of the complex is highly similar. The present study analyzes the functional conservation of P(II)-mediated NAGK regulation in plants and cyanobacteria to distinguish between universal properties and those that are specific for the different phylogenetic lineages. This study shows that plant and cyanobacterial P(II) proteins can mutually regulate the NAGK enzymes across the domains of life, implying a high selective pressure to conserve P(II)-NAGK interaction over more than 1.2 billion years of separate evolution. The non-conserved C-terminus of S. elongatus NAGK was identified as an element, which strongly enhances arginine inhibition and is responsible for most of the differences between S. elongatus and A. thaliana NAGK with respect to arginine sensitivity. Both P(II) proteins relieve arginine inhibition of NAGK, and in both lineages, P(II)-mediated relief from arginine inhibition is antagonized by 2-oxoglutarate. Together, these properties highlight the conserved role of P(II) as a signal integrator of the C/N balance sensed as 2-oxoglutarate to regulate arginine synthesis in oxygenic phototrophs. PMID:19409905

  3. Crystal Structure of Mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding Domain in Complex with Type II TGF-[beta] Receptor Promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-08-18

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-{beta} receptor gene (T{beta}R-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, the A-site and the B-site. Here, we report the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter DNA (mT{beta}R-II{sub DNA}). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from a major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity.

  4. Optimal Replication Activity of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase Requires Phosphorylation of a Residue(s) at Carboxy-Terminal Domain II of Its Accessory Subunit, Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Leroy N.; Englund, Nathan; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Amiya K.; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    1999-01-01

    The phosphoprotein, P, of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a key subunit of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. The protein is phosphorylated at multiple sites in two different domains. We recently showed that specific serine and threonine residues within the amino-terminal acidic domain I of P protein must be phosphorylated for in vivo transcription activity, but not for replication activity, of the polymerase complex. To examine the role of phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of the P protein in transcription and replication, we have used a panel of mutant P proteins in which the phosphate acceptor sites (Ser-226, Ser-227, and Ser-233) were altered to alanines either individually or in various combinations. Analyses of the mutant proteins for their ability to support replication of a VSV minigenomic RNA suggest that phosphorylation of either Ser-226 or Ser-227 is necessary for optimal replication activity of the protein. The mutant protein (P226/227) in which both of these residues were altered to alanines was only about 8% active in replication compared to the wild-type (wt) protein. Substitution of alanine for Ser-233 did not have any adverse effect on replication activity of the protein. In contrast, all the mutant proteins showed activities similar to that of the wt protein in transcription. These results indicate that phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of P protein are required for optimal replication activity but not for transcription activity. Furthermore, substitution of glutamic acid residues for Ser-226 and Ser-227 resulted in a protein that was only 14% active in replication but almost fully active in transcription. Taken together, these results, along with our earlier studies, suggest that phosphorylation of residues at two different domains in the P protein regulates its activity in transcription and replication of the VSV genome. PMID:10364310

  5. The type II and X cellulose-binding domains of Pseudomonas xylanase A potentiate catalytic activity against complex substrates by a common mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, J; Rixon, J E; Bolam, D N; McQueen-Mason, S; Simpson, P J; Williamson, M P; Hazlewood, G P; Gilbert, H J

    1999-01-01

    Xylanase A (Pf Xyn10A), in common with several other Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa polysaccharidases, consists of a Type II cellulose-binding domain (CBD), a catalytic domain (Pf Xyn10A(CD)) and an internal domain that exhibits homology to Type X CBDs. The Type X CBD of Pf Xyn10A, expressed as a discrete entity (CBD(X)) or fused to the catalytic domain (Pf Xyn10A'), bound to amorphous and bacterial microcrystalline cellulose with a K(a) of 2.5 x 10(5) M(-1). CBD(X) exhibited no affinity for soluble forms of cellulose or cello-oligosaccharides, suggesting that the domain interacts with multiple cellulose chains in the insoluble forms of the polysaccharide. Pf Xyn10A' was 2-3 times more active against cellulose-hemicellulose complexes than Pf Xyn10A(CD); however, Pf Xyn10A' and Pf Xyn10A(CD) exhibited the same activity against soluble substrates. CBD(X) did not disrupt the structure of plant-cell-wall material or bacterial microcrystalline cellulose, and did not potentiate Pf Xyn10A(CD) when not covalently linked to the enzyme. There was no substantial difference in the affinity of full-length Pf Xyn10A and the enzyme's Type II CBD for cellulose. The activity of Pf Xyn10A against cellulose-hemicellulose complexes was similar to that of Pf Xyn10A', and a derivative of Pf Xyn10A in which the Type II CBD is linked to the Pf Xyn10A(CD) via a serine-rich linker sequence [Bolam, Cireula, McQueen-Mason, Simpson, Williamson, Rixon, Boraston, Hazlewood and Gilbert (1998) Biochem J. 331, 775-781]. These data indicate that CBD(X) is functional in Pf Xyn10A and that no synergy, either in ligand binding or in the potentiation of catalysis, is evident between the Type II and X CBDs of the xylanase. PMID:10455036

  6. Crystal Structures of the p21-Activated Kinases PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 Reveal Catalytic Domain Plasticity of Active Group II PAKs

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Lee, Wen Hwa; Debreczeni, Judit É.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Turnbull, Andrew; Fedorov, Oleg; Deacon, Sean W.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Knapp, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Summary p21-activated kinases have been classified into two groups based on their domain architecture. Group II PAKs (PAK4–6) regulate a wide variety of cellular functions, and PAK deregulation has been linked to tumor development. Structural comparison of five high-resolution structures comprising all active, monophosphorylated group II catalytic domains revealed a surprising degree of domain plasticity, including a number of catalytically productive and nonproductive conformers. Rearrangements of helix αC, a key regulatory element of kinase function, resulted in an additional helical turn at the αC N terminus and a distortion of its C terminus, a movement hitherto unseen in protein kinases. The observed structural changes led to the formation of interactions between conserved residues that structurally link the glycine-rich loop, αC, and the activation segment and firmly anchor αC in an active conformation. Inhibitor screening identified six potent PAK inhibitors from which a tri-substituted purine inhibitor was cocrystallized with PAK4 and PAK5. PMID:17292838

  7. Homodimerization and Heterodimerization of Minimal Zinc(II)-Binding Domain Peptides of T-cell Proteins CD4, CD8α, and Lck

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alisa M.; Berg, Jeremy M.

    2009-01-01

    Metal-mediated protein oligomerization is an emerging mode of protein-protein interaction. The C-terminal cytosolic domains of T-cell coreceptors CD4 and CD8α form zinc-bridged heterodimers with the N-terminal region of the kinase Lck, with each protein contributing two cysteinate ligands to the complex. Using size exclusion chromatography, 1H NMR, and UV/visible absorption spectroscopy with cobalt(II) as a spectroscopic probe, we demonstrate that small peptides derived from these regions form metal-bridged heterodimers but also homodimers, in contrast to previous reports. The Lck-CD4 and Lck-CD8α cobalt(II)-bridged heterodimer complexes are more stable than the corresponding (Lck)2cobalt(II) complex by factors of 11 ± 4 and 22 ± 9, respectively. These studies were aided by the discovery that cobalt(II) complexes with a cobalt(II)(-Cys-X-X-Cys-)(-Cys-X-Cys-) chromophore show unusual optical spectra with one component of the visible d to d (4A2 to 4T1(P)) transition red-shifted and well separated from the other components. These results provide insights into the basis of specificity of metal-bridged complex formation and on the potential biological significance of metal-bridged homodimers in T-cells. PMID:19624124

  8. A Nonessential African Swine Fever Virus Gene UK Is a Significant Virulence Determinant in Domestic Swine

    PubMed Central

    Zsak, L.; Caler, E.; Lu, Z.; Kutish, G. F.; Neilan, J. G.; Rock, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the right variable genomic region of the pathogenic African swine fever virus (ASFV) isolate E70 revealed a novel gene, UK, that is immediately upstream from the previously described ASFV virulence-associated gene NL-S (L. Zsak, Z. Lu, G. F. Kutish, J. G. Neilan, and D. L. Rock, J. Virol. 70:8865–8871, 1996). UK, transcriptionally oriented toward the right end of the genome, predicts a protein of 96 amino acids with a molecular mass of 10.7 kDa. Searches of genetic databases did not find significant similarity between UK and other known genes. Sequence analysis of the UK genes from several pathogenic ASFVs from Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa demonstrated that this gene was highly conserved among diverse pathogenic isolates, including those from both tick and pig sources. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the UK protein specifically precipitated a 15-kDa protein from ASFV-infected macrophage cell cultures as early as 2 h postinfection. A recombinant UK gene deletion mutant, ΔUK, and its revertant, UK-R, were constructed from the E70 isolate to study gene function. Although deletion of UK did not affect the growth characteristics of the virus in macrophage cell cultures, ΔUK exhibited reduced virulence in infected pigs. While mortality among parental E70- or UK-R-infected animals was 100%, all ΔUK-infected pigs survived infection. Fever responses were comparable in E70-, UK-R-, and ΔUK-infected groups; however, ΔUK-infected animals exhibited significant, 100- to 1,000-fold, reductions in viremia titers. These data indicate that the highly conserved UK gene of ASFV, while being nonessential for growth in macrophages in vitro, is an important viral virulence determinant for domestic pigs. PMID:9444996

  9. A nonessential African swine fever virus gene UK is a significant virulence determinant in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Zsak, L; Caler, E; Lu, Z; Kutish, G F; Neilan, J G; Rock, D L

    1998-02-01

    Sequence analysis of the right variable genomic region of the pathogenic African swine fever virus (ASFV) isolate E70 revealed a novel gene, UK, that is immediately upstream from the previously described ASFV virulence-associated gene NL-S (L. Zsak, Z. Lu, G. F. Kutish, J. G. Neilan, and D. L. Rock, J. Virol. 70:8865-8871, 1996). UK, transcriptionally oriented toward the right end of the genome, predicts a protein of 96 amino acids with a molecular mass of 10.7 kDa. Searches of genetic databases did not find significant similarity between UK and other known genes. Sequence analysis of the UK genes from several pathogenic ASFVs from Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa demonstrated that this gene was highly conserved among diverse pathogenic isolates, including those from both tick and pig sources. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the UK protein specifically precipitated a 15-kDa protein from ASFV-infected macrophage cell cultures as early as 2 h postinfection. A recombinant UK gene deletion mutant, deltaUK, and its revertant, UK-R, were constructed from the E70 isolate to study gene function. Although deletion of UK did not affect the growth characteristics of the virus in macrophage cell cultures, deltaUK exhibited reduced virulence in infected pigs. While mortality among parental E70- or UK-R-infected animals was 100%, all deltaUK-infected pigs survived infection. Fever responses were comparable in E70-, UK-R-, and deltaUK-infected groups; however, deltaUK-infected animals exhibited significant, 100- to 1,000-fold, reductions in viremia titers. These data indicate that the highly conserved UK gene of ASFV, while being nonessential for growth in macrophages in vitro, is an important viral virulence determinant for domestic pigs. PMID:9444996

  10. Labile Fe(II) concentrations in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean along a transect from the subtropical domain to the Weddell Sea Gyre

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarthou, G.; Bucciarelli, E.; Chever, F.; Hansard, S.P.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Planchon, F.; Speich, S.

    2011-01-01

    Labile Fe(II) distributions were investigated in the Sub-Tropical South Atlantic and the Southern Ocean during the BONUS-GoodHope cruise from 34 to 57?? S (February-March 2008). Concentrations ranged from below the detection limit (0.009 nM) to values as high as 0.125 nM. In the surface mixed layer, labile Fe(II) concentrations were always higher than the detection limit, with values higher than 0.060 nM south of 47?? S, representing between 39 % and 63 % of dissolved Fe (DFe). Apparent biological production of Fe(II) was evidenced. At intermediate depth, local maxima were observed, with the highest values in the Sub-Tropical domain at around 200 m, and represented more than 70 % of DFe. Remineralization processes were likely responsible for those sub-surface maxima. Below 1500 m, concentrations were close to or below the detection limit, except at two stations (at the vicinity of the Agulhas ridge and in the north of the Weddell Sea Gyre) where values remained as high as ???0.030-0.050 nM. Hydrothermal or sediment inputs may provide Fe(II) to these deep waters. Fe(II) half life times (t1/2) at 4??C were measured in the upper and deep waters and ranged from 2.9 to 11.3 min, and from 10.0 to 72.3 min, respectively. Measured values compared quite well in the upper waters with theoretical values from two published models, but not in the deep waters. This may be due to the lack of knowledge for some parameters in the models and/or to organic complexation of Fe(II) that impact its oxidation rates. This study helped to considerably increase the Fe(II) data set in the Ocean and to better understand the Fe redox cycle. ?? Author(s) 2011.

  11. Structure of the Lectin Mannose 6-Phosphate Receptor Homology (MRH) Domain of Glucosidase II, an Enzyme That Regulates Glycoprotein Folding Quality Control in the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Linda J.; Orsi, Ramiro; Alculumbre, Solana G.; Peterson, Francis C.; Stigliano, Ivan D.; Parodi, Armando J.; D'Alessio, Cecilia; Dahms, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report for the first time the three-dimensional structure of a mannose 6-phosphate receptor homology (MRH) domain present in a protein with enzymatic activity, glucosidase II (GII). GII is involved in glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. GII removes the two innermost glucose residues from the Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 transferred to nascent proteins and the glucose added by UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase. GII is composed of a catalytic GIIα subunit and a regulatory GIIβ subunit. GIIβ participates in the endoplasmic reticulum localization of GIIα and mediates in vivo enhancement of N-glycan trimming by GII through its C-terminal MRH domain. We determined the structure of a functional GIIβ MRH domain by NMR spectroscopy. It adopts a β-barrel fold similar to that of other MRH domains, but its binding pocket is the most shallow known to date as it accommodates a single mannose residue. In addition, we identified a conserved residue outside the binding pocket (Trp-409) present in GIIβ but not in other MRHs that influences GII glucose trimming activity. PMID:23609449

  12. Dynamic interplay between the periplasmic and transmembrane domains of GspL and GspM in the type II secretion system.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, Mathilde; Login, Frédéric H; Guschinskaya, Natalia; Pineau, Camille; Effantin, Géraldine; Robert, Xavier; Shevchik, Vladimir E

    2013-01-01

    The type II secretion system (T2SS) is a multiprotein nanomachine that transports folded proteins across the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. The molecular mechanisms that govern the secretion process remain poorly understood. The inner membrane components GspC, GspL and GspM possess a single transmembrane segment (TMS) and a large periplasmic region and they are thought to form a platform of unknown function. Here, using two-hybrid and pull-down assays we performed a systematic mapping of the GspC/GspL/GspM interaction regions in the plant pathogen Dickeya dadantii. We found that the TMS of these components interact with each other, implying a complex interaction network within the inner membrane. We also showed that the periplasmic, ferredoxin-like, domains of GspL and GspM drive homo- and heterodimerizations of these proteins. Disulfide bonding analyses revealed that the respective domain interfaces include the equivalent secondary-structure elements, suggesting alternating interactions of the periplasmic domains, L/L and M/M versus L/M. Finally, we found that displacements of the periplasmic GspM domain mediate coordinated shifts or rotations of the cognate TMS. These data suggest a plausible mechanism for signal transmission between the periplasmic and the cytoplasmic portions of the T2SS machine. PMID:24223969

  13. Dynamic Interplay between the Periplasmic and Transmembrane Domains of GspL and GspM in the Type II Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Guschinskaya, Natalia; Pineau, Camille; Effantin, Géraldine; Robert, Xavier; Shevchik, Vladimir E.

    2013-01-01

    The type II secretion system (T2SS) is a multiprotein nanomachine that transports folded proteins across the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. The molecular mechanisms that govern the secretion process remain poorly understood. The inner membrane components GspC, GspL and GspM possess a single transmembrane segment (TMS) and a large periplasmic region and they are thought to form a platform of unknown function. Here, using two-hybrid and pull-down assays we performed a systematic mapping of the GspC/GspL/GspM interaction regions in the plant pathogen Dickeya dadantii. We found that the TMS of these components interact with each other, implying a complex interaction network within the inner membrane. We also showed that the periplasmic, ferredoxin-like, domains of GspL and GspM drive homo- and heterodimerizations of these proteins. Disulfide bonding analyses revealed that the respective domain interfaces include the equivalent secondary-structure elements, suggesting alternating interactions of the periplasmic domains, L/L and M/M versus L/M. Finally, we found that displacements of the periplasmic GspM domain mediate coordinated shifts or rotations of the cognate TMS. These data suggest a plausible mechanism for signal transmission between the periplasmic and the cytoplasmic portions of the T2SS machine. PMID:24223969

  14. Effect of chirality on domain wall dynamics in molecular ferrimagnet [MnII(HL-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6]·2H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushenok, F.; Koplak, O.; Morgunov, R.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we distinguish the contributions of switching, slide, creep and Debye relaxation modes of the domain wall dynamics to the low-frequency magnetic properties of chiral and racemic [MnII(HL-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6]·2H2O molecular ferrimagnets. We demonstrate that crystal and spin chirality affects the characteristic transition temperatures between different modes. In chiral crystals, transitions to the creep and Debye relaxation modes were observed at T = 7 K and 5 K, whereas in racemic crystals the same transitions occurred at higher temperatures T = 13 K and 9 K, respectively. Difference of the Peierls relief in chiral and racemic crystals is a possible reason of the chirality effect on the domain walls dynamics.

  15. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  16. Crystal structure of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-01-01

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-β receptor gene (TβR-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, A-site and B-site. Here we report the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA (mTβR-IIDNA). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity. PMID:20079749

  17. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  18. Role for the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 1 (NSD1) methyltransferase in coordinating lysine 36 methylation at histone 3 with RNA polymerase II function

    PubMed Central

    Lucio-Eterovic, Agda Karina; Singh, Melissa M.; Gardner, Jeffrey E.; Veerappan, Chendhore S.; Rice, Judd C.; Carpenter, Phillip B.

