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Sample records for nonnewtonian gravity-driven liquid

  1. Gravity-Driven Flow of non-Newtonian Fluids in Heterogeneous Porous Media: a Theoretical and Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Federico, V.; Longo, S.; Ciriello, V.; Chiapponi, L.

    2015-12-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of non-Newtonian gravity-driven flow in porous media with spatially variable properties is presented. The motivation for our study is the rheological complexity exhibited by several environmental contaminants (wastewater sludge, oil pollutants, waste produced by the minerals and coal industries) and remediation agents (suspensions employed to enhance the efficiency of in-situ remediation). Natural porous media are inherently heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity influences the extent and shape of the porous domain invaded by the contaminant or remediation agent. To grasp the combined effect of rheology and spatial heterogeneity, we consider: a) the release of a thin current of non-Newtonian power-law fluid into a 2-D, semi-infinite and saturated porous medium above a horizontal bed; b) perfectly stratified media, with permeability and porosity varying along the direction transverse (vertical) or parallel (horizontal) to the flow direction. This continuous variation of spatial properties is described by two additional parameters. In order to represent several possible spreading scenarios, we consider: i) instantaneous injection with constant mass; ii) continuous injection with time-variable mass; iii) instantaneous release of a mound of fluid, which can drain freely out of the formation at the origin (dipole flow). Under these assumptions, scalings for current length and thickness are derived in self similar form. An analysis of the conditions on model parameters required to avoid an unphysical or asymptotically invalid result is presented. Theoretical results are validated against multiple sets of experiments, conducted for different combinations of spreading scenarios and types of stratification. Two basic setups are employed for the experiments: I) direct flow simulation in an artificial porous medium constructed superimposing layers of glass beads of different diameter; II) a Hele-Shaw (HS) analogue made of two parallel

  2. Gravity-driven liquid flow over a flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Howell, Peter; Popova, Marinela; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the time dependence of a liquid spreading along a flexible beam. The flow is modeled using lubrication theory and the substrate is modeled as an (Euler-Bernoulli) elastic beam. We classify the model problem into two cases depending on the maximum beam deflection angle ϕmax from the horizontal, i.e. a small deflection (ϕmax < 30°) and large deflection (30° < ϕmax < 90°). For a small deflection case, we obtain asymptotic solutions for the liquid propagation speed for the early time and terminal time periods, which for the front position σ(t) show power-law behaviors σ(t) ~ t 4 / 5 and σ(t) ~ t4, respectively. The theoretical model also predicts the deflection angle of the beam at the propagating liquid front. We validate the results with experiments, which show good agreement with theory. Furthermore, for large beam deflections, we obtain experimental results demonstrating power-law behaviors, σ(t) ~ t and ϕ(t) ~ t2 for the early time period.

  3. Gravity-driven instability of a thin liquid film underneath a soft solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Maki, K. L.; Flath, D.; Weinstein, S. J.; Kealey, C.; Li, W.; Talbot, C.; Kumar, S.

    2014-11-01

    The gravity-driven instability of a thin liquid film located underneath a soft solid material is considered. The equations and boundary conditions governing the solid deformation are systematically converted from a Lagrangian representation to an Eulerian representation, which is the natural framework for describing the liquid motion. This systematic conversion reveals that the continuity-of-velocity boundary condition at the liquid-solid interface is more complicated than has previously been assumed, even in the small-strain limit. We then make clear the conditions under which the commonly used simplified version of this boundary condition is valid. The small-strain approximation, lubrication theory, and linear stability analysis are applied to derive an expression for the growth rate of small-amplitude perturbations. Asymptotic analysis reveals that the coupling between the liquid and solid manifests itself as a lower effective liquid-air interfacial tension that leads to larger instability growth rates. Although this suggests that it is more difficult to maintain a stable liquid coating underneath a soft solid, the effect is expected to be weak for cases of practical interest.

  4. Gravity-driven fingering simulations for a thin liquid film flowing down the outside of a vertical cylinder.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Lisa C; McCue, Scott W; Moroney, Timothy J

    2013-05-01

    A numerical study is presented to examine the fingering instability of a gravity-driven thin liquid film flowing down the outer wall of a vertical cylinder. The lubrication approximation is employed to derive an evolution equation for the height of the film, which is dependent on a single parameter, the dimensionless cylinder radius. This equation is identified as a special case of that which describes thin film flow down an inclined plane. Fully three-dimensional simulations of the film depict a fingering pattern at the advancing contact line. We find the number of fingers observed in our simulations to be in excellent agreement with experimental observations and a linear stability analysis reported recently by Smolka and SeGall [Phys. Fluids 23, 092103 (2011)]. As the radius of the cylinder decreases, the modes of perturbation have an increased growth rate, thus increasing cylinder curvature partially acts to encourage the contact line instability. In direct competition with this behavior, a decrease in cylinder radius means that fewer fingers are able to form around the circumference of the cylinder. Indeed, for a sufficiently small radius, a transition is observed, at which point the contact line is stable to transverse perturbations of all wave numbers. In this regime, free surface instabilities lead to the development of wave patterns in the axial direction, and the flow features become perfectly analogous to the two-dimensional flow of a thin film down an inverted plane as studied by Lin and Kondic [Phys. Fluids 22, 052105 (2010)]. Finally, we simulate the flow of a single drop down the outside of the cylinder. Our results show that for drops with low volume, the cylinder curvature has the effect of increasing drop speed and hence promoting the phenomenon of pearling. In contrast, drops with much larger volume evolve to form single long rivulets with a similar shape to a finger formed in the aforementioned simulations. PMID:23767631

  5. Dense, gravity-driven granular-liquid flows down steep channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armanini, A.; Larcher, M.; Nucci, E.

    2011-12-01

    Debris flows are complex natural phenomena, characterized by a mixture of poorly sorted sediments and water driven by gravity. Depending on the size distribution, on the volume concentration of sediments and on the geometry and topography of the channel, flow conditions may be very different, ranging from very fast flows, dominated by granular collisions and by the turbulence on the liquid phase, to very slow and dense flows, dominated by the frictional contacts among the grains. To investigate the basic physics of debris flows, it is very useful to analyze the flow of a mixture of identical spherical particles saturated by water and driven by gravity down a steep channel in steady flow condition (Armanini et al. 2005). The flow presents three regions: an external one, near to the free surface, dominated by nearly instantaneous contacts among the particles (collisional regime), an internal region dominated by prolonged contacts among the particles (frictional regime) and a static bed in which the particles are immobile. The detailed vertical structure of this kind of flows was obtained by means of experiments carried out by Armanini et al. (2005) and Larcher et al. (2007). Armanini et al. (2009) analysed the stratification of rheological mechanisms inside the flow, focusing on the coexistence of frictional and collisional regimes, on the stress transmission inside the flow and on particles kinematics. In particular, it was observed that debris flows may show locally a typical intermittence of the flow regime, switching alternatively from frictional to collisional. While the rheology of the collisional layers is well described by the dense gas analogy (kinetic theory), a persuasive theoretical description of the frictional regime does not yet exist. A Coulombian scheme is often assumed, but this hypothesis is rather limitative because it requires a constant concentration or a distribution of particles concentration known a priori. An interesting scheme of this kind

  6. Impinging jet spray formation using non-Newtonian liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.

    Over the past two decades there has been a heightened interest in implementing gelled propellants for rocket propulsion, especially for hypergolic bi-propellants such as monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer (NTO). Due to the very high level of toxicity of hypergolic liquid rocket propellants, increasing safety is an important area of need for continued space exploration and defense operations. Gelled propellants provide an attractive solution to meeting the requirements for safety, while also potentially improving performance. A gelling agent can be added to liquid propellants exhibiting Newtonian behavior to transform the liquid into a non-Newtonian fluid with some solid-like behavior, i.e. a gel. Non-Newtonian jet impingement is very different from its Newtonian counterpart in terms of fluid flow, atomization, and combustion. This is due to the added agents changing physical properties such as the bulk rheology (viscosity) and interfacial rheology (surface tension). Spray characterization of jet impingement with Newtonian liquids has been studied extensively in existing literature. However, there is a scarcity in literature of studies that consider the spray characterization of jet impingement with gelled propellants. This is a rather critical void since a major tradeoff of utilizing gelled propellants is the difficulty with atomization due to the increased effective viscosity. However, this difficulty can be overcome by using gels that exhibit shear-thinning behavior---viscosity decreases with increasing strain rate. Shear-thinning fluids are ideal because they have the distinct advantage of only flowing easily upon pressure. Thereby, greatly reducing the amount of propellant that could be accidentally leaked during both critical functions such as liftoff or engagement in the battlefield and regular tasks like refilling propellant tanks. This experimental work seeks to help resolve the scarcity in existing literature by providing drop size

  7. Superhydrophobic meshes that can repel hot water and strong corrosive liquids used for efficient gravity-driven oil/water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Kang, Ruimei; Tang, Xiaohua; She, Houde; Yang, Yaoxia; Zha, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Oil-polluted water has become a worldwide problem due to increasing industrial oily wastewater as well as frequent oil-spill pollution. Compared with underwater superoleophobic (water-removing) filtration membranes, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic (oil-removing) materials have advantages as they can be used for the filtration of heavy oil or the absorption of floating oil from water/oil mixtures. However, most of the superhydrophobic materials used for oil/water separation lose their superhydrophobicity when exposed to hot (e.g. >50 °C) water and strong corrosive liquids. Herein, we demonstrate superhydrophobic overlapped candle soot (CS) and silica coated meshes that can repel hot water (about 92 °C) and strong corrosive liquids, and were used for the gravity driven separation of oil-water mixtures in hot water and strong acidic, alkaline, and salty environments. To the best of our knowledge, we are unaware of any previously reported studies on the use of superhydrophobic materials for the separation of oil from hot water and corrosive aqueous media. In addition, the as-prepared robust superhydrophobic CS and silica coated meshes can separate a series of oils and organic solvents like kerosene, toluene, petroleum ether, heptane and chloroform from water with a separation efficiency larger than 99.0%. Moreover, the as-prepared coated mesh still maintained a separation efficiency above 98.5% and stable recyclability after 55 cycles of separation. The robust superhydrophobic meshes developed in this work can therefore be practically used as a highly efficient filtration membrane for the separation of oil from harsh water conditions, benefiting the environment and human health.Oil-polluted water has become a worldwide problem due to increasing industrial oily wastewater as well as frequent oil-spill pollution. Compared with underwater superoleophobic (water-removing) filtration membranes, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic (oil-removing) materials have advantages as

  8. Superhydrophobic meshes that can repel hot water and strong corrosive liquids used for efficient gravity-driven oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Kang, Ruimei; Tang, Xiaohua; She, Houde; Yang, Yaoxia; Zha, Fei

    2016-04-14

    Oil-polluted water has become a worldwide problem due to increasing industrial oily wastewater as well as frequent oil-spill pollution. Compared with underwater superoleophobic (water-removing) filtration membranes, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic (oil-removing) materials have advantages as they can be used for the filtration of heavy oil or the absorption of floating oil from water/oil mixtures. However, most of the superhydrophobic materials used for oil/water separation lose their superhydrophobicity when exposed to hot (e.g. >50 °C) water and strong corrosive liquids. Herein, we demonstrate superhydrophobic overlapped candle soot (CS) and silica coated meshes that can repel hot water (about 92 °C) and strong corrosive liquids, and were used for the gravity driven separation of oil-water mixtures in hot water and strong acidic, alkaline, and salty environments. To the best of our knowledge, we are unaware of any previously reported studies on the use of superhydrophobic materials for the separation of oil from hot water and corrosive aqueous media. In addition, the as-prepared robust superhydrophobic CS and silica coated meshes can separate a series of oils and organic solvents like kerosene, toluene, petroleum ether, heptane and chloroform from water with a separation efficiency larger than 99.0%. Moreover, the as-prepared coated mesh still maintained a separation efficiency above 98.5% and stable recyclability after 55 cycles of separation. The robust superhydrophobic meshes developed in this work can therefore be practically used as a highly efficient filtration membrane for the separation of oil from harsh water conditions, benefiting the environment and human health. PMID:26987990

  9. The physics of non-Newtonian liquid slurry atomization. Part 2: Twin-fluid atomization of non-Newtonian liquids -- First quarterly technical report, 1 January--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A.; Chigier, N.

    1994-06-01

    The changes in the physical processes of atomization as a result of adding a high molecular weight polymer in low concentrations to liquid have been studied. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids were investigated with particular emphasis on the non-Newtonian rheological characteristics. It was found that viscoelastic liquids are much more difficult to atomize than viscoinelastic liquids. Viscoinelastic liquids showed a breakup behavior similar to that of water sprays. Viscoelastic materials showed remarkably different breakup patterns. The ligaments were seen to undergo a very large stretching motion before they breakup, resulting in long threads of liquid attached to droplets. The normal stresses developed in viscoelastic materials are much higher than their associated shear stresses. Consequently, the development of the large normal stresses appears to be the most important rheological mechanism that inhibits breakup. The non-Newtonian liquids selected for the experiment were aqueous solutions of Xanthan gum and Polyacrylamide E10.

  10. Gravity-Driven Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Garagash, D.; Murdoch, L. C.; Robinowitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study is motived by a new method for disposing of nuclear waste by injecting it as a dense slurry into a hydraulic fracture that grows downward to great enough depth to permanently isolate the waste. Disposing of nuclear waste using gravity-driven hydraulic fractures is mechanically similar to the upward growth of dikes filled with low density magma. A fundamental question in both applications is how the injected fluid controls the propagation dynamics and fracture geometry (depth and breadth) in three dimensions. Analog experiments in gelatin [e.g., Heimpel and Olson, 1994; Taisne and Tait, 2009] show that fracture breadth (the short horizontal dimension) remains nearly stationary when the process in the fracture "head" (where breadth is controlled) is dominated by solid toughness, whereas viscous fluid dissipation is dominant in the fracture tail. We model propagation of the resulting gravity-driven (buoyant or sinking), finger-like fracture of stationary breadth with slowly varying opening along the crack length. The elastic response to fluid loading in a horizontal cross-section is local and can be treated similar to the classical Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model of hydraulic fracturing. The propagation condition for a finger-like crack is based on balancing the global energy release rate due to a unit crack extension with the rock fracture toughness. It allows us to relate the net fluid pressure at the tip to the fracture breadth and rock toughness. Unlike the PKN fracture, where breadth is known a priori, the final breadth of a finger-like fracture is a result of processes in the fracture head. Because the head is much more open than the tail, viscous pressure drop in the head can be neglected leading to a 3D analog of Weertman's hydrostatic pulse. This requires relaxing the local elasticity assumption of the PKN model in the fracture head. As a result, we resolve the breadth, and then match the viscosity-dominated tail with the 3-D, toughness

  11. Collision Dynamics and Internal Mixing of Droplets of Non-Newtonian Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Law, Chung K.; Wang, Tianyou

    2015-11-01

    The efficient internal mixing of colliding droplets upon coalescence is critical to various technological processes such as color manipulation in ink-jet printing and the initiation of the liquid-phase reaction of gelled hypergolic propellants in rocket engines. Recognizing that such processes can be optimized by varying the impact inertia as well as employing fluids of non-Newtonian rheology, the head-on collision, coalescence, and internal mixing pattern between two impacting equal-sized droplets of non-Newtonian fluids is computationally investigated by using the lattice Boltzmann method. Results show that, with increasing non-Newtonian effects, droplet deformation and separation following coalescence is promoted for shear-thinning fluids, while permanent coalescence allowing an extended duration for mixing is promoted for shear-thickening fluids. Furthermore, large-scale internal mixing is promoted for the colliding droplets with larger shear-thinning disparity, while coalescence and mixing is synergistically facilitated for the collision between a shear-thinning droplet and a shear-thickening droplet. The individual and coupled influences of viscosity on the droplet deformation and impact inertia, internal motion, viscous loss, and merging of the colliding interfaces leading to the observed outcomes are mechanistically identified and described.

  12. Viscoelastic Suppression of Gravity-Driven Counterflow Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Layne, D.; Magee, E. W.; Katz, J. I.

    2011-02-01

    Attempts to achieve “top kill” of flowing oil wells by pumping dense drilling “muds,” i.e., slurries of dense minerals, from above will fail if the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the gravity-driven counterflow produces turbulence that breaks up the denser fluid into small droplets. Here we estimate the droplet size to be submillimeter for fast flows and suggest the addition of a shear-thickening or viscoelastic polymer to suppress turbulence. We find in laboratory experiments a variety of new physical effects for a viscoelastic shear-thickening liquid in a gravity-driven counterstreaming flow. There is a progression from droplet formation to complete turbulence suppression at the relevant high velocities. Thick descending columns show a viscoelastic analogue of the viscous buckling instability. Thinner streams form structures resembling globules on a looping filament.

  13. Viscoelastic suppression of gravity-driven counterflow instability.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Layne, D; Magee, E W; Katz, J I

    2011-02-01

    Attempts to achieve "top kill" of flowing oil wells by pumping dense drilling "muds," i.e., slurries of dense minerals, from above will fail if the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the gravity-driven counterflow produces turbulence that breaks up the denser fluid into small droplets. Here we estimate the droplet size to be submillimeter for fast flows and suggest the addition of a shear-thickening or viscoelastic polymer to suppress turbulence. We find in laboratory experiments a variety of new physical effects for a viscoelastic shear-thickening liquid in a gravity-driven counterstreaming flow. There is a progression from droplet formation to complete turbulence suppression at the relevant high velocities. Thick descending columns show a viscoelastic analogue of the viscous buckling instability. Thinner streams form structures resembling globules on a looping filament. PMID:21405442

  14. EOS3nn: An iTOUGH2 module for non-Newtonian liquid and gasflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Finsterle, Stefan; Pruess, Karsten

    2002-08-01

    This report documents the iTOUGH2 module EOS3nn, developed for modeling two-phase isothermal flow of a non-Newtonian liquid and a non-condensible gas in multidimensional, porous and fractured geologic media. This document supplements the TOUGH2 and iTOUGH2 user s guides and is therefore not a self-contained manual. It presents information on the physical processes modeled and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Also included are two sample problems for code testing and benchmarking. Modeling scenarios and approaches are discussed to illustrate problem setup and usage of the EOS3nn module.

  15. Non-Newtonian Liquid Flow through Small Diameter Piping Components: CFD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Tarun Kanti; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis have been carried out to evaluate the frictional pressure drop across the horizontal pipeline and different piping components, like elbows, orifices, gate and globe valves for non-Newtonian liquid through 0.0127 m pipe line. The mesh generation is done using GAMBIT 6.3 and FLUENT 6.3 is used for CFD analysis. The CFD results are verified with our earlier published experimental data. The CFD results show the very good agreement with the experimental values.

  16. Non-Newtonian flow of an ultralow-melting chalcogenide liquid in strongly confined geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Siyuan; Jain, Chhavi; Wondraczek, Katrin; Kobelke, Jens; Wondraczek, Lothar; Troles, Johann; Caillaud, Celine; Schmidt, Markus A.

    2015-05-18

    The flow of high-viscosity liquids inside micrometer-size holes can be substantially different from the flow in the bulk, non-confined state of the same liquid. Such non-Newtonian behavior can be employed to generate structural anisotropy in the frozen-in liquid, i.e., in the glassy state. Here, we report on the observation of non-Newtonian flow of an ultralow melting chalcogenide glass inside a silica microcapillary, leading to a strong deviation of the shear viscosity from its value in the bulk material. In particular, we experimentally show that the viscosity is radius-dependent, which is a clear indication that the microscopic rearrangement of the glass network needs to be considered if the lateral confinement falls below a certain limit. The experiments have been conducted using pressure-assisted melt filling, which provides access to the rheological properties of high-viscosity melt flow under previously inaccessible experimental conditions. The resulting flow-induced structural anisotropy can pave the way towards integration of anisotropic glasses inside hybrid photonic waveguides.

  17. Study of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in non-Newtonian liquid-gas two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Non-Newtonian liquid-gas stratified flow data in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes were obtained. Interfacial level gradients between the two phases were observed. The Heywood-Charles model is found to be valid for pseudoplastic liquid-gas uniform stratified flow. Two-phase drag reduction in non-Newtonian systems was not achieved as the transition to semi-slug flow occurred before the model criteria were reached. Interfacial liquid and gas shear stresses were compared. A new parameter ..sigma../sup 2/ is introduced which is a numerical indication of the interfacial level gradient. Two-phase drag reduction was experimentally observed in polymer solution-air plug-slug flow in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes. The Hubbard-Dukler pressure drop model was extended to non-Newtonian systems. Reasonable agreement between the experiment and the model predictions is obtained. However, more work needs to be done in order to better understand the two-phase drag reduction phenomena. Liquid holdup correlations were developed for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian systems which successfully correlate the holdup over a wide range of parameters. The Petukhov correlation is found to be better than the Dittus-Boelter correlation in predicting the single-phase water heat-transfer coefficients.

  18. Effect of shim configuration on internal die flows for non-Newtonian coating liquids in slot coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guang Lin; Ahn, Won-Gi; Kim, See Jo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Wook; Hyun, Jae Chun

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a strategy for designing optimal shim configuration inside a slot die is suggested to assure the uniform coating flow distribution of various non-Newtonian shear-thinning liquids at the die exit in a slot coating system. Flow patterns of non-Newtonian liquids inside the slot die, via three-dimensional computations, have been compared using various shim geometries which can adjust the flow region in a slot manifold. The rather non-uniform (parabolic) velocity distributions of shear-thinning liquids at the die exit under the basic shim condition could be effectively flattened by the modification of shim geometry without the change of die manifold structure. Dimensions of hybrid shims for controlling flow features at edge and center regions within slit channel are positively tuned, according to the shear-thinning level of coating liquids.

  19. Entrance region heat transfer of a laminar non-Newtonian falling liquid film

    SciTech Connect

    Gorla, R.S.R.; Nee, Y.L. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    There exist several industrial applications in which falling film heat exchangers are used widely. The non-Newtonian fluid falling film shell and tube exchangers are utilized in the food and polymer processing industries. In columns of small length, the falling film flow is laminar when the viscosity of the fluid is high. The authors discuss a study of the heat transfer in one thermal entrance region Ostwald-de-Waele type power of a non-Newtonian laminar falling film. The velocity field is assumed to be fully developed whereas the temperature field is taken as developing. The effect of heat generation by viscous dissipation is included in the analysis.

  20. Gravity-driven intrusions in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Benjamin Dudley

    All natural fluids stratify. Stable stratifications, in which isobars and isopycnals are parallel, are capable of supporting internal wave motion. Unstable stratification, in which density and pressure gradients are not aligned, results in gravity-driven flow. Gravity currents are a subset of these flows in which horizontal density gradients sharpen and propagate horizontally, transporting mass, momentum, and energy. If the density of the gravity current is within the density extrema of the stably stratified ambient fluid, it propagates as an intrusion at an intermediate height. Through laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, this dissertation explores the influence of stratification on the dynamics of gravity-driven intrusions. Intrusions require stable stratification in the ambient fluid, which is capable of transporting momentum and energy away from the current in the form of internal waves. We investigate the constant velocity propagation of well-mixed intrusions propagating into a linearly stratified ambient fluid. Varying the level of neutral buoyancy, we quantify the corresponding variation in structure, momentum, and energy of the upstream wave field. Adjacent stable stratifications of differing vertical density structure necessarily entail horizontal density gradients. These gradients determine the hydrostatic pressure differences driving the ensuing gravity current. We examine the mid-depth, constant velocity propagation of one linearly stratified fluid into another more strongly linearly stratified fluid. Working from the available potential energy of the system and measurements of the intrusion thickness, we develop an energy model to describe the speed of the intrusion in terms of the ratio of the two buoyancy frequencies. Distinct from adjacent linear stratifications, adjacent discrete stratifications may create flow consisting of interleaving intrusions. Single intrusions into a two-layer ambient fluid are well understood. Limiting our

  1. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  2. Effect of scale-up on average shear rates for aerated non-Newtonian liquids in external loop airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Al-Masry

    1999-02-01

    Average shear rates have been estimated experimentally in a 700-dm3 external loop airlift reactor. Aqueous pseudoplastic carboxymethylcellulose and xanthan gum solutions were used to simulate non-Newtonian behavior of biological media. Average shear rates of non-Newtonian solutions were found by analogy with Newtonian glycerol solutions using downcomer liquid velocity as the measurable parameter. Due to the complexity of local shear rate measurement, an average shear rate was assumed to exist and is proportional to superficial gas velocity. The data from this work and those in the literature were used in producing a new correlation for estimating average shear rates as a function of superficial gas velocity, geometry, and dispersion height. Wall shear rates were found to be significant. The ratio of wall shear rates to bulk shear rates were varied from 5% to 40%. Furthermore, it has been found that shear rates generated in airlift loop reactors are lower than those generated in bubble columns. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099557

  3. Non-Newtonian rheological properties of shearing nematic liquid crystal model systems based on the Gay-Berne potential.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Wang, Yong-Lei; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-07-01

    The viscosities and normal stress differences of various liquid crystal model systems based on the Gay-Berne potential have been obtained as functions of the shear rate in the non-Newtonian regime. Various molecular shapes such as regular convex calamitic and discotic ellipsoids and non-convex shapes such as bent core molecules and soft ellipsoid strings have been examined. The isotropic phases were found to be shear thinning with the shear rate dependence of the viscosity following a power law in the same way as alkanes and other non-spherical molecules. The nematic phases turned out to be shear thinning but the logarithm of the viscosity proved to be an approximately linear function of the square root of the shear rate. The normal stress differences were found to display a more or less parabolic dependence on the shear rate in the isotropic phase whereas this dependence was linear at low to intermediate shear rates in the nematic phase. PMID:26055543

  4. Tornadolike gravity-driven vortex model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.; Boldman, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The buoyancy-induced vorticity concentration produced as the fluid in a vortex accelerates vertically was studied. The boiloff from liquid nitrogen, to which a small amount of initial vorticity was added, provided a source of cool, heavy gas in which a concentration of vorticity took place. Condensation streamers made the flow visible. It is shown that the presence of a surface boundary layer is not necessary for the effective concentration of vorticity. A simple theoretical analysis of the phenomenon was also made. A radial contraction of the flow with vertical position and a characteristic hook shape in the top view of the streamlines were observed in both theory and experiment. The vorticity concentration observed may be similar to that which occurs in tornadoes.

  5. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability. PMID:23687391

  6. Gravity driven flows of bubble suspensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto; Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok K.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments on vertical and inclined channels were performed to study the behavior of a mono-dispersed bubble suspension for which the dual limit of large Reynolds number and small Weber number is satisfied. A uniform stream of 1.5 mm diameter bubbles is produced by a bank of identical capillaries and coalescence is inhibited by addition of salt to the water. Measurements of the liquid velocity and bubble-probe collision rate are obtained with a hot wire anemometer. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, velocity variance and chord length are measured using a dual impedance probe. Image analysis is used to quantify the distributions of bubble size and aspect ratio. For vertical channels the bubble velocity is observed to decrease as the bubble concentration increases in accord with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani (1998). The bubble velocity variance arises largely due to bubble-wall and bubble-bubble collisions. For inclined channels, the strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  7. Design and characterization of large-drop generators for viscous, Newtonian, and non-Newtonian liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitter, Richard L.; Hoffer, Thomas E.; Allan, Craig R.; Carlon, Hugh R.; Stuempfle, Arthur K.

    1989-03-01

    Work performed by contractor personnel in conjunction with CRDEC Engineering Center (CRDEC) scientists is described. To evaluate protective clothing and the effects of chemical aerosols dispersed over a battlefield, a physical testing facility capable of simulating the behavior of falling drops is needed. In such a facility, the effects of drop size, surface interactions, long-term evaporation, and similar phenomena can be studied. This report describes two drop generators developed at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and one drop generator developed at CRDEC. The first generator uses a drop injection of impulse technique and is appropriate for a wide variety of drop sizes using Newtonian liquids of various viscosities. The drop ejection technique has been improved in this work. The second generator uses a unique, two-step process. A microfilm is formed across a horizontal loop, and the test liquid is extruded onto the microfilm surface. The liquid drop is released into freefall by a short burst of solvent directed at the loop, causing the microfilm to disintegrate.

  8. Fluid bulk velocity and attenuation measurements in non-Newtonian liquids using a dipstick sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, F. B.; Cawley, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports an evaluation of a method to measure acoustic fluid bulk properties in order to characterize the fluid. The method is based on a 'dipstick' that is inserted into the liquid of interest; a propagating interface wave, called the quasi-Scholte mode, is used to extract the necessary information. Quasi-Scholte mode measurements on four different silica-suspensions are compared to experiments in a conventional ultrasonic test cell. The results show that the liquid bulk velocity can accurately be retrieved by means of the new approach and errors range within the uncertainties imposed by the experimental setup (0.5%). Further bulk velocity measurements on distilled water and a 5% ethanol-distilled-water mixture over a range of temperatures illustrate that the method can successfully monitor small changes in velocity. The values of fluid attenuation measured by the two techniques agree well in their qualitative trends but quantitative differences of up to 20% are encountered. Errors in the measurements are believed to be mainly due to geometrical features of the current setup.

  9. Condensation during gravity driven ECC: Experiments with PACTEL

    SciTech Connect

    Munther, R.; Kalli, H.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper provides the results of the second series of gravity driven emergency core cooling (ECC) experiments with PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop). The simulated accident was a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) with a break in a cold leg. The ECC flow was provided from a core makeup tank (CMT) located at a higher elevation than the main part of the primary system. The CMT was pressurized with pipings from the pressurizer and a cold leg. The tests indicated that steam condensation in the CMT can prevent ECC and lead to core uncovery.

  10. Basal entrainment by Newtonian gravity-driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Belinda M.; Andreini, Nicolas; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Gravity-driven flows can erode the bed along which they descend and increase their mass by a factor of 10 or more. This process is called "basal entrainment." Although documented by field observations and laboratory experiments, it remains poorly understood. This paper examines what happens when a viscous gravity-driven flow generated by releasing a fixed volume of incompressible Newtonian fluid encounters a stationary layer (composed of fluid with the same density and viscosity). Models based on depth-averaged mass and momentum balance equations deal with bed-flow interfaces as shock waves. In contrast, we use an approach involving the long-wave approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations (lubrication theory), and in this context, bed-flow interfaces are acceleration waves that move quickly across thin stationary layers. The incoming flow digs down into the bed, pushing up downstream material, thus advancing the flow front. Extending the method used by Huppert ["The propagation of two-dimensional and axisymmetric viscous gravity currents over a rigid horizontal surface," J. Fluid Mech. 121, 43-58 (1982)] for modeling viscous dam-break waves, we end up with a nonlinear diffusion equation for the flow depth, which is solved numerically. Theory is compared with experimental results. Excellent agreement is found in the limit of low Reynolds numbers (i.e., for flow Reynolds numbers lower than 20) for the front position over time and flow depth profile.

  11. Basal entrainment by Newtonian gravity-driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Belinda; Andreini, Nicolas; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Gravity-driven flows can erode the bed along which they descend and increase their mass by a factor of 10 or more. This process is called basal entrainment. Although documented by field observations and laboratory experiments, it remains poorly understood. We look into this issue by studying eroding dam-break waves. More specifically we would like to determine what happens when a viscous gravity-driven flow generated by releasing a fixed volume of incompressible Newtonian fluid encounters a stationary erodible layer (composed of fluid with the same density and viscosity). Models based on depth-averaged mass and momentum balance equations deal with bed-flow interfaces as shock waves. In contrast, we use an approach involving the long-wave approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations (lubrication theory), and in this context, bed-flow interfaces are acceleration waves that move quickly across thin stationary layers. The incoming flow digs down into the bed, pushing up downstream material, thus advancing the flow front. Extending the method used by Huppert [J. Fluid Mech. 121, 43--58 (1982)] for modelling viscous dam-break waves, we end up with a nonlinear diffusion equation for the flow depth, which is solved numerically. Theory is compared with experimental results. Excellent agreement is found in the limit of low Reynolds numbers (i.e., for flow Reynolds numbers lower than 20) for the front position over time and flow depth profile. The Newtonian model has sometimes been used to describe the flow behaviour of natural materials such as snow and debris suspensions, but the majority of existing approaches rely on more elaborate constitutive equations. So there is no direct application of the results presented here to real flow conditions. Yet, our study sheds light on the mechanisms involved in basal entrainment. We provide evidence that the whole layer of loose material is entrained quickly once the flow makes contact with the erodible layer. As this process occurs

  12. Experimental study of the hydrodynamic interaction between a pair of bubbles ascending in a non-Newtonian liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samano, Diego; Velez, Rodrigo; Zenit, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    We present some experimental results about the interaction of a pair of bubbles ascending in non-Newtonian fluids. A high speed camera was used to follow in-line and off-line rising motion of two bubbles in a Newtonian fluid (a glycerin-water solution), a Boger fluid (aqueous polyacrylamide solution), and a shear-thinning fluid (aqueous xanthan solution). For the case of shear-thinning fluids, the power index, n, affects the tendency of the bubble pair to aggregate. Therefore, in addition to bubble separation, orientation and Reynolds number, the hydrodynamic force depends strongly on the shear-thinning nature of the fluid. Several examples will be shown. For elastic fluids, the Deborah number affects the hydrodynamic interaction. We found that the appearance of the negative wake changes the nature of the interaction substantially. Some examples and comparisons with numerical results will be presented.

  13. Biodegradation of Microcystins during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) Ultrafiltration

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Esther; Villiger, Jörg; Posch, Thomas; Derlon, Nicolas; Shabarova, Tanja; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Pernthaler, Jakob; Blom, Judith F.

    2014-01-01

    Gravity-driven membrane (GDM) ultrafiltration systems require little maintenance: they operate without electricity at ultra-low pressure in dead-end mode and without control of the biofilm formation. These systems are already in use for water purification in some regions of the world where adequate treatment and distribution of drinking water is not readily available. However, many water bodies worldwide exhibit harmful blooms of cyanobacteria that severely lower the water quality due to the production of toxic microcystins (MCs). We studied the performance of a GDM system during an artificial Microcystis aeruginosa bloom in lake water and its simulated collapse (i.e., the massive release of microcystins) over a period of 21 days. Presence of live or destroyed cyanobacterial cells in the feed water decreased the permeate flux in the Microcystis treatments considerably. At the same time, the microbial biofilms on the filter membranes could successfully reduce the amount of microcystins in the filtrate below the critical threshold concentration of 1 µg L−1 MC for human consumption in three out of four replicates after 15 days. We found pronounced differences in the composition of bacterial communities of the biofilms on the filter membranes. Bacterial genera that could be related to microcystin degradation substantially enriched in the biofilms amended with microcystin-containing cyanobacteria. In addition to bacteria previously characterized as microcystin degraders, members of other bacterial clades potentially involved in MC degradation could be identified. PMID:25369266

  14. Biodegradation of microcystins during gravity-driven membrane (GDM) ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Esther; Villiger, Jörg; Posch, Thomas; Derlon, Nicolas; Shabarova, Tanja; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Pernthaler, Jakob; Blom, Judith F

    2014-01-01

    Gravity-driven membrane (GDM) ultrafiltration systems require little maintenance: they operate without electricity at ultra-low pressure in dead-end mode and without control of the biofilm formation. These systems are already in use for water purification in some regions of the world where adequate treatment and distribution of drinking water is not readily available. However, many water bodies worldwide exhibit harmful blooms of cyanobacteria that severely lower the water quality due to the production of toxic microcystins (MCs). We studied the performance of a GDM system during an artificial Microcystis aeruginosa bloom in lake water and its simulated collapse (i.e., the massive release of microcystins) over a period of 21 days. Presence of live or destroyed cyanobacterial cells in the feed water decreased the permeate flux in the Microcystis treatments considerably. At the same time, the microbial biofilms on the filter membranes could successfully reduce the amount of microcystins in the filtrate below the critical threshold concentration of 1 µg L(-1) MC for human consumption in three out of four replicates after 15 days. We found pronounced differences in the composition of bacterial communities of the biofilms on the filter membranes. Bacterial genera that could be related to microcystin degradation substantially enriched in the biofilms amended with microcystin-containing cyanobacteria. In addition to bacteria previously characterized as microcystin degraders, members of other bacterial clades potentially involved in MC degradation could be identified. PMID:25369266

  15. Noncommutative minisuperspace, gravity-driven acceleration, and kinetic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, S. M. M.; Moniz, Paulo Vargas

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce a noncommutative version of the Brans-Dicke (BD) theory and obtain the Hamiltonian equations of motion for a spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe filled with a perfect fluid. We focus on the case where the scalar potential as well as the ordinary matter sector are absent. Then, we investigate gravity-driven acceleration and kinetic inflation in this noncommutative BD cosmology. In contrast to the commutative case, in which the scale factor and BD scalar field are in a power-law form, in the noncommutative case the power-law scalar factor is multiplied by a dynamical exponential warp factor. This warp factor depends on the noncommutative parameter as well as the momentum conjugate associated to the BD scalar field. We show that the BD scalar field and the scale factor effectively depend on the noncommutative parameter. For very small values of this parameter, we obtain an appropriate inflationary solution, which can overcome problems within BD standard cosmology in a more efficient manner. Furthermore, a graceful exit from an early acceleration epoch towards a decelerating radiation epoch is provided. For late times, due to the presence of the noncommutative parameter, we obtain a zero acceleration epoch, which can be interpreted as the coarse-grained explanation.

  16. Gravity-Driven Thin Film Flow of an Ellis Fluid.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2013-12-01

    The thin film lubrication approximation has been studied extensively for moving contact lines of Newtonian fluids. However, many industrial and biological applications of the thin film equation involve shear-thinning fluids, which often also exhibit a Newtonian plateau at low shear. This study presents new numerical simulations of the three-dimensional (i.e. two-dimensional spreading), constant-volume, gravity-driven, free surface flow of an Ellis fluid. The numerical solution was validated with a new similarity solution, compared to previous experiments, and then used in a parametric study. The parametric study centered around rheological data for an example biological application of thin film flow: topical drug delivery of anti-HIV microbicide formulations, e.g. hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) polymer solutions. The parametric study evaluated how spreading length and front velocity saturation depend on Ellis parameters. A lower concentration polymer solution with smaller zero shear viscosity (η 0), τ 1/2, and λ values spread further. However, when comparing any two fluids with any possible combinations of Ellis parameters, the impact of changing one parameter on spreading length depends on the direction and magnitude of changes in the other two parameters. In addition, the isolated effect of the shear-thinning parameter, λ, on the front velocity saturation depended on τ 1/2. This study highlighted the relative effects of the individual Ellis parameters, and showed that the shear rates in this flow were in both the shear-thinning and plateau regions of rheological behavior, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the full range of shear-rates in rheological measurements. The validated numerical model and parametric study provides a useful tool for future steps to optimize flow of a fluid with rheological behavior well-described by the Ellis constitutive model, in a range of industrial and biological applications. PMID:25309029

  17. Gravity-Driven Thin Film Flow of an Ellis Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.

    2014-01-01

    The thin film lubrication approximation has been studied extensively for moving contact lines of Newtonian fluids. However, many industrial and biological applications of the thin film equation involve shear-thinning fluids, which often also exhibit a Newtonian plateau at low shear. This study presents new numerical simulations of the three-dimensional (i.e. two-dimensional spreading), constant-volume, gravity-driven, free surface flow of an Ellis fluid. The numerical solution was validated with a new similarity solution, compared to previous experiments, and then used in a parametric study. The parametric study centered around rheological data for an example biological application of thin film flow: topical drug delivery of anti-HIV microbicide formulations, e.g. hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) polymer solutions. The parametric study evaluated how spreading length and front velocity saturation depend on Ellis parameters. A lower concentration polymer solution with smaller zero shear viscosity (η0), τ1/2, and λ values spread further. However, when comparing any two fluids with any possible combinations of Ellis parameters, the impact of changing one parameter on spreading length depends on the direction and magnitude of changes in the other two parameters. In addition, the isolated effect of the shear-thinning parameter, λ, on the front velocity saturation depended on τ1/2. This study highlighted the relative effects of the individual Ellis parameters, and showed that the shear rates in this flow were in both the shear-thinning and plateau regions of rheological behavior, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the full range of shear-rates in rheological measurements. The validated numerical model and parametric study provides a useful tool for future steps to optimize flow of a fluid with rheological behavior well-described by the Ellis constitutive model, in a range of industrial and biological applications. PMID:25309029

  18. Gravity driven current during the coalescence of two sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Oberdick, Samuel D.; Swanson, Ellen R.; Anna, Shelley L.; Garoff, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Coalescence of liquid drops is critical in many phenomena such as emulsion stability, inkjet printing, and coating applications. For sessile drops on a solid surface, the coalescence process is more complicated than the coalescence of drops suspended in a fluid medium as a result of the coupling of the contact line motions to the fluid flow. In this paper, we use video microscopy to track the evolution of the interfaces and contact lines as well as the internal fluid motion within a merged sessile droplet. In this study, the fluids in the coalescing drops are miscible and have similar surface tensions and drop volumes but different viscosities and densities. Coalescence occurs in three stages. During the first stage, rapid healing of the bridge between the drops occurs just after they touch. In the second stage, slower rearrangement of the liquids occurs. We show that these intermediate rearrangements are driven by gravity even for density differences of the two fluids as small as 1%. For the systems examined, little to no mixing occurs during these first two stages. Finally, in the third stage, diffusion leads to mixing of the fluids. Dimensional analysis reveals the scaling of the intermediate flow behavior as a function of density difference and geometric dimensions of the merged drop; however, the scaling with viscosity is more complicated, motivating development of a lubrication analysis of the coalescence problem. Numerical calculations based on the lubrication analysis capture aspects of the experimental observations and reveal the governing forces and time scales of the coalescence process. The results reveal that internal fluid motions persist over much longer time scales than imaging of the external interface alone would reveal. Furthermore, nearly imperceptible motions of the external composite drop interface can lead to important deviations from the predominant gravity current scaling, where viscous resistance of the lighter fluid layer plays a

  19. Diffusive smoothing of surfzone bathymetry by gravity-driven sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M. R.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity-driven sediment transport often is assumed to have a small effect on the evolution of nearshore morphology. Here, it is shown that down-slope gravity-driven sediment transport is an important process acting to smooth steep bathymetric features in the surfzone. Gravity-driven transport can be modeled as a diffusive term in the sediment continuity equation governing temporal (t) changes in bed level (h): ∂h/∂t ≈ κ ▽2h, where κ is a sediment diffusion coefficient that is a function of the bed shear stress (τb) and sediment properties, such as the grain size and the angle of repose. Field observations of waves, currents, and the evolution of large excavated holes (initially 10-m wide and 2-m deep, with sides as steep as 35°) in an energetic surfzone are consistent with diffusive smoothing by gravity. Specifically, comparisons of κ estimated from the measured bed evolution with those estimated with numerical model results for several transport theories suggest that gravity-driven sediment transport dominates the bed evolution, with κ proportional to a power of τb. The models are initiated with observed bathymetry and forced with observed waves and currents. The diffusion coefficients from the measurements and from the model simulations were on average of order 10-5 m2/s, implying evolution time scales of days for features with length scales of 10 m. The dependence of κ on τb varies for different transport theories and for high and low shear stress regimes. The US Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility, Duck, NC provided excellent logistical support. Funded by a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship, a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the Office of Naval Research.

  20. Shock wave mitigation using Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xingtian; Colvert, Brendan; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. High-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors allow measurement during the relevant shock interaction time periods of the liquid-gas interface. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. In particular, the effects of viscous properties of the fluid are considered when using non-Newtonian dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids. Experiments have been performed with both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The impact of a shock waves on Non-newtonian fluids is compared to that of Newtonian fluids. Experiments show that non-Newtonian fluids have very strong reflection properties, acting like solid walls under the impact of a shock wave. Further work is to be performed to compare quantitatively the properties of Newtonian vs. non-Newtonian fluids.

  1. Resonator response to Non-Newtonian fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Schneider, T.W.; Frye, G.C.; Cernosek, R.W.; Senturia, S.D.

    1994-06-01

    The thickness-shear mode (TSM) resonator typically consists of a thin disk of AT-cut quartz with circular electrodes patterned on both sides. An RF voltage applied between these electrodes excites a shear mode mechanical resonance when the excitation frequency matches the crystal resonant frequency. When the TSM resonator is operated in contact with a liquid, the shear motion of the surface generates motion in the contacting liquid. The liquid velocity field, v{sub x}(y), can be determined by solving the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation. Newtonian fluids cause an equal increase in resonator motional resistance and reactance, R{sub 2}{sup (N)} = X{sub 2}{sup (N)}, with the response depending only on the liquid density-viscosity product ({rho}{eta}). Non-Newtonian fluids, as illustrated by the simple example of a Maxwell fluid, can cause unequal increases in motional resistance and reactance. For the Maxwell fluid, R{sub 2}{sup (M)} > X{sub 2}{sup (M)}, with relaxation time {tau} proportional to the difference between R{sub 2}{sup (M)}and X{sub 2}{sup (M)}. Early results indicate that a TSM resonator can be used to extract properties of non-Newtonian fluids.

  2. The moving boundary approach to modeling gravity-driven stable and unstable flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindt, Naaran; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Many field and laboratory studies in the last 40 years have found that water flow in homogeneous soil profiles may occur in preferential flow pathways rather than in a laterally uniform wetting front, as expected from classical soil physics theory and expressed by the Richards equation. The water-content distribution within such gravity-driven fingers was found to be nonmonotonic due to water accumulation behind a sharp wetting front (denoted as saturation overshoot). The unstable flow was first related to soil coarseness. However, its appearance in water-repellent soils led the authors to hypothesize that gravity-driven unstable flow formation is triggered by a non-zero contact angle between water and soil particles. Despite its widespread occurrence, a macroscopic-type model describing the nonmonotonic water distribution and sharp wetting front is still lacking. The moving boundary approach, which divides the flow domain into two well-defined subdomains with a sharp change in fluid saturation between them, is suggested to replace the classical approach of solving the Richards equation for the entire flow domain. The upper subdomain consists of water and air, whose relationship varies with space and time following the imposed boundary condition at the soil surface as calculated by the Richards equation. The lower subdomain also consists of water and air, but their relationship remains constant following the predetermined initial condition. The moving boundary between the two subdomains is the sharp wetting front, whose location is part of the solution. As such, the problem is inherently nonlinear. The wetting front's movement is controlled by the dynamic water-entry pressure of the soil, which depends on soil wettability and the front's propagation rate. A lower soil wettability, which hinders the spontaneous invasion of dry pores and increases the water-entry pressure, induces a sharp wetting front and water accumulation behind it. The wetting front starts to

  3. In situ polymerized superhydrophobic and superoleophilic nanofibrous membranes for gravity driven oil-water separation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaomin; Si, Yang; Ge, Jianlong; Ding, Bin; Liu, Lifang; Zheng, Gang; Luo, Wenjing; Yu, Jianyong

    2013-12-01

    Creating an efficient, cost-effective method that can provide simple, practical and high-throughput separation of oil-water mixtures has proved extremely challenging. This work responds to these challenges by designing, fabricating and evaluating a novel fluorinated polybenzoxazine (F-PBZ) modified nanofibrous membrane optimized to achieve gravity driven oil-water separation. The membrane design is then realized by a facile combination of electrospun poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (PMIA) nanofibers and an in situ polymerized F-PBZ functional layer incorporating SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs). By employing the F-PBZ/SiO2 NP modification, the pristine hydrophilic PMIA nanofibrous membranes are endowed with promising superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 161° and superoleophilicity with an oil contact angle of 0°. This new membrane shows high thermal stability (350 °C) and good repellency to hot water (80 °C), and achieves an excellent mechanical strength of 40.8 MPa. Furthermore, the as-prepared membranes exhibited fast and efficient separation of oil-water mixtures by a solely gravity driven process, which makes them good candidates for industrial oil-polluted water treatments and oil spill cleanup, and also provided new insights into the design and development of functional nanofibrous membranes through F-PBZ modification. PMID:24100352

  4. Gravity-driven structures and rift basin evolution: Rio Muni Basin, offshore equatorial West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    Offshore Equatorial Guinea, west Africa, gravity-driven nappes, more than 1 km thick and 15 km from head to toe, provide key evidence in reconstructing the late synrift: evolution of this part of the South Atlantic margin basin system. Furthermore, Aptian-Cenomanian carbonate and clastic rocks in the nappes` allochthonous hanging walls are attracting interest as a new exploration play in west Africa. The nappes exhibit a range of geometries that suggest they share many of the same deformation processes as thin-skin thrust and linked extensional fault systems. Not only are these structures significant in their own right, representing a rare example of gravity tectonics in the virtual absence of major halokinesis, but their presence may record an other-wise undetectable process active during the transition from a rift basin to a passive continental margin. A review of Equatorial Guinea in its pre-Atlantic configuration, alongside neighboring basins in Brazil (the Sergipe-Alagoas basin) and Gabon, suggests that gravity gliding was sustained by a relatively steep, westward paleoslope promoted by east-ward offset of the locus of thermal uplift from the rift basin (i.e., a simple shear model of basin formation). In contrast to gravity-driven structures in most postrift settings, the Equatorial Guinea nappes developed at the close of the Aptian-Albian synrift episode in response to a growing bathymetric deep caused by rapid subsidence outpacing restricted sedimentation.

  5. Generalized reynolds number for non-newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madlener, K.; Frey, B.; Ciezki, H. K.

    2009-09-01

    An extended version of the generalized Reynolds number was derived to characterize the duct flow of non-Newtonian gelled fluids of the Herschel-Bulkley-Extended (HBE) type. This number allows also estimating the transition from laminar to turbulent flow conditions. An experimental investigation was conducted with a capillary rheometer for several non-Newtonian gelled fluids to evaluate the introduced HBE-generalized Reynolds number Regen HBE. A good correlation between the experimental results and the theory could be found for laminar flow conditions. For one of the examined gelled fuels, the necessary high Reynolds numbers could be realized so that the transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow regime could be measured. Because of its general description, the HBE-generalized Reynolds number can also be applied to Newtonian liquids as well as to non-Newtonian fluids of the Herschel-Bulkley (HB), Ostwald-de-Waele (power-law, PL), and Bingham type.

  6. On the continuum-scale simulation of gravity-driven fingers with hysteretic Richards equation: Trucation error induced numerical artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    ELIASSI,MEHDI; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-03-08

    The authors consider the ability of the numerical solution of Richards equation to model gravity-driven fingers. Although gravity-driven fingers can be easily simulated using a partial downwind averaging method, they find the fingers are purely artificial, generated by the combined effects of truncation error induced oscillations and capillary hysteresis. Since Richards equation can only yield a monotonic solution for standard constitutive relations and constant flux boundary conditions, it is not the valid governing equation to model gravity-driven fingers, and therefore is also suspect for unsaturated flow in initially dry, highly nonlinear, and hysteretic media where these fingers occur. However, analysis of truncation error at the wetting front for the partial downwind method suggests the required mathematical behavior of a more comprehensive and physically based modeling approach for this region of parameter space.

  7. The LS-STAG immersed boundary method for non-Newtonian flows in irregular geometries: flow of shear-thinning liquids between eccentric rotating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, Olivier; Ait-Messaoud, Mazigh; Pertat, Adrien; Cheny, Yoann; Rigal, Claire

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the extension of a well-established immersed boundary/cut-cell method, the LS-STAG method (Cheny and Botella in J Comput Phys 229:1043-1076, 2010), to non-Newtonian flow computations in 2D irregular geometries. One of the distinguished features of our IB method is to use level-set techniques in the cut-cells near the irregular boundary, where accurate discretization is of paramount importance for stability and accuracy of the computations. For this purpose, we present here an accurate discretization of the velocity gradients and shear rate in the cut-cells that fits elegantly in the framework of the velocity-pressure-stress staggered arrangement and the special quadratures developed previously for viscoelastic flows. After assessing the accuracy of the discretization on a benchmark solution for power-law fluids, the LS-STAG code is applied to the flow of various shear-thinning xanthan solutions in a wide-gap, non-coaxial, Taylor-Couette reactor for which rheological characterization, experimental flow measurements (PIV) and FLUENT simulations have recently been performed in our group. Our numerical investigation will give new insight on the flow patterns (onset, size and position of the recirculation zone) and will firmly correlate them to global flow properties such as shear-thinning index, generalized Reynolds number and torque ratio at the cylinders.

  8. Slow viscous gravity-driven interaction between a bubble and a free surface with unequal surface tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guémas, Marine; Sellier, Antoine; Pigeonneau, Franck

    2015-04-01

    The axisymmetric gravity-driven dynamics of a bubble rising toward a free surface is addressed for gas-liquid interfaces having unequal surface tensions. The liquid flow is governed by the Stokes equations which are here solved using a boundary element method in axisymmetric configuration. Within this framework, two dimensionless numbers arise: the Bond number Bo1 based on the surface tension of the bubble interface and the surface tension ratio γ ˆ comparing the free surface and bubble surface tensions. Under a careful and discussed selection of the code key settings (number of boundary elements, initial bubble location, and distance beyond which the free surface is truncated), it has been possible to numerically and accurately track in time the bubble and free surface shapes for several values of ( Bo 1 , γ ˆ ) . The long-time shapes are found to deeply depend upon both Bo1 and γ ˆ and also to compare well with the shapes predicted in Princen and Mason ["Shape of a fluid drop at a fluid-liquid interface. II. Theory for three-phase systems," J. Colloid. Sci. 20, 246-266 (1965)] using a hydrostatic model in which both surfaces are touching. Similarly, the drainage dynamics of the liquid film thickness between the bubble and the free surface depends on ( Bo 1 , γ ˆ ) . The long-time film thickness exponentially decays in time and a so-called thinning rate α for which the numerical behaviors and a simple model reveal two basic behaviors: (i) at small Bond number, α behaves as 1/Bo1 and (ii) at large Bond number, α is nearly constant. In addition, it is found that in the entire range of the quantity χ = ( 1 + γ ˆ ) Bo 1 / ( 2 γ ˆ ) , the thinning rate α is well approximated by the function 1/(18χ) + α∞ with α∞ ≈ 0.158. Such a result also permits one to estimate the typical drainage time versus the initial bubble radius a, the liquid density ρ and viscosity μ, the gravity and the free surface, and bubble surface tensions.

  9. A discontinuous Galerkin method for gravity-driven viscous fingering instabilities in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scovazzi, G.; Gerstenberger, A.; Collis, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new approach to the simulation of gravity-driven viscous fingering instabilities in porous media flow. These instabilities play a very important role during carbon sequestration processes in brine aquifers. Our approach is based on a nonlinear implementation of the discontinuous Galerkin method, and possesses a number of key features. First, the method developed is inherently high order, and is therefore well suited to study unstable flow mechanisms. Secondly, it maintains high-order accuracy on completely unstructured meshes. The combination of these two features makes it a very appealing strategy in simulating the challenging flow patterns and very complex geometries of actual reservoirs and aquifers. This article includes an extensive set of verification studies on the stability and accuracy of the method, and also features a number of computations with unstructured grids and non-standard geometries.

