Science.gov

Sample records for nonpalpable breast lesions

  1. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) of the nonpalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Zgajnar, J; Hocevar, M; Frkovic-Grazio, S; Hertl, K; Schweiger, E; Besic, N

    2004-01-01

    Standard localization techniques of the nonpalpable breast lesions (guide wire, carbon, skin marking) have several disadvantages. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) was recently proposed as a better alternative resulting in wider surgical margins and lower average specimen weight. The aim of our study was to compare ROLL to our previously published series of the standard guidewire localization, performed at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. ROLL was performed in 110 nonpalpable breast lesions. Human serum albumin macroaggregats, marked with 1.8-5.5 MBq 99mTc was injected in the nonpalpable lesion. During surgery the radioactive breast tissue was excised using hand held gamma probe. Nonpalpable breast lesions were excised in all 110 patients. The definitive histology revealed 32 invasive carcinomas, 19 DCIS, 5 LCIS in and 54 benign breast lesions. Mean specimen weight was 40 g which is less in comparison to 53 g of the guidewire series (p=0.002). Surgical margins were clear in 36/51 (70%) invasive breast cancer or DCIS patients and close or involved in 15/51 (30%) patients. Compared to the guidewire series, where 41/92 (44%) margins were clear and 51/92 (56%) were close or involved, the difference was statistically significant (p=0.005). ROLL proved to be superior to guidewire localization in our series, allowing excision of the nonpalpable breast lesion with wider surgical margins despite lower average specimen weight. PMID:15640944

  2. [The treatment of nonpalpable breast lesions. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Latteri, M; Cipolla, C; Amato, C; Cassano, T; Salanitro, L; Graceffa, G; Di Lisi, G; Bottino, A; Grillo, A; Farro, G

    1991-04-01

    Thanks to the diffusion of the clinico-mammographic screening, in the last ten years a considerable increase of breast carcinomas diagnosed in a subclinical stage has been registered. The authors report the preliminary results of their experience in nonpalpable lesions of the breast and confirm the validity of conservative surgery for their treatment. Nonpalpable breast carcinomas must be considered as an early stage of palpable T1 tumors, for which validity of conservative surgery is largely demonstrated. Moreover, results are not compromised by possible multicentricity and/or positivity of axillary lymph nodes. PMID:1911072

  3. Dual modality surgical guidance of non-palpable breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Patricia Goodale

    Although breast conserving therapy has some advantages over the traditional mastectomy procedure, the biggest disadvantage is the chance of local re-occurrence in which a second surgery is often required. Adequate surgical removal of breast tumors requires accurate tumor localization in order to ensure a balance between optimal cosmetic results and minimization of the risk for local re-occurrence. These challenges have motivated the search for alternative, more accurate methods for intraoperative localization of non-palpable breast lesions. The overall goal of this project was to develop an innovative technique for radioguided localization of non-palpable breast lesions that is more accurate, easier for the breast surgeon, and more comfortable for the patient than the current practice of wire localization. The technique uses a dual modality breast imaging system to place a marker composed of radiolabeled albumin (99mTc-MAA or 111ln-MAA) into the lesion. Preliminary studies were made to evaluate the localization accuracy of the system, which showed that the dual modality breast scanner is capable of accurate 3-dimensional localization using either X-ray or gamma ray imaging. A 3-axis needle positioning system was built and integrated into the dual modality breast scanner and its accuracy tested. A pilot clinical trial to evaluate the dual-modality surgical guidance technique was designed and preliminary clinical data collected. Detailed results were presented on the first three subjects; although a total of seven subjects have been recruited to the study to date. So far, it has been demonstrated that the radioguided surgery technique can be performed with approximately 10 times less radiomarker activity than is currently being used by other researchers employing 99mTc-MAA as a radiomarker, while maintaining comparable localization accuracy. Although the DMSG technique has not been tested in a large cohort of subjects, the preliminary data on the first few are

  4. Diagnostic Value of Hook Wire Localization Technique for Non-Palpable Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Demiral, Gokhan; Senol, Metin; Bayraktar, Baris; Ozturk, Hasan; Celik, Yahya; Boluk, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of hook wire localization biopsy for non-palpable breast lesions which were detected by ultrasonography (USG) or mammography (MMG). Methods In this retrospective study, USG or MMG-guided hook wire localization technique was performed on 83 patients who had non-palpable breast lesions. Then histopathological examination was performed on surgically removed specimens. All patients’ mammograms or ultrasonograms were categorized using Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. Results Radiologically, 27 (32.53%) patients were classified as BI-RADS 3, 49 (59.04%) BI-RADS 4, one (1.2%) BIRADS 5 and six (7.23%) BI-RADS 0. Histopathological results were benign in 68 (81.9%) and malignant in 15 (18.1%) patients. Twenty-seven patients were classified as BI-RADS 3 and definitive diagnoses for all were benign. Besides, 49 patients were classified as BI-RADS 4 and histopathologically 14 of them were reported as malignant, and 35 as benign. Sensitivity of MMG was 93% and specificity was 55%. For USG, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 73%. Conclusion In early diagnosis of breast cancer, the validity of the imaging-guided hook wire localization biopsy of non-palpable breast lesions has been proved. The cooperation of surgeon, radiologist and pathologist increases the successfull results of hook wire localization technique. PMID:27081425

  5. Present state of and problems with core needle biopsy for non-palpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Takuji; Takahashi, Kaoru; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi

    2006-01-01

    The widespread use of screening mammography has resulted in increased detection of nonpalpable breast lesions here in Japan. For the histopathologic work-up of these lesions, stereotactic core biopsy is essential as a minimally invasive diagnostic procedure. However, the number of facilities that provide this procedure cannot keep up with the increasing demand from patients. Another issue is interpreting the results of the biopsy. With a histological diagnosis using needle samples, there is always a risk of underestimation or a false-negative result. To avoid missing cancers after stereotactic biopsy, it is important to check for sampling errors and for discrepancies between the radiologic and pathologic findings. We are pushing for the rapid spread of an ideal form of stereotactic breast core biopsy (using prone-type units, digital methods, and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy devices) throughout Japan so that every patient can undergo this examination. PMID:16518060

  6. Pathological aspects of core needle biopsy for non-palpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Usami, Shin; Moriya, Takuya; Kasajima, Atsuko; Suzuki, Akihiko; Ishida, Takanori; Sasano, Hironobu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the incidence of non-palpable or noninvasive breast cancer has increased. Consequently, criteria for choosing procedures to obtain pathological materials had changed. Fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB) are both reliable procedures for detecting breast cancer. However, for non-palpable lesions, the diagnostic accuracy of CNB is higher. The main limits of FNA are the high rate of insufficient sampling and inability to determine invasiveness. CNB is an established alternative to surgical biopsy, and CNB can avoid excess surgical biopsies in a large number of patients. In addition to accurate histological diagnosis, there is interest in obtaining prognostic information from CNB, especially for patients being considered for preoperative (neoadjuvant) therapy. CNB provides useful information about histologic type and grade. However, an unavoidable problem of CNB is underestimation of invasion. On the other hand, there is good concordance in particular for estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) between CNB and surgical excision. Several aspects of CNB remains controversial, such as diagnosing papillary lesions by CNB, problems regarding tumor cell displacement after CNB, and management of lobular neoplasia (LN) on CNB. PMID:16286907

  7. Intra-operative specimen analysis using faxitron microradiography for excision of mammographically suspicious, non-palpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Muttalib, M; Tisdall, M; Scawn, R; Shousha, S; Cummins, R S; Sinnett, H D

    2004-08-01

    Recent advances in digital imaging have made Faxitron microradiography an attractive alternative to intra-operative conventional specimen radiography (CSR) for the excision of wire-localized breast lesions. Faxitron specimen analysis time, usefulness of digital image manipulation and re-excision rates were evaluated in comparison to CSR in 299 consecutive wire-localized excisions for mammographically suspicious non-palpable breast lesions (172 procedures with Faxitron, 127 with CSR) in a non-randomized study. The corresponding mean operation times were 34.7 vs. 42.7 min and the respective re-excision rates were 19.8% vs. 31.5% (no significant difference on chi analysis P < 0.1). Faxitron digital image manipulation led to cavity biopsies in 50% (60/121) of the cancer excisions. In 19 of these (16%), histological excision margins were converted from incomplete to complete. The shorter Faxitron mean operating time enables an additional wire-localized operation per theatre list. Digital imaging guides the surgeon for additional cavity biopsies, resulting in re-excision rates as good as CSR. PMID:15325665

  8. The efficacy of 'Radio guided Occult Lesion Localization' (ROLL) versus 'Wire-guided Localization' (WGL) in breast conserving surgery for non-palpable breast cancer: A randomized clinical trial – ROLL study

    PubMed Central

    van Esser, Stijn; Hobbelink, Monique GG; Peeters, Petra HM; Buskens, Erik; van der Ploeg, Iris M; Mali, Willem PTHM; Rinkes, Inne H M Borel; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background With the increasing number of non palpable breast carcinomas, the need of a good and reliable localization method increases. Currently the wire guided localization (WGL) is the standard of care in most countries. Radio guided occult lesion localization (ROLL) is a new technique that may improve the oncological outcome, cost effectiveness, patient comfort and cosmetic outcome. However, the studies published hitherto are of poor quality providing less than convincing evidence to change the current standard of care. The aim of this study is to compare the ROLL technique with the standard of care (WGL) regarding the percentage of tumour free margins, cost effectiveness, patient comfort and cosmetic outcome. Methods/design The ROLL trial is a multi center randomized clinical trial. Over a period of 2–3 years 316 patients will be randomized between the ROLL and the WGL technique. With this number, the expected 15% difference in tumour free margins can be detected with a power of 80%. Other endpoints include cosmetic outcome, cost effectiveness, patient (dis)comfort, degree of difficulty of the procedures and the success rate of the sentinel node procedure. The rationale, study design and planned analyses are described. Trial Registration (, study protocol number NCT00539474) PMID:18495027

  9. Fine-needle aspiration cytology in nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities in breast cancer screening: results from the breast cancer screening programme in Oslo 1996-2001.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Torin; Myrvold, Kristina; Lømo, Jon; Anderssen, Karin Yvonne; Skaane, Per

    2003-10-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of nonpalpable mammographic lesions has been under attack from two sides for some years. There has been much discussion and controversy as to the ability to differentiate between in situ and invasive carcinomas in cytological material. A further issue is that of optimal sampling to obtain adequate cell material in sufficient quantity. We present the results of FNAC from 832 nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities detected in the course of the breast cancer screening programme in Oslo during 1996-2001. In 11.6% of cases the smears were inadequate, and there were 7% false negatives (FN) and 1.3% false positives. Of the FN, 64% represented microcalcifications and 86% were due to sampling errors. Absolute sensitivity was 74%, complete sensitivity 88% and specificity 88%. In 255 carcinomas a cytological diagnosis of them as in situ or invasive was made. In 93% of the invasive cases (190/205) these had been correctly identified as invasive on FNAC. In 78% of cases proper follow-up could be resolved by cytology/radiology alone. Suboptimal sampling and localization remains the main cause of FN FNAC results. Problems in differentiating between in situ and invasive breast carcinomas can be significantly reduced by applying strict criteria for in situ lesions. PMID:14659146

  10. Simulation of spiculated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Alrehily, Faisal; Pinto, R. Ferrari; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are a promising new approach increasingly used for the evaluation and comparison of breast imaging modalities. A key component in such an assessment paradigm is the use of simulated pathology, in particular, simulation of lesions. Breast mass lesions can be generally classified into two categories based on their appearance; nonspiculated masses and spiculated masses. In our previous work, we have successfully simulated non-spiculated masses using a fractal growth process known as diffusion limited aggregation. In this new work, we have extended the DLA model to simulate spiculated lesions by using features extracted from patient DBT images containing spiculated lesions. The features extracted included spicule length, width, curvature and distribution. This information was used to simulate realistic looking spicules which were attached to the surface of a DLA mass to produce a spiculated mass. A batch of simulated spiculated masses was inserted into normal patient images and presented to an experienced radiologist for review. The study yielded promising results with the radiologist rating 60% of simulated lesions in 2D and 50% of simulated lesions in DBT as realistic.