    2010-01-01

    The NSD (nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein) family encodes methyltransferases that are important in multiple aspects of development and disease. Perturbations in NSD family members can lead to Sotos syndrome and Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome as well as cancers such as acute myeloid leukemia. Previous studies have implicated NSD1 (KMT3B) in transcription and methylation of histone H3 at lysine 36 (H3-K36), but its molecular mechanism in these processes remains largely unknown. Here we describe an NSD1 regulatory network in human cells. We show that NSD1 binds near various promoter elements and regulates multiple genes that appear to have a concerted role in various processes, such as cell growth/cancer, keratin biology, and bone morphogenesis. In particular, we show that NSD1 binding is concentrated upstream of gene targets such as the bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) and zinc finger protein 36 C3H type-like 1 (ZFP36L1/TPP). NSD1 regulates the levels of the various forms of methylation at H3-K36 primarily, but not exclusively, within the promoter proximal region occupied by NSD1. At BMP4 we find that this reduces the levels of RNAP II recruited to the promoter, suggesting a role for NSD1-dependent methylation in initiation. Interestingly, we also observe that the RNAP II molecules that lie within BMP4 have inappropriate persistence of serine-5 phosphorylation and reduced levels of serine-2 phosphorylation within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of RNAP II. Our findings indicate that NSD1 regulates RNAP II recruitment to BMP4, and failure to do so leads to reduced gene expression and abrogated levels of H3K36Me and CTD phosphorylation. PMID:20837538

  19. Labile Fe(II) concentrations in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean along a transect from the subtropical domain to the Weddell Sea Gyre

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarthou, G.; Bucciarelli, E.; Chever, F.; Hansard, S.P.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Planchon, F.; Speich, S.

    2011-01-01

    Labile Fe(II) distributions were investigated in the Sub-Tropical South Atlantic and the Southern Ocean during the BONUS-GoodHope cruise from 34 to 57?? S (February-March 2008). Concentrations ranged from below the detection limit (0.009 nM) to values as high as 0.125 nM. In the surface mixed layer, labile Fe(II) concentrations were always higher than the detection limit, with values higher than 0.060 nM south of 47?? S, representing between 39% and 63% of dissolved Fe (DFe). Biological production was evidenced. At intermediate depth, local maxima were observed, with the highest values in the Sub-Tropical domain at around 200 m, and represented more than 70% of DFe. Remineralization processes were likely responsible for those sub-surface maxima. Below 1500 m, concentrations were close to or below the detection limit, except at two stations (at the vicinity of the Agulhas ridge and in the north of the Weddell Sea Gyre) where values remained as high as ???0.030-0.050 nM. Hydrothermal or sediment inputs may provide Fe(II) to these deep waters. Fe(II) half life times (t1/2) at 4 ??C were measured in the upper and deep waters and ranged from 2.9 to 11.3 min, and from 10.0 to 72.3 min, respectively. Measured values compared quite well in the upper waters with theoretical values from two published models, but not in the deep waters. This may be due to the lack of knowledge for some parameters in the models and/or to organic complexation of Fe(II) that impact its oxidation rates. This study helped to considerably increase the Fe(II) data set in the Ocean and to better understand the Fe redox cycle. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  20. The Cost of Concreteness: The Effect of Nonessential Information on Analogical Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Jennifer A.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Heckler, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Most theories of analogical transfer focus on similarities between the learning and transfer domains, where transfer is more likely between domains that share common surface features, similar elements, or common interpretations of structure. We suggest that characteristics of the learning instantiation alone can give rise to different levels of…

  1. Virus Evolution toward Limited Dependence on Nonessential Functions of the Host: the Case of Bacteriophage SPP1

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-López, Rut

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT All viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and depend on certain host cell functions for multiplication. However, the extent of such dependence and the exact nature of the functions provided by the host cell remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated if nonessential Bacillus subtilis genes are necessary for multiplication of bacteriophage SPP1. Screening of a collection of 2,514 single-gene knockouts of nonessential B. subtilis genes yielded only a few genes necessary for efficient SPP1 propagation. Among these were genes belonging to the yuk operon, which codes for the Esat-6-like secretion system, including the SPP1 receptor protein YueB. In addition, we found that SPP1 multiplication was negatively affected by the absence of two other genes, putB and efp. The gene efp encodes elongation factor P, which enhances ribosome activity by alleviating translational stalling during the synthesis of polyproline-containing proteins. PutB is an enzyme involved in the proline degradation pathway that is required for infection in the post-exponential growth phase of B. subtilis, when the bacterium undergoes a complex genetic reprogramming. The putB knockout shortens significantly the window of opportunity for SPP1 infection during the host cell life cycle. This window is a critical parameter for competitive phage multiplication in the soil environment, where B. subtilis rarely meets conditions for exponential growth. Our results in combination with those reported for other virus-host systems suggest that bacterial viruses have evolved toward limited dependence on nonessential host functions. IMPORTANCE A successful viral infection largely depends on the ability of the virus to hijack cellular machineries and to redirect the flow of building blocks and energy resources toward viral progeny production. However, the specific virus-host interactions underlying this fundamental transformation are poorly understood. Here, we report on the first systematic

  2. A Lysine Cluster in Domain II of Bacillus subtilis PBP4a Plays a Role in the Membrane Attachment of This C1-PBP

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Broeck, Arnaud; Van der Heiden, Edwige; Sauvage, Eric; Dauvin, Marjorie; Joris, Bernard; Duez, Colette

    2015-01-01

    In PBP4a, a Bacillus subtilis class-C1 penicillin-binding protein (PBP), four clustered lysine (K) residues, K86, K114, K119, and K265, protrude from domain II. Replacement of these amino acids with glutamine (Q) residues by site-directed mutagenesis yielded Mut4KQ PBP4a. When produced in Escherichia coli without its predicted Sec-signal peptide, wild-type (WT) PBP4a was found mainly associated with the host cytoplasmic membrane, whereas Mut4KQ PBP4a remained largely unbound. After purification, the capacities of the two proteins to bind to B. subtilis membranes were compared. The results were similar to those obtained in E. coli: in vitro, a much higher percentage of WT PBP4a than of Mut4KQ PBP4a was found to interact with B. subtilis membranes. Immunodetection of PBP4a in B. subtilis membrane extracts revealed that a processed form of this PBP (as indicated by its size) associates with the B. subtilis cytoplasmic membrane. In the absence of any amphiphilic peptide in PBP4a, the crown of positive charges on the surface of domain II is likely responsible for the cellular localization of this PBP and its attachment to the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:26460848

  3. A carboxyl-terminal-domain kinase associated with RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Serizawa, H; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1992-01-01

    We previously purified RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver and found that it has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity. In this report, we show that delta is also closely associated with a protein kinase activity that catalyzes phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Kinase activity copurifies with transcription and DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activities when delta is analyzed by anion- and cation-exchange HPLC as well as by sucrose gradient sedimentation, arguing that delta possesses all three activities. Phosphorylation of the largest subunits of both rat and yeast RNA polymerase II is stimulated by DNA, whereas phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide containing multiple copies of the carboxyl-terminal heptapeptide repeat is not. Although both ATP and GTP appear to function as phosphate donors, GTP is utilized less than 10% as well as ATP. These findings suggest that delta may exert its action in transcription at least in part through a mechanism involving phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:1386928

  4. RPRD1A and RPRD1B Are Human RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Scaffolds for Ser5 Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinghua; Hunter, Gerald O.; Kuznetsova, Olga V.; Tempel, Wolfram; Marcon, Edyta; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Hongbo; Kuo, Wei-Hung William; Li, Joyce; Young, Peter; Olsen, Jonathan B.; Wan, Cuihong; Loppnau, Peter; El Bakkouri, Majida; Senisterra, Guillermo A.; He, Hao; Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Emili, Andrew; Murphy, Shona; Mosley, Amber L.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Min, Jinrong; Greenblatt, Jack F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) heptapeptide repeats (Y1-S2-P3-T4-S5-P6-S7) undergo dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation during the transcription cycle to recruit factors that regulate transcription, RNA processing and chromatin modification. We show here that RPRD1A and RPRD1B form homodimers and heterodimers through their coiled-coil domains and interact preferentially via CTD interaction domains (CIDs) with CTD repeats phosphorylated at S2 and S7. Our high resolution crystal structures of the RPRD1A, RPRD1B and RPRD2 CIDs, alone and in complex with CTD phosphoisoforms, elucidate the molecular basis of CTD recognition. In an interesting example of cross-talk between different CTD modifications, our data also indicate that RPRD1A and RPRD1B associate directly with RPAP2 phosphatase and, by interacting with CTD repeats where phospho-S2 and/or phospho-S7 bracket a phospho-S5 residue, serve as CTD scaffolds to coordinate the dephosphorylation of phospho-S5 by RPAP2. PMID:24997600

  5. A novel intermediate mucolipidosis II/IIIαβ caused by GNPTAB mutation in the cytosolic N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Jules G; Sillence, David; Wood, Tim; Barnes, Jarrod; Lebel, Robert Roger; Friez, Michael J; Stevenson, Roger E; Steet, Richard; Cathey, Sara S

    2014-05-01

    Mucolipidosis (ML) II and ML IIIα/β are allelic autosomal recessive metabolic disorders due to mutations in GNPTAB. The gene encodes the enzyme UDP-GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase (GNPT), which is critical to proper trafficking of lysosomal acid hydrolases. The ML phenotypic spectrum is dichotomous. Criteria set for defining ML II and ML IIIα/β are inclusive for all but the few patients with phenotypes that span the archetypes. Clinical and biochemical findings of the 'intermediate' ML in eight patients with the c.10A>C missense mutation in GNPTAB are presented to define this intermediate ML and provide a broader insight into ML pathogenesis. Extensive clinical information, including radiographic examinations at various ages, was obtained from a detailed study of all patients. GNPTAB was sequenced in probands and parents. GNPT activity was measured and cathepsin D sorting assays were performed in fibroblasts. Intermediate ML patients who share the c.10A>C/p.K4Q mutation in GNPTAB demonstrate a distinct, consistent phenotype similar to ML II in physical and radiographic features and to ML IIIα/β in psychomotor development and life expectancy. GNPT activity is reduced to 7-12% but the majority of newly synthesized cathepsin D remains intracellular. The GNPTAB c.10A>C/p.K4Q missense allele results in an intermediate ML II/III with distinct clinical and biochemical characteristics. This delineation strengthens the utility of the discontinuous genotype-phenotype correlation in ML II and ML IIIα/β and prompts additional studies on the tissue-specific pathogenesis in GNPT-deficient ML. PMID:24045841

  6. NMR structure of a complex containing the TFIIF subunit RAP74 and the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao D.; Abbott, Karen L.; Potempa, Krzysztof; Kobor, Michael S.; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G.

    2003-01-01

    FCP1 [transcription factor IIF (TFIIF)-associated carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase] is the only identified phosphatase specific for the phosphorylated CTD of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The phosphatase activity of FCP1 is enhanced in the presence of the large subunit of TFIIF (RAP74 in humans). It has been demonstrated that the CTD of RAP74 (cterRAP74; residues 436–517) directly interacts with the highly acidic CTD of FCP1 (cterFCP; residues 879–961 in human). In this manuscript, we have determined a high-resolution solution structure of a cterRAP74/cterFCP complex by NMR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the cterFCP protein is completely disordered in the unbound state, but forms an α-helix (H1′; E945–M961) in the complex. The cterRAP74/cterFCP binding interface relies extensively on van der Waals contacts between hydrophobic residues from the H2 and H3 helices of cterRAP74 and hydrophobic residues from the H1′ helix of cterFCP. The binding interface also contains two critical electrostatic interactions involving aspartic acid residues from H1′ of cterFCP and lysine residues from both H2 and H3 of cterRAP74. There are also three additional polar interactions involving highly conserved acidic residues from the H1′ helix. The cterRAP74/cterFCP complex is the first high-resolution structure between an acidic residue-rich domain from a holoenzyme-associated regulatory protein and a general transcription factor. The structure defines a clear role for both hydrophobic and acidic residues in protein/protein complexes involving acidic residue-rich domains in transcription regulatory proteins. PMID:12732728

  7. NMR structure of a complex containing the TFIIF subunit RAP74 and the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao D; Abbott, Karen L; Potempa, Krzysztof; Kobor, Michael S; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2003-05-13

    FCP1 [transcription factor IIF (TFIIF)-associated carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase] is the only identified phosphatase specific for the phosphorylated CTD of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The phosphatase activity of FCP1 is enhanced in the presence of the large subunit of TFIIF (RAP74 in humans). It has been demonstrated that the CTD of RAP74 (cterRAP74; residues 436-517) directly interacts with the highly acidic CTD of FCP1 (cterFCP; residues 879-961 in human). In this manuscript, we have determined a high-resolution solution structure of a cterRAP74cterFCP complex by NMR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the cterFCP protein is completely disordered in the unbound state, but forms an alpha-helix (H1'; E945-M961) in the complex. The cterRAP74cterFCP binding interface relies extensively on van der Waals contacts between hydrophobic residues from the H2 and H3 helices of cterRAP74 and hydrophobic residues from the H1' helix of cterFCP. The binding interface also contains two critical electrostatic interactions involving aspartic acid residues from H1' of cterFCP and lysine residues from both H2 and H3 of cterRAP74. There are also three additional polar interactions involving highly conserved acidic residues from the H1' helix. The cterRAP74cterFCP complex is the first high-resolution structure between an acidic residue-rich domain from a holoenzyme-associated regulatory protein and a general transcription factor. The structure defines a clear role for both hydrophobic and acidic residues in proteinprotein complexes involving acidic residue-rich domains in transcription regulatory proteins. PMID:12732728

  8. Electron-Transfer Pathways in the Heme and Quinone-Binding Domain of Complex II (Succinate Dehydrogenase)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single electron transfers have been examined in complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) by the method of pulse radiolysis. Electrons are introduced into the enzyme initially at the [3Fe–4S] and ubiquinone sites followed by intramolecular equilibration with the b heme of the enzyme. To define thermodynamic and other controlling parameters for the pathways of electron transfer in complex II, site-directed variants were constructed and analyzed. Variants at SdhB-His207 and SdhB-Ile209 exhibit significantly perturbed electron transfer between the [3Fe–4S] cluster and ubiquinone. Analysis of the data using Marcus theory shows that the electronic coupling constants for wild-type and variant enzyme are all small, indicating that electron transfer occurs by diabatic tunneling. The presence of the ubiquinone is necessary for efficient electron transfer to the heme, which only slowly equilibrates with the [3Fe–4S] cluster in the absence of the quinone. PMID:24559074

  9. Substitution of aspartate for glycine 103 of the type II collagen triple helical domain: Identification of the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, D.J.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    Kniest dysplasia is an autosomal dominant chondrodysplasia which results from mutations in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. Characteristics of the disorder include a short trunk and extremities, mid-face hypoplasia, cleft palate, myopia, retinal detachment, and hearing loss. Recently, deletions of all or part of exon 12 have been identified in individuals with Kniest dysplasia, suggesting that mutations within this region of the protein may primarily result in the Kniest dysplasia phenotype. We used SSCP to analyze an amplified genomic DNA fragment containing exon 12 from 7 individuals with Kniest dysplasia. An abnormality was identified in one patient. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the patient was heterozygous for a G to A transition that implied substitution of glycine{sup 103} of the triple helix by aspartate. The mutation was not observed in DNA from either of the proband`s parents. Protein microsequencing demonstrated expression of the abnormal allele in the proband`s cartilage, indicating that the Kniest phenotype results from the presence of abnormal type II collagen molecules in the extracellular matrix. These data demonstrate the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia and further support the hypothesis that alteration of a domain which includes the region encoded by exon 12 in the type II collagen protein leads to this disorder. Experiments designed to identify specific effects that mutations in this region have on intermolecular interactions among abnormal type II collagen molecules and other components of the cartilage extracellular matrix may clarify the underlying pathophysiology of Kniest dysplasia.

  10. Frequency-domain gravitational waves from nonprecessing black-hole binaries. II. A phenomenological model for the advanced detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sebastian; Husa, Sascha; Hannam, Mark; Ohme, Frank; Pürrer, Michael; Forteza, Xisco Jiménez; Bohé, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    We present a new frequency-domain phenomenological model of the gravitational-wave signal from the inspiral, merger and ringdown of nonprecessing (aligned-spin) black-hole binaries. The model is calibrated to 19 hybrid effective-one-body-numerical-relativity waveforms up to mass ratios of 1 ∶18 and black-hole spins of |a /m |˜0.85 (0.98 for equal-mass systems). The inspiral part of the model consists of an extension of frequency-domain post-Newtonian expressions, using higher-order terms fit to the hybrids. The merger ringdown is based on a phenomenological ansatz that has been significantly improved over previous models. The model exhibits mismatches of typically less than 1% against all 19 calibration hybrids and an additional 29 verification hybrids, which provide strong evidence that, over the calibration region, the model is sufficiently accurate for all relevant gravitational-wave astronomy applications with the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. Beyond the calibration region the model produces physically reasonable results, although we recommend caution in assuming that any merger-ringdown waveform model is accurate outside its calibration region. As an example, we note that an alternative nonprecessing model, SEOBNRv2 (calibrated up to spins of only 0.5 for unequal-mass systems), exhibits mismatch errors of up to 10% for high spins outside its calibration region. We conclude that waveform models would benefit most from a larger number of numerical-relativity simulations of high-aligned-spin unequal-mass binaries.