  10. Improvements on a gravity-driven low-rate particle feeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shaolong; Chen, Wei-Yin; Gowan, George

    2009-07-01

    A gravity-driven particle feeder has been modified to achieve sustained operation at steady rates. Particle reservoirs and rod for controlling the nozzle opening are completely redesigned. Particle attrition and rod wobbling are the two main contributors to the feed instabilities. They, in turn, are affected by the height of the particle bed, particle contact time with the moving rod, strength of the magnetic field, and the weight, shape, and position of the rod in the magnetic field. A secondary reservoir minimizes the residence time of particles in the main reservoir. Its shape, orientation, and connection with the main reservoir have profound influences on the feeding stabilities. Tests have been conducted with particles of different types, sizes, and feed rates; results showed good long-term and short-term stabilities.

  11. In situ polymerized superhydrophobic and superoleophilic nanofibrous membranes for gravity driven oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaomin; Si, Yang; Ge, Jianlong; Ding, Bin; Liu, Lifang; Zheng, Gang; Luo, Wenjing; Yu, Jianyong

    2013-11-01

    Creating an efficient, cost-effective method that can provide simple, practical and high-throughput separation of oil-water mixtures has proved extremely challenging. This work responds to these challenges by designing, fabricating and evaluating a novel fluorinated polybenzoxazine (F-PBZ) modified nanofibrous membrane optimized to achieve gravity driven oil-water separation. The membrane design is then realized by a facile combination of electrospun poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (PMIA) nanofibers and an in situ polymerized F-PBZ functional layer incorporating SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs). By employing the F-PBZ/SiO2 NP modification, the pristine hydrophilic PMIA nanofibrous membranes are endowed with promising superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 161° and superoleophilicity with an oil contact angle of 0°. This new membrane shows high thermal stability (350 °C) and good repellency to hot water (80 °C), and achieves an excellent mechanical strength of 40.8 MPa. Furthermore, the as-prepared membranes exhibited fast and efficient separation of oil-water mixtures by a solely gravity driven process, which makes them good candidates for industrial oil-polluted water treatments and oil spill cleanup, and also provided new insights into the design and development of functional nanofibrous membranes through F-PBZ modification.Creating an efficient, cost-effective method that can provide simple, practical and high-throughput separation of oil-water mixtures has proved extremely challenging. This work responds to these challenges by designing, fabricating and evaluating a novel fluorinated polybenzoxazine (F-PBZ) modified nanofibrous membrane optimized to achieve gravity driven oil-water separation. The membrane design is then realized by a facile combination of electrospun poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (PMIA) nanofibers and an in situ polymerized F-PBZ functional layer incorporating SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs). By employing the F-PBZ/SiO2 NP

  12. Salt tectonics and gravity driven deformation: Structural guidelines for exploration in passive margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mauduit, T.; Gwenael G.; Brun, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    The West African Margin, (Gulf of Guinea) presents spectacular examples of gravity driven deformation above a salt decollement (i.e. growth faulting, rafts, diapirs and contractional structures) which have been documented by numerous Oil and Gas investigations. Seismic data demonstrate that the variation of deformation styles in space and time appear to be function of: regional geometry of the margin (i.e. value of basal slope and presence/absence of residual reliefs below the salt layers) and, mode, rate and repartition of sedimentation. The role and effects of the above parameters were analyzed using laboratory modeling investigation based on basic structural patterns identified through seismic data. Models are built with sand and silicone putty, that respectively represent the frictional behavior of upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic cover and the viscous behavior of the upper Aptian salt. They are scaled to fit observed natural configurations. Results are compared with examples from the Gulf of Guinea on the basis of seismic data. This approach allowed to better understand the evolution of the margin and therefore the reservoir distributions and traps geometries.

  13. Characterizing local forces and rearrangements inside a gravity-driven granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackray, Emma; Nordstrom, Kerstin

    While the gravity-driven flow of a granular material in a silo geometry can be modeled by the Beverloo equation, the mesoscale-level particle rearrangements and interactions that drive this flow are not well-understood. We have constructed a quasi-two-dimensional system of bidisperse, millimeter-scale disks with photoelastic properties that make force networks within the material visible. The system is contained in an acrylic box with an adjustable bottom opening. We can approach the clogging transition by adjusting this opening and by adding external forcing to the top of the flowing pile. By placing the system between cross-polarizers, we can obtain high-speed video of this system during flow, and extract intensity signals that can be used to identify and quantify localized, otherwise indeterminate forces. We can simultaneously track individual particle motions, which can be used to identify shear transformation zones in the system. We are therefore able to correlate local forces with rearrangements within the system, and characterize the evolution of this interplay on the approach to the clogging transition.

  14. Modeling gravity-driven fingering in rough-walled fractures using modified percolation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Pore scale invasion percolation theory is modified for imbibition of.wetting fluids into fractures. The effects of gravity, local aperture field geometry, and local in-plane air/water interfacial curvatureare included in the calculation of aperture filling potential which controls wetted structure growth within the fracture. The inclusion of gravity yields fingers oriented in the direction of the gravitational gradient. These fingers widen and tend to meander and branch more as the gravitational gradient decreases. In-plane interfacial curvature also greatly affects the wetted structure in both horizontal and nonhorizontal fractures causing the formation of macroscopic wetting fronts. The modified percolation model is used to simulate imbibition into an analogue rough-walled fracture where both fingering and horizontal imbibition experiments were previously conducted. Comparison of numerical and experimental results showed reasonably good agreement. This process oriented physical and numerical modeling is-a necessary step toward including gravity-driven fingering in models of flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock.

  15. Comparative study of disinfectants for use in low-cost gravity driven household water purifiers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajshree A; Kausley, Shankar B; Balkunde, Pradeep L; Malhotra, Chetan P

    2013-09-01

    Point-of-use (POU) gravity-driven household water purifiers have been proven to be a simple, low-cost and effective intervention for reducing the impact of waterborne diseases in developing countries. The goal of this study was to compare commonly used water disinfectants for their feasibility of adoption in low-cost POU water purifiers. The potency of each candidate disinfectant was evaluated by conducting a batch disinfection study for estimating the concentration of disinfectant needed to inactivate a given concentration of the bacterial strain Escherichia coli ATCC 11229. Based on the concentration of disinfectant required, the size, weight and cost of a model purifier employing that disinfectant were estimated. Model purifiers based on different disinfectants were compared and disinfectants which resulted in the most safe, compact and inexpensive purifiers were identified. Purifiers based on bromine, tincture iodine, calcium hypochlorite and sodium dichloroisocyanurate were found to be most efficient, cost effective and compact with replacement parts costing US$3.60-6.00 for every 3,000 L of water purified and are thus expected to present the most attractive value proposition to end users. PMID:23981873

  16. Gravity-driven creeping flow of two adjacent layers through a channel and down a plane wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozrikidis, C.

    1998-09-01

    We study the stability of the interface between (a) two adjacent viscous layers flowing due to gravity through an inclined or vertical channel that is confined between two parallel plane walls, and (b) two superimposed liquid films flowing down an inclined or vertical plane wall, in the limit of Stokes flow. In the case of channel flow, linear stability analysis predicts that, when the fluids are stably stratified, the flow is neutrally stable when the surface tension vanishes and the channel is vertical, and stable otherwise. This behaviour contrasts with that of the gravity-driven flow of two superimposed films flowing down an inclined plane, where an instability has been identified when the viscosity of the fluid next to the plane is less than that of the top fluid, even in the absence of fluid inertia. We investigate the nonlinear stages of the motion subject to finite-amplitude two-dimensional perturbations by numerical simulations based on boundary-integral methods. In both cases of channel and film flow, the mathematical formulation results in integral equations for the unknown interface and free-surface velocity. The properties of the integral equation for multi-film flow are investigated with reference to the feasibility of computing a solution by the method of successive substitutions, and a deflation strategy that allows an iterative procedure is developed. In the case of channel flow, the numerical simulations show that disturbances of sufficiently large amplitude may cause permanent deformation in which the interface folds or develops elongated fingers. The ratio of the viscosities and densities of the two fluids plays an important role in determining the morphology of the emerging interfacial patterns. Comparing the numerical results with the predictions of a model based on the lubrication approximation shows that the simplified approach can only describe a limited range of motions. In the case of film flow down an inclined plane, we develop a method

  17. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    PubMed

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions. PMID:25980642

  18. [Kinetic theory and boundary conditions for flows of highly inelastic spheres: Application to gravity driven granular flows down bumpy inclines

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this quarter, we extended our study of the effects of isotropic boundary vibrations to steady, gravity driven, inclined granular flows. These flows are more complex than those considered last quarter because of the presence of slip and mean velocity gradients at the boundary. Consequently, it was first necessary to modify the boundary conditions derived by Richman (1992) to account for corrections to the flow particle velocity distribution function from velocity gradients. In what follows we only summarize the results obtained.

  19. The non-Newtonian heat and mass transport of He 2 in porous media used for vapor-liquid phase separation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.

    1985-01-01

    This investigation of vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) of He 2 is related to long-term storage of cryogenic liquid. The VLPS system utilizes porous plugs in order to generate thermomechanical (thermo-osmotic) force which in turn prevents liquid from flowing out of the cryo-vessel (e.g., Infrared Astronomical Satellite). An apparatus was built and VLPS data were collected for a 2 and a 10 micrometer sintered stainless steel plug and a 5 to 15 micrometer sintered bronze plug. The VLPS data obtained at high temperature were in the nonlinear turbulent regime. At low temperature, the Stokes regime was approached. A turbulent flow model was developed, which provides a phenomenological description of the VLPS data. According to the model, most of the phase separation data are in the turbulent regime. The model is based on concepts of the Gorter-Mellink transport involving the mutual friction known from the zero net mass flow (ZNMF) studies. The latter had to be modified to obtain agreement with the present experimental VLPS evidence. In contrast to the well-known ZNMF mode, the VLPS results require a geometry dependent constant (Gorter-Mellink constant). A theoretical interpretation of the phenomenological equation for the VLPS data obtained, is based on modelling of the dynamics of quantized vortices proposed by Vinen. In extending Vinen's model to the VLPS transport of He 2 in porous media, a correlation between the K*(GM) and K(p) was obtained which permits an interpretation of the present findings. As K(p) is crucial, various methods were introduced to measure the permeability of the porous media at low temperatures. Good agreement was found between the room temperature and the low temperature K(p)-value of the plugs.

  20. Non-Newtonian Fluids Spreading with Surface Tension Effect: 3D Numerical Analysis Using FEM and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah

    2010-11-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow down an incline is studied for optimal design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. We develop a 3D FEM model using non-Newtonian mechanics to model the flow of gels in response to gravity, surface tension and shear-thinning. Constant volume setup is applied within the lubrication approximation scope. The lengthwise profiles of the 3D model agree with our previous 2D finite difference model, while the transverse contact line patterns of the 3D model are compared to the experiments. With incorporation of surface tension, capillary ridges are observed at the leading front in both 2D and 3D models. Previously published studies show that capillary ridge can amplify the fingering instabilities in transverse direction. Sensitivity studies (2D & 3D) and experiments are carried out to describe the influence of surface tension and shear-thinning on capillary ridge and fingering instabilities.

  1. Laboratory and numerical simulations of gravity-driven coastal currents: Departures from geostrophic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio, S. O.; Haidvogel, D. B.; Thomas, P. J.; Taskinoglu, E. S.; Skeen, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory realizations and numerical simulations of buoyant, gravity-driven coastal plumes are summarized and compared to the inviscid geostrophic theory of Thomas and Linden (2007). The lengths, widths and velocities of the buoyant currents, as well as their internal structure and dynamics, are studied. Agreement between the laboratory and numerical experiments and the geostrophic theory is found to depend on two non-dimensional parameters which characterize, respectively, the steepness of the plumes isopycnal interface ( I) and the strength of horizontal viscous forces ( EkH, the horizontal Ekman number). In general, the numerical and laboratory experiments are in good agreement when conducted at comparable values of I and EkH. The best agreement between experiments (both laboratory and numerical) and the geostrophic theory are found for the least viscous flows, though important departures from the theoretical predictions are nonetheless found, particularly in the early development of the plume system. At elevated values of the horizontal Ekman number, laboratory and numerical experiments depart more significantly from theory, e.g., in the rate of plume movement along the coast. A simple extension to the geostrophic theory suggests that the discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental propagation speed should be proportional to the square root of the horizontal Ekman number. The numerical simulations confirm this relationship. For some combinations of the non-dimensional parameters, instabilities develop in the seaward edge of the buoyant plumes. The laboratory and numerical experiments are used together to infer the region within parameter space within which the instabilities occur. Mixing of ambient and buoyant fluids by the plume-edge instabilities is explored using the numerical results.

  2. Optimization of gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration process for seawater pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Hochstrasser, Florian; Akhondi, Ebrahim; Ambauen, Noëmi; Tschirren, Lukas; Burkhardt, Michael; Fane, Anthony G; Pronk, Wouter

    2016-04-15

    Seawater pretreatment by gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration at 40 mbar has been investigated. In this system, a beneficial biofilm develops on the membrane that helps to stabilize flux. The effects of membrane type, prefiltration and system configuration on stable flux, biofilm layer properties and dissolved carbon removal were studied. The results show that the use of flat sheet PVDF membranes with pore sizes of 0.22 and 0.45 μm in GDM filtration achieved higher stabilized permeate fluxes (7.3-8.4 L/m(2)h) than that of flat sheet PES 100 kD membranes and hollow fibre PVDF 0.1 μm membranes. Pore constriction and cake filtration were identified as major membrane fouling mechanisms, but their relative contributions varied with filtration time for the various membranes. Compared to raw seawater, prefiltering of seawater with meshes at sizes of 10, 100 and 1000 μm decreased the permeate flux, which was attributed to removal of beneficial eukaryotic populations. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed that the porosity of the biofouling layer was more significantly related with permeate flux development rather than its thickness and roughness. To increase the contact time between the biofilm and the dissolved organics, a hybrid biofilm-submerged GDM reactor was evaluated, which displayed significantly higher permeate fluxes than the submerged GDM reactor. Although integrating the biofilm reactor with the membrane system displayed better permeate quality than the GDM filtration cells, it could not effectively reduce dissolved organic substances in the seawater. This may be attributed to the decomposition/degradation of solid organic substances in the feed and carbon fixation by the biofilm. Further studies of the dynamic carbon balance are required. PMID:26900974

  3. Enhancing gas-liquid mass transfer rates in non-newtonian fermentations by confining mycelial growth to microbeads in a bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Gbewonyo, K.; Wang, D.I.C.

    1983-12-01

    The performance of a penicillin fermentation was assessed in a laboratory-scale bubble column fermentor, with mycelial growth confined to the pore matrix of celite beads. Final cell densities of 29 g/L and penicillin titres of 5.5 g/L were obtained in the confined cell cultures. In comparison, cultures of free mycelial cells grown in the absence of beads experienced dissolved oxygen limitations in the bubble column, giving only 17 g/L final cell concentrations with equally low penicillin titres of 2 g/L. The better performance of the confined cell cultures was attributed to enhanced gas liquid mass transfer rates, with mass transfer coefficients (k /SUB L/ a) two to three times higher than those determined in the free cell cultures. Furthermore, the confined cell cultures showed more efficient utilization of power input for mass transfer, providing up to 50% reduction in energy requirements for aeration.

  4. Self-diffusion in the non-Newtonian regime of shearing liquid crystal model systems based on the Gay-Berne potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten; Wang, Yong-Lei; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2016-02-01

    The self-diffusion coefficients of nematic phases of various model systems consisting of regular convex calamitic and discotic ellipsoids and non-convex bodies such as bent-core molecules and soft ellipsoid strings have been obtained as functions of the shear rate in a shear flow. Then the self-diffusion coefficient is a second rank tensor with three different diagonal components and two off-diagonal components. These coefficients were found to be determined by a combination of two mechanisms, which previously have been found to govern the self-diffusion of shearing isotropic liquids, namely, (i) shear alignment enhancing the diffusion in the direction parallel to the streamlines and hindering the diffusion in the perpendicular directions and (ii) the distortion of the shell structure in the liquid whereby a molecule more readily can escape from a surrounding shell of nearest neighbors, so that the mobility increases in every direction. Thus, the diffusion parallel to the streamlines always increases with the shear rate since these mechanisms cooperate in this direction. In the perpendicular directions, these mechanisms counteract each other so that the behaviour becomes less regular. In the case of the nematic phases of the calamitic and discotic ellipsoids and of the bent core molecules, mechanism (ii) prevails so that the diffusion coefficients increase. However, the diffusion coefficients of the soft ellipsoid strings decrease in the direction of the velocity gradient because the broadsides of these molecules are oriented perpendicularly to this direction due the shear alignment (i). The cross coupling coefficient relating a gradient of tracer particles in the direction of the velocity gradient and their flow in the direction of the streamlines is negative and rather large, whereas the other coupling coefficient relating a gradient in the direction of the streamlines and a flow in the direction of the velocity gradient is very small.

  5. Self-diffusion in the non-Newtonian regime of shearing liquid crystal model systems based on the Gay-Berne potential.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Wang, Yong-Lei; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2016-02-01

    The self-diffusion coefficients of nematic phases of various model systems consisting of regular convex calamitic and discotic ellipsoids and non-convex bodies such as bent-core molecules and soft ellipsoid strings have been obtained as functions of the shear rate in a shear flow. Then the self-diffusion coefficient is a second rank tensor with three different diagonal components and two off-diagonal components. These coefficients were found to be determined by a combination of two mechanisms, which previously have been found to govern the self-diffusion of shearing isotropic liquids, namely, (i) shear alignment enhancing the diffusion in the direction parallel to the streamlines and hindering the diffusion in the perpendicular directions and (ii) the distortion of the shell structure in the liquid whereby a molecule more readily can escape from a surrounding shell of nearest neighbors, so that the mobility increases in every direction. Thus, the diffusion parallel to the streamlines always increases with the shear rate since these mechanisms cooperate in this direction. In the perpendicular directions, these mechanisms counteract each other so that the behaviour becomes less regular. In the case of the nematic phases of the calamitic and discotic ellipsoids and of the bent core molecules, mechanism (ii) prevails so that the diffusion coefficients increase. However, the diffusion coefficients of the soft ellipsoid strings decrease in the direction of the velocity gradient because the broadsides of these molecules are oriented perpendicularly to this direction due the shear alignment (i). The cross coupling coefficient relating a gradient of tracer particles in the direction of the velocity gradient and their flow in the direction of the streamlines is negative and rather large, whereas the other coupling coefficient relating a gradient in the direction of the streamlines and a flow in the direction of the velocity gradient is very small. PMID:26851931

  6. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  7. Seismogenic slump folds formed by gravity-driven tectonics down a negligible subaqueous slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. Ian; Marco, Shmuel

    2013-10-01

    The Late Pleistocene Lisan Formation contains superb examples of soft-sediment deformation generated during gravity-driven slumping and failure down extremely gentle (< 1°) slopes towards the palaeo-Dead Sea Basin. Following a previously established framework, portions of individual slumps are broadly categorised into coherent, semi-coherent, and incoherent domains, reflecting increasing deformation and disarticulation of sediment. We present new structural data collected from each of these (overlapping) domains that demonstrate how the orientation of fold hinges and axial planes becomes more dispersed as slumps become increasingly incoherent. Such patterns are the reverse to that typically encountered in lithified rocks where increasing deformation results in clustering of linear elements towards the flow direction, and may reflect greater heterogeneity and disarticulation within slumps. Use of folds to determine palaeoslopes should therefore be limited to those from coherent slumps, where the opportunity for hinge dislocation and rotation is more limited. Within coherent and semi-coherent slumps, folds are reworked to create classic Type 1, 2 and 3 refold patterns during a single progressive deformation perhaps lasting just a matter of minutes. It is noteworthy that slump folds are typically lacking in smaller parasitic folds, implying that instantaneous development and/or limited viscosity contrasts have hindered the formation of second order folds. As deformation intensifies within semi-coherent to incoherent slumps, some fold hinges rotate towards the flow direction to create sheath folds. However, many fold hinges do not rotate into the flow direction, but rather roll downslope to form a new category of spiral folds. Extreme deformation may also generate semi-detached fold trains in which the short limbs of verging fold pairs are relatively thickened resulting in en-echelon X folds. The hinges of the sheared fold pair are reduced to apophyses, although these

  8. Modeling the shallow gravity-driven flows as saturated binary mixtures over temporally varying topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yih-Chin; Kuo, Chih-Yu

    2010-05-01

    Based on the "shallow water models over arbitrary topography" by Bouchut and Westdickenberg [2004], and the "Coulomb-mixture theory" by Iversion and Denlinger [2001], we propose a saturated binary mixture model over temporally varying topography, where the effects of the entrainment and deposition are considered. Due to the deposition or erosion processes, the interface between the moving material and the stagnant base is a non-material singular surface that moves with its own velocity. Its motion is thus determined by the mass exchange between the flowing layer and the ground. Through the introduction of the unified coordinate method (e.g. Hui [2004, 2007]) and dimension analysis, the leading-order depth-integrated mass and momentum equations are presented in the time-dependent and topography-fitted curvilinear coordinate system, where the evolving curvature effect is neatly included in the total derivative operator of the variable topography-fitted coordinates. The motion of the basal interface is postulated by function of basal friction coefficient, sliding velocity, local thickness of the flowing layer and a threshold kinetic energy. A shock-capturing numerical scheme is implemented to solve the derived equation system (e.g. Tai and Kuo [2008] or Tai and Lin [2008]). And the key features are investigated and illustrated by the numerical results. References: [1] F. Bouchut and M. Westdickenberg, "Gravity driven shallow water models for arbitrary topography." Commun. Math. Sci. 2, 359-389 (2004). [2] R.M. Iverson and R.P. Denlinger, "Flow of variably fluidized granular masses across three-dimensional terrain. Part 1 Coulomb mixture theory." J. Geophysical Research, 106, 537-552 (2001). [3] W.H. Hui, "A unified coordinates approach to computational Fluid dynamics." J. Comput. and Applied Math., 163, 15-28 (2004). [4] W.H. Hui. "The unified coordinate system in computational fluid dynamics." Commun. Comput. Phys., 2(4), 577-610 (2007). [5] Y.C. Tai and C.Y. Kuo, "A

  9. Investigation of Non-Newtonian Flow in Anaerobic Digesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, Jeremy M.

    This thesis examines how the non-Newtonian characteristics of liquid hog manure affect the flow conditions within a steady-flow anaerobic digester. There are three main parts to this thesis. In the first part of this thesis, the physical properties of liquid hog manure and their variation with temperature and solids concentration are experimentally determined. Naturally-settled manure sampled from an outdoor storage lagoon is studied, and density, viscosity, and particle size distribution are measured. Hog manure with total solids concentrations of less than 3.6% exhibits Newtonian behaviour; manure between 3.6% and 6.5% total solids is pseudoplastic, and fits the power law; manure with more than 6.5% total solids exhibits non-Newtonian and time-dependent characteristics. The second part of this thesis investigates the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids---represented by tap water and xanthan gum solution, respectively---within four lab-scale reactor geometries, using residence time distribution (RTD) experiments. The effect of reactor geometry, flow rate, and fluid viscosity are evaluated. In the third part of this thesis, flow conditions within lab-scale and pilot-scale anaerobic digester reactors are simulated using three-dimensional modeling techniques. The RTDs of lab-scale reactors as predicted by the 3D numerical models compare well to the experimental results. The 3D models are also validated using data from particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. Finally, the viscous properties of liquid hog manure at 3% and 8% total solids are incorporated into the models, and the results are evaluated.

  10. The extensional rheology of non-Newtonian materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegelberg, Stephen H.; Gaudet, Samuel; Mckinley, Gareth H.

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed to measure the extensional viscosity function of a non-Newtonian polymer solution in a reduced gravity environment as part of the Advanced Fluid Module. In ground-based extensional measurements, the no-sip boundary condition at solid-fluid interfaces always result in appreciable shear gradients in the test fluid; however the removal of gravitational body forces permits controlled extensional deformation of containerless test samples and the first unambiguous measurements of this kind. Imperative to successful implementation of this experiment is the generation and subsequent deformation of a stable cylindrical column of test fluid. A study of the generation and deformation of liquid bridges demonstrates that Newtonian liquid bridges undergo capillary breakup as anticipated when stretched beyond a critical aspect ratio; non-Newtonian liquid bridges, however, are stabilized by the strain-hardening phenomenon exhibited by these materials. Numerical simulations of Newtonian breakup are compared with experimental results, and show that previous ground-based attempts at measuring the extensional viscosity of Newtonian fluids are of limited accuracy.

  11. A comparison between laboratory and numerical simulations of gravity-driven coastal currents with a geostrophic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio, Sandy; Thomas, Peter; Haidvogel, Dale; Taskinoglu, Ezgi; Skeen, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    Laboratory and numerical simulations of buoyant, gravity-driven coastal currents are summarized and compared to the inviscid geostrophic theory of Thomas & Linden 2007. The lengths, widths and velocities of the buoyant currents are studied. Agreement between the laboratory and numerical experiments and the geostrophic theory is found to depend on two non-dimensional parameters which characterize, respectively, the steepness of the plumes isopycnal interface and the strength of horizontal viscous forces (quantified by the horizontal Ekman number). The best agreement between experiments (both laboratory and numerical) and the geostrophic theory are found for the least viscous flows. At elevated values of the horizontal Ekman number, laboratory and numerical experiments depart more significantly from theory. MEOM/LEGI from the 1st of October 2011.

  12. Experimental and theoretical study of fluid-structure interactions in plunging hydrofoils and gravity-driven falling plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun

    Two typical unsteady fluid-structure interaction problems have been investigated in the present study. One of them was about actively plunged flexible hydrofoil; the other was about gravity-driven falling plates in water. Real-time velocity field and dynamic response on the moving objects were measured to study these unsteady and highly nonlinear problems. For a long time, scientists have believed that bird and insect flight benefits greatly from the flexibility and morphing facility of their wings via flapping motion. A significant advantage flexible wing models have over quasi-steady rigid wing models is a much higher lift generation capability. Both experimental and computational studies have shown that the leading and trailing edge vortexes (LEV and TEV) play a major role in the efficient generation of such unconventionally high lift force. In this study, two NACA0012 miniature hydrofoils, one flexible and the other rigid, were actively plunged at various frequencies in a viscous glycerol-water solution to study the influence of flexibility. Two-dimensional, phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the temporal and spacial development of LEVs and TEVs. Simultaneous measurements of lift and thrust forces were recorded to reveal the relationship between hydrodynamic force and the evolution of the surrounding flow field. Results from the flexible hydrofoil were compared to those from the rigid one in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of flexibility. The second problem focused on fluid-structure interaction of gravity driven falling plates. Falling leaves and paper cards in air has drawn plenty of research interest in the past decades to investigate the interaction between the fluid flow and the falling object. In this research, time-resolved PIV were employed to experimentally visualize the flow field evolution around the gravity-driven falling plates. The plates were made of different materials with

  13. Gravity-driven hybrid membrane for oleophobic-superhydrophilic oil-water separation and water purification by graphene.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun; Na, Seung-Heon; Choi, Jae-Young; Latthe, Sanjay S; Swihart, Mark T; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Yoon, Sam S

    2014-10-01

    We prepared a simple, low-cost membrane suitable for gravity-driven oil-water separation and water purification. Composite membranes with selective wettability were fabricated from a mixture of aqueous poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) solution, sodium perfluorooctanoate, and silica nanoparticles. Simply dip-coating a stainless steel mesh using this mixture produced the oil-water separator. The contact angles (CAs) of hexadecane and water on the prepared composite membranes were 95 ± 2° and 0°, respectively, showing the oleophobicity and superhydrophilicity of the membrane. In addition, a graphene plug was stacked below the membrane to remove water-soluble organics by adsorption. As a result, this multifunctional device not only separates hexadecane from water, but also purifies water by the permeation of the separated water through the graphene plug. Here, methylene blue (MB) was removed as a demonstration. Membranes were characterized by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to elucidate the origin of their selective wettability. PMID:25192514

  14. Effect of operation parameters on the flux stabilization of gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration system for decentralized water supply.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaobin; Ding, An; Qu, Fangshu; Jia, Ruibao; Chang, Haiqing; Cheng, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Bin; Li, Guibai; Liang, Heng

    2016-08-01

    A pilot-scale gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration system under low gravitational pressure without any pre-treatment, backwash, flushing, or chemical cleaning was carried out to investigate the effect of operation parameters (including operation pressure, aeration mode, and intermittent filtration) on the effluent quality and permeability development. The results revealed that GDM system exhibited an efficient performance for the removal of suspended substances and organic compounds. The stabilization of flux occurred and the average values of stable flux were 6.6, 8.1, and 8.6 Lm(-2) h(-1) for pressures of 65, 120, and 200 mbar, respectively. In contrast, flux stabilization was not observed under continuous and intermittent aeration conditions. However, aeration (especially continuous aeration) was effective to improve flux and alleviate membrane fouling during 1-month operation. Moreover, intermittent filtration would influence the stabilization of permeate flux, resulting in a higher stable flux (ranging from 6 to 13 Lm(-2) h(-1)). The stable flux significantly improved with the increase of intermittent period. Additionally, GDM systems exhibited an efficient recovery of flux after simple physical cleaning and the analyses of resistance reversibility demonstrated that most of the total resistance was hydraulic reversible resistance (50-75 %). Therefore, it is expected that the results of this study can develop strategies to increase membrane permeability and reduce energy consumption in GDM systems for decentralized water supply. PMID:27189452

  15. Rarefaction-singular shock dynamics for conserved volume gravity driven particle-laden thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Mavromoustaki, A.; Bertozzi, A. L.; Urdaneta, G.; Huang, K.

    2015-03-01

    We employ a recently proposed model [Murisic et al., "Dynamics of particle settling and resuspension in viscous liquids," J. Fluid. Mech. 717, 203-231 (2013)] to study a finite-volume, particle-laden thin film flowing under gravity on an incline. For negatively buoyant particles with concentration above a critical value and buoyant particles, the particles accumulate at the front of the flow forming a particle-rich ridge, whose similarity solution is of the rarefaction-singular shock type. We investigate the structure in detail and find that the particle/fluid front advances linearly to the leading order with time to the one-third power as predicted by the Huppert solution [H. E. Huppert, "Flow and instability of a viscous current down a slope," Nature 300, 427-419 (1982)] for clear fluid (i.e., in the absence of particles). We also explore a deviation from this law when the particle concentration is high. Several experiments are carried out with both buoyant and negatively buoyant particles whose results qualitatively agree with the theoretics.

  16. Simulation of Non-Newtonian Emulsion Flows in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanichev, I. V.; Akhmadiev, F. G.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation of emulsion flows in differently shaped microchannels to reproduce the choking of such flows as a result of the effect of dynamic blocking has been made. A model of a highly concentrated emulsion as a structure of tightly packed deformed droplets surrounded by elastic shells is considered. The motion of liquid was determined by the method of the lattice Boltzmann equations together with the immersed boundary method. The influence of the non-Newtonian properties and of elastic turbulence of the indicated emulsion, as well as of the elasticity of the shells of its droplets and of the interaction of these shells on the emulsion motion in a microchannel, has been investigated. It is shown that the flow of this emulsion can be slowed down substantially only due to the mutual attraction of the shells of its droplets.

  17. Nonlinear drainage of some non-Newtonian free films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakova, S.

    2015-10-01

    In the present work we apply the generalized lubrication approach (including inertial, viscous, capillary and van-der-Waals forces) to study the dynamics of a free thin film of a non-Newtonian fluid, whose viscosity is described by the Power law and Carreau models. For planar films with fully mobile surfaces, this approach leads to a system of two nonlinear PDE for the film thickness and lateral velocity. This system is solved numerically in the case of laterally bounded free films. The calculations of the film shape and velocity are presented using data of some real liquids: blood and aqueous solution of 0.5% hydroxyethylcellulose. It is shown that the Power law model predicts a very different viscosity to the Carreau model viscosity, although that the film profiles are not very different for all film wetting angles.

  18. 3D seismic analysis of gravity-driven and basement influenced normal fault growth in the deepwater Otway Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, A. G.; King, R. C.; Holford, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    We use three-dimensional (3D) seismic reflection data to analyse the structural style and growth of a normal fault array located at the present-day shelf-edge break and into the deepwater province of the Otway Basin, southern Australia. The Otway Basin is a Late Jurassic to Cenozoic, rift-to-passive margin basin. The seismic reflection data images a NW-SE (128-308) striking, normal fault array, located within Upper Cretaceous clastic sediments and which consists of ten fault segments. The fault array contains two hard-linked fault assemblages, separated by only 2 km in the dip direction. The gravity-driven, down-dip fault assemblage is entirely contained within the 3D seismic survey, is located over a basement plateau and displays growth commencing and terminating during the Campanian-Maastrichtian, with up to 1.45 km of accumulated throw (vertical displacement). The up-dip normal fault assemblage penetrates deeper than the base of the seismic survey, but is interpreted to be partially linked along strike at depth to major basement-involved normal faults that can be observed on regional 2D seismic lines. This fault assemblage displays growth initiating in the Turonian-Santonian and has accumulated up to 1.74 km of throw. Our detailed analysis of the 3D seismic data constraints post-Cenomanian fault growth of both fault assemblages into four evolutionary stages: [1] Turonian-Santonian basement reactivation during crustal extension between Australia and Antarctica. This either caused the upward propagation of basement-involved normal faults or the nucleation of a vertically isolated normal fault array in shallow cover sediments directly above the reactivated basement-involved faults; [2] continued Campanian-Maastrichtian crustal extension and sediment loading eventually created gravitational instability on the basement plateau, nucleating a second, vertically isolated normal fault array in the cover sediments; [3] eventual hard-linkage of fault segments in both fault

  19. Non-Newtonian fluid flow over a heterogeneously slippery surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, A. Sander; Wood, Jeffery A.; Sprakel, Lisette M. J.; Lammertink, Rob G. H.

    2015-11-01

    The no-slip boundary condition does not always hold. In the past, we have investigated the influence of effective wall slip on interfacial transport for a bubble mattress - a superhydrophobic surface consisting of an array of transverse gas-filled grooves. We proved experimentally that the amount of effective wall slip depends on the bubble protrusion angle and the surface porosity (Karatay et al., PNAS 110, 2013), and predicted that mass transport can be enhanced significantly (Haase et al., Soft Matter 9, 2013). Both studies involve the flow of water. In practise, however, many liquids encountered are non-Newtonian, like blood and polymer solutions. This raises some interesting questions. How does interfacial transport depend on the rheological properties of the liquid? Does the time-scale of the experiment matter? A bubble mattress is a suitable platform to investigate this, due to local variations in shear rate. We predict that for shear-thinning liquids, compared to water, the amount of wall slip can be enhanced considerably, although this depends on the applied flow rate. Experiments are performed to proof this behaviour. Simulations are used to assess what will happen when the characteristic time-scale of the system matches the relaxation time of the visco-elastic liquid. R.G.H.L. acknowledges the European Research Council for the ERC starting grant 307342-TRAM.

  20. Highly efficient and flexible electrospun carbon-silica nanofibrous membrane for ultrafast gravity-driven oil-water separation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Ming Hang; Gao, Peng; Tan, Benny Yong Liang; Sun, Darren D; Leckie, James O

    2014-06-25

    A novel free-standing and flexible electrospun carbon-silica composite nanofibrous membrane is newly introduced. The characterization results suggest that the electrospun composite nanofibers are constructed by carbon chains interpenetrated through a linear network of 3-dimensional SiO2. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the presence of insulating silica further improve the thermal resistance of the membrane. Additionally, the mechanical strength test shows that the membrane's toughness and flexibility can be enhanced if the concentration of SiO2 is maintained below 2.7 wt %. Thermal and chemical stability test show that the membrane's wettability properties can be sustained at an elevated temperature up to 300 °C and no discernible change in wettability was observed under highly acidic and basic conditions. After surface-coating with silicone oil for 30 mins, the composite membrane exhibits ultra-hydrophobic and superoleophilic properties with water and oil contact angles being 144.2 ± 1.2° and 0°, respectively. The enhanced flexibility and selective wetting property enables the membrane to serve as an effective substrate for separating free oil from water. Lab-scale oil-water separation test indicates that the membrane possesses excellent oil-water separation efficiency. In addition, its inherent property of high porosity allows oil-water separation to be performed in a gravity-driven process with high-flux. We anticipate that this study will open up a new avenue for fabrication of free-standing carbonaceous composite membrane with tunable flexibility for energy efficient and high-throughput production of clean water. PMID:24867399

  1. Activity of metazoa governs biofilm structure formation and enhances permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration.

    PubMed

    Derlon, Nicolas; Koch, Nicolas; Eugster, Bettina; Posch, Thomas; Pernthaler, Jakob; Pronk, Wouter; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2013-04-15

    The impact of different feed waters in terms of eukaryotic populations and organic carbon content on the biofilm structure formation and permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration was investigated in this study. GDM filtration was performed at ultra-low pressure (65 mbar) in dead-end mode without control of the biofilm formation. Different feed waters were tested (River water, pre-treated river water, lake water, and tap water) and varied with regard to their organic substrate content and their predator community. River water was manipulated either by chemically inhibiting all eukaryotes or by filtering out macrozoobenthos (metazoan organisms). The structure of the biofilm was characterized at the meso- and micro-scale using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), respectively. Based on Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements, the river waters provided the highest potential for bacterial growth whereas tap water had the lowest. An increasing content in soluble and particulate organic substrate resulted in increasing biofilm accumulation on membrane surface. However, enhanced biofilm accumulation did not result in lower flux values and permeate flux was mainly influenced by the structure of the biofilm. Metazoan organisms (in particular nematodes and oligochaetes) built-up protective habitats, which resulted in the formation of open and spatially heterogeneous biofilms composed of biomass patches. In the absence of predation by metazoan organisms, a flat and compact biofilm developed. It is concluded that the activity of metazoan organisms in natural river water and its impact on biofilm structure balances the detrimental effect of a high biofilm accumulation, thus allowing for a broader application of GDM filtration. Finally, our results suggest that for surface waters with high particulate organic carbon (POC) content, the use of worms is suitable to enhance POC removal before ultrafiltration units. PMID

  2. Non-Newtonian mechanics of oscillation centers

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-10-15

    Classical particles oscillating in high-frequency or static fields effectively exhibit a modified rest mass m{sub eff} which determines the oscillation center motion. Unlike the true mass, m{sub eff} depends on the field parameters and can be a nonanalytic function of the particle average velocity and the oscillation energy; hence non-Newtonian ''metaplasmas'' that permit a new type of plasma maser, signal rectification, frequency doubling, and one-way walls.

  3. CFD simulation of non-Newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin; Chen, Shulin

    2008-02-15

    A general mathematical model that predicts the flow fields in a mixed-flow anaerobic digester was developed. In this model, the liquid manure was assumed to be a non-Newtonian fluid, and the flow governed by the continuity, momentum, and k-epsilon standard turbulence equations, and non-Newtonian power law model. The commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was applied to simulate the flow fields of lab-scale, scale-up, and pilot-scale anaerobic digesters. The simulation results were validated against the experimental data from literature. The flow patterns were qualitatively compared for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids flow in a lab-scale digester. Numerical simulations were performed to predict the flow fields in scale-up and pilot-scale anaerobic digesters with different water pump power inputs and different total solid concentration (TS) in the liquid manure. The optimal power inputs were determined for the pilot-scale anaerobic digester. Some measures for reducing dead and low velocity zones were proposed based upon the CFD simulation results. PMID:17705227

  4. Numerical Modeling of Mixing of Chemically Reacting, Non-Newtonian Slurry for Tank Waste Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, David A.; Onishi, Yasuo; Rustad, James R.; Michener, Thomas E.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Ten, Arkady A.; Hier, Catherine A.

    2000-06-01

    Many highly radioactive wastes will be retrieved by installing mixer pumps that inject high-speed jets to stir up the sludge, saltcake, and supernatant liquid in the tank, blending them into a slurry. This slurry will then be pumped out of the tank into a waste treatment facility. Our objectives are to investigate interactions-chemical reactions, waste rheology, and slurry mixing-occurring during the retrieval operation and to provide a scientific basis for the waste retrieval decision-making process. Specific objectives are to: (1) Evaluate numerical modeling of chemically active, non-Newtonian tank waste mixing, coupled with chemical reactions and realistic rheology; (2) Conduct numerical modeling analysis of local and global mixing of non-Newtonian and Newtonian slurries; and (3) Provide the bases to develop a scientifically justifiable, decision-making support tool for the tank waste retrieval operation.

  5. 2D numerical modeling of gravity-driven giant-scale deformation processes in the offshore Barreirinhas Basin (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Manconi, Andrea; Rinaldo Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    Gravity-driven deformation processes at continental passive margins occur at different scales, from small-scale turbidity currents and sediment slides, to large-scale mass transport complexes (MTCs), to the giant-scale deep water fold and thrust belts (DW-FTBs), which affect most or the entire sedimentary sequence. This kind of giant structures, quite widespread in passive margins, may be active for tens of millions of years. In this context, the Brazilian Atlantic margin hosts several well-known DW-FTBs detached on both shale and salt décollement. Despite of their relevant scientific and economic importance, the mechanical processes driving the onset and evolution of these giant-scale structures are still poorly investigated. In this work, we focus on the shale décollement DW-FTB of the Barreirinhas Basin, where the continental slope has been affected by multi-phase gravitational processes since the Late Cretaceous. This DW-FTB consists of a linked fault system of listric normal faults updip and thrust faults downdip, detached over a common concave upward décollement surface. From the onshore extensional to the offshore compressional domain the DW-FTB is about 50 km wide and involve a sedimentary sequence up to 5 km thick. Shortening within the compressional domain is accommodated almost entirely from a single thrust ramp with a large related anticline fold. Previous studies have shown that the main activity phases of the gravitational processes are closely linked to significant increases in the sediment supply within the basin. Indeed, the highest deformation rate, accounting for about 80% of the net strain, occurred in the Upper Miocene following a drainage rearrangement which led to the birth of the modern Amazon River drainage system. The Barreirinhas Basin DW-FTB entails a rather simple geometrical structure, which can be well schematized, therefore is particularly suitable for numerical simulations aimed to study and understand the dynamics of DW-FTB at

  6. Gravity-driven membrane filtration as pretreatment for seawater reverse osmosis: linking biofouling layer morphology with flux stabilization.

    PubMed

    Akhondi, Ebrahim; Wu, Bing; Sun, Shuyang; Marxer, Brigit; Lim, Weikang; Gu, Jun; Liu, Linbo; Burkhardt, Michael; McDougald, Diane; Pronk, Wouter; Fane, Anthony G

    2015-03-01

    In this study gravity-driven membrane (GDM) ultrafiltration is investigated for the pretreatment of seawater before reverse osmosis (RO). The impacts of temperature (21 ± 1 and 29 ± 1 °C) and hydrostatic pressure (40 and 100 mbar) on dynamic flux development and biofouling layer structure were studied. The data suggested pore constriction fouling was predominant at the early stage of filtration, during which the hydrostatic pressure and temperature had negligible effects on permeate flux. With extended filtration time, cake layer fouling played a major role, during which higher hydrostatic pressure and temperature improved permeate flux. The permeate flux stabilized in a range of 3.6 L/m(2) h (21 ± 1 °C, 40 mbar) to 7.3 L/m(2) h (29 ± 1 °C, 100 mbar) after slight fluctuations and remained constant for the duration of the experiments (almost 3 months). An increase in biofouling layer thickness and a variable biofouling layer structure were observed over time by optical coherence tomography and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The presence of eukaryotic organisms in the biofouling layer was observed by light microscopy and the microbial community structure of the biofouling layer was analyzed by sequences of 16S rRNA genes. The magnitude of permeate flux was associated with the combined effect of the biofouling layer thickness and structure. Changes in the biofouling layer structure were attributed to (1) the movement and predation behaviour of the eukaryotic organisms which increased the heterogeneous nature of the biofouling layer; (2) the bacterial debris generated by eukaryotic predation activity which reduced porosity; (3) significant shifts of the dominant bacterial species over time that may have influenced the biofouling layer structure. As expected, most of the particles and colloids in the feed seawater were removed by the GDM process, which led to a lower RO fouling potential. However, the dissolved organic carbon in the

  7. The Transition from Stable Creep to Stick-slip Instability in Gravity-driven Landslide Motion (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, R. M.; Schaeffer, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Landslides provide accessible sites for studying diverse styles of displacement that may serve as analogs for fault slip in Earth's crust. Field observations and large-scale experiments demonstrate that landslides can exhibit slow, stable creep, episodic stick-slip, or runaway acceleration - similar to the diverse styles of motion inferred for faults and subduction zones. A mechanical model that explains all of these styles of landsliding considers gravity-driven motion of a water-saturated, poroelastic slide block regulated by pore-pressure change in a dilating or contracting basal shear zone that exchanges water with the block. If the shear zone exhibits rate-independent Coulomb friction, the stability of slide-block motion depends only on the sign of the Coulomb dilatancy angle, ψ (ψ > 0 implies dilation and stable creep; ψ < 0 implies contraction and runaway acceleration) and on evolution of ψ with displacement. If the shear zone exhibits nonlinearly rate-weakening friction together with ψ > 0, however, the model predicts that a transition (i.e., a Hopf bifurcation) occurs from stable, creeping motion to periodic stick-slip. The bifurcation is sharply demarcated by a line that transects a parameter space defined by the logarithms of two dimensionless parameters, one proportional to the ratio of the intrinsic timescales for downslope motion and pore-pressure diffusion in the slide block, and one proportional to the ratio of the intrinsic velocity scales for pore-fluid flow and rate-weakening of friction in the basal shear zone. In the unstable (upper) part of this parameter space, the amplitude and period of stick-slip oscillations increase with distance from the bifurcation line. Significantly, stick-slip behavior predicted by the model occurs in the absence of an elastic driving force; the elastic spring in classic spring-slider earthquake models is effectively replaced by pore-pressure diffusion, and the energy necessary to drive this dissipative but

  8. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.1 for gravity-driven injection experiment in the core makeup tank of the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.I.; No, H.C.; Bang, Y.S.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to improve the analysis capability of RELAP5/MOD3.1 on the direct contact condensation in the core makeup tank (CMT) of passive high-pressure injection system (PHPIS) in the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300). The gravity-driven injection experiment is conducted by using a small scale test facility to identify the parameters having significant effects on the gravity-driven injection and the major condensation modes. It turns out that the larger the water subcooling is, the more initiation of injection is delayed, and the sparger and the natural circulation of the hot water from the steam generator accelerate the gravity-driven injection. The condensation modes are divided into three modes: sonic jet, subsonic jet, and steam cavity. RELAP5/MOD3.1 is chosen to evaluate the cod predictability on the direct contact condensation in the CMT. It is found that the predictions of MOD3.1 are in better agreement with the experimental data than those of MOD3.0. From the nodalization study of the test section, the 1-node model shows better agreement with the experimental data than the multi-node models. RELAP5/MOD3.1 identifies the flow regime of the test section as vertical stratification. However, the flow regime observed in the experiment is the subsonic jet with the bubble having the vertical cone shape. To accurately predict the direct contact condensation in the CMT with RELAP5/MOD3.1, it is essential that a new set of the interfacial heat transfer coefficients and a new flow regime map for direct contact condensation in the CMT be developed.

  9. Controls of sedimentary supply and gravity driven deformation on the eastern Niger delta (Plio-Pleistocene) from the shoreline to the deep sea plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Cécile; Guillocheau, François; Rouby, Delphine; Nalpas, Thierry; Jermannaud, Paul; Raillard, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    We studied the evolution of the gravity flow sedimentary within a large shelf-edge delta (Eastern Niger delta) over the last 2,5Myr taking into account the influence of the contemporaneous gravity driven deformation and sedimentary supply. To do this, we mapped (i) the shoreline geometry and (ii) the associated turbiditic systems for 9 intervals using a classification based on three morphological end-members: erosive, constructive and depositional modes. We characterized the depositional profile of the passive margin delta from the littoral domain to the abyssal plain and its spatial and temporal variability. We showed that, at the scale of the delta, the depositional profile varied from (i) a shelf edge delta profile with a slope break at the location of the shoreline during progradation to (ii) a ramp profile characteristic of a mid-shelf delta during retrogradation. Thus, during a stratigraphic cycle, the delta front evolved from a prograding slope break during the development of the HST, to steepening clinoforms during the development of the LST that progressively flattened out during the TST to reach a ramp profile at the MFS. The turbiditic systems (including MTC) initiate near the shoreline, at the toe of the delta front. Also, they form preferentially down slope synthetic faults or within antithetic fault relays. They are initially erosive, becoming constructive further down slope and eventually depositional. They may become erosive again as they cut through the compressional structures. We showed that the stratigraphic state (progradation/retrogradation) controls the amount of sediment reaching the platform and strongly impacts the density of gravity flow sedimentary systems (low density during progradation and high density during progradation). On the other hand, the gravity driven deformation controls the slope of the sea-floor and, in doing so, their morphology (erosive/constructive/depositional). Within this framework, lateral migrations of the delta

  10. Justification of the Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation for the Evolution of Gravity Driven 2D Surface Water Waves in a Canal of Finite Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düll, Wolf-Patrick; Schneider, Guido; Wayne, C. Eugene

    2016-05-01

    In 1968 V.E. Zakharov derived the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the two-dimensional water wave problem in the absence of surface tension, that is, for the evolution of gravity driven surface water waves, in order to describe slow temporal and spatial modulations of a spatially and temporarily oscillating wave packet. In this paper we give a rigorous proof that the wave packets in the two-dimensional water wave problem in a canal of finite depth can be approximated over a physically relevant timespan by solutions of the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  11. Effect of temperature-dependency of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid properties on the dynamics of droplet impinging on hot surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binesh, A. R.; Mousavi, S. M.; Kamali, R.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis is employed to study the droplet dynamics of Newtonian and non-Newtonian droplets impinging on a hot surface under various impact conditions. The Navier-Stokes equations for unsteady, incompressible, and viscous fluid flow are solved using a control volume method. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique is also used to track the free-surface of the liquid. The effect of viscosity, density and surface tension on droplet dynamics is evaluated considering their dependence of temperature. The results indicate that the temperature dependence of the both Newtonian and non-Newtonian physicochemical liquid properties must be considered to obtain better agreement of the numerical results with experimental data. After ensuring the accuracy of the numerical methodology, the internal behavior of the droplets is examined, which is shown that the receding velocity of the non-Newtonian droplet is slower than the Newtonian one.

  12. Coeval gravity-driven and thick-skinned extensional tectonics in the mid-Cretaceous of the western Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodego, Arantxa; Agirrezabala, Luis M.

    2010-05-01

    , which define a horst and graben system. Rollovers (unfaulted and faulted), hangingwall synclines and central domes are present in the hangingwalls of both listric and planar faults. Also, a fault-propagation fold, a forced fold and a roller have been interpreted. Synkinematic depositional systems and sediment-filled fissures are parallel to the NW- to N-trending tectonic structures. Based on the trend of tectonic structures, the orientation of sediment-filled fissures and the paleocurrent pattern of growth strata, a thin-skinned NE-SW to E-W extension has been deduced for the interior of the Lasarte sub-basin. Both the coincidence between the directions of extension and dip of the detachment layer and the characteristics of the deformation suggest a thin-skinned gravity-driven extensional tectonics caused by the dip of the detachment layer. Recorded extensional deformation event in the Lasarte sub-basin is contemporaneous with and would have been triggered by the extreme crustal thinning and mantle exhumation processes documented recently in both the Basque-Cantabrian Basin and the Pyrenees.

  13. Undulatory swimming in non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo; Li, Gaojin

    2015-11-01

    Microorganisms often swim in complex fluids exhibiting both elasticity and shear-thinning viscosity. The motion of low Reynolds number swimmers in complex fluids is important for better understanding the migration of sperms and formation of bacterial biofilms. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of non-Newtonian fluid properties, including shear-thinning and elasticity, on the undulatory locomotion. Our results show that elasticity hinders the swimming speed, but a shear-thinning viscosity in the absence of elasticity enhances the speed. The combination of the two effects hinders the swimming speed. The swimming boost in a shear-thinning fluid occurs even for an infinitely long flagellum. The swimming speed has a maximum, whose value depends on the flagellum oscillation amplitude and fluid rheological properties. The power consumption, on the other hand, follows a universal scaling law. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1445955 and Indiana CTSI TR001108.

  14. Aerosol entrainment from a sparged non-Newtonian slurry.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Brad G

    2006-08-01

    Previous bench-scale experiments have provided data necessary for the development of empirical models that describe aerosol entrainment from bubble bursting. However, previous work has not been extended to non-Newtonian liquid slurries. Design of a waste treatment plant on the Hanford Site in Washington required an evaluation of the applicability of these models outside of their intended range. For this evaluation, aerosol measurements were conducted above an air-sparged mixing tank filled with simulated waste slurry possessing Bingham plastic rheological properties. Three aerosol-size fractions were measured at three sampling heights and for three different sparging rates. The measured entrainment was compared with entrainment models. One model developed based on bench-scale air-water experiments agreed well with measured entrainment. Another model did not agree well with the measured entrainment. It appeared that the source of discrepancy between measured and modeled entrainment stemmed from application beyond the range of data used to develop the model. A possible separation in entrainment coefficients between air-water and steam-water systems was identified. A third entrainment model was adapted to match experimental conditions and fit a posteri to the experimental data, resulting in a modified version that resulted in estimated entrainment rates similar to the first model. PMID:16933643

  15. Slow viscous stream over a non-Newtonian fluid sphere in an axisymmetric deformed spherical vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, B. R.

    2016-08-01

    The creeping motion of a non-Newtonian (Reiner-Rivlin) liquid sphere at the instant it passes the center of an approximate spherical container is discussed. The flow in the spheroidal container is governed by the Stokes equation, while for the flow inside the Reiner-Rivlin liquid sphere, the expression for the stream function is obtained by expressing it in the power series of a parameter S , characterizing the cross-viscosity. Both the flow fields are then determined explicitly by matching the boundary conditions at the interface of Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, and also the condition of imperviousness and no-slip on the outer surface. As an application, we have considered an oblate spheroidal container. The drag and wall effects on the liquid spherical body are evaluated. Their variations with regard to the separation parameter ℓ , viscosity ratio λ, cross-viscosity S, and deformation parameter ɛ are studied and demonstrated graphically. Several renowned cases are derived from the present analysis. It is observed that the drag not only varies with ɛ, but as ℓ increases, the rate of change in behavior of drag force also increases. The influences of these parameters on the wall effects has also been studied and presented in a table.