  11. 99Tcm-MIBI scintimammography in the evaluation of breast lesions and axillary involvement: a comparison with mammography and histopathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Arslan, N; Oztürk, E; Ilgan, S; Urhan, M; Karaçalioglu, O; Pekcan, M; Tufan, T; Bayhan, H

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the diagnostic value of prone lateral 99Tcm-MIBI scintimammography in the detection of primary breast cancer and axillary lymph node involvement in patients with breast lesions. We evaluated 83 palpable and 22 non-palpable lesions in 77 consecutive patients with a clinically palpable mass and/or suspicious mammographic finding. Early and late scintimammograms were performed after the intravenous injection of 740 MBq 99Tcm-MIBI. The overall sensitivity of both scintimammography and mammography in the detection of primary breast cancer was 94%. The overall specificity was 84% and 56% for scintimammography and mammography respectively. In the patients with palpable masses, the sensitivity of scintimammography was 97% and the specificity was 84%; in those with non-palpable masses, the sensitivity was 35% and the specificity 100%. For the detection of axillary lymph node involvement, the sensitivity and specificity of scintimammography were 68% and 93% respectively. However, conventional mammography showed 37% sensitivity and 86% specificity. In conclusion, scintimammography is an accurate and clinically valuable tool for evaluating palpable and non-palpable breast abnormalities. In addition to its high sensitivity, it improves the specificity of mammography both in the evaluation of breast masses and in the detection of axillary involvement. PMID:10319351

  12. Breast lesions in generalized neurofibromatosis: breast cancer and cystosarcoma phylloides.

    PubMed

    el-Zawahry, M D; Farid, M; Abd el-Latif, A; Horeia, H; el-Gindy, M; Twakal, G

    1989-01-01

    This report describes three cases from one surgical unit of the Mansoura Teaching Hospital of Cairo, Egypt, with generalized neurofibromatosis and associated breast lesions. Two patients had carcinoma of the breast and the third had cystosarcoma phylloides. PMID:2560398

  13. Efficiency of Core Biopsy for BI-RADS-5 Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ronald; Quan, Glenda; Calhoun, Kris; Soot, Laurel; Skokan, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic biopsy has proven more cost effective for biopsy of lesions associated with moderately suspicious mammograms. Data regarding selection of stereotactic biopsy (CORE) instead of excisional biopsy (EB) as the first diagnostic procedure in patients with nonpalpable breast lesions and highest suspicion breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS)-5 mammograms are sparse. Records from a regional health system radiology database were screened for mammograms associated with image-guided biopsy. A total of 182 nonpalpable BI-RADS-5 lesions were sampled in 178 patients over 5 years, using CORE or EB. Initial surgical margins, number of surgeries, time from initial procedure to last related surgical procedure, and hospital and professional charges for related admissions were compared using chi-squared, t-test, and Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney tests. A total of 108 CORE and 74 EB were performed as the first diagnostic procedure. Invasive or in situ carcinoma was diagnosed in 156 (86%) of all biopsies, 95 in CORE and 61 in EB groups. Negative margins of the first surgical procedure were more frequent in CORE (n = 70, 74%) versus EB (n = 17, 28%), p < 0.05. Use of CORE was associated with fewer total surgical procedures per lesion (1.29 +/- 0.05 versus 1.8 +/- 0.05, p < 0.05). Time of initial diagnostic procedure to final treatment did not vary significantly according to group (27 +/- 2 days versus 22 +/- 2 days, CORE versus EB). Mean charges including the diagnostic procedure and all subsequent surgeries were not different between CORE and EB groups ($10,500 +/- 300 versus $11,500 +/- 500, p = 0.08). Use of CORE as the first procedure in patients with highly suspicious mammograms is associated with improved pathologic margins and need for fewer surgical procedures than EB, and should be considered the preferred initial diagnostic approach. PMID:18821933

  14. Feasibility of preoperative 125I seed-guided tumoural tracer injection using freehand SPECT for sentinel lymph node mapping in non-palpable breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to explore the feasibility of replacing the conventional peri-/intratumoural ultrasound (US)-guided technetium-99m albumin nanocolloid (99mTc-nanocolloid) administration by an injection of the same tracer guided by a freehand single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) device in patients with non-palpable breast cancer with an iodine-125 (125I) seed as tumour marker, who are scheduled for a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). This approach aimed to decrease the workload of the radiology department, avoiding a second US-guided procedure. Methods In ten patients, the implanted 125I seed was primarily localised using freehand SPECT and subsequently verified by conventional US in order to inject the 99mTc-nanocolloid. The following 34 patients were injected using only freehand SPECT localisation. In these patients, additional SPECT/CT was acquired to measure the distance between the 99mTc-nanocolloid injection depot and the 125I seed. In retrospect, a group of 21 patients with US-guided 99mTc-nanocolloid administrations was included as a control group. Results The depth difference measured by US and freehand SPECT in ten patients was 1.6 ± 1.6 mm. In the following 36 125I seeds (34 patients), the average difference between the 125I seed and the centre of the 99mTc-nanocolloid injection depot was 10.9 ± 6.8 mm. In the retrospective study, the average distance between the 125I seed and the centre of the 99mTc-nanocolloid injection depot as measured in SPECT/CT was 9.7 ± 6.5 mm and was not significantly different compared to the freehand SPECT-guided group (two-sample Student's t test, p = 0.52). Conclusion We conclude that using freehand SPECT for 99mTc-nanocolloid administration in patients with non-palpable breast cancer with previously implanted 125I seed is feasible. This technique may improve daily clinical logistics, reducing the workload of the radiology department. PMID:24949282

  15. Therapeutic application of ultrasound-guided 8-gauge Mammotome system in presumed benign breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao-jun; Chen, Xin; Tu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Wu, Cheng-yi; Yang, Guang-lun

    2011-01-01

    The stereotactic or ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (Mammotome, MMT) system is a minimally invasive surgical technique. Increasingly, it is used to remove benign breast lesions as management. To evaluate the therapeutic value of 8-gauge ultrasound-guided MMT system (UMS) in presumed benign breast lesions, a retrospective analysis was performed on a series of 2,167 consecutive 8-gauge UMS procedures. The parameters used in this analysis included lesion size, location, breast imaging reporting and data system for ultrasound category, histopathologic diagnosis, and others. A total of 1,119 women whose mean ages were 36.6 years (range: 12-71, SD: 9.6) underwent 2,167 consecutive 8-gauge UMS procedures. Among the patients, 298 cases (26.63%) did not have palpable mass, 430 (38.43%) had multiple lesions, and 237 (21.18%) had bilateral ones. The average size of excised lesions was 15.8 mm (range: 5-55, SD: 6.7) in the largest dimension, including 294 lesions < 10 mm (13.57%); 1,359 lesions, 10-19 mm (62.71%); 420 lesions, 20-29 mm (19.38%), and 94 lesions ≥ 30 mm (4.34%). Predominant lesions (81.59%) were solid on ultrasound image and nearly half (48.59%) of them were localized in the upper outer quadrant. Histopathologic diagnosis revealed that the overwhelming majority of specimens (96.61%) were benign, most of which manifested as fibroadenoma and fibrocystic changes, while high-risk lesions were revealed in 31 (2.29%) cases and malignancies in 15 (1.11%). Average time for procedure was 8.6 minutes (range: 3.5-38, SD: 5.4) and mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 9.3 (range: 2-42, SD: 3.7). Complete excision was achieved predominantly (99.82%). Complications (59, 5.27%) in which hematoma (41, 3.66%) was the majority were acceptable. In conclusion, the 8-gauge UMS procedure is a safe and potent therapeutic management with satisfactory cosmetic outcome for benign and high-risk breast lesions, especially for bilateral, multiple, and

  16. 21 CFR 884.2990 - Breast lesion documentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Breast lesion documentation system. 884.2990... Devices § 884.2990 Breast lesion documentation system. (a) Identification. A breast lesion documentation system is a device for use in producing a surface map of the breast as an aid to document palpable...

  17. 21 CFR 884.2990 - Breast lesion documentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breast lesion documentation system. 884.2990... Devices § 884.2990 Breast lesion documentation system. (a) Identification. A breast lesion documentation system is a device for use in producing a surface map of the breast as an aid to document palpable...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2990 - Breast lesion documentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Breast lesion documentation system. 884.2990... Devices § 884.2990 Breast lesion documentation system. (a) Identification. A breast lesion documentation system is a device for use in producing a surface map of the breast as an aid to document palpable...

  19. 21 CFR 884.2990 - Breast lesion documentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breast lesion documentation system. 884.2990... Devices § 884.2990 Breast lesion documentation system. (a) Identification. A breast lesion documentation system is a device for use in producing a surface map of the breast as an aid to document palpable...

  20. 21 CFR 884.2990 - Breast lesion documentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Breast lesion documentation system. 884.2990... Devices § 884.2990 Breast lesion documentation system. (a) Identification. A breast lesion documentation system is a device for use in producing a surface map of the breast as an aid to document palpable...

  1. Computerized lesion detection on breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L; Horsch, Karla; Kupinski, Matthew A; Vyborny, Carl J; Mendelson, Ellen B

    2002-07-01

    We investigated the use of a radial gradient index (RGI) filtering technique to automatically detect lesions on breast ultrasound. After initial RGI filtering, a sensitivity of 87% at 0.76 false-positive detections per image was obtained on a database of 400 patients (757 images). Next, lesion candidates were segmented from the background by maximizing an average radial gradient (ARD) index for regions grown from the detected points. At an overlap of 0.4 with a radiologist lesion outline, 75% of the lesions were correctly detected. Subsequently, round robin analysis was used to assess the quality of the classification of lesion candidates into actual lesions and false-positives by a Bayesian neural network. The round robin analysis yielded an Az value of 0.84, and an overall performance by case of 94% sensitivity at 0.48 false-positives per image. Use of computerized analysis of breast sonograms may ultimately facilitate the use of sonography in breast cancer screening programs. PMID:12148724

  2. Hematoma-Directed Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, LaNette F.; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Harms, Steve; Hronas, Theodore; Mancino, Anne T.; Westbrook, Kent C.; Korourian, Sohelia; Jones, Mary P.; Klimberg, V. Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Objective and Summary Background Data The standard technique for removal of nonpalpable breast lesions is needle localization breast biopsy. Because traumatic hematomas can often be seen with ultrasound, the authors hypothesized that iatrogenically induced hematomas could be used to guide the excision of nonpalpable lesions using ultrasound. Methods Twenty patients with nonpalpable breast lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging only were enrolled in this single-institution trial, approved by the institutional review board. A hematoma consisting of 2 to 5 mL of the patient’s own blood was injected into the breast to target the nonpalpable lesion. Intraoperative ultrasound of the hematoma was used to direct the excisional biopsy. Results The average age of women was 53.8 ± 10 years. Ninety-five percent of lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging were localized by hematoma injection. All the hematomas used to recognize targeted lesions were identified at surgery by ultrasound and removed without complication. Eight (40%) of the lesions were malignant, with an average tumor size of 12 ± 6 mm (range 4–25). The remaining 12 lesions (60%) comprised papillomas, sclerosing adenosis, radial scar, fibroadenoma, and areas of atypical ductal hyperplasia. Conclusion The results of this pilot study show the effectiveness of hematoma-directed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy for nonpalpable lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging. This new procedure is potentially more comfortable for the patient because no wire or needle is left in the breast. It is technically faster and easier because ultrasound is used to visualize directly the location of the hematoma at surgery and to confirm lesion removal in the operating room by specimen ultrasound. The hematoma can be placed several days before biopsy, easing scheduling, and without fear of the migration that may occur with needle localization. This method may have ready application to mammographically detected

  3. Malignant hyperechoic breast lesions at ultrasound: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Tiang, Stephen; Metcalf, Cecily; Dissanayake, Deepthi; Wylie, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Malignant breast lesions are typically hypoechoic at sonography. However, a small subgroup of hyperechoic malignant breast lesions is encountered in clinical practice. We present a pictorial essay of a number of different hyperechoic breast malignancies with mammographic, sonographic and histopathologic correlation. Suspicious sonographic features in a hyperechoic lesion include inhomogeneity in echogenic pattern, an irregular margin, posterior acoustic shadowing and internal vascularity. A hyperechoic lesion at ultrasound does not discount the need to undertake histological assessment of a mammographically suspicious lesion. PMID:27216965

  4. Detection of breast lesions by holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, HyunDae; Sheffer, Daniel B.; Loughry, C. William

    1999-07-01

    The holographic interferometry (HI) technique commonly used for nondestructive testing of laminate materials was applied to create fringe contour distortion near the site of indwelling breast lesions. For this medical imaging application, the HI technique was successful in demonstrating abnormal mechanical properties of living tissue. Adequate density and contrast of fringes, crucial factors necessary for analysis of surface deformation of an object, can be made only with an appropriate stressing method. We have applied vibration and mild pressure to the surface of female breasts for the purpose of detecting localized densities and mass alterations of the tissue, which may be indicative of an abnormality of that tissue. Even though each stressing method had both positive and negative aspects, pneumatic pressure was adopted for the present study because it was more suitable for a noninvasive and noncontact breast examination. We also developed a computer based holographic imaging system to precisely control the stressing phase for the pressure and laser triggering so the resultant holograms had manageable fringe density and repeatability.