  11. Multiple mutations in hepatitis C virus NS5A domain II are required to confer a significant level of resistance to alisporivir.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rivera, Jose A; Bobardt, Michael; Chatterji, Udayan; Hopkins, Sam; Gregory, Matthew A; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lin, Kai; Gallay, Philippe A

    2012-10-01

    Alisporivir is the most advanced host-targeting antiviral cyclophilin (Cyp) inhibitor in phase III studies and has demonstrated a great deal of promise in decreasing hepatitis C virus (HCV) viremia in infected patients. In an attempt to further elucidate the mechanism of action of alisporivir, HCV replicons resistant to the drug were selected. Interestingly, mutations constantly arose in domain II of NS5A. To demonstrate that these mutations are responsible for drug resistance, they were reintroduced into the parental HCV genome, and the resulting mutant viruses were tested for replication in the presence of alisporivir or in the absence of the alisporivir target, CypA. We also examined the effect of the mutations on NS5A binding to itself (oligomerization), CypA, RNA, and NS5B. Importantly, the mutations did not affect any of these interactions. Moreover, the mutations did not preserve NS5A-CypA interactions from alisporivir rupture. NS5A mutations alone render HCV only slightly resistant to alisporivir. In sharp contrast, when multiple NS5A mutations are combined, significant resistance was observed. The introduction of multiple mutations in NS5A significantly restored viral replication in CypA knockdown cells. Interestingly, the combination of NS5A mutations renders HCV resistant to all classes of Cyp inhibitors. This study suggests that a combination of multiple mutations in domain II of NS5A rather than a single mutation is required to render HCV significantly and universally resistant to Cyp inhibitors. This in accordance with in vivo data that suggest that alisporivir is associated with a low potential for development of viral resistance. PMID:22802259

  12. Evidence for the presence of R250G mutation at the ATPase domain of topoisomerase II in an arsenite-resistant Leishmania donovani exhibiting a differential drug inhibition profile.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gaganmeet; Thakur, Meghna; Chakraborti, Pradip K; Dey, Chinmoy S

    2009-01-01

    Resistance to operational drugs is a major barrier to successful antileishmanial chemotherapy that demands development of novel drug intervention strategies based on rational approaches. Model drug resistance phenotypes, such as arsenite resistance used in the current study, facilitate our understanding of the mechanism of drug resistance and assist in identifying new drug target(s). The current study was undertaken to investigate the sensitivity of topoisomerase II (topo II) of arsenite-sensitive (Ld-Wt) and -resistant (Ld-As20) Leishmania donovani to antileishmanial/anti-topo II agents. The effect of antileishmanial/anti-topo II drugs on partially purified topo II enzyme from Ld-Wt and Ld-As20 revealed differential inhibition of topo II decatenation activity for the two strains, with a lower amount of drug required to inhibit activity by 50% in Ld-Wt compared with Ld-As20. Comparison of topo II sequences from both strains indicated a point mutation, R250G, in the ATPase domain of the resistant strain. Furthermore, the Arg-250 of the ATPase domain of topo II was observed to be conserved throughout different species of Leishmania. Variation in the topo II gene sequence between Ld-Wt and Ld-As20 is envisaged to be responsible for the differential behaviour of the enzymes from the two sources. PMID:18805675

  13. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  14. Theory of filtered type-II parametric down-conversion in the continuous-variable domain: Quantifying the impacts of filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Andreas; Lupo, Cosmo; Reichelt, Matthias; Meier, Torsten; Silberhorn, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Parametric down-conversion (PDC) forms one of the basic building blocks for quantum optical experiments. However, the intrinsic multimode spectral-temporal structure of pulsed PDC often poses a severe hindrance for the direct implementation of the heralding of pure single-photon states or, for example, continuous-variable entanglement distillation experiments. To get rid of multimode effects narrowband frequency filtering is frequently applied to achieve a single-mode behavior. A rigorous theoretical description to accurately describe the effects of filtering on PDC, however, is still missing. To date, the theoretical models of filtered PDC are rooted in the discrete-variable domain and only account for filtering in the low-gain regime, where only a few photon pairs are emitted at any single point in time. In this paper we extend these theoretical descriptions and put forward a simple model, which is able to accurately describe the effects of filtering on PDC in the continuous-variable domain. This developed straightforward theoretical framework enables us to accurately quantify the tradeoff between suppression of higher-order modes, reduced purity, and lowered Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement, when narrowband filters are applied to multimode type-II PDC.

  15. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P.; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  16. Loop replacements with gut-binding peptides in Cry1Ab domain II enhanced toxicity against the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ensi; Lin, Li; Chen, Chen; Chen, Hanze; Zhuang, Haohan; Wu, Songqing; Sha, Li; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins have been used widely in pest managements. However, Cry toxins are not effective against sap-sucking insects (Hemiptera), which limits the application of Bt for pest management. In order to extend the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxins to the rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, we modified Cry1Ab putative receptor binding domains with selected BPH gut-binding peptides (GBPs). Three surface exposed loops in the domain II of Cry1Ab were replaced with two GBPs (P2S and P1Z) respectively. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of modified toxin L2-P2S increased significantly (~9 folds) against BPH nymphs. In addition, damage of midgut cells was observed from the nymphs fed with L2-P2S. Our results indicate that modifying Cry toxins based on the toxin-gut interactions can broaden the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxin. This method provides another approach for the development of transgenic crops with novel insecticidal activity against hemipteran insects and insect populations resistant to current Bt transgenic crops. PMID:26830331

  17. HESS-II reconstruction strategy and performance in the low-energy (20-150 GeV) domain

    SciTech Connect

    Becherini, Y.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Punch, M.; Bernloehr, K.; Ehlert, S.; Masbou, J.; Moulin, E.

    2008-12-24

    In mid-2009 a notable upgrade of the H.E.S.S. telescope system will take place: a new telescope with a 600 m{sup 2} mirror area and very-high-resolution camera (0.07 deg.) will be positioned at the centre of the present configuration, with the aim of lowering the threshold and enhance its sensitivity in the 100 GeV to several TeV energy range. HESS-II will permit the investigation of the lower energy {gamma}-ray spectra in various cosmic accelerators, giving information on the origin of the {gamma}-rays observed, and will detect AGNs with a redshift greater than 0.2 (being less affected by absorption by Extragalactic Background Light--EBL--in this energy range) and will search for new classes of very high energy {gamma}-ray emitters (pulsars, microquasars, GRB, and dark matter candidates)

  18. Conservation of salivary glycoprotein-interacting and human immunoglobulin G-cross-reactive domains of antigen I/II in oral streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Moisset, A; Schatz, N; Lepoivre, Y; Amadio, S; Wachsmann, D; Schöller, M; Klein, J P

    1994-01-01

    In this study we localized more precisely the salivary glycoprotein-interacting and the human immunoglobulin G (hIgG)-cross-reacting domains on the SR molecule, an antigen I/II-related protein from S. mutans serotype f. Mapping of the SR molecule with polypeptides expressed by subclones covering the entire molecule and with synthetic peptides demonstrates that the salivary glycoprotein-binding domain is located in the N-terminal alanine-rich repeats of the SR molecule. In order to investigate the degree of conservation of both regions in various oral streptococci, we tested the reactivity of 8 representative strains of the mutans group and 11 nonmutans oral Streptococcus strains (S. anginosus, S. milleri, S. constellatus, S. intermedius, S. mitis, S. sanguis, S. gordonii, S. salivarius, and S. mitis strains) with antipeptide antibodies in a whole-cell enzyme linked immunosorbent assay together with colony hybridization analysis using DNA probes designed to map these two regions. All the mutans group strains except S. rattus and the 11 nonmutans streptococcal strains showed a high conservation of the C-terminal part of the SR molecule, especially the hIgG-cross-reacting domain, and less homology for the N-terminal salivary glycoprotein-binding region. Almost all of the sera from patients with rheumatic disease reacted strongly with SR from S. mutans serotype f, P1 from S. mutans serotype c, and four peptides located in the hIgG-cross-reacting region and not with peptides located at the C and N termini and in the proline-rich repeats. These results confirm that epitopes located within this region are immunogenic in humans and could lead to the synthesis of natural anti-IgG antibodies. PMID:8262626

  19. Identification of domains on the extrinsic 23 kDa protein possibly involved in electrostatic interaction with the extrinsic 33 kDa protein in spinach photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Tohri, Akihiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Ohta, Hisataka; Inoue, Yasunori; Enami, Isao

    2004-03-01

    To elucidate the domains on the extrinsic 23 kDa protein involved in electrostatic interaction with the extrinsic 33 kDa protein in spinach photosystem II, we modified amino or carboxyl groups of the 23 kDa protein to uncharged methyl ester groups with N-succinimidyl propionate or glycine methyl ester in the presence of a water-soluble carbodiimide, respectively. The N-succinimidyl propionate-modified 23 kDa protein did not bind to the 33 kDa protein associated with PSII membranes, whereas the glycine methyl ester-modified 23 kDa protein completely bound. This indicates that positive charges on the 23 kDa protein are important for electrostatic interaction with the 33 kDa protein associated with the PSII membranes. Mapping of the N-succinimidyl propionate-modified sites of the 23 kDa protein was performed using Staphylococcus V8 protease digestion of the modified protein followed by determination of the mass of the resultant peptide fragments with MALDI-TOF MS. The results showed that six domains (Lys11-Lys14, Lys27-Lys38, Lys40, Lys90-Lys96, Lys143-Lys152, Lys166-Lys174) were modified with N-succinimidyl propionate. In these domains, Lys11, Lys13, Lys33, Lys38, Lys143, Lys166, Lys170 and Lys174 were wholly conserved in the 23 kDa protein from 12 species of higher plants. These positively charged lysyl residues on the 23 kDa protein may be involved in electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged carboxyl groups on the 33 kDa protein, the latter has been suggested to be important for the 23 kDa binding [Bricker, T.M. & Frankel, L.K. (2003) Biochemistry42, 2056-2061]. PMID:15009208

  20. First-Year Evaluation of Mexico’s Tax on Nonessential Energy-Dense Foods: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Juan A.; Popkin, Barry M.; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2016-01-01

    Background In an effort to prevent continued increases in obesity and diabetes, in January 2014, the Mexican government implemented an 8% tax on nonessential foods with energy density ≥275 kcal/100 g and a peso-per-liter tax on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Limited rigorous evaluations of food taxes exist worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine changes in volume of taxed and untaxed packaged food purchases in response to these taxes in the entire sample and stratified by socioeconomic status (SES). Methods and Findings This study uses data on household packaged food purchases representative of the Mexican urban population from The Nielsen Company’s Mexico Consumer Panel Services (CPS). We included 6,248 households that participated in the Nielsen CPS in at least 2 mo during 2012–2014; average household follow-up was 32.7 mo. We analyzed the volume of purchases of taxed and untaxed foods from January 2012 to December 2014, using a longitudinal, fixed-effects model that adjusted for preexisting trends to test whether the observed post-tax trend was significantly different from the one expected based on the pre-tax trend. We controlled for household characteristics and contextual factors like minimum salary and unemployment rate. The mean volume of purchases of taxed foods in 2014 changed by -25 g (95% confidence interval = -46, -11) per capita per month, or a 5.1% change beyond what would have been expected based on pre-tax (2012–2013) trends, with no corresponding change in purchases of untaxed foods. Low SES households purchased on average 10.2% less taxed foods than expected (-44 [–72, –16] g per capita per month); medium SES households purchased 5.8% less taxed foods than expected (-28 [–46, –11] g per capita per month), whereas high SES households’ purchases did not change. The main limitations of our findings are the inability to infer causality because the taxes were implemented at the national level (lack of control group

  1. The Zebrafish Homologue of the Human DYT1 Dystonia Gene Is Widely Expressed in CNS Neurons but Non-Essential for Early Motor System Development

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Jonathan J.; Torres, Gonzalo E.; Burton, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is caused by mutation of the TOR1A gene, resulting in the loss of a single glutamic acid residue near the carboxyl terminal of TorsinA. The neuronal functions perturbed by TorsinA[ΔE] are a major unresolved issue in understanding the pathophysiology of dystonia, presenting a critical roadblock to developing effective treatments. We identified and characterized the zebrafish homologue of TOR1A, as a first step towards elucidating the functions of TorsinA in neurons, in vivo, using the genetically-manipulable zebrafish model. The zebrafish genome was found to contain a single alternatively-spliced tor1 gene, derived from a common ancestral locus shared with the dual TOR1A and TOR1B paralogues found in tertrapods. tor1 was expressed ubiquitously during early embryonic development and in multiple adult tissues, including the CNS. The 2.1 kb tor1 mRNA encodes Torsin1, which is 59% identical and 78% homologous to human TorsinA. Torsin1 was expressed as major 45 kDa and minor 47 kDa glycoproteins, within the cytoplasm of neurons and neuropil throughout the CNS. Similar to previous findings relating to human TorsinA, mutations of the ATP hydrolysis domain of Torsin1 resulted in relocalization of the protein in cultured cells from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nuclear envelope. Zebrafish embryos lacking tor1 during early development did not show impaired viability, overt morphological abnormalities, alterations in motor behavior, or developmental defects in the dopaminergic system. Torsin1 is thus non-essential for early development of the motor system, suggesting that important CNS functions may occur later in development, consistent with the critical time window in late childhood when dystonia symptoms usually emerge in DYT1 patients. The similarities between Torsin1 and human TorsinA in domain organization, expression pattern, and cellular localization suggest that the zebrafish will provide a useful model to understand the neuronal functions of Torsins

  2. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Song, Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids. PMID:20561903

  3. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  4. Analogues and derivatives of Oncrasin-1, a Novel Inhibitor of the C-Terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II, and Their Antitumor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuhong; Wang, Li; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Jinsong; Wei, Xiaoli; Fang, Bingliang

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the antitumor activity of oncrasin-1, a small molecule RNA polymerase II inhibitor, we evaluated 69 oncrasin-1 analogues for their cytotoxic activity against normal human epithelial cells and K-Ras mutant tumor cells. About 40 of those compounds were as potent as or more potent than oncrasin-1 in tumor cells and had minimal cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Structure-activity relationship analysis revealed that most of the active compounds contained either a hydroxymethyl group or an aldehyde group as a substitute at the 3-position of the indole. Both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups in the benzene ring were well tolerated. The hydroxymethyl compounds ranged from equipotent with to 100 times as potent as the corresponding aldehyde compounds. We tested 3 active analogues’ effect on RNA polymerase phosphorylation and found that they all inhibited phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the active compounds might act through the same mechanisms as oncrasin-1. PMID:21443218

  5. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Song, Weizhong; Groome, James R; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Dong, Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids. PMID:20561903

  6. Identification of the peptide derived from S1 domain that inhibits type I and type II feline infectious peritonitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Koyama, Yusuke; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). A therapeutic drug that is effective against FIP has not yet been developed. Peptides based on viral protein amino acid sequences have recently been attracting attention as new antiviral drugs. In the present study, we synthesized 30 overlapping peptides based on the amino acid sequence of the S1 domain of the type I FIPV strain KU-2 S protein, and investigated their inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. To evaluate the inhibitory effects on type I FIPV infection of these peptides, we investigated a method to increase the infection efficiency of poorly replicative type I FIPV. The efficiency of type I FIPV infection was increased by diluting the virus with medium containing a polycation. Of the 30 peptides, I-S1-8 (S461-S480), I-S1-9 (S471-S490), I-S1-10 (S481-S500), I-S1-16 (S541-S560), and I-S1-22 (S601-S620) significantly decreased the infectivity of FIPV strain KU-2 while I-S1-9 and I-S1-16 exhibited marked inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. The inhibitory effects on FIPV infection of these 2 peptides on other type I and type II FIPV strains, feline herpesvirus (FHV), and feline calicivirus (FCV) were also examined. These 2 peptides specifically inhibited type I and type II FIPV, but did FHV or FCV infection. In conclusion, the possibility of peptides derived from the S protein of type I FIPV strain KU-2 as anti-FIPV agents effective not only for type I, but also type II FIPV was demonstrated in vitro. PMID:25896976

  7. Bio-recovery of non-essential heavy metals by intra- and extracellular mechanisms in free-living microorganisms.

    PubMed

    García-García, Jorge D; Sánchez-Thomas, Rosina; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Free-living microorganisms may become suitable models for recovery of non-essential and essential heavy metals from wastewater bodies and soils by using and enhancing their accumulating and/or leaching abilities. This review analyzes the variety of different mechanisms developed mainly in bacteria, protists and microalgae to accumulate heavy metals, being the most relevant those involving phytochelatin and metallothionein biosyntheses; phosphate/polyphosphate metabolism; compartmentalization of heavy metal-complexes into vacuoles, chloroplasts and mitochondria; and secretion of malate and other organic acids. Cyanide biosynthesis for extra-cellular heavy metal bioleaching is also examined. These metabolic/cellular processes are herein analyzed at the transcriptional, kinetic and metabolic levels to provide mechanistic basis for developing genetically engineered microorganisms with greater capacities and efficiencies for heavy metal recovery, recycling of heavy metals, biosensing of metal ions, and engineering of metalloenzymes. PMID:27184302

  8. Metabolism of Nonessential N15-Labeled Amino Acids and the Measurement of Human Whole-Body Protein Synthesis Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Dempsey, D. T.; Melnick, G.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15 labeled nonessential amino acids plus (15)NH4Cl were administered over a 10 h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted (Kendall coefficient of concordance W = 0.83, P is less than 0.01). Protein synthesis rates were calculated from the urinary ammonia plateau enrichment and the cumulative excretion of N-15. Glycine was one of the few amino acids that gave similar values by both methods.

  9. Stability of the Plasmodium falciparum AMA1-RON2 Complex Is Governed by the Domain II (DII) Loop

    PubMed Central

    Delgadillo, Roberto F.; Parker, Michelle L.; Lebrun, Maryse; Boulanger, Martin J.; Douguet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that employs a highly sophisticated mechanism to access the protective environment of the host cells. Key to this mechanism is the formation of an electron dense ring at the parasite-host cell interface called the Moving Junction (MJ) through which the parasite invades. The MJ incorporates two key parasite components: the surface protein Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1) and its receptor, the Rhoptry Neck Protein (RON) complex, the latter one being targeted to the host cell membrane during invasion. Crystal structures of AMA1 have shown that a partially mobile loop, termed the DII loop, forms part of a deep groove in domain I and overlaps with the RON2 binding site. To investigate the mechanism by which the DII loop influences RON2 binding, we measured the kinetics of association and dissociation and binding equilibria of a PfRON2sp1 peptide with both PfAMA1 and an engineered form of PfAMA1 where the flexible region of the DII loop was replaced by a short Gly-Ser linker (ΔDII-PfAMA1). The reactions were tracked by fluorescence anisotropy as a function of temperature and concentration and globally fitted to acquire the rate constants and corresponding thermodynamic profiles. Our results indicate that both PfAMA1 constructs bound to the PfRON2sp1 peptide with the formation of one intermediate in a sequential reversible reaction: A↔B↔C. Consistent with Isothermal Titration Calorimetry measurements, final complex formation was enthalpically driven and slightly entropically unfavorable. Importantly, our experimental data shows that the DII loop lengthened the complex half-life time by 18-fold (900 s and 48 s at 25°C for Pf and ΔDII-Pf complex, respectively). The longer half-life of the Pf complex appeared to be driven by a slower dissociation process. These data highlight a new influential role for the DII loop in kinetically locking the functional binary complex to enable host cell invasion

  10. The Calcium-induced Conformation and Glycosylation of Scavenger-rich Cysteine Repeat (SRCR) Domains of Glycoprotein 340 Influence the High Affinity Interaction with Antigen I/II Homologs*

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2014-01-01

    Oral streptococci adhere to tooth-immobilized glycoprotein 340 (GP340) via the surface protein antigen I/II (AgI/II) and its homologs as the first step in pathogenesis. Studying this interaction using recombinant proteins, we observed that calcium increases the conformational stability of the scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCRs) domains of GP340. Our results also show that AgI/II adheres specifically with nanomolar affinity to the calcium-induced SRCR conformation in an immobilized state and not in solution. This interaction is significantly dependent on the O-linked carbohydrates present on the SRCRs. This study also establishes that a single SRCR domain of GP340 contains the two surfaces to which the apical and C-terminal regions of AgI/II noncompetitively adhere. Compared with the single SRCR domain, the three tandem SRCR domains displayed a collective/cooperative increase in their bacterial adherence and aggregation. The previously described SRCRP2 peptide that was shown to aggregate several oral streptococci displayed limited aggregation and also nonspecific adherence compared to SRCR domains. Finally, we show distinct species-specific adherence/aggregation between Streptococcus mutans AgI/II and Streptococcus gordonii SspB in their interaction with the SRCRs. This study concludes that identification of the metal ion and carbohydrate adherence motifs on both SRCRs and AgI/II homologs could lead to the development of anti-adhesive inhibitors that could deter the adherence of pathogenic oral streptococci and thereby prevent the onset of infections. PMID:24923446

  11. Identification of transmembrane domain 3, 4 & 5 residues that contribute to the formation of the ligand-binding pocket of the urotensin-II receptor.