  16. Submarine allochthonous salt sheets: Gravity-driven deformation of North African Cretaceous passive margin in Tunisia - Bled Dogra case study and nearby salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrouhi, Amara; Bellier, Olivier; Ben Youssef, Mohamed; Koyi, Hemin

    2014-09-01

    We used structural, stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, together with a comparison of nearby structures and a Bouguer gravity map, to evaluate the evolution of the Bled Dogra salt structure (northern Tunisia) during the Cretaceous. Triassic salt sheets are recognized in the northwestern region of the Tunisian Atlas. These salt sheets are the result of Cretaceous thick and/or thin-skinned extension along the south Tethyan margin. The Bled Dogra salt structure is one of these submarine allochthonous salt sheets, which was emplaced during the Early Cretaceous. The geologic framework, during this period, produces conditions for a predominantly gravity-driven deformation: extension has produced space for the salt to rise; vigorous differential sedimentation created differential loading that resulted in the emplacement and extrusion of a large volume of Triassic salt and formation of large submarine salt sheets. Geologic field data suggest an interlayered Triassic salt sheet within Albian sequences. Salt was extruded at the sea floor during the Early-Middle Albian and was initially buried by Middle-Late Albian strata. The Coniacian corresponds to a second transgressive cover onto the salt sheet after the gliding of the first salt cover (Late Albian-Turonian). In addition, this northwest Tunisian area exposes evidences for salt flow and abundant slump features at the base of a northward facing submarine slope, which was probably dominant from the Early Cretaceous to Santonian. Two gravity deformation processes are recognized: gravity gliding and gravity spreading. Acting concurrently, these two processes appear indistinguishable in this geologic context. Like the present-day salt-involved passive margins - such as the northern Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic margin of Morocco, the Brazilian Santos basin, the Angola margin, Cadiz in western Iberia, and the Red Sea - the North African Cretaceous passive margin in Tunisia provides evidences that deformation in a passive

  17. Squeeze Film Problems of Long Partial Journal Bearings for Non-Newtonian Couple Stress Fluids with Pressure-Dependent Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jaw-Ren; Chu, Li-Ming; Hung, Chi-Ren; Lu, Rong-Fang

    2011-09-01

    According to the experimental work of C. Barus in Am. J. Sci. 45, 87 (1893) [1], the dependency of liquid viscosity on pressure is exponential. Therefore, we extend the study of squeeze film problems of long partial journal bearings for Stokes non-Newtonian couple stress fluids by considering the pressure-dependent viscosity in the present paper. Through a small perturbation technique, we derive a first-order closed-form solution for the film pressure, the load capacity, and the response time of partial-bearing squeeze films. It is also found that the non-Newtonian couple-stress partial bearings with pressure-dependent viscosity provide better squeeze-film characteristics than those of the bearing with constant-viscosity situation.

  18. Physiological non-Newtonian blood flow through single stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, Khairuzzaman; Rahman, Mohammad Matiur; Akhter, Most. Nasrin; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    A numerical simulation to investigate the Non-Newtonian modelling effects on physiological flows in a three dimensional idealized artery with a single stenosis of 85% severity. The wall vessel is considered to be rigid. Oscillatory physiological and parabolic velocity profile has been imposed for inlet boundary condition. Where the physiological waveform is performed using a Fourier series with sixteen harmonics. The investigation has a Reynolds number range of 96 to 800. Low Reynolds number k - ω model is used as governing equation. The investigation has been carried out to characterize two Non-Newtonian constitutive equations of blood, namely, (i) Carreau and (ii) Cross models. The Newtonian model has also been investigated to study the physics of fluid. The results of Newtonian model are compared with the Non-Newtonian models. The numerical results are presented in terms of pressure, wall shear stress distributions and the streamlines contours. At early systole pressure differences between Newtonian and Non-Newtonian models are observed at pre-stenotic, throat and immediately after throat regions. In the case of wall shear stress, some differences between Newtonian and Non-Newtonian models are observed when the flows are minimum such as at early systole or diastole.

  19. Physical-based non-Newtonian fluid animation using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hai

    Fluids are commonly seen in our daily lives. They exhibit a wide range of motions, which depend on their physical properties, and often result in amazing visual phenomena. Hence, fluid animation is a popular topic in computer graphics. The animation results not only enrich a computer-generated virtual world but have found applications in generating special effects in motion pictures and in computer games. The three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes (NS) equation is a comprehensive mechanical description of the fluid motions. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a popular particle-based fluid modeling formulation. In physical-based fluid animation, the fluid models are based on the 3D NS equation, which can be solved using SPH based methods. Non-Newtonian fluids form a rich class of fluids. Their physical behavior exhibits a strong and complex stress-strain relationship which falls outside the modeling range of Newtonian fluid mechanics. In physical-based fluid animation, most of the fluid models are based on Newtonian fluids, and hence they cannot realistically animate non-Newtonian fluid motions such as stretching, bending, and bouncing. Based on the 3D NS equation and SPH, three original contributions are presented in this dissertation, which address the following three aspects of fluid animation: (1) particle-based non-Newtonian fluids, (2) immiscible fluid-fluid collision, and (3) heating non-Newtonian fluids. Consequently, more varieties of non-Newtonian fluid motions can be animated, which include stretching, bending, and bouncing.

  20. Non-Newtonian Aspects of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Michail

    2016-05-01

    The challenge of this work is to connect physics with the concept of intelligence. By intelligence we understand a capability to move from disorder to order without external resources, i.e., in violation of the second law of thermodynamics. The objective is to find such a mathematical object described by ODE that possesses such a capability. The proposed approach is based upon modification of the Madelung version of the Schrodinger equation by replacing the force following from quantum potential with non-conservative forces that link to the concept of information. A mathematical formalism suggests that a hypothetical intelligent particle, besides the capability to move against the second law of thermodynamics, acquires such properties like self-image, self-awareness, self-supervision, etc. that are typical for Livings. However since this particle being a quantum-classical hybrid acquires non-Newtonian and non-quantum properties, it does not belong to the physics matter as we know it: the modern physics should be complemented with the concept of the information force that represents a bridge to intelligent particle. As a follow-up of the proposed concept, the following question is addressed: can artificial intelligence (AI) system composed only of physical components compete with a human? The answer is proven to be negative if the AI system is based only on simulations, and positive if digital devices are included. It has been demonstrated that there exists such a quantum neural net that performs simulations combined with digital punctuations. The universality of this quantum-classical hybrid is in capability to violate the second law of thermodynamics by moving from disorder to order without external resources. This advanced capability is illustrated by examples. In conclusion, a mathematical machinery of the perception that is the fundamental part of a cognition process as well as intelligence is introduced and discussed.

  1. Rockglacier furrow-and-ridge morphology explained by gravity-driven buckle folding: A case study of the Murtèl rockglacier (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Ling, Anna H. M.

    2014-05-01

    Rockglaciers often feature a prominent transverse furrow-and-ridge morphology. Previous studies have suggested that these structures develop due to a longitudinal compressive flow in the lower part of a rockglacier. However, these hypotheses are mostly based on descriptive observations and not on mechanical considerations and therefore remained speculative. We propose that gravity-driven buckle folding is the dominating process leading to furrow-and-ridge morphology on rockglaciers. Buckle folding is the mechanical response to compression of a layered viscous material with significant mechanical contrast between the layers. The resulting buckle folds are common structures in rocks, which can be assumed viscous at elevated temperatures and pressures, and have extensively been studied in outcrops, experimentally, numerically, and analytically. In this cross-disciplinary study we use the buckle folding theory, which is well-established in the field of structural geology, and apply it to the field of rockglacier geomorphology. As a case study we use the Murtèl rockglacier in the Upper Engadin Valley (Switzerland), which features a very spectacular example of furrow-and-ridge morphology. The internal structure of the Murtèl rockglacier is well-studied and can be approximated by two layers: an upper mixed rock-ice layer and a lower almost pure ice layer, both exhibiting a viscous rheology. Such a simple structure is a prerequisite for applying the analytical buckle folding expressions. We use the Fold Geometry Toolbox (FGT) to analyze a 1 m-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) based on low-altitude aerial photographs. This software incorporates the analytical buckle folding expressions and hence provides a quantitative relationship between the observed wavelength (from DEM), layer thickness (from boreholes), and the effective viscosity ratio between the folded layer and the underlying ice. The geometrical parameters from the DEM and boreholes and the rheological

  2. Accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Schneider, Andreas; Böhle, Martin

    2015-11-01

    This work deals with the accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations. Previous work for Newtonian fluids indicate that, depending on the numerical value of the dimensionless collision frequency Ω, additional artificial viscosity is introduced, which negatively influences the accuracy. Since the non-Newtonian fluid behavior is incorporated through appropriate modeling of the dimensionless collision frequency, a Ω dependent error EΩ is introduced and its influence on the overall error is investigated. Here, simulations with the SRT and the MRT model are carried out for power-law fluids in order to numerically investigate the accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations. A goal of this accuracy analysis is to derive a recommendation for an optimal choice of the time step size and the simulation Mach number, respectively. For the non-Newtonian case, an error estimate for EΩ in the form of a functional is derived on the basis of a series expansion of the Lattice Boltzmann equation. This functional can be solved analytically for the case of the Hagen-Poiseuille channel flow of non-Newtonian fluids. With the help of the error functional, the prediction of the global error minimum of the velocity field is excellent in regions where the EΩ error is the dominant source of error. With an optimal simulation Mach number, the simulation is about one order of magnitude more accurate. Additionally, for both collision models a detailed study of the convergence behavior of the method in the non-Newtonian case is conducted. The results show that the simulation Mach number has a major impact on the convergence rate and second order accuracy is not preserved for every choice of the simulation Mach number.

  3. CFD simulation of gas and non-Newtonian fluid two-phase flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an Eulerian multiphase flow model that characterizes gas mixing in anaerobic digesters. In the model development, liquid manure is assumed to be water or a non-Newtonian fluid that is dependent on total solids (TS) concentration. To establish the appropriate models for different TS levels, twelve turbulence models are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops of gas and non-Newtonian fluid two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from a correlation analysis. The commercial CFD software, Fluent12.0, is employed to simulate the multiphase flow in the digesters. The simulation results in a small-sized digester are validated against the experimental data from literature. Comparison of two gas mixing designs in a medium-sized digester demonstrates that mixing intensity is insensitive to the TS in confined gas mixing, whereas there are significant decreases with increases of TS in unconfined gas mixing. Moreover, comparison of three mixing methods indicates that gas mixing is more efficient than mixing by pumped circulation while it is less efficient than mechanical mixing. PMID:20627353

  4. Numerical Analysis of Gravity-driven Spreading of Viscoelastic Fluids: Investigation of the Effect of Shear-thinning and Elastic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah

    2011-11-01

    Many complex fluids of interest exhibit viscoelastic hehavior. Polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides, are among these fluids. For the optimal design of microbicides, the combined effect of shear-thinning and elastic behavior on the gravity-driven spreading of viscoelastic fluids is studied. We develop a 2D model to simulate the fluids spreading down an incline using ANSYS POLYFLOW software package. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method combined with Lagrangian remeshing is applied to track the moving free surface of fluids during spreading. Adaptive meshing method is used to generate high quality mesh for the remeshing process. Based on an elastic viscous split stress (EVSS) approach, several differential viscoelastic constitutive models are studied to investigate the combined effect of shear-thinning and elastic behavior. Mesh convergence test and constant volume check are studied to verify the new model. Moreover, the new model with zero elasticity is compared with previous studies of Newtonian and power-law fluids.

  5. Gravity-driven transport of three engineered nanomaterials in unsaturated soils and their effects on soil pH and nutrient release.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jon R; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-07-01

    The gravity-driven transport of TiO2, CeO2, and Cu(OH)2 engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and their effects on soil pH and nutrient release were measured in three unsaturated soils. ENM transport was found to be highly limited in natural soils collected from farmland and grasslands, with the majority of particles being retained in the upper 0-3 cm of the soil profile, while greater transport depth was seen in a commercial potting soil. Physical straining appeared to be the primary mechanism of retention in natural soils as ENMs immediately formed micron-scale aggregates, which was exacerbated by coating particles with Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) which promote steric hindrance. Small changes in soil pH were observed in natural soils contaminated with ENMs that were largely independent of ENM type and concentration, but differed from controls. These changes may have been due to enhanced release of naturally present pH-altering ions (Mg(2+), H(+)) in the soil via substitution processes. These results suggest ENMs introduced into soil will likely be highly retained near the source zone. PMID:27108211

  6. On numerical methods in non-Newtonian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fileas, G.

    1982-12-01

    The constitutive equations for non-Newtonian flows are presented and the various flow models derived from continuum mechanics and molecular theories are considered and evaluated. Detailed account is given of numerical simulation employing differential and integral models of different kinds of non-Newtonian flows using finite difference and finite element techniques. Procedures for computer set ups are described and references are given for finite difference, finite element and molecular theory based programs for several kinds of flow. Achievements and unreached goals in the field of numerical simulation of non-Newtonian flows are discussed and the lack of numerical work in the fields of suspension flows and heat transfer is pointed out. Finally, FFOCUS is presented as a newly built computer program which can simulate freezing flows of Newtonian fluids through various geometries and is aimed to be further developed to handle non-Newtonian freezing flows and certain types of suspension phenomena involved in corium flow after a hypothetical core melt down accident in a pressurized water reactor.

  7. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azaiez, Jalel; Homsy, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    This work is a continuing effort to advance our understanding of the effects of polymer additives on the structures of the mixing layer. In anticipation of full nonlinear simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer, we examined in a first stage the linear stability of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. The results of this study show that, for a fluid described by the Oldroyd-B model, viscoelasticity reduces the instability of the inviscid mixing layer in a special limit where the ratio (We/Re) is of order 1 where We is the Weissenberg number, a measure of the elasticity of the flow, and Re is the Reynolds number. In the present study, we pursue this project with numerical simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. Our primary objective is to determine the effects of viscoelasticity on the roll-up structure. We also examine the origin of the numerical instabilities usually encountered in the simulations of non-Newtonian fluids.

  8. The Earth's Mantle: Evidence of Non-Newtonian Flow.

    PubMed

    Post, R L; Griggs, D T

    1973-09-28

    Recent information from experimentally deformed dunite coupled with a reanalysis of data on the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound suggest that the rheological behavior of the upper mantle is distinctly non-Newtonian, and that the shear strain rate is proportional to the shear stress raised to about the third power. PMID:17821590

  9. Flow Curve Determination for Non-Newtonian Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjahjadi, Mahari; Gupta, Santosh K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experimental program to examine flow curve determination for non-Newtonian fluids. Includes apparatus used (a modification of Walawender and Chen's set-up, but using a 50cc buret connected to a glass capillary through a Tygon tube), theoretical information, procedures, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  10. [Kinetic theory and boundary conditions for flows of highly inelastic spheres: Application to gravity driven granular flows down bumpy inclines]. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, M.W.

    1992-12-01

    In this quarter, we extended our study of the effects of isotropic boundary vibrations to steady, gravity driven, inclined granular flows. These flows are more complex than those considered last quarter because of the presence of slip and mean velocity gradients at the boundary. Consequently, it was first necessary to modify the boundary conditions derived by Richman (1992) to account for corrections to the flow particle velocity distribution function from velocity gradients. In what follows we only summarize the results obtained.

  11. Superficial and deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal succession: the case study of Maiolica Formation, Gargano Promontory, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, Danica; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational phenomena on the paleoslope of continental margins play a significant role both in redistribution of sediment and formation of new structural features within sedimentary basins worldwide. Mass-transport deposits (MTDs) represent important heterogeneities within the succession and occur on various scales (tens of centimetres to hundreds of metres). Small- to medium-scale MTDs (up to tens of meters) act as layers of different petrophysical properties, whereas large-scale MTDs (tens to hundreds of meters) form both stratigraphic and structural discontinuities (faults, thrusts, erosional surfaces, dykes or injections) within the succession. The Maiolica Formation, Early Cretaceous deep basinal succession cropping out in Gargano Promontory of Southeast Italy is represented by undisturbed intervals of flat-lying thin-bedded, cherty micritic limestone interstratified with intervals of lithologically similar, but structurally distorted beds. For this reason, the studied outcrops provide a good opportunity to characterize the geometry and the internal deformation of small- and medium-scale carbonate MTDs. At the outcrop scale, small- to medium-sized MTDs can be simply identified as sheets of deformed strata alternated with packages of undeformed beds. However, several observed features such as folded stylolites with radially oriented peaks within some of these deformed packages and the presence of large vertical clastic-dyke-like bodies in the succession suggest that some of these deformed packages represent deep-seated basal gliding horizons of large-scale MTDs. In this study, we present MTDs on two different scales that have a crucial influence on the evolution of slope to basinal successions. Moreover, we define the features that distinguish superficial MTDs from the deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal carbonates.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL BUBBLE FORMATION IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM FOR NEWTONIAN AND NONNEWTONIAN FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-06-26

    The complexities of bubble formation in liquids increase as the system size increases, and a photographic study is presented here to provide some insight into the dynamics of bubble formation for large systems. Air was injected at the bottom of a 28 feet tall by 30 inch diameter column. Different fluids were subjected to different air flow rates at different fluid depths. The fluids were water and non-Newtonian, Bingham plastic fluids, which have yield stresses requiring an applied force to initiate movement, or shearing, of the fluid. Tests showed that bubble formation was significantly different in the two types of fluids. In water, a field of bubbles was formed, which consisted of numerous, distributed, 1/4 to 3/8 inch diameter bubbles. In the Bingham fluid, large bubbles of 6 to 12 inches in diameter were formed, which depended on the air flow rate. This paper provides comprehensive photographic results related to bubble formation in these fluids.

  13. A review of approaches to the study of turbulence modification by means of non-Newtonian additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassopoulos, Dimitris; Schowalter, William R.

    1987-12-01

    The addition of small amounts of polymers to Newtonian liquids under conditions of turbulent flow results in substantial reduction of skin friction. This phenomenon has been observed experimentally. It can be attributed to the unusual behavior of dilute polymer solutions in turbulent flows. A condensed review of topics relevent to theoretical study of drag reduction by non-Newtonian additives is presented. In addition, the techniques and results of experimental investigations of this phenomenon are examined. It is proposed that dilute solutions of polymers or surfactants can be rheologically characterized by measuring the secondary flow characteristics that occur in the neighborhood of an oscillating cylinder. Plans for conducting these measurements are presented.

  14. Verification of vertically rotating flume using non-newtonian fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Three tests on non-Newtonian fluids were used to verify the use of a vertically rotating flume (VRF) for the study of the rheological properties of debris flow. The VRF is described and a procedure for the analysis of results of tests made with the VRF is presented. The major advantages of the VRF are a flow field consistent with that found in nature, a large particle-diameter threshold, inexpensive operation, and verification using several different materials; the major limitations are a lack of temperature control and a certain error incurred from the use of the Bingham plastic model to describe a more complex phenomenon. Because the VRF has been verified with non-Newtonian fluids as well as Newtonian fluids, it can be used to measure the rheological properties of coarse-grained debris-flow materials.

  15. Stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a non-Newtonian incompressible complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, S.; Banerjee, D.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-03-01

    The stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is investigated in a non-Newtonian unmagnetized dusty plasma with an experimentally verified model of shear flow rate dependent viscosity. It has been found that non-Newtonian property has also a significant role in stabilization of RT instability along with velocity shear stabilization in the short wavelength regime. The effect of the non-Newtonian parameters is more profound in the higher velocity shear rate regime. A detailed study is reported on the role of non-Newtonian effect on RT instability with conventional dust fluid equations using standard numerical eigenvalue analysis.

  16. Stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a non-Newtonian incompressible complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-03-15

    The stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is investigated in a non-Newtonian unmagnetized dusty plasma with an experimentally verified model of shear flow rate dependent viscosity. It has been found that non-Newtonian property has also a significant role in stabilization of RT instability along with velocity shear stabilization in the short wavelength regime. The effect of the non-Newtonian parameters is more profound in the higher velocity shear rate regime. A detailed study is reported on the role of non-Newtonian effect on RT instability with conventional dust fluid equations using standard numerical eigenvalue analysis.

  17. The Non-Newtonian Rheology of Real Magmas: insights into 3D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, M.; Caricchi, L.; Ulmer, P.; Reusser, E.; Marone, F.; Burlini, L.

    2010-12-01

    We present high-resolution 3D microstructures of three-phase magmas composed of melt, bubbles and crystals in different proportions deformed at magmatic pressure and temperature conditions. This study aims to constrain the dependence of rheological and physical properties of magmas on the viscosity of the silicate melt, the applied deformation rate, the relative contents of crystals and bubbles and on the interactions between these phases. The starting material is composed of a hydrous haplogranitic melt containing H2O (2.26 wt%) and CO2 (624 ppm) and different proportions of quartz crystals (between 24 and 65 vol%; 63-125 μm in diameter) and bubbles (between 9 and 12 vol%; 5-150 μm in diameter). Experiments were performed in simple shear using a HT-HP internally-heated Paterson-type rock deformation apparatus (Paterson and Olgaard, 2000) at strain rates ranging between 5×10-5 s-1 and 4×10-3 s-1, at a constant pressure of 200 MPa and temperatures ranging between 723 and 1023 K. Synchrotron based X-ray tomographic microscopy performed at the TOMCAT beamline (Stampanoni et al., 2006) at the Swiss Light Source enabled quantitative evaluation of the 3D microstructure. At high temperature and low strain rate conditions the silicate melt behaves as a Newtonian liquid (Webb and Dingwell, 1990). Higher deformation rates and the contemporary presence of gas bubbles and solid crystals make magma rheology more complex and non-Newtonian behaviour occurs. In all experimental runs two different non-Newtonian effects were observed: shear thinning (decrease of viscosity with increasing strain rate) in high crystal-content magmas (55-65 vol% crystals; 9-10 vol% bubbles) and shear thickening (increase of viscosity with increasing strain rate) in magmas at lower degree of crystallinity (24 vol% crystals; 12 vol% bubbles). Both behaviours were observed at intermediate crystal-content (44 vol% crystals; 12 vol% bubbles), with an initial thickening that subsequently gives way to

  18. Attractors of equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, V. G.; Kondrat'ev, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    This survey describes a version of the trajectory-attractor method, which is applied to study the limit asymptotic behaviour of solutions of equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The trajectory-attractor method emerged in papers of the Russian mathematicians Vishik and Chepyzhov and the American mathematician Sell under the condition that the corresponding trajectory spaces be invariant under the translation semigroup. The need for such an approach was caused by the fact that for many equations of mathematical physics for which the Cauchy initial-value problem has a global (weak) solution with respect to the time, the uniqueness of such a solution has either not been established or does not hold. In particular, this is the case for equations of fluid dynamics. At the same time, trajectory spaces invariant under the translation semigroup could not be constructed for many equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. In this connection, a different approach to the construction of trajectory attractors for dissipative systems was proposed in papers of Zvyagin and Vorotnikov without using invariance of trajectory spaces under the translation semigroup and is based on the topological lemma of Shura-Bura. This paper presents examples of equations of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics (the Jeffreys system describing movement of the Earth's crust, the model of motion of weak aqueous solutions of polymers, a system with memory) for which the aforementioned construction is used to prove the existence of attractors in both the autonomous and the non-autonomous cases. At the beginning of the paper there is also a brief exposition of the results of Ladyzhenskaya on the existence of attractors of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes system and the result of Vishik and Chepyzhov for the case of attractors of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes system. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  19. Controlling and minimizing fingering instabilities in non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, João V.; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the viscous fingering instability in Hele-Shaw cells has great practical and scientific importance. Recently, researchers have proposed different strategies to control the number of interfacial fingering structures, or to minimize as much as possible the amplitude of interfacial disturbances. Most existing studies address the situation in which an inviscid fluid displaces a viscous Newtonian fluid. In this work, we report on controlling and minimizing protocols considering the situation in which the displaced fluid is a non-Newtonian, power-law fluid. The necessary changes on the controlling schemes due to the shear-thinning and shear thickening nature of the displaced fluid are calculated analytically and discussed.

  20. Fast Imaging Technique to Study Drop Impact Dynamics of Non-Newtonian Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin; Peters, Ivo; Wilken, Sam; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, many dynamical processes not only occur over a very short time interval but also require high spatial resolution for detailed observation, scenarios that make it challenging to observe with conventional imaging systems. One of these is the drop impact of liquids, which usually happens within one tenth of millisecond. To tackle this challenge, a fast imaging technique is introduced that combines a high-speed camera (capable of up to one million frames per second) with a macro lens with long working distance to bring the spatial resolution of the image down to 10 µm/pixel. The imaging technique enables precise measurement of relevant fluid dynamic quantities, such as the flow field, the spreading distance and the splashing speed, from analysis of the recorded video. To demonstrate the capabilities of this visualization system, the impact dynamics when droplets of non-Newtonian fluids impinge on a flat hard surface are characterized. Two situations are considered: for oxidized liquid metal droplets we focus on the spreading behavior, and for densely packed suspensions we determine the onset of splashing. More generally, the combination of high temporal and spatial imaging resolution introduced here offers advantages for studying fast dynamics across a wide range of microscale phenomena. PMID:24637404

  1. Free convection flow of non-Newtonian fluids along a vertical plate embedded in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Han-Taw Chen; Cha'o-Kuang Chen )

    1988-02-01

    The problem of free convection flow of a non-Newtonian power law fluid along an isothermal vertical flat plate embedded in the porous medium is considered in the present study. The physical coordinate system is shown schematically in Fig 1. In the present study, it is assumed that the modified Darcy law and the boundary layer approximation are applicable. This implies that the present solutions are valid at a high Rayleigh number. With these simplifications, the governing partial nonlinear differential equations can be transformed into a set of coupled ordinary differential equations which can be solved by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Algebraic equations for heat transfer rate and boundary layer thickness as a function of the prescribed wall temperature and physical properties of liquid-porous medium are obtained. The similarity solutions can be applied to problems in geophysics and engineering. The primary purpose of the present study is to predict the characteristics of steady natural convection heat transfer using the model of the flow of a non-Newtonian power law fluid in a porous medium given by Dharmadhikari and Kale (1985). Secondly, the effects of the new power law index n on heat transfer are investigated.

  2. Intermittent outgassing through a non-Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Divoux, Thibaut; Bertin, Eric; Vidal, Valérie; Géminard, Jean-Christophe

    2009-05-01

    We report an experimental study of the intermittent dynamics of a gas flowing through a column of a non-Newtonian fluid. In a given range of the imposed constant flow rate, the system spontaneously alternates between two regimes: bubbles emitted at the bottom either rise independently one from the other or merge to create a winding flue which then connects the bottom air entrance to the free surface. The observations are reminiscent of the spontaneous changes in the degassing regime observed on volcanoes and suggest that, in the nature, such a phenomenon is likely to be governed by the non-Newtonian properties of the magma. We focus on the statistical distribution of the lifespans of the bubbling and flue regimes in the intermittent steady state. The bubbling regime exhibits a characteristic time whereas, interestingly, the flue lifespan displays a decaying power-law distribution. The associated exponent, which is significantly smaller than the value 1.5 often reported experimentally and predicted in some standard intermittency scenarios, depends on the fluid properties and can be interpreted as the ratio of two characteristic times of the system. PMID:19518533

  3. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy–Chapman solution to the Poisson–Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases. PMID:21503161

  4. Porous media flow problems: Natural convection and non-Newtonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, K. L.

    1980-03-01

    Natural convection of a Newtonian fluid and one dimensional flow of a nonNewtonian fluid are studied. Convection in a rectangular porous cavity driven by heating in the horizontal is analyzed by a number of different techniques which yield a fairly complete description of the two dimensional solutions. The solutions are governed by two dimensionless parameters: the Darcy-Rayleigh number R and cavity aspect ratio A. The flow behavior of a dilute solution of polyacrylamide in corn syrup flowing through porous media is also studied. Measurement of the pressure drop and flow rate are made for the solution flowing through a packed bed of glass beads. At low velocities the pressure drop as a function of velocity is the same as that for a Newtonian fluid of equal viscosity. At high flow rates the nonNewtonian fluid exhibited significantly higher pressure drops than a Newtonian fluid. Careful rheological measurements of the fluid are made using a Weissenberg rheogoniometer. From measurements of the dynamic viscosity shear it is determined that elastic effects are negligible. It is believed that the increased pressure gradients are caused by nonlinear viscous effects resulting from the extensional components of the flow.

  5. Bubble rise velocities and drag coefficients in non-Newtonian polysaccharide solutions.

    PubMed

    Margaritis, A; te Bokkel, D W; Karamanev, D G

    1999-08-01

    Microbially produced polysaccharides have properties which are extremely useful in different applications. Polysaccharide producing fermentations start with liquid broths having Newtonian rheology and end as highly viscous non-Newtonian solutions. Since aerobic microorganisms are used to produce these polysaccharides, it is of great importance to know the mass transfer rate of oxygen from a rising air bubble to the liquid phase, where the microorganisms need the oxygen to grow. One of the most important parameters determining the oxygen transfer rate is the terminal rise velocity of air bubble. The dynamics of the rise of air bubbles in the aqueous solutions of different, mostly microbially produced polysaccharides was studied in this work. Solutions with a wide variety of polysaccharide concentrations and rheological properties were studied. The bubble sizes varied between 0.01 mm3 and 10 cm3. The terminal rise velocities as a function of air bubble volume were studied for 21 different polysaccharide solutions with different rheological properties. It was found that the terminal velocities reached a plateau at higher bubble volumes, and the value of the plateau was nearly constant, between 23 and 27 cm/s, for all solutions studied. The data were analyzed to produce the functional relationship between the drag coefficient and Reynolds number (drag curves). It was found out that all the experimental data obtained from 21 polysaccharide solutions (431 experimental points), can be represented by a new single drag curve. At low values of Reynolds numbers, below 1.0, this curve could be described by the modofoed Hadamard-Rybczynski model, while at Re > 60 the drag coefficient was a constant, equal to 0.95. The latter finding is similar to that observed for bubble rise in Newtonian liquids which was explained on the basis of the "solid bubble" approach. PMID:10397862

  6. Dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Rame, E; Walker, L M; Garoff, S

    2009-11-18

    We examine various aspects of dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Rather than concentrating on the mechanisms that relieve the classic contact line stress singularity, we focus on the behavior in the wedge flow near the contact line which has the dominant influence on wetting with these fluids. Our experiments show that a Newtonian polymer melt composed of highly flexible molecules exhibits dynamic wetting behavior described very well by hydrodynamic models that capture the critical properties of the Newtonian wedge flow near the contact line. We find that shear thinning has a strong impact on dynamic wetting, by reducing the drag of the solid on the fluid near the contact line, while the elasticity of a Boger fluid has a weaker impact on dynamic wetting. Finally, we find that other polymeric fluids, nominally Newtonian in rheometric measurements, exhibit deviations from Newtonian dynamic wetting behavior. PMID:21715890

  7. Intermittent outgassing through a non-Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, T.; Vidal, V.; Bertin, E.; Géminard, J.

    2009-12-01

    Open-conduit basaltic volcanoes experience a wide range of degassing processes, which directly control intensity and style of the explosive activity. For example, they can go through cyclic changes in activity between long periods of continuous lava fountaining (Hawaiian eruptions), and discrete bursts of large gas bubbles (Strombolian explosions). The physical origins of these changes in regime and of the time intervals between them remain unclear, despite a few attempts to model [Jaupart & Vergniolle, Nature88] or interpret it [Bottiglieri, EPL05]. Up to now, this alternation has been explained by variations in gas flux and/or magma input-rates or by constrictions in the chamber and in the conduit [Vergniolle & Jaupart, JGR90]. Here we report simple laboratory experiments which strongly suggest that the non-Newtonian rheology of lava [Webb & Dingwell, JGR90] could be responsible, alone, for this intriguing behaviour, even in stationary gas-flux regime. In our experiment, air is injected at a controlled flow-rate, through a tank-chamber connected to the bottom of a column of a non-Newtonian fluid. This complex fluid features the main rheological properties of lava: it is shear thinning and presents a yield stress. While air is injected at constant flow-rate, one observes an alternation between bubbles, rising quite independently and bursting at the free surface (bubbling regime), and a tortuous gas channel, which crosses the system from the bottom air entrance to the free surface of the fluid (open channel regime). Here, the alternation between these two regimes directly results from the non-Newtonian properties of the fluid and reminds the changes in the degassing regime observed on the field. First, we report statistical data concerning the irregular oscillations between the bubbling and the open channel regimes. Specifically, we measure the statistics of the time spent in both regimes. We observe that the lifespan of the flue is characterized by a power

  8. Controlling and minimizing fingering instabilities in non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Fontana, João V; Dias, Eduardo O; Miranda, José A

    2014-01-01

    The development of the viscous fingering instability in Hele-Shaw cells has great practical and scientific importance. Recently, researchers have proposed different strategies to control the number of interfacial fingering structures, or to minimize as much as possible the amplitude of interfacial disturbances. Most existing studies address the situation in which an inviscid fluid displaces a viscous Newtonian fluid. In this work, we report on controlling and minimizing protocols considering the situation in which the displaced fluid is a non-Newtonian, power-law fluid. The necessary changes on the controlling schemes due to the shear-thinning and shear thickening nature of the displaced fluid are calculated analytically and discussed. PMID:24580329

  9. Dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Rame, E.; Walker, L. M.; Garoff, S.

    2009-11-01

    We examine various aspects of dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Rather than concentrating on the mechanisms that relieve the classic contact line stress singularity, we focus on the behavior in the wedge flow near the contact line which has the dominant influence on wetting with these fluids. Our experiments show that a Newtonian polymer melt composed of highly flexible molecules exhibits dynamic wetting behavior described very well by hydrodynamic models that capture the critical properties of the Newtonian wedge flow near the contact line. We find that shear thinning has a strong impact on dynamic wetting, by reducing the drag of the solid on the fluid near the contact line, while the elasticity of a Boger fluid has a weaker impact on dynamic wetting. Finally, we find that other polymeric fluids, nominally Newtonian in rheometric measurements, exhibit deviations from Newtonian dynamic wetting behavior.

  10. Surface shear viscosity of a lung surfactant: Newtonian to non-Newtonian transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2011-11-01

    DPPC molecule is the most prevalent constituent of lung surfactant, and understanding its behavior as a monolayer may lead to better simulations of respiration. At low surface pressures (i.e. large surface tensions, corresponding to area per molecule of about 50 angstrom squared, or greater), DPPC behaves as a purely viscous film with surface shear viscosity that is Reynolds number independent. Transition to a non-Newtonian regime occurs at large surface pressures. At the small scales associated with the liquid lining of the alveoli, the relative effects of surface viscosities can be comparable to that of surface tension. Here, we examine the interfacial hydrodynamics by isolating the effects of the surface shear viscosity. DPPC monolayer is spread from a concentrated solution at the air/water interface in a deep channel viscometer, consisting of an annular region between two stationary cylinders and a rotating floor. The interfacial velocity is measured non-invasively (without any seeding particles) using Brewster angle microscopy with short laser pulses. The departure from Newtonian behavior is quantified by comparisons to numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes with a BoussinesqâScriven surface model and various surface shear viscosities.

  11. Couette flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in narrow eccentric annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Chukwu, G.A.

    1995-03-01

    The analysis of the steady laminar Couette flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in a narrow eccentric cannulus is employed in this study to compute the surge or swab pressure encountered when running or pulling tubular goods in a liquid-filled borehole, respectively. Excessive surge pressure can fracture the formation, while uncontrolled swab pressure can result in well blowout. In this study, the eqs of motion are analytically solved and the solution of these eqs is presented in both dimensionless and graphical forms for a more general application to computing the surge or swab pressure. The family of curves is presented for different pipe/borehole eccentricity ratios and power-law fluid index values which span the range of typical drilling fluids. By employing the computed surge pressures, in combination with the family of curves, the maximum velocity at which the casing can be run in the hole without the danger of fracturing the formation can be obtained. The expected error in surge computation for a narrow concentric annulus represented by a slot, as a result of eccentricity, is evaluated. The results obtained from the these analyses will aid in proper design and optimization of drilling programs, especially in deviated holes.

  12. Non-Newtonian flow of pathological bile in the biliary system: experimental investigation and CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchumov, Alex G.; Gilev, Valeriy; Popov, Vitaliy; Samartsev, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vasiliy

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents an experimental study of pathological human bile taken from the gallbladder and bile ducts. The flow dependences were obtained for different types of bile from patients with the same pathology, but of different age and sex. The parameters of the Casson's and Carreau's equations were found for bile samples. Results on the hysteretic bile behavior at loading-unloading tests are also presented, which proved that the pathologic bile is a non-Newtonian thixotropic liquid. The viscosity of the gallbladder bile was shown to be higher compared to the duct bile. It was found that at higher shear stress the pathological bile behaves like Newtonian fluid, which is explained by reorientation of structural components. Moreover, some pathological bile flow in the biliary system CFD simulations were performed. The velocity and pressure distributions as well as flow rates in the biliary segments during the gallbladder refilling and emptying phases are obtained. The results of CFD simulations can be used for surgeons to assess the patient's condition and choose an adequate treatment.

  13. Fingering instabilities in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kristi E.

    Fingering has been studied in different fluid systems. Viscous fingering, which is driven by a difference in viscosity between fluids, has been studied by both experiments and numerical simulations. We used a single fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity and studied the instability for a range of inlet pressures and viscosity ratios. The spreading and fingering of a fluid drop subjected to a centrifugal force, known as spin coating, has also been studied for a range of drop volumes and rotation speeds, both for a Newtonian and a non-Newtonian fluid. Experiments on viscous fingering with a single fluid, glycerine, show that an instability occurs at the boundary separating hot and cold fluid. The results indicate that the instability is similar to that which occurs between two miscible fluids. Fingering only occurs for high enough values of the inlet pressure and viscosity ratio. The wavelength of the fingering pattern is found to be proportional to the cell width for the two smallest cell widths used. The fingering patterns seen in the simulations are very similar to the experimental patterns, although there are some quantitative differences. In particular, the wavelength of the instability is seen to depend only weakly on the cell width. The spreading of silicone oil, a Newtonian fluid, during spin coating follows the time dependence predicted theoretically, although with a shift in the scaled time variable. Once the radius of the spreading silicone oil drop becomes large enough, fingers form around the perimeter of the drop for all experimental conditions studied. The number of fingers and the growth rate of the fingers are in agreement with theoretical predictions. Fingers are also observed to form for high enough drop volumes and rotation speeds during the spinning of a non-Newtonian fluid drop, Carbopol, which possesses a yield stress. In this case the fingering is a localized effect, occuring once the stress on the drop exceeds the yield stress, rather

  14. Electrorheological effect and directional non-Newtonian behavior in a nematic capillary subjected to a pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Carlos I.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Reyes, J. Adrián

    2008-01-01

    We consider a capillary consisting of two coaxial cylinders whose core is filled with a nematic liquid crystal (LC) subjected to the simultaneous action of both a pressure gradient applied parallel to the axis of the cylinders and a radial low frequency electric field. We find the configuration of the director of the nematic, initially with an escaped-like configuration, for the flow aligning LC 4'-n -pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) by assuming hard anchoring hybrid boundary conditions. Also, we obtain the velocity profile parametrized by the electric field and the pressure gradient for nonslip boundary conditions. Finally, we calculate exactly the effective viscosity, the first normal stress difference, and the dragging forces on the cylinders. The results show an important electrorheological effect and a directional non-Newtonian response with regions of flow thinning and thickening.

  15. CFD Analysis for Flow of Liquids in Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Tarun Kanti; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The effects of liquid flow rate, coil diameter, pseudo plasticity of the liquids on the frictional pressure drop for the flow through helical coils have been reported through experimental investigation. Numerical modeling is carried using Fluent 6.3 software to find its applicability in the flow system. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are carried out using laminar non-Newtonian pseudo plastic power law model for laminar flow and k-ɛ model for turbulent flow for water. Water and dilute solution of Sodium Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (SCMC) as a non-Newtonian pseudo plastic fluid used for the study. Both hexahedral and tetrahedral grids are used for this simulation. The CFD results show the very good agreement with the experimental values. The comparison of the non-Newtonian liquid flow and water are also reported.

  16. Using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry to investigate the mixing of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dineshkumar; Ein-Mozaffari, Farhad; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2012-12-01

    Mixing is a critical unit operation, which is widely used in chemical and allied industries. Mixing of non-Newtonian fluids is a challenging task due to the complex rheology exhibited by these fluids. Pseudoplastic fluids with yield stress are an important class of non-Newtonian fluids. In this study, we utilized ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry (UDV) to explore the flow field generated by different impellers in the agitation of xanthan gum solutions and pulp suspensions, which are yield-pseudoplastic fluids.

  17. Effect of non-Newtonian viscosity on the fluid-dynamic characteristics in stenotic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Hyung Kyu; Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-08-01

    Although blood is known to have shear-thinning and viscoelastic properties, the effects of such properties on the hemodynamic characteristics in various vascular environments are not fully understood yet. For a quantitative hemodynamic analysis, the refractive index of a transparent blood analogue needs to be matched with that of the flowing conduit in order to minimize the errors according to the distortion of the light. In this study, three refractive index-matched blood analogue fluids with different viscosities are prepared—one Newtonian and two non-Newtonian analogues—which correspond to healthy blood with 45 % hematocrit (i.e., normal non-Newtonian) and obese blood with higher viscosity (i.e., abnormal non-Newtonian). The effects of the non-Newtonian rheological properties of the blood analogues on the hemodynamic characteristics in the post-stenosis region of an axisymmetric stenosis model are experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry velocity field measurement technique and pathline flow visualization. As a result, the centerline jet flow from the stenosis apex is suppressed by the shear-thinning feature of the blood analogues when the Reynolds number is smaller than 500. The lengths of the recirculation zone for abnormal and normal non-Newtonian blood analogues are 3.67 and 1.72 times shorter than that for the Newtonian analogue at Reynolds numbers smaller than 200. The Reynolds number of the transition from laminar to turbulent flow for all blood analogues increases as the shear-thinning feature increases, and the maximum wall shear stresses in non-Newtonian fluids are five times greater than those in Newtonian fluids. However, the shear-thinning effect on the hemodynamic characteristics is not significant at Reynolds numbers higher than 1000. The findings of this study on refractive index-matched non-Newtonian blood analogues can be utilized in other in vitro experiments, where non-Newtonian features dominantly affect the flow

  18. The effect of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and the resulting droplet size distributions. Fourth quarterly technical report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A.; Chigier, N.

    1993-12-31

    In this progress report the authors report on progress in making experimental measurements to describe the rheological properties of non-Newtonian fluids. Non-Newtonian liquids exhibit a non linear relationship between the shear stress and the shear rate. A typical time-dependent rheological phenomenon is thixotropy. Thixotropic fluids show a limited decrease in the shear viscosity of the fluid with time under a suddenly applied constant stress. Thixotropic fluids also show a hysteresis loop and a decaying stress on the shear stress-shear rate plot. Here the authors are using a power law model to describe the behavior of such non-Newtonian liquids.

  19. Aspects of non-Newtonian flow and displacement in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-02-01

    The rheology of many heavy oils has been shown to be non-Newtonian, Bingham plastics being one manifestation of heavy oil flow. In EOR applications, non-Newtonian fluids such as low concentration polymer solutions, emulsions, gels etc. are simultaneously injected to increase the viscosity of driving agents that displace oil. Such rheologically complex fluids are used to improve sweep efficiencies, divert displacing fluids and block swept zones. The present study has been undertaken to understand the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. The work considered involves the numerical (pore network) modeling of both single and multiphase flow of power-law and Bingham plastic fluids in network-like porous media. We consider aspects of both single- and multi-phase flow and displacement. Section 2 describes elementary aspects of non-Newtonian flow and some simple models for porous media. Viscoelastic effects in the flow of non-Newtonian fluids are also discussed. The section includes a brief literature review on non-Newtonian flow in porous media. Section 3 describes single-phase flow.

  20. Theoretical studies of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu.

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. This work is divided into three parts: development of numerical and analytical solutions; theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media; and applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement involving non-Newtonian fluids in porous media has been developed. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in porous media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms involved in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in porous media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. Transient flow of a general pseudoplastic fluid has been studied numerically. 125 refs., 91 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Analysis of non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein accumulation in an artery.

    PubMed

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola

    2016-06-14

    In this work, non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) transport across an artery are analyzed with a multi-layer model. Four rheological models (Carreau, Carreau-Yasuda, power-law and Newtonian) are used for the blood flow through the lumen. For the non-Newtonian cases, the arterial wall is modeled with a generalized momentum equation. Convection-diffusion equation is used for the LDL transport through the lumen, while Staverman-Kedem-Katchalsky, combined with porous media equations, are used for the LDL transport through the wall. Results are presented in terms of filtration velocity, Wall Shear Stresses (WSS) and concentration profiles. It is shown that non-Newtonian effects on mass transport are negligible for a healthy intramural pressure value. Non-Newtonian effects increase slightly with intramural pressure, but Newtonian assumption can still be considered reliable. Effects of arterial size are also analyzed, showing that Newtonian assumption can be considered valid for both medium and large arteries, in predicting LDL deposition. Finally, non-Newtonian effects are also analyzed for an aorta-common iliac bifurcation, showing that Newtonian assumption is valid for mass transport at low Reynolds numbers. At a high Reynolds number, it has been shown that a non-Newtonian fluid model can have more impact due to the presence of flow recirculation. PMID:27055766

  2. A modelling and experimental study of the bubble trajectory in a non-Newtonian crystal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, N. M. S.; Khan, M. M. K.; Rasul, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of air bubbles rising in a massecuite-equivalent non-Newtonian crystal suspension. The bubble trajectory inside the stagnant liquid of a 0.05% xanthan gum crystal suspension was investigated and modelled using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to gain an insight into the bubble flow characteristics. The CFD code FLUENT was used for numerical simulation, and the bubble trajectory calculations were performed through a volume of fluid (VOF) model. The influences of the Reynolds number (Re), the Weber number (We) and the bubble aspect ratio (E) on the bubble trajectory are discussed. The conditions for the bubbles' path oscillations are identified. The experimental results showed that the path instability for the crystal suspension was less rapid than in water. The trajectory analysis indicated that 5.76 mm diameter bubbles followed a zigzag motion in the crystal suspension. Conversely, the smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) followed a path of least horizontal movement and larger bubbles (21.21 mm) produced more spiral motion within the crystal suspension. Path instability occurred for bubbles of 15.63 and 21.21 mm diameter, and they induced both zigzag and spiral trajectories within the crystal suspension. At low Re and We, smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) produced a zigzag trajectory, whereas larger bubbles (15.63 and 21.21 mm) showed both zigzag and spiral trajectories at intermediate and moderately high Re and We in the crystal suspension. The simulation results illustrated that a repeating pattern of swirling vortices was created for smaller bubbles due to the unstable wake and unsteady flow of these bubbles. This is the cause of the smaller bubbles moving in a zigzag way. Larger bubbles showed two counter-rotating trailing vortices at the back of the bubble. These vortices induced a velocity component to the gas-liquid interface and caused a deformation. Hence, the larger bubbles produced a path transition.

  3. Theoretical Studies of Non-Newtonian and Newtonian Fluid Flowthrough Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.S.

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. This work is divided into three parts: (1) development of numerical and analytical solutions; (2) theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media; and (3) applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement involving non-Newtonian fluids in porous media has been developed. Based on this solution, a graphic approach for evaluating non-Newtonian displacement efficiency has been developed. The Buckley-Leverett-Welge theory is extended to flow problems with non-Newtonian fluids. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in porous media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms involved in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in porous media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. The results show that this kind of displacement is a complicated process and is determined by the rheological properties of the non-Newtonian fluids and the flow conditions, in addition to relative permeability data. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. For flow at a constant rate, non-Newtonian flow behavior in a fractured

  4. The physics of coal liquid slurry atomization. Final report to Department of Energy - PETC

    SciTech Connect

    Chigier, N.; Mansour, A.

    1995-10-01

    The stability of turbulent columns of liquid injected into a quiescent environment was studied. Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements of the flow patterns and turbulence characteristics in free liquid jets were made. Turbulence decay along Newtonian jets was investigated along with the effects of turbulence on the resulting droplet size distributions after breakup. The rate of decay of turbulence properties along the jet were investigated. Disintegration of liquid jets injected into a high-velocity gas stream has also been studied. Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids were studied with particular emphasis on the non-Newtonian rheological characteristics. Determination was made of the extent that the addition of high molecular weight polymer to liquids change the breakup process. Shear thinning, extension thinning and extension thickening fluids were investigated. Shear viscosities were measured over five decades of shear rates. The contraction flow technique was also used for measurement of the extensional viscosity of non-Newtonian liquids. The die-swell technique was also used to determine the first normal stress difference. The near field produced by a co-axial airblast atomizer was investigated using the phase Doppler particle analyzer. Whether or not the classical wave mechanism and empirical models reported for airblast atomization of low viscosity liquid are applicable to airblast atomization of viscous non-Newtonian liquids was determined. The theoretical basis of several models which give the best fit to the experimental data for airblast atomization of non-Newtonian liquids was also discussed. The accuracy of the wave mechanism-based models in predicting droplets sizes after breakup of viscous non-Newtonian liquids using an airblast atomizer has also been demonstrated.

  5. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian blood flow through a mechanical aortic valve. Non-Newtonian blood flow in the aortic root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vita, F.; de Tullio, M. D.; Verzicco, R.

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flows through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in the aortic root. The blood, in fact, is a concentrated suspension of cells, mainly red blood cells, in a Newtonian matrix, the plasma, and consequently its overall behavior is that of a non-Newtonian fluid owing to the action of the cells' membrane on the fluid part. The common practice, however, assumes the blood in large vessels as a Newtonian fluid since the shear rate is generally high and the effective viscosity becomes independent of the former. In this paper, we show that this is not always the case even in the aorta, the largest artery of the systemic circulation, owing to the pulsatile and transitional nature of the flow. Unexpectedly, for most of the pulsating cycle and in a large part of the fluid volume, the shear rate is smaller than the threshold level for the blood to display a constant effective viscosity and its shear thinning character might affect the system dynamics. A direct inspection of the various flow features has shown that the valve dynamics, the transvalvular pressure drop and the large-scale features of the flow are very similar for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models. On the other hand, the mechanical damage of the red blood cells (hemolysis), induced by the altered stress values in the flow, is larger for the non-Newtonian fluid model than for the Newtonian one.

  6. A numerical and analytical study of normal stresses and pressure differences in non-Newtonian creeping flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Minwu

    1989-12-01

    Analytical and numerical studies of some non-Newtonian creeping flows are pursued with particular interests in normal stresses and pressure differences. The study is started with the phenomenon of excess pressure rise across the pressure-hole which was observed in the Couette base flow over a transverse slot. This excess pressure rise phenomenon turns out to be very important in correctly applying the Higashitani and Pritchard (HP) theory. The correct application of HP theory involves a modified hole-pressure relation (MHPR). By studying the MHPR in streamline coordinate formulation, a fortuitous error cancellation phenomenon was found which provides a complete theoretical explanation for the paradox between an apparently flawed derivation and the fortunate success of the HP prediction. This error cancellation is proved to be exact for second-order fluid, and for Tanner's viscoelastic liquids under certain assumptions. For other non-Newtonian models, such as the Maxwell and modified Johnson-Segalman fluids, results also favor the error cancellation postulate. The theory numerical simulations of hole-pressure are conducted for second-order, Maxwell and Johnson-Segalman fluids. Some important results and conclusions are presented for creeping flows. Two unperturbed shearing flows, i.e., the plane Poiseuille flow and plate-driven tangential annular flow of modified Johnson-Segalman fluid are also studied. By changing integral variable and solving a cubic equation at each location, exact steady solutions were obtained for these two flows. Both monotone and non-monotone stress-strain-rate relations are considered and complete formulation and solution procedures are developed. Then the analytical solution technique and results are applied to the hole-pressure error prediction, convergence study of FEM solutions and reliability verification of the numerical methods used in the hole-pressure simulation.

  7. Forces and Flows in Non-Newtonian Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Melody; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    Above a certain solid mass fraction, suspensions of dense granular particles in water exhibit non-Newtonian behavior, including impact-activated solidification. Although it has been suggested that solidification depends on interactions with the suspension boundary, quantitative experiments on the boundary forces have not been reported. In the present experiments, we determine the magnitude and timings of impactor-driven events in both the boundaries and body of the suspension using high-speed video, tracer particles, and photoelastic container boundaries. We observe a shock-like propagation in the cornstarch suspension during impact. The dynamics of the shockfront are strongly correlated to those of the intruder. We also observe a second extremely fast shockfront, associated with the propagation of forces to the boundaries of the suspension. The dynamics of this shockfront do not depend on the intruder dynamics, but are correlated to the volume fraction of cornstarch particles in the suspension. The observed shockfront propagates at a speed which is faster than the sound speed in the experiment container. We acknowledge funding from the W. M. Keck Foundation, and grants NSF-DMR1206351 and NASA NNX15AD38G.

  8. Non-Newtonian particulate flow simulation: A direct-forcing immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Succi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, a direct-forcing immersed boundary-non-Newtonian lattice Boltzmann method (IB-NLBM) is developed to investigate the sedimentation and interaction of particles in shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. In the proposed IB-NLBM, the non-linear mechanics of non-Newtonian particulate flows is detected by combination of the most desirable features of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann methods. The noticeable roles of non-Newtonian behavior on particle motion, settling velocity and generalized Reynolds number are investigated by simulating benchmark problem of one-particle sedimentation under the same generalized Archimedes number. The effects of extra force due to added accelerated mass are analyzed on the particle motion which have a significant impact on shear-thinning fluids. For the first time, the phenomena of interaction among the particles, such as Drafting, Kissing, and Tumbling in non-Newtonian fluids are investigated by simulation of two-particle sedimentation and twelve-particle sedimentation. The results show that increasing the shear-thickening behavior of fluid leads to a significant increase in the kissing time. Moreover, the transverse position of particles for shear-thinning fluids during the tumbling interval is different from Newtonian and the shear-thickening fluids. The present non-Newtonian particulate study can be applied in several industrial and scientific applications, like the non-Newtonian sedimentation behavior of particles in food industrial and biological fluids.

  9. Non-Newtonian rheology of bubble-bearing magmas: effects on conduit dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; Papale, Paolo; Montagna, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian rheology typically arises in magmas from the presence of a dispersed phase. In particular bubbles can reduce or increase the relative viscosity, depending on size and strain regime (i.e., capillary number), for example large bubbles, as well as low strain, reduce the apparent viscosity. In a Non-Newtonian regime it is not possible to define a strain-rate-independent viscosity and the velocity profile is complex. In this work we extended the 1D, steady, isothermal, multiphase non-homogeneous magma ascent model of Papale (2001) to 1.5D to include the Non-Newtonian effect of a bubble-bearing magma. The model has been tested with a basaltic test case. In this way we were able to calculate depth-dependent Non-newtonian velocity profiles across the conduit radius along with shear strain-rate and viscosity distributions. Moreover, the model could quantify the effects of the Non-Newtonian rheology on conduit flow dynamics, in terms of flow variables (e.g. velocity, pressure). P. Papale (2001). Dynamics of magma flow in volcanic conduits with variable fragmentation efficiency and nonequilibrium pumice degassing. JGR, 106, 11043-11065.