  5. Hyperechoic breast lesions: anatomopathological correlation and differential sonographic diagnosis*

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Marcelo Menezes; Graziano, Luciana; de Souza, Juliana Alves; Guatelli, Camila Souza; Poli, Miriam Rosalina B.; Yoshitake, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hyperechoic lesions are not a frequent finding at breasts ultrasonography, and most of times are associated with benign pathologies that do not require further evaluation. However, some neoplasms such as invasive breast carcinomas and metastases may present with hyperechogenicity. Thus, the knowledge about differential diagnoses and identification of signs of lesion aggressiveness are of great relevance to avoid unnecessary procedures or underdiagnosis, and to support the correct clinical/surgical approach. On the basis of such concepts, the present essay describes and illustrates the main features of hyperechoic lesions at breast ultrasonography in different cases, with anatomopathological correlation. PMID:26929460

  6. Characterization of Breast Lesions: Comparison of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Ah; Cho, Nariya; Yi, Ann; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and conventional breast ultrasound (US) to characterize breast lesions as benign or malignant. Materials and Methods A total of 332 women, presenting for screening examinations or for breast biopsy between March and June 2012 were recruited to undergo digital mammography (DM), DBT, and breast US examination. Among them, 113 patients with 119 breast lesions depicted on DM were finally included. Three blinded radiologists performed an enriched reader study and reviewed the DBT and US images. Each reader analyzed the lesions in random order, assigned Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) descriptors, rated the images for the likelihood of malignancy (%) and made a BI-RADS final assessment. Diagnostic accuracy, as assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, and specificity of DBT and US were compared. Results Among the 119 breast lesions depicted on DM, 75 were malignant and the remaining 44 were benign. The average diagnostic performance for characterizing breast lesions as benign or malignant in terms of area under the curve was 0.899 for DBT and 0.914 for US (p = 0.394). Mean sensitivity (97.3% vs. 98.7%, p = 0.508) and specificity (44.7% vs. 39.4%, p = 0.360) were also not significantly different. Conclusion Digital breast tomosynthesis may provide similar reader lesion characterization performance to that of US for breast lesions depicted on DM. PMID:25741187

  7. Management of breast magnetic resonance imaging-detected lesions.

    PubMed

    Seely, Jean M

    2012-08-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential component of breast imaging. Whether it is used as a problem-solving tool or a screening test or for staging patients with breast cancer, it detects many lesions in the breast. The challenge for the radiologist is to distinguish significant from insignificant lesions and to direct their management. A brief summary of the terminology according to the American College of Radiologists lexicon will be provided. This review article will cover the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions, including masses and nonmass enhancement, from benign and malignant causes. Some of the specific morphologic and kinetic features that help to differentiate benign from malignant lesions will be illustrated, and positive predictive values of these features will be reviewed. The various methods of investigating enhancing lesions of the breast will be discussed, including second-look ultrasound, ultrasound-guided biopsy, stereotactic biopsy, and MRI-guided biopsy. A practical approach to the management of MRI-detected lesions will include timing of follow-up, when to biopsy and when to ignore enhancing lesions in the breast. PMID:21798693

  8. Management issues in breast lesions diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration and percutaneous core breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Pascale; Simsir, Aylin; Cangiarella, Joan

    2006-06-01

    The use offine-needle aspiration biopsy or percutaneous core needle biopsy to diagnose breast lesions has increased during the past few decades. Although the benefits of these procedures are well known, controversies remain about the management of certain categories of breast lesions detected by these methods. This article discusses the management issues in categories of breast lesions, including papillary lesions, atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ, and mucinous lesions diagnosed by the preoperative techniques of aspiration or core biopsy. PMID:16830962

  9. Diffuse Infiltrative Lesion of the Breast: Clinical and Radiologic Features

    PubMed Central

    An, Yeong Yi; Cha, Eun Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Chang Suk; Jung, Na Young; Whang, In Yong; Yoon, Soo Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the clinical and radiologic features of a variety of diffuse, infiltrative breast lesions, as well to review the relevant literature. Radiologists must be familiar with the various conditions that can diffusely involve the breast, including normal physiologic changes, benign disease and malignant neoplasm. PMID:21228947

  10. Characterization of lesions in dense breasts: Does tomosynthesis help?

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Krithika; Hari, Smriti; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Sanjay; Srivastava, Anurag; Parshad, Rajinder

    2016-01-01

    Context: Mammography in dense breasts is challenging due to lesion obscuration by tissue overlap. Does tomosynthesis offers a solution? Aims: To study the impact of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in characterizing lesions in breasts of different mammographic densities. Settings and Design: Prospective blinded study comparing mammography in two views with Mammography + Tomosynthesis. Methods and Material: Tomosynthesis was performed in 199 patients who were assigned Breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) categories 0, 3, 4, or 5 on two-dimensional (2D) mammogram. Mammograms were first categorized into one of 4 mammographic breast densities in accordance with the American College of Radiology (ACR). Three radiologists independently analyzed these images and assigned a BIRADS category first based on 2D mammogram alone, and then assigned a fresh BIRADS category after taking mammography and tomosynthesis into consideration. A composite gold-standard was used in the study (histopathology, ultrasound, follow-up mammogram, magnetic resonance imaging). Each lesion was categorized into 3 groups—superior categorization with DBT, no change in BIRADS, or inferior BIRADS category based on comparison with the gold-standard. The percentage of lesions in each group was calculated for different breast densities. Results: There were 260 lesions (ages 28–85). Overall, superior categorization was seen in 21.2% of our readings on addition of DBT to mammography. DBT was most useful in ACR Densities 3 and 4 breasts where it led to more appropriate categorization in 27 and 42% of lesions, respectively. DBT also increased diagnostic confidence in 54.5 and 63.6% of lesions in ACR Densities 3 and 4, respectively. Conclusions: In a diagnostic setting, the utility of tomosynthesis increases with increasing breast density. This helps in identifying the sub category of patients where DBT can actually change management.

  11. Optical discrimination between malignant and benign breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Ieva, Francesca; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Abbate, Francesca; Cassano, Enrico; Taroni, Paola

    2015-07-01

    Time domain multi-wavelength (635 to 1060 nm) optical mammography was performed on 82 subjects with breast lesions (45 malignant and 38 benign lesions). A perturbative approach based on the high-order calculation of the pathlength of photons inside the lesion was applied to estimate differences between lesion and average healthy tissue of the same breast in terms of: i) absorption properties, and ii) concentration of the major tissue constituents (oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipid and collagen). The absorption difference Δμa between lesion and healthy tissue is significantly different for malignant vs. benign lesions at all wavelengths. Logistic regression fitted to the absorption data identifies 975 nm as the key wavelength to discriminate malignant from benign lesions. When the difference in tissue composition between lesion and healthy tissue is considered, malignant lesions are characterized by significantly higher collagen content than benign lesions. Also the best model for the discrimination of malignant lesions obtained applying regression logistic to tissue composition is based only on collagen. Including demographic information into the model improves its specificity.

  12. Raman spectroscopic analysis of atypical proliferative lesions of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, K.; Kendall, C.; Stone, N.; Brown, J. C.; McCarthy, K.; Bristol, J.; Chan, Y. H.

    2006-02-01

    Atypical lesions of the breast have potential to turn malignant. The diagnosis of these lesions has increased considerably with screening mammography. A good understanding of their progression to invasive cancer is yet to be proved. Using Raman spectroscopy to study their chemical finger printing at different stages of proliferation a clear picture of whether a progression exists between lesions could be made. At present there is no clear recognition of the biochemical changes that distinguish between the different proliferative lesions of the breast. Our aim is to understand these changes through Raman mapping studies. Raman spectroscopy is a highly sensitive and specific technique for demonstration of biochemical changes in different atypical proliferative lesions of the breast. The technique could be used to classify the different grades and analyse progression of pathology in the proliferative lesions of the breast. Breast pathologists carefully marked 50 ducts and classified the different pathology on H and E sections from biopsy samples. Raman spectra were measured, using a Renishaw Raman Spectrometer, on a 20-micron thick consecutive frozen section. Principal component analysis was undertaken using Matlab. Pseudocolor maps of the principal components scores have been generated. The peaks of the corresponding loads were identified enabling visualisation of the biochemical changes associated with proliferative lesions. Proliferative lesions of the duct were grouped according to the existing standard pathological classification and formed four major groups-HUT, ADH, DCIS and IDC. Spectra of biochemical constituents were fitted to mean spectra from selected regions, taken from maps of each pathology, to identify the relative concentration of the constituents. The study gave an insight into chemical make up of the ducts in each pathology group and showed similar results to earlier studies in progression but no clear-cut demarcation or continuum of the

  13. Grey zone lesions of breast: Potential areas of error in cytology.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Dey, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the breast is a rapid, cost-effective, and sensitive procedure to diagnose breast lesions, and was widely employed to diagnose breast lesions in the past. However, in recent times, core needle biopsy of the breast is gaining popularity and acceptability, although FNAC still looms large. There are some intrinsic disadvantages to FNAC, of which the most important is probably difficulty in classification of a significant percentage of breast lesions. Such lesions are usually denoted by the rubric "grey zone lesions of the breast." This article attempts to review these grey zone lesions and highlight the difficulties in diagnosing them. PMID:26729973

  14. Grey zone lesions of breast: Potential areas of error in cytology

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Dey, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the breast is a rapid, cost-effective, and sensitive procedure to diagnose breast lesions, and was widely employed to diagnose breast lesions in the past. However, in recent times, core needle biopsy of the breast is gaining popularity and acceptability, although FNAC still looms large. There are some intrinsic disadvantages to FNAC, of which the most important is probably difficulty in classification of a significant percentage of breast lesions. Such lesions are usually denoted by the rubric “grey zone lesions of the breast.” This article attempts to review these grey zone lesions and highlight the difficulties in diagnosing them. PMID:26729973

  15. Computerized analysis of sonograms for the detection of breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.; Horsch, Karla; Vyborny, Carl J.

    2002-05-01

    With a renewed interest in using non-ionizing radiation for the screening of high risk women, there is a clear role for a computerized detection aid in ultrasound. Thus, we are developing a computerized detection method for the localization of lesions on breast ultrasound images. The computerized detection scheme utilizes two methods. Firstly, a radial gradient index analysis is used to distinguish potential lesions from normal parenchyma. Secondly, an image skewness analysis is performed to identify posterior acoustic shadowing. We analyzed 400 cases (757 images) consisting of complex cysts, solid benign lesions, and malignant lesions. The detection method yielded an overall sensitivity of 95% by image, and 99% by case at a false-positive rate of 0.94 per image. In 51% of all images, only the lesion itself was detected, while in 5% of the images only the shadowing was identified. For malignant lesions these numbers were 37% and 9%, respectively. In summary, we have developed a computer detection method for lesions on ultrasound images of the breast, which may ultimately aid in breast cancer screening.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) in breast cancer using Tc-99m macro-aggregated albumin and distilled water control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided wire localization presents several challenges apart from the technical difficulties. An alternative to this conventional localization method using a wire is the radio-guided occult lesion localization (ROLL), more related to safe surgical margins and reductions in excision volume. The purpose of this study was to establish a safe and reliable magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (MRI-ROLL) technique and to report our initial experience with the localization of nonpalpable breast lesions only observed on MRI. Methods Sixteen women (mean age 53.2 years) with 17 occult breast lesions underwent radio-guided localization in a 1.5-T MR system using a grid-localizing system. All patients had a diagnostic MRI performed prior to the procedure. An intralesional injection of Technetium-99m macro-aggregated albumin followed by distilled water was performed. After the procedure, scintigraphy was obtained. Surgical resection was performed with the help of a gamma detector probe. The lesion histopathology and imaging concordance; the procedure’s positive predictive value (PPV), duration time, complications, and accuracy; and the rate of exactly excised lesions evaluated with MRI six months after the surgery were assessed. Results One lesion in one patient had to be excluded because the radioactive substance came back after the injection, requiring a wire placement. Of the remaining cases, there were four malignant lesions, nine benign lesions, and three high-risk lesions. Surgical histopathology and imaging findings were considered concordant in all benign and high-risk cases. The PPV of MRI-ROLL was greater if the indication for the initial MR examination was active breast cancer. The median procedure duration time was 26 minutes, and all included procedures were defined as accurate. The exact and complete lesion removal was confirmed in all (100%) patients who underwent six-month postoperative MRI