    PubMed

    Sainsily, Xavier; Cabana, Jérôme; Boulais, Philip E; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Urotensin-II (UII), a cyclic undecapeptide, selectively binds the urotensin-II receptor (UT receptor), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in cardiovascular effects and associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions including hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and others. In order to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TM) three (TM3), four (TM4) and five (TM5) that are involved in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). Each residue in the F118((3.20)) to S146((3.48)) fragment of TM3, the L168((4.44)) to G194((4.70)) fragment of TM4 and the W203((5.30)) to V232((5.59)) fragment of TM5, was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were then expressed in COS-7 cells and subsequently treated with the positively charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of (125)I-UII to TM3 mutants L126C((3.28)), F127C((3.29)), F131C((3.33)) and M134C((3.36)) and TM4 mutants M184C((4.60)) and I188C((4.64)). No loss of binding was detected following treatment by MTSEA for all TM5 mutants tested. In absence of a crystal structure of UT receptor, these results identify key determinants in TM3, TM4 and TM5 that participate in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket and has led us to propose a homology model of the UT receptor. PMID:24084430

  12. RECQ5 helicase associates with the C-terminal repeat domain of RNA polymerase II during productive elongation phase of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Huehn, Daniela; MacKellar, April; Menigatti, Mirco; Zheng, Lu; Urban, Vaclav; Shevelev, Igor; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Janscak, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    It is known that transcription can induce DNA recombination, thus compromising genomic stability. RECQ5 DNA helicase promotes genomic stability by regulating homologous recombination. Recent studies have shown that RECQ5 forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in human cells, but the cellular role of this association is not understood. Here, we provide evidence that RECQ5 specifically binds to the Ser2,5-phosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNAPII, RPB1, by means of a Set2–Rpb1-interacting (SRI) motif located at the C-terminus of RECQ5. We also show that RECQ5 associates with RNAPII-transcribed genes in a manner dependent on the SRI motif. Notably, RECQ5 density on transcribed genes correlates with the density of Ser2-CTD phosphorylation, which is associated with the productive elongation phase of transcription. Furthermore, we show that RECQ5 negatively affects cell viability upon inhibition of spliceosome assembly, which can lead to the formation of mutagenic R-loop structures. These data indicate that RECQ5 binds to the elongating RNAPII complex and support the idea that RECQ5 plays a role in the maintenance of genomic stability during transcription. PMID:20705653

  13. DNA-binding activity of rat DNA topoisomerase II α C-terminal domain contributes to efficient DNA catenation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shinji; Kato, Yuri; Okada, Natsumi; Sano, Kuniaki; Tsutsui, Ken; Tsutsui, Kimiko M; Ikeda, Shogo

    2016-03-01

    DNA topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) is an essential enzyme for resolution of DNA topologies arising in DNA metabolic reactions. In proliferating cells, topo II activities of DNA catenation or decatenation are required for condensation of chromosomes and segregation of chromatids. Recent studies suggest that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of human topo IIα is required for localization to mitotic chromosomes. Here, we show that the CTD of topo IIα is also associated with efficient DNA catenation in vitro, based on comparison of wild-type (WT) rat topo IIα and its deletion mutants. Unlike WT, the CTD truncated mutant (ΔCTD) lacked linear DNA binding activity, but could bind to negatively supercoiled DNA similarly to WT. The CTD alone showed linear DNA-binding activity. ΔCTD mediated formation of a DNA catenane in the presence of polyethylene glycol, which enhances macromolecular association. These results indicate that DNA-binding activity in the CTD of topo IIα concentrates the enzyme in the vicinity of condensed DNA and allows topo IIα to efficiently form a DNA catenane. PMID:26527691

  14. Five-factor model personality domains in the prediction of Axis II personality disorders: an exploratory study in late adulthood women non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Henriques-Calado, Joana; Duarte-Silva, Maria Eugénia; Junqueira, Diana; Sacoto, Carlota; Keong, Ana Marta

    2014-05-01

    Relationships between Axis II personality disorders (DSM-IV) and the five-factor model were explored in a non-clinical sample of late adulthood women. The sample consists of 90 women (M = 72.29 years of age, standard deviation = 7.10), who were administered with two measures, the NEO-FFI and the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+. Some personality disorders scales such as paranoid, schizotypal, borderline and dependent demonstrate a differentiated pattern of five-factor model domain predictors. Low agreeableness predicted schizoid, narcissistic and antisocial; histrionic, obsessive-compulsive and negativistic were predicted by high neuroticism and low agreeableness; high neuroticism and low extraversion, in turn, predicted dependent and depressive scales. Also, two clusters of personality disorders are identified, one associated with low agreeableness and another with low agreeableness and high neuroticism. This study suggest that some traits become maladaptive personality traits, and correspond more closely to psychopathology, when they become opposite to what would be expected in line with studies in normal late adulthood development. PMID:24700735

  15. Secretion of dengue virus envelope protein ectodomain from mammalian cells is dependent on domain II serotype and affects the immune response upon DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Slon Campos, J L; Poggianella, M; Marchese, S; Bestagno, M; Burrone, O R

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is currently among the most important human pathogens and affects millions of people throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Although it has been a World Health Organization priority for several years, there is still no efficient vaccine available to prevent infection. The envelope glycoprotein (E), exposed on the surface on infective viral particles, is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. For this reason it has been used as the antigen of choice for vaccine development efforts. Here we show a detailed analysis of factors involved in the expression, secretion and folding of E ectodomain from all four DENV serotypes in mammalian cells, and how this affects their ability to induce neutralizing antibody responses in DNA-vaccinated mice. Proper folding of E domain II (DII) is essential for efficient E ectodomain secretion, with DIII playing a significant role in stabilizing soluble dimers. We also show that the level of protein secreted from transfected cells determines the strength and efficiency of antibody responses in the context of DNA vaccination and should be considered a pivotal feature for the development of E-based DNA vaccines against DENV. PMID:26358704

  16. cis-Proline-mediated Ser(P)[superscript 5] Dephosphorylation by the RNA Polymerase II C-terminal Domain Phosphatase Ssu72

    SciTech Connect

    Werner-Allen, Jon W.; Lee, Chul-Jin; Liu, Pengda; Nicely, Nathan I.; Wang, Su; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Zhou, Pei

    2012-05-16

    RNA polymerase II coordinates co-transcriptional events by recruiting distinct sets of nuclear factors to specific stages of transcription via changes of phosphorylation patterns along its C-terminal domain (CTD). Although it has become increasingly clear that proline isomerization also helps regulate CTD-associated processes, the molecular basis of its role is unknown. Here, we report the structure of the Ser(P){sup 5} CTD phosphatase Ssu72 in complex with substrate, revealing a remarkable CTD conformation with the Ser(P){sup 5}-Pro{sup 6} motif in the cis configuration. We show that the cis-Ser(P){sup 5}-Pro{sup 6} isomer is the minor population in solution and that Ess1-catalyzed cis-trans-proline isomerization facilitates rapid dephosphorylation by Ssu72, providing an explanation for recently discovered in vivo connections between these enzymes and a revised model for CTD-mediated small nuclear RNA termination. This work presents the first structural evidence of a cis-proline-specific enzyme and an unexpected mechanism of isomer-based regulation of phosphorylation, with broad implications for CTD biology

  17. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Brickler, Thomas; Gresham, Kisha; Meza, Armand; Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl; Williams, Tere M; Rothschild, Daniel E; Allen, Irving C; Theus, Michelle H

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR), caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC). ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1(-/-), Asc(-/-), and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1(-/-) and Asc(-/-) mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury. PMID:27199506

  18. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brickler, Thomas; Gresham, Kisha; Meza, Armand; Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl; Williams, Tere M.; Rothschild, Daniel E.; Allen, Irving C.; Theus, Michelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR), caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC). ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury. PMID:27199506

  19. Persistence time of loss-of-function mutations at nonessential loci affecting eye color in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yampolsky, Lev Y; Allen, Chenoa; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Kondrashov, Alexey S

    2005-12-01

    Persistence time of a mutant allele, the expected number of generations before its elimination from the population, can be estimated as the ratio of the number of segregating mutations per individual over the mutation rate per generation. We screened two natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster for mutations causing clear-cut eye phenotypes and detected 25 mutant alleles, falling into 19 complementation groups, in 1164 haploid genomes, which implies 0.021 eye mutations/genome. The de novo haploid mutation rate for the same set of loci was estimated as 2 x 10(-4) in a 10-generation mutation-accumulation experiment. Thus, the average persistence time of all mutations causing clear-cut eye phenotypes is approximately 100 generations (95% confidence interval: 61-219). This estimate shows that the strength of selection against phenotypically drastic alleles of nonessential loci is close to that against recessive lethals. In both cases, deleterious alleles are apparently eliminated by selection against heterozygous individuals, which show no visible phenotypic differences from wild type. PMID:16118190

  20. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Lisa; Millership, Charlotte; Dupont Søgaard, Mia; Kaever, Volkhard; Siljamäki, Pia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Varmanen, Pekka; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and a promising target for the development of vaccines and antimicrobial compounds against Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that mutations in the conditionally essential ltaS (LTA synthase) gene arise spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement defects of an LTA-depleted strain, while other phenotypes typical of LTA-negative S. aureus mutants, including increased cell size and decreased autolytic activity, are retained. In conclusion, our results indicate that LTA has an essential role in septum placement that can be bypassed by inactivating the ClpX chaperone. PMID:27507828

  1. Phosphatase Rtr1 Regulates Global Levels of Serine 5 RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation and Cotranscriptional Histone Methylation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gerald O; Fox, Melanie J; Smith-Kinnaman, Whitney R; Gogol, Madelaine; Fleharty, Brian; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1 contains a heptapeptide repeat sequence of (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7)n that undergoes reversible phosphorylation through the opposing action of kinases and phosphatases. Rtr1 is a conserved protein that colocalizes with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and has been shown to be important for the transition from elongation to termination during transcription by removing RNAPII CTD serine 5 phosphorylation (Ser5-P) at a selection of target genes. In this study, we show that Rtr1 is a global regulator of the CTD code with deletion of RTR1 causing genome-wide changes in Ser5-P CTD phosphorylation and cotranscriptional histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-resolution microarrays, we show that RTR1 deletion results in global changes in RNAPII Ser5-P levels on genes with different lengths and transcription rates consistent with its role as a CTD phosphatase. Although Ser5-P levels increase, the overall occupancy of RNAPII either decreases or stays the same in the absence of RTR1 Additionally, the loss of Rtr1 in vivo leads to increases in H3K36me3 levels genome-wide, while total histone H3 levels remain relatively constant within coding regions. Overall, these findings suggest that Rtr1 regulates H3K36me3 levels through changes in the number of binding sites for the histone methyltransferase Set2, thereby influencing both the CTD and histone codes. PMID:27247267

  2. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P

    2015-09-25

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min(-1), respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2'/3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg(2+) ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3-6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  3. CDKF;1 and CDKD protein kinases regulate phosphorylation of serine residues in the C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Hajheidari, Mohsen; Farrona, Sara; Huettel, Bruno; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Koncz, Csaba

    2012-04-01

    Phosphorylation of conserved Y₁S₂P₃T₄S₅P₆S₇ repeats in the C-terminal domain of largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII CTD) plays a central role in the regulation of transcription and cotranscriptional RNA processing. Here, we show that Ser phosphorylation of Arabidopsis thaliana RNAPII CTD is governed by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE F;1 (CDKF;1), a unique plant-specific CTD S₇-kinase. CDKF;1 is required for in vivo activation of functionally redundant CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE Ds (CDKDs), which are major CTD S₅-kinases that also phosphorylate in vitro the S₂ and S₇ CTD residues. Inactivation of CDKF;1 causes extreme dwarfism and sterility. Inhibition of CTD S₇-phosphorylation in germinating cdkf;1 seedlings is accompanied by 3'-polyadenylation defects of pre-microRNAs and transcripts encoding key regulators of small RNA biogenesis pathways. The cdkf;1 mutation also decreases the levels of both precursor and mature small RNAs without causing global downregulation of the protein-coding transcriptome and enhances the removal of introns that carry pre-microRNA stem-loops. A triple cdkd knockout mutant is not viable, but a combination of null and weak cdkd;3 alleles in a triple cdkd123* mutant permits semidwarf growth. Germinating cdkd123* seedlings show reduced CTD S₅-phosphorylation, accumulation of uncapped precursor microRNAs, and a parallel decrease in mature microRNA. During later development of cdkd123* seedlings, however, S₇-phosphorylation and unprocessed small RNA levels decline similarly as in the cdkf;1 mutant. Taken together, cotranscriptional processing and stability of a set of small RNAs and transcripts involved in their biogenesis are sensitive to changes in the phosphorylation of RNAPII CTD by CDKF;1 and CDKDs. PMID:22547781

  4. Identification of transmembrane domain 1 & 2 residues that contribute to the formation of the ligand-binding pocket of the urotensin-II receptor.

    PubMed

    Sainsily, Xavier; Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2014-11-15

    The vasoactive urotensin-II (UII), a cyclic undecapeptide widely distributed in cardiovascular, renal and endocrine systems, specifically binds the UII receptor (UT receptor), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The involvement of this receptor in numerous pathophysiological conditions including atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, renal impairment and diabetes potentially makes it an interesting therapeutic target. To elucidate how UII binds the UT receptor through the identification of specific residues in transmembrane domains (TM) one (TM1) and two (TM2) that are involved in the formation of the receptor's binding pocket, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). Each residue of TM1 (V49((1.30)) to M76((1.57))) and TM2 (V88((2.41)) to H117((2.70))) was mutated, one by one, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were then expressed in COS-7 cells and subsequently treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant binding inhibition of (125)I-UII to mutant I54C((1.35)) in TM1 and mutants Y100C((2.53)), S103C((2.56)), F106C((2.59)), I107C((2.60)), T110C((2.63)) and Y111C((2.64)) in TM2. These results identify key structural residues in TM1 and TM2 that participate in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket. Together with previous SCAM analysis of TM3, TM4, TM5, TM6 and TM7, these results have led us to identify residues within all 7 TMs that participate in UT's binding pocket and have enabled us to propose a model of this receptor's orthosteric binding site. PMID:25175740

  5. Two-domain MHC class II molecules form stable complexes with myelin basic protein 69-89 peptide that detect and inhibit rat encephalitogenic T cells and treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Burrows, G G; Bebo, B F; Adlard, K L; Vandenbark, A A; Offner, H

    1998-12-01

    We designed and expressed in bacteria a single-chain two-domain MHC class II molecule capable of binding and forming stable complexes with antigenic peptide. The prototype "beta1alpha1" molecule included the beta1 domain of the rat RT1.B class II molecule covalently linked to the amino terminus of the alpha1 domain. In association with the encephalitogenic myelin basic protein (MBP) 69-89 peptide recognized by Lewis rat T cells, the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex specifically labeled and inhibited activation of MBP-69-89 reactive T cells in an IL-2-reversible manner. Moreover, this complex both suppressed and treated clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and inhibited delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and lymphocyte proliferation in an Ag-specific manner. These data indicate that the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex functions as a simplified natural TCR ligand with potent inhibitory activity that does not require additional signaling from the beta2 and alpha2 domains. This new class of small soluble polypeptide may provide a template for designing human homologues useful in detecting and regulating potentially autopathogenic T cells. PMID:9834080

  6. Temporal trends (1986-2005) of essential and non-essential elements in a terrestrial raptor in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Bustnes, Jan O; Bårdsen, Bård-J; Bangjord, Georg; Lierhagen, Syverin; Yoccoz, Nigel G

    2013-08-01

    In the recent decades, the atmospheric deposition of many metals has declined in northern Europe, mostly due to reductions of emissions in other parts of the Europe. However, less is known about the temporal trends at higher trophic levels in terrestrial food chains. In this study we measured 39 different essential and non-essential elements in tawny owl (Strix aluco) tail-feathers (n=633) collected annually between 1986 and 2005 in Central Norway. There was a strong decline in lead (Pb) concentrations (~94%) consistent with the termination of the use of Pb as a petrol additive. There were also significant declines in cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co) and arsenic (As) concentrations. Zinc (Zn) may also have declined after 2000, but this is not yet clear due to possible analytical problems. More unexpected was a strong decline of boron (B) in the late 1980s and early 1990s with a subsequent leveling-off, but with high concentrations in 1999. The decline in B could be related to changes in the agricultural practices and use of fertilizers. Tin (Sn) showed an abrupt decline in the mid-1990s, after which the concentrations established at one fifth of the level before this time. Iron (Fe) was stable until the late 1990s, but showed an increase afterwards, whereas lanthanum (La) tended to increase up to the mid-1990s and then leveled-off. Aluminum (Al) showed decreasing levels until the mid-1990s, but a considerable increase afterwards. There was a small increase in praseodymium (Pr), but the only element showing a consistent strong increase over the study period (61%) was rubidium (Rb). The causes of the temporal trends in different elements may be changed input to the local ecosystem from local and trans-boundary sources, but possibly also variation in climate and feeding conditions for the owls. PMID:23644358

  7. Study of wheat high molecular weight 1Dx5 subunit by (13)C and (1)H solid-state NMR. II. Roles of nonrepetitive terminal domains and length of repetitive domain.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Enrica; Gilbert, Simon M; Tatham, Arthur S; Shewry, Peter R; Naito, Akira; Okuda, Kanna; Saitô, Hazime; Gil, Ana M