  10. Diagnosis at a glance of biological non-Newtonian fluids with Film Interference Flow Imaging (FIFI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidema, R.; Yamada, N.; Furukawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the human body, full of biological non-Newtonian fluids exist. For example, synovial fluids exist in our joints, which contain full of biopolymers, such as hyaluronan and mucin. It is thought that these polymers play critical roles on the smooth motion of the joint. Indeed, luck of biopolymers in synovial fluid cause joint pain. Here we study the effects of polymer in thin liquid layer by using an original experimental method called Film Interference Flow Imaging (FIFI). A vertically flowing soap film containing polymers is made as two-dimensional flow to observe turbulence. The thickness of water layer is about 4 μm sandwiched between surfactant mono-layers. The interference pattern of the soap film is linearly related to the flow velocity in the water layer through the change in the thickness of the film. Thus the flow velocity is possibly analyzed by the single image analysis of the interference pattern, that is, FIFI. The grid turbulence was made in the flowing soap films containing the long flexible polymer polyethyleneoxide (PEO, Mw=3.5x106), and rigid polymer hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC, Mw > 1.0 x106). The decaying process of the turbulence is affected by PEO and HPC at several concentrations. The effects of PEO are sharply seen even at low concentrations, while the effects of HPC are gradually occurred at much higher concentration compared to the PEO. It is assumed that such a difference between PEO and HPC is due to the polymer stretching or polymer orientation under turbulence, which is observed and analyzed by FIFI. We believe the FIFI will be applied in the future to examine biological fluids such as synovial fluids quickly and quantitatively.

  11. Sinking of spherical slablets through a non-Newtonian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Fabio; Stegman, Dave; Petersen, Robert; Tackley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The dominant driving force for plate tectonics is slab pull, in which sinking slabs pull the trailing plate. Forward plate velocities are typically similar in magnitude (7 cm/yr) as estimates for sinking velocities of slabs through the upper mantle. However, these estimates are based on data for slabs that are coherent into the transition zone as well as models that considered the upper mantle to be entirely Newtonian. Dislocation creep in the upper mantle can strongly influence mantle flow, and is likely activated for flow around vertically sinking slabs in the uppermost mantle. Thus, it is possible that in some scenarios, a non-Newtonian mantle will have an influence on plate motions but it is unclear to what degree. To address this question, we investigate how the non-Newtonian rheology modifies the sinking velocities of slablets (spherical, negatively buoyant and highly viscous blobs). The model set-up is similar to a Stokes sphere sinking, but is in 2-D cartesian with temperature-and stress-dependent rheology. For these numerical models, we use the Stag-YY code (e.g., Tackley 2008) and apply a pseudo-free surface using the 'sticky-air' approach (Matsumoto and Tomoda 1983; Schmeling et al, 2008, Crameri et al., 2012). The sinking blob is both highly viscous and compositionally dense, but is the same temperature as the background fluid which eliminates thermal diffusion and associated variations in thermal buoyancy. The model domain is 2x1 or 4x1 and allows enough distance to the sidewalls so that sinking velocities are not influenced by the boundary conditions. We compare our results with those previously obtained for salt diapirs rising through a power-law rheology mantle/crust (Weinberg, 1993; Weinberg and Podladchikov, 1994), which provided both numerical and analytic results. Previous results indicate a speed-up of an order of magnitude is possible. Finally, we then extend the models and analysis to mantle convection systems that include for single

  12. Numerical Simulation of non-Newtonian Fluid Flows through Fracture Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmawan, I. A.; Ulhag, R. Z.; Endyana, C.; Aufaristama, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation of non-Newtonian fluid flow in a twodimensional fracture network. The fracture is having constant mean aperture and bounded with Hurst exponent surfaces. The non-Newtonian rheology behaviour of the fluid is described using the Power-Law model. The lattice Boltzmann method is employed to calculate the solutions for non-Newtonian flow in finite Reynolds number. We use a constant force to drive the fluid within the fracture, while the bounceback rules and periodic boundary conditions are applied for the fluid-solid interaction and inflow outlflow boundary conditions, respectively. The validation study of the simulation is done via parallel plate flow simulation and the results demonstrated good agreement with the analytical solution. In addition, the fluid flow properties within the fracture network follow the relationships of power law fluid while the errors are becoming larger if the fluid more shear thinning.

  13. Experimental investigation of surface tension in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids with optical diffractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargham, Mehrnaz; Moradi, Ali-Reza; Najafi, Ali

    2013-11-01

    In this paper using an optical method based on diffraction phenomenon, we studied surface tension of fluids. Diffraction patterns of a laser beam diffracted from surface waves, induced by an external acoustic wave generator, provides information of the surface of fluids. This information, in turn, enables calculating an experimental dispersion relation and surface tension of fluids. Spherical and cylindrical surface waves on fluids are generated by sticking a long thin needle and a thin metal plate, respectively, to a loudspeaker. Turning on the generator, the needle (or metal plate) causes waves on the surface, which act as a diffraction grating to the incident laser beam. The experiment and analysis were performed for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Distilled water was used as a Newtonian sample fluid, and polyacrylamide solution was used as a non-Newtonian one. Our results predict considerable differences between Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids behavior in terms of their surface wave dispersion.

  14. MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS FOR A NON-NEWTONIAN FLUID AND WATER WITH AND WITHOUT ANTI-FOAM AGENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.

    2009-09-09

    Mass transfer rates were measured in a large scale system, which consisted of an 8.4 meter tall by 0.76 meter diameter column containing one of three fluids: water with an anti-foam agent, water without an anti-foam agent, and AZ101 simulant, which simulated a non-Newtonian nuclear waste. The testing contributed to the evaluation of large scale mass transfer of hydrogen in nuclear waste tanks. Due to its radioactivity, the waste was chemically simulated, and due to flammability concerns oxygen was used in lieu of hydrogen. Different liquids were used to better understand the mass transfer processes, where each of the fluids was saturated with oxygen, and the oxygen was then removed from solution as air bubbled up, or sparged, through the solution from the bottom of the column. Air sparging was supplied by a single tube which was co-axial to the column, the decrease in oxygen concentration was recorded, and oxygen measurements were then used to determine the mass transfer coefficients to describe the rate of oxygen transfer from solution. Superficial, average, sparging velocities of 2, 5, and 10 mm/second were applied to each of the liquids at three different column fill levels, and mass transfer coefficient test results are presented here for combinations of superficial velocities and fluid levels.

  15. LES of non-Newtonian physiological blood flow in a model of arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Molla, M M; Paul, M C

    2012-10-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed to study the physiological pulsatile transition-to-turbulent non-Newtonian blood flow through a 3D model of arterial stenosis by using five different blood viscosity models: (i) Power-law, (ii) Carreau, (iii) Quemada, (iv) Cross and (v) modified-Casson. The computational domain has been chosen is a simple channel with a biological type stenosis formed eccentrically on the top wall. The physiological pulsation is generated at the inlet of the model using the first four harmonic series of the physiological pressure pulse (Loudon and Tordesillas [1]). The effects of the various viscosity models are investigated in terms of the global maximum shear rate, post-stenotic re-circulation zone, mean shear stress, mean pressure, and turbulent kinetic energy. We find that the non-Newtonian viscosity models enlarge the length of the post-stenotic re-circulation region by moving the reattachment point of the shear layer separating from the upper wall further downstream. But the turbulent kinetic energy at the immediate post-lip of the stenosis drops due to the effects of the non-Newtonian viscosity. The importance of using LES in modelling the non-Newtonian physiological pulsatile blood flow is also assessed for the different viscosity models in terms of the results of the dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) stress Smagorinsky model constant, C(s), and the corresponding SGS normalised viscosity. PMID:22153320

  16. Learning about Non-Newtonian Fluids in a Student-Driven Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dounas-Frazer, D. R.; Lynn, J.; Zaniewski, A. M.; Roth, N.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a simple, low-cost experiment and corresponding pedagogical strategies for studying fluids whose viscosities depend on shear rate, referred to as "non-Newtonian fluids." We developed these materials teaching for the Compass Project, an organization that fosters a creative, diverse, and collaborative community of science students at UC…

  17. Harmonic oscillations of laminae in non-Newtonian fluids: A lattice Boltzmann-Immersed Boundary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the fluid dynamics induced by a rigid lamina undergoing harmonic oscillations in a non-Newtonian calm fluid is investigated. The fluid is modelled through the lattice Boltzmann method and the flow is assumed to be nearly incompressible. An iterative viscosity-correction based procedure is proposed to properly account for the non-Newtonian fluid feature and its accuracy is evaluated. In order to handle the mutual interaction between the lamina and the encompassing fluid, the Immersed Boundary method is adopted. A numerical campaign is performed. In particular, the effect of the non-Newtonian feature is highlighted by investigating the fluid forces acting on a harmonically oscillating lamina for different values of the Reynolds number. The findings prove that the non-Newtonian feature can drastically influence the behaviour of the fluid and, as a consequence, the forces acting upon the lamina. Several considerations are carried out on the time history of the drag coefficient and the results are used to compute the added mass through the hydrodynamic function. Moreover, the computational cost involved in the numerical simulations is discussed. Finally, two applications concerning water resources are investigated: the flow through an obstructed channel and the particle sedimentation. Present findings highlight a strong coupling between the body shape, the Reynolds number, and the flow behaviour index.

  18. A Colorful Mixing Experiment in a Stirred Tank Using Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujilo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecillia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballesca´-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Marion Moise´s

    2014-01-01

    A simple experiment designed to study mixing of a material of complex rheology in a stirred tank is described. Non-Newtonian suspensions of blue maize flour that naturally contain anthocyanins have been chosen as a model fluid. These anthocyanins act as a native, wide spectrum pH indicator exhibiting greenish colors in alkaline environments, blue…

  19. An experimental study of non-Newtonian polymer rheology effects on oil recovery and injectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gleasure, R.W.; Phillips, C.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Pseudoplastic non-Newtonian polymer solutions were examined for their enhanced oil recovery performance. Detailed results are reported for xanthan gum (XAN), Kelzan XCD, and a viscoelastic polyethylene oxide (PEO), Polyox OF-50. Increases in the power-law coefficient resulted in improved displacement efficiency. Effects were also observed in the injectivity-index parameter results.

  20. Revisiting Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Using Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how a computer algebra system, such as Maple[R], can assist in the study of theoretical fluid mechanics, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The continuity equation, the stress equations of motion, the Navier-Stokes equations, and various constitutive equations are treated, using a full, but straightforward,…

  1. Introducing Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Computations with Mathematica in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binous, Housam

    2007-01-01

    We study four non-Newtonian fluid mechanics problems using Mathematica[R]. Constitutive equations describing the behavior of power-law, Bingham and Carreau models are recalled. The velocity profile is obtained for the horizontal flow of power-law fluids in pipes and annuli. For the vertical laminar film flow of a Bingham fluid we determine the…

  2. The Lamu Basin deepwater fold-and-thrust belt: An example of a margin-scale, gravity-driven thrust belt along the continental passive margin of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Barchi, Massimiliano R.

    2016-03-01

    In recent decades, advances in seismic processing and acquisition of new data sets have revealed the presence of many deepwater fold-and-thrust belts (DW-FTBs), often developing along continental passive margins. These kinds of tectonic features have been intensively studied, due to their substantial interest. This work presents a regional-scale study of the poorly explored Lamu Basin DW-FTB, a margin-scale, gravity-driven system extending for more than 450 km along the continental passive margin of Kenya and southern Somalia (East Africa). A 2-D seismic data set was analyzed, consisting of both recently acquired high-quality data and old reprocessed seismic profiles, for the first detailed structural and stratigraphic interpretation of this DW-FTB. The system originated over an Early to mid-Cretaceous shale detachment due to a mainly gravity-spreading mechanism. Analysis of synkinematic strata indicates that the DW-FTB was active from the Late Cretaceous to the Early Miocene, but almost all of the deformation occurred before the Late Paleocene. The fold-and-thrust system displays a marked N-S variation in width, the northern portion being more than 150 km wide and the southern portion only a few dozen kilometers wide; this along-strike variation is thought to be related to the complex tectonosedimentary evolution of the continental margin at the Somalia-Kenya boundary, also reflected in the present-day bathymetry. Locally, a series of volcanic edifices stopped the basinward propagation of the DW-FTB. A landward change in the dominant structural style, from asymmetric imbricate thrust sheets to pseudo-symmetric detachment folds, is generally observed, related to the landward thickening of the detached shales.

  3. Studying Mixing in Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions Using Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecilia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballescá-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Newtonian fluids occur in many relevant flow and mixing scenarios at the lab and industrial scale. The addition of acid or basic solutions to a non-Newtonian fluid is not an infrequent operation, particularly in Biotechnology applications where the pH of Non-Newtonian culture broths is usually regulated using this strategy. Methodology and Findings We conducted mixing experiments in agitated vessels using Non-Newtonian blue maize flour suspensions. Acid or basic pulses were injected to reveal mixing patterns and flow structures and to follow their time evolution. No foreign pH indicator was used as blue maize flours naturally contain anthocyanins that act as a native, wide spectrum, pH indicator. We describe a novel method to quantitate mixedness and mixing evolution through Dynamic Color Analysis (DCA) in this system. Color readings corresponding to different times and locations within the mixing vessel were taken with a digital camera (or a colorimeter) and translated to the CIELab scale of colors. We use distances in the Lab space, a 3D color space, between a particular mixing state and the final mixing point to characterize segregation/mixing in the system. Conclusion and Relevance Blue maize suspensions represent an adequate and flexible model to study mixing (and fluid mechanics in general) in Non-Newtonian suspensions using acid/base tracer injections. Simple strategies based on the evaluation of color distances in the CIELab space (or other scales such as HSB) can be adapted to characterize mixedness and mixing evolution in experiments using blue maize suspensions. PMID:25401332

  4. Gravity driven instability in elastic solid layers.

    PubMed

    Mora, Serge; Phou, Ty; Fromental, Jean-Marc; Pomeau, Yves

    2014-10-24

    We demonstrate the instability of the free surface of a soft elastic solid facing downwards. Experiments are carried out using a gel of constant density ρ, shear modulus μ, put in a rigid cylindrical dish of depth h. When turned upside down, the free surface of the gel undergoes a normal outgoing acceleration g. It remains perfectly flat for ρgh/μ<α* with α*≃6, whereas a steady pattern spontaneously appears in the opposite case. This phenomenon results from the interplay between the gravitational energy and the elastic energy of deformation, which reduces the Rayleigh waves celerity and vanishes it at the threshold. PMID:25379940

  5. A Cosmology with a Gravity Driven Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enginol, Turan B.

    2015-08-01

    The theoretically expected value of Λ is some 10120 orders of magnitude larger than the current observational limits. Since Λ=8πc-2ρΛG, where the vacuum energy density ρΛ is constant, we argue that this discrepancy is due to a large value of G at the beginning which decreases to its present value at reheating. This suggests that initially gravity may have been a strong force. Inflation would then be driven by a large Gi, the variation range of G being similar to Λ. This may be a possible solution for the cosmological constant problem.A graceful exit from inflation occurs when ρr reaches the value ρΛ as radiation is created. Radiation is created through the decay of massive particle species φ with small mean lifetimes τ, which are produced by the fluctuations of the gravity field. We find that radiation energy density ρr increases sharply from the end of inflation at Rf to its maximum value and then decreases as R-3/2 until reheating at t=τ, continuing on to decrease with its natural pattern of R-4.Following Sciama's idea of gravitational induction, an equation of continuity for a possibly non-constant G is obtained using the equations of general relativity. This equation indicates that G is non-constant if radiation and/or matter is created, its solution for G having an inverse dependence on the sum of ρr, ρm, and ρΛ. Accordingly, with the sudden increase of ρr, G and therefore Λ fall off sharply from their values Gi and Λi at Rf, and continue to decrease as R-3/2. From reheating on they attain their constant values of the present epoch, namely G0 and Λ0.Our equation of cosmology, obtained by integrating the expression for the deceleration parameter q, gives two inflection points for R=R(t). The first one occurs at the recovery from inflation when ρr(R)=ρΛ. The second inflection is at R’, where R’

  6. Fabrication of gravity-driven microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Terada, N.; Hagihara, S.; Komatsu, T.; Terasawa, A.

    2008-12-01

    We have studied the micro total analysis system as a blood test. A microfluidic device with a three-pronged microchannel and artificial capillary vessels was fabricated. The microchannel is to transport blood, focus blood cells, and line them up. The vessels are to observe red blood cell deformation. An excimer laser was used to form grooves and so on. Numbers of thermosetting resin film and fluororesin were piled up on a cover glass. A laser fabricated part of the channel at the each film every lamination, and then a three-dimensional structure microchannel was fabricated. The channel sizes have widths of 50-150 μm and depths of 45 μm. Through holes used as artificial capillary vessels are made in the fluororesin having a minimum diameter of 5 μm and a length of 100 μm. As blood and a physiological saline are injected into the microchannel, the device stands upward facing the channel, and blood cells go into the vessels by the force of gravity and sheath flow of the saline. By gravity various groove patterns were made changing the width and length for measurement of blood focusing. Moreover, the red blood cell deformation was observed in the vessels with a microscope.

  7. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  8. Constraints on Non-Newtonian Gravity From the Experiment on Neutron Quantum States in the Earth’s Gravitational Field

    PubMed Central

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Protasov, K. V.

    2005-01-01

    An upper limit to non-Newtonian attractive forces is obtained from the measurement of quantum states of neutrons in the Earth’s gravitational field. This limit improves the existing constraints in the nanometer range. PMID:27308134

  9. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

    2013-08-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

  10. Survey of the literature: Controlled generation of liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Craig R.; Carlon, Hugh R.; Stuempfle, Arthur K.; Hoffer, Thomas E.; Pitter, Richard L.

    1988-08-01

    Techniques utilized in generating large drops from visco-elastic liquids, which are also referred to as non-Newtonian liquids, are surveyed, reviewed and evaluated. The minimum droplet size of interest was 0.2 mm (200 micrometers). Drop generation techniques considered include the capillary dropper, liquid jets, atomization, the spinning disc, vaporization-condensation, impulse generation, and other techniques. Of these, only three generator configurations were found to meet experimental requirements. These included a drop impulse/ejection system, a capillary device utilizing immiscible liquids, and a microfilm technique whereby presized drops are released into free fall by the sudden removal of the supporting microfilm utilizing a liquid solvent spray technique.

  11. Vortex rings in non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluids play yo-yo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagnac, Julie; Laupsien, David; Anne-Archard, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Vortex rings are coherent vortical structures widely presents in geophysical flows and engineering applications. Numerous applications imply industrial processes including food processing, or petrol industry. Those applications are very often confronted with non-Newtonian fluids. Nevertheless, to the best of our knowledge, only few studies dealing with vortex dynamics in non-Newtonian shear-thinning fluids exist, and none with viscoelastic ones. The aim for the present study is to characterize experimentally the dynamics of vortex rings generated thanks to a piston-cylinder apparatus in various viscoelastic fluids as a function of the generalized Reynolds number, the piston stroke and the final piston position relative to the cylinder exit. In particular, the elastic property of the fluid will be highlighted by the furling-unfurling of vortex rings.

  12. Instrumentation to Monitor Transient Periodic Developing Flow in Non-Newtonian Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.

    2013-11-15

    Staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have conducted mixing and mobilization experiments with non-Newtonian slurries that exhibit Bingham plastic and shear thinning behavior and shear strength. This paper describes measurement techniques applied to identify the interface between flowing and stationary regions of non-Newtonian slurries that are subjected to transient, periodic, developing flows. Techniques were developed to identify the boundary between the flowing and stationary regions, time to mix, characteristic velocities of the flow field produced by the symmetrically spaced nozzles, and the velocity of the upwell formed in the center of the tank by the intersection of flow from four symmetrically spaced nozzles that impinge upon the tank floor. Descriptions of the instruments and instrument performance are presented. These techniques were an effective approach to characterize mixing phenomena, determine mixing energy required to fully mobilize vessel contents and to determine mixing times for process evaluation.

  13. Conduction and dissipation in the shearing flow of granular materials modeled as non-Newtonian fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.C.; Tran, P.X.

    2007-06-15

    After providing a brief review of the constitutive modeling of the stress tensor for granular materials using non-Newtonian fluid models, we study the flow between two horizontal flat plates. It is assumed that the granular media behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid (of the Reiner–Rivlin type); we use the constitutive relation derived by Rajagopal and Massoudi [Rajagopal, K. R. and M. Massoudi, “A Method for measuring material moduli of granular materials: flow in an orthogonal rheometer,” Topical Report, DOE/PETC/TR-90/3, 1990] which can predict the normal stress differences. The lower plate is fixed and heated, and the upper plate (which is at a lower temperature than the lower plate) is set into motion with a constant velocity. The steady fully developed flow and the heat transfer equations are made dimensionless and are solved numerically; the effects of different dimensionless numbers and viscous dissipation are discussed.

  14. Spreading of Non-Newtonian and Newtonian Fluids on a Solid Substrate under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta Choudhury, Moutushi; Chandra, Subrata; Nag, Soma; Das, Shantanu; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2011-09-01

    Strongly non-Newtonian fluids namely, aqueous gels of starch, are shown to exhibit visco-elastic behavior, when subjected to a load. We study arrowroot and potato starch gels. When a droplet of the fluid is sandwiched between two glass plates and compressed, the area of contact between the fluid and plates increases in an oscillatory manner. This is unlike Newtonian fluids, where the area increases monotonically in a similar situation. The periphery moreover, develops an instability, which looks similar to Saffman Taylor fingers. This is not normally seen under compression. The loading history is also found to affect the manner of spreading. We attempt to describe the non-Newtonian nature of the fluid through a visco-elastic model incorporating generalized calculus. This is shown to reproduce qualitatively the oscillatory variation in the surface strain.

  15. Non-Newtonian Viscosity Modeling of Crude Oils—Comparison Among Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-González, Patsy V.; Aguayo, Juan Pablo; Quiñones-Cisneros, Sergio E.; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of precipitated wax or even just low temperatures may induce non-Newtonian rheological behavior in crude oils. Such behavior can be found at operating conditions, for instance, in reservoirs at deep-water conditions. Therefore, reliable rheological models for crude oils applicable over the wide range of conditions the fluid may encounter are essential for a large number of oil technology applications. Such models must also be composition dependent, as many applications require predicting the rheological behavior of the fluid under strong compositional changes, e.g., recovery applications such as vapor extraction (VAPEX) processes or blending of fluids for improved rheological characteristics for piping, among many other applications. In this study, a comparative analysis between some published models applicable to the description of the non-Newtonian behavior of crude oils is carried out. Emphasis is placed on the stability of the model predictions within the wide range of conditions that may be encountered.

  16. FDA’s Nozzle Numerical Simulation Challenge: Non-Newtonian Fluid Effects and Blood Damage

    PubMed Central

    Trias, Miquel; Arbona, Antonio; Massó, Joan; Miñano, Borja; Bona, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Data from FDA’s nozzle challenge–a study to assess the suitability of simulating fluid flow in an idealized medical device–is used to validate the simulations obtained from a numerical, finite-differences code. Various physiological indicators are computed and compared with experimental data from three different laboratories, getting a very good agreement. Special care is taken with the derivation of blood damage (hemolysis). The paper is focused on the laminar regime, in order to investigate non-Newtonian effects (non-constant fluid viscosity). The code can deal with these effects with just a small extra computational cost, improving Newtonian estimations up to a ten percent. The relevance of non-Newtonian effects for hemolysis parameters is discussed. PMID:24667931

  17. Drop Characteristics of non-Newtonian Impinging Jets at High Generalized Bird-Carreau Jet Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, Paul E.; Rodrigues, Neil S.

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the drop characteristics of three Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sprays produced by the impingement of two liquid jets. The three water-based solutions used in this work (0.5 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, and 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF) exhibited strong shear-thinning, non-Newtonian behavior - characterized by the Bird-Carreau rheological model. A generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number was used as the primary parameter to characterize the drop size and the drop velocity, which were measured using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). PDA optical configuration enabled a drop size measurement range of approximately 2.3 to 116.2 μm. 50,000 drops were measured at each test condition to ensure statistical significance. The arithmetic mean diameter (D10) , Sauter mean diameter (D32) , and mass median diameter (MMD) were used as representative diameters to characterize drop size. The mean axial drop velocity Uz -mean along with its root-mean square Uz -rms were used to characterize drop velocity. Incredibly, measurements for all three CMC liquids and reference DI water sprays seemed to follow a single curve for D32 and MMD drop diameters in the high generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number range considered in this work (9.21E +03

  18. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Magnetic-field Relaxations in Solar-coronal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper treats the relaxation of a magnetic field into a minimum-energy force-free state in a cold (pressure-less) viscous fluid, under the frozen-in condition of perfect electrical conductivity and letting the viscosity-dissipated energy be completely lost. A non-Newtonian fluid in popular use is studied in relation to the Newtonian viscous fluid, as two alternative numerical means to (1) construct force-free fields representing solar coronal structures in realistic geometry and (2) investigate the Parker theory of spontaneous formation of electric current sheets as a basic MHD process. Faraday's induction equation imposes an independent condition on the fluid velocity at rigid, perfectly conducting boundaries. This boundary condition is quite compatible with Newtonian mechanics but not with the non-Newtonian fluid model where velocity is equated to the Lorentz force with a free, positive multiplicative-factor. This defining property gives rise to unphysical or artificial singularities not previously known that are completely distinct from the physically admissible singularities representing the current sheets of the Parker theory. In particular, the non-Newtonian fluid takes a magnetic field with neutral points from any one of a continuum of initial states into an unphysical state instead of the proper force-free end-state accessible by Newtonian relaxation. The validity of previously published MHD results based on this non-Newtonian fluid, including some counterclaims against the Parker theory, is dubious. Investigating the Parker theory requires numerical relaxation models capable of anticipating and accurately describing inevitable current-sheet singularities. By including a weak resistivity to dissipate the inevitable current sheets as they form, the field can change topology intermittently to seek a terminal force-free state free of singularities. The minimum-energy state of this more complete model corresponds to the long-lived relaxed structures in the

  19. Effect of non-Newtonian fluid properties on bovine sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Hyakutake, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Satoru

    2015-09-18

    The swimming process by which mammal spermatozoa progress towards an egg within the reproductive organs is important in achieving successful internal fertilization. The viscosity of oviductal mucus is more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of water, and oviductal mucus also has non-Newtonian properties. In this study, we experimentally observed sperm motion in fluids with various fluid rheological properties and investigated the influence of varying the viscosity and whether the fluid was Newtonian or non-Newtonian on the sperm motility. We selected polyvinylpyrrolidone and methylcellulose as solutes to create solutions with different rheological properties. We used the semen of Japanese cattle and investigated the following parameters: the sperm velocity, the straight-line velocity and the amplitude from the trajectory, and the beat frequency from the fragellar movement. In a Newtonian fluid environment, as the viscosity increased, the motility of the sperm decreased. However, in a non-Newtonian fluid, the straight-line velocity and beat frequency were significantly higher than in a Newtonian fluid with comparable viscosity. As a result, the linearity of the sperm movement increased. Additionally, increasing the viscosity brought about large changes in the sperm flagellar shape. At low viscosities, the entire flagellum moved in a curved flapping motion, whereas in the high-viscosity, only the tip of the flagellum flapped. These results suggest that the bovine sperm has evolved to swim toward the egg as quickly as possible in the actual oviduct fluid, which is a high-viscosity non-Newtonian fluid. PMID:26277700

  20. Stationary flow of non-Newtonian fluid with nonmonotone frictional boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Sylwia; Kalita, Piotr; Migórski, Stanisław

    2015-10-01

    We study the stationary two-dimensional incompressible flow of non-Newtonian fluid governed by a nonlinear constitutive law and with a multivalued nonmonotone subdifferential frictional boundary condition. We provide an abstract result on existence of solution to an operator inclusion modeling the flow phenomenon. We prove a theorem on existence and, under additional assumptions, also uniqueness of weak solution to the flow problem.

  1. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Monaghan, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is verif;ed by simulating Poiseuille flow, plane shear flow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian fluid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, such that the effect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

  2. NEWTONIAN AND NON-NEWTONIAN MAGNETIC-FIELD RELAXATIONS IN SOLAR-CORONAL MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper treats the relaxation of a magnetic field into a minimum-energy force-free state in a cold (pressure-less) viscous fluid, under the frozen-in condition of perfect electrical conductivity and letting the viscosity-dissipated energy be completely lost. A non-Newtonian fluid in popular use is studied in relation to the Newtonian viscous fluid, as two alternative numerical means to (1) construct force-free fields representing solar coronal structures in realistic geometry and (2) investigate the Parker theory of spontaneous formation of electric current sheets as a basic MHD process. Faraday's induction equation imposes an independent condition on the fluid velocity at rigid, perfectly conducting boundaries. This boundary condition is quite compatible with Newtonian mechanics but not with the non-Newtonian fluid model where velocity is equated to the Lorentz force with a free, positive multiplicative-factor. This defining property gives rise to unphysical or artificial singularities not previously known that are completely distinct from the physically admissible singularities representing the current sheets of the Parker theory. In particular, the non-Newtonian fluid takes a magnetic field with neutral points from any one of a continuum of initial states into an unphysical state instead of the proper force-free end-state accessible by Newtonian relaxation. The validity of previously published MHD results based on this non-Newtonian fluid, including some counterclaims against the Parker theory, is dubious. Investigating the Parker theory requires numerical relaxation models capable of anticipating and accurately describing inevitable current-sheet singularities. By including a weak resistivity to dissipate the inevitable current sheets as they form, the field can change topology intermittently to seek a terminal force-free state free of singularities. The minimum-energy state of this more complete model corresponds to the long-lived relaxed structures in the

  3. Pore-Scale Modeling of Non-Newtonian Shear-Thinning Fluids in Blood Oxygenator Design.

    PubMed

    Low, Kenny W Q; van Loon, Raoul; Rolland, Samuel A; Sienz, Johann

    2016-05-01

    This paper reviews and further develops pore-scale computational flow modeling techniques used for creeping flow through orthotropic fiber bundles used in blood oxygenators. Porous model significantly reduces geometrical complexity by taking a homogenization approach to model the fiber bundles. This significantly simplifies meshing and can avoid large time-consuming simulations. Analytical relationships between permeability and porosity exist for Newtonian flow through regular arrangements of fibers and are commonly used in macroscale porous models by introducing a Darcy viscous term in the flow momentum equations. To this extent, verification of analytical Newtonian permeability-porosity relationships has been conducted for parallel and transverse flow through square and staggered arrangements of fibers. Similar procedures are then used to determine the permeability-porosity relationship for non-Newtonian blood. The results demonstrate that modeling non-Newtonian shear-thinning fluids in porous media can be performed via a generalized Darcy equation with a porous medium viscosity decomposed into a constant term and a directional expression through least squares fitting. This concept is then investigated for various non-Newtonian blood viscosity models. The proposed methodology is conducted with two different porous model approaches, homogeneous and heterogeneous, and validated against a high-fidelity model. The results of the heterogeneous porous model approach yield improved pressure and velocity distribution which highlights the importance of wall effects. PMID:26902524

  4. SPH non-Newtonian Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-07-07

    We propose a new three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model to study coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. Most existing ice sheet numerical models use a grid-based Eulerian approach, and are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations of the momentum conservation equation. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, solves the full momentum conservation equation. SPH method also allows modeling of free-surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation without employing complex front-tracking schemes, and does not require re-meshing. As a result, SPH codes are highly scalable. Numerical accuracy of the proposed SPH model is first verified by simulating a plane shear flow with a free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. Next, the SPH model is used to investigate the grounding line dynamics of ice sheet/shelf. The steady position of the grounding line, obtained from our SPH simulations, is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of bedrock slopes, ice-to-fluid density ratios, and flux. We examine the effect of non-Newtonian behavior of ice on the grounding line dynamics. The non-Newtonian constitutive model is based on Glen's law for a creeping flow of a polycrystalline ice. Finally, we investigate the effect of a bedrock geometry on a steady-state position of the grounding line.

  5. Studies on heat transfer to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triveni, B.; Vishwanadham, B.; Venkateshwar, S.

    2008-09-01

    Heat transfer studies to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids are carried out in a stirred vessel fitted with anchor/turbine impeller and a coil for heating/cooling with an objective of determining experimentally the heat transfer coefficient of few industrially important systems namely castor oil and its methyl esters, soap solution, CMC and chalk slurries. The effect of impeller geometry, speed and aeration is investigated. Generalized Reynolds and Prandtl numbers are calculated using an apparent viscosity for non-Newtonian fluids. The data is correlated using a Sieder-Tate type equation. A trend of increase in heat transfer coefficient with RPM in presence and absence of solids has been observed. Relatively high values of Nusselt numbers are obtained for non-Newtonian fluids when aeration is coupled with agitation. The contribution of natural convection to heat transfer has been accounted for by incorporating the Grashof number. The correlations developed based on these studies are applied for design of commercial scale soponification reactor. Power per unit volume resulted in reliable design of a reactor.

  6. Self-similarity of solitary pulses on falling liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; Charogiannis, Alexandros; Pradas, Marc; Markides, Christos N.; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    A gravity-driven liquid film is unstable to long-wave perturbations above a critical Reynolds number. At low frequencies these perturbations evolve into fast solitary pulses. These strongly non-linear structures have a dominant elevation with a long tail and steep front, typically with capillary ripples preceding the main wave hump. We present the results of a comprehensive numerical study of solitary pulses on gravity-driven inertia-dominated water films flowing down an inclined substrate for a range of inclination angles (45-90 degrees), Reynolds numbers (Re =20-120) and Kapitza numbers (Ka =2765-3887). Our results reveal a self-similarity of solitary pulses on falling films and provide an in-depth understanding of the driving physical mechanisms of such pulses. We formulate a consistent characterisation of the shape and non-linear dispersion of solitary pulses, founded on a newly proposed scaling derived from the Nusselt flat film solution. We present and discuss our findings and resulting correlations with respect to the self-similarity of the shape and non-linear dispersion of solitary pulses as well as the influence of gravity and surface tension on solitary pulses in general. We acknowledge financial support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) through Grant No. EP/K008595/1 and Grant No. EP/M021556/1.

  7. Thermal convection in a nonlinear non-Newtonian magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroze, D.; Pleiner, H.

    2015-09-01

    We report theoretical and numerical results on thermal convection of a magnetic fluid in a viscoelastic carrier liquid. The viscoelastic properties are described by a general nonlinear viscoelastic model that contains as special cases the standard phenomenological constitutive equations for the stress tensor. In order to explore numerically the system we perform a truncated Galerkin expansion obtaining a generalized Lorenz system with ten modes. We find numerically that the system has stationary, periodic and chaotic regimes. We establish phase diagrams to identify the different dynamical regimes as a function of the Rayleigh number and the viscoelastic material parameters.

  8. High-gravity spreading of liquid puddles on wetting flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen; Burrous, Adam; Xie, Jingjin; Shaikh, Hassan; Elike-Avion, Akofa; Rojas Rodriguez, Luis; Ramachandran, Adithya; Choi, Wonjae; Mazzeo, Aaron D.

    2016-02-01

    This letter describes a mechanical approach of using high gravity to decrease the capillary length and increase the spreading rate of liquid puddles on wetting flexible substrates. By using centrifugation and a flexible substrate floating on a high-density liquid, uniform acceleration enhances the spreading of liquid puddles. Under high gravity of 600 g, the capillary length reduces by a factor of 24.5 to ˜60 μm. The reduction in capillary length results in gravity dominating the spreading of small puddles that would otherwise have slower spreading driven by both surface tension and gravity of 1 g. The resulting measurements suggest that derived expressions in the literature for gravity-driven spreading of puddles under earth's standard gravity extend to predicting the behavior of sufficiently large puddles spreading on flexible substrates exposed to more than 100 g of acceleration. This work explores the spreading of puddles/coatings under high gravity, and the techniques described in this work will allow further interrogation of the transition between surface tension- and gravity-driven spreading.

  9. Simplified thermodynamic functions for vapor-liquid phase separation and fountain effect pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1984-01-01

    He-4 fluid handling devices near 2 K require novel components for non-Newtonian fluid transport in He II. Related sizing of devices has to be based on appropriate thermophysical property functions. The present paper presents simplified equilibrium state functions for porous media components which serve as vapor-liquid phase separators and fountain effect pumps.

  10. The influence of the non-Newtonian properties of blood on blood-hammer through the posterior cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Tazraei, Pedram; Riasi, Alireza; Takabi, Behrouz

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates a two dimensional numerical analysis of blood hammer through the posterior cerebral artery. The non-Newtonian and usual Newtonian blood models are compared in the case of blood hammer through the posterior cerebral artery to quantify the differences between the models. In this way, a validated CFD simulation is used to study non-Newtonian shear-thinning effects of blood. The governing equations for the modeling of two-dimensional transient flow are solved using a combination of characteristics and central finite difference methods, respectively for the hyperbolic and parabolic parts. Herein, the non-Newtonian viscosity characteristic of blood is incorporated by using the Carreau model. To convert the nonlinear terms available in the characteristics equation into the linear ones, the Newton-Kantorovich method is implemented. The verification and validation of the numerical results are carried out in detail. Hemodynamic characteristics of blood hammer through the posterior cerebral artery are derived with both the Newtonian and non-Newtonian models, and the results are meticulously compared and discussed. The results show that when blood hammer occurs, the non-Newtonian properties greatly influence the velocity and shear stress profiles. At the early stages of blood hammer, there is a 64% difference between magnitudes of wall shear stress in these two models, and the magnitude of the wall shear stress for the shear-thinning blood flow is lower than the Newtonian one. PMID:25865933

  11. Rheological transition in mantle convection with a composite temperature-dependent, non-Newtonian and Newtonian rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Den Berg, Arie P.; Yuen, David A.; Van Keken, Peter E.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations of mantle convection with a composite temperature-dependent, Newtonian and non-Newtonian creep law have revealed a transition in the dominant creep mechanism with the increasing vigour of convection. Newtonian creep is found to dominate in the low Rayleigh number regime. With sufficiently high effective Rayleigh number, the overall creep mechanism in the convective flow becomes non-Newtonian. The transitional Rayleigh number increases strongly with the activation energy. These results would suggest a scenario that in the early epochs of Earth the flow in the mantle would have been governed by non-Newtonian rheology and would have exhibited both strong spatial and temporal fluctuations. With time the flow mechanism would behave like a Newtonian fluid and would have a different time-dependent character. In time-dependent Newtonian-dominated flows there are still localized features with distinctly non-Newtonian character. Our analysis of the relative contributions to the lateral viscosity field supports the idea that the inference of the nature of lateral viscosity heterogeneities by seismic tomography may be strongly contaminated by the dominant non-Newtonian contributions to the total lateral viscosity field.

  12. Effects of capillary heterogeneity on vapor-liquid counterflow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Stubos, A.K.; Satik, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-06-01

    Based on a continuum description, the effect of capillary heterogeneity, induced by variation in permeability, on the steady state, countercurrent, vapor-liquid flow in porous media is analyzed. It is shown that the heterogeneity acts as a body force, that may enhance or diminish gravity effects on heat pipes. Selection rules that determine the steady states reached in homogeneous, gravity-driven heat pipes are also formulated. It is shown that the ``infinite`` two-phase zone may terminate by a substantial change in the permeability somewhere in the medium. The two possible sequences, liquid - liquid dominated - dry, or liquid - vapor dominated - dry find applications in geothermal systems. Finally, it is shown that although weak heterogeneity affects only gravity controlled flows, stronger variations in permeability can give rise to significant capillary effects.

  13. Viscous propagation of two-dimensional non-Newtonian gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, M. R.; Testik, F. Y.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a detailed experimental and theoretical investigation on the viscous propagation of non-Newtonian gravity currents. Laboratory gravity currents are generated in a horizontal rectangular tank by releasing a constant flux of high-concentration fluid mud suspensions that exhibit profound non-Newtonian (shear thinning) behavior. Experimental observations on the propagation of fluid mud gravity currents revealed that viscous propagation of these currents was typically preceded by two phases as expected: an initial momentum-driven horizontal buoyant wall jet and a buoyancy-driven inertial phase. The experimental transition times, t**, and positions, x**, at which fluid mud gravity currents transition into viscous propagation phase were determined. The experimental data that correspond to the viscous propagation of fluid mud gravity currents (i.e. experimental time, t ⩾ t**, and front position, xN ⩾ x**) were used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of two well-known mathematical modeling approaches: the lubrication theory approximation and the box-model approaches. Regarding the lubrication theory approximation, a recently developed self-similarity solution for viscous propagation of power-law gravity currents that has not been experimentally evaluated was used. Regarding the box-model approach, a viscous box-model solution for two-dimensional (2D) non-Newtonian gravity currents was developed. The evaluation of these models using experimental data revealed that both models were in good agreement with the experimental observations, despite several simplifying assumptions embedded in each. Given its more advanced mathematical development, the lubrication theory approximation model provides a more complete description of a gravity current (i.e. shape and velocity variation along the gravity current) than the box model at the expense of a relatively simple computational effort.

  14. Smart Fluids in Hydrology: Use of Non-Newtonian Fluids for Pore Structure Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Najm, Majdi; Atallah, Nabil; Selker, John; Roques, Clément; Stewart, Ryan; Rupp, David; Saad, George; El-Fadel, Mutasem

    2016-04-01

    Classic porous media characterization relies on typical infiltration experiments with Newtonian fluids (i.e., water) to estimate hydraulic conductivity. However, such experiments are generally not able to discern important characteristics such as pore size distribution or pore structure. We show that introducing non-Newtonian fluids provides additional unique flow signatures that can be used for improved pore structure characterization. We present a new method that transforms results of N infiltration experiments using water and N-1 non-Newtonian solutions into a system of equations that yields N representative radii (Ri) and their corresponding percent contribution to flow (wi). Those radii and weights are optimized in terms of flow and porosity to represent the functional hydraulic behavior of real porous media. The method also allows for estimating the soil retention curve using only saturated experiments. Experimental and numerical validation revealed the ability of the proposed method to represent the water retention and functional infiltration behavior of real soils. The experimental results showed the ability of such fluids to outsmart Newtonian fluids and infer pore size distribution and unsaturated behavior using simple saturated experiments. Specifically, we demonstrate using synthetic porous media composed of different combinations of sizes and numbers of capillary tubes that the use of different non-Newtonian fluids enables the prediction of the pore structure. The results advance the knowledge towards conceptualizing the complexity of porous media and can potentially impact applications in fields like irrigation efficiencies, vadose zone hydrology, soil-root-plant continuum, carbon sequestration into geologic formations, soil remediation, petroleum reservoir engineering, oil exploration and groundwater modeling.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Blood Flow: Non-Newtonian Rheology and Clotting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouared, Rafik; Chopard, Bastien

    2005-10-01

    The numerical simulation of thrombosis in stented aneurysms is an important issue to estimate the efficiency of a stent. In this paper, we consider a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach to bloodflow modeling and we implement a non-Newtonian correction in order to reproduce more realistic flow profiles. We obtain a good agreement between simulations and Casson's model of blood rheology in a simple geometry. Finally we discuss how, by using a passive scalar suspension model with aggregation on top of the LB dynamics, we can describe the clotting processes in the aneurysm

  16. Non-Newtonian gravitational forces and the Greenland ice-sheet experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Goldman, T.; Nieto, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results of an experiment to test Newton's Inverse-Square Law of Gravitation in the Greenland ice-cap were announced recently. The anomalous gravity gradient which was found can be explained either by an unrecognized anomaly in the density of the rocks under the ice sheet, or by the existence of a non-Newtonian component of the gravitational force. Here we focus on the latter possibility, and find that the force would be attractive, with a strength between about 2.4% and 3.5% that of Newtonian gravity, and a range between about 225 m and 5.4 km. 11 refs.

  17. Learning About Non-Newtonian Fluids in a Student-Driven Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dounas-Frazer, D. R.; Lynn, J.; Zaniewski, A. M.; Roth, N.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a simple, low-cost experiment and corresponding pedagogical strategies for studying fluids whose viscosities depend on shear rate, referred to as "non-Newtonian fluids." We developed these materials teaching for the Compass Project, an organization that fosters a creative, diverse, and collaborative community of science students at UC Berkeley. Incoming freshmen worked together in a week-long residential program to explore physical phenomena through a combination of conceptual model-building and hands-on experimentation. During the program, students were exposed to three major aspects of scientific discovery: developing a model, testing the model, and investigating deviations from the model.

  18. Postglacial rebound with a non-Newtonian upper mantle and a Newtonian lower mantle rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperini, Paolo; Yuen, David A.; Sabadini, Roberto

    1992-01-01

    A composite rheology is employed consisting of both linear and nonlinear creep mechanisms which are connected by a 'transition' stress. Background stress due to geodynamical processes is included. For models with a non-Newtonian upper-mantle overlying a Newtonian lower-mantle, the temporal responses of the displacements can reproduce those of Newtonian models. The average effective viscosity profile under the ice-load at the end of deglaciation turns out to be the crucial factor governing mantle relaxation. This can explain why simple Newtonian rheology has been successful in fitting the uplift data over formerly glaciated regions.

  19. Computational modeling of non-Newtonian blood flow through stenosed arteries in the presence of magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Alshare, Aiman; Tashtoush, Bourhan; El-Khalil, Hossam H

    2013-11-01

    Steady flow simulations of blood flow in an axisymmetric stenosed artery, subjected to a static magnetic field, are performed to investigate the influence of artery size, magnetic field strength, and non-Newtonian behavior on artery wall shear stress and pressure drop in the stenosed section. It is found that wall shear stress and pressure drop increase by decreasing artery size, assuming non-Newtonian fluid, and increasing magnetic field strength. In the computations, the shear thinning behavior of blood is accounted for by the Carreau-Yasuda model. Computational results are compared and found to be inline with available experimental data. PMID:24061603

  20. Non-Newtonian Effects of Second-Order Fluids on the Hydrodynamic Lubrication of Inclined Slider Bearings.

    PubMed

    Apparao, Siddangouda; Biradar, Trimbak Vaijanath; Naduvinamani, Neminath Bhujappa

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical study of non-Newtonian effects of second-order fluids on the performance characteristics of inclined slider bearings is presented. An approximate method is used for the solution of the highly nonlinear momentum equations for the second-order fluids. The closed form expressions for the fluid film pressure, load carrying capacity, frictional force, coefficient of friction, and centre of pressure are obtained. The non-Newtonian second order fluid model increases the film pressure, load carrying capacity, and frictional force whereas the center of pressure slightly shifts towards exit region. Further, the frictional coefficient decreases with an increase in the bearing velocity as expected for an ideal fluid. PMID:27437446

  1. Non-Newtonian Effects of Second-Order Fluids on the Hydrodynamic Lubrication of Inclined Slider Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Apparao, Siddangouda; Biradar, Trimbak Vaijanath; Naduvinamani, Neminath Bhujappa

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical study of non-Newtonian effects of second-order fluids on the performance characteristics of inclined slider bearings is presented. An approximate method is used for the solution of the highly nonlinear momentum equations for the second-order fluids. The closed form expressions for the fluid film pressure, load carrying capacity, frictional force, coefficient of friction, and centre of pressure are obtained. The non-Newtonian second order fluid model increases the film pressure, load carrying capacity, and frictional force whereas the center of pressure slightly shifts towards exit region. Further, the frictional coefficient decreases with an increase in the bearing velocity as expected for an ideal fluid.

  2. Very accurate upward continuation to low heights in a test of non-Newtonian theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romaides, Anestis J.; Jekeli, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    Recently, gravity measurements were made on a tall, very stable television transmitting tower in order to detect a non-Newtonian gravitational force. This experiment required the upward continuation of gravity from the Earth's surface to points as high as only 600 m above ground. The upward continuation was based on a set of gravity anomalies in the vicinity of the tower whose data distribution exhibits essential circular symmetry and appropriate radial attenuation. Two methods were applied to perform the upward continuation - least-squares solution of a local harmonic expansion and least-squares collocation. Both methods yield comparable results, and have estimated accuracies on the order of 50 microGal or better (1 microGal = 10(exp -8) m/sq s). This order of accuracy is commensurate with the tower gravity measurments (which have an estimated accuracy of 20 microGal), and enabled a definitive detection of non-Newtonian gravity. As expected, such precise upward continuations require very dense data near the tower. Less expected was the requirement of data (though sparse) up to 220 km away from the tower (in the case that only an ellipsoidal reference gravity is applied).

  3. Study on local resistance of non-Newtonian power law fluid in elbow pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Tiantian; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Yuxiang; Wang, Yuancheng; Liu, Xueting

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on the flow characteristic and local resistance of non-Newtonian power law fluid in a curved 90° bend pipe with circular cross-sections, which are widely used in industrial applications. By employing numerical simulation and theoretical analysis the properties of the flow and local resistance of power law fluid under different working conditions are obtained. To explore the change rule the experiment is carried out by changing the Reynolds number, the wall roughness and different diameter ratio of elbow pipe. The variation of the local resistance coefficient with the Reynolds number, the diameter ratio and the wall roughness is presented comprehensively in the paper. The results show that the local resistance force coefficient hardly changes with Reynolds number of the power law fluid; the wall roughness has a significant impact on the local resistance coefficient. As the pipe wall roughness increasing, the coefficient of local resistance force will increase. The main reason of the influence of the roughness on the local resistance coefficient is the increase of the eddy current region in the power law fluid flow, which increases the kinetic energy dissipation of the main flow. This paper provides theoretical and numerical methods to understand the local resistance property of non-Newtonian power law fluid in elbow pipes.

  4. An experimental study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow dynamics in a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Mann, K A; Deutsch, S; Tarbell, J M; Geselowitz, D B; Rosenberg, G; Pierce, W S

    1987-05-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a Newtonian water/glycerol solution, a non-Newtonian polymer (separan) solution, and bovine blood were compared in the Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device (EVAD). Pulsed doppler ultrasound velocimetry was used to measure velocities in the near wall region (0.95-2.7 mm) along the perimeter of the pump. Mean velocity, turbulence intensity, local and convective acceleration, and shear rate were calculated from the PDU velocity measurements. Flow visualization provided qualitative information about the general flow patterns in the EVAD. Results indicate that water/glycerol does not accurately model the flow characteristics of bovine blood in the EVAD. The non-Newtonian separan solution produced results closer to those of the bovine blood than did the water/glycerol solution. Near wall velocity magnitudes for the separan were similar to those of the bovine blood, but the profile shapes differed for portions of the pump cycle. All three fluids exhibited periods of stagnation. Bovine blood results indicated the presence of a desired rotational washout pattern at midsystole, while results with the other fluids did not show this feature. PMID:3599939

  5. Transition to Non-Newtonian behavior of blood suspensions flowing in small tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caswell, Bruce; Lei, Huan; Fedosov, Dmitry; Karniadakis, George

    2011-11-01

    Blood flow in tubes is widely considered to be Newtonian down to diameters of about 200 microns. We have employed a multi-scale, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) model of the red blood cell (RBC) to investigate suspensions driven through small tubes (diameters 20-150 microns). The cross-stream stress gradient induces radial migration of the suspended RBCs resulting in the formation of a hematocrit (H) peak at the centerline, and at the wall a cell-free layer (CFL) whose edge is the point of maximum RBC distortion. This suggests that hard-sphere suspension theories will not capture well blood flow in tubes. For the larger tubes the velocity profiles beyond the CFL are essentially parabolic even though the core H is non-uniform. As the diameter decreases: (1) the CFL moves inward and the central H peak grows, but for the smallest (20 microns) the H peak is shifted off-center, (2) the bulk velocity profiles become similar to those of a shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid. However, accurate modeling of the velocity field of the bulk flow in small tubes as a homogeneous non-Newtonian fluid can only be achieved if model parameters are taken to depend on tube diameter and pressure drop.

  6. Non-Newtonian temperature and pressure effects of a lubricant slurry in a rotating hydrostatic step bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.; Finn, W.E.; Dareing, D.W. |

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the pressure and temperature effects of graphite powder lubricant when added to a Newtonian carrier fluid and applied in a rotating hydrostatic step bearing. Temperature and pressure profiles were determined both analytically and experimentally. The rheological behavior of the non-Newtonian lubricant was modeled using a power law model previously shown to approximate experimental data for this fluid. Ethylene glycol was used as the Newtonian lubricant, providing a check on the test apparatus and a base line for comparison with the non-Newtonian graphite slurry. Data revealed a temperature increase with bearing rotational speed for both fluids and compared favorably with the mathematical predictions. A significantly higher temperature rise was seen in the non- Newtonian lubricant due to the higher shear rates. The pressure profile was not directly dependent on bearing rotational speed in the mathematical model, but experimental data demonstrated a reduction in pressure at higher rotation speeds. This loss was greater for the non-Newtonian lubricant and attributed to temperature dependence of power law constants. It was concluded that the effects of operating speed and temperature on a non-Newtonian lubricant should be considered as well as their greater load-carrying capacity.

  7. Non-Newtonian flow effects on the coalescence and mixing of initially stationary droplets of shear-thinning fluids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Tianyou; Zhang, Peng; Law, Chung K

    2015-02-01

    The coalescence of two initially stationary droplets of shear-thinning fluids in a gaseous environment is investigated numerically using the lattice Boltzmann method, with particular interest in non-Newtonian flow effects on the internal mixing subsequent to coalescence. Coalescence of equal-sized droplets, with one being Newtonian while the other is non-Newtonian, leads to the non-Newtonian droplet wrapping around the Newtonian one and hence minimal fine-scale mixing. For unequal-sized droplets, mixing is greatly promoted if both droplets are shear-thinning. When only one of the droplets is shear-thinning, the non-Newtonian effect from the smaller droplet is found to be significantly more effective than that from the larger droplet in facilitating internal jetlike mixing. Parametric study with the Carreau-Yasuda model indicates that the phenomena are universal to a wide range of shear-thinning fluids, given that the extent of shear thinning reaches a certain level, and the internal jet tends to be thicker and develops more rapidly with increasing extent of the shear-thinning effect. PMID:25768599

  8. On the rheology of refractive-index-matched, non-Newtonian blood-analog fluids for PIV experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Hinke, Jessica A.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Four commonly used refractive-index (RI)-matched Newtonian blood-analog fluids are reviewed, and different non-Newtonian blood-analogs, with RI of 1.372-1.495, are investigated. Sodium iodide (NaI), sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) and potassium thiocyanate are used to adjust the RI of blood-analogs to that of test sections for minimizing optical distortions in particle image velocimetry data, and xanthan gum (XG) is added to the fluids to give them non-Newtonian properties (shear thinning and viscoelasticity). Our results support the general belief that adding NaI to Newtonian fluids matches the RI without changing the kinematic viscosity. However, in contrast to claims made in a few studies that did not measure rheology, our investigation revealed that adding NaI or NaSCN to XG-based non-Newtonian fluids changes the viscosity of the fluids considerably and reduces the shear-thinning property. Therefore, the RI of non-Newtonian blood-analog fluids with XG cannot be adjusted easily by varying the concentration of NaI or NaSCN and needs more careful rheological study.