  17. Magnetic resonance guided localization and biopsy of suspicious breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, U; Kopka, L; Grabbe, E

    1998-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being used increasingly as a complementary diagnostic modality in breast imaging of preselected patients. The exclusion of multicentricity before surgery and the differentiation between a scar and a carcinoma are well-accepted indications of this method. Problems result when suspicious lesions found with MRI cannot be visualized with mammography or ultrasonography. In these cases, MRI-based guidance systems are needed to guide needle biopsy or allow localization of the lesion before surgery. At our institution, 167 MR-guided interventions (35 percutaneous biopsies and 132 preoperative localizations) have been performed with the use of different types of add-on devices during the past 3 years. Percutaneous biopsy (31 fine needle aspiration and four core biopsies) revealed 24 benign and 8 malignant lesions, 3 biopsies were insufficient. Histologic examination after MR-guided wire localization showed benign findings in 68 lesions (52%) and malignancy in 64 lesions (48%). Technical aspects, experiences, advantages, and disadvantages of our system as well as those of other devices are reported and discussed. MR-compatible equipment for interventions of the breast is demonstrated. In conclusion, we perform MR-guided interventions of the breast routinely in indicated cases at a rate of approximately 3-5% for all patients undergoing diagnostic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast. PMID:9617901

  18. Nonpalpable thyroid carcinoma: clinical controversies on preoperative selection.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Angelo; Nicolini, Andrea; Casara, Dario; Rubello, Domenico; Rosa Pelizzo, Maria

    2003-06-01

    This article emphasizes some controversies concerning the preoperative selection of nonpalpable thyroid tumors. The prevalence of occult thyroid carcinoma in surgical series (1.8-10%) is not higher than in autopsy thyroid series (2.7-24%). The prevalence of occult thyroid carcinoma in thyroid glands examined in the same institution by ultrasound, for a clinical thyroid abnormality or for investigation of other neck structures without clinically evident or suspected thyroid disease, varies from 3% to 8% and is very similar independent of the fact that a thyroid abnormality is or is not the indication for ultrasonography. These data suggest that the presence of a thyroid disease is not a risk factor for harboring an occult thyroid carcinoma (except for C-cell hyperplasia in the rare case of MEN 2 syndromes). As it is not cost effective to examine all the nonpalpable lesions with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) guided by ultrasounds, it is necessary to define to which extent ultrasound is useful in selecting those lesions to be examined cytologically by FNA. The use of ultrasound to select these lesions is very controversial. Ultrasound-guided cytologic diagnosis of nonpalpable nodules is not as accurate as in the case of palpable nodules. Sampling of material adequate for cytologic analysis depends on the lesion size; it is 64% for a 0.7-cm lesion and it increases to 86.7% for a mean size of 1.1 cm. For the diagnosis of occult thyroid carcinomas (< or =1 cm), sensitivity is 35.8% and false-negative results are 49.3%. Nonpalpable nodules with a size of 1.5 cm represent an absolute indication to perform an ultrasound-guided FNA because this is the size limit for dividing thyroid nodules in probably innocuous or potentially dangerous categories and because the cytologic diagnosis of nodules of this size is sufficiently reliable. For the smaller incidentally discovered thyroid nodules following ultrasound, physicians should discuss with the patient whether and when to

  19. Second-look ultrasonography for MRI-detected suspicious breast lesions in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of second-look ultrasonography (US) for investigating additional suspicious lesions detected on preoperative staging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast cancer. Methods: Between September 2008 and August 2010, 1,970 breast MRIs were performed at our medical institution for the evaluation of breast cancer before surgery. Second-look US was recommended for 135 patients with 149 suspicious lesions, following the MRI interpretation, and 108 patients with 121 lesions were included in this study. The detection rate on second-look US, according to the lesion type, diameter, and histopathological outcome, was analyzed. Results: Of the 121 lesions considered in this study, 97 (80.2%) were diagnosed on MRI as masses and 24 (19.8%) as non-mass-like lesions; 105 lesions (86.8%) were correlated and 16 (13.2%) were not correlated with the findings of second-look US. Of the 105 correlated lesions, 29 (27.6%) were proven to be malignant and 76 (72.4%) were benign. Although a greater number of large malignant lesions were correlated on second-look US than small benign lesions, there was no statistically significant difference according to lesion diameter or type, as seen on MRI or pathology. Conclusion: We have concluded that second-look US is a useful diagnostic tool for lesions incidentally detected on breast MRI, as in this study, it could identify 86.8% of the MRI-detected breast lesions. PMID:25623054

  20. First International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions).

    PubMed

    Rageth, Christoph J; O'Flynn, Elizabeth Am; Comstock, Christopher; Kurtz, Claudia; Kubik, Rahel; Madjar, Helmut; Lepori, Domenico; Kampmann, Gert; Mundinger, Alexander; Baege, Astrid; Decker, Thomas; Hosch, Stefanie; Tausch, Christoph; Delaloye, Jean-François; Morris, Elisabeth; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain a consensus for the therapy of B3 lesions. The first International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions) including atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), classical lobular neoplasia (LN), papillary lesions (PL), benign phyllodes tumors (PT), and radial scars (RS) took place in January 2016 in Zurich, Switzerland organized by the International Breast Ultrasound School and the Swiss Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy group-a subgroup of the Swiss Society of Senology. Consensus recommendations for the management and follow-up surveillance of these B3 lesions were developed and areas of research priorities were identified. The consensus recommendation for FEA, LN, PL, and RS diagnosed on core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) is to therapeutically excise the lesion seen on imaging by VAB and no longer by open surgery, with follow-up surveillance imaging for 5 years. The consensus recommendation for ADH and PT is, with some exceptions, therapeutic first-line open surgical excision. Minimally invasive management of selected B3 lesions with therapeutic VAB is acceptable as an alternative to first-line surgical excision. PMID:27522516

  1. Novel Use for DOG1 in Discriminating Breast Invasive Carcinoma from Noninvasive Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henghui; Qu, Zhiling; Zhou, Sheng; Ruan, Qiurong

    2016-01-01

    Aims. DOG1 has proven to be a useful marker of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Recently, DOG1 expression has also been reported in some non-GIST malignant tumors, but the details related to DOG1 expression in breast tissue remain unclear. The aim of this study was to detect the expression of DOG1 in the human breast and to evaluate the feasibility of using DOG1 to discriminate between invasive breast carcinoma and noninvasive breast lesions. Methods and Results. A total of 210 cases, including both invasive and noninvasive breast lesions, were collected to assess DOG1 expression immunohistochemically. DOG1 expression was consistently positive in breast myoepithelial cells (MECs), which was similar to the results obtained for three other MEC markers: calponin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), and P63 (P > 0.05 in all). Importantly, DOG1 was useful in discriminating invasive breast carcinoma from noninvasive breast lesions (P < 0.05). Conclusions. DOG1 is a useful marker of breast MECs, and adding DOG1 to the MEC identification panel will provide more sophisticated information when diagnosing uncertain cases in the breast. PMID:27041791

  2. Breast ultrasound imaging phantom to mimic malign lesion characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, I. M.; Basto, R. L. Q.; Infantosi, A. F. C.; von Krüger, M. A.; Pereira, W. C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) phantoms are used to simulate the main acoustic properties of human soft tissues and are usually applied in guided biopsy training and equipment calibration. In this work it is presented an ultrasound phantom that mimics breast lesions with irregular edge, which is a typical feature related to malignancy. The phantom matrix was made of a mixture of water, agar, glycerine and graphite and PVC powders and the lesions were of silicon and polyacrylamide. The mimicking properties were US attenuation, propagation speed and density. The images obtained were visually compatible to malignant and benign lesions and are meant to be used as references for evaluation of segmentation algorithms for image processing.

  3. Effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Huang, Minming; Zhu, Quing

    2009-07-01

    The chest wall underneath the breast tissue affects near-infrared (NIR) diffusive waves measured with reflection geometry. With the assistance of a co-registered ultrasound, the depth and the tilting angle of the chest wall can be determined and are used to model the breast as a two-layer medium. Finite element method (FEM) is suitable for modeling complex boundary conditions and is adapted to model the breast tissue and chest wall. Four parameters of bulk absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of these two layers are estimated and used for imaging reconstruction. Using a two-layer model, we have systematically investigated the effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction. Results have shown that chest-wall depth, titling angle, and difference between optical properties of two layers of lesion and reference sites affect the lesion reconstruction differently. Our analysis will be valuable and informative to researchers who are using reflectance geometry for breast imaging. The analysis can also provide guidelines for imaging operators to minimize image artifacts and to produce the best reconstruction results.

  4. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal. PMID:26185119

  5. Frequent phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase mutations in proliferative breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne C; Warrick, Andrea L; Shilling, Amy; Beadling, Carol; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2014-05-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway is one of the most commonly altered molecular pathways in invasive breast carcinoma, with phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) mutations in 25% of invasive carcinomas. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), benign papillomas, and small numbers of columnar cell lesions harbor an analogous spectrum of PIK3CA and AKT1 mutations, yet there is little data on usual ductal hyperplasia and atypical ductal and lobular neoplasias. We screened 192 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast lesions from 75 patients for point mutations using a multiplexed panel encompassing 643 point mutations across 53 genes, including 58 PIK3CA substitutions. PIK3CA point mutations were identified in 31/62 (50%) proliferative lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia and columnar cell change), 10/14 (71%) atypical hyperplasias (atypical ductal hyperplasia and flat epithelial atypia), 7/16 (44%) lobular neoplasias (atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ), 10/21 (48%) DCIS, and 13/37 (35%) invasive carcinomas. In genotyping multiple lesions of different stage from the same patient/specimen, we found considerable heterogeneity; most notably, in 12 specimens the proliferative lesion was PIK3CA mutant but the concurrent carcinoma was wild type. In 11 additional specimens, proliferative epithelium and cancer contained different point mutations. The frequently discordant genotypes of usual ductal hyperplasia/columnar cell change and concurrent carcinoma support a role for PIK3CA-activating point mutations in breast epithelial proliferation, perhaps more so than transformation. Further, these data suggest that proliferative breast lesions are heterogeneous and may represent non-obligate precursors of invasive carcinoma. PMID:24186142

  6. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, E A M; Wilson, A R M; Michell, M J

    2010-04-01

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues. PMID:20338392

  7. Classification of breast lesions presenting as mass and non-mass lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Ortiz, Cristina; Martel, Anne L.

    2014-03-01

    We aim to develop a CAD system for robust and reliable di erential diagnosis of breast lesions, in particular non-mass lesions. A necessary prerequisite for the development of a successful CAD system is the selection of the best subset of lesion descriptors. But an important methodological concern is whether the selected features are in uenced by the model employed rather than by the underlying characteristic distribution of descriptors for positive and negative cases. Another interesting question is how a particular classi er exploits the relationships between descriptors to increase the accuracy of the classi cation. In this work we set to: (1) Characterize kinetic, morphological and textural features among mass and non-mass lesions; (2) Examine feature spaces and compare selection of subset of features based on similarity of feature importance across feature rankings; (3) Compare two classi er performances namely binary Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Random Forest (RF) for the task of di erentiating between positive and negative cases when using binary classi cation for mass and non-mass lesions separately or when employing a multi-class classi cation. Breast MRI datasets consists of 243 (173 mass and 70 non-mass) lesions. Results show that RF variable importance used with RF-binary based classi cation optimized for mass and non-mass lesions separately o ers the best classi cation accuracy.