    2002-10-15

    This work follows a previous article that addressed the role of disulfide bonds in the behavior of the 1Dx5 subunit upon hydration. Here the roles of nonrepetitive terminal domains present and the length of the central repetitive domain in the hydration of 1Dx5 are investigated. This was achieved by comparing the hydration behavior of suitable model samples determined by (13)C- and (1)H-NMR: an alkylated 1Dx5 subunit (alk1Dx5), a recombinant 58-kDa peptide corresponding to the central repetitive domain of 1Dx5 (i.e., lacking the terminal domains), and two synthetic peptides (with 6 and 21 amino acid residues) based on the consensus repeat motifs of the central domain. The (13)C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments recorded as a function of hydration gave information about the protein or peptide fractions resisting plasticization. Conversely, (13)C single pulse excitation and (1)H-MAS gave information on the more plasticized segments. The results are consistent with the previous proposal of a hydrated network held by hydrogen-bonded glutamines and possibly hydrophobic interactions. The nonrepetitive terminal domains were found to induce water insolubility and a generally higher network hindrance. Shorter chain lengths were shown to increase plasticization and water solubility. However, at low water contents, the 21-mer peptide was characterized by higher hindrance in the megahertz and kilohertz frequency ranges compared to the longer peptide; and a tendency for a few hydrogen-bonded glutamines and hydrophobic residues to remain relatively hindered was still observed, as for the protein and large peptide. It is suggested that this ability is strongly dependent on the peptide primary structure. PMID:12209466

  8. Functional characterization of mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacking short domains within the large, lumen-exposed loop of the chlorophyll protein CP47 in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Gleiter, H M; Haag, E; Shen, J R; Eaton-Rye, J J; Inoue, Y; Vermaas, W F; Renger, G

    1994-10-11

    Several autotrophic mutant strains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 carrying short deletions or a single-site mutation within the large, lumen-exposed loop (loop E) of the chlorophyll a-binding photosystem II core protein, CP47, are analyzed for their functional properties by measuring the flash-induced pattern of thermoluminescence, oxygen yield, and fluorescence quantum yield. A physiological and biochemical characterization of these mutant strains has been given in two previous reports [Eaton-Rye, J.J., & Vermaas, W.F.J. (1991) Plant Mol. Biol. 17, 1165-1177; Haag, E., Eaton-Rye, J.J., Renger, G., & Vermaas, S. F.J. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 4444-4454]. The results of the present study show that deletion of charged and conserved amino acids in a region roughly located between residues 370 and 390 decreases the binding affinity of the extrinsic PS II-O protein to photosystem II. Marked differences with PSII-O deletion mutants are observed with respect to Ca2+ requirement and the flash-induced pattern of oxygen evolution. Under conditions where a sufficient light activation is provided, the psbB mutants assayed in this study reveal normal S-state parameters and lifetimes. The results bear two basic implications: (i) the manganese involved in water oxidation can still be bound in a functionally normal or only slightly distorted manner, and (ii) the binding of the extrinsic PS II-O protein to photosystem II is impaired in mutants carrying a deletion in the domain between residues 370 and 390, but the presence of the PS II-O protein is still of functional relevance for the PS II complex, e.g., for maintenance of a high-affinity binding site for Ca2+ and/or involvement during the process of photoactivation. PMID:7918426

  9. Functional characterisation of the non-essential protein kinases and phosphatases regulating Aspergillus nidulans hydrolytic enzyme production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in the understanding of lignocellulolytic enzyme regulation, less is known about how different carbon sources are sensed and the signaling cascades that result in the adaptation of cellular metabolism and hydrolase secretion. Therefore, the role played by non-essential protein kinases (NPK) and phosphatases (NPP) in the sensing of carbon and/or energetic status was investigated in the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Results Eleven NPKs and seven NPPs were identified as being involved in cellulase, and in some cases also hemicellulase, production in A. nidulans. The regulation of CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in the parental strain was determined by fluorescence microscopy, utilising a CreA::GFP fusion protein. The sensing of phosphorylated glucose, via the RAS signalling pathway induced CreA repression, while carbon starvation resulted in derepression. Growth on cellulose represented carbon starvation and derepressing conditions. The involvement of the identified NPKs in the regulation of cellulose-induced responses and CreA derepression was assessed by genome-wide transcriptomics (GEO accession 47810). CreA::GFP localisation and the restoration of endocellulase activity via the introduction of the ∆creA mutation, was assessed in the NPK-deficient backgrounds. The absence of either the schA or snfA kinase dramatically reduced cellulose-induced transcriptional responses, including the expression of hydrolytic enzymes and transporters. The mechanism by which these two NPKs controlled gene transcription was identified, as the NPK-deficient mutants were not able to unlock CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression under derepressing conditions, such as carbon starvation or growth on cellulose. Conclusions Collectively, this study identified multiple kinases and phosphatases involved in the sensing of carbon and/or energetic status, while demonstrating the overlapping, synergistic roles of schA and

  10. The Conserved Disulfide Bond within Domain II of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Has Divergent Roles in Membrane Fusion with Epithelial Cells and B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Möhl, Britta S.; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects target cells via fusion with cellular membranes. For entry into epithelial cells, EBV requires the herpesvirus conserved core fusion machinery, composed of glycoprotein B (gB) and gH/gL. In contrast, for B cell fusion it requires gB and gH/gL with gp42 serving as a cell tropism switch. The available crystal structures for gH/gL allow the targeted analysis of structural determinants of gH to identify functional regions critical for membrane fusion. Domain II of EBV gH contains two disulfide bonds (DBs). The first is unique for EBV and closely related gammaherpesviruses. The second is conserved across the beta- and gammaherpesviruses and is positioned to stabilize a putative syntaxin-like bundle motif. To analyze the role of these DBs in membrane fusion, gH was mutated by amino acid substitution of the DB cysteines. Mutation of the EBV-specific DB resulted in diminished gH/gL cell surface expression that correlated with diminished B cell and epithelial cell fusion. In contrast, mutation of the conserved DB resulted in wild-type-like B cell fusion, whereas epithelial cell fusion was greatly reduced. The gH mutants bound well to gp42 but had diminished binding to epithelial cells. Tyrosine 336, located adjacent to cysteine 335 of the conserved DB, also was found to be important for DB stabilization and gH/gL function. We conclude that the conserved DB has a cell type-specific function, since it is important for the binding of gH to epithelial cells initiating epithelial cell fusion but not for fusion with B cells and gp42 binding. IMPORTANCE EBV predominantly infects epithelial and B cells in humans, which can result in EBV-associated cancers, such as Burkitt and Hodgkin lymphoma, as well as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. EBV is also associated with a variety of lymphoproliferative disorders, typically of B cell origin, observed in immunosuppressed individuals, such as posttransplant or HIV/AIDS patients. The gH/gL complex plays an

  11. Atomic structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I at pH 8.0 reveals the large disulfide-rich region in domain II to be sensitive to a pH change

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a recombinant thaumatin at pH 8.0 determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantial fluctuations of a loop in domain II was found in the structure at pH 8.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-factors for Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in mobility might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although the sweetness remains when thaumatin is heated at 80 Degree-Sign C for 4 h under acid conditions, it rapidly declines when heating at a pH above 6.5. To clarify the structural difference at high pH, the atomic structure of a recombinant thaumatin I at pH 8.0 was determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Comparison to the crystal structure of thaumatin at pH 7.3 and 7.0 revealed the root-mean square deviation value of a C{alpha} atom to be substantially greater in the large disulfide-rich region of domain II, especially residues 154-164, suggesting that a loop region in domain II to be affected by solvent conditions. Furthermore, B-factors of Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change, suggesting that a striking increase in the mobility of these lysine residues, which could facilitate a reaction with a free sulfhydryl residue produced via the {beta}-elimination of disulfide bonds by heating at a pH above 7.0. The increase in mobility of lysine residues as well as a loop region in domain II might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation of thaumatin above pH 7.0.

  12. Domain Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  13. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO GENES THAT ENCODE ACTIVE GLUCOAMYLASE WITHOUT A STARCH BINDING DOMAIN FROM A TYPE II RHIZOPUS ORYZAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucoamylase obtained from Rhizopus sp. is frequently preferred for certain applications of starch modification or saccharification. The predominant enzyme, which contains a starch binding domain on the amino terminus, has been previously characterized from several species. Additionally, the cDNA ...

  14. The Octarepeat Domain of the Prion Protein Binds Cu(II) with Three Distinct Coordination Modes at pH 7.4

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Madhuri; Walter, Eric D.; Newell, Dustin J.; Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Peisach, Jack; Gerfen, Gary J.; Bennett, Brian; Antholine, William E.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds Cu2+ in its N-terminal octarepeat domain. This unusual domain is comprised of four or more tandem repeats of the fundamental sequence PHGGGWGQ. Previous work from our laboratories demonstrates that at full copper occupancy, each HGGGW segment binds a single Cu2+. However, several recent studies suggest that low copper occupancy favors different coordination modes, possibly involving imidazoles from histidines in adjacent octapeptide segments. This is investigated here using a combination of X-band EPR, S-band EPR, and ESEEM, along with a library of modified peptides designed to favor different coordination interactions. At pH 7.4, three distinct coordination modes are identified. Each mode is fully characterized to reveal a series of copper-dependent octarepeat domain structures. Multiple His coordination is clearly identified at low copper stoichiometry. In addition, EPR detected copper–copper interactions at full occupancy suggest that the octarepeat domain partially collapses, perhaps stabilizing this specific binding mode and facilitating cooperative copper uptake. This work provides the first complete characterization of all dominant copper coordination modes at pH 7.4. PMID:16144413

  15. Homo- and Heterobimetallic Ruthenium(II) and Osmium(II) Complexes Based on a Pyrene-Biimidazolate Spacer as Efficient DNA-Binding Probes in the Near-Infrared Domain.

    PubMed

    Mardanya, Sourav; Karmakar, Srikanta; Mondal, Debiprasad; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2016-04-01

    We report in this work a new family of homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of the type [(bpy)2M(Py-Biimz)M'(II)(bpy)2](2+) (M = M' = Ru(II) or Os(II); M = Ru(II) and M' = Os(II)) derived from a pyrenyl-biimidazole-based bridge, 2-imidazolylpyreno[4,5-d]imidazole (Py-BiimzH2). The homobimetallic Ru(II) and Os(II) complexes were found to crystallize in monoclinic form with space group P21/n. All the complexes exhibit strong absorptions throughout the entire UV-vis region and also exhibit luminescence at room temperature. For osmium-containing complexes (2 and 3) both the absorption and emission band stretched up to the NIR region and thus afford more biofriendly conditions for probable applications in infrared imaging and phototherapeutic studies. Detailed luminescence studies indicate that the emission originates from the respective (3)MLCT excited state mainly centered in the [M(bpy)2](2+) moiety of the complexes and is only slightly affected by the pyrene moiety. The bimetallic complexes show two successive one-electron reversible metal-centered oxidations in the positive potential window and several reduction processes in the negative potential window. An efficient intramolecular electronic energy transfer is found to occur from the Ru center to the Os-based component in the heterometallic dyad. The binding studies of the complexes with DNA were thoroughly studied through different spectroscopic techniques such as UV-vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved emission, circular dichroism, and relative DNA binding study using ethidium bromide. The intercalative mode of binding was suggested to be operative in all cases. Finally, computational studies employing DFT and TD-DFT were also carried out to interpret the experimentally observed absorption and emission bands of the complexes. PMID:27011117

  16. PS II model-based simulations of single turnover flash-induced transients of fluorescence yield monitored within the time domain of 100 ns-10 s on dark-adapted Chlorella pyrenoidosa cells.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Steffen, R; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Chemeris, Yu K; Renger, G; Rubin, A B

    2008-01-01

    The set up described in Steffen et al. (Biochemistry 40:173-180, 2001) was used to monitor in the time domain from 100 ns to 10 s single turnover flash-induced transients of the normalized fluorescence yield (SFITFY) on dark-adapted cells of the thermophilic algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick. Perfect data fit was achieved within the framework of a previously proposed model for the PS II reaction pattern (Lebedeva et al., Biophysics 47:968-980, 2002; Belyaeva et al., Biophysics 51:860-872, 2006) after its modification by taking into account nonradiative decay processes including nonphotochemical quenching due to time-dependent populations of P680(+*) and (3)Car. On the basis of data reported in the literature, a consistent set of rate constants was obtained for electron transfer at the donor and acceptor sides of PS II, pH in lumen and stroma, the initial redox state of plastoquinone pool and the rate of plastoquinone oxidation. The evaluation of the rate constant values of dissipative processes due to quenching by carotenoid triplets in antennae and P680(+*)Q(A)(-*) recombination as well as the initial state populations after excitation with a single laser flash are close to that outlined in (Steffen et al., Biochemistry 44:3123-3133, 2005a). The simulations based on the model of the PS II reaction pattern provide information on the time courses of population probabilities of different PS II states. We analyzed the maximum (F(m)(STF)) and minimum (F(0)) of the normalized FL yield dependence on the rate of the recombination processes (radiative and dissipative nonradiative) and of P680(+*) reduction. The developed PS II model provides a basis for theoretical comparative analyses of time-dependent fluorescence signals, observed at different photosynthetic samples under various conditions (e.g. presence of herbicides, other stress conditions, excitation with actinic pulses of different intensity, and duration). PMID:18937044

  17. Functional role of residues corresponding to helical domain II (amino acids 35 to 46) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Tomkowicz, B; Lai, D; Cartas, M; Mahalingam, S; Kalyanaraman, V S; Murali, R; Srinivasan, A

    2000-11-01

    Vpr, encoded by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome, contains 96 amino acids and is a multifunctional protein with features which include cell cycle arrest at G(2), nuclear localization, participation in transport of the preintegration complex, cation channel activity, oligomerization, and interaction with cellular proteins, in addition to its incorporation into the virus particles. Recently, structural studies based on nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Vpr contains a helix (HI)-turn-helix (HII) core at the amino terminus and an amphipathic helix (HIII) in the middle region. Though the importance of helical domains HI and HIII has been defined with respect to Vpr functions, the role of helical domain HII is not known. To address this issue, we constructed a series of mutants in which the HII domain was altered by deletion, insertion, and/or substitution mutagenesis. To enable the detection of Vpr, the sequence corresponding to the Flag epitope (DYKDDDDK) was added, in frame, to the Vpr coding sequences. Mutants, expressed through the in vitro transcription/translation system and in cells, showed an altered migration corresponding to deletions in Vpr. Substitution mutational analysis of residues in HII showed reduced stability for VprW38S-FL, VprL42G-FL, and VprH45W-FL. An assay involving cotransfection of NLDeltaVpr proviral DNA and a Vpr expression plasmid was employed to analyze the virion incorporation property of Vpr. Mutant Vpr containing deletions and specific substitutions (VprW38S-FL, VprL39G-FL, VprL42G-FL, VprG43P-FL, and VprI46G-FL) exhibited a negative virion incorporation phenotype. Further, mutant Vpr-FL containing deletions also failed to associate with wild-type Vpr, indicating a possible defect in the oligomerization feature of Vpr. Subcellular localization studies indicated that mutants VprDelta35-50-H-FL, VprR36W-FL, VprL39G-FL, and VprI46G-FL exhibited both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization

  18. Functional Role of Residues Corresponding to Helical Domain II (Amino Acids 35 to 46) of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satya P.; Tomkowicz, Brian; Lai, Derhsing; Cartas, Maria; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.; Murali, Ramachandran; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy

    2000-01-01

    Vpr, encoded by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome, contains 96 amino acids and is a multifunctional protein with features which include cell cycle arrest at G2, nuclear localization, participation in transport of the preintegration complex, cation channel activity, oligomerization, and interaction with cellular proteins, in addition to its incorporation into the virus particles. Recently, structural studies based on nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Vpr contains a helix (HI)-turn-helix (HII) core at the amino terminus and an amphipathic helix (HIII) in the middle region. Though the importance of helical domains HI and HIII has been defined with respect to Vpr functions, the role of helical domain HII is not known. To address this issue, we constructed a series of mutants in which the HII domain was altered by deletion, insertion, and/or substitution mutagenesis. To enable the detection of Vpr, the sequence corresponding to the Flag epitope (DYKDDDDK) was added, in frame, to the Vpr coding sequences. Mutants, expressed through the in vitro transcription/translation system and in cells, showed an altered migration corresponding to deletions in Vpr. Substitution mutational analysis of residues in HII showed reduced stability for VprW38S-FL, VprL42G-FL, and VprH45W-FL. An assay involving cotransfection of NLΔVpr proviral DNA and a Vpr expression plasmid was employed to analyze the virion incorporation property of Vpr. Mutant Vpr containing deletions and specific substitutions (VprW38S-FL, VprL39G-FL, VprL42G-FL, VprG43P-FL, and VprI46G-FL) exhibited a negative virion incorporation phenotype. Further, mutant Vpr-FL containing deletions also failed to associate with wild-type Vpr, indicating a possible defect in the oligomerization feature of Vpr. Subcellular localization studies indicated that mutants VprΔ35-50-H-FL, VprR36W-FL, VprL39G-FL, and VprI46G-FL exhibited both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization, unlike

  19. Mapping the interaction site for the tarantula toxin hainantoxin-IV (β-TRTX-Hn2a) in the voltage sensor module of domain II of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tianfu; Luo, Ji; Meng, Er; Ding, Jiuping; Liang, Songping; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-06-01

    Peptide toxins often have pharmacological applications and are powerful tools for investigating the structure-function relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Although a group of potential VGSC inhibitors have been reported from tarantula venoms, little is known about the mechanism of their interaction with VGSCs. In this study, we showed that hainantoxin-IV (β-TRTX-Hn2a, HNTX-IV in brief), a 35-residue peptide from Ornithoctonus hainana venom, preferentially inhibited rNav1.2, rNav1.3 and hNav1.7 compared with rNav1.4 and hNav1.5. hNav1.7 was the most sensitive to HNTX-IV (IC50∼21nM). In contrast to many other tarantula toxins that affect VGSCs, HNTX-IV at subsaturating concentrations did not alter activation and inactivation kinetics in the physiological range of voltages, while very large depolarization above +70mV could partially activate toxin-bound hNav1.7 channel, indicating that HNTX-IV acts as a gating modifier rather than a pore blocker. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the toxin bound to site 4, which was located on the extracellular S3-S4 linker of hNav1.7 domain II. Mutants E753Q, D816N and E818Q of hNav1.7 decreased toxin affinity for hNav1.7 by 2.0-, 3.3- and 130-fold, respectively. In silico docking indicated that a three-toed claw substructure formed by residues with close contacts in the interface between HNTX-IV and hNav1.7 domain II stabilized the toxin-channel complex, impeding movement of the domain II voltage sensor and inhibiting hNav1.7 activation. Our data provide structural details for structure-based drug design and a useful template for the design of highly selective inhibitors of a specific subtype of VGSCs. PMID:25218973

  20. Essential and non-essential elements in tissues of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) stranded on the coasts of the North and Baltic Seas between 2004-2006.