  9. Analysis of flow and LDL concentration polarization in siphon of internal carotid artery: Non-Newtonian effects.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Alireza; Niazmand, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    Carotid siphon is known as one of the risky sites among the human intracranial arteries, which is prone to formation of atherosclerotic lesions. Indeed, scientists believe that accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) inside the lumen is the major cause of atherosclerosis. To this aim, three types of internal carotid artery (ICA) siphon have been constructed to examine variations of hemodynamic parameters in different regions of the arteries. Providing real physiological conditions, blood considered as non-Newtonian fluid and real velocity and pressure waveforms have been employed as flow boundary conditions. Moreover, to have a better estimation of risky sites, the accumulation of LDL particles has been considered, which has been usually ignored in previous relevant studies. Governing equations have been discretized and solved via open source OpenFOAM software. A new solver has been built to meet essential parameters related to the flow and mass transfer phenomena. In contrast to the common belief regarding negligible effect of blood non-Newtonian behavior inside large arteries, current study suggests that the non-Newtonian blood behavior is notable, especially on the velocity field of the U-type model. In addition, it is concluded that neglecting non-Newtonian effects underestimates the LDL accumulation up to 3% in the U-type model at the inner side of both its bends. However, in the V and C type models, non-Newtonian effects become relatively small. Results also emphasize that the outer part of the second bend at the downstream is also at risk similar to the inner part of the carotid bends. Furthermore, from findings it can be implied that the risky sites strongly depend on the ICA shape since the extension of the risky sites are relatively larger for the V-type model, while the LDL concentrations are higher for the C-type model. PMID:26313530

  10. Development and Implementation of Non-Newtonian Rheology Into the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiSalvo, Roberto; Deaconu, Stelu; Majumdar, Alok

    2006-01-01

    One of the goals of this program was to develop the experimental and analytical/computational tools required to predict the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through the various system components of a propulsion system: pipes, valves, pumps etc. To achieve this goal we selected to augment the capabilities of NASA's Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) software. GFSSP is a general-purpose computer program designed to calculate steady state and transient pressure and flow distributions in a complex fluid network. While the current version of the GFSSP code is able to handle various systems components the implicit assumption in the code is that the fluids in the system are Newtonian. To extend the capability of the code to non-Newtonian fluids, such as silica gelled fuels and oxidizers, modifications to the momentum equations of the code have been performed. We have successfully implemented in GFSSP flow equations for fluids with power law behavior. The implementation of the power law fluid behavior into the GFSSP code depends on knowledge of the two fluid coefficients, n and K. The determination of these parameters for the silica gels used in this program was performed experimentally. The n and K parameters for silica water gels were determined experimentally at CFDRC's Special Projects Laboratory, with a constant shear rate capillary viscometer. Batches of 8:1 (by weight) water-silica gel were mixed using CFDRC s 10-gallon gelled propellant mixer. Prior to testing the gel was allowed to rest in the rheometer tank for at least twelve hours to ensure that the delicate structure of the gel had sufficient time to reform. During the tests silica gel was pressure fed and discharged through stainless steel pipes ranging from 1", to 36", in length and three diameters; 0.0237", 0.032", and 0.047". The data collected in these tests included pressure at tube entrance and volumetric flowrate. From these data the uncorrected shear rate, shear stress, residence time

  11. Viscosity and non-Newtonian features of thickened fluids used for dysphagia therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Mark; Hanson, Ben; Smith, Christina

    2010-08-01

    Thickening agents based primarily on granulated maize starch are widely used in the care of patients with swallowing difficulties, increasing viscosity of consumed fluids. This slows bolus flow during swallowing, allowing airway protection to be more properly engaged. Thickened fluids have been shown to exhibit time-varying behavior and are non-Newtonian, complicating assessment of fluid thickness, potentially compromising efficacy of therapy. This work aimed to quantify the flow properties of fluids produced with commercial thickeners at shear rates representative of slow tipping in a beaker to fast swallowing. Results were presented as indices calculated using a power-law model representing apparent viscosity (consistency index) and non-Newtonian nature of flow (flow behavior index). Immediately following mixing, 3 fluid thicknesses showed distinct consistency indices and decreasing flow behavior index with increasing thickener concentration. An increase in consistency index over 30 min was observed, but only for samples that were repeatedly sheared during acquisition. Three-hour measurements showed changes in consistency index across fluids with the largest being a 25% rise from initial value. This may have implications for efficacy of treatment, as fluids are not always consumed immediately upon mixing. Flow behavior indices were comparable across thickeners exhibiting similar rises over time. The indices were a more complete method of quantifying flow properties compared with single viscosity measurements, allowing an increased depth of analysis. The non-Newtonian nature of fluids perhaps renders them particularly suitable for use as dysphagia therapies, and such analysis may allow the possibility of altering these properties to optimize therapeutic efficacy to be explored. Practical Application: Effective treatment of swallowing disorders relies upon the appropriate choice and subsequent reproduction of drinks thickened to one of a number of predetermined

  12. Propagation of Gravity Currents of non-Newtonian Power-Law Fluids in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Federico, V.; Longo, S.; Ciriello, V.; Chiapponi, L.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental framework is presented to describe gravity-driven motions of rheologically complex fluids through porous media. These phenomena are relevant in geophysical, environmental, industrial and biological applications. The fluid is characterized by an Ostwald-DeWaele constitutive equation with behaviour index n. The flow is driven by the release of fluid at the origin of an infinite porous domain. In order to represent several possible spreading scenarios, we consider: i) different domain geometries: plane, radial, and channelized, with the channel shape parameterized by k; ii) instantaneous or continuous injection, depending on the time exponent of the volume of fluid in the current, α; iii) horizontal or inclined impermeable boundaries. Systematic heterogeneity along the streamwise and/or transverse direction is added to the conceptualization upon considering a power-law permeability variation governed by two additional parameters ω and β. Scalings for current length and thickness are derived in self similar form coupling the modified Darcy's law accounting for the fluid rheology with the mass balance equation. The length, thickness, and aspect ratio of the current are studied as functions of model parameters; several different critical values of α emerge and govern the type of dependency, as well as the tendency of the current to accelerate or decelerate and become thicker or thinner at a given point. The asymptotic validity of the solutions is limited to certain ranges of model parameters. Experimental validation is performed under constant volume, constant and variable flux regimes in tanks/channels filled with transparent glass beads of uniform or variable diameter, using shear-thinning suspensions and Newtonian mixtures. The experimental results for the length and profile of the current agree well with the self-similar solutions at intermediate and late times.

  13. Exact Solutions for Stokes' Flow of a Non-Newtonian Nanofluid Model: A Lie Similarity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Taha; Aziz, A.; Khalique, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The fully developed time-dependent flow of an incompressible, thermodynamically compatible non-Newtonian third-grade nanofluid is investigated. The classical Stokes model is considered in which the flow is generated due to the motion of the plate in its own plane with an impulsive velocity. The Lie symmetry approach is utilised to convert the governing nonlinear partial differential equation into different linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The reduced ordinary differential equations are then solved by using the compatibility and generalised group method. Exact solutions for the model equation are deduced in the form of closed-form exponential functions which are not available in the literature before. In addition, we also derived the conservation laws associated with the governing model. Finally, the physical features of the pertinent parameters are discussed in detail through several graphs.

  14. Non-Newtonian Flow of Blood in Arterioles: Consequences for Wall Shear Stress Measurements

    PubMed Central

    SRIRAM, Krishna; INTAGLIETTA, Marcos; TARTAKOVSKY, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    We model blood in a microvessel as an inhomogeneous non-Newtonian fluid, whose viscosity varies with hematocrit and shear rate in accordance with the Quemada rheological relation. The flow is assumed to consist of two distinct, immiscible and homogeneous fluid layers: an inner region densely packed with red blood cells, and an outer cell-free layer whose thickness depends on discharge hematocrit. We demonstrate that the proposed model provides a realistic description of velocity profiles, tube hematocrit, core hematocrit and apparent viscosities over a wide range of vessel radii and discharge hematocrits. Our analysis reveals the importance of incorporating this complex blood rheology into estimates of wall shear stress in micro-vessels. The latter is accomplished by specifying a correction factor, which accounts for the deviation of blood flow from the Poiseuille law. PMID:24703006

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic third-grade non-Newtonian nanofluid flow through a porous coaxial cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadikin, Zubaidah; Kechil, Seripah Awang

    2015-10-01

    The convective flow of third grade non-Newtonian nanofluid through porous coaxial cylinders with inclined magnetic field is investigated. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using the non-dimensional quantities. The transformed system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The viscosity of the nanofluid is considered as a function of temperature in form of Vogel's model. Numerical solutions are obtained for the velocity, temperature and nanoparticles concentration. The effects of the some physical parameters particularly the angle of inclination, the magnetic, Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters on non-dimensional velocity, temperature and nanoparticles concentration are analyzed. It is found that as the angle of inclination of magnetic field increases, the velocity decreases. The results also show that increasing the thermophoresis parameter and Brownian motion, the temperature increases. By increasing the Brownian motion or decreasing the thermophoresis parameter, nanoparticles concentration increases.

  16. Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Akbar; Ali, Nasir; Sajid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood hydro-magnetic flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery are analyzed. The constitutive equation of power law model is employed to simulate the rheological characteristics of the blood. The governing equations giving the flow derived by assuming the flow to be unsteady and two-dimensional. Mild stenosis approximation is employed to obtain the reduced form of the governing equations. Finite difference method is employed to obtain the solution of the non-linear partial differential equation in the presence of slip at the surface. An extensive quantitative analysis is performed for the effects of slip parameter, Hartmann number, cathetered parameter and arterial geometrical parameters of stenosis on the quantities of interest such as axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress. The streamlines for the blood flow through the artery are also included.

  17. Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow through Three-Dimensional Disordered Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Apiano F.; Seybold, Hansjoerg; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S., Jr.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the flow of various non-Newtonian fluids through three-dimensional disordered porous media by direct numerical simulation of momentum transport and continuity equations. Remarkably, our results for power-law (PL) fluids indicate that the flow, when quantified in terms of a properly modified permeability-like index and Reynolds number, can be successfully described by a single (universal) curve over a broad range of Reynolds conditions and power-law exponents. We also study the flow behavior of Bingham fluids described in terms of the Herschel-Bulkley model. In this case, our simulations reveal that the interplay of (i) the disordered geometry of the pore space, (ii) the fluid rheological properties, and (iii) the inertial effects on the flow is responsible for a substantial enhancement of the macroscopic hydraulic conductance of the system at intermediate Reynolds conditions.

  18. Rheological non-Newtonian behaviour of ethylene glycol-based Fe2O3 nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The rheological behaviour of ethylene glycol-based nanofluids containing hexagonal scalenohedral-shaped α-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanoparticles at 303.15 K and particle weight concentrations up to 25% has been carried out using a cone-plate Physica MCR rheometer. The tests performed show that the studied nanofluids present non-Newtonian shear-thinning behaviour. In addition, the viscosity at a given shear rate is time dependent, i.e. the fluid is thixotropic. Finally, using strain sweep and frequency sweep tests, the storage modulus G', loss modulus G″ and damping factor were determined as a function of the frequency showing viscoelastic behaviour for all samples. PMID:22027018

  19. Analytical and Numerical Solutions of a Generalized Hyperbolic Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdemirli, Mehmet; Sarı, Pınar; Solmaz, Bekir

    2010-03-01

    The generalized hyperbolic non-Newtonian fluid model first proposed by Al-Zahrani [J. Petroleum Sci. Eng. 17, 211 (1997)] is considered. This model was successfully applied to some drilling fluids with a better performance in relating shear stress and velocity gradient compared to power-law and the Hershel-Bulkley model. Special flow geometries namely pipe flow, parallel plate flow, and flow between two rotating cylinders are treated. For the first two cases, analytical solutions of velocity profiles and discharges in the form of integrals are presented. These quantities are calculated by numerically evaluating the integrals. For the flow between two rotating cylinders, the differential equation is solved by the Runge-Kutta method combined with shooting. For all problems, the power-law approximation of the model is compared with the generalized hyperbolic model, too.

  20. Novel Microstructures for Polymer-Liquid Crystal Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magda, Jules J.

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of interface-dominated composite materials that contain a liquid crystalline (LC) phase in intimate contact with an isotropic phase. For example, polymer- dispersed liquid crystals, used in the fabrication of windows with switchable transparency, consist of micron size LC droplets dispersed in an isotropic polymer matrix. Many other types of liquid crystal composite materials can be envisioned that might have outstanding optical properties that could be exploited in novel chemical sensors, optical switches, and computer displays. This research project was based on the premise that many of these potentially useful LC composite materials can only be fabricated under microgravity conditions where gravity driven flows are absent. In the ground-based research described below, we have focused on a new class of LC composites that we call thermotropic- lyotropic liquid crystal systems (TLLCs). TLLCs consist of nanosize droplets of water dispersed in an LC matrix, with surfactants at the interface that stabilize the structure. By varying the type of surfactant one can access almost an infinite variety of unusual LC composite microstructures. Due to the importance of the interface in these types of systems, we have also developed molecular simulation models for liquid crystals at interfaces, and made some of the first measurements of the interfacial tension between liquid crystals and water.

  1. Digital image correlation applied to the calculation of the out-of-plane deformation induced by the formation of roll waves in a non-Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Alfredo; Amigo, Nicolás; Ihle, Christian; Tamburrino, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    A method based on digital image correlation (DIC) is implemented for measuring the height of the roll waves developed in a non-Newtonian fluid flowing on an inclined channel. A projector and a high-resolution digital camera, placed vertically above the fluid surface, are used to project and record a random speckle pattern located on the free liquid surface, where the pattern is deformed due to the developed roll waves. According to the experimental geometry, the height of the roll waves associated to the out-of-plane deformation of the dots is obtained through a quantitative relationship between the experimental parameters and the in-plane displacement field in the flow direction. In terms of this, the out-of-plane deformation is found using a DIC criterion based on the speckle comparison between a reference image without the deformed pattern and an image with a deformed pattern. The maximum height of the roll waves computed with this technique is compared with the height measured using a lateral camera, with both results differing by <10% over the set of experimental instances.

  2. Non-Newtonian characteristics of peristaltic flow of blood in micro-vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, S.; Misra, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Of concern in the paper is a generalized theoretical study of the non-Newtonian characteristics of peristaltic flow of blood through micro-vessels, e.g. arterioles. The vessel is considered to be of variable cross-section and blood to be a Herschel-Bulkley type of fluid. The progressive wave front of the peristaltic flow is supposed sinusoidal/straight section dominated (SSD) (expansion/contraction type); Reynolds number is considered to be small with reference to blood flow in the micro-circulatory system. The equations that govern the non-Newtonian peristaltic flow of blood are considered to be non-linear. The objective of the study has been to examine the effect of amplitude ratio, mean pressure gradient, yield stress and the power law index on the velocity distribution, wall shear stress, streamline pattern and trapping. It is observed that the numerical estimates for the aforesaid quantities in the case of peristaltic transport of blood in a channel are much different from those for flow in an axisymmetric vessel of circular cross-section. The study further shows that peristaltic pumping, flow velocity and wall shear stress are significantly altered due to the non-uniformity of the cross-sectional radius of blood vessels of the micro-circulatory system. Moreover, the magnitude of the amplitude ratio and the value of the fluid index are important parameters that affect the flow behaviour. Novel features of SSD wave propagation that affect the flow behaviour of blood have also been discussed.

  3. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John; Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids like water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (>20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  4. Effect of non-newtonian viscosity for surfactant solutions on vortex characteristics in a swirling pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munekata, Mizue; Takaki, Hidefumi; Ohba, Hideki; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi

    2005-12-01

    Effects of non-Newtonian viscosity for surfactant solution on the vortex characteristics and drag-reducing rate in a swirling pipe flow are investigated by pressure drop measurements, velocity profile measurements and viscosity measurements. Non-Newtonian viscosity is represented by power-law model (τ=kD n). Surfactant solution used has shear-thinning viscosity with n<1.0. The swirling flow in this study has decay of swirl and vortex-type change from Rankin’s combined vortex to forced vortex. It is shown that the effect of shear-thinning viscosity on the decay of swirl intensity is different by vortex category and the critical swirl number with the vortex-type change depends on shear-thinning viscosity.

  5. Numerical analysis of natural convection for non-Newtonian fluid conveying nanoparticles between two vertical parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahebi, S. A. R.; Pourziaei, H.; Feizi, A. R.; Taheri, M. H.; Rostamiyan, Y.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, natural convection of non-Newtonian bio-nanofluids flow between two vertical flat plates is investigated numerically. Sodium Alginate (SA) and Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose (SCMC) are considered as the base non-Newtonian fluid, and nanoparticles such as Titania ( TiO2 and Alumina ( Al2O3 were added to them. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are calculated through Maxwell-Garnetts (MG) and Brinkman models, respectively. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method (NUM) and three Weighted Residual Methods (WRMs), Collocation (CM), Galerkin (GM) and Least-Square Method (LSM) and Finite-Element Method (FEM), are used to solve the present problem. The influence of some physical parameters such as nanofluid volume friction on non-dimensional velocity and temperature profiles are discussed. The results show that SCMC- TiO2 has higher velocity and temperature values than other nanofluid structures.

  6. Porous media flow problems: natural convection and one-dimensional flow of a non-Newtonian fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, K.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two fluid problems in porous media are studied: natural convection of a Newtonian fluid and one-dimensional flow of a non-Newtonian fluid. Convection in a rectangular porous cavity driven by heating in the horizontal is analyzed by a number of different techniques which yield a fairly complete description of the 2-dimensional solutions. The solutions are governed by 2 dimensionless parameters: the Darcy-Rayleigh number R and cavity aspect ratio A. The flow behavior of a dilute solution of polyacrylamide in corn syrup flowing through porous media also is studied. Measurements of the pressure drop and flow rate are made for the solution flowing through a packed bed of glass beads. At low velocities the pressure drop as a function of velocity is the same as that for a Newtonian fluid of equal viscosity. At higher flow rates the non-Newtonian fluid exhibited significantly higher pressure drops than a Newtonian fluid.

  7. Pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous blood vessels using a third grade non-Newtonian fluids model.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration and a periodic pressure gradient are numerically simulated. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid. Besides the numerical solution, for small Womersley parameter (such as blood flow through arterioles and capillaries), the analytical perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear governing equations. Consequently, analytical expressions for the velocity profile, wall shear stress, and blood flow rate are obtained. Excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical predictions is evident. Also, the effects of body acceleration, magnetic field, third-grade non-Newtonian parameter, pressure gradient, and porosity on the flow behaviors are examined. Some important conclusions are that, when the Womersley parameter is low, viscous forces tend to dominate the flow, velocity profiles are parabolic in shape, and the center-line velocity oscillates in phase with the driving pressure gradient. In addition, by increasing the pressure gradient, the mean value of the velocity profile increases and the amplitude of the velocity remains constant. Also, when non-Newtonian effect increases, the amplitude of the velocity profile. PMID:26792174

  8. Simulating non-Newtonian flows with the moving particle semi-implicit method with an SPH kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Hao; Chen, Bin

    2015-02-01

    The moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) are commonly used mesh-free particle methods for free surface flows. The MPS method has superiority in incompressible flow simulation and simple programing. However, the crude kernel function is not accurate enough for the discretization of the divergence of the shear stress tensor by the particle inconsistency when the MPS method is extended to non-Newtonian flows. This paper presents an improved MPS method with an SPH kernel to simulate non-Newtonian flows. To improve the consistency of the partial derivative, the SPH cubic spline kernel and the Taylor series expansion are combined with the MPS method. This approach is suitable for all non-Newtonian fluids that can be described with τ = μ(|γ|) Δ (where τ is the shear stress tensor, μ is the viscosity, |γ| is the shear rate, and Δ is the strain tensor), e.g., the Casson and Cross fluids. Two examples are simulated including the Newtonian Poiseuille flow and container filling process of the Cross fluid. The results of Poiseuille flow are more accurate than the traditional MPS method, and different filling processes are obtained with good agreement with previous results, which verified the validation of the new algorithm. For the Cross fluid, the jet fracture length can be correlated with We0.28Fr0.78 (We is the Weber number, Fr is the Froude number).

  9. Natural convection of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder using modified power-law model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thohura, Sharaban; Molla, Md. Mamun; Sarker, M. M. A.

    2016-07-01

    A study on the natural convection flow of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder with constant wall temperature using modified power law viscosity model has been done. The basic equations are transformed to non dimensional boundary layer equations and the resulting systems of nonlinear partial differential equations are then solved employing marching order implicit finite difference method. The evolution of the surface shear stress in terms of local skin-friction, the rate of heat transfer in terms of local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles for shear thinning as well as shear-thickening fluid considering the different values of Prandtl number have been focused. For the Newtonian fluids the present numerical results are compared with available published results which show a good agreement indeed. From the results it can be concluded that, at the leading edge, a Newtonian-like solution exists as the shear rate is not large enough to trigger non-Newtonian effects. Non-Newtonian effects can be found when the shear-rate increases beyond a threshold value.

  10. A triangular discontinuous Galerkin method for non-Newtonian implicit constitutive models of rarefied and microscale gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, N. T. P.; Xiao, H.; Myong, R. S.

    2014-09-01

    The discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method has been popular as a numerical technique for solving the conservation laws of gas dynamics. In the present study, we develop an explicit modal DG scheme for multi-dimensional conservation laws on unstructured triangular meshes in conjunction with non-Newtonian implicit nonlinear coupled constitutive relations (NCCR). Special attention is given to how to treat the complex non-Newtonian type constitutive relations arising from the high degree of thermal nonequilibrium in multi-dimensional gas flows within the Galerkin framework. The Langmuir velocity slip and temperature jump conditions are also implemented into the two-dimensional DG scheme for high Knudsen number flows. As a canonical scalar case, Newtonian and non-Newtonian convection-diffusion Burgers equations are studied to develop the basic building blocks for the scheme. In order to verify and validate the scheme, we applied the scheme to a stiff problem of the shock wave structure for all Mach numbers and to the two-dimensional hypersonic rarefied and low-speed microscale gas flows past a circular cylinder. The computational results show that the NCCR model yields the solutions in better agreement with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) data than the Newtonian linear Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) results in all cases of the problem studied.

  11. Investigation on dip coating process by mathematical modeling of non-Newtonian fluid coating on cylindrical substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi, Mahyar; Pope, Michael A.; Hrymak, Andrew N.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model for the dip coating process has been developed for cylindrical geometries with non-Newtonian fluids. This investigation explores the effects of the substrate radius and hydrodynamic behavior of the non-Newtonian viscous fluid on the resulting thin film on the substrate. The coating fluid studied, Dymax 1186-MT, is a resin for fiber optics and used as a matrix to suspend 1 vol. % titanium dioxide particles. The coating substrate is a 100 μm diameter fiber optic diffuser. Ellis viscosity model is applied as a non-Newtonian viscous model for coating thickness prediction, including the influence of viscosity in low shear rates that occurs near the surface of the withdrawal film. In addition, the results of the Newtonian and power law models are compared with the Ellis model outcomes. The rheological properties and surface tension of fluids were analyzed and applied in the models and a good agreement between experimental and analytical solutions was obtained for Ellis model.

  12. Flow of non-Newtonian blood analog fluids in rigid curved and straight artery models.

    PubMed

    Mann, D E; Tarbell, J M

    1990-01-01

    The influence of non-Newtonian rheology on wall shear rate in steady and oscillatory flow through rigid curved and straight artery models was studied experimentally. Wall shear rates measured by flush mounted hot film anemometry under nearly identical flow conditions are reported for the following four fluids: aqueous glycerin (Newtonian), aqueous polyacrylamide (shear thinning, highly elastic), aqueous Xanthan gum (shear thinning, moderately elastic), and bovine blood. For steady flow conditions there was little difference at any measurement site in the wall shear rate levels measured for the four fluids. However, large differences were apparent for oscillatory flows, particularly at the inner curvature 180 degrees from the entrance of the curved artery model. At that position the peak wall shear rate for polyacrylamide was 5-6 times higher than for glycerin and 2-3 times higher than for bovine blood. It is concluded that polyacylamide is too elastic to provide a good model of blood flow under oscillatory conditions, particularly when there is wall shear reversal. Xanthan gum and glycerin are better analog fluids, but neither is entirely satisfactory. PMID:2271763

  13. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (zoffset), particle size (dp) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels.

  14. A Numerical Study of Mesh Adaptivity in Multiphase Flows with Non-Newtonian Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, James; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Alberini, Federico; Simmons, Mark; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    We present an investigation into the computational efficiency benefits of dynamic mesh adaptivity in the numerical simulation of transient multiphase fluid flow problems involving Non-Newtonian fluids. Such fluids appear in a range of industrial applications, from printing inks to toothpastes and introduce new challenges for mesh adaptivity due to the additional ``memory'' of viscoelastic fluids. Nevertheless, the multiscale nature of these flows implies huge potential benefits for a successful implementation. The study is performed using the open source package Fluidity, which couples an unstructured mesh control volume finite element solver for the multiphase Navier-Stokes equations to a dynamic anisotropic mesh adaptivity algorithm, based on estimated solution interpolation error criteria, and conservative mesh-to-mesh interpolation routine. The code is applied to problems involving rheologies ranging from simple Newtonian to shear-thinning to viscoelastic materials and verified against experimental data for various industrial and microfluidic flows. This work was undertaken as part of the EPSRC MEMPHIS programme grant EP/K003976/1.

  15. Coating flow of non-Newtonian anti-HIV microbicide vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su Chan; Szeri, Andrew; Verguet, Stéphane; Katz, David; Weiss, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication over soft substrates is of importance for the drug delivery functions of vehicles for anti-HIV topical microbicides. These are intended to inhibit transmission into vulnerable mucosa, e.g. in the vagina. First generation prototype microbicides have gel vehicles, which spread after insertion and coat luminal surfaces. Effectiveness derives from potency of the active ingredients and completeness and durability of coating. Delivery vehicle rheology, luminal biomechanical properties and the force due to gravity influence the coating mechanics. We develop a framework for understanding the relative importance of boundary squeezing and body forces on the extent and speed of the coating that results. In the case of a shear-thinning fluid, the Carreau number also plays a role. Numerical solutions are developed for a range of conditions and materials. Results are interpreted with respect to tradeoffs between wall elasticity, longitudinal forces, bolus viscosity and bolus volume. These provide initial insights of practical value for formulators of non-Newtonian gel delivery vehicles for anti-HIV microbicidal formulations.

  16. Forces and flows during high speed impacts on a non-Newtonian suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Melody; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Above a certain mass fraction of particles, suspensions of dense granular particles in water exhibit non-Newtonian behavior, including impact-activated solidification. Although it has been suggested that the solidification of the suspension depends on interactions with the suspension boundary, quantitative experiments on the forces experienced by the boundaries of the suspension have not been reported. In the present experiments, we determine the magnitude and timings of impactor-driven events in both the boundaries and body of the suspension using high-speed video, tracer particles, and photoelastic container boundaries. We observe a shock-like propagation in the cornstarch suspension during impact. The dynamics of this shockfront are strongly correlated to the dynamics of the intruder. Additionally, we observe a second extremely fast shockfront, associated with the propagation of forces to the boundaries of the suspension. The dynamics of this shockfront do not depend on the intruder dynamics, but are correlated to the volume fraction of cornstarch particles in the suspension. We acknowledge funding from NSF-DMR1206351 and NASA NNX15AD38G.

  17. Forces and flows during high speed impacts on a non-Newtonian suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Melody; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2014-11-01

    A suspension made of starch particles dispersed in water displays significant non-Newtonian behavior for high enough particulate concentration. In order to shed light on the possible micro-structural basis of this behavior, we perform collisions on a quasi-2D suspension, using a high speed camera to gain access to the dynamics of the suspension. We suspend small dark particles (charcoal) in the cornstarch suspension. From these, we can carry out particle tracking to determine the velocity field during impact. We observe a shock-like propagation in the cornstarch suspension. Although the dynamics of this shockfront are strongly correlated to the dynamics of the intruder, we find that a simple process of momentum transfer to the suspension is insufficient to account for the force experienced by the impactor. We use boundaries made from a photoelastic material which then registers the arrival of strong forces at the boundaries. By linking the forces observed at the boundaries with the dynamics of the suspension, we assess the role of interactions with the boundaries of the suspension.

  18. Non-Newtonian Poiseuille flow of a gas in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tij, Mohamed; Santos, Andrés

    2001-01-01

    The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation is solved for the steady cylindrical Poiseuille flow fed by a constant gravity field. The solution is obtained as a perturbation expansion in powers of the field (through fourth order) and for a general class of repulsive potentials. The results, which are hardly sensitive to the interaction potential, suggest that the expansion is only asymptotic. A critical comparison with the profiles predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations shows that the latter fail over distances comparable to the mean free path. In particular, while the Navier-Stokes description predicts a monotonically decreasing temperature as one moves apart from the cylinder axis, the kinetic theory description shows that the temperature has a local minimum at the axis and reaches a maximum value at a distance of the order of the mean free path. Within that distance, the radial heat flows from the colder to the hotter points, in contrast to what is expected from the Fourier law. Furthermore, a longitudinal component of the heat flux exists in the absence of gradients along the longitudinal direction. Non-Newtonian effects, such as a non-uniform hydrostatic pressure and normal stress differences, are also present.

  19. CFD investigation of turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluates six turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in a lab-scale anaerobic digestion tank with a pitched blade turbine (PBT) impeller. The models studied are: (1) the standard k-ɛ model, (2) the RNG k-ɛ model, (3) the realizable k-ɛ model, (4) the standard k-ω model, (5) the SST k-ω model, and (6) the Reynolds stress model. Through comparing power and flow numbers for the PBT impeller obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from the lab specifications, the realizable k-ɛ and the standard k-ω models are found to be more appropriate than the other turbulence models. An alternative method to calculate the Reynolds number for the moving zone that characterizes the impeller rotation is proposed to judge the flow regime. To check the effect of the model setup on the predictive accuracy, both discretization scheme and numerical approach are investigated. The model validation is conducted by comparing the simulated velocities with experimental data in a lab-scale digester from literature. Moreover, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale digester with two side-entry impellers is performed to optimize the installation. PMID:21216428

  20. Transitions of the propagation phases for non-Newtonian gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Mijanur; Testik, Firat

    2011-11-01

    Transitions of the propagation phases for both two-dimensional and axisymmetric non-Newtonian gravity currents were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Fluid mud gravity currents, which exhibit power-law (shear thinning) rheological properties, were generated for constant-volume (in a flume) and constant-flux (in a flume and a three-dimensional tank) release configurations. Experimental observations indicated that, similar to their Newtonian counterparts (e.g. saline gravity currents), fluid mud gravity currents exhibit inertial and viscous propagation phases, preceded by either slumping (for the case of constant-volume release) or chaotic jet (for the case of constant-flux release) phase. When the currents make transitions from inertial to viscous phase, a thickening-thinning behavior was observed. Order-of-magnitude expressions for the transition time and position were derived and predictions of these expressions were compared to the experimental observations. A Moody-like diagram based upon a new friction factor and Reynolds number for power-law gravity currents is proposed to identify the transition from the inertial to viscous propagation phase.

  1. The effect of non-Newtonian viscosity on the stability of the Blasius boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, P. T.; Gallagher, M. T.; Stephen, S. O.

    2016-07-01

    We consider, for the first time, the stability of the non-Newtonian boundary layer flow over a flat plate. Shear-thinning and shear-thickening flows are modelled using a Carreau constitutive viscosity relationship. The boundary layer equations are solved in a self-similar fashion. A linear asymptotic stability analysis, that concerns the lower-branch structure of the neutral curve, is presented in the limit of large Reynolds number. It is shown that the lower-branch mode is destabilised and stabilised for shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids, respectively. Favourable agreement is obtained between these asymptotic predictions and numerical results obtained from an equivalent Orr-Sommerfeld type analysis. Our results indicate that an increase in shear-thinning has the effect of significantly reducing the value of the critical Reynolds number, this suggests that the onset of instability will be significantly advanced in this case. This postulation, that shear-thinning destabilises the boundary layer flow, is further supported by our calculations regarding the development of the streamwise eigenfunctions and the relative magnitude of the temporal growth rates.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester. PMID:21047058

  3. Self-consistent generation of single-plume state for Enceladus using non-Newtonian rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozel, A.; Besserer, J.; Golabek, G. J.; Kaplan, M.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    The thermal dichotomy of Enceladus suggests an asymmetrical structure in its global heat transfer. So far, most of the models proposed that obtained such a distribution have prescribed an a priori asymmetry, i.e., some anomaly in or below the south polar ice shell. We present here the first set of numerical models of convection that yield a stable single-plume state for Enceladus without prescribed mechanical asymmetry. Using the convection code StagYY in a 2-D spherical annulus geometry, we show that a non-Newtonian ice rheology is sufficient to create a localized, single hot plume surrounded by a conductive ice mantle. We obtain a self-sustained state in which a region of small angular extent has a sufficiently low viscosity to allow subcritical to weak convection to occur due to the stress-dependent part of the rheological law. We find that the single-plume state is very unlikely to remain stable if the rheology is Newtonian, confirming what has been found by previous studies. In a second set of numerical simulations, we also investigate the first-order effect of tidal heating on the stability of the single-plume state. Tidal heating reinforces the stability of the single-plume state if it is generated in the plume itself. Lastly, we show that the likelihood of a stable single-plume state does not depend on the thickness of the ice shell.

  4. Similarity solutions for flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media revisited under parameter uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciriello, Valentina; Di Federico, Vittorio

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the transient motion of a non-Newtonian power-law fluid in a porous medium of infinite extent and given geometry (plane, cylindrical or spherical). The flow in the domain, initially at constant ambient pressure, is induced by fluid withdrawal or injection in the domain origin at prescribed pressure or injection rate. Previous literature work is generalized and expanded, providing a dimensionless formulation suitable for any geometry, and deriving similarity solutions to the nonlinear governing equations valid for pseudoplastic, Newtonian and dilatant fluids. A pressure front propagating with finite velocity is generated when the fluid is pseudoplastic; no such front exists for Newtonian or dilatant fluids. The front rate of advance depends directly on fluid flow behavior index and inversely on medium porosity and domain dimensionality. The effects and relative importance of uncertain input parameters on the model outputs are investigated via Global Sensitivity Analysis by calculating the Sobol' indices of (a) pressure front position and (b) domain pressure, by adopting the Polynomial Chaos Expansion technique. For the selected case study, the permeability is the most influential factor affecting the system responses.

  5. Numerical investigation of laminar forced convection in Newtonian and non-Newtonian flows in eccentric annuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Pingping

    1998-12-01

    An extended numerical investigation of fully developed, forced convective laminar flows with heat transfer in eccentric annuli has been carried out. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian (power-law or Ostwald-de Waele) fluids are studied, representing typical applications in petrochemical, bio-chemical, personal care products, polymer/plastic extrusion and food industries. For the heat transfer problem, with an insulated outer surface, two types of thermal boundary conditions have been considered: Constant wall temperature (T), and uniform axial heat flux with constant peripheral temperature (H1) on the inner surface of the annulus. The governing differential equations for momentum and energy conservation are solved by finite-difference methods. Velocity and temperature distributions in the flow cross section, the wall shear-stress distribution, and isothermal f Re, Nu i,T and Nu i,H1 values for different eccentric annuli (0/leɛ/*/le0.6,/ 0.2/le r/sp/*/le0.8) are presented. In Newtonian flows, the eccentricity is found to have a very strong influence on the flow and temperature fields. In an annulus with relatively large inner cylinder eccentricity, the flow tends to stagnate in the narrow section and has higher peak velocities in the wide section of the annulus. There is considerable flow maldistribution in the azimuthal direction, which in turn produces greater nonuniformity in the temperature field and a consequent degradation in the average heat transfer. Also, the H1 wall condition sustains higher heat transfer coefficients relative to the T boundary condition on the inner surface. For viscous, power-law type non-Newtonian flows, both shear thinning (n<1) and shear thickening (n>1) fluids are considered. Here, the non-linear shear behavior of the fluid is found to further aggravate the flow and temperature maldistribution, and once again the eccentricity is seen to exhibit a very strong influence on the friction and heat transfer behavior. Finally, the

  6. Physics of Life: A Model for Non-Newtonian Properties of Living Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2010-01-01

    This innovation proposes the reconciliation of the evolution of life with the second law of thermodynamics via the introduction of the First Principle for modeling behavior of living systems. The structure of the model is quantum-inspired: it acquires the topology of the Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced with the information potential. As a result, the model captures the most fundamental property of life: the progressive evolution; i.e. the ability to evolve from disorder to order without any external interference. The mathematical structure of the model can be obtained from the Newtonian equations of motion (representing the motor dynamics) coupled with the corresponding Liouville equation (representing the mental dynamics) via information forces. All these specific non-Newtonian properties equip the model with the levels of complexity that matches the complexity of life, and that makes the model applicable for description of behaviors of ecological, social, and economical systems. Rather than addressing the six aspects of life (organization, metabolism, growth, adaptation, response to stimuli, and reproduction), this work focuses only on biosignature ; i.e. the mechanical invariants of life, and in particular, the geometry and kinematics of behavior of living things. Living things obey the First Principles of Newtonian mechanics. One main objective of this model is to extend the First Principles of classical physics to include phenomenological behavior on living systems; to develop a new mathematical formalism within the framework of classical dynamics that would allow one to capture the specific properties of natural or artificial living systems such as formation of the collective mind based upon abstract images of the selves and non-selves; exploitation of this collective mind for communications and predictions of future expected characteristics of evolution; and for making decisions and implementing the corresponding corrections if

  7. The numerical analysis of non-Newtonian blood flow in human patient-specific left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Zhong, Liang; Su, Boyang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various non-invasive tools such as the magnetic resonance image (MRI), ultrasound imaging (USI), computed tomography (CT), and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been widely utilized to enhance our current understanding of the physiological parameters that affect the initiation and the progression of the cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with heart failure (HF). In particular, the hemodynamics of left ventricle (LV) has attracted the attention of the researchers due to its significant role in the heart functionality. In this study, CFD owing its capability of predicting detailed flow field was adopted to model the blood flow in images-based patient-specific LV over cardiac cycle. In most published studies, the blood is modeled as Newtonian that is not entirely accurate as the blood viscosity varies with the shear rate in non-linear manner. In this paper, we studied the effect of Newtonian assumption on the degree of accuracy of intraventricular hemodynamics. In doing so, various non-Newtonian models and Newtonian model are used in the analysis of the intraventricular flow and the viscosity of the blood. Initially, we used the cardiac MRI images to reconstruct the time-resolved geometry of the patient-specific LV. After the unstructured mesh generation, the simulations were conducted in the CFD commercial solver FLUENT to analyze the intraventricular hemodynamic parameters. The findings indicate that the Newtonian assumption cannot adequately simulate the flow dynamic within the LV over the cardiac cycle, which can be attributed to the pulsatile and recirculation nature of the flow and the low blood shear rate. PMID:26849955

  8. Characterising the rheology of non-Newtonian fluids using PFG-NMR and cumulant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, T. W.; Sederman, A. J.; Mitchell, J.; Stitt, E. H.; York, A. P. E.; Gladden, L. F.

    2015-06-01

    Conventional rheological characterisation using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) typically utilises spatially-resolved measurements of velocity. We propose a new approach to rheometry using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR which readily extends the application of MR rheometry to single-axis gradient hardware. The quantitative use of flow propagators in this application is challenging because of the introduction of artefacts during Fourier transform, which arise when realistic sampling strategies are limited by experimental and hardware constraints and when particular spatial and temporal resolution are required. The method outlined in this paper involves the cumulant analysis of the acquisition data directly, thereby preventing the introduction of artefacts and reducing data acquisition times. A model-dependent approach is developed to enable the pipe-flow characterisation of fluids demonstrating non-Newtonian power-law rheology, involving the use of an analytical expression describing the flow propagator in terms of the flow behaviour index. The sensitivity of this approach was investigated and found to be robust to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and number of acquired data points, enabling an increase in temporal resolution defined by the SNR. Validation of the simulated results was provided by an experimental case study on shear-thinning aqueous xanthan gum solutions, whose rheology could be accurately characterised using a power-law model across the experimental shear rate range of 1-100 s-1. The flow behaviour indices calculated using this approach were observed to be within 8% of those obtained using spatially-resolved velocity imaging and within 5% of conventional rheometry. Furthermore, it was shown that the number of points sampled could be reduced by a factor of 32, when compared to the acquisition of a volume-averaged flow propagator with 128 gradient increments, without negatively influencing the accuracy of the characterisation, reducing the

  9. Characterising the rheology of non-Newtonian fluids using PFG-NMR and cumulant analysis.

    PubMed

    Blythe, T W; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Stitt, E H; York, A P E; Gladden, L F

    2015-06-01

    Conventional rheological characterisation using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) typically utilises spatially-resolved measurements of velocity. We propose a new approach to rheometry using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR which readily extends the application of MR rheometry to single-axis gradient hardware. The quantitative use of flow propagators in this application is challenging because of the introduction of artefacts during Fourier transform, which arise when realistic sampling strategies are limited by experimental and hardware constraints and when particular spatial and temporal resolution are required. The method outlined in this paper involves the cumulant analysis of the acquisition data directly, thereby preventing the introduction of artefacts and reducing data acquisition times. A model-dependent approach is developed to enable the pipe-flow characterisation of fluids demonstrating non-Newtonian power-law rheology, involving the use of an analytical expression describing the flow propagator in terms of the flow behaviour index. The sensitivity of this approach was investigated and found to be robust to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and number of acquired data points, enabling an increase in temporal resolution defined by the SNR. Validation of the simulated results was provided by an experimental case study on shear-thinning aqueous xanthan gum solutions, whose rheology could be accurately characterised using a power-law model across the experimental shear rate range of 1-100 s(-1). The flow behaviour indices calculated using this approach were observed to be within 8% of those obtained using spatially-resolved velocity imaging and within 5% of conventional rheometry. Furthermore, it was shown that the number of points sampled could be reduced by a factor of 32, when compared to the acquisition of a volume-averaged flow propagator with 128 gradient increments, without negatively influencing the accuracy of the characterisation, reducing the

  10. Non-Newtonian hydrodynamics for a dilute granular suspension under uniform shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Moisés G; Reyes, Francisco Vega; Garzó, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    We study in this work a steady shearing laminar flow with null heat flux (usually called "uniform shear flow") in a gas-solid suspension at low density. The solid particles are modeled as a gas of smooth hard spheres with inelastic collisions while the influence of the surrounding interstitial fluid on the dynamics of grains is modeled by means of a volume drag force, in the context of a rheological model for suspensions. The model is solved by means of three different but complementary routes, two of them being theoretical (Grad's moment method applied to the corresponding Boltzmann equation and an exact solution of a kinetic model adapted to granular suspensions) and the other being computational (Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation). Unlike in previous studies on granular sheared suspensions, the collisional moment associated with the momentum transfer is determined in Grad's solution by including all the quadratic terms in the stress tensor. This theoretical enhancement allows for the detection and evaluation of the normal stress differences in the plane normal to the laminar flow. In addition, the exact solution of the kinetic model gives the explicit form of the velocity moments of the velocity distribution function. Comparison between our theoretical and numerical results shows in general a good agreement for the non-Newtonian rheological properties, the kurtosis (fourth velocity moment of the distribution function), and the velocity distribution of the kinetic model for quite strong inelasticity and not too large values of the (scaled) friction coefficient characterizing the viscous drag force. This shows the accuracy of our analytical results that allows us to describe in detail the flow dynamics of the granular sheared suspension. PMID:26651687

  11. Bacterial gliding fluid dynamics on a layer of non-Newtonian slime: Perturbation and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Asghar, Z; Anwar Bég, O; Sajid, M

    2016-05-21

    Gliding bacteria are an assorted group of rod-shaped prokaryotes that adhere to and glide on certain layers of ooze slime attached to a substratum. Due to the absence of organelles of motility, such as flagella, the gliding motion is caused by the waves moving down the outer surface of these rod-shaped cells. In the present study we employ an undulating surface model to investigate the motility of bacteria on a layer of non-Newtonian slime. The rheological behavior of the slime is characterized by an appropriate constitutive equation, namely the Carreau model. Employing the balances of mass and momentum conservation, the hydrodynamic undulating surface model is transformed into a fourth-order nonlinear differential equation in terms of a stream function under the long wavelength assumption. A perturbation approach is adopted to obtain closed form expressions for stream function, pressure rise per wavelength, forces generated by the organism and power required for propulsion. A numerical technique based on an implicit finite difference scheme is also employed to investigate various features of the model for large values of the rheological parameters of the slime. Verification of the numerical solutions is achieved with a variational finite element method (FEM). The computations demonstrate that the speed of the glider decreases as the rheology of the slime changes from shear-thinning (pseudo-plastic) to shear-thickening (dilatant). Moreover, the viscoelastic nature of the slime tends to increase the swimming speed for the shear-thinning case. The fluid flow in the pumping (generated where the organism is not free to move but instead generates a net fluid flow beneath it) is also investigated in detail. The study is relevant to marine anti-bacterial fouling and medical hygiene biophysics. PMID:26903204

  12. A Qualitative Investigation of Deposition Velocities of a Non-Newtonian Slurry in Complex Pipeline Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Yokuda, Satoru T.; Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Karri, Naveen K.; Luna, Maria; Minette, Michael J.; Tingey, Joel M.

    2009-05-11

    The External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) has identified the issues relating to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pipe plugging. Per the review’s executive summary, “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” To evaluate the potential for plugging, testing was performed to determine critical velocities for the complex WTP piping layout. Critical velocity is defined as the point at which a moving bed of particles begins to form on the pipe bottom during slurry-transport operations. Pressure drops across the fittings of the test pipeline were measured with differential pressure transducers, from which the critical velocities were determined. A WTP prototype flush system was installed and tested upon the completion of the pressure-drop measurements. We also provide the data for the overflow relief system represented by a WTP complex piping geometry with a non-Newtonian slurry. A waste simulant composed of alumina (nominally 50 μm in diameter) suspended in a kaolin clay slurry was used for this testing. The target composition of the simulant was 10 vol% alumina in a suspending medium with a yield stress of 3 Pa. No publications or reports are available to confirm the critical velocities for the complex geometry evaluated in this testing; therefore, for this assessment, the results were compared to those reported by Poloski et al. (2008) for which testing was performed for a straight horizontal pipe. The results of the flush test are compared to the WTP design guide 24590-WTP-GPG-M-0058, Rev. 0 (Hall 2006) in an effort to confirm flushing-velocity requirements.

  13. Non-Newtonian hydrodynamics for a dilute granular suspension under uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Moisés G.; Reyes, Francisco Vega; Garzó, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    We study in this work a steady shearing laminar flow with null heat flux (usually called "uniform shear flow") in a gas-solid suspension at low density. The solid particles are modeled as a gas of smooth hard spheres with inelastic collisions while the influence of the surrounding interstitial fluid on the dynamics of grains is modeled by means of a volume drag force, in the context of a rheological model for suspensions. The model is solved by means of three different but complementary routes, two of them being theoretical (Grad's moment method applied to the corresponding Boltzmann equation and an exact solution of a kinetic model adapted to granular suspensions) and the other being computational (Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation). Unlike in previous studies on granular sheared suspensions, the collisional moment associated with the momentum transfer is determined in Grad's solution by including all the quadratic terms in the stress tensor. This theoretical enhancement allows for the detection and evaluation of the normal stress differences in the plane normal to the laminar flow. In addition, the exact solution of the kinetic model gives the explicit form of the velocity moments of the velocity distribution function. Comparison between our theoretical and numerical results shows in general a good agreement for the non-Newtonian rheological properties, the kurtosis (fourth velocity moment of the distribution function), and the velocity distribution of the kinetic model for quite strong inelasticity and not too large values of the (scaled) friction coefficient characterizing the viscous drag force. This shows the accuracy of our analytical results that allows us to describe in detail the flow dynamics of the granular sheared suspension.

  14. Self-Consistent Generation of Single-Plume State for Enceladus Using Non-Newtonian Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besserer, Jonathan; Rozel, A.; Golabek, G. J.; Kaplan, M.; Becker, T. W.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    The thermal dichotomy of Enceladus suggests an asymmetrical structure in its global heat transfer [1]. So far, most of the models proposed that obtained such a distribution have prescribed an a priori asymmetry, i.e. a mechanical anomaly in the south polar ice shell surface [2], at its base [3], or in core topography [4]. We present here the first set of numerical simulations of convection that yield a stable single-plume state for Enceladus without prescribed mechanical asymmetry. Using the convection code StagYY [5,6] in a 2D-spherical annulus geometry [7], we show that a non-Newtonian rheology is sufficient to create a localized, single hot plume surrounded by a conductive ice mantle. Using a grain size-dependent rheology [8,9], we obtain a self-sustained state in which a region of small angular extent has a sufficiently low viscosity to allow convection to occur due to the stress-dependent part of the rheological law. We find that the single-plume state is very unlikely to remain stable if the rheology is Newtonian. For simplicity, we neglect tidal heating effects. Despite this, our preferred model yields a south polar heat flux which is about half the recently revised observational value [10]. References: [1] Spencer and Nimmo, 2013, An. Rev. Earth Plan. Sci., 41, 693-717 [2] Han et al., 2012, Icarus, 218, 320-330 [3] Běhounková et al. 2012, Icarus, 219, 655-664 [4] Han and Showman, 2012, LPSC, 2028 [5] Tackley, 1993, GRL, 20, 2187-2190 [6] Tackley, 2008, PEPI, 171, 7-18 [7] Hernlund and Tackley, 2008, PEPI, 171, 48-54 [8] Rozel, 2012, GGG, 13, Q10020 [9] Barr and McKinnon, 2007, JGR, 112, E02012 [10] Spencer et al., 2013, EPSC Abstract, 8, EPSC2013-840-1

  15. Electro-osmosis of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media using lattice Poisson-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Simeng; He, Xinting; Bertola, Volfango; Wang, Moran

    2014-12-15

    Electro-osmosis in porous media has many important applications in various areas such as oil and gas exploitation and biomedical detection. Very often, fluids relevant to these applications are non-Newtonian because of the shear-rate dependent viscosity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the behaviors and physical mechanism of electro-osmosis of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. Model porous microstructures (granular, fibrous, and network) were created by a random generation-growth method. The nonlinear governing equations of electro-kinetic transport for a power-law fluid were solved by the lattice Poisson-Boltzmann method (LPBM). The model results indicate that: (i) the electro-osmosis of non-Newtonian fluids exhibits distinct nonlinear behaviors compared to that of Newtonian fluids; (ii) when the bulk ion concentration or zeta potential is high enough, shear-thinning fluids exhibit higher electro-osmotic permeability, while shear-thickening fluids lead to the higher electro-osmotic permeability for very low bulk ion concentration or zeta potential; (iii) the effect of the porous medium structure depends significantly on the constitutive parameters: for fluids with large constitutive coefficients strongly dependent on the power-law index, the network structure shows the highest electro-osmotic permeability while the granular structure exhibits the lowest permeability on the entire range of power law indices considered; when the dependence of the constitutive coefficient on the power law index is weaker, different behaviors can be observed especially in case of strong shear thinning. PMID:25278358

  16. Liquid metal diffusion experiments in microgravity—vibrational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiak, G.; Plescher, E.; Willnecker, R.

    2005-02-01

    Diffusion and convection in melts play an important role in most technological processes involving the liquid state. Many diffusion experiments in liquids suffer from additional transport induced by gravity-driven flow. Therefore, different research groups performed experiments under microgravity conditions aboard a space vehicle. But even there, diffusion measurements can be disturbed by residual accelerations and vibrations. To analyse this additional transport, model experiments using water as liquid were performed inside an airplane performing zero gravity flight manoeuvres. Because of the short duration of low gravity, the analogy between diffusive mass transport and the faster heat transport was used. The angle between the capillary and the direction of acceleration ranged between 0° and 90°. For an oscillation amplitude of 100 mm, the increase of the frequency up to 1 Hz led to a slight increase of the additional transport. Experiments with 1.7 Hz showed an additional transport of a 50% maximum. The effect of the angle between the capillary and the acceleration vector was within the experimental error limits.

  17. Friction reduction and heat transfer enhancement in turbulent pipe flow of non-Newtonian liquid-solid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, U. S.; Liu, K. V.

    1988-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has identified two concepts for developing advanced energy transmission fluids for thermal systems, in particular district heating and cooling systems. A test series was conducted at ANL to prove these concepts. This paper presents experimental results and discusses the degradation behavior of linear polymer additives and the flow and heat transfer characteristics of non-melting slurry flows. The test results furnished strong evidence that the use of friction reducing additives and slurries can yield improved thermal-hydraulic performance of thermal systems.

  18. Analytical modelling of free convection of non-Newtonian nanofluids flow in porous media with gyrotactic microorganisms using OHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazle; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, free convection of non-Newtonian nanofluids over an impermeable vertical flat plate in a porous medium is studied. The medium contains both nanoparticles and gyrotactic microorganisms. The vertical plate is deemed to have prescribed temperature, nanoparticle concentration and density of motile microorganisms. Approximate analytical solutions for the dimensionless velocity, temperature, nanoparticle concentration, and density of the motile microorganisms are obtained using optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) and the effects of controlling parameters on dimensionless quantities such as velocity, temperature, nanoparticles concentration and density of motile microorganisms, as well as on dimensionless numbers such as local Nusselt, Sherwood and motile microorganism numbers are analyzed.

  19. Group solution for an unsteady non-Newtonian Hiemenz flow with variable fluid properties and suction/injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. El-Hawary, H.; Mostafa, A. A. Mahmoud; Reda, G. Abdel-Rahman; Abeer, S. Elfeshawey

    2014-09-01

    The theoretic transformation group approach is applied to address the problem of unsteady boundary layer flow of a non-Newtonian fluid near a stagnation point with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity. The application of a two-parameter group method reduces the number of independent variables by two, and consequently the governing partial differential equations with the boundary conditions transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations with the appropriate corresponding conditions. Two systems of ordinary differential equations have been solved numerically using a fourth-order Runge—Kutta algorithm with a shooting technique. The effects of various parameters governing the problem are investigated.

  20. Heat Source/Sink in a Magneto-Hydrodynamic Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in a Porous Medium: Dual Solutions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Awais, Muhammad; Imtiaz, Amna

    2016-01-01

    This communication deals with the properties of heat source/sink in a magneto-hydrodynamic flow of a non-Newtonian fluid immersed in a porous medium. Shrinking phenomenon along with the permeability of the wall is considered. Mathematical modelling is performed to convert the considered physical process into set of coupled nonlinear mathematical equations. Suitable transformations are invoked to convert the set of partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are tackled numerically for the solution computations. It is noted that dual solutions for various physical parameters exist which are analyzed in detail. PMID:27598314

  1. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Group analysis and numerical computation of magneto-convective non-Newtonian nanofluid slip flow from a permeable stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. J.; Ferdows, M.; Bég, O. Anwar

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer flow of non-Newtonian power-law nanofluids past a linearly stretching sheet with a linear hydrodynamic slip boundary condition is investigated numerically. The non-Newtonian nanofluid model incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Similarity transformations and corresponding similarity equations of the transport equations are derived via a linear group of transformations. The transformed equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order numerical method available in the Maple 14 software for the influence of power-law (rheological) index, Lewis number, Prandtl number, thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter, magnetic field parameter and linear momentum slip parameter. Validation is achieved with an optimized Nakamura implicit finite difference algorithm (NANONAK). Representative results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and concentration profiles have been presented graphically. The present results of skin friction factor and reduced heat transfer rate are also compared with the published results for several special cases of the model and found to be in close agreement. The study has applications in electromagnetic nano-materials processing.