  8. Electropotential evaluation as a new technique for diagnosing breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Faupel, M; Vanel, D; Barth, V; Davies, R; Fentiman, I S; Holland, R; Lamarque, J L; Sacchini, V; Schreer, I

    1997-01-01

    A new approach, termed the Biofield test, may have the potential to augment the process of diagnosing breast cancer. This technique is based on the analysis of skin surface electrical potentials measured by an array of specially designed sensors which are placed on the breasts. Measurements are recorded noninvasively and then analyzed using pattern recognition algorithms to produce an immediate and objective assessment of breast tissue in vivo. Initial clinical trials suggests that the test can achieve a sensitivity of approximately 90% and a specificity of 40-50%, which indicates that the test might be useful for excluding cancer when it is, in fact, absent. Although research to date has focused on the differential diagnosis of suspicious breast lesions, future applications could include breast cancer screening, close surveillance and diagnosis of recurrent cancers in breasts previously treated with conservative therapy, and monitoring the effectiveness of breast cancer therapies. Improvements and new applications are expected to occur as additional research and validation in actual clinical settings is performed. PMID:9056147

  9. Accuracy of lesion boundary tracking in navigated breast tumor excision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Emily; Ungi, Tamas; Vaughan, Thomas; Pezeshki, Padina; Lasso, Andras; Gauvin, Gabrielle; Rudan, John; Engel, C. Jay; Morin, Evelyn; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: An electromagnetic navigation system for tumor excision in breast conserving surgery has recently been developed. Preoperatively, a hooked needle is positioned in the tumor and the tumor boundaries are defined in the needle coordinate system. The needle is tracked electromagnetically throughout the procedure to localize the tumor. However, the needle may move and the tissue may deform, leading to errors in maintaining a correct excision boundary. It is imperative to quantify these errors so the surgeon can choose an appropriate resection margin. METHODS: A commercial breast biopsy phantom with several inclusions was used. Location and shape of a lesion before and after mechanical deformation were determined using 3D ultrasound volumes. Tumor location and shape were estimated from initial contours and tracking data. The difference in estimated and actual location and shape of the lesion after deformation was quantified using the Hausdorff distance. Data collection and analysis were done using our 3D Slicer software application and PLUS toolkit. RESULTS: The deformation of the breast resulted in 3.72 mm (STD 0.67 mm) average boundary displacement for an isoelastic lesion and 3.88 mm (STD 0.43 mm) for a hyperelastic lesion. The difference between the actual and estimated tracked tumor boundary was 0.88 mm (STD 0.20 mm) for the isoelastic and 1.78 mm (STD 0.18 mm) for the hyperelastic lesion. CONCLUSION: The average lesion boundary tracking error was below 2mm, which is clinically acceptable. We suspect that stiffness of the phantom tissue affected the error measurements. Results will be validated in patient studies.

  10. An infrared image based methodology for breast lesions screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, K. C. C.; Vargas, J. V. C.; Reisemberger, G. G.; Freitas, F. N. P.; Oliari, S. H.; Brioschi, M. L.; Louveira, M. H.; Spautz, C.; Dias, F. G.; Gasperin, P.; Budel, V. M.; Cordeiro, R. A. G.; Schittini, A. P. P.; Neto, C. D.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential of utilizing a structured methodology for breast lesions screening, based on infrared imaging temperature measurements of a healthy control group to establish expected normality ranges, and of breast cancer patients, previously diagnosed through biopsies of the affected regions. An analysis of the systematic error of the infrared camera skin temperature measurements was conducted in several different regions of the body, by direct comparison to high precision thermistor temperature measurements, showing that infrared camera temperatures are consistently around 2 °C above the thermistor temperatures. Therefore, a method of conjugated gradients is proposed to eliminate the infrared camera direct temperature measurement imprecision, by calculating the temperature difference between two points to cancel out the error. The method takes into account the human body approximate bilateral symmetry, and compares measured dimensionless temperature difference values (Δ θ bar) between two symmetric regions of the patient's breast, that takes into account the breast region, the surrounding ambient and the individual core temperatures, and doing so, the results interpretation for different individuals become simple and non subjective. The range of normal whole breast average dimensionless temperature differences for 101 healthy individuals was determined, and admitting that the breasts temperatures exhibit a unimodal normal distribution, the healthy normal range for each region was considered to be the dimensionless temperature difference plus/minus twice the standard deviation of the measurements, Δ θ bar ‾ + 2σ Δ θ bar ‾ , in order to represent 95% of the population. Forty-seven patients with previously diagnosed breast cancer through biopsies were examined with the method, which was capable of detecting breast abnormalities in 45 cases (96%). Therefore, the conjugated gradients method was considered effective

  11. Migration of Guidewire After Surgical Breast Biopsy: An Unusual Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Seifi, Ali; Axelrod, Howard; Nascimento, Tome; Salam, Zia; Karimi, Sasan; Avestimehr, Sahar; Ohebsion, Jonathan

    2009-09-15

    Needle localization of breast lesions is commonly performed for surgical guidance when excising nonpalpable lesions. A few reports have specifically addressed complications associated with needle-localized surgical breast biopsy. We present the first reported case of delayed cardiac injury resulting from migration of a guidewire from a needle-localized breast biopsy that occurred 2 years after the procedure. The patient presented with chest pain and cardiac tamponade. It was found that a hook-wire had penetrated the pericardium and left ventricular myocardium through the aortic valve into the ascending aorta. The diagnosis was made by echocardiogram and computed axial tomography scan and subsequent surgical removal was undertaken successfully.

  12. Clinical Outcome of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Detected Additional Lesions in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Gi-Won; Yi, Mi Suk; Lee, Byoung Kil; Jung, Sung Hoo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of additional breast lesions identified with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in breast cancer patients. Methods A total of 153 patients who underwent breast MRI between July 2006 and March 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-three patients (21.6&) were recommended for second-look ultrasound (US) for further characterization of additional lesions detected on breast MRI and these patients constituted our study population. Results Assessment for lesions detected on breast MRI consisted of the following: 25 benign lesions (73.5&), two indeterminate (5.9%), and seven malignant (20.6%) in 33 patients. Second-look US identified 12 additional lesions in 34 lesions (35.3%) and these lesions were confirmed by histological examination. Of the 12 lesions found in the 11 patients, six (50.0%) including one contralateral breast cancer were malignant. The surgical plan was altered in 18.2% (six of 33) of the patients. The use of breast MRI justified a change in treatment for four patients (66.7%) and caused two patients (33.3&) to undergo unwarranted additional surgical procedures. Conclusion Breast MRI identified additional multifocal or contralateral cancer which was not detected initially on conventional imaging in breast cancer patients. Breast MRI has become an indispensable modality in conjunction with conventional modalities for preoperative evaluation of patients with operable breast cancer. PMID:22031803

  13. ROC analysis of lesion descriptors in breast ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Michael P.; Galperin, Michael; Phan, Peter; Chiu, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Breast biopsy serves as the key diagnostic tool in the evaluation of breast masses for malignancy, yet the procedure affects patients physically and emotionally and may obscure results of future mammograms. Studies show that high quality ultrasound can distinguish a benign from malignant lesions with accuracy, however, it has proven difficult to teach and clinical results are highly variable. The purpose of this study is to develop a means to optimize an automated Computer Aided Imaging System (CAIS) to assess Level of Suspicion (LOS) of a breast mass. We examine the contribution of 15 object features to lesion classification by calculating the Wilcoxon area under the ROC curve, AW, for all combinations in a set of 146 masses with known findings. For each interval A, the frequency of appearance of each feature and its combinations with others was computed as a means to find an "optimum" feature vector. The original set of 15 was reduced to 6 (area, perimeter, diameter ferret Y, relief, homogeneity, average energy) with an improvement from Aw=0.82-/+0.04 for the original 15 to Aw=0.93-/+0.02 for the subset of 6, p=0.03. For comparison, two sub-specialty mammography radiologists also scored the images for LOS resulting in Az of 0.90 and 0.87. The CAIS performed significantly higher, p=0.02.

  14. Ultrasound RF time series for classification of breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Uniyal, Nishant; Eskandari, Hani; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Sojoudi, Samira; Gordon, Paula; Warren, Linda; Rohling, Robert N; Salcudean, Septimiu E; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-02-01

    This work reports the use of ultrasound radio frequency (RF) time series analysis as a method for ultrasound-based classification of malignant breast lesions. The RF time series method is versatile and requires only a few seconds of raw ultrasound data with no need for additional instrumentation. Using the RF time series features, and a machine learning framework, we have generated malignancy maps, from the estimated cancer likelihood, for decision support in biopsy recommendation. These maps depict the likelihood of malignancy for regions of size 1 mm(2) within the suspicious lesions. We report an area under receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.84%-0.90%) using support vector machines and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.78-0.85) using Random Forests classification algorithms, on 22 subjects with leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. Changing the classification method yielded consistent results which indicates the robustness of this tissue typing method. The findings of this report suggest that ultrasound RF time series, along with the developed machine learning framework, can help in differentiating malignant from benign breast lesions, subsequently reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies after mammography screening. PMID:25350925

  15. Role of Breast Ultrasound for the Detection and Differentiation of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Madjar, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Summary Diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely improved since the development of high-resolution ultrasound equipment. In the past, ultrasound was only considered useful for the diagnosis of cysts. Meanwhile, it improves the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions, local preoperative staging and guided interventional diagnosis. In dense breasts, mammography has limited sensitivity. Furthermore, women with dense parenchyma have a highly increased risk of breast cancer development. Ultrasound is useful to examine dense breast tissue. Recent studies have shown that the detection of small cancers with high-resolution ultrasound is increased by 3–4 cancers per 1,000 women without clinical or mammographic abnormalities. Furthermore, stage distribution is similar between mammographically and sonographically detected carcinomas. Ultrasound is routinely used for curative diagnosis, to overcome the limitations of mammography. However, within the mammographic screening in Germany, breast density is not considered as important. Ultrasound is only used if a suspicious lesion is detected by mammography. Interestingly, 2 years ago, a screening project started in Austria in which ultrasound is always added in cases of dense breasts. Preliminary data show that the detection of additional carcinomas is increased in the same order as shown in previous studies. Therefore, an improved cancer detection and differentiation can be expected with high-resolution ultrasound. PMID:20847824

  16. The impact of breast structure on lesion detection in breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Loren W.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Segars, William P.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials (VCT) can be carefully designed to inform, orient, or potentially replace clinical trials. The focus of this study was to demonstrate the capability of the sophisticated tools that can be used in the design, implementation, and performance analysis of VCTs, through characterization of the effect of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of irregular masses in digital breast tomosynthesis. Twenty breast phantoms from the extended cardiactorso (XCAT) family, generated based on dedicated breast computed tomography of human subjects, were used to extract a total of 2173 volumes of interest (VOI) from simulated tomosynthesis images. Five different lesions, modeled after human subject tomosynthesis images, were embedded in the breasts, for a total of 6×2173 VOIs with and without lesions. Effects of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of the lesions were studied by implementing a doubly composite hypothesis signal detection theory paradigm with location known exactly, lesion known exactly, and background known statistically. The results indicated that the detection performance as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) deteriorated as density was increased, yielding findings consistent with clinical studies. The detection performance varied substantially across the twenty breasts. Furthermore, the log-likelihood ratio under H0 and H1 seemed to be affected by background tissue density and heterogeneity differently. Considering background tissue variability can change the outcomes of a VCT and is hence of crucial importance. The XCAT breast phantoms can address this concern by offering realistic modeling of background tissue variability based on a wide range of human subjects.

  17. Four cases of echogenic breast lesions: a case series and review

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lin Wah; Wong, Su Lin Jill; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Echogenic breast lesions are generally thought to be benign. We herein report four cases of echogenic breast lesions that were seen at our centre over 38 months. One patient had a prior history of wide excision and radiotherapy for breast cancer and was imaged as part of routine cancer surveillance, while the other three were recalled for further assessment following an abnormal screening mammogram. All four patients were assessed on ultrasonography, which demonstrated an echogenic lesion in each patient. All four lesions underwent ultrasonography-guided core biopsy, followed by excision biopsy. The indications for biopsy were interval increase in the size of lesion or indeterminate features demonstrated in the lesion. Three lesions were benign, while the lesion from the patient who had received previous radiotherapy was angiosarcoma. Not all echogenic lesions are benign and lesions with suspicious features on ultrasonography should undergo biopsy. PMID:26891743

  18. Modeling realistic breast lesions using diffusion limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Elangovan, Premkumar; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Diaz, Oliver; Wells, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Synthesizing the appearance of malignant masses and inserting these into digital mammograms can be used as part of a wider framework for investigating the radiological detection task in X-ray mammography. However, the randomness associated with cell division within cancerous masses and the associated complex morphology challenges the realism of the modeling process. In this paper, Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA), a type of fractal growth process is proposed and utilized for modeling breast lesions. Masses of different sizes, shapes and densities were grown by controlling DLA growth parameters either prior to growth, or dynamically updating these during growth. A validation study was conducted by presenting 30 real and 30 simulated masses in a random order to a team of radiologists. The results from the validation study suggest that the observers found it difficult to differentiate between the real and simulated lesions.