    PubMed

    Fahrenholtz, Svea; Griesel, Simone; Pröfrock, Daniel; Kakuschke, Antje

    2009-05-01

    This study on harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) stranded along the coasts of the Eastern North and Western Baltic Sea as well as in the river Elbe during 2004-2006, evaluated concentrations of 20 essential and non-essential elements (Ag, Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sn, V, Zn) in liver and muscle samples. Tissue samples of 22 porpoises were taken during post-mortem investigations at the Research and Technology Centre (FTZ) in Büsum, Germany. A multi element method utilizing microwave accelerated acid digestion for sample preparation and collision/reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CC-ICP-MS) was used for element quantification. All 20 elements investigated could be determined in liver and muscle tissues except for Al in muscle samples. Furthermore the concentrations in liver tissues were higher compared to muscle tissues. While sex specific differences were observed only for Cu concentrations in liver tissue, age-dependent relationships were obtained for nine elements. Differences between juveniles and adults were found for Ag, Al, Co, Mn, Mo, Se, Sn, Pb, and V concentrations in liver, as well as Sn concentrations in muscle tissues. Furthermore, As and Sn concentrations in liver and muscle showed differences between the stranding locations. This multi-element study on harbour porpoises gives baseline information to concentrations of essential and non-essential elements in tissue to develop reference ranges for health status determination as well as the assessment of the pollutant body burden. PMID:19436872

  1. The Gcn4p Activation Domain Interacts Specifically In Vitro with RNA Polymerase II Holoenzyme, TFIID, and the Adap-Gcn5p Coactivator Complex

    PubMed Central

    Drysdale, Connie M.; Jackson, Belinda M.; McVeigh, Richard; Klebanow, Edward R.; Bai, Yu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Swanson, Mark; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Weil, P. Anthony; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    1998-01-01

    The Gcn4p activation domain contains seven clusters of hydrophobic residues that make additive contributions to transcriptional activation in vivo. We observed efficient binding of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)–Gcn4p fusion protein to components of three different coactivator complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell extracts, including subunits of transcription factor IID (TFIID) (yeast TAFII20 [yTAFII20], yTAFII60, and yTAFII90), the holoenzyme mediator (Srb2p, Srb4p, and Srb7p), and the Adap-Gcn5p complex (Ada2p and Ada3p). The binding to these coactivator subunits was completely dependent on the hydrophobic clusters in the Gcn4p activation domain. Alanine substitutions in single clusters led to moderate reductions in binding, double-cluster substitutions generally led to greater reductions in binding than the corresponding single-cluster mutations, and mutations in four or more clusters reduced binding to all of the coactivator proteins to background levels. The additive effects of these mutations on binding of coactivator proteins correlated with their cumulative effects on transcriptional activation by Gcn4p in vivo, particularly with Ada3p, suggesting that recruitment of these coactivator complexes to the promoter is a cardinal function of the Gcn4p activation domain. As judged by immunoprecipitation analysis, components of the mediator were not associated with constituents of TFIID and Adap-Gcn5p in the extracts, implying that GST-Gcn4p interacted with the mediator independently of these other coactivators. Unexpectedly, a proportion of Ada2p coimmunoprecipitated with yTAFII90, and the yTAFII20, -60, and -90 proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with Ada3p, revealing a stable interaction between components of TFIID and the Adap-Gcn5p complex. Because GST-Gcn4p did not bind specifically to highly purified TFIID, Gcn4p may interact with TFIID via the Adap-Gcn5p complex or some other adapter proteins. The ability of Gcn4p to interact with several distinct

  2. Identification of the site on calcineurin phosphorylated by Ca sup + /CaM-dependent kinase II: Modification of the CaM-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Martensen, T.M.; Kincaid, R.L. ); Martin, B.M. )

    1989-11-28

    The catalytic subunit of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin- (CaM) dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) was phosphorylated by an activated form of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) incorporating approximately 1 mol of phosphoryl group/mol of catalytic subunit, in agreement with a value previously reported. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of radiolabeled CN followed by peptide fractionation using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography yielded a single labeled peptide that contained a phosphoserine residue. Microsequencing of the peptide allowed both the determination of the cleavage cycle that released ({sup 32}P)phosphoserine and the identity of amino acids adjacent to it. Comparison of this sequence with the sequences of methionyl peptides deduced from the cDNA structure of CN allowed the phosphorylated serine to be uniquely identified. Interestingly, the phosphoserine exists in the sequence Met-Ala-Arg-Val-Phe-Ser(P)-Val-Leu-Arg-Glu, part of which lies within the putative CaM-binding sites. The phosphorylated serine residue was resistant to autocatalytic dephosphorylation, yet the slow rate of hydrolysis could be powerfully stimulated by effectors of CN phosphatase activity. The mechanism of dephosphorylation may be intramolecular since the initial rate was the same at phosphoCN concentrations of 2.5-250 nM.

  3. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of the human knee joint--Part II: Time-domain analyses: effects of structural damage in postmortem experiments.

    PubMed

    Dortmans, L; Jans, H; Sauren, A; Huson, A

    1991-11-01

    A description is given of the results obtained for step excitation for two human knee joint specimens using a time-domain analysis technique. As was expected from the results of a previous study, the magnitude of the dynamic load applied has a marked influence upon the stiffness and damping values for the two observed vibration modes. Deliberate damaging of selected joint elements also yields a well observable change in the dynamic behavior of the joint although these changes are difficult to interpret. Here the use of a nonlinear dynamic numerical model of the knee joint seems indispensable. An important observation is, however, that the experimental method discussed here enables to quantify the behavior of the joint and therefore may provide a valuable tool for validation of such a model. PMID:1762435

  4. Mutations in the Voltage Sensors of Domains I and II of Nav1.5 that are Associated with Arrhythmias and Dilated Cardiomyopathy Generate Gating Pore Currents

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels (Nav) are transmembrane proteins responsible for action potential initiation. Mutations mainly located in the voltage sensor domain (VSD) of Nav1.5, the cardiac sodium channel, have been associated with the development of arrhythmias combined with dilated cardiomyopathy. Gating pore currents have been observed with three unrelated mutations associated with similar clinical phenotypes. However, gating pores have never been associated with mutations outside the first domain of Nav1.5. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that gating pore currents might be caused by the Nav1.5 R225P and R814W mutations (R3, S4 in DI and DII, respectively), which are associated with rhythm disturbances and dilated cardiomyopathy. Nav1.5 WT and mutant channels were transiently expressed in tsA201 cells. The biophysical properties of the alpha pore currents and the presence of gating pore currents were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. We confirmed the previously reported gain of function of the alpha pores of the mutant channels, which mainly consisted of increased window currents mostly caused by shifts in the voltage dependence of activation. We also observed gating pore currents associated with the R225P and R814W mutations. This novel permeation pathway was open under depolarized conditions and remained temporarily open at hyperpolarized potentials after depolarization periods. Gating pore currents could represent a molecular basis for the development of uncommon electrical abnormalities and changes in cardiac morphology. We propose that this biophysical defect be routinely evaluated in the case of Nav1.5 mutations on the VSD. PMID:26733869

  5. Effect of chirality on the dynamics of domain walls in the molecular ferrimagnet [MnII(H L-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6] · 2H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushenok, F. B.; Morgunov, R. B.; Koplak, O. V.; Kirman, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    The contributions from modes of switching, sliding, creep, and Debye relaxation of pinned domain walls to the low-frequency magnetic properties of the chiral and racemic molecular ferrimagnets [MnII(H L-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6] · 2H2O have been separated. It has been found that the chirality of the atomic and spin structures affects the temperatures of the transitions from the sliding mode to the creep mode and from the creep mode to the mode of Debye relaxation. In the chiral crystals, transitions to the creep and Debye relaxation modes have been observed at temperatures T = 7 and 5 K, respectively. In the racemic crystals, these transitions have been observed at temperatures T = 13 and 9 K, respectively, all other factors being equal.

  6. Antibodies to envelope glycoprotein of dengue virus during the natural course of infection are predominantly cross-reactive and recognize epitopes containing highly conserved residues at the fusion loop of domain II.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Yun; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Lin, Su-Ru; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Hsien-Ping; King, Chwan-Chuen; Wu, Han-Chung; Chang, Gwong-Jen; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2008-07-01

    The antibody response to the envelope (E) glycoprotein of dengue virus (DENV) is known to play a critical role in both protection from and enhancement of disease, especially after primary infection. However, the relative amounts of homologous and heterologous anti-E antibodies and their epitopes remain unclear. In this study, we examined the antibody responses to E protein as well as to precursor membrane (PrM), capsid, and nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of four serotypes of DENV by Western blot analysis of DENV serotype 2-infected patients with different disease severity and immune status during an outbreak in southern Taiwan in 2002. Based on the early-convalescent-phase sera tested, the rates of antibody responses to PrM and NS1 proteins were significantly higher in patients with secondary infection than in those with primary infection. A blocking experiment and neutralization assay showed that more than 90% of anti-E antibodies after primary infection were cross-reactive and nonneutralizing against heterologous serotypes and that only a minor proportion were type specific, which may account for the type-specific neutralization activity. Moreover, the E-binding activity in sera of 10 patients with primary infection was greatly reduced by amino acid replacements of three fusion loop residues, tryptophan at position 101, leucine at position 107, and phenylalanine at position 108, but not by replacements of those outside the fusion loop of domain II, suggesting that the predominantly cross-reactive anti-E antibodies recognized epitopes involving the highly conserved residues at the fusion loop of domain II. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of dengue and for the future design of subunit vaccine against DENV as well. PMID:18448542

  7. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Qin, Tao; Ding, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 5′-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximide-treated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts. PMID:26887918

  8. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. II. Cellular Components, Domains, Technical Terms, Developmental Processes and Coding Sequence Diversities Correlated with Long Disordered Regions

    PubMed Central

    Vucetic, Slobodan; Xie, Hongbo; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable ordered structure (i.e., intrinsically disordered proteins) are attracting increased attention. Functional repertoires of ordered and disordered proteins are very different, and the ability to differentiate whether a given function is associated with intrinsic disorder or with a well-folded protein is crucial for modern protein science. However, there is a large gap between the number of proteins experimentally confirmed to be disordered and their actual number in nature. As a result, studies of functional properties of confirmed disordered proteins, while helpful in revealing the functional diversity of protein disorder, provide only a limited view. To overcome this problem, a bioinformatics approach for comprehensive study of functional roles of protein disorder was proposed in the first paper of this series (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic Z., Uversky V.N. (2006) Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. I. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res.). Applying this novel approach to Swiss-Prot sequences and functional keywords, we found over 238 and 302 keywords to be strongly positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with long intrinsically disordered regions. This paper describes ~90 Swiss-Prot keywords attributed to the cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes and coding sequence diversities possessing strong positive and negative correlation with long disordered regions. PMID:17391015

  9. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA. PMID:27362828

  10. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas; Torchinsky, Darius H; Dyre, Jeppe C; Nelson, Keith A

    2013-03-28

    This paper presents and discusses the temperature and frequency dependence of the longitudinal and shear viscoelastic response at MHz and GHz frequencies of the intermediate glass former glycerol and the fragile glass former tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704). Measurements were performed using the recently developed time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, in which acoustic waves are generated optically, propagated through nm thin liquid layers of different thicknesses, and detected optically after transmission into a transparent detection substrate. This allows for a determination of the frequency dependence of the speed of sound and the sound-wave attenuation. When the data are converted into mechanical moduli, a linear relationship between longitudinal and shear acoustic moduli is revealed, which is consistent with the generalized Cauchy relation. In glycerol, the temperature dependence of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz over an extended range of temperatures. The shoving model's prediction for the relaxation time's temperature dependence is fairly well obeyed for both liquids as demonstrated from a plot with no adjustable parameters. Finally, we show that for both liquids the instantaneous shear modulus follows an exponential temperature dependence to a good approximation, as predicted by Granato's interstitialcy model. PMID:23556795

  11. Photoprotection in plants involves a change in lutein 1 binding domain in the major light-harvesting complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ilioaia, Cristian; Johnson, Matthew P; Liao, Pen-Nan; Pascal, Andrew A; van Grondelle, Rienk; Walla, Peter J; Ruban, Alexander V; Robert, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is the fundamental process by which plants exposed to high light intensities dissipate the potentially harmful excess energy as heat. Recently, it has been shown that efficient energy dissipation can be induced in the major light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHCII) in the absence of protein-protein interactions. Spectroscopic measurements on these samples (LHCII gels) in the quenched state revealed specific alterations in the absorption and circular dichroism bands assigned to neoxanthin and lutein 1 molecules. In this work, we investigate the changes in conformation of the pigments involved in NPQ using resonance Raman spectroscopy. By selective excitation we show that, as well as the twisting of neoxanthin that has been reported previously, the lutein 1 pigment also undergoes a significant change in conformation when LHCII switches to the energy dissipative state. Selective two-photon excitation of carotenoid (Car) dark states (Car S(1)) performed on LHCII gels shows that the extent of electronic interactions between Car S(1) and chlorophyll states correlates linearly with chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, as observed previously for isolated LHCII (aggregated versus trimeric) and whole plants (with versus without NPQ). PMID:21646360

  12. Structure and conformational dynamics of the domain 5 RNA hairpin of a bacterial group II intron revealed by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, Maria; Sigel, Roland K O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) data obtained for a 35-nucleotide RNA segment of a bacterial group II intron indicate a helical hairpin structure in which three parts, a terminal pentaloop, a bulge, and a G-A mismatch, display no Watson-Crick base pairing. The 668 NOE upper distance bounds for atom pairs are insufficient to uniquely determine the conformation of these segments. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations including time-averaged distance restraints have been used to obtain a conformational ensemble compatible with the observed NMR data. The ensemble shows alternating hydrogen bonding patterns for the mentioned segments. In particular, in the pentaloop and in the bulge, the hydrogen bonding networks correspond to distinct conformational clusters that could not be captured by using conventional single-structure refinement techniques. This implies that, to obtain a realistic picture of the conformational ensemble of such flexible biomolecules, it is necessary to properly account for the conformational variability in the structure refinement of RNA fragments. PMID:24001362

  13. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Valeev, Edward F.; Neese, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate previous

  14. Sparse maps--A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Valeev, Edward F; Neese, Frank

    2016-01-14

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  15. Levels of non-essential elements in muscle from harp seal (Phagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) caught in the Greenland Sea area.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Linn Anne; Graff, Ingvild Eide; Frøyland, Livar; Julshamn, Kåre

    2006-08-01

    The non-essential elements, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead, inevitably accumulate in marine top predators such as seals. The concentration of these elements and the essential element selenium, due to its proposed protective properties against mercury toxicity in marine mammals, were measured in muscle, liver and kidney from reproductive active females of harp seal (Phagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) caught in the drift ice between Iceland and East Greenland. Arsenic levels were below 1 microg/g w.w. in all analysed samples, and were therefore low compared to other seafood products. The concentrations of arsenic found in the present study were comparable to the results reported in a similar study from 1985. Mean concentrations of total mercury in muscle from the present study were higher than levels in other seafood products. The levels of total mercury from the present study showed a tendency of lower levels in all tissue samples compared to the study from 1985. Methyl mercury displayed a trend of a lower ratio of methyl mercury to total mercury as the concentration of total mercury increased, indicating a demethylation of methyl mercury at high total mercury concentrations (e.g. mercury in liver of hooded seal). The concentration ratio of methyl mercury to total mercury in muscle samples was more than 75%, with total mercury concentration less than 0.5 microg/g w.w., whereas the ratio for liver was as low as 0.2% with a total mercury concentration of 128 microg/g w.w. The molar concentration ratios of selenium to mercury showed that selenium was present in a molar surplus to mercury in all tissues with low mercury concentration. However, there seemed to be a general mobilisation of selenium in liver and kidney tissues of harp seal and hooded seal, whereas an extraordinary mobilisation seemed to take place at hepatic mercury concentrations exceeding 50 microg/g w.w. The mean concentrations of lead in muscles in the present study

  16. Genome Distribution of Replication-independent Histone H1 Variants Shows H1.0 Associated with Nucleolar Domains and H1X Associated with RNA Polymerase II-enriched Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Regina; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Bustillos, Alberto; Sampaio, Cristina; Luque, Neus; Jordan, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Unlike core histones, the linker histone H1 family is more evolutionarily diverse, and many organisms have multiple H1 variants or subtypes. In mammals, the H1 family includes seven somatic H1 variants; H1.1 to H1.5 are expressed in a replication-dependent manner, whereas H1.0 and H1X are replication-independent. Using ChIP-sequencing data and cell fractionation, we have compared the genomic distribution of H1.0 and H1X in human breast cancer cells, in which we previously observed differential distribution of H1.2 compared with the other subtypes. We have found H1.0 to be enriched at nucleolus-associated DNA repeats and chromatin domains, whereas H1X is associated with coding regions, RNA polymerase II-enriched regions, and hypomethylated CpG islands. Further, H1X accumulates within constitutive or included exons and retained introns and toward the 3′ end of expressed genes. Inducible H1X knockdown does not affect cell proliferation but dysregulates a subset of genes related to cell movement and transport. In H1X-depleted cells, the promoters of up-regulated genes are not occupied specifically by this variant, have a lower than average H1 content, and, unexpectedly, do not form an H1 valley upon induction. We conclude that H1 variants are not distributed evenly across the genome and may participate with some specificity in chromatin domain organization or gene regulation. PMID:25645921

  17. HIV-1 Tat interaction with RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) and a dynamic association with CDK2 induce CTD phosphorylation and transcription from HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Deng, Longwen; Ammosova, Tatyana; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2002-09-13

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), Tat protein activates viral gene expression through promoting transcriptional elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). In this process Tat enhances phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII by activating cell cycle-dependent kinases (CDKs) associated with general transcription factors of the promoter complex, specifically CDK7 and CDK9. We reported a Tat-associated T-cell-derived kinase, which contained CDK2. Here, we provide further evidence that CDK2 is involved in Tat-mediated CTD phosphorylation and in HIV-1 transcription in vitro. Tat-mediated CTD phosphorylation by CDK2 required cysteine 22 in the activation domain of Tat and amino acids 42-72 of Tat. CDK2 phosphorylated Tat itself, apparently by forming dynamic contacts with amino acids 15-24 and 36-49 of Tat. Also, amino acids 24-36 and 45-72 of Tat interacted with CTD. CDK2 associated with RNAPII and was found in elongation complexes assembled on HIV-1 long-terminal repeat template. Recombinant CDK2/cyclin E stimulated Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription in reconstituted transcription assay. Immunodepletion of CDK2/cyclin E in HeLa nuclear extract blocked Tat-dependent transcription. We suggest that CDK2 is part of a transcription complex that is required for Tat-dependent transcription and that interaction of Tat with CTD and a dynamic association of Tat with CDK2/cyclin E stimulated CTD phosphorylation by CDK2. PMID:12114499

  18. Mapping of herpes simplex virus-1 neurovirulence to. gamma. sub 1 34. 5, a gene nonessential for growth in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.; Roizman, B. ); Kern, E.R.; Whitley, R.J. )

    1990-11-30

    The gene designated {gamma}{sub 1}34.5 maps in the inverted repeats flanking the long unique sequence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) DNA, and therefore it is present in two copies per genome. This gene is not essential for viral growth in cell culture. Four recombinant viruses were genetically engineered to test the function of this gene. These were (i) a virus from which both copies of the gene were deleted, (ii) a virus containing a stop codon in both copies of the gene, (iii) a virus containing after the first codon an insert encoding a 16-amino acid epitope known to react with a specific monoclonal antibody, and (iv) a virus in which the deleted sequences were restored. The viruses from which the gene was deleted or which carried stop codons were avirulent on intracerebral inoculation of mice. The virus with the gene tagged by the sequence encoding the epitope was moderately virulent, whereas the restored virus reacquired the phenotype of the parent virus. Significant amounts of virus were recovered only from brains of animals inoculated with virulent viruses. Inasmuch as the product of the {gamma}{sub 1}34.5 gene extended the host range of the virus by enabling it to replicate and destroy brain cells, it is a viral neurovirulence factor.