  3. Non-Newtonian perspectives on pulsatile blood-analog flows in a 180° curved artery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Stevin; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Fuchs, Laszlo; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-07-01

    Complex, unsteady fluid flow phenomena in the arteries arise due to the pulsations of the heart that intermittently pumps the blood to the extremities of the body. The many different flow waveform variations observed throughout the arterial network are a result of this process and a function of the vessel properties. Large scale secondary flow structures are generated throughout the aortic arch and larger branches of the arteries. An experimental 180° curved artery test section with physiological inflow conditions was used to validate the computational methods implemented in this study. Good agreement of the secondary flow structures is obtained between experimental and numerical studies of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid under steady-state and pulsatile, carotid artery flow rate waveforms. Multiple vortical structures, some of opposite rotational sense to Dean vortices, similar to Lyne-type vortices, were observed to form during the systolic portion of the pulse. Computational tools were used to assess the effect of blood-analog fluid rheology (i.e., Newtonian versus non-Newtonian). It is demonstrated that non-Newtonian, blood-analog fluid rheology results in shear layer instabilities that alter the formation of vortical structures during the systolic deceleration and onwards during diastole. Additional vortices not observed in the Newtonian cases appear at the inside and outside of the bend at various times during the pulsation. The influence of blood-analog shear-thinning viscosity decreases mean pressure losses in contrast to the Newtonian blood analog fluid.

  4. Comparative study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian simulations of drug transport in a model drug-eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenze; Sun, Anqiang; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the difference between Newtonian and shear thinning non-Newtonian assumptions of blood in the analysis of DES drug delivery, we numerically simulated the local flow pattern and the concentration distribution of the drug at the lumen-tissue interface for a structurally simplified DES deployed in a curved segment of an artery under pulsatile blood flow conditions. The numerical results showed that when compared with the Newtonian model, the Carreau (shear thinning) model could lead to some differences in the luminal surface drug concentration in certain areas along the outer wall of the curved vessel. In most areas of the vessel, however, there were no significant differences between the 2 models. Particularly, no significant difference between the two models was found in terms of the area-averaged luminal surface drug concentration. Therefore, we believe that the shear thinning property of blood may play little roles in DES drug delivery. Nevertheless, before we draw the conclusion that Newtonian assumption of blood can be used to replace its non-Newtonian one for the numerical simulation of drug transport in the DES implanted coronary artery, other more complex mechanical properties of blood such as its thixotropic behavior should be tested. PMID:22836079

  5. MHD mixed convection analysis in an open channel by obstructed Poiseuille flow of non-Newtonian power law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbi, Khan Md.; Rakib, Tawfiqur; Das, Sourav; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    This paper demonstrates magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow through a channel with a rectangular obstacle at the entrance region using non-Newtonian power law fluid. The obstacle is kept at uniformly high temperature whereas the inlet and top wall of the channel are maintained at a temperature lower than obstacle temperature. Poiseuille flow is implemented as the inlet velocity boundary condition. Grid independency test and code validation are performed to justify the computational accuracy before solving the present problem. Galerkin weighted residual method has been appointed to solve the continuity, momentum and energy equations. The problem has been solved for wide range of pertinent parameters like Richardson number (Ri = 0.1 - 10) at a constant Reynolds number (Re = 100), Hartmann number (Ha = 0 - 100), power index (n = 0.6 - 1.6). The flow and thermal field have been thoroughly discussed through streamline and isothermal lines respectively. The heat transfer performance of the given study has been illustrated by average Nusselt number plots. It is observed that increment of Hartmann number (Ha) tends to decrease the heat transfer rate up to a critical value (Ha = 20) and then let increase the heat transfer performance. Thus maximum heat transfer rate has been recorded for higher Hartmann number and Rayleigh number in case of pseudo-plastic (n = 0.6) non-Newtonian fluid flow.

  6. Development of a modified Hess-Murray law for non-Newtonian fluids in bifurcating micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, David; Barber, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Microfluidic manifolds frequently require the use of bifurcating channels and these can be used to create precise concentration gradients for chemical applications. More recently, novel devices have been attempting to replicate vasculatures or bronchial structures occurring in nature with the goal of creating artificial bifurcations that mimic the basic principles of designs found in nature. In previous work, we have used the biological principles behind the Hess-Murray Law, where bifurcating structures exhibit a constant stress profile and follow a third-power rule, to enable rectangular or trapezoidal micro-channels to be fabricated using conventional lithographic or wet-etching techniques. Using biological principles to design man made devices is generally referred to as biomimetics and this approach has found success in a range of new and emerging topics. However, our previous work was limited to Newtonian flows. More recently, we have used the Rabinovitsch-Mooney equation to be able to extend our analysis to non-Newtonian fluids. This has allowed us to develop a new rule that can provide a design criterion to predict channel dimensions for non-Newtonian flows obeying a constant stress biological principle. The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for support of CCP12 and Programme Grant award (grant number EP/I011927/1).

  7. Toward non-Newtonian effects on secondary flow structures in a 180 degree bent tube model for curved arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Stevin; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Fuchs, Laszlo; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the development of vortical flow structures of blood like fluids in a 180 degree tube bend, analogous to the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are localized to regions of curvature in the arterial tree. The pathology of atherogenesis is widely considered an inflammatory response, hypothesized to be modulated by the interplay between Wall Shear Stress (WSS) variations and particulate transport mechanisms from the bulk fluid core to the near wall. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics as well as the rheological properties of the blood, which in turn are dependent on the bulk secondary flows. In this work, the time dependent fluid flow under various physiological flow conditions are investigated both experimentally and numerically. A Newtonian blood analog fluid model is considered in both studies to validate both methods and thereby study flow structure development during steady as well as pulsatile conditions. Particle image velocimetry (2C - 2D PIV) is used to acquire velocity field data from an acrylic tube bend. The numerical study is extended to consider the non-Newtonian properties of blood according to an empirical model to identify the relative importance of the non-Newtonian behavior. The studies show complex Dean and Lyne vortex interaction that are enhanced with increasing peak Reynolds numbers.

  8. The Effect Of Viscosity and Non-Newtonian Rheology On Reaction Enhancement Between Two Initially Distant Scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoaei, Farrokh; Crimaldi, John

    2014-11-01

    The effect of viscosity and non-Newtonian (shear-thinning) rheology on mixing and reaction between two initially distant scalars has been investigated using a two-channel planar laser-induced fluorescence technique (2C-PLIF). The scalars are stirred and mixed in the mildly turbulent (Re = 2000) wake of a round cylinder. The scalars are released continuously upstream of the cylinder, with a separation that initially impedes the reaction. The ambient flow is pure water, but the scalar solutions include Xanthan gum to alter their rheology. Results indicate that mixing and reaction rates in the low-Damkohler limit between the two scalars plumes increase as the viscosity of the scalars is increased. The study also shows that the dominant contribution of total reaction derives from the scalar covariance associated with instantaneous flow processes, and depends strongly on viscosity and non-Newtonian rheology of the scalars in the domain. The results have broad implications for biological and ecological mixing processes involving now-Newtonian fluids. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0849695 and No. 1205816.

  9. Numerical analysis of mixed convection in lid-driven cavity using non-Newtonian ferrofluid with rotating cylinder inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbi, Khan Md.; Shuvo, Moinuddin; Kabir, Rabiul Hasan; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convection in a lid-driven square enclosure with a rotating cylinder inside has been analyzed using non-Newtonian ferrofluid (Fe3O4-water). Left vertical wall is heated while the right vertical wall is kept cold. Bottom wall and cylinder surface are assumed to be adiabatic. Top wall has a moving lid with a constant velocity U0. Galerkin method of finite element analysis has been used to solve the governing equations. Numerical accuracy of solution is ensured by the grid independency test. A variety of Richardson number (Ri = 0.1 - 10) at a governing Reynolds number (Re = 100), power law index (n = 0.5 - 1.5), rotational speed (Ω = 0 - 15) and solid volume fraction of ferrous particles (φ = 0 - 0.05) are employed for this present problem. To illustrate flow and thermal field, streamline and isotherms are included. Average Nusselt number plots are shown to show overall heat transfer rate. It is observed that better heat transfer is achieved at higher rotational speed (Ω), Richardson number (Ri) and power law index (n). This paper also concludes significant variation in streamline and isotherm patterns for higher solid volume fraction (φ) of non-Newtonian ferrofluid.

  10. Can we approximate non-Newtonian rheology to model mantle convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüttig, Christian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important parameters in mantle convection studies is the rheology since it is directly responsible for the convective vigor, heat transport and shape of up- and downwellings. Deformation in terrestrial mantles is accommodated by two main deformation mechanisms: diffusion and dislocation creep. While the former probably plays a dominant role at high pressures, the latter is thought to be important at relatively low pressures, as inferred by seismic anisotropy of the Earth's upper mantle [1]. Dislocation creep is more challenging to handle than diffusion creep as the viscosity becomes strain-rate dependent [2], introducing a strong non-linearity that requires much longer computational times. In order to avoid this additional complexity, a Newtonian rheology (i.e. diffusion creep) with reduced activation parameters is often used to mimic non-Newtonian behaviour as described in [3], although this approximation has never been carefully tested for a stagnant-lid regime. Mobile-lid steady-state simulations presented in [3] show that the reduction of the activation parameters should be applied with care and in dependence of the problem considered (e.g., amount of internal heating, pressure- or temperature-dominated viscosity). Nevertheless, this simplification is widely employed in convection studies assuming its presumed general validity (e.g. [4,5]). We perform numerical simulations in 2D Cartesian, cylindrical and 3D spherical geometry using the mantle convection codes YACC [6] and Gaia [7] to investigate the consequences of this simplification for various scenarios. To verify our methods, we rerun some of the cases from [3] finding a good agreement. Using rheological parameters from [2] and the approximation from [3], our results show that some global properties such as mean temperature, root mean square velocity and nusselt number are indeed similar (within ~10%) to those obtained when employing a fully non-linear rheology. However, the mantle

  11. Can We Approximate Non-Newtonian Rheology to Model Mantle Convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, A. C.; Breuer, D.; Hüttig, C.; Tosi, N.

    2014-12-01

    The rheology is a key influencing factor in mantle convection as it is directly responsible for the convective vigor, therefore altering heat transport and the distribution of stresses. Deformation in terrestrial mantles is mainly accommodated by two mechanisms: diffusion and dislocation creep. While the former probably plays a dominant role at high pressures, the latter is thought to be important at relatively low pressures, as inferred by seismic anisotropy in the Earth's upper mantle [1].Dislocation creep is more challenging to handle than diffusion creep as the viscosity becomes strain-rate dependent, introducing a non-linearity that requires more computational resources. Thus, to avoid this additional complexity, a Newtonian rheology (i.e. diffusion creep) with reduced activation parameters is often used to mimic non-Newtonian behavior [2], causing misleading results if applied to certain scenarios.We run thermal evolution models in 2D cylindrical geometry using the mantle convection code Gaia [3] for Mercury, the Moon and Mars. It has been argued that their mantles deform by pure dislocation creep but our simulations show that, when using a mixed rheology that accounts for both diffusion and dislocation creep, deformation in the mantles of Mercury, Moon and Mars is dominated by diffusion creep, while dislocation creep only occurs in small confined regions. Further, our results show a transition from a diffusion creep to a dislocation creep dominated mantle as the Rayleigh number increases and indicate that systems even with relatively high effective Rayleigh numbers (up to 5 x 107) are dominated by diffusion creep. Terrestrial bodies like Mercury, the Moon or Mars can thus be correctly modeled using a Newtonian rheology. This may change for bodies like the Earth or Venus since the effective Rayleigh numbers are higher and thus either a mixture of both diffusion and dislocation or purely dislocation creep would define the deformation mechanism. Moreover

  12. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  13. Finite-sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel: Non-Newtonian effects

    PubMed Central

    Mukundakrishnan, Karthik; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Eckmann, David M.

    2009-01-01

    We have numerically investigated the axisymmetric motion of a finite-sized nearly occluding air bubble through a shear-thinning Casson fluid flowing in blood vessels of circular cross section. The numerical solution entails solving a two-layer fluid model—a cell-free layer and a non-Newtonian core together with the gas bubble. This problem is of interest to the field of rheology and for gas embolism studies in health sciences. The numerical method is based on a modified front-tracking method. The viscosity expression in the Casson model for blood (bulk fluid) includes the hematocrit [the volume fraction of red blood cells (RBCs)] as an explicit parameter. Three different flow Reynolds numbers, Reapp=ρlUmaxd/μapp, in the neighborhood of 0.2, 2, and 200 are investigated. Here, ρl is the density of blood, Umax is the centerline velocity of the inlet Casson profile, d is the diameter of the vessel, and μapp is the apparent viscosity of whole blood. Three different hematocrits have also been considered: 0.45, 0.4, and 0.335. The vessel sizes considered correspond to small arteries, and small and large arterioles in normal humans. The degree of bubble occlusion is characterized by the ratio of bubble to vessel radius (aspect ratio), λ, in the range 0.9≤λ≤1.05. For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effects are taken into account. Both horizontal and vertical vessel geometries have been investigated. Many significant insights are revealed by our study: (i) bubble motion causes large temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the “endothelial cell” (EC) surface lining the blood vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it, and passes it by; (ii) rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress (+ → − → +) imparted to the cell surface during bubble motion; (iii) large shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are ascribable to the development of a recirculation vortex at the rear of the bubble

  14. Finite-sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel: Non-Newtonian effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundakrishnan, Karthik; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Eckmann, David M.

    2008-09-01

    We have numerically investigated the axisymmetric motion of a finite-sized nearly occluding air bubble through a shear-thinning Casson fluid flowing in blood vessels of circular cross section. The numerical solution entails solving a two-layer fluid model—a cell-free layer and a non-Newtonian core together with the gas bubble. This problem is of interest to the field of rheology and for gas embolism studies in health sciences. The numerical method is based on a modified front-tracking method. The viscosity expression in the Casson model for blood (bulk fluid) includes the hematocrit [the volume fraction of red blood cells (RBCs)] as an explicit parameter. Three different flow Reynolds numbers, Reapp=ρlUmaxd/μapp , in the neighborhood of 0.2, 2, and 200 are investigated. Here, ρl is the density of blood, Umax is the centerline velocity of the inlet Casson profile, d is the diameter of the vessel, and μapp is the apparent viscosity of whole blood. Three different hematocrits have also been considered: 0.45, 0.4, and 0.335. The vessel sizes considered correspond to small arteries, and small and large arterioles in normal humans. The degree of bubble occlusion is characterized by the ratio of bubble to vessel radius (aspect ratio), λ , in the range 0.9⩽λ⩽1.05 . For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effects are taken into account. Both horizontal and vertical vessel geometries have been investigated. Many significant insights are revealed by our study: (i) bubble motion causes large temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the “endothelial cell” (EC) surface lining the blood vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it, and passes it by; (ii) rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress (+ → - → +) imparted to the cell surface during bubble motion; (iii) large shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are ascribable to the development of a recirculation vortex at the rear of the bubble

  15. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Gas Retention and Release Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Barnes, Steven M.

    2006-03-02

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies performed to establish the methodology to perform reduced-scale gas retention and release tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids with gas generation. The technical basis for scaled testing with unsteady jet mixing systems in gas-generating non-Newtonian fluids is presented in the form of a bubble migration model that accounts for the gas generation rate, the average bubble rise velocity, and the geometry of the vessel. Scaling laws developed from the model were validated with gas holdup and release tests conducted at three scales: large scale, 1/4 scale, and 1/9 scale. Experiments were conducted with two non-Newtonian simulants with in-situ gas generation by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were examined. From these results, scaling laws are developed which allow the design of mixing systems at a reduced scale.

  16. Emplacement mechanisms and trapping potential of gravity-driven allochthons

    SciTech Connect

    Pinney, R.B.

    1985-02-01

    Gravity-slide blocks of Paleozoic carbonate detached from the Snake River Range show evidence of episodic emplacement into the Salt Lake group (Mio-Pliocene) in the Palisades reservoir area near Alpine, Wyoming. The allochthons lie in a large graben system created by the Grand Valley listric normal fault, a reactivated thrust that soles into a ramp in the underlying Absaroka thrust. In the Alpine 7 1/2-min quadrangle, one of the detached blocks is 2 1/2 mi (4 km) by 1 mi (1.6 km) in map view and contains the Ferry Peak thrust as well as other Laramide structures. Structures and formations of the Alpine allochthon may be matched to those in the range to restore approximate predetachment position. Very low-angle westward translation at or near the surface moved the blocks across the Grand Valley fault into the graben. The current location and attitude of these allochthons are due to subsequent movement and rotation on the Grand Valley fault. The allochthons occur at different stratigraphic levels in the Salt Lake group, each level corresponding to the time of a specific emplacement event. Catastrophic emplacement of a fractured allochthon, a potential reservoir, into a lacustrine or other source rock depocenter creates a unique and potentially predictable type of petroleum occurrence. Paleogeographic reconstruction may explain anomalous occurrence of discrete allochthons in structurally low areas where it can be shown that a gravitational potential existed for detachment and sliding. The resulting trap would consist of allochthons encased in autochthonous source rock.

  17. Kinetics of gravity-driven water channels under steady rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Frétigny, Christian; Durian, Douglas J.; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-two-dimensional experimental setup composed of a random close packing of monodisperse glass beads. Using controlled experiments, we analyze the finger instabilities that develop from the wetting front as a function of fundamental granular (particle size) and fluid properties (rainfall, viscosity). These finger instabilities act as precursors for water channels, which serve as outlets for water drainage. We look into the characteristics of the homogeneous wetting front and channel size as well as estimate relevant time scales involved in the instability formation and the velocity of the channel fingertip. We compare our experimental results with that of the well-known prediction developed by Parlange and Hill [D. E. Hill and J. Y. Parlange, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 36, 697 (1972), 10.2136/sssaj1972.03615995003600050010x]. This model is based on linear stability analysis of the growth of perturbations arising at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Results show that, in terms of morphology, experiments agree with the proposed model. However, in terms of kinetics we nevertheless account for another term that describes the homogenization of the wetting front. This result shows that the manner we introduce the fluid to a porous medium can also influence the formation of finger instabilities. The results also help us to calculate the ideal flow rate needed for homogeneous distribution of water in the soil and minimization of runoff, given the grain size, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. This could have applications in optimizing use of irrigation water.

  18. Kinetics of gravity-driven water channels under steady rainfall.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Cesare M; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Frétigny, Christian; Durian, Douglas J; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-two-dimensional experimental setup composed of a random close packing of monodisperse glass beads. Using controlled experiments, we analyze the finger instabilities that develop from the wetting front as a function of fundamental granular (particle size) and fluid properties (rainfall, viscosity). These finger instabilities act as precursors for water channels, which serve as outlets for water drainage. We look into the characteristics of the homogeneous wetting front and channel size as well as estimate relevant time scales involved in the instability formation and the velocity of the channel fingertip. We compare our experimental results with that of the well-known prediction developed by Parlange and Hill [D. E. Hill and J. Y. Parlange, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 36, 697 (1972)]. This model is based on linear stability analysis of the growth of perturbations arising at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Results show that, in terms of morphology, experiments agree with the proposed model. However, in terms of kinetics we nevertheless account for another term that describes the homogenization of the wetting front. This result shows that the manner we introduce the fluid to a porous medium can also influence the formation of finger instabilities. The results also help us to calculate the ideal flow rate needed for homogeneous distribution of water in the soil and minimization of runoff, given the grain size, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. This could have applications in optimizing use of irrigation water. PMID:25375487

  19. Gravity driven current during sessile drop coalescence on a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Oberdick, Samuel; Garoff, Stephen; Anna, Shelley

    2013-11-01

    We study the mixing behavior of two sessile drops following coalescence on a flat surface. The surface is composed of silicone elastomer on which the drops exhibit contact angles of about 90 degree. The two drops are of equal volume at coalescence, but different densities and viscosities. Using laser induced fluorescence, we obtain both a top view of the contact line motion and a side view of the cross-sectional flow. During the coalescence stage, the initial healing of the meniscus bridge and damping of capillary waves occur on time scales comparable to the inertio-capillary time. However, the interface between the dyed and undyed components remains sharp, with diffusive mixing occurring at much longer timescales. At intermediate time scales the motion is controlled by a gravity current, which leads to the eventual stratification into two separate horizontal layers within the composite drop. Using lubrication analysis, we characterize the gravity current as a function of the drop sizes, and the density and viscosity differences between the two merging fluids. The numerical solution of the lubrication analysis captures the observed scaling of the time dependent interface movement as a function of fluid and geometric parameters.

  20. On exponential stability of gravity driven viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Wu, Guochun; Zhong, Xin

    2016-05-01

    We investigate stability of an equilibrium state to a nonhomogeneous incompressible viscoelastic fluid driven by gravity in a bounded domain Ω ⊂R3 of class C3. First, we establish a critical number κC, which depends on the equilibrium density and the gravitational constant, and is a threshold of the elasticity coefficient κ for instability and stability of the linearized perturbation problem around the equilibrium state. Then we prove that the equilibrium state is exponential stability provided that κ >κC and the initial disturbance quantities around the equilibrium state satisfy some relations. In particular, if the equilibrium density ρ bar is a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) type and ρbar‧ is a constant, our result strictly shows that the sufficiently large elasticity coefficient can prevent the RT instability from occurrence.

  1. Gravity-driven soap film dynamics in subcritical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auliel, M. I.; Castro, F.; Sosa, R.; Artana, G.

    2015-10-01

    We undertake the analysis of soap-film dynamics with the classical approach of asymptotic expansions. We focus our analysis in vertical soap film tunnels operating in subcritical regimes with elastic Mach numbers Me=O(10-1) . Considering the associated set of nondimensional numbers that characterize this flow, we show that the flow behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) divergence free flow with variable mass density. When the soap film dynamics agrees with that of a 2D and almost constant mass density flow, the regions where the second invariant of the velocity gradient is non-null correspond to regions where the rate of change of film thickness is non-negligible.

  2. Flucutations in power dissipation in a gravity driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greguric, Zrinka; Cervoni, Miguel; Cressman, John

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the three dimensional motion of a disk falling through a column of water. The disk's position and orientation are measured with a high speed video camera enabling an analysis of the fluid forces acting on the disk. On average the fluid exerts a dissipative drag on the falling body. However, these forces are dynamic and lead to fluctuations in the kinetic energy of the disk. The resulting power fluctuations are of the same magnitude as the mean power dissipated by the fluid and can be large enough to cause the disk to move upward against the force of gravity. We have analyzed these fluctuations and compared their statistics to those predicted by non-equilibrium statistical theory.

  3. Numerical investigation of non-Newtonian fluids in annular ducts with finite aspect ratio using lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Khali, S; Nebbali, R; Ameziani, D E; Bouhadef, K

    2013-05-01

    In this work the instability of the Taylor-Couette flow for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids) is investigated for cases of finite aspect ratios. The study is conducted numerically using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). In many industrial applications, the apparatuses and installations drift away from the idealized case of an annulus of infinite length, and thus the end caps effect can no longer be ignored. The inner cylinder is rotating while the outer one and the end walls are maintained at rest. The lattice two-dimensional nine-velocity (D2Q9) Boltzmann model developed from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation is used to obtain the flow field for fluids obeying the power-law model. The combined effects of the Reynolds number, the radius ratio, and the power-law index n on the flow characteristics are analyzed for an annular space of finite aspect ratio. Two flow modes are obtained: a primary Couette flow (CF) mode and a secondary Taylor vortex flow (TVF) mode. The flow structures so obtained are different from one mode to another. The critical Reynolds number Re(c) for the passage from the primary to the secondary mode exhibits the lowest value for the pseudoplastic fluids and the highest value for the dilatant fluids. The findings are useful for studies of the swirling flow of non-Newtonians fluids in axisymmetric geometries using LBM. The flow changes from the CF to TVF and its structure switches from the two-cells to four-cells regime for both Newtonian and dilatant fluids. Contrariwise for pseudoplastic fluids, the flow exhibits 2-4-2 structure passing from two-cells to four cells and switches again to the two-cells configuration. Furthermore, the critical Reynolds number presents a monotonic increase with the power-law index n of the non-Newtonian fluid, and as the radius ratio grows, the transition flow regimes tend to appear for higher critical Reynolds numbers. PMID:23767615

  4. Numerical investigation of non-Newtonian fluids in annular ducts with finite aspect ratio using lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khali, S.; Nebbali, R.; Ameziani, D. E.; Bouhadef, K.

    2013-05-01

    In this work the instability of the Taylor-Couette flow for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids) is investigated for cases of finite aspect ratios. The study is conducted numerically using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). In many industrial applications, the apparatuses and installations drift away from the idealized case of an annulus of infinite length, and thus the end caps effect can no longer be ignored. The inner cylinder is rotating while the outer one and the end walls are maintained at rest. The lattice two-dimensional nine-velocity (D2Q9) Boltzmann model developed from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation is used to obtain the flow field for fluids obeying the power-law model. The combined effects of the Reynolds number, the radius ratio, and the power-law index n on the flow characteristics are analyzed for an annular space of finite aspect ratio. Two flow modes are obtained: a primary Couette flow (CF) mode and a secondary Taylor vortex flow (TVF) mode. The flow structures so obtained are different from one mode to another. The critical Reynolds number Rec for the passage from the primary to the secondary mode exhibits the lowest value for the pseudoplastic fluids and the highest value for the dilatant fluids. The findings are useful for studies of the swirling flow of non-Newtonians fluids in axisymmetric geometries using LBM. The flow changes from the CF to TVF and its structure switches from the two-cells to four-cells regime for both Newtonian and dilatant fluids. Contrariwise for pseudoplastic fluids, the flow exhibits 2-4-2 structure passing from two-cells to four cells and switches again to the two-cells configuration. Furthermore, the critical Reynolds number presents a monotonic increase with the power-law index n of the non-Newtonian fluid, and as the radius ratio grows, the transition flow regimes tend to appear for higher critical Reynolds numbers.

  5. Deposition Velocities of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Abrefah, John; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Nigl, Franz; Minette, Michael J.; Toth, James J.; Tingey, Joel M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-03-01

    correlation used in the WTP design guide has been shown to be inaccurate for Hanford waste feed materials. The use of the Thomas (1979) correlation in the design guide is not conservative—In cases where 100% of the particles are smaller than 74 μm or particles are considered to be homogeneous due to yield stress forces suspending the particles the homogeneous fraction of the slurry can be set to 100%. In such cases, the predicted critical velocity based on the conservative Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation is reduced to zero and the design guide returns a value from the Thomas (1979) correlation. The measured data in this report show that the Thomas (1979) correlation predictions often fall below that measured experimental values. A non-Newtonian deposition velocity design guide should be developed for the WTP— Since the WTP design guide is limited to Newtonian fluids and the WTP expects to process large quantities of such materials, the existing design guide should be modified address such systems. A central experimental finding of this testing is that the flow velocity required to reach turbulent flow increases with slurry rheological properties due to viscous forces dampening the formation of turbulent eddies. The flow becomes dominated by viscous forces rather than turbulent eddies. Since the turbulent eddies necessary for particle transport are not present, the particles will settle when crossing this boundary called the transitional deposition boundary. This deposition mechanism should be expected and designed for in the WTP.

  6. Perspectives on using implicit type constitutive relations in the modelling of the behaviour of non-Newtonian fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Janečka, Adam Průša, Vít

    2015-04-28

    We discuss the benefits of using the so-called implicit type constitutive relations introduced by K. R. Rajagopal, J. Fluid Mech. 550, 243-249 (2006) and K. R. Rajagopal, Appl. Math. 48, 279-319 (2003) in the description of the behaviour of non-Newtonian fluids. In particular, we focus on the benefits of using the implicit type constitutive relations in the mathematical modelling of fluids in which the shear stress/shear rate dependence is given by an S-shaped curve, and in modelling of fluids that exhibit nonzero normal stress differences. We also discuss a thermodynamical framework that allows one to cope with the implicit type constitutive relations.

  7. Stability characteristics of a non-Newtonian strongly coupled dusty plasma in the presence of shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, S.; Jana, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-06-01

    A visco-elastic medium, such as a strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP), permits both the propagation of longitudinal dust acoustic mode due to compressibility and transverse shear mode due to elasticity. In the presence of finite velocity shear, these two modes get coupled with each other and eventually the coupled mode becomes unstable. In a non-Newtonian dust fluid, it has been found that the viscosity gradient has a modulating effect on this shear-driven instability under various parametric regimes. A detailed investigation has been carried out on the effect of viscosity gradient on the stability characteristics of a strongly coupled dusty plasma by using the conventional dust fluid equations; both analytically and numerically. These results can be helpful in understanding the phenomena associated with mechanical instabilities in highly viscous fluids; such as metallic glasses, Earth's mantle etc.

  8. Effects of unsteadiness and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow through a tapered time-variant stenotic artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, A.; Ali, N.; Sajid, M.; Hayat, T.

    2015-03-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to analyze the unsteady pulsatile flow of blood through a tapered artery with stenosis. The rheology of the flowing blood is captured by the constitutive equation of Carreau model. The geometry of the time-variant stenosis has been used to carry out the present analysis. The flow equations are set up under the assumption that the lumen radius is sufficiently smaller than the wavelength of the pulsatile pressure wave. A radial coordinate transformation is employed to immobilize the effect of the vessel wall. The resulting partial differential equations along with the boundary and initial conditions are solved using finite difference method. The dimensionless radial and axial velocity, volumetric flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress are analyzed for normal and diseased artery with particular focus on variation of these quantities with non-Newtonian parameters.

  9. A FEM-DEM technique for studying the motion of particles in non-Newtonian fluids. Application to the transport of drill cuttings in wellbores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celigueta, Miguel Angel; Deshpande, Kedar M.; Latorre, Salvador; Oñate, Eugenio

    2016-04-01

    We present a procedure for coupling the finite element method (FEM) and the discrete element method (DEM) for analysis of the motion of particles in non-Newtonian fluids. Particles are assumed to be spherical and immersed in the fluid mesh. A new method for computing the drag force on the particles in a non-Newtonian fluid is presented. A drag force correction for non-spherical particles is proposed. The FEM-DEM coupling procedure is explained for Eulerian and Lagrangian flows, and the basic expressions of the discretized solution algorithm are given. The usefulness of the FEM-DEM technique is demonstrated in its application to the transport of drill cuttings in wellbores.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Mixing of Chemically Reacting, Non-Newtonian Slurry for Tank Waste Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Yuen; Y. Onishi; J.R. Rustand; B.E. Wells; T.E. Michener; A.R. Felmy; D.S. Trent; A.A. Ten; C.A. Hier

    2002-02-06

    Fifty-four million gallons of wastes containing 180-million curies of radioactivity are stored in single (SSTs)- and double-shell underground tanks (DSTs) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in eastern Washington (Gephart and Lundgren 1997). They are a multiphase, multicomponent, high-ionic strength, and highly basic mixture of liquids, solids, and, in some cases, gases. Mixer pumps will be installed in twenty-eight 4,0000-m DSTs to stir radioactive sludge/saltcake and supernatant liquid (and possibly a solvent) so the waste can be retrieved from the tanks for subsequent treatment and disposal. During the retrieval operation, complex interactions occur between waste mixing, chemical reactions, and rheology. Thus, decisions made about waste retrieval must account for these complex interactions.

  11. Non-Newtonian rheology of igneous melts at high stresses and strain rates: Experimental results for rhyolite, andesite, basalt, and nephelinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Sharon L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    1990-09-01

    The stress-strain rate relationships of four silicate melt compositions (high-silica rhyolite, andesite, tholeiitic basalt, and nephelinite) have been studied using the fiber elongation method. Measurements were conducted in a stress range of 10-400 MPa and a strain rate range of 10-6 to 10-3 s-1. The stress-strain rate relationships for all the melts exhibit Newtonian behavior at low strain rates, but non-Newtonian (nonlinear stress-strain rate) behavior at higher strain rates, with strain rate increasing faster than the applied stress. The decrease in calculated shear viscosity with increasing strain rate precedes brittle failure of the fiber as the applied stress approaches the tensile strength of the melt. The decrease in viscosity observed at the high strain rates of the present study ranges from 0.25 to 2.54 log10 Pa s. The shear relaxation times τ of these melts have been estimated from the low strain rate, Newtonian, shear viscosity, using the Maxwell relationship τ = ηs/G∞. Non-Newtonian shear viscosity is observed at strain rates (ɛ˙=time-1) equivalent to time scales that lie 3 log10 units of time above the calculated relaxation time. Brittle failure of the fibers occurs 2 log10 units of time above the relaxation time. This study illustrates that the occurrence of non-Newtonian viscous flow in geological melts can be predicted to within a log10 unit of strain rate. High-silica rhyolite melts involved in ash flow eruptions are expected to undergo a non-Newtonian phase of deformation immediately prior to brittle failure.

  12. Non-Newtonian effects of blood on LDL transport inside the arterial lumen and across multi-layered arterial wall with and without stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza; Mesri, Yaser

    2016-06-01

    Blood non-Newtonian behavior on low-density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulation is analyzed numerically, while fluid-multilayered arteries are adopted for nonstenotic and 30%-60% symmetrical stenosed models. Present model considers non-Newtonian effects inside the lumen and within arterial layers simultaneously, which has not been examined in previous studies. Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the mass transport convection-diffusion equations and Darcy’s model for species transport inside the luminal flow and across wall layers, respectively. Carreau model for the luminal flow and the modified Darcy equation for the power-law fluid within arterial layers are employed to model blood rheological characteristics, appropriately. Results indicate that in large arteries with relatively high Reynolds number Newtonian model estimates LDL concentration patterns well enough, however, this model seriously incompetent for regions with low WSS. Moreover, Newtonian model for plasma underestimates LDL concentration especially on luminal surface and across arterial wall. Therefore, applying non-Newtonian model seems essential for reaching to a more accurate estimation of LDL distribution in the artery. Finally, blood flow inside constricted arteries demonstrates that LDL concentration patterns along the stenoses inside the luminal flow and across arterial layers are strongly influenced as compared to the nonstenotic arteries. Additionally, among four stenosis severity grades, 40% stenosis is prone to more LDL accumulation along the post-stenotic regions.

  13. Non-Newtonian unconfined flow and heat transfer over a heated cylinder using the direct-forcing immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Succi, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method has been used to simulate non-Newtonian fluid flow over a heated circular cylinder. The direct-forcing algorithm has been employed to couple the off-lattice obstacles and on-lattice fluid nodes. To investigate the effect of boundary sharpness, two different diffuse interface schemes are considered to interpolate the velocity and temperature between the boundary and computational grid points. The lattice Boltzmann equation with split-forcing term is applied to consider the effects of the discrete lattice and the body force to the momentum flux, simultaneously. A method for calculating the Nusselt number based on diffuse interface schemes is developed. The rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids are investigated under the different power-law indices and Reynolds numbers. The effect of numerical parameters on the accuracy of the proposed method has been investigated in detail. Results show that the rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids in the presence of a heated immersed body can be suitably captured using the immersed boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method.

  14. Numerical analysis of non-Newtonian blood flow and wall shear stress in realistic single, double and triple aorto-coronary bypasses.

    PubMed

    Vimmr, J; Jonášová, A; Bublík, O

    2013-10-01

    Considering the fact that hemodynamics plays an important role in the patency and overall performance of implanted bypass grafts, this work presents a numerical investigation of pulsatile non-Newtonian blood flow in three different patient-specific aorto-coronary bypasses. The three bypass models are distinguished from each other by the number of distal side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses and denoted as single, double and triple bypasses. The mathematical model in the form of time-dependent nonlinear system of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is coupled with the Carreau-Yasuda model describing the shear-thinning property of human blood and numerically solved using the principle of the SIMPLE algorithm and cell-centred finite volume method formulated for hybrid unstructured tetrahedral grids. The numerical results computed for non-Newtonian and Newtonian blood flow in the three aorto-coronary bypasses are compared and analysed with emphasis placed on the distribution of cycle-averaged wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. As shown in this study, the non-Newtonian blood flow in all of the considered bypass models does not significantly differ from the Newtonian one. Our observations further suggest that, especially in the case of sequential grafts, the resulting flow field and shear stimulation are strongly influenced by the diameter of the vessels involved in the bypassing. PMID:23733715

  15. Three dimensional laminar non-Newtonian fluid flow and heat transfer in the entrance region of a cross-shaped duct

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, S.G.

    1997-11-01

    Many important industrial fluids are non-Newtonian in their flow characteristics. These include food materials, soap and detergent slurries, polymer solutions and many others. In the most of the industries such as polymer, foods, petrochemical the heat exchanger is an especially important component of the processing equipment. In the design of heat exchanger, the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient plays a key role as a design factor. Here the Galerkin finite element is used to solve the three dimensional momentum and energy equations for laminar non-Newtonian flow in cross-shaped straight duct. Both flow and heat transfer develop simultaneously from the entrance of the channel. Uniform wall temperature (T) and also constant wall heat flux both axially and peripherally (H2) are used as thermal boundary conditions. The power-law model is chosen to characterize the non-Newtonian behavior of the fluid. The effect of power-law index and geometric parameter on the apparent friction factor as well as Nusselt number are presented and discussed.

  16. Bouncing jet: a Newtonian liquid rebounding off a free surface.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan; Pang, Yee Kwong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Swinney, Harry L

    2007-11-01

    We find that a liquid jet can bounce off a bath of the same liquid if the bath is moving horizontally with respect to the jet. Previous observations of jets rebounding off a bath (e.g., the Kaye effect) have been reported only for non-Newtonian fluids, while we observe bouncing jets in a variety of Newtonian fluids, including mineral oil poured by hand. A thin layer of air separates the bouncing jet from the bath, and the relative motion replenishes the film of air. Jets with one or two bounces are stable for a range of viscosity, jet flow rate and velocity, and bath velocity. The bouncing phenomenon exhibits hysteresis and multiple steady states. PMID:18233768

  17. Bouncing jet: A Newtonian liquid rebounding off a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan; Pang, Yee Kwong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-11-01

    We find that a liquid jet can bounce off a bath of the same liquid if the bath is moving horizontally with respect to the jet. Previous observations of jets rebounding off a bath (e.g., the Kaye effect) have been reported only for non-Newtonian fluids, while we observe bouncing jets in a variety of Newtonian fluids, including mineral oil poured by hand. A thin layer of air separates the bouncing jet from the bath, and the relative motion replenishes the film of air. Jets with one or two bounces are stable for a range of viscosity, jet flow rate and velocity, and bath velocity. The bouncing phenomenon exhibits hysteresis and multiple steady states.

  18. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E.

    2013-12-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  19. Self-similarity of solitary waves on inertia-dominated falling liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; Pradas, Marc; Charogiannis, Alexandros; Markides, Christos N.; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-03-01

    We propose consistent scaling of solitary waves on inertia-dominated falling liquid films, which accurately accounts for the driving physical mechanisms and leads to a self-similar characterization of solitary waves. Direct numerical simulations of the entire two-phase system are conducted using a state-of-the-art finite volume framework for interfacial flows in an open domain that was previously validated against experimental film-flow data with excellent agreement. We present a detailed analysis of the wave shape and the dispersion of solitary waves on 34 different water films with Reynolds numbers Re =20 -120 and surface tension coefficients σ =0.0512 -0.072 N m-1 on substrates with inclination angles β =19∘-90∘ . Following a detailed analysis of these cases we formulate a consistent characterization of the shape and dispersion of solitary waves, based on a newly proposed scaling derived from the Nusselt flat film solution, that unveils a self-similarity as well as the driving mechanism of solitary waves on gravity-driven liquid films. Our results demonstrate that the shape of solitary waves, i.e., height and asymmetry of the wave, is predominantly influenced by the balance of inertia and surface tension. Furthermore, we find that the dispersion of solitary waves on the inertia-dominated falling liquid films considered in this study is governed by nonlinear effects and only driven by inertia, with surface tension and gravity having a negligible influence.

  20. Stability and break-up of thin liquid films on patterned and structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ajaev, Vladimir S; Gatapova, Elizaveta Ya; Kabov, Oleg A

    2016-02-01

    Solid surfaces with chemical patterning or topographical structure have attracted attention due to many potential applications such as manufacture of flexible electronics, microfluidic devices, microscale cooling systems, as well as development of self-cleaning, antifogging, and antimicrobial surfaces. In many configurations involving patterned or structured surfaces, liquid films are in contact with such solid surfaces and the issue of film stability becomes important. Studies of stability in this context have been largely focused on specific applications and often not connected to each other. The purpose of the present review is to provide a unified view of the topic of stability and rupture of liquid films on patterned and structured surfaces, with particular focus on common mathematical methods, such as lubrication approximation for the liquid flow, bifurcation analysis, and Floquet theory, which can be used for a wide variety of problems. The physical mechanisms of the instability discussed include disjoining pressure, thermocapillarity, and classical hydrodynamic instability of gravity-driven flows. Motion of a contact line formed after the film rupture is also discussed, with emphasis on how the receding contact angle is expected to depend on the small-scale properties of the substrate. PMID:26792018

  1. Generalized solution for 1-D non-Newtonian flow in a porous domain due to an instantaneous mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Federico, V.; Ciriello, V.

    2011-12-01

    Non-Newtonian fluid flow in porous media is of considerable interest in hydrology, chemical and petroleum engineering, and biofluid mechanics. We consider an infinite porous domain of plane (d=1), cylindrical (d=2) or semi-spherical geometry (d=3), having uniform permeability k and porosity Φ, initially at uniform pressure and saturated by a weakly compressible non-Newtonian fluid, and analyze the dynamics of the pressure variation generated within the domain by an instantaneous mass injection m0 in its origin. The fluid is described by a rheological power-law model of given consistency index H and flow behavior index n; the flow law is a modified Darcy's law depending on H, Φ, n. Coupling flow law and mass balance equations yields the nonlinear partial differential equation governing the pressure field; an analytical solution is derived in space r and time t as a function of a self-similar variable η=r/tβ(n). We revisit and expand the work in previous papers by providing a dimensionless general formulation and solution to the problem for d=1,2,3. When a shear-thinning fluid (n<1) is considered, the analytical solution exhibits traveling wave characteristics, in variance with Newtonian fluids; the front velocity is proportional to t(n-2)/2 in plane geometry, t(2n-3)/(3-n) in cylindrical geometry, and t(3n-4)/(4-2n) in semi-spherical geometry. The front position is a markedly increasing function of n and is inversely dependent on d; the pressure front advances at a slower rate for larger values of compressibility, higher injected mass and lower porosity. When pressure is considered, it is seen that an increase in d from 1 to 3 brings about an order of magnitude reduction. An increase in compressibility implies a significant decrease in pressure, especially at early times. To reflect the uncertainty inherent in values of the problem parameters, we then consider selected properties of fluid (flow behavior index n) and porous domain (permeability k, porosity

  2. Scaling of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics without inertia for quantitative modelling of rock flow due to gravity (including the concept of rheological similarity)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, Ruud; Schmeling, Harro

    1986-09-01

    Scale model theory for constructing dynamically scaled analogue models of rock flowing in the solid state has until now assumed that the natural and model flows were both viscous. In viscous flows, at the very low Reynolds numbers ( Re ≪ 1) common in solid rocks, geometrical similarity is sufficient to achieve dynamic similarity between a homogeneous material (scale) model and its natural prototype. However, experiments on the rheology of natural rocks suggest that they flow predominantly as non-Newtonian strain rate softening materials at the characteristic geological strain rate 10 -14 s -1. Non-dimensionalisation of both the equation of motion and the constitutive flow law of non-Newtonian flows is carried out to investigate what criteria are required to achieve dynamic similarity. It is shown that dynamic similarity of non-Newtonian flows at low inertia (e.g., a rock with Re ≪ 1 and its model analogue) can only be attained if the steady-state flow curves of the model materials and the various rocks in the prototype have mutually similar shapes and slopes, and if these flows operate on similar parts of their respective flow curves. We term this the requirement of rheological similarity. Dynamic similarity of low inertia flows ( Re ≪ 1) in non-Newtonian continua is achieved if they are rheologically and geometrically similar. Additional criteria for dynamic similarity of low inertia flows in inhomogeneous media (with Newtonian or non-Newtonian subregions, or both) are formulated in section 5. Scaling of thermal properties is not included. Steady-state flow curves of common rocks are compiled in log stress-log strain rate space together with analogue materials suitable for modelling of solid state rock deformation. This compilation aids the selection of model materials with flow curves geometrically similar to those of rocks in the prototype. Laboratory scale models of rock flow should generally be constructed of materials which strain rate soften during

  3. Three-Dimensional Stabilization of a Vortex Street in Viscoelastic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadot, Olivier; Kumar, Satish

    The local injection of a viscoelastic liquid into the vortex street produced by a circular cylinder drastically modifies its two- and three-dimensional structure. At low injection rates, a stabilization of mode A (3D instability) is observed while the primary wavelength of the vortex street (2D instability) remains identical to that of the Newtonian case. There is also a flattening of the vortices in the street. At higher injection rates, the primary wavelength increases as well. These observations support the stabilization mechanism suggested by the numerical simulations of Kumar and Homsy (S. Kumar and G. M. Homsy: J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 83, 251 (1999)).

  4. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Claire A.; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Todd, Billy D.; Daivis, Peter J.; Hansen, Jesper S.

    2015-06-01

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear are investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity, normal stress differences, and pressure of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid at all temperatures. In addition, the Cooee model is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules in bitumen. These nanoaggregates are immersed in a solvent of saturated hydrocarbon molecules. At a fixed temperature, the shear-shinning behavior is related not only to the inter- and intramolecular alignments of the solvent molecules but also to the decrease of the average size of the nanoaggregates at high shear rates. The variation of the viscosity with temperature at different shear rates is also related to the size and relative composition of the nanoaggregates. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified. Finally, the position of bitumen mixtures in the broad literature of complex systems such as colloidal suspensions, polymer solutions, and associating polymer networks is discussed.

  5. Modelling of Turbulent Flows of Newtonian Fluids Based on Analogies to Flows of Non-Newtonian Fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Ning

    In this work, we derive necessary and sufficient conditions for turbulent secondary flows of a Newtonian fluid and necessary and sufficient conditions for laminar steady secondary flows of a Non-Newtonian fluid in a straight tube. It is found that there is a striking similarity between them. This similarity motivates the assumption used in developing a generalized non-linear K- epsilon model. Based on an analogy that exists between the constitutive relations for turbulent mean flows of a Newtonian fluid and that for laminar flows of a Non -Newtonian fluid, and making use of the constitutive framework of extended thermodynamics, we develop a generalized non -linear K-epsilon model with the same relaxation time as that which appears in the turbulence model proposed by Yakhot, Orszag, Thangam, Gatski and Speziale in 1992. We show that the non-linear K-epsilon model developed by Speziale in 1987 is unable to predict the relaxation phenomena of the Reynolds stresses because of involving no K and dotepsilon , and a coefficient of which leads to a negative relaxation time for the Reynolds stresses. To correct this deficiency, we resort to making use of the relaxation time in the model of Yakhot et al.. The approximate form of our generalized non-linear K-epsilon model, which can predict the relaxation phenomena of the Reynolds stresses and is frame indifferent, is an extension of the standard K-epsilon model and the non-linear K-epsilon model of Speziale.

  6. Defect correction based velocity reconstruction for physically consistent simulations of non-Newtonian flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumatary, Mantulal; Natarajan, Ganesh; Mishra, Subhash C.

    2014-09-01

    A new algorithm to recover centroidal velocities from face-normal data on two-dimensional unstructured staggered meshes is presented. The proposed approach uses iterative defect correction in conjunction with a lower-order accurate Gauss reconstruction to obtain second-order accurate centroidal velocities. We derive the conditions that guarantee the second-order accuracy of the velocity reconstruction and demonstrate its efficacy on arbitrary polygonal mesh topologies. The necessity of the proposed algorithm for non-Newtonian flow simulations is elucidated through numerical simulations of channel flow, driven cavity and backward facing step problems with power-law and Carreau fluids. Numerical investigations show that second-order accuracy of the reconstructed velocity field is critical to obtaining physically consistent solutions of vorticity-dominated flows on non-orthogonal meshes. It is demonstrated that the spurious solutions are not linked to discrete conservation and arise solely due to the lower order accuracy of velocity reconstruction. The importance of the proposed algorithm for hemodynamic simulations is highlighted through studies of laminar flow in an idealized stenosed artery using different blood models.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of Suspended Particle Migration in Non-Newtonian Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.; Baer, T.; Mondy, L.; Rao, R.; Stephens, T.

    1999-03-04

    Shear-induced migration of particles is studied during the slow flow of suspensions of spheres (particle volume fraction {phi} = 0.50) in an inelastic but shear-thinning, suspending fluid in flow between counterrotating concentric cylinders, The conditions are such that nonhydrodynamic effects are negligible. The movement of particles away from the high shear rate region is more pronounced than in a Newtonian suspending liquid. We test a continuum constitutive model for the evolution of particle concentration in a flowing suspension proposed by Phillips et al. (1992) by using shear-thinning, suspending fluids. The fluid constitutive equation is Carreau-like in its shear-thinning behavior but also varies with the local particle concentration. The model is compared with the experimental data gathered with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging.

  8. Bubble production using a Non-Newtonian fluid in microfluidic flow focusing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Lin; Ward, Thomas; Grant, Christine

    2012-02-01

    We experimentally study the production of micrometer-sized bubbles using microfluidic technology and a flow-focusing geometry. Bubbles are produced by using a mixture containing aqueous polyacrylamide of concentrations ranging from 0.01-0.10% by weight and several solution also containing a sodium-lauryl-sulfate (SLS) surfactant at concentrations ranging 0.01-0.1% by weight. The fluids are driven by controlling the static pressure above a hydrostatic head of the liquid while the disperse phase fluid static pressure is held constant (air). In the absence of surfactant the bubble production is discontinuous. The addition of surfactant stabilizes the bubble production. In each type of experiment, the bubble length l, velocity U and production frequency φ are measured and compared as a function of the inlet pressure ratio. The bubbles exhibit a contraction in their downstream length as a function of the polymer concentration which is investigated.

  9. NMR imaging and hydrodynamic analysis of neutrally buoyant non-Newtonian slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.; Sinton, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The flow of solids loaded suspension in cylindrical pipes has been the object of intense experimental and theoretical investigations in recent years. These types of flows are of great interest in chemical engineering because of their important use in many industrial manufacturing processes. Such flows are for example encountered in the manufacture of solid-rocket propellants, advanced ceramics, reinforced polymer composites, in heterogenous catalytic reactors, and in the pipeline transport of liquid-solids suspensions. In most cases, the suspension microstructure and the degree of solids dispersion greatly affect the final performance of the manufactured product. For example, solid propellant pellets need to be extremely-well dispersed in gel matrices for use as rocket engine solid fuels. The homogeneity of pellet dispersion is critical to allow good uniformity of the burn rate, which in turn affects the final mechanical performance of the engine. Today`s manufacturing of such fuels uses continuous flow processes rather than batch processes. Unfortunately, the hydrodynamics of such flow processes is poorly understood and is difficult to assess because it requires the simultaneous measurements of liquid/solids phase velocities and volume fractions. Due to the recent development in pulsed Fourier Transform NMR imaging, NMR imaging is now becoming a powerful technique for the non intrusive investigation of multi-phase flows. This paper reports and exposes a state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methodology that can be used to study such flows. The hydrodynamic model developed for this study is a two-phase flow shear thinning model with standard constitutive fluid/solids interphase drag and solids compaction stresses. this model shows good agreement with experimental data and the limitations of this model are discussed.

  10. Crystal clustering and non-Newtonian rheology of low-viscosity crystal-poor magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Silvia; Vona, Alessandro; Romano, Claudia; Giordano, Guido

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the rheology of liquid and crystal-bearing tephriphonolite magmas from the Colli Albani volcanic district. High (1124 - 1569 ° C) and low (690 - 800 ° C) temperature anhydrous liquid viscosities were determined by a combination of concentric cylinder (101.0 to 103.6 Pa s) and micropenetration (109.2 to 1012.1 Pa s) viscometry. Comparison with literature data reveals that at high temperatures, viscosity seems to be related to the melts degree of polymerization (NBO/T), while at low temperatures the dependency is not linear with values of viscosity higher than expected. Subliquidus isothermal crystallization experiments and viscosity determinations were carried out at high temperature (1150 - 1240 ° C) in air using a concentric cylinder apparatus at constant shear strain rate (γ' = 0.1 s‑1). The overall crystal fraction varies between φ = 0.06 at 1240 ° C (leucite) and φ = 0.34 at 1150 ° C (leucite φ = 0.32 + plagioclase φ = 0.02), with a direct linear increase of crystal content with decreasing temperature which parallels the viscosity increase. The inspection of products quenched at the end of the crystallization stage, defined when viscosity reaches a constant value, reveals strong evidence of leucite clustering. After the first segment of the experiment, performed at a constant shear rate, a second stage of experiments at variable shear rate was performed, comprised of an up-ramp (γ' = 0.1 - 0.9 s‑1) and a down-ramp (γ'= 0.9 - 0.1 s‑1) segment. At the end of the down-ramp, leucite crystals appear sub-spherical and unclustered. For the same applied shear rate, the viscosity values of the up-ramp are not recovered within the experimental time-scale, indicating strain and strain-rate dependent rheology for these suspensions. While the down-ramp viscosity data are shown to be in perfect agreement with literature models, discrepancies between the up-ramp data and pre-existing predicting models have been observed. We suggest that

  11. The mantle convection model with non-Newtonian rheology and phase transitions: The flow structure and stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrova, A. M.; Baranov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The mantle convection model with phase transitions, non-Newtonian viscosity, and internal heat sources is calculated for two-dimensional (2D) Cartesian geometry. The temperature dependence of viscosity is described by the Arrhenius law with a viscosity step of 50 at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle. The viscosity in the model ranges within 4.5 orders of magnitude. The use of the non-Newtonian rheology enabled us to model the processes of softening in the zone of bending and subduction of the oceanic plates. The yield stress in the model is assumed to be 50 MPa. Based on the obtained model, the structure of the mantle flows and the spatial fields of the stresses σ xz and σ xx in the Earth's mantle are studied. The model demonstrates a stepwise migration of the subduction zones and reveals the sharp changes in the stress fields depending on the stage of the slab detachment. In contrast to the previous model (Bobrov and Baranov, 2014), the self-consistent appearance of the rigid moving lithospheric plates on the surface is observed. Here, the intense flows in the upper mantle cause the drift and bending of the top segments of the slabs and the displacement of the plumes. It is established that when the upwelling plume intersects the boundary between the lower and upper mantle, it assumes a characteristic two-level structure: in the upper mantle, the ascending jet of the mantle material gets thinner, whereas its velocity increases. This effect is caused by the jump in the viscosity at the boundary and is enhanced by the effect of the endothermic phase boundary which impedes the penetration of the plume material from the lower mantle to the upper mantle. The values and distribution of the shear stresses σ xz and superlithostatic horizontal stresses σ xx are calculated. In the model area of the subducting slabs the stresses are 60-80 MPa, which is by about an order of magnitude higher than in the other mantle regions. The character of the stress fields

  12. Onset of Convection in Ice I with Composite Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Rheology: Application to the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Ice I exhibits a complex rheology at temperature and pressure conditions appropriate for the interiors of the ice I shells of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. We use numerical methods and existing parameterizations of the critical Rayleigh number to determine the conditions required to trigger convection in an ice I shell with the stress-, temperature- and grain size- dependent rheology measured in laboratory experiments by Goldsby and Kohlstedt [2001]. The critical Rayleigh number depends on the ice grain size and the amplitude and wavelength of temperature perturbation issued to an initially conductive ice I shell. If the shells have an assumed uniform grain size less than 0.4 mm, deformation during initial plume growth is accommodated by Newtonian volume diffusion. If the ice grain size is between 0.4 mm and 3 cm, deformation during plume growth is accommodated by weakly non-Newtonian grain boundary sliding, where the critical ice shell thickness for convection depends on the amplitude of temperature perturbation to the _0.5 power. If the ice grain size exceeds 2 cm, convection can not occur in the ice I shells of the Galilean satellites regardless of the amplitude or wavelength of temperature perturbation. If the grain size in a convecting ice I shell evolves to effective values greater than 2 cm, convection will cease. If the ice shell has a grain size large enough to permit flow by dislocation creep, the ice is too stiff to permit convection, even in the thickest possible ice I shell. Consideration of the composite rheology implies that estimates of the grain size in the satellites and knowledge of their initial thermal states are required when judging the convective instability of their ice I shells.