  19. The management of papillary breast lesions on core biopsy: the contentious issues.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Warren M; Joseph, Samuel; Murphy, Craig

    2007-06-01

    The management of papillary lesions of the breast diagnosed on core needle biopsy is highly contentious. Papillary lesions are epithelial proliferations of breast tissue and are on a continuum of mutations with atypical hyperplastic lesions and in situ carcinoma. With the current literature suggesting that excisional biopsy of papillary lesions might not be required, we discuss a unique case that suggests otherwise. We present a 21-year-old woman with multiple papillary lesions on core biopsy of a breast lesion, and a subsequent excisional biopsy revealing extensive in situ carcinoma of the breast. This finding necessitated total mastectomy. This unique case highlights that core biopsy specimens are unable to effectively exclude adjacent in situ carcinoma and suggests that papillary lesions diagnosed on core needle biopsy require excisional biopsy. PMID:17592679

  20. Benign breast lesions in Bayelsa State, Niger Delta Nigeria: a 5 year multicentre histopathological audit

    PubMed Central

    Uwaezuoke, Stanley Chibuzo; Udoye, Ezenwa Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There has been no previous study to classify benign breast lesions in details based on histopathologically confirmed diagnosis in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. This study therefore aims to review all cases of benign breast lesions seen in all the three centres in Bayelsa State with histopathology services over a five year period for a comprehensive baseline data in our community for management, research and education. Methods This is a multicentre retrospective descriptive study based on histopathological diagnosed benign breast lesions from January 2009 to December 2013. Archival results and slides on benign breast lesions were retrieved and analysed using simple statistical methods. Results A total of 228 benign breast lesions (68.3%) were seen among 334 histopathologically diagnosed breast diseases. The male to female ratio was 19.7:1. Peak age incidence was the third decade (43%) with a mean age of 29.1years. Fibroadenoma was the most common benign breast disease (BBD) accounting for 45.6% of all the cases followed by fibrocystic change (23.1%). The mean ages of fibroadenoma and fibrocystic change were 23.1years and 31.1years respectively. Inflammatory breast lesions constituted 8.3%. We recorded only 2 cases (0.9%) of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) with no case of atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) within the study period. Gynaecomastia (4%) was the main male breast lesion in the study. Conclusion Benign breast diseases are the most common breast lesions in Bayelsa State. Fibroadenoma is the most common lesion followed by fibrocystic change. The incidence of atypical hyperplasia recorded was rather low in the state. PMID:25995790

  1. The Role of the Obstetrician-Gynecologist in the Management of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is based on the author's frequent experience in the diagnosis of breast masses in his everyday practice as an obstetriciangynecologist. It appears that gynecologists, by the very nature of their practices, are in an excellent position to head the case-finding expedition for breast lesions. Furthermore, the obstetrician-gynecologist can use acquired surgical skills to great advantage in the management of benign lesions and assist surgical associates in the management of the malignant lesions. PMID:6631987

  2. Risk of malignancy in nonpalpable thyroid nodules: predictive value of ultrasound and color-Doppler features.

    PubMed

    Papini, Enrico; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Bianchini, Antonio; Crescenzi, Anna; Taccogna, Silvia; Nardi, Francesco; Panunzi, Claudio; Rinaldi, Roberta; Toscano, Vincenzo; Pacella, Claudio M

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate the sonographic [ultrasound (US)] and color-Doppler (CFD) findings with the results of US-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) and of pathologic staging of resected carcinomas to establish: 1) the relative importance of US features as risk factors of malignancy; and 2) a cost-effective management of nonpalpable thyroid nodules. Four hundred ninety-four consecutive patients with nonpalpable thyroid nodules (8-15 mm) were evaluated by US, CFD, and US-FNA. Ninety-two patients with inadequate cytology were excluded from the study. All patients with suspicious or malignant cytology underwent surgery, whereas subjects with benign cytology had clinical and US control 6 months later. Thyroid malignancies were observed in 18 of 195 (9.2%) solitary thyroid nodules and in 13 of 207 (6.3%) multinodular goiters. Cancer prevalence was similar in nodules greater or smaller than 10 mm (9.1 vs. 7.0%). Extracapsular growth (pT(4)) was present in 35.5%, and nodal involvement in 19.4% of neoplastic lesions, with no significant differences between tumors greater or smaller than 10 mm. At US cancers presented a solid hypoechoic appearance in 87% of cases, irregular or blurred margins in 77.4%, an intranodular vascular pattern in 74.2%, and microcalcifications in 29.0%. Irregular margins (RR 16.83), intranodular vascular spots (RR 14.29), and microcalcifications (RR 4.97) were independent risk factors of malignancy. FNA performed on hypoechoic nodules with at least one risk factor was able to identify 87% of the cancers at the expence of cytological evaluation of 38.4% of nonpalpable lesions. The majority of nonpalpable thyroid tumors can be identified by cytological evaluation of lesions presenting hypoechoic appearance in conjunction with one independent risk factor. Due to the nonnegligible prevalence of extracapsular growth and nodal metastasis, US-FNA should be performed on all 8-15 mm hypoechoic nodules with irregular margins

  3. Value of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in Differentiating Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt Bostan, Tuğba; Koç, Gonca; Sezgin, Gülten; Altay, Canan; Fazıl Gelal, M.; Oyar, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a diagnostic and problem solving method for the breast examinations in addition to conventional breast examination methods. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) adds valuable information to conventional MRI. Aims: Our aim was to show the impact of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values acquired with DWI to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: Forty-six women with 58 breast masses (35 malignant, 23 benign) were examined on a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. The morphologic characteristics of the lesions on conventional MRI sequences and contrast uptake pattern were assessed. ADC values of both lesions and normal breast parenchyma were measured. The ADC values obtained were statistically compared with the histopathologic results using Paired Samples t-Test. Results: Multiple lesions were detected in 12 (26%) of the patients, while only one lesion was detected in 34 (74%). Overall, 35 lesions out of 58 were histopathologically proven to be malignant. In the dynamic contrast-enhanced series, 5 of the malignant lesions were type 1, while 8 benign lesions revealed either type 2 or 3 time signal intensity curves (85% sensitivity, 56% spesifity). Mean ADC values were significantly different in malignant vs. benign lesions. (1.04±0.29×10−3 cm2/sec vs. 1.61±0.50×10−3 cm2/sec for the malignant and benign lesions, respectively, p=0.03). A cut-off value of 1.30×10−3 mm2/sec for ADC detected with receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded 89.1% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. Conclusion: ADC values improve the diagnostic accuracy of solid breast lesions when evaluated with the conventional MRI sequences. Therefore, DWI should be incorporated to routine breast MRI protocol. PMID:27308073

  4. Targeted Ultrasound for MR-Detected Lesions in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung Hee; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Ko, Kyungran; Choi, Nami

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the usefulness of targeted ultrasound (US) in the identification of additional suspicious lesions found by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in breast cancer patients and the changes in treatment based on the identification of the lesions by the use of targeted US. Materials and Methods One-hundred forty nine patients who underwent breast MR imaging for a preoperative evaluation of breast cancer between January 2002 and July 2004 were included in the study. We searched all cases for any additional lesions that were found initially by MR imaging and investigated the performance of targeted US in identifying the lesions. We also investigated their pathological outcomes and changes in treatment as a result of lesion identification. Results Of the 149 patients with breast cancer, additional suspicious lesions were detected with MR imaging in 62 patients (42%). Of the 69 additional lesions found in those 62 patients, 26 (38%) were confirmed as cancers by histology. Thirty-eight lesions in 31 patients were examined with targeted US and were histologically revealed as cancers in 18 (47%), high risk lesions in two (5%), benign lesions in 15 (39%), and unidentified lesions in three (8%). The cancer rate was statistically higher in lesions with a US correlate than in lesions without a US correlate (p = 0.028). Of 31 patients, the surgical plan was altered in 27 (87%). The use of targeted US justified a change in treatment for 22 patients (81%) and misled five patients (19%) into having an unnecessary surgical excision. Conclusion Targeted US can play a useful role in the evaluation of additional suspicious lesions detected by MR imaging in breast cancer patients, but is limited in lesions without a US correlate. PMID:18071277

  5. Ex vivo Raman spectroscopic study of breast metastatic lesions in lungs in animal models.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Tanmoy; Tawde, Sneha; Hudlikar, Rasika; Mahimkar, Manoj; Maru, Girish; Ingle, Arvind; Murali Krishna, C

    2015-08-01

    The lung is one of the most common sites of metastases, with approximately 50% of patients with extrathoracic cancer exhibiting pulmonary metastases. Correct identification of the metastatic status of a lung lesion is vital to therapeutic planning and better prognosis. However, currently available diagnostic techniques, such as conventional radiography and low dose computed tomography (LDCT), may fail to identify metastatic lesions. Alternative techniques such as Raman spectroscopy (RS) are hence being extensively explored for correct diagnosis of metastasis. The current ex vivo study aims to evaluate the ability of a fiber optic-based Raman system to distinguish breast cancer metastasis in lung from primary breast and lung tumor in animal models. In this study, spectra were acquired from normal breast, primary breast tumor, normal lung, primary lung tumor, and breast cancer metastasis in lung tissues and analyzed using principal component analysis and principal component-linear discriminant analysis. Breast cancer metastasis in lung could be classified with 71% classification efficiency. Approximately 6% breast metastasis spectra were misclassified with breast tumor, probably due to the presence of breast cancer cells in metastasized lungs. Test prediction results show 64% correct prediction of breast metastasis, while 13% breast metastasis spectra were wrongly predicted as breast tumor, suggesting the possible influence of breast cancer cells. Thus, findings of this study, the first of such explorations, demonstrate the potential of RS in classifying breast metastasis in lungs from primary lung and primary breast tumor. Prospective evaluation on a larger cohort with better multivariate analysis, combined with LDCT and recently developed real-time in vivo probes, RS can play a significant role in nonsurgical screening of lesions, which can lead to individualized therapeutic regimes and improved prognoses. PMID:26295177

  6. Diagnosing breast lesions by fine needle aspiration cytology or core biopsy: which is better?

    PubMed

    Tse, Gary M; Tan, Puay-Hoon

    2010-08-01

    Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and core needle biopsy (CNB) are widely used in diagnosing breast lesions, with both achieving high sensitivity and specificity. Whether FNAC or CNB is better remains highly controversial. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods are discussed, especially in relation to specific problematic groups of breast lesions. In general, CNB has a slight advantage with lower inadequate and suspicious rates, allowing easier grade assessment and ancillary testings (hormome receptors, HER2) in cases of cancers. FNAC cannot reliably predict invasion in a malignant aspirate, whereas CNB, although useful in confirming invasion in carcinomas, has a much lower efficacy in predicting invasion when only in situ carcinoma is detected. The other problematic areas are papillary breast lesions and fibroepithelial lesions, notably phyllodes tumors. In papillary lesions, FNAC diagnosis is inaccurate, but with CNB, one can confidently diagnose papillary lesion, although there is still significant false positive and false negative rates, even with immunohistochemistry. For fibroepithelial lesions, using either FNAC or CNB to differentiate between a phyllodes tumor from fibroadenoma is also inaccurate. As management of breast diseases necessitates the triple approach (clinical, imaging and pathological), an awareness of the limitations of these very useful diagnostic modalities by all specialists is prudent, especially when dealing with these specific groups of breast lesions. PMID:20526738

  7. Prospective evaluation of skin surface electropotentials in Japanese patients with suspicious breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M; Shimizu, K; Okamoto, N; Arimura, T; Ohta, T; Yamaguchi, S; Faupel, M L

    1996-10-01

    The biofield breast examination (BBE) is a new, noninvasive and cost-effective method for diagnosing breast lesions currently undergoing multicenter evaluation in the USA and Europe. The test analyzes subtle differences in electrical potential caused by dysregulated epithelial proliferation. This report summarizes a prospective evaluation of BBE in a population of 101 patients with suspicious breast lesions scheduled either for open surgical biopsy or fine needle aspiration biopsy. Of the 101 patients included in the study, 49 were found to have a breast malignancy and 52 were found to have a benign breast lesion. BBE correctly identified 44 of 49 biopsy-proven cancers (sensitivity=90%) and correctly indicated no cancer in 31 of 52 biopsy-proven benign cases (specificity=60%). Sensitivity increased to 95% for cancers less than 2.5 cm in size. These results indicate that BBE may be an effective adjunctive test to help to resolve abnormalities discovered by physical examination or other screening methods. PMID:8957069