  19. Comparison of essential and non-essential element distribution in leaves of the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox as revealed by micro-PIXE.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina; Simcic, Jure; Pelicon, Primoz; Budnar, Milos; Kump, Peter; Necemer, Marijan; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J; Regvar, Marjana

    2008-10-01

    A detailed localization of elements in leaf tissues of the field-collected Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox (Brassicaceae) growing at a highly metal-polluted site was determined by micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) in order to reveal and compare nutrient and non-essential element accumulation patterns in the case of multiple metal accumulation within particular leaf tissues, including the detailed distribution between apoplast and symplast regions. On the larger scans, the highest concentrations of metals were observed in the epidermis, S and Ca in the palisade mesophyll, Cl in the spongy mesophyll and vascular bundles, and P and K in the vascular bundles. On the more detailed scans, the highest Cd, Pb, Cl and K concentrations were observed in vascular bundle collenchyma. The relative element distribution (%) was calculated based on concentrations of elements in particular leaf tissues and their relative weight portions, indicating that most of the accumulated Zn was located in epidermises, while the majority of Cd and Pb was distributed within the mesophyll. Detailed scans of epidermal/mesophyll tissues revealed that Zn was mainly accumulated and detoxified in the symplast of large vacuolated epidermal cells, Cd in the mesophyll symplast, and Pb in the mesophyll symplast and apoplast. PMID:18643900

  20. Subcellular partitioning of non-essential trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl) in livers of American (Anguilla rostrata) and European (Anguilla anguilla) yellow eels.

    PubMed

    Rosabal, Maikel; Pierron, Fabien; Couture, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Hare, Landis; Campbell, Peter G C

    2015-03-01

    We determined the intracellular compartmentalization of the trace metals Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl in the livers of yellow eels collected from the Saint Lawrence River system in Canada (Anguilla rostrata) and in the area of the Gironde estuary in France (Anguilla anguilla). Differential centrifugation, NaOH digestion and thermal shock were used to separate eel livers into putative "sensitive" fractions (heat-denatured proteins, mitochondria and microsomes+lysosomes) and detoxified metal fractions (heat-stable peptides/proteins and granules). The cytosolic heat-stable fraction (HSP) was consistently involved in the detoxification of all trace metals. In addition, granule-like structures played a complementary role in the detoxification of Ni, Pb, and Tl in both eel species. However, these detoxification mechanisms were not completely effective because increasing trace metal concentrations in whole livers were accompanied by significant increases in the concentrations of most trace metals in "sensitive" subcellular fractions, that is, mitochondria, heat-denatured cytosolic proteins and microsomes+lysosomes. Among these "sensitive" fractions, mitochondria were the major binding sites for As, Cd, Pb, and Tl. This accumulation of non-essential metals in "sensitive" fractions likely represents a health risk for eels inhabiting the Saint Lawrence and Gironde environments. PMID:25635611

  1. Polar domains and charge-density waves in the acentric cerium(III) iron(II) sulfide Ce{sub 22}Fe{sub 21}S{sub 54}

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Allison M.; Ruck, Michael

    2008-11-15

    The cerium(III) iron(II) sulfide Ce{sub 22}Fe{sub 21}S{sub 54} was synthesized through reaction of the binary sulfides C-Ce{sub 2}S{sub 3} and FeS in a LiCl/KCl flux at 1170 K, and its structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Ce{sub 22}Fe{sub 21}S{sub 54} crystallizes in the polar monoclinic space group Cm with a=16.3912(7) A, b=3.9554(1) A, c=62.028(3) A, {beta}=94.831(4){sup o}, and Z=2. The structure is a superstructure of the La{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5} structure type. Akin to the parent structure, trans-edge-sharing [FeS{sub 6}]-octahedra form linear chains, which are isotactically capped on one side by [FeS{sub 4}]-tetrahedra. The polarity of the resulting {sub {infinity}}{sup 1}[Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5}]-chains is transferred to the entire structure, as the unit cell contains two layered domains of opposite polarity with the unbalanced size ratio of 4:6. The domain walls are intrinsically centrosymmetric (layer group c 1 2/m 1). One wall consists of trigonal [FeS{sub 5}]-bipyramids, which are linked by corners and edges into a {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5}]-layer. In the other wall, the [FeS{sub 4}]-tetrahedra of two opposing {sub {infinity}}{sup 1}[Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5}]-chains share their vertices. The sulfur anions eliminated thereby are counterbalanced by vacancies in the iron sites, which follow a sinusoidal occupation modulation corresponding to a frozen charge-density wave with the wave vector k=4{pi}c*. The coordination polyhedra of all the cerium cations are bicapped trigonal prisms. - Graphical Abstract: Chains of [FeS{sub 6}]-octahedra that are isotactically capped on one side by [FeS{sub 4}]-tetrahedra dominate the acentric structure. The unit cell contains two layered domains of opposite polarity with unbalanced size ratio. Vacancies in the iron sites follow a sinusoidal occupation modulation corresponding to a frozen charge-density wave.

  2. A human primary T-lymphocyte-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-associated kinase phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and induces CAK activity.

    PubMed

    Nekhai, S; Shukla, R R; Kumar, A

    1997-10-01

    Tat protein mediates transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which results in more-efficient transcript elongation. Since phosphorylation of C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II correlates with its enhanced processivity, we studied the properties of a Tat-associated CTD kinase derived from mitogenically stimulated human primary T lymphocytes (TTK). TTK binds to full-length Tat and specifically phosphorylates CTD and CDK2. This dual kinase activity is characteristic of CDK-activating kinase (CAK). The CTD kinase activity is induced upon mitogenic stimulation of primary T lymphocytes. Fractionation of T-cell lysate demonstrates that Tat-associated CTD kinase activity elutes in two peaks. About 60% of Tat-associated CTD kinase copurifies with CDK2 kinase activity and contains the CAK components CDK7 and cyclin H. The rest of Tat-associated kinase is free of CDK2 kinase activity and the CAK components and thus may represent a novel CTD kinase. The kinase activities of TTK are blocked by the adenosine analog 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB) as well as by the kinase inhibitor H8 at concentrations known to block transcript elongation. Importantly, the Tat-associated kinase markedly induced CAK. We suggest that the mechanism of Tat-mediated processive transcription of the HIV-1 promoter includes a Tat-associated CAK activator. PMID:9311822

  3. Reversible thermally induced phase transition in ordered domains of Co(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-porphyrin on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Michael; Ditze, Stefanie; Thomann, Michael; Lungerich, Dominik; Jux, Norbert; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the adsorption behavior of Co(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-porphyrin (CoTTBPP) on Cu(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At room temperature (RT), the coverage dependent adsorption behavior follows an expected scheme: at low coverage step decoration is found, which evolves into supramolecular domains with a hexagonal order at higher coverage. Interestingly, upon cooling the sample to 180 K the occurrence of a clearly distinguishable coexisting herringbone phase is observed. Upon heating to RT again, the herringbone phase vanishes. Thus a temperature dependent, fully reversible phase transition was observed. High resolution STM micrographs allow for the determination of the intramolecular conformations which are different for the two supramolecular arrangements. In addition, we studied the bias voltage dependent appearance of the molecule in STM and assigned a dominant contribution of the central Co at negative bias voltages close to the Fermi edge to the occupied dz2 orbital. Interestingly, the herringbone phase, which dominates at 180 K, exhibits a significantly higher molecular density than the monomodal hexagonal arrangement at RT, which is in line with the "normal" behavior of freezing substances.

  4. Assessment of essential and nonessential metals and different metal exposure biomarkers in the human placenta in a population from the south of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Serafim, A; Company, R; Lopes, B; Rosa, J; Cavaco, A; Castela, G; Castela, E; Olea, N; Bebianno, M J

    2012-01-01

    The general population is exposed to metals as trace amounts of metallic compounds are present in air, water, and food. Information on background exposures and biomarker concentrations of environmental chemicals in the general Portuguese population is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the levels of important nonessential metals with recognized toxicity cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) and essential metals copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), and zinc (Zn) in placentas of mothers living in south Portugal (Algarve). Due to the difficulty in establishing the effects of chemicals in a complex and variable environment, this study also aimed to examine the response of biomarkers, such as biochemical changes that occurs at subcellular levels in the presence of contaminants. The investigated biomarkers in placentas indicative of metal exposure or damage included the metallothioneins (MT), delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) (specific for Pb), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) as an index of oxidative stress damage. Moreover, HJ-BIPLOT was applied in order to identify and categorize mothers vulnerable to environmental contamination in this region. Metal concentrations in the placenta were not excessive but within the range found in most European studies. In general, the biomarkers MT and LPO were positively correlated with metal levels, while with ALAD the opposite occurred, indicating the selected battery of biomarkers were suitable to study the effects of metals on human placenta. Further, the application of multivariate analysis with HJ-BIPLOT showed that most significant factors contributing to maternal and fetal exposures via placenta were dietary and smoking habits. PMID:22788373

  5. Individual non-essential amino acids fortification of a low-protein diet for broilers under the hot and humid tropical climate.

    PubMed

    Awad, E A; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; Loh, T C

    2015-11-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding low-protein diets fortified with individual non-essential amino acids (NEAA) on growth performance, serum metabolites (uric acid, UA; triglycerides, TG; total protein, TP; and albumin, Alb), organ weight, breast yield, and abdominal fat weight in broiler chicks raised under the hot and humid tropical climate. Eight isocaloric (3,017 kcal/kg) experimental diets were formulated and fed to male broiler chicks from d 1-21 as follows: 1) 22.2% crude protein (CP) (positive control; PC); 2) 16.2% CP + mixture essential amino acids (EAA) to meet or exceed the National Research Council (1994) recommendations (negative control; NC); 3) NC + glycine (Gly) to equal the total glycine + serine level in the PC; diets 4 through 7 were obtained by supplementing NC diet with individual glutamic acid, proline, alanine, or aspartic acid (Glu, Pro, Ala, or Asp, respectively); 8) NC + NEAA (Gly + Glu + Pro + Ala + Asp) to equal the total level of these NEAA in the PC. Fortifying NC diet with mixture NEAA resulted in a similar growth performance as PC. However, fortification of low-CP diet with individual NEAA failed to improve body weight (BW) (P < 0.0001), feed intake (FI) (P = 0.0001), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) (P = 0.0001). Serum uric acid (UA) was lower (P = 0.0356) in NC birds and NC diet supplemented with individual NEAA birds, whereas serum triglyceride (TG) (P = 0.007) and relative weight of abdominal fat (P = 0.001) were higher in these birds. In conclusion, no single NEAA fortification may compensate the depressed growth performance attributed to a low-CP diet. However, fortification with Gly may improve FCR. There is a possibility that broilers raised under the hot and humid climate require higher Gly fortification than the level used in this study. PMID:26371331

  6. A conserved African swine fever virus right variable region gene, l11L, is non-essential for growth in vitro and virulence in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Kleiboeker, S B; Kutish, G F; Neilan, J G; Lu, Z; Zsak, L; Rock, D L

    1998-05-01

    The right variable region of the African swine fever virus (ASFV) genome is known to contain genes with functions involving virus virulence and host range in swine. A novel open reading frame, ORF l11L, which was absent in the non-pathogenic, cell culture-adapted European isolate BA71V, was identified in the pathogenic African isolate Malawi Lil-20/1. The location of l11L in the right variable region, together with its absence in BA71V, suggested that l11L may have a function in virus virulence and/or host range. Here, we show that the l11L gene is highly conserved among pathogenic African, European and Caribbean ASFV field isolates and that it exists either in a short form, encoding a protein of 77-78 amino acids (9.1 kDa) or in a longer form of 93-94 amino acids (11.1 kDa). The presence of two predicted membrane-spanning segments suggests that l11L is an integral membrane protein. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that l11L mRNA is expressed late in the virus replication cycle. A recombinant l11L gene deletion mutant, deltal11L, was constructed from the ASFV isolate Malawi Lil-20/1 to examine gene function. Deletion of l11L did not affect virus replication in swine macrophage cell cultures nor virulence in domestic pigs, indicating that l11L is non-essential for growth in vitro and for virus virulence in domestic swine. PMID:9603334

  7. A conserved African swine fever virus IkappaB homolog, 5EL, is nonessential for growth in vitro and virulence in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Neilan, J G; Lu, Z; Kutish, G F; Zsak, L; Lewis, T L; Rock, D L

    1997-09-01

    An African swine fever virus (ASFV) gene with similarity to the cellular inhibitor of NFkappaB (IkappaB) was described in the pathogenic African isolate Malawi Lil-20/1 (ORF 5EL) and a cell-culture-adapted European virus, BA71V (ORF A238L). Recently, this gene was shown to be a functional IkappaB homolog capable of downregulating NFkappaB-regulated gene expression. This observation suggests the gene may be of significance to aspects of ASFV pathogenesis and virulence in domestic swine by interfering with a normal antiviral host response. Here we show, using nucleotide sequence analysis, that 5EL is highly conserved among various African and European pathogenic field isolates and that in all cases its similarity to IkappaB genes is limited to the presence of four low complexity ankyrin repeats in the ASFV gene. The 5EL gene of Malawi Lil-20/1 encodes a 28-kDa protein which was expressed early in virus-infected macrophage cell cultures with maximum levels observed at 3 to 5 hr postinfection. To study gene function, a Malawi Lil-20/1 5EL gene deletion mutant (Delta5EL) was constructed. Growth characteristics of Delta5EL in porcine macrophage cell cultures were indistinguishable from those of the parental virus. And, Delta5EL exhibited an unaltered parental Malawi Lil-20/1 disease and virulence phenotype in domestic swine. Thus, although highly conserved among ASFV isolates, 5EL is nonessential for growth in porcine macrophages in vitro and for viral virulence in domestic swine. A possible role for this gene in transmission of ASFV in nature, a setting which involves the cycling of ASFV between two highly adapted hosts, Ornithodoros ticks and warthogs or bush pigs, in sub-Saharan Africa is discussed. PMID:9281518

  8. A BIR motif containing gene of African swine fever virus, 4CL, is nonessential for growth in vitro and viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Neilan, J G; Lu, Z; Kutish, G F; Zsak, L; Burrage, T G; Borca, M V; Carrillo, C; Rock, D L

    1997-04-14

    An African swine fever virus (ASFV) gene with similarity to viral and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis genes (iap) has been described in the African isolate Malawi Lil-20/1 (ORF 4CL) and a cell-culture-adapted European virus, BA71V (ORF A224L). The similarity of the ASFV gene to genes involved in inhibiting cellular apoptosis suggested the gene may regulate apoptosis in ASFV-infected cells and thus may function in ASFV virulence and/or host range. Sequence analysis of additional African and European pathogenic isolates demonstrates that this gene is highly conserved among both pig and tick ASFV isolates and that its similarity to iap genes is limited to the presence of a single IAP repeat motif (BIR motif) in the ASFV gene. To study gene function, a 4CL gene deletion mutant, delta 4CL, was constructed from the pathogenic Malawi Lil-20/1 isolate. Growth characteristics of delta 4CL in swine macrophage cell cultures were indistinguishable from those of parental virus. Infected macrophage survival time and the induction and magnitude of apoptosis in virus-infected macrophages were comparable for cells infected with either delta 4CL or parental virus. In infected swine, delta 4CL exhibited an unaltered Malawi Lil-20/1 virulence phenotype. These data indicate that, although highly conserved among ASFV isolates, the 4CL gene is nonessential for growth in macrophage cell cultures in vitro and for pig virulence. Additionally, despite its limited similarity to JAP genes, 4CL exhibits no anti-apoptotic function in infected macrophage cell cultures. The high degree of gene conservation among ASFV isolates, together with the apparent lack of function in the swine host, suggests 4CL may be a host range gene involved in aspects of infection in the arthropod host, ticks of the genus Ornithodoros. PMID:9143281

  9. Small cetaceans found stranded or accidentally captured in southeastern Brazil: bioindicators of essential and non-essential trace elements in the environment.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Leila Soledade; de Moura, Jailson Fulgencio; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Siciliano, Salvatore

    2013-11-01

    Essential (Cu, Mn, Se and Zn) and non-essential (Cd and Hg) elements were analyzed in the hepatic tissue of 22 individuals of seven different species of small cetaceans (Feresa attenuata; Orcinus orca; Pontoporia blainvillei; Sotalia guianensis; Stenella frontalis; Steno bredanensis; Tursiops truncatus) accidentally caught in fishing nets or found stranded along the northern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2001 and 2010. Atlantic spotted dolphin (S. frontalis) showed the highest levels of Cd (20.23μgg(-1), dry weight), while rough-toothed dolphin (S. bredanensis) showed the highest levels of Hg (825.9μgg(-1)dw) and Se (221.9μgg(-1)dw). Killer whale (O. orca) presented the highest levels of Cu (64.80μgg(-1)dw) and Zn (2220μgg(-1)dw), and Guiana dolphin (S. guianensis), the highest level of Mn (13.05μgg(-1)dw). Cu, Hg, Mn and Zn in the hepatic tissue of killer whale (O. orca), Cu, Hg, Mn, Se and Zn in the hepatic tissue of rough-toothed dolphin (S. bredanensis) and Cd and Zn in the hepatic tissue of Guiana dolphin (S. guianensis) were significantly higher when compared to other studies with these species around the world. No significant correlations were observed between element accumulation and sex, sexual maturity and body length. An analysis of the interelemental relationships in the Guiana dolphin specimens showed strong positive correlations between Cd and Se, Cu and Zn, and Hg and Se. Differences were observed in the bioaccumulation of elements between the analyzed species, probably related to each species feeding habit, and differences between different element concentrations in the different dolphin species were probably due to the preference for certain preys and their bioavailability in the environment. Thus, the bioavailability of the analyzed elements in the marine environment should also be taken in consideration. This study also presents the first data ever reported for pygmy killer whale (F. attenuata) regarding trace

  10. Distribution of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements among protein fractions from hepatic cytosol of European chub (Squalius cephalus L.).