  13. Homotopy Analysis Method for the heat transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in an axisymmetric channel with a porous wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilpour, M.; Domairry, G.; Sadoughi, N.; Davodi, A. G.

    2010-09-01

    In this article, a powerful analytical method, called the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) is introduced to obtain the exact solutions of heat transfer equation of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in an axisymmetric channel with a porous wall for turbine cooling applications. The HAM is employed to obtain the expressions for velocity and temperature fields. Tables are presented for various parameters on the velocity and temperature fields. These results are compared with the solutions which are obtained by Numerical Methods (NM). Also the convergence of the obtained HAM solution is discussed explicitly. These comparisons show that this analytical method is strongly powerful to solve nonlinear problems arising in heat transfer.

  14. Mechanical annealing in the flow of supercooled metallic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Dai, Lan Hong; Liu, Lin

    2014-08-07

    Flow induced structural evolution in a supercooled metallic liquid Vit106a (Zr{sub 58.5}Cu{sub 15.6}Al{sub 10.3}Ni{sub 12.8}Nb{sub 2.8}, at. %) was investigated via uni-axial compression combined with differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Compression tests at strain rates covering the transition from Newtonian flow to non-Newtonian flow and at the same strain rate 2 × 10{sup −1} s{sup −1} to different strains were performed at the end of glass transition (T{sub g-end} = 703 K). The relaxation enthalpies measured by DSC indicate that the samples underwent non-Newtonian flow contain more free volume than the thermally annealed sample (703 K, 4 min), while the samples underwent Newtonian flow contain less, namely, the free volume of supercooled metallic liquids increases in non-Newtonian flow, while decreases in Newtonian flow. The oscillated variation of the relaxation enthalpies of the samples deformed at the same strain rate 2 × 10{sup −1} s{sup −1} to different strains confirms that the decrease of free volume was caused by flow stress, i.e., “mechanical annealing.” Micro-hardness tests were also performed to show a similar structural evolution tendency. Based on the obtained results, the stress-temperature scaling in the glass transition of metallic glasses are supported experimentally, as stress plays a role similar to temperature in the creation and annihilation of free volume. In addition, a widening perspective angle on the glass transition of metallic glasses by exploring the 3-dimensional stress-temperature-enthalpy phase diagram is presented. The implications of the observed mechanical annealing effect on the amorphous structure and the work-hardening mechanism of metallic glasses are elucidated based on atomic level stress model.

  15. Role of asphaltenes in stabilizing thin liquid emulsion films.

    PubMed

    Tchoukov, Plamen; Yang, Fan; Xu, Zhenghe; Dabros, Tadeusz; Czarnecki, Jan; Sjöblom, Johan

    2014-03-25

    Drainage kinetics, thickness, and stability of water-in-oil thin liquid emulsion films obtained from asphaltenes, heavy oil (bitumen), and deasphalted heavy oil (maltenes) diluted in toluene are studied. The results show that asphaltenes stabilize thin organic liquid films at much lower concentrations than maltenes and bitumen. The drainage of thin organic liquid films containing asphaltenes is significantly slower than the drainage of the films containing maltenes and bitumen. The films stabilized by asphaltenes are much thicker (40-90 nm) than those stabilized by maltenes (∼10 nm). Such significant variation in the film properties points to different stabilization mechanisms of thin organic liquid films. Apparent aging effects, including gradual increase of film thickness, rigidity of oil/water interface, and formation of submicrometer size aggregates, were observed for thin organic liquid films containing asphaltenes. No aging effects were observed for films containing maltenes and bitumen in toluene. The increasing stability and lower drainage dynamics of asphaltene-containing thin liquid films are attributed to specific ability of asphaltenes to self-assemble and form 3D network in the film. The characteristic length of stable films is well beyond the size of single asphaltene molecules, nanoaggregates, or even clusters of nanoaggregates reported in the literature. Buildup of such 3D structure modifies the rheological properties of the liquid film to be non-Newtonian with yield stress (gel like). Formation of such network structure appears to be responsible for the slower drainage of thin asphaltenes in toluene liquid films. The yield stress of liquid film as small as ∼10(-2) Pa is sufficient to stop the drainage before the film reaches the critical thickness at which film rupture occurs. PMID:24564447

  16. Computer simulation of MHD blood conveying gold nanoparticles as a third grade non-Newtonian nanofluid in a hollow porous vessel.

    PubMed

    Hatami, M; Hatami, J; Ganji, D D

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, heat transfer and flow analysis for a non-Newtonian third grade nanofluid flow in porous medium of a hollow vessel in presence of magnetic field are simulated analytically and numerically. Blood is considered as the base third grade non-Newtonian fluid and gold (Au) as nanoparticles are added to it. The viscosity of nanofluid is considered a function of temperature as Vogel's model. Least Square Method (LSM), Galerkin method (GM) and fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method (NUM) are used to solve the present problem. The influences of the some physical parameters such as Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters on non-dimensional velocity and temperature profiles are considered. The results show that increasing the thermophoresis parameter (N(t)) caused an increase in temperature values in whole domain and an increase in nanoparticles concentration just near the inner wall of vessel. Furthermore by increasing the MHD parameter, velocity profiles decreased due to magnetic field effect. PMID:24286727

  17. Numerical Study of Non-Newtonian Boundary Layer Flow of Jeffreys Fluid Past a Vertical Porous Plate in a Non-Darcy Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra Prasad, V.; Gaffar, S. Abdul; Keshava Reddy, E.; Bég, O. Anwar

    2014-07-01

    Polymeric enrobing flows are important in industrial manufacturing technology and process systems. Such flows are non-Newtonian. Motivated by such applications, in this article we investigate the nonlinear steady state boundary layer flow, heat, and mass transfer of an incompressible Jefferys non-Newtonian fluid past a vertical porous plate in a non-Darcy porous medium. The transformed conservation equations are solved numerically subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions using a versatile, implicit, Keller-box finite-difference technique. The numerical code is validated with previous studies. The influence of a number of emerging non-dimensional parameters, namely Deborah number (De), Darcy number (Da), Prandtl number (Pr), ratio of relaxation to retardation times (λ), Schmidt number (Sc), Forchheimer parameter (Λ), and dimensionless tangential coordinate (ξ) on velocity, temperature, and concentration evolution in the boundary layer regime are examined in detail. Furthermore, the effects of these parameters on surface heat transfer rate, mass transfer rate, and local skin friction are also investigated. It is found that the boundary layer flow is decelerated with increasing De and Forchheimer parameter, whereas temperature and concentration are elevated. Increasing λ and Da enhances the velocity but reduces the temperature and concentration. The heat transfer rate and mass transfer rates are found to be depressed with increasing De and enhanced with increasing λ. Local skin friction is found to be decreased with a rise in De, whereas it is elevated with increasing λ. An increasing Sc decreases the velocity and concentration but increases temperature.

  18. The Bouncing Jet: A Newtonian Liquid Rebounding off a Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan; Pang, Yee Kwong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-10-01

    We find that a liquid jet can bounce off a bath of the same liquid if the bath is moving horizontally with respect to the jet. Previous observations of jets rebounding off a bath (e.g. Kaye effect) have been reported only for non-Newtonian fluids, while we observe bouncing jets in a variety of Newtonian fluids, including mineral oil poured by hand. A thin layer of air separates the bouncing jet from the bath, and the relative motion replenishes the film of air. Jets with one or two bounces are stable for a range of viscosity, jet flow rate and velocity, and bath velocity. The bouncing jet phenomenon can be observed in many household fluids using only minimal equipment, making it accessible as a classroom demonstration and a science project.

  19. Simulation of two phase flow of liquid - solid in the annular space in drilling operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kootiani, Reza Cheraghi; Samsuri, Ariffin Bin

    2014-10-01

    Drilling cutting transfer is an important factor in oil and gas wells drilling. So that success drilling operation is directly dependent on the quality of clean the wellbore drilling operation. In this paper, modeled upward flow of liquid - solid in the annular concentric and non-concentric in the well drilling by Euler two - fluid model and then analysis using numerical method. Numerical simulation of liquid - solid flow evaluated initially with a Newtonian fluid (water) and then a non-Newtonian fluid (CMC solution 0.4%). After that, investigated the effect of parameters such as flow rate, rotating drill pipe and out of centered on drilling operations. The results show that drilling cutting transfer is improve due to the rotation of drill pipe particularly in drilling operations.

  20. Evaluation of dispersive mixing, extension rate and bubble size distribution using numerical simulation of a non-Newtonian fluid in a twin-screw mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Maureen L.

    Initially 3D FEM simulation of a simplified mixer was used to examine the effect of mixer configuration and operating conditions on dispersive mixing of a non-Newtonian fluid. Horizontal and vertical velocity magnitudes increased with increasing mixer speed, while maximum axial velocity and shear rate were greater with staggered paddles. In contrast, parallel paddles produced an area of efficient dispersive mixing between the center of the paddle and the barrel wall. This study was expanded to encompass the complete nine-paddle mixing section using power-law and Bird-Carreau fluid models. In the center of the mixer, simple shear flow was seen, corresponding with high [special character omitted]. Efficient dispersive mixing appeared near the barrel wall at all flow rates and near the barrel center with parallel paddles. Areas of backflow, improving fluid retention time, occurred with staggered paddles. The Bird-Carreau fluid showed greater influence of paddle motion under the same operating conditions due to the inelastic nature of the fluid. Shear-thinning behavior also resulted in greater maximum shear rate as shearing became easier with decreasing fluid viscosity. Shear rate distributions are frequently calculated, but extension rate calculations have not been made in a complex geometry since Debbaut and Crochet (1988) defined extension rate as the ratio of the third to the second invariant of the strain rate tensor. Extension rate was assumed to be negligible in most studies, but here extension rate is shown to be significant. It is possible to calculate maximum stable bubble diameter from capillary number if shear and extension rates in a flow field are known. Extension rate distributions were calculated for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. High extension and shear rates were found in the intermeshing region. Extension is the major influence on critical capillary number and maximum stable bubble diameter, but when extension rate values are low shear rate has

  1. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  2. Finite Element Model of a Two-Phase Non-Newtonian Thixotropic Fluid: Mount St. Helens Lava Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Zevada, P.

    2011-12-01

    Extrusion of highly viscous lavas that spread laterally and form lava domes in the craters of large volcanoes is associated with significant volcanic hazards. Gas overpressure driven fragmentation of the lava dome or collapse and slumping of marginal sections or the entire mass of the dome can trigger dangerous pyroclastic flows that threaten surrounding populations up to tens of kilometers away. The rate of lava dome growth in the mature state of the dome evolution is often oscillatory. Relatively quiescent episodes are terminated by renewed extrusion and emplacement of exogenous "lobes" or "spines" of lava on the surface of the dome. Emplacement of new lobes is preceded by pressurization of magma in the magmatic conduit that can trigger volcanic eruptions and is preceded by crater floor deformation (e.g. Swanson and Holcombe, 1990). This oscillatory behavior was previously attributed primarily to crystallization kinetics and gas exsolution generating cyclic overpressure build-ups. Analogue modeling of the lava domes has revealed that the oscillatory growth rate can be reproduced by extrusion of isothermal, pseudoplastic and thixotropic plaster of Paris (analogue material for the magma) on a sand layer (analogue material for the unconsolidated deposits of the crater floor). The patterns of dome growth of these models closely correspond to both the 1980-1985 and 2004-2005 growth episodes of Mt. St. Helens lava dome (Swanson and Holcombe, 1990; Major et al., 2005). They also suggest that the oscillatory growth dynamics of the lavas can be explained by the mechanical interaction of the non-Newtonian magma with the frictional and deformable substrate below the lava dome rather than complex crystallization kinetics (e.g. Melnik and Sparks, 1999). In addition, these results suggest that the renewed growth episode of Mt. St. Helens dome in 2006 could be associated with an even higher degree of magma pressurization in the conduit than occurred during the 1980 - 1986

  3. Space Inside a Liquid Sphere Transforms into De Sitter Space by Hilbert Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabounski, Dmitri; Borissova, Larissa

    2010-04-01

    Consider space inside a sphere of incompressible liquid, and space surrounding a mass-point. Metrics of the spaces were deduced in 1916 by Karl Schwarzschild. 1) Our calculation shows that a liquid sphere can be in the state of gravitational collapse (g00 = 0) only if its mass and radius are close to those of the Universe (M = 8.7x10^55 g, a = 1.3x10^28 cm). However if the same mass is presented as a mass-point, the radius of collapse rg (Hilbert radius) is many orders lesser: g00 = 0 realizes in a mass-point's space by other conditions. 2) We considered a liquid sphere whose radius meets, formally, the Hilbert radius of a mass-point bearing the same mass: a = rg, however the liquid sphere is not a collapser (see above). We show that in this case the metric of the liquid sphere's internal space can be represented as de Sitter's space metric, wherein λ = 3/a^2 > 0: physical vacuum (due to the λ-term) is the same as the field of an ideal liquid where ρ0 < 0 and p = -ρ0 c^2 > 0 (the mirror world liquid). The gravitational redshift inside the sphere is produced by the non-Newtonian force of repulsion (which is due to the λ-term, λ = 3/a^2 > 0); it is also calculated.

  4. Evolution of vortical structures in a curved artery model with non-Newtonian blood-analog fluid under pulsatile inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Steady flow and physiological pulsatile flow in a rigid 180° curved tube are investigated using particle image velocimetry. A non-Newtonian blood-analog fluid is used, and in-plane primary and secondary velocity fields are measured. A vortex detection scheme ( d 2-method) is applied to distinguish vortical structures. In the pulsatile flow case, four different vortex types are observed in secondary flow: deformed-Dean, Dean, Wall and Lyne vortices. Investigation of secondary flow in multiple cross sections suggests the existence of vortex tubes. These structures split and merge over time during the deceleration phase and in space as flow progresses along the 180° curved tube. The primary velocity data for steady flow conditions reveal additional vortices rotating in a direction opposite to Dean vortices—similar to structures observed in pulsatile flow—if the Dean number is sufficiently high.

  5. MHD Effects on Non-Newtonian Power-Law Fluid Past a Continuously Moving Porous Flat Plate with Heat Flux and Viscous Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishan, N.; Shashidar Reddy, B.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of a magneto-hydro dynamic flow and heat transfer to a non-Newtonian power-law fluid flow past a continuously moving flat porous plate in the presence of sucion/injection with heat flux by taking into consideration the viscous dissipation is analysed. The non-linear partial differential equations governing the flow and heat transfer are transformed into non-linear ordinary differential equations using appropriate transformations and then solved numerically by an implicit finite difference scheme. The solution is found to be dependent on various governing parameters including the magnetic field parameter M, power-law index n, suction/injection parameter ƒw, Prandtl number Pr and Eckert number Ec. A systematical study is carried out to illustrate the effects of these major parameters on the velocity profiles, temperature profile, skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer and the local Nusslet number.

  6. Effect of ion slip on the time-varying Hartmann flow of a non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.; Abdeen, M. A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Ion slip in a time-varying Hartmann flow of a conducting incompressible non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid between two parallel horizontal insulating porous plates is studied with allowance for heat transfer. A uniform and constant pressure gradient is applied in the axial direction. An external uniform magnetic field and uniform suction and injection through the surface of the plates are applied in the normal direction. The two plates are maintained at different but constant temperatures; the Joule and viscous dissipations are taken into consideration. Numerical solutions for the governing momentum and energy equations are obtained with the use of finite differences, and the effect of various physical parameters on both the velocity and temperature fields is discussed.

  7. Effect of variable viscosity on free flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids along a vertical surface with thermal stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, M. B. K.; Senthilvadivu, K.

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of thermal stratification together with variable viscosity on free convection flow of non- Newtonian fluids along a nonisothermal semi infinite vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium. The governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and then solved by using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method along with shooting technique. Governing parameters for the problem under study are the variable viscosity, thermal stratification parameter, non-Newtonian parameter and the power-law index parameter.The velocity and temperature distributions are presented and discussed. The Nusselt number is also derived and discussed numerically.

  8. Mantle plumes - A boundary layer approach for Newtonian and non-Newtonian temperature-dependent rheologies. [modeling for island chains and oceanic aseismic ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, D. A.; Schubert, G.

    1976-01-01

    Stress is placed on the temperature dependence of both a linear Newtonian rheology and a nonlinear olivine rheology in accounting for narrow mantle flow structures. The boundary-layer theory developed incorporates an arbitrary temperature-dependent power-law rheology for the medium, in order to facilitate the study of mantle plume dynamics under real conditions. Thermal, kinematic, and dynamic structures of mantle plumes are modelled by a two-dimensional natural-convection boundary layer rising in a fluid with a temperature-dependent power-law relationship between shear stress and strain rate. An analytic similarity solution is arrived at for upwelling adjacent to a vertical isothermal stress-free plane. Newtonian creep as a deformation mechanism, thermal anomalies resulting from chemical heterogeneity, the behavior of plumes in non-Newtonian (olivine) mantles, and differences in the dynamics of wet and dry olivine are discussed.

  9. Spreading of Thin Droplets of Perfect and Leaky Dielectric Liquids on Inclined Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Andrew; Kumar, Satish

    2016-07-01

    The spreading of droplets may be influenced by electric fields, a situation that is relevant to applications such as coating, printing, and microfluidics. In this work we study the effects of an electric field on the gravity-driven spreading of two-dimensional droplets down an inclined plane. We consider both perfect and leaky dielectric liquids, as well as perfectly and partially wetting systems. In addition to the effects of electric fields, we examine the use of thermocapillary forces to suppress the growth of the capillary ridge near the droplet front. Lubrication theory is applied to generate a set of coupled partial differential equations for interfacial height and charge, which are then solved numerically with a finite-difference method. Electric fields increase the height of the capillary ridge in both perfect and leaky dielectric droplets due to electrostatic pressure gradients that drive liquid into the ridge. In leaky dielectrics, large interfacial charge gradients in the contact-line region create shear stresses that also enhance ridge growth and the formation of trailing minor ridges. The coalescence of these ridges can significantly affect the long-time thinning rate of leaky dielectric droplets. In partially wetting liquids, electric fields promote the splitting of smaller droplets from the primary droplet near the receding contact line due to the interplay between electrostatic forces and disjoining pressure. Cooling from below and heating from above generates thermocapillary forces that counteract the effects of electric fields and suppress the growth of the capillary ridge. The results of this work have important implications for manipulating the spreading of droplets down inclined surfaces. PMID:27247998

  10. Postglacial Rebound With Non-newtonian Rheology: A Revisitation In The Light Of A Composite Flow Law And An Exhaustive Exploration Of Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dal Forno, G.; Gasperini, P.

    The great majority of postglacial rebound computations carried out in the last three decades indicate a purely linear stress-strain relation to be the most suitable to de- scribe mantle behavior at the glacial cycle time-scale. Only recently, some studies have shown the allowance of wide non-linear portions inside the mantle (Wu, 1995; 1999) but still have confirmed the incompatibility of Relative Sea Level (RSL) data with a non-linear rheology extended to the whole mantle. These results disagree somehow with most experimental data on high-temperature creep properties of relevant mate- rials and modeling of other tectonic processes that generally support the hypothesis of a non-newtonian flow-law. To investigate on this apparent contradiction, we have employed an axially symmetric finite-elements model of the mantle with a composite rheology consisting of the combination of the linear viscoelastic Maxwell body rela- tion and the power-law creep equation. According to microphysical experimental data (Ranalli, 1998), the transition stress T has been brought into the rheological relation to manage the interaction between the Newtonian term and the non-Newtonian one. As other tectonic processes influence mantle stress conditions, we have considered also the role of background (ambient) stress B modeled as an additive term to the second invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor. By varying T between 0.01 and 2 MPa and B between 0.01 and 3 MPa, we have tested our composite model with respect to a purely linear mantle model comparing the observed and predicted time sequences of RSL variations for 129 North American sites (Tushingham and Peltier, 1992). We found that, for a wide range of and values, the composite model fits the RSL data-set better than the purely linear model although the data and modeling uncertainties do not allow to definitely exclude the purely linear hypothesis.

  11. Gas-Non-Newtonian liquid flow through helical coils—pressure drop and CFD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, T. K.; Biswas, A. B.; Das, S. K.

    2010-10-01

    The problem of determining the pressure losses in helical coil is important in design and analysis of the fluid machinery. It is well known that when a fluid flows through a curved pipe, the flow pattern becomes more complex than that of a straight pipe because of the generation of secondary flows due to the interaction between centrifugal and viscous forces. To understand the interaction between the two-phase gas- non-Newtonian liquid flow through helical coil tube, hydrodynamic modeling is being performed with a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code—FLUENT 6.3. The modeling has attempted to describe the results of flow visualization experiments performed in transparent helical coil tube. Both phases are first treated separately as homogeneous. Coupling is achieved through pressure and interphase exchange coefficients. Multiphase model Eulerian-Eulerian, viscous non-Newtonian laminar power law model is used to describe the interaction between the phases. The CFD modeling is compared with the experimental data.

  12. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  13. Experimental investigation of non-Newtonian/Newtonian liquid-liquid flow in microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumpea, Eynagelia-Panagiota; Weheliye, Weheliye; Chinaud, Maxime; Angeli, Panagiota; Lyes Kahouadji Collaboration; Omar. K. Matar Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Plug flow of an organic phase and an aqueous non-Newtonian solution was investigated experimentally in a quartz microchannel with I.D. 200 μm. The aqueous phase was a glycerol solution where 1000 and 2000 ppm of xanthan gum was added while the organic phase was silicon oil with 155 and 5 cSt viscosity. The two phases were brought together in a T-junction and their flowrates varied from 0.3 to 6 ml/hr. High speed imaging was used to study the characteristics of the plugs and the effect of the liquid properties on the flow patterns while a two-colour micro-PIV technique was used to investigate velocity profiles and circulation patterns within the plugs. The experimental results revealed that plug length was affected by both flowrate and viscosity. In all cases investigated, a film of the continuous phase always surrounded the plugs and its thickness was compared with existing literature models. Circulation patterns inside plugs were obtained by subtracting the plug velocity and found to be depended on the plug length and the amount of xanthan gum in the aqueous phase. Finally, the dimensionless circulation time was calculated and plotted as a function of the plug length. Department of Chemical Engineering South Kensington Campus Imperial College London SW7 2AZ.

  14. Liquid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayvel, L.; Orzechowski, Z.

    The present text defines the physical processes of liquid atomization, the primary types of atomizers and their design, and ways of measuring spray characteristics; it also presents experimental investigation results on atomizers and illustrative applications for them. Attention is given to the macrostructural and microstructural parameters of atomized liquids; swirl, pneumatic, and rotary atomizers; and optical drop sizing methods, with emphasis on nonintrusive optical methods.

  15. Plasticity in the Supercooled Liquid Region of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T G; Wadsworth, J; Liu, C T; Ice, G E

    2000-10-30

    Intensive efforts have been carried out over the past decade to develop means to slow down the phase transformation kinetics during the forming of metallic glasses. As a result of these efforts, some metallic glasses can now be fabricated in bulk forms (BMG) from the liquid state at cooling rates on the order of 1-10 K/s, which is close to that of conventional casting. This enables the production of bulk amorphous alloys with a thickness of {approx}10 mm. While advances in amorphous metallic alloy development have been impressive, they have been made largely through experience [1]. Three main conclusions drawn from this study are: (1) Bulk metallic glasses generally have excellent mechanical formability in the supercooled liquid region. (2) Bulk metallic glasses may not be necessarily behave like a Newtonian fluid (i.e. m=1). The non-Newtonian behavior is associated with glass instability during deformation. (3) Multi-component Bulk metallic glasses can be used as the precursor of a nanocrystalline solid. However, the nanocrystalline solid is not necessarily superplastic. The non-superplastic behavior is caused by the difficult strain accommodation at grain triple junctions.

  16. Two-phase, gas-liquid flows in static mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.F.; Kale, D.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that static mixers are used for many gas-liquid two-phase operations. some of the typical applications are processing of natural gas to remove hydrogen sulfide or carbon dioxide, waste water treatment, dissolution of gases, hydrogenation, chlorination, and so on. They have experimentally studied the pressure drop for oxygen-water system in a bubble column packed with Sulzer-Koch-type mixing elements. They observed that the ratio of pressure drop through the packed bubble column to that through the unpacked one was slightly greater than one. The suitability of static mixers to mix fluids of very widely different viscosities has been demonstrated. Two-phase operations in polymer industry involve very viscous fluids. Due to the high viscosity of these fluids, the flow will be predominantly in laminar region for both fluids. There are no data on gas-liquid two-phase systems incorporating viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids where flows are predominantly in laminar region.

  17. Liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussillous, Pascale; Quéré, David

    2001-06-01

    The transport of a small amount of liquid on a solid is not a simple process, owing to the nature of the contact between the two phases. Setting a liquid droplet in motion requires non-negligible forces (because the contact-angle hysteresis generates a force opposing the motion), and often results in the deposition of liquid behind the drop. Different methods of levitation-electrostatic, electromagnetic, acoustic, or even simpler aerodynamic techniques-have been proposed to avoid this wetting problem, but all have proved to be rather cumbersome. Here we propose a simple alternative, which consists of encapsulating an aqueous liquid droplet with a hydrophobic powder. The resulting `liquid marbles' are found to behave like a soft solid, and show dramatically reduced adhesion to a solid surface. As a result, motion can be generated using gravitational, electrical and magnetic fields. Moreover, because the viscous friction associated with motion is very small, we can achieve quick displacements of the droplets without any leaks. All of these features are of potential benefit in microfluidic applications, and also permit the study of a drop in a non-wetting situation-an issue of renewed interest following the recent achievement of super-hydrophobic substrates.

  18. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  19. Liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Aussillous, P; Quéré, D

    2001-06-21

    The transport of a small amount of liquid on a solid is not a simple process, owing to the nature of the contact between the two phases. Setting a liquid droplet in motion requires non-negligible forces (because the contact-angle hysteresis generates a force opposing the motion), and often results in the deposition of liquid behind the drop. Different methods of levitation-electrostatic, electromagnetic, acoustic, or even simpler aerodynamic techniques-have been proposed to avoid this wetting problem, but all have proved to be rather cumbersome. Here we propose a simple alternative, which consists of encapsulating an aqueous liquid droplet with a hydrophobic powder. The resulting 'liquid marbles' are found to behave like a soft solid, and show dramatically reduced adhesion to a solid surface. As a result, motion can be generated using gravitational, electrical and magnetic fields. Moreover, because the viscous friction associated with motion is very small, we can achieve quick displacements of the droplets without any leaks. All of these features are of potential benefit in microfluidic applications, and also permit the study of a drop in a non-wetting situation-an issue of renewed interest following the recent achievement of super-hydrophobic substrates. PMID:11418851

  20. Macromolecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Safinya, C.R.; Safran, S.A. ); Pincus, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Liquids include a broad range of material systems which are of high scientific and technological interest. Generally speaking, these are partially ordered or disordered phases where the individual molecular species have organized themselves on length scales which are larger than simple fluids, typically between 10 Angstroms and several microns. The specific systems reported on in this book include membranes, microemulsions, micelles, liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions, and polymers. They have a major impact on a broad spectrum of technological industries such as displays, plastics, soap and detergents, chemicals and petroleum, and pharmaceuticals.

  1. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  2. A CFD study of steady flow of a Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid through a mildly curved tube with stent-like wall protrusions patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, Chekema; Peterson, Sean D.

    2012-11-01

    Early stent designs caused vessel straightening post-implantation and motivated the exploration of flow in the stent vicinity using straight pipe models with stent-like protrusion patterns. Recent advancements in stent design allow the device to better conform to the native vessel curvature. The present study focuses on the investigation of steady flow through mildly curved pipes with protrusion patterns that emulate current stent designs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The modeled geometries include various protrusion frequencies, heights, and widths with flow behavior within the range of physiologically relevant Dean numbers. The results are compared to smooth wall curved pipe models as well as straight pipe protrusion studies. Differences in flow behavior pre/post stent implantation will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to flow characteristics, such as wall shear stress (WSS) magnitude and WSS gradients, indicative of potential stent failure. Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models will be utilized to discuss their impact on flow patterns. The study findings can be used to optimize stent design to mitigate flow conditions associated with stent failure.

  3. The effect of shear and extensional viscosities on atomization of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in ultrasonic inhaler.

    PubMed

    Broniarz-Press, L; Sosnowski, T R; Matuszak, M; Ochowiak, M; Jabłczyńska, K

    2015-05-15

    The paper contains results of the experimental study on atomization process of aqueous solutions of glycerol and aqueous solutions of glycerol-polyacrylamide (Rokrysol WF1) in an ultrasonic inhaler. In experiments the different concentration aqueous solutions of glycerol and glycerol-polyacrylamide have been tested. The results have been obtained by the use of laser diffraction technique. The differences between characteristics of ultrasonic atomization for test liquids have been observed. The analysis of drop size histograms shows that the different sizes of drops have been formed during atomization process. The present study confirmed the previous reports which suggested that the drops size changes with the increase in viscosity of solution changes in spray characteristics were also observed. It has been shown that the shear and extensional viscosities affect the process of atomization. PMID:25735665

  4. Microemulsion to liquid crystal transition in two anionic surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, J.L.; Miller, C.A.

    1988-08-01

    The phase behavior of two anionic surfactant systems, one containing a commercial alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS) and the other containing pure sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was determined in the region where a transition from microemulsion to liquid-crystalline phases occurred with decreasing alcohol content and temperature. A general and rather complex pattern of phase behavior was seen that included a four-phase coexistence region of brine, microemulsion, lamellar liquid crystal, and oil, and two three-phase regions containing both microemulsion and liquid crystal. In much of the four-phase region, complete separation of the phases did not occur even after equilibration for 1 year or more at constant temperature. Instead, oil and brine were observed to coexist with stable birefringent dispersions that (for some compositions at least) apparently contained three phases: microemulsion, liquid crystal, and oil. Solubilization of brine was uniformly low in the phases making up the dispersions. The dispersions in the SDS system exhibited non-Newtonian behavior with apparent viscosities in the range of 50 to 100 mPa . s (50 to 100 cp) at a shear rate of 10 seconds/sup -1/. Microemulsion viscosities in the same system were about an order of magnitude lower. No plugging or other adverse behavior was seen when such dispersions flowed at a velocity of 10/sup -5/ m/s (3 ft/D) through a model porous medium having pore sizes comparable with those in reservoirs. In preliminary experiments, selected dispersions appeared to be capable of displacing oil from the same model porous medium.

  5. Colloidal-Particle Monolayers at Liquid Interfaces: Capsules, Membranes and Functional Electronic Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinsmore, A. D.; McGorty, R.; Edmond, K. V.; Knutson, C. R.; Soyler, S. G.; Marquez, M.

    2004-11-01

    The interface between two liquids, as on the surface of a water droplet in oil, provides a versatile platform for self assembly of functional membranes, capsules, and other devices composed of colloidal particles. Owing to the large liquid interfacial tension, nanometer-to-micron-sized particles in either liquid readily adsorb at the interface, forming a densely packed monolayer. In this way, a shell of cross-linked particles is constructed around water droplets containing nutrients, drugs or, potentially, living cells. The resulting elastic capsules are transferred directly to a continuous aqueous solution, allowing diffusive permeation of macromolecules and small particles while encapsulating the larger objects. Moreover, liquid structures of cylindrical shape are formed by hydrodynamic focusing of a non-Newtonian aqueous solution; these are used as platforms for interfacial assembly. Finally, the assembly of ligand-stabilized nanoparticles on the surfaces of electrically conducting droplets in insulating oil leads to functional electronic devices, including single-electron transistors. We gratefully acknowledge support from Kraft Foods, Inc.

  6. Liquid atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Walzel, P. )

    1993-01-01

    A systematic review of different liquid atomizers is presented, accompanied by a discussion of various mechanisms of droplet formation in a gas atmosphere as a function of the liquid flow-regime and the geometry of the atomizer. Equations are presented for the calculation of the mean droplet-diameter. In many applications, details of the droplet size distribution are, also, important, e.g., approximate values of the breadth of the droplet formation are given. The efficiency of utilization of mechanical energy in droplet formation is indicated for the different types of atomizers. Atomization is used, in particular, for the following purposes: (1) atomization of fuels; (2) making granular products; (3) carrying out mass-transfer operations; and (4) coating of surfaces.

  7. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  8. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  9. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  10. Liquid density analysis of sucrose and alcoholic beverages using polyimide guided Love-mode acoustic wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turton, Andrew; Bhattacharyya, Debabrata; Wood, David

    2006-02-01

    A liquid density sensor using Love-mode acoustic waves has been developed which is suitable for use in the food and drinks industries. The sensor has an open flat surface allowing immersion into a sample and simple cleaning. A polyimide waveguide layer allows cheap and simple fabrication combined with a robust chemically resistant surface. The low shear modulus of polyimide allows thin guiding layers giving a high sensitivity. A dual structure with a smooth reference device exhibiting viscous coupling with the wave, and a patterned sense area to trap the liquid causing mass loading, allows discrimination of the liquid density from the square root of the density-viscosity product (ρη)0.5. Frequency shift and insertion loss change were proportional to (ρη)0.5 with a non-linear response due to the non-Newtonian nature of viscous liquids at high frequencies. Measurements were made with sucrose solutions up to 50% and different alcoholic drinks. A maximum sensitivity of 0.13 µg cm-3 Hz-1 was achieved, with a linear frequency response to density. This is the highest liquid density sensitivity obtained for acoustic mode sensors to the best of our knowledge.

  11. Computationally and experimentally assessed gravity-driven, mono- and bidisperse, particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shreyas; Huang, Kaiwen; Hin, Matt; Urdaneta, Gilberto; Mavromoustaki, Aliki; Wong, Jeffrey; Lee, Sungyon; Bertozzi, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    We present an experimental study which investigates the motion of granular materials in mono- and bi-disperse suspensions consisting of silicone oil, glass and ceramic beads. The beads are of distinct densities both denser than the oil but of approximately the same size. A finite volume of slurry is allowed to flow down an inclined plane and the subsequent flow development is recorded. The system parameters are the angle of inclination, the total particle concentration and the relative amount of heavy (ceramic) to light (glass) beads. Similarly to the results observed in previous studies of mono-disperse slurry flows, in bidisperse suspensions, there exist two stable flow regimes: the first one involves settling of particles to the substrate while, in the second one, the particles aggregate at the front of the flow. We carry out a series of experiments to investigate the effect of system parameters on the resulting flow regime patterns and compare our results with a theoretical model which incorporates the effects of shear-induced migration and sedimentation in bidisperse suspensions of negatively buoyant particles. Further, we use fluorescent particle beads to compare the particle spatio-temporal evolution observed in experiments against numerical simulations.

  12. Influence of gravity driven convection on the directional solidification of Bi/MnBi eutectic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, R. G.; Larson, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The role of gravity on Bridgman-Stockharger directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi has been studied in reduced gravity aboard NASA sounding rocket SPAR flight experiments and contrasted with normal gravity investigations. The directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi results in a low volume fraction, faceted/nonfaceted aligned rod eutectic whose MnBi rod size, interrod spacing, thermal and magnetic properties are sensitive functions of solidification processing conditions. The morphology of the low-gravity samples showed striking differences compared with identically processed, normal gravity samples grown in the same apparatus. The MnBi rod diameter and interrod spacing distributions were significantly smaller, approximately 50 percent, for the low gravity samples compared with identically processed one gravity samples. Accompanying the smaller MnBi rod diameters observed in the flight samples, was an increase in permanent magnet properties which reached greater than 97 percent of the theoretical maximum. Gravitationally induced thermal instabilities in one-gravity which result in irregular interface movement and associated difficulty of the faceted MnBi phase to branch are suggested to explain the morphological differences between one and low gravity solidification.

  13. Gravity-driven deformation of Tenerife measured by InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J.; Tizzani, P.; Manzo, M.; Borgia, A.; González, P. J.; Martí, J.; Pepe, A.; Camacho, A. G.; Casu, F.; Berardino, P.; Prieto, J. F.; Lanari, R.

    2009-02-01

    We study the state of deformation of Tenerife (Canary Islands) using Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR). We apply the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) DInSAR algorithm to radar images acquired from 1992 to 2005 by the ERS sensors to determine the deformation rate distribution and the time series for the coherent pixels identified in the island. Our analysis reveals that the summit area of the volcanic edifice is characterized by a rather continuous subsidence extending well beyond Las Cañadas caldera rim and corresponding to the dense core of the island. These results, coupled with GPS ones, structural and geological information and deformation modeling, suggest an interpretation based on the gravitational sinking of the dense core of the island into a weak lithosphere and that the volcanic edifice is in a state of compression. We also detect more localized deformation patterns correlated with water table changes and variations in the deformation time series associated with the seismic crisis in 2004.

  14. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array

    PubMed Central

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams. PMID:27526935

  15. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    PubMed

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams. PMID:27526935

  16. Simulation of gravity driven free-surface flow in fractured geological media

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Geyer, Tobias; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-08-25

    Abstract—Simulation of unsaturated free-surface flow in fractured geological media represents a challenge due to the highly heterogeneous flow field induced by extensive faults, joints and fissures. Free-surface flow in unsaturated media leads to highly intermittent flow regimes and flow velocities well above those assumed for the bulk volume. However, common modeling approaches relying on volume-averaged effective equations fail to capture this flow feature. In this work we present micro-scale flow simulations using a three-dimensional multiphase SPH code. Pairwise fluid-fluid and solid-fluid interaction forces are used to simulate a wide range of wetting conditions encountered on rock surfaces. It is shown that static contact angles for sessiles droplets are independent of the model discretization, i.e. the total amount of particles. Thus, computation times can be reduced without sacrificing qualitative or quantitative information. Furthermore we show that our model is in accordance with general scaling laws for droplet flow.

  17. Density, topography, and regional, tensile stresses: Gravity-driven extension of the northern Basin and range

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    It has long been recognized that regional topographic gradients may give rise to tectonic (non-lithostatic) stresses in the lithosphere (Artyushkov, 1973). The elevation of a buoyantly-uplifted region represents a balance between these stresses and the strength of the lithosphere. This study uses existing data on crustal and lithospheric structure in the western United States to test the hypothesis that the topographically high (1.5--2.2 km) northern Basin and Range is spreading under it own weight. Following England and Jackson (1989), the total deviatoric tensile force (Fl) in the northern Basin and Range (NBR) due to the regional high topography is the difference between the vertically-integrated lithostatic stress in the NBR and in western California. Using available velocity models for the crust and upper mantle, and empirically-derived velocity-density relationships, calculated values of Fl range between 1--3 [times] 10[sup 12] N/m. Assuming a visco-elastic rheology for the lithosphere, an average heat flow of 90 m W/m[sup 2], and a crustal thickness of 35 km, values of Fl ranging from 1--3 [times] 10[sup 12] N/m may result in horizontal extension rates of approximately 10[sup [minus]15]/s to 10[sup [minus]15]/s to 10[sup [minus]16]/s. This is comparable to the rate of seismically-released strain in the NBR, and to extension rates of 8--9 mm/yr across the region determined from geologic and geodetic data. These results imply that shear tractions on the base of the lithosphere from mantle convection are not necessary to explain NBR extension. In addition to driving active extension, the weight of the topographically high NBR may exert a compressive force on surrounding lowlands. If so, this may account for some of the active shortening in western California, and the state of horizontal compressive stress in the western Great Plains.

  18. Gravity-Driven Enhancement of Heavy Particle Clustering in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, Jérémie; Homann, Holger; Ray, Samriddhi Sankar

    2014-05-01

    Heavy particles suspended in a turbulent flow settle faster than in a still fluid. This effect stems from a preferential sampling of the regions where the fluid flows downward and is quantified here as a function of the level of turbulence, of particle inertia, and of the ratio between gravity and turbulent accelerations. By using analytical methods and detailed, state-of-the-art numerical simulations, settling is shown to induce an effective horizontal two-dimensional dynamics that increases clustering and reduce relative velocities between particles. These two competing effects can either increase or decrease the geometrical collision rates between same-size particles and are crucial for realistic modeling of coalescing particles.

  19. A dielectrophoretic-gravity driven particle focusing technique for digital microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiei, Ehsan; Rezaei Nejad, Hojatollah; Hoorfar, Mina

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, a particle focusing technique functioning based on the cumulative effects of gravity and negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) is developed for digital microfluidic (DMF) systems. This technique works using the conventional electrodes used for droplet manipulation without a need for geometrical modification. Particle manipulation is performed by applying an AC voltage to the electrode above which there is the droplet containing the non-buoyant particles. The particles sediment due to the difference between the gravitational and the vertical component of the nDEP forces, while the horizontal component of the nDEP force concentrates them on the center of the electrode. Therefore, the magnitude of the voltage must be kept within an effective range to have simultaneous effects of sedimentation (dominated by gravity) and concentration (due to the horizontal component of the nDEP force). The physics of the phenomenon is explained using simulation. The effects of the magnitude of the applied voltage, the particle size and density, and the electrode size on the focusing behavior of the particles are studied. Finally, a potential application of the present technique is illustrated for particle concentration in DMF.

  20. The Role of Testimony in Young Children's Solution of a Gravity-Driven Invisible Displacement Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bascandziev, Igor; Harris, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that young children make a perseverative, gravity-oriented, error when asked to predict the final location of a ball dropped down an S-shaped opaque tube (Hood, 1995). We asked if providing children with verbal information concerning the role that the tubes play, in determining the ball's trajectory would improve their…

  1. Gravity-driven instability in a spherical Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, José A.; Parisio, Fernando; Moraes, Fernando; Widom, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A pair of concentric spheres separated by a small gap form a spherical Hele-Shaw cell. In this cell an interfacial instability arises when two immiscible fluids flow. We derive the equation of motion for the interface perturbation amplitudes, including both pressure and gravity drivings, using a mode coupling approach. Linear stability analysis shows that mode growth rates depend upon interface perimeter and gravitational force. Mode coupling analysis reveals the formation of fingering structures presenting a tendency toward finger tip-sharpening.

  2. Interaction contributions in thermal conductivity of three-dimensional complex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2013-07-01

    This work generalizes Evans' homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (HNEMD) algorithm for computing the thermal conductivity of strongly-coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs) described by the Yukawa potential. The effects of external field strength along with different screening strengths on the conductivity of Yukawa liquids have investigated using HNEMD simulations. We have carried out some more linear and nonlinear molecular dynamics calculations of the thermal conductivity, and the obtained simulation results of SCCDPLs are presented for various plasma coupling and screening parameters. Our calculations show that Yukawa liquid exhibits a non-Newtonian behavior that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing field strength which explains interaction contributions in Yukawa conductivity, for the first time. The simulation results obtained with different external filed strengths are in reasonable agreement with earlier simulation results and with reference set of data showed deviations within less than ±10% for most of the present data point. It is shown that new simulations extended the range of field strength (0.001≤F*≤0.1) used in the earlier studies in order to find out the size of the linear regimes and to explain the nature of nonlinearity of SCCDPLs.

  3. Cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss model for horizontal narrow annular flow with rotating drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofei, T. N.; Irawan, S.; Pao, W.

    2015-04-01

    During oil and gas drilling operations, frictional pressure loss is experienced as the drilling fluid transports the drilled cuttings from the bottom-hole, through the annulus, to the surface. Estimation of these pressure losses is critical when designing the drilling hydraulic program. Two-phase frictional pressure loss in the annulus is very difficult to predict, and even more complex when there is drillpipe rotation. Accurate prediction will ensure that the correct equivalent circulating density (ECD) is applied in the wellbore to prevent formation fracture, especially in formations with narrow window between the pore pressure and fracture gradient. Few researchers have attempted to propose cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models, nevertheless, these models fail when they are applied to narrow wellbores such as in casing- while-drilling and slimhole applications. This study proposes improved cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models for narrow horizontal annuli with drillpipe rotation using Dimensional Analysis. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were considered. The proposed model constants were fitted by generated data from a full-scale simulation study using ANSYS-CFX. The models showed improvement over existing cuttings-liquid pressure loss correlations in literature.

  4. Rheology and thermal budget of lunar basalts: an experimental study and its implications for rille formation of non-Newtonian lavas on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, A.; Whittington, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    the heat capacity of crystal-bearing glasses (representing erodible solid substrate) and the heat released during lava crystallization at different cooling rates measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The rheological and thermal properties will then be integrated into thermo-mechanical models of rille formation in non-Newtonian lavas on the lunar surface.

  5. Drop interaction with solid boundaries in liquid/liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep

    The present experimental work was motivated primarily by the CO 2 sequestration process. In a possible scenario during this process, gravity driven CO2 bubbles coalesce at an interface near the rock surface. In another scenario, trapped CO2 fluid may escape from a porous matrix overcoming interfacial force inside a pore. Based on these potential scenarios, the current research was divided into two broad experimental studies. In the first part, coalescence at a quiescent interface of two analogous fluids (silicone oil and water/glycerin mixture) was investigated for water/glycerin drops with Bond number (Bo) ~7 and Ohnesorge number ~ 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic PIV. Two perturbation cases with a solid particle wetted in oil and water/glycerin placed adjacent to the coalescing drop were considered. The results were compared with coalescence of a single drop and that of a drop neighBored by a second drop of equivalent size. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location, subsequent film retraction and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The trends in local retraction speed of the ruptured film and the overall dynamics of the collapsing drops were discussed in detail. In the second part, the motion of gravity driven drops (B o~0.8-11) through a confining orifice d/D<1) was studied using high speed imaging and planar PIV. Drops of water/glycerin, surrounded by silicone oil, fall toward and encounter the orifice plate after reaching terminal speed. The effects of surface wettability were investigated for Both round-edged and sharp-edged orifices. For the round-edged case, a thin film of surrounding oil prevented the drop fluid from contacting the orifice surface, such that the flow outcomes of the drops were independent of surface

  6. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  7. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  8. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  9. Liquid supercoiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil; Habibi, Mehdi; Hosseini, Hossein; Hassan Khatami, Mohammad

    2011-11-01

    Supercoiling is defined as the large-scale secondary coiling of a slender body that is already coiled at a smaller scale (e.g., telephone cords and DNA strands). We demonstrate experimentally a novel fluid-mechanical form of supercoiling that occurs in the context of the familiar ``liquid rope coiling'' instability of a thin thread of viscous fluid falling onto a rigid surface. Under appropriate conditions, the coiling instability generates a tall pile of coils in the form of a hollow cylindrical column, which in turn becomes unstable to a secondary coiling instability with a frequency ~ 10 % of the primary one. To place this phenomenon in a broader context, we determine experimentally the phase diagram for the different possible behaviors of the thread (stagnation flow, simple coiling, rotatory folding, periodic column collapse, supercoiling) in the space of the fluid viscosity, the flow rate, and the fall height. We formulate a mathematical model for supercoiling by combining a thin-shell description of the column wall with a slender-thread description of the column as a whole. This leads to a set of coupled ordinary differential equations in one space dimension (the arclength along the axis of the coiling column) that we solve numerically using a continuation method. A comparison of the predicted and observed frequencies of secondary coiling will be shown.

  10. Liquid annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, Hans

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the specific impulse varies with the square root of the temperature and inversely with the square root of the molecular weight of the propellant. Typical values for specific impulse corresponding to various rocket concepts are shown. The Liquid Annulus core concept consists of a fuel element which will be arranged in a moderator block. The advantages as seen for the system are: high specific impulse; structural material will all run at low temperature; and lower fission product inventory because of evaporation. It is felt that this concept is worth at least a first look because of the promise of very high specific impulse. Because of the low thrust, one would probably need a cluster of engines. This is not necessarily bad because there would be some redundancy, but because of the low thrust one might have to refuel while running. Depending on the fuel vaporization, material can be included in the uranium that is injected as one is running along.

  11. Minimizing liquid contaminants in natural gas liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Wines, T.H.; Williamson, K.M.

    1996-12-31

    In processing natural gas liquids, significant contamination occurs with liquid dispersions and emulsions. Natural gas liquids (NGL) and liquid petroleum gas (LPG) streams are treated with caustic to remove residual organic sulfur compounds such as mercaptans and with amines to remove hydrogen sulfide. In both cases a liquid/liquid contactor is used. Significant amounts of the caustic or amine can be carried over into the product stream in process units that are running at rates above design capacity, are treating high sulfur feed stocks, or have other operational problems. The carried over liquid results in off-spec products, excessive loses of caustic or amine, and can cause operating problems in downstream processes. In addition, water is a significant contaminant which can cause LPG and natural gasoline to be off-specification. This paper discusses a new technique for separating very stable liquid dispersions of caustic, amine, or water from natural gas liquids using liquid/liquid cartridge coalescers constructed with specially formulated polymer and fluoropolymer medium with enhanced surface properties. In addition, factors influencing the coalescer mechanism will be discussed including interfacial tension, concentration of surface active compounds, steric repulsion, and electrostatic charge affects. Results from field tests, operating data from commercial installations, and economic benefits will also be presented.

  12. Effect of storage duration on the rheological properties of goose liquid egg products and eggshell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kumbar, V; Nedomova, S; Trnka, J; Buchar, J; Pytel, R

    2016-07-01

    In practice, goose eggs are increasingly used and, therefore, the rheological properties have to be known for processing. The eggs of geese (Landes Goose, Anser anser f. domestica) were stored for one, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 wk at a constant temperature 4°C. First of all, the egg quality parameters were described in terms of egg weight, egg weight loss, egg shape index, yolk height, albumen height, yolk index, albumen index, and Haugh units. In the next step the rheological behavior of liquid egg products (egg yolk, albumen, and whole liquid egg) was studied using a concentric cylinder viscometer. Flow curves of all liquid egg products exhibited non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. This behavior can be described using the Herschel-Bulkley model and for technical application using the Ostwald-de Waele model. The effect of the storage duration on the rheological behavior is different for the different liquid egg products. With the exception of very low shear rates, the viscosity of the egg yolk as well as of the whole liquid egg decreases with storage time. At lower shear rates there is a tendency toward increased albumen viscosity with storage duration. The storage duration also affects the mechanical properties of the eggshell membrane. This effect has been evaluated in terms of the ultimate tensile strength, fracture strain, and fracture toughness. All these parameters increased with the loading rate, but decreased during the egg storage. These mechanical phenomena should be respected, namely in the design of the egg model for the numerical simulation of the egg behavior under different kinds of the mechanical loading. PMID:26994202

  13. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  14. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  15. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  16. Highly Stable Liquid Metal-Based Pressure Sensor Integrated with a Microfluidic Channel

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Taekeon; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Pressure measurement is considered one of the key parameters in microfluidic systems. It has been widely used in various fields, such as in biology and biomedical fields. The electrical measurement method is the most widely investigated; however, it is unsuitable for microfluidic systems because of a complicated fabrication process and difficult integration. Moreover, it is generally damaged by large deflection. This paper proposes a thin-film-based pressure sensor that is free from these limitations, using a liquid metal called galinstan. The proposed pressure sensor is easily integrated into a microfluidic system using soft lithography because galinstan exists in a liquid phase at room temperature. We investigated the characteristics of the proposed pressure sensor by calibrating for a pressure range from 0 to 230 kPa (R2 > 0.98) using deionized water. Furthermore, the viscosity of various fluid samples was measured for a shear-rate range of 30–1000 s−1. The results of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were evaluated using a commercial viscometer and normalized difference was found to be less than 5.1% and 7.0%, respectively. The galinstan-based pressure sensor can be used in various microfluidic systems for long-term monitoring with high linearity, repeatability, and long-term stability. PMID:26007732

  17. The rheological properties of bamboo cellulose pulp/ionic liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. F.; Zhang, P. R.; Wu, J.; Jia, Q. X.; Liu, X. Y.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, two kinds of spinning solutions were prepared by dissolving bamboo cellulose pulp into 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazole chloride salt ([EMIM] Cl) and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazole diethyl phosphate salt ([BMIM]DEP) ionic liquids, respectively. Furthermore, the rotational rheometer was used to test the steady-state rheological properties of above as-prepared spinning solutions. The research results show that both of these two ionic liquids exhibit better solubility to the bamboo cellulose pulp. The apparent viscosities(ηa) decrease with the increased temperature(T) and shear rate(γ) and increase with the increased concentration. The non-Newtonian index(n) declined with the increase of both shear rate and concentration, as well as increased with the build-up temperature. The structural viscosity index(Δη) increased with the increased concentration and tended to decrease with temperature rise. Meanwhile, viscous flow activation energy(Eη) decreases with the increased share rate as well as the concentration. According to the results, it can be seen that the bamboo cellulose pulp/[EMIM]Cl with the concentration of 6% at 70°C exhibits better spinnability.