  8. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  9. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-07-01

    Interpretation of F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  10. Radiologists' Performance for Detecting Lesions and the Interobserver Variability of Automated Whole Breast Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hun; Choi, Byung Gil; Choi, Jae Jung; Lee, Ji Hye; Song, Byung Joo; Choe, Byung Joo; Park, Sarah; Kim, Hyunbin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the detection performance of the automated whole breast ultrasound (AWUS) with that of the hand-held breast ultrasound (HHUS) and to evaluate the interobserver variability in the interpretation of the AWUS. Materials and Methods AWUS was performed in 38 breast cancer patients. A total of 66 lesions were included: 38 breast cancers, 12 additional malignancies and 16 benign lesions. Three breast radiologists independently reviewed the AWUS data and analyzed the breast lesions according to the BI-RADS classification. Results The detection rate of malignancies was 98.0% for HHUS and 90.0%, 88.0% and 96.0% for the three readers of the AWUS. The sensitivity and the specificity were 98.0% and 62.5% in HHUS, 90.0% and 87.5% for reader 1, 88.0% and 81.3% for reader 2, and 96.0% and 93.8% for reader 3, in AWUS. There was no significant difference in the radiologists' detection performance, sensitivity and specificity (p > 0.05) between the two modalities. The interobserver agreement was fair to good for the ultrasonographic features, categorization, size, and the location of breast masses. Conclusion AWUS is thought to be useful for detecting breast lesions. In comparison with HHUS, AWUS shows no significant difference in the detection rate, sensitivity and the specificity, with high degrees of interobserver agreement. PMID:23482698

  11. Mucocele-like lesions of the breast: a clinical outcome and histologic analysis of 102 cases.

    PubMed

    Meares, Annie L; Frank, Ryan D; Degnim, Amy C; Vierkant, Robert A; Frost, Marlene H; Hartmann, Lynn C; Winham, Stacey J; Visscher, Daniel W

    2016-03-01

    Mucocele-like lesions (MLLs) of the breast are characterized by cystic architecture with stromal mucin and frequent atypia, but it is unknown whether they convey long-term breast cancer risk. We evaluated 102 MLLs that were derived from a single-institution benign breast disease cohort of 13412 women who underwent biopsy from 1967 to 2001. MLLs were histologically characterized by type of lining epithelium, architecture of the lesion, associated atypical hyperplasia (AH), and incidence of breast cancer (14.8-year median follow-up). A relatively large proportion of MLLs (42%) were diagnosed in women older than 55 years. AH was significantly more frequent in MLL patient compared to the cohort overall (27% versus 5%; P < .001). Breast cancer has developed in 13 patients with MLL. This frequency is only slightly higher than population expected rates overall (standardized incidence ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-3.91) and not significantly different from women in the cohort with (nonatypical) proliferative breast lesions. Younger women (<45) with MLL had a nonsignificant increase in risk of cancer compared to the general population (standardized incidence ratio, 5.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-13.23). We conclude that MLL is an uncommon breast lesion that is often associated with coexisting AH. However, in women older than 45 years, MLLs do not convey additional risk of breast cancer beyond that associated with the presence of proliferative disease. PMID:26826407

  12. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Liu, Bob; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta

    2006-04-15

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A{sub z}) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically

  13. Textural kinetics: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI feature for breast lesion classification.

    PubMed

    Agner, Shannon C; Soman, Salil; Libfeld, Edward; McDonald, Margie; Thomas, Kathleen; Englander, Sarah; Rosen, Mark A; Chin, Deanna; Nosher, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-06-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has emerged as an adjunct imaging tool to conventional X-ray mammography due to its high detection sensitivity. Despite the increasing use of breast DCE-MRI, specificity in distinguishing malignant from benign breast lesions is low, and interobserver variability in lesion classification is high. The novel contribution of this paper is in the definition of a new DCE-MRI descriptor that we call textural kinetics, which attempts to capture spatiotemporal changes in breast lesion texture in order to distinguish malignant from benign lesions. We qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated on 41 breast DCE-MRI studies that textural kinetic features outperform signal intensity kinetics and lesion morphology features in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) classifier in conjunction with textural kinetic descriptors yielded an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 82%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. Graph embedding, used for qualitative visualization of a low-dimensional representation of the data, showed the best separation between benign and malignant lesions when using textural kinetic features. The PBT classifier results and trends were also corroborated via a support vector machine classifier which showed that textural kinetic features outperformed the morphological, static texture, and signal intensity kinetics descriptors. When textural kinetic attributes were combined with morphologic descriptors, the resulting PBT classifier yielded 89% accuracy, 99% sensitivity, 76% specificity, and an AUC of 0.91. PMID:20508965

  14. Diagnostic imaging strategy for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions: use of targeted sonography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leading-edge technology such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) often reveals mammographically and ultrasonographically occult lesions. MRI is a well-documented, effective tool to evaluate these lesions; however, the detection rate of targeted sonography varies for MRI detected lesions, and its significance is not well established in diagnostic strategy of MRI detected lesions. We assessed the utility of targeted sonography for multidetector-row CT (MDCT)- or MRI-detected lesions in practice. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 695 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were candidates for breast conserving surgery and underwent MDCT or MRI in our hospital between January 2004 and March 2011. Targeted sonography was performed in all MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions followed by imaging-guided biopsy. Patient background, histopathology features and the sizes of the lesions were compared among benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Results Of the 695 patients, 61 lesions in 56 patients were detected by MDCT or MRI. The MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography in 58 out of 61 lesions (95.1%). Patients with pathological diagnoses were significantly older and more likely to be postmenopausal than the follow-up patients. Pathological diagnosis proved to be benign in 20 cases and malignant in 25. The remaining 16 lesions have been followed up. Lesion size and shape were not significantly different among the benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Conclusions Approximately 95% of MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography, and nearly half of these lesions were pathologically proven malignancies in this study. Targeted sonography is a useful modality for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions. PMID:22691539

  15. Advanced MRI Techniques in the Evaluation of Complex Cystic Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Popli, Manju Bala; Gupta, Pranav; Arse, Devraj; Kumar, Pawan; Kaur, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this research work was to evaluate complex cystic breast lesions by advanced MRI techniques and correlating imaging with histologic findings. METHODS AND MATERIALS In a cross-sectional design from September 2013 to August 2015, 50 patients having sonographically detected complex cystic lesions of the breast were included in the study. Morphological characteristics were assessed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI along with diffusion-weighted imaging and MR spectroscopy were used to further classify lesions into benign and malignant categories. All the findings were correlated with histopathology. RESULTS Of the 50 complex cystic lesions, 32 proved to be benign and 18 were malignant on histopathology. MRI features of heterogeneous enhancement on CE-MRI (13/18), Type III kinetic curve (13/18), reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (18/18), and tall choline peak (17/18) were strong predictors of malignancy. Thirteen of the 18 lesions showed a combination of Type III curve, reduced apparent diffusion coefficient value, and tall choline peak. CONCLUSIONS Advanced MRI techniques like dynamic imaging, diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR spectroscopy provide a high level of diagnostic confidence in the characterization of complex cystic breast lesion, thus allowing early diagnosis and significantly reducing patient morbidity and mortality. From our study, lesions showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement, Type III kinetic curve, diffusion restriction, and tall choline peak were significantly associated with malignant complex cystic lesions of the breast. PMID:27330299

  16. Discrimination between benign and malignant lesions of the breast using ultrasound disparity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.; Carlson, Donald L.; Birnbaum, Julia A.

    2001-05-01

    A technique called disparity mapping (DM) processes pairs of ultrasound B-scan images collected while a sonographer varies the probe pressure slightly on the breast surface. Dm measures the apparent displacement of the tissue about each image point and subsequently constructs a correlation map which represents the similarity between the speckle patterns around each point. The continuity of the lesion perimeter in the correlation image is used to separate benign from malignant lesions, with high continuity corresponding well with benign lesions and highly segmented perimeters correlating with malignancies. Twenty five solid masses were evaluated, and the results were compared with histology from core or surgical biopsy, or with cytology from fine needle aspiration. The results analyzed all lesions correctly (15 cancers and 10 benign lesions). There were no false positives or false negatives. The results suggest that DM may be a useful tool in digitally diagnosing breast lesions and consequently in reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  17. The Diagnostic Value of Superb Microvascular Imaging (SMI) in Detecting Blood Flow Signals of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Li, Gang; Li, Jing; Ren, Wei-dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The correlation between color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) and Superb Microvascular Imaging (SMI) for detecting blood flow in breast lesions was investigated, as was the diagnostic value of SMI in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions. These lesions were evaluated using both CDFI and SMI according to Adler's method. Pathologic examination showed 57 malignant lesions and 66 benign lesions. The number of blood vessels in a single mass was detected by 2 techniques (SMI and CDFI), and the difference between the 2 values (SMI-CDFI) was calculated. The optimal threshold for the diagnosis of malignant neoplasms and the diagnostic performances of SMI, CDFI, and SMI-CDFI were calculated. For the total lesions and malignant lesions alone, the difference between SMI and CDFI for detecting blood flow was significant (P < 0.01), but the difference was not significant for benign lesions (P = 0.15). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64–0.82) for CDFI; 0.81 (95% CI: 0.74–0.89) for SMI; and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82–0.95) for SMI-CDFI. Furthermore, the modality of “SMI-CDFI” showed the best diagnostic performance. SMI provides further microvessel information in breast lesions. The diagnostic modality of “SMI-CDFI” can improve the diagnostic performance of ultrasound in the differentiation between benign and malignant masses. PMID:26356718

  18. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-Weighted MRI at 3.0 T Differentiates Malignant Breast Lesions From Benign Lesions and Breast Parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Kaplan, Jennifer B.; Giri, Dilip D.; Patil, Sujata; Gnanasigamani, Merlin; Nyman, C. Gregory; Deasy, Joseph O.; Morris, Elizabeth A.; Thakur, Sunitha B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the differentiation of malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included 26 malignant and 14 benign breast lesions in 35 patients who underwent diffusion-weighted MRI at 3.0T and nine b-values (0–1000 s/mm2). ADC and IVIM parameters (perfusion fraction fp, pseudodiffusion coefficient Dp, and true diffusion coefficient Dd) were determined in lesions and FGT. For comparison, IVIM was also measured in 16 high-risk normal patients. A predictive model was constructed using linear discriminant analysis. Lesion discrimination based on ADC and IVIM parameters was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results In FGT of normal subjects, fp was 1.1 ± 1.1%. In malignant lesions, fp (6.4 ± 3.1%) was significantly higher than in benign lesions (3.1 ± 3.3%, P = 0.0025) or FGT (1.5 ± 1.2%, P < 0.001), and Dd ((1.29 ± 0.28) × 10−3 mm2/s) was lower than in benign lesions ((1.56 ± 0.28) × 10−3 mm2/s, P = 0.011) or FGT ((1.86 ± 0.34) × 10−3 mm2/s, P < 0.001). A combination of Dd and fp provided higher AUC for discrimination between malignant and benign lesions (0.84) or FGT (0.97) than ADC (0.72 and 0.86, respectively). Conclusion The IVIM parameters provide accurate identification of malignant lesions. PMID:24273096

  19. Follow-up design of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joo-Yeon; Moon, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to analyze the characteristics and long-term follow-up results of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of breast cancer patients. METHODS From August 2007 through February 2010, second-look ultrasound (SLUS) was recommended for 84 of 312 breast cancer patients having unexpected enhancing lesions on MRI. SLUS was performed for 85 unexpected enhancing lesions in 72 patients. We performed a retrospective review to determine the size, lesion type, enhancement kinetic curve, and location in relation to the index cancer. We obtained the pathologic outcome of the detected lesions and in case of a negative finding on SLUS, we performed follow-up examinations for at least two years. RESULTS Of 85 unexpected lesions, 72 (85%) were detected on SLUS. In total, 41 lesions (56.9%) were confirmed as malignant and 31 lesions (43.6%) as benign. Cancer rate was statistically higher in lesions having type III enhancement pattern, located at the same quadrant as the index cancer. However, no significant association was observed between the cancer rate and the lesion size and type. None of the 13 negative cases on SLUS developed cancer on follow-up. CONCLUSION In case of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients, SLUS can be useful to find out the matched lesion. Lesions with type III enhancement pattern or those located at the same quadrant as the index cancer should be considered as a separate cancer. In the absence of any suspicious findings on SLUS, patient may be followed up with confidence. PMID:25430525

  20. Breast ultrasound lesions classification: a performance evaluation between manual delineation and computer segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Yap, Chuin Hong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a threat to women worldwide. Manual delineation on breast ultrasound lesions is time-consuming and operator dependent. Computer segmentation of ultrasound breast lesions can be a challenging task due to the ill-defined lesions boundaries and issues related to the speckle noise in ultrasound images. The main contribution of this paper is to compare the performance of the computer classifier on the manual delineation and computer segmentation in malignant and benign lesions classification. This paper we implement computer segmentation using multifractal approach on a database consists of 120 images (50 malignant lesions and 70 benign lesions). The computer segmentation result is compared with the manual delineation using Jaccard Similarity Index (JSI). The result shows that the average JSI of 0.5010 (+/-0.2088) for malignant lesions and the average JSI of 0.6787 (+/-0.1290) for benign lesions. These results indicate lower agreement in malignant lesions due to the irregular shape while the higher agreement in benign lesions with regular shape. Further, we extract the shape descriptors for the lesions. By using logistic regression with 10 fold cross validation, the classification rates of manual delineation and computer segmentation are computed. The computer segmentation produced results with sensitivity 0.780 and specificity 0.871. However, the manual delineation produced sensitivity of 0.520 and specificity of 0.800. The results show that there are no clear differences between the delineation in MD and CS in benign lesions but the computer segmentation on malignant lesions shows better accuracy for computer classifier.