    PubMed

    Krasnići, Nesrete; Dragun, Zrinka; Erk, Marijana; Raspor, Biserka

    2013-04-01

    Association of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements with cytosolic proteins of different molecular masses was described for the liver of European chub (Squalius cephalus) from weakly contaminated Sutla River in Croatia. The principal aim was to establish basic trace element distributions among protein fractions characteristic for the fish living in the conditions of low metal exposure in the water. The fractionation of chub hepatic cytosols was carried out by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC; Superdex™ 200 10/300 GL column), and measurements were performed by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS). Elution profiles of essential elements were mostly characterized by broad peaks covering wide range of molecular masses, as a sign of incorporation of essential elements in various proteins within hepatic cytosol. Exceptions were Cu and Fe, with elution profiles characterized by sharp, narrow peaks indicating their probable association with specific proteins, metallothionein (MT), and ferritin, respectively. The main feature of the elution profile of nonessential metal Cd was also single sharp, narrow peak, coinciding with MT elution time, and indicating almost complete Cd detoxification by MT under the conditions of weak metal exposure in the water (dissolved Cd concentration ≤0.3 μg L(-1)). Contrary, nonessential metal Pb was observed to bind to wide spectrum of proteins, mostly of medium molecular masses (30-100 kDa), after exposure to dissolved Pb concentration of ~1 μg L(-1). The obtained information within this study presents the starting point for identification and characterization of specific metal/metalloid-binding proteins in chub hepatic cytosol, which could be further used as markers of metal/metalloid exposure or effect on fish. PMID:22886752

  11. Identification of nonessential regions of the nsp2 replicase protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain VR-2332 for replication in cell culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a multi-domain protein and has been shown to undergo remarkable genetic variation, primarily in its middle region, while exhibiting high conservation in the N-terminal putative protease domain and th...

  12. Direct Measurement of Hg(II) Removal from Organomercurial Lyase (MerB) by Tryptophan Fluorescence: NmerA Domain of Co-evolved γ -Proteobacterial Mercuric Ion Reductase (MerA) Is More Efficient than MerA Catalytic Core or Glutathione†

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Baoyu; Nauss, Rachel; Harwood, Ian; Miller, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea harboring mer loci exhibit resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)]. In broad spectrum resistance, RHg(I) is converted to less toxic Hg(0) in the cytosol by the sequential action of organomercurial lyase (MerB: RHg(I) --> RH + Hg(II)) and mercuric ion reductase (MerA: Hg(II) --> Hg(0)) enzymes, requiring transfer of Hg(II) from MerB to MerA. Although previous studies with γ-proteobacterial versions of MerA and a non-physiological Hg(II)-DTT-MerB complex qualitatively support a pathway for direct transfer between proteins, assessment of the relative efficiencies of Hg(II) transfer to the two different di-cysteine motifs in γ-proteobacterial MerA and to competing cellular thiol is lacking. Here we show the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of γ-proteobacterial MerB is sensitive to Hg(II) binding and use this to probe the kinetics of Hg(II) removal from MerB by the N-terminal domain (NmerA) and catalytic core C-terminal cysteine pairs of its co-evolved MerA, and by glutathione (GSH), the major competing cellular thiol in γ-proteobacteria. At physiologically relevant concentrations, reaction with a 10-fold excess NmerA over HgMerB removes ≥ 92% Hg(II), while similar extents of reaction require more than 1000-fold excess of GSH. Kinetically, the apparent second order rate constant for Hg(II) transfer from MerB to NmerA, at 2.3 ± 0.1 × 104 M−1 s−1 is ~ 100-fold greater than that for GSH (1.2 ± 0.2 × 102 M−1 s−1) or the MerA catalytic core (1.2 × 102 M−1 s−1), establishing transfer to the metallochaperone-like NmerA domain as the kinetically favored pathway in this co-evolved system. PMID:20722420

  13. Direct measurement of mercury(II) removal from organomercurial lyase (MerB) by tryptophan fluorescence: NmerA domain of coevolved γ-proteobacterial mercuric ion reductase (MerA) is more efficient than MerA catalytic core or glutathione .

    PubMed

    Hong, Baoyu; Nauss, Rachel; Harwood, Ian M; Miller, Susan M

    2010-09-21

    Aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea harboring mer loci exhibit resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)]. In broad spectrum resistance, RHg(I) is converted to less toxic Hg(0) in the cytosol by the sequential action of organomercurial lyase (MerB: RHg(I) → RH + Hg(II)) and mercuric ion reductase (MerA: Hg(II) → Hg(0)) enzymes, requiring transfer of Hg(II) from MerB to MerA. Although previous studies with γ-proteobacterial versions of MerA and a nonphysiological Hg(II)-DTT-MerB complex qualitatively support a pathway for direct transfer between proteins, assessment of the relative efficiencies of Hg(II) transfer to the two different dicysteine motifs in γ-proteobacterial MerA and to competing cellular thiol is lacking. Here we show the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of γ-proteobacterial MerB is sensitive to Hg(II) binding and use this to probe the kinetics of Hg(II) removal from MerB by the N-terminal domain (NmerA) and catalytic core C-terminal cysteine pairs of its coevolved MerA and by glutathione (GSH), the major competing cellular thiol in γ-proteobacteria. At physiologically relevant concentrations, reaction with a 10-fold excess of NmerA over HgMerB removes ≥92% Hg(II), while similar extents of reaction require more than 1000-fold excess of GSH. Kinetically, the apparent second-order rate constant for Hg(II) transfer from MerB to NmerA, at (2.3 ± 0.1) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), is ∼100-fold greater than that for GSH ((1.2 ± 0.2) × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) or the MerA catalytic core (1.2 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)), establishing transfer to the metallochaperone-like NmerA domain as the kinetically favored pathway in this coevolved system. PMID:20722420

  14. The conserved H1 domain of the type II keratin 1 chain plays an essential role in the alignment of nearest neighbor molecules in mouse and human keratin 1/keratin 10 intermediate filaments at the two- to four-molecule level of structure.

    PubMed

    Steinert, P M; Parry, D A

    1993-02-01

    A number of fundamental questions pertaining to the registration and packing of the constituent coiled-coil molecules in keratin intermediate filaments, and to the regions of the sequences that are responsible for these levels of organization, remain to be elucidated. In this study, small assembly-competent oligomers of mouse and human keratin 1/keratin 10 keratin filaments were cross-linked by the formation of disulfide bonds catalyzed by the copper-phenanthroline reaction. By isolation and characterization of cross-linked peptides, it has been possible to establish two major modes of molecule alignment: an antiparallel arrangement of half-staggered molecules with their 2B segments overlapping and an antiparallel arrangement of molecules in close axial registration. These data confirm earlier models based on theoretical considerations (Crewther, W. G., Dowling, L. M., Steinert, P. M., and Parry, D. A. D. (1983) Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 5, 267-274). Interestingly, these models place the conserved H1 and H2 end domain segments, which flank the ends of the rod domains of the type II keratin 1 chain, in alignment with either the ends of the rod domains and/or with the L2 segment near the center of the rod domains, of the nearest neighbor molecules. Competition experiments with synthetic peptides suggest that the conserved H1 (and possibly H2) subdomain sequences unique to type II keratin chains play pivotal roles in the registration of neighboring molecules in keratin filaments. The data thus afford a molecular explanation for why keratin filaments require a type II chain for assembly in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7679103

  15. Revisiting the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sridevi; Brenet, Gilles; Caliste, Damien; Genovese, Luigi; Deutsch, Thierry; Pochet, Pascal

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, we study the stability of the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite in stages III and II by means of Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the domain model is either thermodynamically or kinetically stable when compared to the standard model in stages III and II. The existence of domains in the intercalation sequence is well supported by recent high resolution transmission electron microscope observations in lithiated graphite. Moreover, we predict that such domain staging sequences leads to a wide range of diffusivity as reported in experiments.

  16. Adenovirus type 5 E4 Orf3 protein targets promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein nuclear domains for disruption via a sequence in PML isoform II that is predicted as a protein interaction site by bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Leppard, Keith N; Emmott, Edward; Cortese, Marc S; Rich, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 5 infection causes the disruption of structures in the cell nucleus termed promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein nuclear domains or ND10, which contain the PML protein as a critical component. This disruption is achieved through the action of the viral E4 Orf3 protein, which forms track-like nuclear structures that associate with the PML protein. This association is mediated by a direct interaction of Orf3 with a specific PML isoform, PMLII. We show here that the Orf3 interaction properties of PMLII are conferred by a 40 aa residue segment of the unique C-terminal domain of the protein. This segment was sufficient to confer interaction on a heterologous protein. The analysis was informed by prior application of a bioinformatic tool for the prediction of potential protein interaction sites within unstructured protein sequences (predictors of naturally disordered region analysis; PONDR). This tool predicted three potential molecular recognition elements (MoRE) within the C-terminal domain of PMLII, one of which was found to form the core of the Orf3 interaction site, thus demonstrating the utility of this approach. The sequence of the mapped Orf3-binding site on PML protein was found to be relatively poorly conserved across other species; however, the overall organization of MoREs within unstructured sequence was retained, suggesting the potential for conservation of functional interactions. PMID:19088278

  17. Surface forcing of the infrared cooling profile over the Tibetan Plateau. I - Influence of relative longwave radiative heating at high altitude. II - Cooling-rate variation over large-scale plateau domain during summer monsoon transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Shi, Lei

    1992-01-01

    The role of the Tibetan Plateau on the behavior of the surface longwave radiation budget is investigated, and the behavior of the vertical profile of longwave cooling over the plateau, including its diurnal variation, is quantified. A medium spectral-resolution IR radiative transfer model utilizing a simple modification for applications in idealized complex (valley) terrain is developed for the investigation. An understanding of how surface and elevation biophysical factors, which are highly variable over the large-scale plateau domain, regulate the spatial distribution of clear-sky IR cooling during the transition phase of the summer monsoon, is described.

  18. Tuning Protein Autoinhibition by Domain Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyun; Muralidharan, Vasant; Vila-Perello, Miquel; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Muir, Tom W.; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of many multi-domain signaling proteins requires rearrangement of autoinhibitory interdomain interactions that occlude activator binding sites. In one model for activation, the major inactive conformation exists in equilibrium with activated-like conformations that can be stabilized by ligand binding or post-translational modifications. The molecular basis for this model is established for the archetypal signaling adapter protein Crk-II by measuring the thermodynamics and kinetics of the equilibrium between autoinhibited and activated-like states using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopies, together with segmental isotopic labeling via expressed protein ligation. The results demonstrate that intramolecular domain-domain interactions both stabilize the autoinhibited state and induce the activated-like conformation. A combination of favorable interdomain interactions and unfavorable intradomain structural changes fine-tunes the population of the activated-like conformation and allows facile response to activators. This mechanism suggests a general strategy for optimization of autoinhibitory interactions of multi-domain proteins. PMID:21532593

  19. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christopher A.; Epperson, Megan L.; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection. PMID:26343707

  20. The Non-Essential Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Genes hadA and hadC Contribute to the Physiology and Fitness of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Jamet, Stevie; Slama, Nawel; Domingues, Joana; Laval, Françoise; Texier, Pauline; Eynard, Nathalie; Quémard, Annaik; Peixoto, Antonio; Lemassu, Anne; Daffé, Mamadou; Cam, Kaymeuang

    2015-01-01

    Gram positive mycobacteria with a high GC content, such as the etiological agent of tuberculosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess an outer membrane mainly composed of mycolic acids (MAs), the so-called mycomembrane, which is essential for the cell. About thirty genes are involved in the biosynthesis of MAs, which include the hadA, hadB and hadC genes that encode the dehydratases Fatty Acid Synthase type II (FAS-II) known to function as the heterodimers HadA-HadB and HadB-HadC. The present study shows that M. smegmatis cells remain viable in the absence of either HadA and HadC or both. Inactivation of HadC has a dramatic effect on the physiology and fitness of the mutant strains whereas that of HadA exacerbates the phenotype of a hadC deletion. The hadC mutants exhibit a novel MA profile, display a distinct colony morphology, are less aggregated, are impaired for sliding motility and biofilm development and are more resistant to detergent. Conversely, the hadC mutants are significantly more susceptible to low- and high-temperature and to selective toxic compounds, including several current anti-tubercular drugs. PMID:26701652

  1. Domains and Naive Theories

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Noles, Nicholaus S.

    2013-01-01

    Human cognition entails domain-specific cognitive processes that influence memory, attention, categorization, problem-solving, reasoning, and knowledge organization. This review examines domain-specific causal theories, which are of particular interest for permitting an examination of how knowledge structures change over time. We first describe the properties of commonsense theories, and how commonsense theories differ from scientific theories, illustrating with children’s classification of biological and non-biological kinds. We next consider the implications of domain-specificity for broader issues regarding cognitive development and conceptual change. We then examine the extent to which domain-specific theories interact, and how people reconcile competing causal frameworks. Future directions for research include examining how different content domains interact, the nature of theory change, the role of context (including culture, language, and social interaction) in inducing different frameworks, and the neural bases for domain-specific reasoning. PMID:24187603

  2. Learning and Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Yishay

    Domain adaptation is a fundamental learning problem where one wishes to use labeled data from one or several source domains to learn a hypothesis performing well on a different, yet related, domain for which no labeled data is available. This generalization across domains is a very significant challenge for many machine learning applications and arises in a variety of natural settings, including NLP tasks (document classification, sentiment analysis, etc.), speech recognition (speakers and noise or environment adaptation) and face recognition (different lighting conditions, different population composition).

  3. An African swine fever virus ORF with similarity to C-type lectins is non-essential for growth in swine macrophages in vitro and for virus virulence in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Neilan, J G; Borca, M V; Lu, Z; Kutish, G F; Kleiboeker, S B; Carrillo, C; Zsak, L; Rock, D L

    1999-10-01

    An African swine fever virus (ASFV) ORF, 8CR, with similarity to the C-type lectin family of adhesion proteins has been described in the pathogenic isolate Malawi Lil-20/1. The similarity of 8CR to cellular and poxvirus genes associated with cell adhesion, cell recognition and virus infectivity suggested that 8CR may be of significance to ASFV-host cell interactions. Sequence analysis of the 8CR ORF from additional pathogenic ASFV isolates demonstrated conservation among isolates from both pig and tick sources. Northern blot analysis demonstrated 8CR mRNA transcription late in the virus replication cycle. A Malawi Lil-20/1 8CR deletion mutant (delta8CR) was constructed to analyse 8CR function further. The growth characteristics in vitro of delta8CR in porcine macrophage cell cultures were identical to those observed for parental virus. In domestic swine, delta8CR exhibited an unaltered parental Malawi Lil-20/1 disease and virulence phenotype. Thus, although well conserved among pathogenic ASFV field isolates, 8CR is non-essential for growth in porcine macrophages in vitro and for virus virulence in domestic swine. PMID:10573162

  4. TbFRP, a novel FYVE-domain containing phosphoinositide-binding Ras-like GTPase from trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Adung’a, Vincent O.; Field, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Ras-like small GTPases are regulatory proteins that control multiple aspects of cellular function, and are particularly prevalent in vesicular transport. A proportion of GTPase paralogs appear restricted to certain eukaryote lineages, suggesting roles specific to a restricted lineage, and hence potentially reflecting adaptation to individual lifestyles or ecological niche. Here we describe the role of a GTPase, TbFRP, a FYVE domain N-terminally fused to a Ras-like GTPase, originally identified in Trypanosoma brucei. As FYVE-domains specifically bind phosphoinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P), which associates with endosomes, we suggest that TbFRP may unite phosphoinositide and small G protein endosomal signaling in trypanosomatids. TbFRP orthologs are present throughout the Euglenazoa suggesting that FRP has functions throughout the group. We show that the FYVE domain of TbFRP is functional in PI3P-dependent membrane targeting and localizes at the endosomal region. Further, while TbFRP is apparently non-essential, knockdown and immunochemical evidence indicates that TbFRP is rapidly cleaved upon synthesis, releasing the GTPase and FYVE-domains. Finally, TbFRP expression at both mRNA and protein levels is cell density-dependent. Together, these data suggest that TbFRP is an endocytic GTPase with a highly unusual mechanism of action that involves proteolysis of the nascent protein and membrane targeting via PI3P. PMID:23220323

  5. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  6. Causal Learning Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Laura E.; Gopnik, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Five studies investigated (a) children's ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of…

  7. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  8. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  9. Mutational analysis of the hepatitis B virus P gene product: domain structure and RNase H activity.

    PubMed Central

    Radziwill, G; Tucker, W; Schaller, H

    1990-01-01

    To correlate the hepatitis B virus P gene with the enzymatic activities predicted to participate in hepadnavirus reverse transcription, a series of P gene mutants containing missense mutations, in-phase insertions, and in-phase deletions was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. These mutants were tested in the context of otherwise intact hepatitis B virus genomes for the ability to produce core particles containing the virus-associated polymerase activity. The results obtained suggest that the P protein consists of three functional domains and a nonessential spacer arranged in the following order: terminal protein, spacer, reverse transcriptase/DNA polymerase, and RNase H. The first two domains are separated by a spacer region which could be deleted to a large extent without significant loss of endogenous polymerase activity. In cotransfection experiments, all P gene mutants could be complemented in trans by constructs expressing the wild-type gene product but not by a second P gene mutant. This indicates that the multifunctional P gene is expressed as a single translational unit and independent of the core gene and furthermore that the gene product is freely diffusible and not processed before core assembly. Images PMID:2153228

  10. Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Vakoc, Benjamin; Yun, Seok Hyun

    In this chapter, we discuss a frequency-domain approach, optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), which is based on optical frequency-domain reflectometry and uses a wavelength-swept laser and standard single-element photodetectors. The chapter begins with an overview of the fundamental aspects of the technology, including the detected signal, sensitivity, depth range, and resolution, and then goes on to discuss specific component technologies including the light source, interferometer and acquisition electronics, and image processing. The final section of the chapter provides a brief glimpse at some of the biomedical applications that most directly take advantage of the improved speed and sensitivity of OFDI.