  18. Highly stable liquid metal-based pressure sensor integrated with a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Jung, Taekeon; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Pressure measurement is considered one of the key parameters in microfluidic systems. It has been widely used in various fields, such as in biology and biomedical fields. The electrical measurement method is the most widely investigated; however, it is unsuitable for microfluidic systems because of a complicated fabrication process and difficult integration. Moreover, it is generally damaged by large deflection. This paper proposes a thin-film-based pressure sensor that is free from these limitations, using a liquid metal called galinstan. The proposed pressure sensor is easily integrated into a microfluidic system using soft lithography because galinstan exists in a liquid phase at room temperature. We investigated the characteristics of the proposed pressure sensor by calibrating for a pressure range from 0 to 230 kPa (R2 > 0.98) using deionized water. Furthermore, the viscosity of various fluid samples was measured for a shear-rate range of 30-1000 s(-1). The results of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were evaluated using a commercial viscometer and normalized difference was found to be less than 5.1% and 7.0%, respectively. The galinstan-based pressure sensor can be used in various microfluidic systems for long-term monitoring with high linearity, repeatability, and long-term stability. PMID:26007732

  19. SUCCESSES AND EMERGING ISSUES IN SIMULATING THE MIXING BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID-PARTICLE NUCLEAR WASTE SLURRIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 211B

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Aqueous radioactive high-level waste slurries are combined during processing steps that ultimately produce a stable borosilicate glass waste form. Chemically treated waste slurries are combined with each other and with glass frit-water slurries to produce the melter feed. Understanding the evolution of the rheological properties of the slurries is an important aspect of removing and treating the stored waste. To a first approximation, combinations of colloidal waste slurry with {approx}0.1-mm mean diameter glass frit or glass beads act in an analogous matter to slurries of spherical beads in Newtonian liquids. The non-Newtonian rheological properties of the waste slurries without frit, however, add complexity to the hydrodynamic analysis. The use of shear rate dependent apparent viscosities with the modified Einstein equation was used to model the rheological properties of aqueous frit-waste slurries.

  20. Semiconductor nanorod liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi; Walda, Joost; Manna, Liberato; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2002-01-28

    Rodlike molecules form liquid crystalline phases with orientational order and positional disorder. The great majority of materials in which liquid crystalline phases have been observed are comprised of organic molecules or polymers, even though there has been continuing and growing interest in inorganic liquid crystals. Recent advances in the control of the sizes and shapes of inorganic nanocrystals allow for the formation of a broad class of new inorganic liquid crystals. Here we show the formation of liquid crystalline phases of CdSe semiconductor nanorods. These new liquid crystalline phases may have great importance for both application and fundamental study.

  1. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  2. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, Albert P.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  3. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  4. Liquid medication administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medicines. They are accurate. They are easy to ... cups are also a handy way to give liquid medicines. However, dosing errors have occurred with them. ...

  5. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  6. Liquid level sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid level sensing device comprising a load cell supporting a column or stack of segments freely resting on one another. The density of each element is substantially identical to that of the surrounding liquid. The elements are freely guided within a surrounding tube. As each element is exposed above the liquid level, its weight will be impressed through the column to the load cell, thereby providing a signal at the load cell directly proportional to the liquid level elevation.

  7. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  8. Liquid detection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Regan, Thomas O.

    1987-01-01

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  9. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  10. Supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of utilizing thin layers of organic solutions of solvent extraction reagents, immobilized on microporous inert supports interposed between two aqueous solutions, for selectively removing metal ions from a mixture represents an attractive alternative to liquid-liquid extraction. A detailed knowledge of the liquid-liquid extraction equilibria and mass transfer kinetics is required to understand and to describe quantitatively the rate laws which control the permeation of metal species through Supported Liquid Membranes (SLM) and to exploit them for separation processes. This paper attempts to understand the mechanism of transport through SLM.

  11. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  12. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  13. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  14. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  15. Duality of liquids

    PubMed Central

    Trachenko, K.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Liquids flow, and in this sense are close to gases. At the same time, interactions in liquids are strong as in solids. The combination of these two properties is believed to be the ultimate obstacle to constructing a general theory of liquids. Here, we adopt a new approach: instead of focusing on the problem of strong interactions, we zero in on the relative contributions of vibrational and diffusional motion. We show that liquid energy and specific heat are given, to a very good approximation, by their vibrational contributions as in solids over almost entire range of relaxation time in which liquids exist as such, and demonstrate that this result is consistent with liquid entropy exceeding solid entropy. Our analysis therefore reveals an interesting duality of liquids not hitherto known: they are close to solids from the thermodynamic perspective and to flowing gases. We discuss several implications of this result. PMID:23851971

  16. Nanowire liquid pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian Yu; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Niu, Jun Jie; Kushima, Akihiro; Qian, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Li; Mao, Scott X.; Li, Ju

    2013-04-01

    The ability to form tiny droplets of liquids and control their movements is important in printing or patterning, chemical reactions and biological assays. So far, such nanofluidic capabilities have principally used components such as channels, nozzles or tubes, where a solid encloses the transported liquid. Here, we show that liquids can flow along the outer surface of solid nanowires at a scale of attolitres per second and the process can be directly imaged with in situ transmission electron microscopy. Microscopy videos show that an ionic liquid can be pumped along tin dioxide, silicon or zinc oxide nanowires as a thin precursor film or as beads riding on the precursor film. Theoretical analysis suggests there is a critical film thickness of ~10 nm below which the liquid flows as a flat film and above which it flows as discrete beads. This critical thickness is the result of intermolecular forces between solid and liquid, which compete with liquid surface energy and Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  17. Liquid/Gas Vortex Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid/gas separator vents gas from tank of liquid that contains gas randomly distributed in bubbles. Centrifugal force separates liquid and gas, forcing liquid out of vortex tube through venturi tube. Gas vented through exhaust port. When liquid detected in vent tube, exhaust port closed, and liquid/gas mixture in vent tube drawn back into tank through venturi.

  18. Liquid Sloshing Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2005-06-01

    The problem of liquid sloshing in moving or stationary containers remains of great concern to aerospace, civil, and nuclear engineers; physicists; designers of road tankers and ship tankers; and mathematicians. Beginning with the fundamentals of liquid sloshing theory, this book takes the reader systematically from basic theory to advanced analytical and experimental results in a self-contained and coherent format. The book is divided into four sections. Part I deals with the theory of linear liquid sloshing dynamics; Part II addresses the nonlinear theory of liquid sloshing dynamics, Faraday waves, and sloshing impacts; Part III presents the problem of linear and nonlinear interaction of liquid sloshing dynamics with elastic containers and supported structures; and Part IV considers the fluid dynamics in spinning containers and microgravity sloshing. This book will be invaluable to researchers and graduate students in mechanical and aeronautical engineering, designers of liquid containers, and applied mathematicians.

  19. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  20. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Tshishiku, Eugene M.

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  1. The stability against freezing of an internal liquid-water ocean in Callisto.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J

    2001-07-26

    The discovery of the induced magnetic field of Callisto-one of Jupiter's moons-has been interpreted as evidence for a subsurface ocean, even though the presence of such an ocean is difficult to understand in the context of existing theoretical models. Tidal heating should not be significant for Callisto, and, in the absence of such heating, it is difficult to see how this internal ocean could have survived until today without freezing. Previous work indicated that an outer ice layer on the ocean would be unstable against solid-state convection, which once begun would lead to total freezing of liquid water in about 108 years. Here I show that when a methodology for more physically reasonable water ice viscosities (that is, stress-dependent non-newtonian viscosities, rather than the stress-independent newtonian viscosities considered previously) is adopted, the outer ice shell becomes stable against convection. This implies that a subsurface ocean could have survived up to the present, without the need for invoking antifreeze substances or other special conditions. PMID:11473308

  2. Harvesting contaminants from liquid

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Hunter, Scott R.

    2016-05-31

    Disclosed are examples of apparatuses for evaporative purification of a contaminated liquid. In each example, there is a vessel for storing the contaminated fluid. The vessel includes a surface coated with a layer of superhydrophobic material and the surface is at least partially in contact with the contaminated liquid. The contaminants do not adhere to the surface as the purified liquid evaporates, thus allowing the contaminants to be harvested.

  3. LIQUID CYCLONE CONTACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Whatley, M.E.; Woods, W.M.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to liquid-liquid extraction systems. The invention, an improved hydroclone system, comprises a series of serially connected, axially aligned hydroclones, each of which is provided with an axially aligned overflow chamber. The chambers are so arranged that rotational motion of a fluid being passed through the system is not lost in passing from chamber to chamber; consequently, this system is highly efficient in contacting and separating two immiscible liquids. (AEC)

  4. PEP liquid level system

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, T.; Sah, R.C.

    1981-03-01

    A liquid level system has been installed in the accelerator housing of the PEP storage ring. This instrument spans the entire 2.2 km circumference of the PEP project, and over one hundred readouts provide reference elevations which are used for the accurate alignment of accelerator components. The liquid level has proven to be extremely precise (+-0.10 mm) and quick to use, and it has contributed to the accurate alignment of PEP before beam turn-on. Since the liquid level readouts are rigidly attached to the accelerator housing, the liquid level has been a convenient means to monitor the settling of the accelerator housing.

  5. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  6. Liquid explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Lowell J.

    1994-03-01

    A Liquid Explosives Screening System capable of scanning unopened bottles for liquid explosives has been developed. The system can be operated to detect specific explosives directly, or to verify the labeled or bar-coded contents of the container. In this system nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to interrogate the liquid. NMR produces an extremely rich data set and many parameters of the NMR response can be determined simultaneously. As a result, multiple NMR signatures may be defined for any given set of liquids, and the signature complexity then selected according to the level of threat.

  7. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid level sensor having a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

  8. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  9. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  10. Modelling multi-phase liquid-sediment scour and resuspension induced by rapid flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) accelerated with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourtakas, G.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A two-phase numerical model using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is applied to two-phase liquid-sediments flows. The absence of a mesh in SPH is ideal for interfacial and highly non-linear flows with changing fragmentation of the interface, mixing and resuspension. The rheology of sediment induced under rapid flows undergoes several states which are only partially described by previous research in SPH. This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the geotechnics, non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows by proposing a model that combines the yielding, shear and suspension layer which are needed to predict accurately the global erosion phenomena, from a hydrodynamics prospective. The numerical SPH scheme is based on the explicit treatment of both phases using Newtonian and the non-Newtonian Bingham-type Herschel-Bulkley-Papanastasiou constitutive model. This is supplemented by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion to predict the onset of yielding of the sediment surface and a concentration suspension model. The multi-phase model has been compared with experimental and 2-D reference numerical models for scour following a dry-bed dam break yielding satisfactory results and improvements over well-known SPH multi-phase models. With 3-D simulations requiring a large number of particles, the code is accelerated with a graphics processing unit (GPU) in the open-source DualSPHysics code. The implementation and optimisation of the code achieved a speed up of x58 over an optimised single thread serial code. A 3-D dam break over a non-cohesive erodible bed simulation with over 4 million particles yields close agreement with experimental scour and water surface profiles.

  11. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  12. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  13. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  14. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  15. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  16. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  17. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  18. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  19. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  20. Liquid Chromatography in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews trends in liquid chromatography including apparatus, factors affecting efficient separation of a mixture (peak sharpness and speed), simplified problem-solving, adsorption, bonded phase chromatography, ion selectivity, and size exclusion. The current trend is to control chemical selectivity by the liquid phase. (Author/JN)

  1. Tunable liquid crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltman, Scott J.

    Liquid crystal lasers are dye-doped distributed feedback lasing systems. Fabricated by coupling the periodic structure of a liquid crystal medium with a fluorescent dye, the emission from these systems is tunable by controlling the liquid crystal system---be it through electric or thermal field effects, photochemical reactions, mechanical deformations, etc. The laser action arises from an extended interaction time between the radiation field, the laser emission, and the matter field, the periodic liquid crystal medium, at the edge of the photonic band gap. In this thesis, several tunable liquid crystal laser systems are investigated: cholesteric liquid crystals, holographic-polymer dispersed liquid crystals and liquid crystal polarization gratings. The primary focus has been to fabricate systems that are tunable through electrical means, as applications requiring mechanical or thermal changes are often difficult to control. Cholesteric liquid crystal lasers are helical Bragg reflectors, with a band gap for circularly polarized light of equivalent handedness to their helix. These materials were doped with a laser dye and laser emission was observed. The use of an in-plane electric field tends to unwind the helical pitch of the film and in doing so tunable emission was demonstrated for ˜15 nm. Holographic-polymer dispersed liquid crystals (H-PDLCs) are grating structures consisting of alternating layers of polymer and liquid crystal, with different indices of refraction. The application of an electric field index matches these layers and switches off the grating. Thus, laser emission can be switched on and off through the use of an electric field. Spatially tunable H-PDLC lasers were fabricated by creating chirped gratings, formed by divergent beams. The emission was shown to tune ˜5 nm as the pump beam was translated across a 1 inch film. Liquid crystal polarization gratings use photo-patterned alignment layers, through a polarization holography exposure, to

  2. Numerical characterization of electrohydrodynamic micro- or nanopatterning processes based on a phase-field formulation of liquid dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongmiao; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming; Liu, Hongzhong

    2013-04-16

    The electrohydrodynamic patterning of polymer is a unique technique for micro- and nanostructuring where an electric voltage is applied to an electrode pair consisting of a patterned template and a polymer-coated substrate either in contact or separated by an air gap to actuate the deformation of the rheological polymer. Depending on the template composition, three processes were proposed for implementing the EHDP technique and have received a great amount of attention (i.e., electrostatic force-assisted nanoimprint, dielectrophoresis-electrocapillary force-driven imprint, and electrically induced structure formation). A numerical approach, which is versatile for visualizing the full evolution of micro- or nanostructures in these patterning processes or their variants, is a desirable critical tool for optimizing the process variables in industrial applications of this structuring technique. Considering the fact that all of these processes use a dielectric and viscous polymer (behaving mechanically as a liquid) and are carried out in ambient air, this Article presents a generalized formulation for the numerical characterization of the EHDP processes by coupling liquid dielectrophoresis (L-DEP) and the phase field of the air-liquid dual phase. More importantly, some major scale effects, such as the surface tension, contact angle, liquid-solid interface slip, and non-Newtonian viscosity law are introduced, which can impact the accuracy of the numerical results, as shown experimentally by our electrical actuation of a dielectric microdroplet as a test problem. The numerical results are in good agreement with or are well explained by experimental observations published for the three EHDP processes. PMID:23506225

  3. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  4. Liquid liquid phase transition in Stillinger Weber silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-04-01

    It was recently demonstrated that Stillinger-Weber silicon undergoes a liquid-liquid first-order phase transition deep into the supercooled region (Sastry and Angell 2003 Nat. Mater. 2 739). Here we study the effects of perturbations on this phase transition. We show that the order of the liquid-liquid transition changes with negative pressure. We also find that the liquid-liquid transition disappears when the three-body term of the potential is strengthened by as little as 5%. This implies that the details of the potential could affect strongly the nature and even the existence of the liquid-liquid phase.

  5. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  6. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  7. Nanowire liquid pumps.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian Yu; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Niu, Jun Jie; Kushima, Akihiro; Qian, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Li; Mao, Scott X; Li, Ju

    2013-04-01

    The ability to form tiny droplets of liquids and control their movements is important in printing or patterning, chemical reactions and biological assays. So far, such nanofluidic capabilities have principally used components such as channels, nozzles or tubes, where a solid encloses the transported liquid. Here, we show that liquids can flow along the outer surface of solid nanowires at a scale of attolitres per second and the process can be directly imaged with in situ transmission electron microscopy. Microscopy videos show that an ionic liquid can be pumped along tin dioxide, silicon or zinc oxide nanowires as a thin precursor film or as beads riding on the precursor film. Theoretical analysis suggests there is a critical film thickness of ∼10 nm below which the liquid flows as a flat film and above which it flows as discrete beads. This critical thickness is the result of intermolecular forces between solid and liquid, which compete with liquid surface energy and Rayleigh-Plateau instability. PMID:23542904

  8. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  9. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  10. Spreading of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  11. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  12. Liquid-level detector

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Aliquid level sensor is described which has a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

  13. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  14. Liquid thickness gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus are developed to measure the thickness of a liquid on a surface independent of liquid conductivity. Two pairs of round, corrosion resistant wires are mounted in an insulating material such that the cross-sectional area of each wire is flush with and normal to the surface. The resistance between each pair of wires is measured using two ac resistance measuring circuits, in which the ratio of the outputs of the two resistance measuring circuits is indicative of the thickness of the liquid on the surface.

  15. Pressurized liquid filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, G.E.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes an apparatus for detecting a leak in a tension leg platform tendon, comprising: a fluid-tight tensioned tubular tendon, the tendon connected on its upper end to a buoyant offshore structure and on its lower end to an anchor means. The anchor means is connected to the sea floor; means for supplying liquid to the tendon; means for pressurizing the liquid in excess of the maximum hydrostatic pressure exerted by the sea water on the tendon; and means for monitoring pressure, the means monitoring variations in liquid pressure to the tendon.

  16. The effect of viscoelasticity on the stability of a pulmonary airway liquid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Grotberg, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The lungs consist of a network of bifurcating airways that are lined with a thin liquid film. This film is a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid possessing viscoelastic characteristics. Surface tension induces flows within the layer, which may cause the lung's airways to close due to liquid plug formation if the liquid film is sufficiently thick. The stability of the liquid layer is also influenced by the viscoelastic nature of the liquid, which is modeled using the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation or as a Jeffreys fluid. To examine the role of mucus alone, a single layer of a viscoelastic fluid is considered. A system of nonlinear evolution equations is derived using lubrication theory for the film thickness and the film flow rate. A uniform film is initially perturbed and a normal mode analysis is carried out that shows that the growth rate g for a viscoelastic layer is larger than for a Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity. Closure occurs if the minimum core radius, Rmin(t), reaches zero within one breath. Solutions of the nonlinear evolution equations reveal that Rmin normally decreases to zero faster with increasing relaxation time parameter, the Weissenberg number We. For small values of the dimensionless film thickness parameter ɛ, the closure time, tc, increases slightly with We, while for moderate values of ɛ, ranging from 14% to 18% of the tube radius, tc decreases rapidly with We provided the solvent viscosity is sufficiently small. Viscoelasticity was found to have little effect for ɛ >0.18, indicating the strong influence of surface tension. The film thickness parameter ɛ and the Weissenberg number We also have a significant effect on the maximum shear stress on tube wall, max(τw), and thus, potentially, an impact on cell damage. Max(τw) increases with ɛ for fixed We, and it decreases with increasing We for small We provided the solvent viscosity parameter is sufficiently

  17. Interfacial and gravitationally-related properties of liquid crystals and other fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Milind Prabhakar

    reported that bridge the gap between the two parts. The stability curve of cylindrical liquid crystal bridges in a Plateau tank was plotted as a function of gravity. Nematic liquid crystals were found to behave exactly like isotropic Newtonian fluid. Smectics, due to their non-Newtonian nature, enabled formation of bridges with length to diameter ratio far beyond Raleigh limit.

  18. The effect of viscoelasticity on the stability of a pulmonary airway liquid layer

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Grotberg, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The lungs consist of a network of bifurcating airways that are lined with a thin liquid film. This film is a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid possessing viscoelastic characteristics. Surface tension induces flows within the layer, which may cause the lung’s airways to close due to liquid plug formation if the liquid film is sufficiently thick. The stability of the liquid layer is also influenced by the viscoelastic nature of the liquid, which is modeled using the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation or as a Jeffreys fluid. To examine the role of mucus alone, a single layer of a viscoelastic fluid is considered. A system of nonlinear evolution equations is derived using lubrication theory for the film thickness and the film flow rate. A uniform film is initially perturbed and a normal mode analysis is carried out that shows that the growth rate g for a viscoelastic layer is larger than for a Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity. Closure occurs if the minimum core radius, Rmin(t), reaches zero within one breath. Solutions of the nonlinear evolution equations reveal that Rmin normally decreases to zero faster with increasing relaxation time parameter, the Weissenberg number We. For small values of the dimensionless film thickness parameter ε, the closure time, tc, increases slightly with We, while for moderate values of ε, ranging from 14% to 18% of the tube radius, tc decreases rapidly with We provided the solvent viscosity is sufficiently small. Viscoelasticity was found to have little effect for ε>0.18, indicating the strong influence of surface tension. The film thickness parameter ε and the Weissenberg number We also have a significant effect on the maximum shear stress on tube wall, max(τw), and thus, potentially, an impact on cell damage. Max(τw) increases with ε for fixed We, and it decreases with increasing We for small We provided the solvent viscosity parameter is sufficiently

  19. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  20. Wettability by Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have become particularly attractive recently because they have demonstrated themselves to be important construction units in the broad fields of chemistry and materials science, from catalysis and synthesis to analysis and electrochemistry, from functional fluids to clean energy, from nanotechnology to functional materials. One of the greatest issues that determines the performance of ILs is the wettability of correlated surfaces. In this concept article, the key developments and issues in IL wettability are surveyed, including the electrowetting of ILs in gas-liquid-solid systems and liquid-liquid-solid systems, ILs as useful probe fluids, the superwettability of Ils, and future directions in IL wettability. This should generate extensive interest in the field and encourage more scientists to engage in this area to tackle its scientific challenges. PMID:26619157

  1. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  2. Liquid level controller

    DOEpatents

    Mangus, J.D.; Redding, A.H.

    1975-07-15

    A system for maintaining two distinct sodium levels within the shell of a heat exchanger having a plurality of J-shaped modular tube bundles each enclosed in a separate shell which extends from a common base portion. A lower liquid level is maintained in the base portion and an upper liquid level is maintained in the shell enwrapping the long stem of the J-shaped tube bundles by utilizing standpipes with a notch at the lower end which decreases in open area the distance from the end of the stand pipe increases and a supply of inert gas fed at a constant rate to produce liquid levels, which will remain generally constant as the flow of liquid through the vessel varies. (auth)

  3. Lacerations - liquid bandage

    MedlinePlus

    ... painless to apply. Skin adhesives, or liquid bandages, seal the cut closed after only one application. There ... scrub the site. Doing so may loosen the seal or even remove the adhesive completely. The seal ...

  4. Diet - full liquid

    MedlinePlus

    ... 7 of the foods you can eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Liquid foods DO NOT include " ... Nonfat dry milk added to your drinks Instant breakfast powder added to milk, puddings, custards, and milkshakes ...

  5. Lacerations - liquid bandage

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes only slight burning when applied. Liquid bandages, seal the cut closed after only 1 application. There ... you can shower or bathe without worry. The seal lasts for 5 to 10 days. It will ...

  6. Safer Liquid Natural Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    After the disaster of Staten Island in 1973 where 40 people were killed repairing a liquid natural gas storage tank, the New York Fire Commissioner requested NASA's help in drawing up a comprehensive plan to cover the design, construction, and operation of liquid natural gas facilities. Two programs are underway. The first transfers comprehensive risk management techniques and procedures which take the form of an instruction document that includes determining liquid-gas risks through engineering analysis and tests, controlling these risks by setting up redundant fail safe techniques, and establishing criteria calling for decisions that eliminate or accept certain risks. The second program prepares a liquid gas safety manual (the first of its kind).

  7. Liquid piston Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a presentation on piston stirling engines. Topics covered include: liquid piston engines; basic design and power calculations; more advanced power calculations; design example; and past research work and some present research needs.

  8. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  9. Liquid sample processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnsen, V. J.; Campen, C. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Processor is automatic and includes series of extraction tubes packed with fibrous absorbent material of large surface area. When introduced into these tubes, liquid test samples become completely absorbed by packing material as thin film.

  10. 114. WEST SIDE OF LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROL ROOM (205). LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. WEST SIDE OF LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROL ROOM (205). LIQUID NITROGEN (LN2) SUBCOOLER ON LEFT; SKID 8, LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROLLER FOR SWITCHING BETWEEN RAPID-LOAD AND TOPPING ON RIGHT. LIQUID OXYGEN LINE FROM SKID 9A AT RIGHT EDGE OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Applications of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Divia Dinesh; Lee, Jong-Min

    2012-06-01

    Ionic liquids have recently gained popularity in the scientific community owing to their special properties and characteristics. One of the reasons why ionic liquids have been termed "green solvents" is due to their negligible vapour pressure. Their use in electrochemical, biological and metal extraction applications is discussed. Wide research has been carried out for their use in batteries, solar panels, fuel cells, drug deliveries and biomass pretreatments. This work aims to consolidate the various findings from previous works in these areas. PMID:22711528

  12. Excitability in liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Coullet, P.; Frisch, T.; Gilli, J. M.; Rica, S.

    1994-09-01

    The spiral waves observed in a liquid crystal submitted to a vertical electric field and a horizontal rotating magnetic field are explained in the framework of a purely mechanical description of the liquid crystal. The originality of the experiment described in this paper is the presence of the vertical electric field which allows us to analyze the spiral waves in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory. PMID:12780124

  13. Liquid cooled helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, William (Inventor); Williams, Bill A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Liquid cooled helmet comprising a cap of flexible material adapted to fit the head of a person, cooling panels mounted inside the cap forming passageways for carrying a liquid coolant, the panels being positioned to engage the cranium and neck of a person wearing the helmet, inlet and outlet lines communicating with the passageways, and releasable straps for securing the helmet about the neck of the wearer.

  14. Compact Liquid Deaerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, S. T.

    1982-01-01

    Gases are removed from liquids by a new deaerator that takes up only 5 inches (12.7 cm) at top of a medium-sized storage tank. Deaerator has a multiple cascading header that exposes more fluid at lower pressures than typical commercial deaerators. Potential applications are in hydraulic systems for aircraft and heavy machinery, in cooling systems where deaerated liquid is needed to prevent cavitation of pump.

  15. Liquid Level Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Duffell, Amanda G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A liquid level sensing system includes waveguides disposed in a liquid and distributed along a path with a gap between adjacent waveguides. A source introduces electromagnetic energy into the waveguides at a first end of the path. A portion of the electromagnetic energy exits the waveguides at a second end of the path. A detector measures the portion of the electromagnetic energy exiting the second end of the path.

  16. Gravity-driven deformation of Olympus Mons volcano, Mars: plate flexure and volcanic spreading studied with finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiol, Stefanie; Cailleau, Béatrice; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Walter, Thomas R.; Williams, David A.; Dumke, Alexander; van Gasselt, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Olympus Mons on Mars is an exceptional volcano, not only for its enormous size, but also for its structural inventory that includes faulting and mass movements. It is a basaltic shield volcano with a height of 22 km, a diameter of about 600 km, and an average flank slope of 5°. Its characteristics include a summit caldera complex, upper- to mid-flank terraces, a basal circumferential scarp of up to 8 km height, and widespread lobate deposits that extend several hundred kilometers from the basal scarp into the surrounding plains. The formation of these major structural elements and association to gravity tectonics remained unclear, however. This study investigated the combined effects of lithospheric flexure and volcanic spreading in the evolution of Olympus Mons. For this purpose, the deformation of an elastoplastic volcanic cone under Martian gravity was simulated with axisymmetric finite element models. To reproduce observed structural complexities, these models were combined with a viscoelastic mantle and a variable coupling-decoupling behaviour at the interface between volcano and underlying lithosphere. We found that the combination of lithospheric flexure and volcanic spreading is able to account for Olympus Mons upper-flank terraces and basal overthrusting. Terraces are explained with radial compression, with an extent and expression that is related to both lithospheric flexure and the nature of a basal detachment surface. As coupling along the basal detachment decreases, and spreading increases, the zone of flank terracing migrates toward the summit area. The presence of faults on the shield depends on the edifice cohesion and the time of volcano growth relative to mantle relaxation. To produce surface faults, a high edifice cohesion has to be combined with quasi instantaneous volcano emplacement. When edifice cohesion is an order of magnitude lower, however, an instantaneous volcano emplacement is unnecessary to produce surface faults. For a load growing in equilibrium with a deforming mantle, modelled by allowing for viscous relaxation of the mantle between loading steps, faults can be produced on every incrementally-formed volcano surface. For a large shield volcano made of basaltic rock mass, a growth time of up to millions of years and a low cohesion value are more realistic assumptions in the end. Therefore, to understand the structural configuration of Olympus Mons, interfingered processes of deformation need to be considered. Flexure, spreading, and other factors may display complexities that significantly alter the position and expression of surface faults, such as those associated with unstable flanks, circumferential scarps and thrust belts, or terraces.

  17. Gravity-driven postseismic deformation following the Mw 6.3 2009 L’Aquila (Italy) earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Matteo; Barba, Salvatore; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Malvarosa, Fabio; Costantini, Mario; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The present work focuses on the postseismic deformation observed in the region of L’Aquila (central Italy) following the Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred on April 6, 2009. A new, 16-month-long dataset of COSMO-SkyMed SAR images was analysed using the Persistent Scatterer Pairs interferometric technique. The analysis revealed the existence of postseismic ground subsidence in the mountainous rocky area of Mt Ocre ridge, contiguous to the sedimentary plain that experienced coseismic subsidence. The postseismic subsidence was characterized by displacements of 10 to 35 mm along the SAR line of sight. In the Mt Ocre ridge, widespread morphological elements associated with gravitational spreading have been previously mapped. We tested the hypothesis that the postseismic subsidence of the Mt Ocre ridge compensates the loss of equilibrium induced by the nearby coseismic subsidence. Therefore, we simulated the coseismic and postseismic displacement fields via the finite element method. We included the gravitational load and fault slip and accounted for the geometrical and rheological characteristics of the area. We found that the elastoplastic behaviour of the material under gravitational loading best explains the observed postseismic displacement. These findings emphasize the role of gravity in the postseismic processes at the fault scale. PMID:26553120

  18. Gravity-driven postseismic deformation following the Mw 6.3 2009 L’Aquila (Italy) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Matteo; Barba, Salvatore; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Malvarosa, Fabio; Costantini, Mario; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    The present work focuses on the postseismic deformation observed in the region of L’Aquila (central Italy) following the Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred on April 6, 2009. A new, 16-month-long dataset of COSMO-SkyMed SAR images was analysed using the Persistent Scatterer Pairs interferometric technique. The analysis revealed the existence of postseismic ground subsidence in the mountainous rocky area of Mt Ocre ridge, contiguous to the sedimentary plain that experienced coseismic subsidence. The postseismic subsidence was characterized by displacements of 10 to 35 mm along the SAR line of sight. In the Mt Ocre ridge, widespread morphological elements associated with gravitational spreading have been previously mapped. We tested the hypothesis that the postseismic subsidence of the Mt Ocre ridge compensates the loss of equilibrium induced by the nearby coseismic subsidence. Therefore, we simulated the coseismic and postseismic displacement fields via the finite element method. We included the gravitational load and fault slip and accounted for the geometrical and rheological characteristics of the area. We found that the elastoplastic behaviour of the material under gravitational loading best explains the observed postseismic displacement. These findings emphasize the role of gravity in the postseismic processes at the fault scale.

  19. Gravity-driven postseismic deformation following the Mw 6.3 2009 L'Aquila (Italy) earthquake.

    PubMed

    Albano, Matteo; Barba, Salvatore; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Malvarosa, Fabio; Costantini, Mario; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The present work focuses on the postseismic deformation observed in the region of L'Aquila (central Italy) following the Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred on April 6, 2009. A new, 16-month-long dataset of COSMO-SkyMed SAR images was analysed using the Persistent Scatterer Pairs interferometric technique. The analysis revealed the existence of postseismic ground subsidence in the mountainous rocky area of Mt Ocre ridge, contiguous to the sedimentary plain that experienced coseismic subsidence. The postseismic subsidence was characterized by displacements of 10 to 35 mm along the SAR line of sight. In the Mt Ocre ridge, widespread morphological elements associated with gravitational spreading have been previously mapped. We tested the hypothesis that the postseismic subsidence of the Mt Ocre ridge compensates the loss of equilibrium induced by the nearby coseismic subsidence. Therefore, we simulated the coseismic and postseismic displacement fields via the finite element method. We included the gravitational load and fault slip and accounted for the geometrical and rheological characteristics of the area. We found that the elastoplastic behaviour of the material under gravitational loading best explains the observed postseismic displacement. These findings emphasize the role of gravity in the postseismic processes at the fault scale. PMID:26553120

  20. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.L.; Mallon, R.G.; Walton, O.R.

    1983-09-21

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus are disclosed in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  1. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Braun, Robert L.; Mallon, Richard G.; Walton, Otis R.

    1986-01-01

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  2. Electrically actuated liquid iris.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Ren, Hongwen; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2015-03-01

    We report an adaptive iris using dielectric liquids and a radial-interdigitated electrode. A black liquid is confined by a circular gasket with a donut shape. The surrounding of the black liquid is filled with an immiscible liquid. In the relaxing state, the black liquid obtains the largest clear aperture. By applying a voltage, the surface of the black liquid is stretched by the generated dielectric force, resulting in a reduction of its aperture. For the demonstrated iris, the diameter of the aperture can be changed from ∼4.7  mm to ∼1.2  mm when the voltage is applied from 0 to 70  V(rms). The aperture ratio is ∼94%. Owing to the radial-interdigitated electrode, the aperture size of the iris can be effectively switched with a reasonably fast response time. The optical switch is polarization-insensitive. The potential applications of our iris are light shutters, optical attenuators, biomimicry, and wearable devices. PMID:25723444

  3. Liquid-liquid critical point: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daanoun, A.

    2006-09-01

    Theoretical simulations and experimental studies have showed that many systems (like liquid metals) can exhibit two phase transitions: gas-liquid and liquid-liquid. Consequently the fluid phase of these systems presents two critical points, namely the usual gas-liquid (G-L) critical point and the liquid-liquid critical point that results from a phase transition between two liquids of different densities: a low density liquid (LDL) and a high density liquid (HDL). The van der Waals theory for simple fluids [Phys. Rev. E 50, 2913 (1994)] is based on taking a system with purely repulsive forces as a reference, is able to describe two stable first-order phase transitions between fluids of different densities. The particles in our system interact via a total pair potential, which splits into a repulsive VR and a density-dependent attractive VA part.

  4. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  5. Transmitting Electromagnetic Energy into Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rough liquid surface enhances coupling. Agitating surface of liquid nitrogen bath with periodic or aperiodic excitation enhances electromagnetic coupling between microwave horn and blackbody temperature standard immersed in liquid. Useful in interfaces between electromagnetic radiation and liquids. Biomedical, radar, and meteorological applications.

  6. Beyond dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Fuh, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-28

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other dispersion liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) methods have been developed since the first DLLME method was reported in 2006. DLLME is simple, rapid, and affords high enrichment factor, this is due to the large contact surface area of the extraction solvent. DLLME is a method suitable for the extraction in many different water samples, but it requires using chlorinated solvents. In recent years, interest in DLLME or dispersion LPME has been focused on the use of low-toxicity solvents and more conveniently practical procedures. This review examines some of the most interesting developments in the past few years. In the first section, DLLME methods are separated in two categories: DLLME with low-density extraction solvent and DLLME with high-density extraction solvent. Besides these methods, many novel special devices for collecting low-density extraction solvent are also mentioned. In addition, various dispersion techniques with LPME, including manual shaking, air-assisted LPME (aspirating and injecting the extraction mixture by syringe), ultrasound-assisted emulsification, vortex-assisted emulsification, surfactant-assisted emulsification, and microwave-assisted emulsification are described. Besides the above methods, combinations of DLLME with other extraction techniques (solid-phase extraction, stir bar sorptive extraction, molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion and supercritical fluid extraction) are introduced. The combination of nanotechnique with DLLME is also introduced. Furthermore, this review illustrates the application of DLLME or dispersion LPME methods to separate and preconcentrate various organic analytes, inorganic analytes, and samples. PMID:24582396

  7. Operation with three liquid phases in a staged liquid-liquid contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Ziegler, A.A.; Wigeland, R.A.; Bane, R.W.; Steindler, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Operation with three liquid phases was demonstrated in a staged liquid-liquid contactor. The possibility that three liquid phases could be handled in a liquid-liquid contactor normally used with two liquid phases was initially established using a laboratory batch test. Tht three liquid phases were obtained using a thorium flow sheet having high concentrations of both acid and thorium. To analyze the batch test, the concept of a dimensionless dispersion number for use with two liquid phases was extended so that it could be applied to three liquid phases. Based on the batch tests, continuous flow tests were run in a staged liquid-liquid contactor used for solvent extraction. A critical factor in the success of these tests was determining the position of the liquid-liquid interface in the contactor. Thus, a contactor was used which allows the position of the liquid-liquid interface to be adjusted. Actual three-phase operation was demonstrated using a 4-cm annular centrifugal contactor, albeit with a somewhat greater (3 to 4 vol. %) aqueous-phase contamination of the organic exit stream than normal (< 1 vol. %).

  8. Flow and heat transfer in a Maxwell liquid film over an unsteady stretching sheet in a porous medium with radiation.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Shimaa E

    2016-01-01

    A problem of flow and heat transfer in a non-Newtonian Maxwell liquid film over an unsteady stretching sheet embedded in a porous medium in the presence of a thermal radiation is investigated. The unsteady boundary layer equations describing the problem are transformed to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations which is solved numerically using the shooting method. The effects of various parameters like the Darcy parameter, the radiation parameter, the Deborah number and the Prandtl number on the flow and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented and discussed. It is observed that increasing values of the Darcy parameter and the Deborah number cause an increase of the local skin-friction coefficient values and decrease in the values of the local Nusselt number. Also, it is noticed that the local Nusselt number increases as the Prandtl number increases and it decreases with increasing the radiation parameter. However, it is found that the free surface temperature increases by increasing the Darcy parameter, the radiation parameter and the Deborah number whereas it decreases by increasing the Prandtl number. PMID:27462509

  9. Microgravity liquid propellant management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement to settle or to position liquid fluid over the outlet end of a spacecraft propellant tank prior to main engine restart, poses a microgravity fluid behavior problem. Resettlement or reorientation of liquid propellant can be accomplished by providing optimal acceleration to the spacecraft such that the propellant is reoriented over the tank outlet without any vapor entrainment, any excessive geysering, or any other undersirable fluid motion for the space fluid management under microgravity environment. The most efficient technique is studied for propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage and weight penalties. Both full scale and subscale liquid propellant tank of Space Transfer Vehicle were used to simulate flow profiles for liquid hydrogen reorientation over the tank outlet. In subscale simulation, both constant and impulsive resettling acceleration were used to simulate the liquid flow reorientation. Comparisons between the constant reverse gravity acceleration and impulsive reverse gravity acceleration to be used for activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive reverse gravity thrust is superior to constant reverse gravity thrust.

  10. Carbenes from ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hollóczki, Oldamur; Nyulászi, László

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade an explosive development has been observed in the fields of both ionic liquids (ILs) as potential chemically inert solvents with many possible technical applications, and N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) as catalysts with superb performance. Since the cations of many ILs can be deprotonated by strong bases yielding NHCs, this two fields are inherently connected. It has only recently been recognized that some of the commonly used basic anions of the ILs (such as acetate) are able to deprotonate azolium cations. While the resulting NHC could clearly be observed in the vapor phase, in the liquid - where the mutual electrostatic interactions within the ion network stabilize the ion pairs - the neutral NHC cannot be detected by commonly used analytical techniques; however, from these ionic liquids NHCs can be trapped, e.g., by complex formation, or more importantly these ILs can be directly used as catalysts, since the NHC content is sufficiently large for these applications. Apart from imidazole-2-ylidenes, the formation of other highly reactive neutral species ("abnormal carbenes," 2-alkylideneimidazoles, pyridine-ylidenes or pyridinium-ylides) is feasible in highly basic ionic liquids. The cross-fertilizing overlap between the two fields may provide access to a great advance in both areas, and we give an overview here on the results published so far, and also on the remaining possibilities and challenges in the concept of "carbenes from ionic liquids." PMID:23539381

  11. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method: Surface-Inclination Effects on Shear Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) method is an image-based technique for both visualizing dynamic surface-flow phenomena, such as transition and separation, and for measuring the continuous shear-stress vector distribution acting on an aerodynamic surface. Under proper lighting and viewing conditions (discussed below), the coating changes color in response to an applied aerodynamic shear. This color-change response is continuous and reversible, with a response time of milliseconds, and is a function of both the shear magnitude and the shear vector orientation relative to the observer. The liquid crystal phase of matter is a weakly-ordered, viscous, non-Newtonian fluid state that exists between the nonuniform liquid phase and the ordered solid phase of certain organic compounds. Cholesteric liquid crystal compounds possess a helical molecular arrangement that selectively scatters white light, incident along the helical axis, as a three-dimensional spectrum. This property is linked to the helical pitch length, which is within the range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The pitch length, and hence the wavelength of the scattered light, is influenced by shear stress normal to the helical axis. This unique optical property produces a measurable color change in response to an applied shearing force. The full-surface shear stress vector measurement method, developed at NASA-Ames, is schematically illustrated. As with the visualization method, the coated test surface is illuminated from the normal direction with white light and the camera is positioned at an above-plane view angle of approximately 30 deg. Experiments have been initiated at NASA Ames to begin the process of quantifying surface-inclination (surface-curvature) effects on shear vector measurement accuracy. In preliminary experiments, surface-inclination angles theta(sub x), theta(sub y) of 0, +/-5, +/-10, and +/-15 deg were employed. In this arrangement, white-light illumination was

  12. Thermohydraulics in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottowski, H. M.

    Heat transfer problems in single-phase and two-phase liquid metal forced convection flow are reviewed. Liquid metal boiling heat transfer in pool flow; and dry out heat fluxes are considered. It is shown that in technological plants working with liquid metals, superheating up to 150 C occurs, and can lead to nonstationary hydraulic transition between the single-phase and established two-phase flows. Boiling phases relative to subcooled boiling and bubble boiling have no importance for technological processes. Piston, slug and annular flow patterns dominate. On the basis of the flow patterns observed during boiling, the separate flow model principle is the only one suitable for calculating the two-phase flow pressure drop. Using this model and total pressure drop measurements, a relationship for the two-phase frictional pressure characteristic, valid for tubular and annular geometry, can be determined.

  13. Liquid lubrication in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for long-term, reliable operation of aerospace mechanisms has, with a few exceptions, pushed the state of the art in tribology. Space mission life requirements in the early 1960s were generally 6 months to a year. The proposed U.S. space station schedule to be launched in the 1990s must be continuously usable for 10 to 20 years. Liquid lubrication systems are generally used for mission life requirements longer than a year. Although most spacecraft or satellites have reached their required lifetimes without a lubrication-related failure, the application of liquid lubricants in the space environment presents unique challenges. The state of the art of liquid lubrication in space as well as the problems and their solutions are reviewed.

  14. Two new vortex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip W.

    2007-03-01

    In 1967, Reatto and Chester proposed that solid helium-4 might exhibit superfluidity, and in 1970, Leggett suggested what was thought to be a definitive experimental test: to find non-classical rotational inertia in a toroidal sample. More than three decades later, the observation by Kim and Chan of exactly that effect generated great interest and has been repeated and confirmed by a number of groups. However, many attempts to find actual superflow in truly solid samples have failed. Here, I draw an analogy with a second example of anomalous response to vorticity in a dissipative fluid, the vortex liquid phase in the pseudogap region of high-temperature superconductors, and propose that the solid helium experiments have been mischaracterized: what is observed is not supersolidity but an incompressible vortex liquid. This state is distinct from a conventional liquid in that its properties are dominated by conserved supercurrents flowing around a thermally fluctuating tangle of vortices.

  15. Liquid air cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosevear, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a definition of Liquid Air Cycle Engines (LACE) and existing relevant technologies. Heat exchanger design and fabrication techniques, the handling of liquid hydrogen to achieve the greatest heat sink capabilities, and air decontamination to prevent heat exchanger fouling are discussed. It was concluded that technology needs to be extended in the areas of design and fabrication of heat exchangers to improve reliability along with weight and volume reductions. Catalysts need to be improved so that conversion can be achieved with lower quantities and lower volumes. Packaging studies need to be investigated both analytically and experimentally. Recycling with slush hydrogen needs further evaluation with experimental testing.

  16. Electroplating Using Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Andrew P.; Frisch, Gero; Ryder, Karl S.

    2013-07-01

    Electroplating is a key technology in many large-scale industrial applications such as corrosion-resistant and decorative coatings. Issues with current aqueous processes, such as toxicity of reagents and low current efficiencies, can often be overcome by using ionic liquids, and this approach has turned ionometallurgy into a fast-growing area of research. This review outlines the interactions in ionic liquids that are responsible for the advantageous properties of these solvents in electroplating. It summarizes recent research in which these properties have been analyzed or exploited and highlights fundamental issues in research and technology that need to be addressed.

  17. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  18. Solar liquid heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, D.J.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a solar heater for heating liquids. It comprises: a heatable bag, a support means supporting the heatable bag, a heatable body of liquid in the heatable bag, the heatable bag being disposed in sunlight so as to become heated thereby, a topside gas bag above the heatable bag, the topside gas bag containing a gas for serving as insulation, a topside fluid bag disposed above the topside gas bag and containing a fluid for further insulation. The bags being substantially gasproof and waterproof and also being flexible whereby the gravity pull on the bags and the flexibility thereof causes the upper sides of the bags to seek horizontal levels.

  19. Improved Capacitive Liquid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, Francis A.

    1992-01-01

    Improved capacitive sensor used to detect presence and/or measure thickness of layer of liquid. Electrical impedance or admittance of sensor measured at prescribed frequency, and thickness of liquid inferred from predetermined theoretical or experimental relationship between impedance and thickness. Sensor is basically a three-terminal device. Features interdigitated driving and sensing electrodes and peripheral coplanar ground electrode that reduces parasitic effects. Patent-pending because first to utilize ground plane as "shunting" electrode. System less expensive than infrared, microwave, or refractive-index systems. Sensor successfully evaluated in commercial production plants to characterize emulsions, slurries, and solutions.

  20. Turbine meters for liquid measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wass, D.J.; Allen, C.R.

    1995-12-01

    Liquid turbine meters operate in response to fundamental engineering principles, Operation with a single moving part produces excellent longevity and reliability. Liquid turbine meters display wide rangeability, high accuracy, excellent repeatability, low pressure drop and moderate cost. Liquid turbine meters may be applied to many different fluids with different physical properties and corrosive tendencies. The marriage of liquid turbine meters to electronic instruments allows instantaneous flow calculations and produces the flexibility to display data, store data, transmit data in the most convenient form. Liquid turbine meters should be the first flow measurement instrument considered for liquid measurement applications.

  1. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  2. 138. LIQUID NITROGEN INSTRUMENT PANEL ON EAST WALL OF LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    138. LIQUID NITROGEN INSTRUMENT PANEL ON EAST WALL OF LIQUID NITROGEN CONTROL ROOM (115), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Liquid propellant densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor); Petrilla, Steve P. (Inventor); Lozano, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Super cooling the cryogenic liquid propellant in a vehicle propellant tank densities the propellant allowing the vehicle propellant tank to carry more fuel in the same volume tank while lowering the vapor pressure and thus the tank operating pressure. Lowering the tank operating pressure reduces the stress and therefore allows the walls of the tank to be thinner. Both the smaller tank volume and thinner tank wall results in an overall smaller and lighter vehicle with increased payload capability. The cryogenic propellant can be supercooled well below the normal boiling point temperature level by transporting the liquid propellant from the vehicle tanks to a ground based cooling unit which utilizes a combination of heat exchanger and compressor. The compressor lowers the coolant fluid bath pressure resulting in a low temperature boiling liquid which is subsequently used to cool the recirculating liquid. The cooled propellant is then returned to the vehicle propellant tank. In addition to reducing the vehicle size and weight the invention also allows location of the vent valve on the ground, elimination of on-board recirculation pumps or bleed systems, smaller and lighter engine pumps and valves, lighter and more stable ullage gas, and significant reduction in tank fill operation. All of these mentioned attributes provide lower vehicle weight and cost.

  4. Properties of Liquid Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Freibert, Franz J.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Schwartz, Daniel S.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Migliori, Albert

    2012-08-02

    Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

  5. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  6. Clean room wiping liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1991-12-01

    A water-based liquid containing isopropyl alcohol, ammonium hydroxide, and surfactants was developed to replace 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane for the dampening of clean room wiping cloths used to wipe clean benches, clean room equipment, and latex finger cots and gloves.

  7. ELECTRONS IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    2002-10-22

    Excess electrons can be introduced into liquids by absorption of high energy radiation, by photoionization, or by photoinjection from metal surfaces. The electron's chemical and physical properties can then be measured, but this requires that the electrons remain free. That is, the liquid must be sufficiently free of electron attaching impurities for these studies. The drift mobility as well as other transport properties of the electron are discussed here as well as electron reactions, free-ion yields and energy levels, Ionization processes typically produce electrons with excess kinetic energy. In liquids during thermalization, where this excess energy is lost to bath molecules, the electrons travel some distance from their geminate positive ions. In general the electrons at this point are still within the coulombic field of their geminate ions and a large fraction of the electrons recombine. However, some electrons escape recombination and the yield that escapes to become free electrons and ions is termed G{sub fi}. Reported values of G{sub fi} for molecular liquids range from 0.05 to 1.1 per 100 eV of energy absorbed. The reasons for this 20-fold range of yields are discussed here.

  8. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  9. Thermoelectricity in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Nordin, Abdul Rahman; Abdullah, Norbani; Balamurugan, S.

    2015-09-01

    The thermoelectric effect, also known as the Seebeck effect, describes the conversion of a temperature gradient into electricity. A Figure of Merit (ZT) is used to describe the thermoelectric ability of a material. It is directly dependent on its Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, and inversely dependent on its thermal conductivity. There is usually a compromise between these parameters, which limit the performance of thermoelectric materials. The current achievement for ZT~2.2 falls short of the expected threshold of ZT=3 to allow its viability in commercial applications. In recent times, advances in organic thermoelectrics been significant, improving by over 3 orders of magnitude over a period of about 10 years. Liquid crystals are newly investigated as candidate thermoelectric materials, given their low thermal conductivity, inherent ordering, and in some cases, reasonable electrical conductivity. In this work the thermoelectric behaviour of a discotic liquid crystal, is discussed. The DLC was filled into cells coated with a charge injector, and an alignment of the columnar axis perpendicular to the substrate was allowed to form. This thermoelectric behavior can be correlated to the order-disorder transition. A reasonable thermoelectric power in the liquid crystal temperature regime was noted. In summary, thermoelectric liquid crystals may have the potential to be utilised in flexible devices, as a standalone power source.

  10. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  11. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  12. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  13. Liquid White Enamel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmar, Marge

    1985-01-01

    A secondary teacher describes how she has her students use liquid white enamel. With the enameling process, students can create lasting, exciting artwork. They can exercise an understanding of design and color while learning the value of careful, sustained craft skills. (RM)

  14. Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Astronauts working on the surface of the moon had to wear liquid-cooled garments under their space suits as protection from lunar temperatures which sometimes reach 250 degrees Fahrenheit. In community service projects conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center, the technology developed for astronaut needs has been adapted to portable cooling systems which will permit two youngsters to lead more normal lives.

  15. Unusually stable liquid foams.

    PubMed

    Rio, Emmanuelle; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Salonen, Anniina; Langevin, Dominique

    2014-03-01

    Obtaining stable liquid foams is an important issue in view of their numerous applications. In some of these, the liquid foam in itself is of interest, in others, the liquid foam acts as a precursor for the generation of solid foam. In this short review, we will make a survey of the existing results in the area. This will include foams stabilised by surfactants, proteins and particles. The origin of the stability is related to the slowing down of coarsening, drainage or coalescence, and eventually to their arrest. The three effects are frequently coupled and in many cases, they act simultaneously and enhance one another. Drainage can be arrested if the liquid of the foam either gels or solidifies. Coalescence is slowed down by gelified foam films, and it can be arrested if the films become very thick and/or rigid. These mechanisms are thus qualitatively easy to identify, but they are less easy to model in order to obtain quantitative predictions. The slowing down of coarsening requests either very thick or small films, and its arrest was observed in cases where the surface compression modulus was large. The detail of the mechanisms at play remains unclear. PMID:24342735

  16. Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating a fast spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water and a subsequent slow crystallization to ice. It is found that supercooled water separates rapidly into low- and high-density domains so as to reduce the surface energy in the rectangular simulation cell at certain thermodynamic states. The liquid-liquid phase separation, which is about two orders of magnitude faster than the crystallization, suggests a possibility to observe this phenomenon experimentally. PMID:25353404

  17. 3-Methylpiperidinium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Belhocine, Tayeb; Forsyth, Stewart A; Gunaratne, H Q Nimal; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; Nockemann, Peter; Puga, Alberto V; Seddon, Kenneth R; Srinivasan, Geetha; Whiston, Keith

    2015-04-28

    A wide range of room temperature ionic liquids based on the 3-methylpiperdinium cation core were produced from 3-methylpiperidine, which is a derivative of DYTEK® A amine. First, reaction with 1-bromoalkanes or 1-bromoalkoxyalkanes generated the corresponding tertiary amines (Rmβpip, R = alkyl or alkoxyalkyl); further quaternisation reactions with the appropriate methylating agents yielded the quaternary [Rmmβpip]X salts (X(-) = I(-), [CF3CO2](-) or [OTf](-); Tf = -SO2CF3), and [Rmmβpip][NTf2] were prepared by anion metathesis from the corresponding iodides. All [NTf2](-) salts are liquids at room temperature. [Rmmβpip]X (X(-) = I(-), [CF3CO2](-) or [OTf](-)) are low-melting solids when R = alkyl, but room temperature liquids upon introduction of ether functionalities on R. Neither of the 3-methylpiperdinium ionic liquids showed any signs of crystallisation, even well below 0 °C. Some related non-C-substituted piperidinium and pyrrolidinium analogues were prepared and studied for comparison. Crystal structures of 1-hexyl-1,3-dimethylpiperidinium tetraphenylborate, 1-butyl-3-methylpiperidinium bromide, 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpiperidinium chloride and 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpyrrolidinium bromide are reported. Extensive structural and physical data are collected and compared to literature data, with special emphasis on the systematic study of the cation ring size and/or asymmetry effects on density, viscosity and ionic conductivity, allowing general trends to be outlined. Cyclic voltammetry shows that 3-methylpiperidinium ionic liquids, similarly to azepanium, piperidinium or pyrrolidinium counterparts, are extremely electrochemically stable; the portfolio of useful alternatives for safe and high-performing electrolytes is thus greatly extended. PMID:25669485

  18. Rockets using Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    It is my task to discuss rocket propulsion using liquid oxygen and my treatment must be highly condensed for the ideas and experiments pertaining to this classic type of rocket are so numerous that one could occupy a whole morning with a detailed presentation. First, with regard to oxygen itself as compared with competing oxygen carriers, it is known that the liquid state of oxygen, in spite of the low boiling point, is more advantageous than the gaseous form of oxygen in pressure tanks, therefore only liquid oxygen need be compared with the oxygen carriers. The advantages of liquid oxygen are absolute purity and unlimited availability at relatively small cost in energy. The disadvantages are those arising from the impossibility of absolute isolation from heat; consequently, allowance must always be made for a certain degree of vaporization and only vented vessels can be used for storage and transportation. This necessity alone eliminates many fields of application, for example, at the front lines. In addition, liquid oxygen has a lower specific weight than other oxygen carriers, therefore many accessories become relatively larger and heavier in the case of an oxygen rocket, for example, the supply tanks and the pumps. The advantages thus become effective only in those cases where definitely scheduled operation and a large ground organization are possible and when the flight requires a great concentration of energy relative to weight. With the aim of brevity, a diagram of an oxygen rocket will be presented and the problem of various component parts that receive particularly thorough investigation in this classic case but which are also often applicable to other rocket types will be referred to.

  19. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  20. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.