  1. Mammotome biopsy under ultrasound control in the diagnostics and treatment of nodular breast lesions - own experience.

    PubMed

    Kibil, Wojciech; Hodorowicz-Zaniewska, Diana; Kulig, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Mammotome biopsy is an effective, minimally invasive, novel technique used in the verification of breast lesions.The aim of the study was to assess the value of ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted core needle biopsy (mammotome biopsy) in the diagnostics and treatment of nodular breast lesions, considering own data.Material and methods. Analysis comprised 1183 mammotome biopsies under ultrasound control performed in 1177 female patients during the period between 2000 and 2010, at the Regional Clinic for Early Diagnostics and Treatment of Breast Lesions, I Chair and Department of General Surgery, Jagiellonian University, Collegium Medicum.Results. The average patient age amounted to 41.7 years. The size of the investigated lesions ranged between 4 and 65 mm (mean - 12 mm). The histopathological examination result was as follows: fibrocystic lesions (n=285), adenofibroma (n=477), adenosis sclerosans (n=188), hyperplasia without atypy (n=58), phyllode tumor (n=2), papilloma (n=14), hamartoma (n=1), atypical hyperplasia (n=25), in situ ductal carcinoma (n=4), in situ lobular carcinoma (n=5), infiltrating ductal carcinoma (n=114), infiltrating lobular carcinoma (n=4), non-diagnostic result (n=6). The histopathological diagnosis was obtained in 99.5% of cases. Patients diagnosed with atypical hyperplasia or cancer were qualified for surgery, according to accepted standards. The presence of a hematoma was the most common complication after the biopsy, observed in 16.5% of patients.Conclusions. The obtained results confirmed the high value of ultrasound-guided biopsies in the diagnostics of nodular breast lesions. The method is safe, minimally invasive, with few complications, providing a good cosmetic effect. In case of benign lesions with a diameter of less than 15 mm the mammotome biopsy enables to completely excise the lesions, being an alternative to open surgical biopsies. The mammotome biopsy should become the method of choice considering the diagnostics of nodular

  2. Three-dimensional finite element model for lesion correspondence in breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yan; Li, Lihua; Goldgof, Dmitry; Sarkar, Sudeep; Anton, Sorin; Clark, Robert A.

    2004-05-01

    Predicting breast tissue deformation is of great significance in several medical applications such as biopsy, diagnosis, and surgery. In breast surgery, surgeons are often concerned with a specific portion of the breast, e.g., tumor, which must be located accurately beforehand. Also clinically it is important for combining the information provided by images from several modalities or at different times, for the detection/diagnosis, treatment planning and guidance of interventions. Multi-modality imaging of the breast obtained by X-ray mammography, MRI is thought to be best achieved through some form of data fusion technique. However, images taken by these various techniques are often obtained under entirely different tissue configurations, compression, orientation or body position. In these cases some form of spatial transformation of image data from one geometry to another is required such that the tissues are represented in an equivalent configuration. We propose to use a 3D finite element model for lesion correspondence in breast imaging. The novelty of the approach lies in the following facts: (1) Finite element is the most accurate technique for modeling deformable objects such as breast. The physical soundness and mathematical rigor of finite element method ensure the accuracy and reliability of breast modeling that is essential for lesion correspondence. (2) When both MR and mammographic images are available, a subject-specific 3D breast model will be built from MRIs. If only mammography is available, a generic breast model will be used for two-view mammography reading. (3) Incremental contact simulation of breast compression allows accurate capture of breast deformation and ensures the quality of lesion correspondence. (4) Balance between efficiency and accuracy is achieved through adaptive meshing. We have done intensive research based on phantom and patient data.

  3. Automated lesion detection in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xi; Kotagiri, Romamohanarao; Frazer, Helen; Yang, Qing

    2015-03-01

    We propose an automated method in detecting lesions to assist radiologists in interpreting dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of breast. The aim is to highlight the suspicious regions of interest to reduce the searching time of the lesions and the possibility of radiologists overlooking small regions. In our method, we locate the suspicious regions by applying a threshold on essential features. The features are normalized to reduce the variation between patients. Support vector machine classifier is then applied to exclude normal tissues from these regions, using both kinetic and morphological features extracted in the lesions. In the evaluation of the system on 21 patients with 50 lesions, all lesions were successfully detected with 5.02 false positive regions per breast.

  4. Application of Raman spectroscopy to identify microcalcifications and underlying breast lesions at stereotactic core needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Saha, Anushree; McGee, Sasha; Galindo, Luis H; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2013-06-01

    Microcalcifications are a feature of diagnostic significance on a mammogram and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. Here, we report development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to simultaneously identify microcalcification status and diagnose the underlying breast lesion, in real-time, during stereotactic core needle biopsy procedures. Raman spectra were obtained ex vivo from 146 tissue sites from fresh stereotactic breast needle biopsy tissue cores from 33 patients, including 50 normal tissue sites, 77 lesions with microcalcifications, and 19 lesions without microcalcifications, using a compact clinical system. The Raman spectra were modeled on the basis of the breast tissue components, and a support vector machine framework was used to develop a single-step diagnostic algorithm to distinguish normal tissue, fibrocystic change (FCC), fibroadenoma, and breast cancer, in the absence and presence of microcalcifications. This algorithm was subjected to leave-one-site-out cross-validation, yielding a positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity of 100%, 95.6%, 62.5%, and 100% for diagnosis of breast cancer (with or without microcalcifications) and an overall accuracy of 82.2% for classification into specific categories of normal tissue, FCC, fibroadenoma, or breast cancer (with and without microcalcifications). Notably, the majority of breast cancers diagnosed are ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common lesion associated with microcalcifications, which could not be diagnosed using previous Raman algorithm(s). Our study shows the potential of Raman spectroscopy to concomitantly detect microcalcifications and diagnose associated lesions, including DCIS, and thus provide real-time feedback to radiologists during such biopsy procedures, reducing nondiagnostic and false-negative biopsies. PMID:23729641

  5. MR-guided fine needle aspiration of breast lesions: Initial experience

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, D.S.; Weinreb, J.C.; Newstead, G.; Flyer, M.; Bose, S.

    1996-01-01

    Fine needle aspiration (FNA) is a minimally invasive procedure that is used to obtain cytologic specimens of suspicious lesions in the breast. The goal of this study was to evaluate the logistics and limitations of MR-guided FNA using a prototype breast localization coil. MR-guided FNAs were attempted on 18 lesions (detected on mammography and/or palpation) in 16 patients. Patients were prone with their compressed mediolaterally between two plates in a circularly polarized RF coil. Lesion position was determined by reference to fiducial makers that corresponded to a grid of holes placed at 5 mm intervals in compression plate. FNA was performed with a 22G non-ferromagnetic needle. FNA was successful for 11 of 18 lesions (61%). Of the seven unsuccessful cases, there were four in which the lesions were too posteriorly placed to be accessed through the compression plate by the needle. Three cases were too anteriorly placed to be effectively immobilized and, although successfully localized, were insufficiently sampled by the FNA technique. MR-guided FNA is possible using a prototype breast localization device in a select group of patients. Current coil design limits its use in performing MR-guided FNA on the most anteriorly and posteriorly placed breast lesions. Unique requirements of FNA under MR guidance as compared to needle localization and biopsy have been identified. Modifications in localization hardware and cytology aspiration needles should overcome these restrictions. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  6. New Fully Automated Method for Segmentation of Breast Lesions on Ultrasound Based on Texture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Flores, Wilfrido; Ruiz-Ortega, Bedert Abel

    2016-07-01

    The study described here explored a fully automatic segmentation approach based on texture analysis for breast lesions on ultrasound images. The proposed method involves two main stages: (i) In lesion region detection, the original gray-scale image is transformed into a texture domain based on log-Gabor filters. Local texture patterns are then extracted from overlapping lattices that are further classified by a linear discriminant analysis classifier to distinguish between the "normal tissue" and "breast lesion" classes. Next, an incremental method based on the average radial derivative function reveals the region with the highest probability of being a lesion. (ii) In lesion delineation, using the detected region and the pre-processed ultrasound image, an iterative thresholding procedure based on the average radial derivative function is performed to determine the final lesion contour. The experiments are carried out on a data set of 544 breast ultrasound images (including cysts, benign solid masses and malignant lesions) acquired with three distinct ultrasound machines. In terms of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, the one-way analysis of variance test (α=0.05) indicates that the proposed approach significantly outperforms two published fully automatic methods (p<0.001), for which the areas under the curve are 0.91, 0.82 and 0.63, respectively. Hence, these results suggest that the log-Gabor domain improves the discrimination power of texture features to accurately segment breast lesions. In addition, the proposed approach can potentially be used for automated computer diagnosis purposes to assist physicians in detection and classification of breast masses. PMID:27095150

  7. Improved characterization of molecular phenotypes in breast lesions using 18F-FDG PET image homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kunlin; Bhagalia, Roshni; Sood, Anup; Brogi, Edi; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using uorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is commonly used in the assessment of breast lesions by computing voxel-wise standardized uptake value (SUV) maps. Simple metrics derived from ensemble properties of SUVs within each identified breast lesion are routinely used for disease diagnosis. The maximum SUV within the lesion (SUVmax) is the most popular of these metrics. However these simple metrics are known to be error-prone and are susceptible to image noise. Finding reliable SUV map-based features that correlate to established molecular phenotypes of breast cancer (viz. estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression) will enable non-invasive disease management. This study investigated 36 SUV features based on first and second order statistics, local histograms and texture of segmented lesions to predict ER and PR expression in 51 breast cancer patients. True ER and PR expression was obtained via immunohistochemistry (IHC) of tissue samples from each lesion. A supervised learning, adaptive boosting-support vector machine (AdaBoost-SVM), framework was used to select a subset of features to classify breast lesions into distinct phenotypes. Performance of the trained multi-feature classifier was compared against the baseline single-feature SUVmax classifier using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results show that texture features encoding local lesion homogeneity extracted from gray-level co-occurrence matrices are the strongest discriminator of lesion ER expression. In particular, classifiers including these features increased prediction accuracy from 0.75 (baseline) to 0.82 and the area under the ROC curve from 0.64 (baseline) to 0.75.

  8. Visualization of suspicious lesions in breast MRI based on intelligent neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Lange, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2006-05-01

    Intelligent medical systems based on supervised and unsupervised artificial neural networks are applied to the automatic visualization and classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI. These systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogenity of the cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal the malignant, benign and normal kinetic signals and and provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  9. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  10. Dedicated Three-dimensional Breast Computed Tomography: Lesion Characteristic Perception by Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmiak, Cherie Marie; Cole, Elodia B; Zeng, Donglin; Tuttle, Laura A; Steed, Doreen; Pisano, Etta D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess radiologist confidence in the characterization of suspicious breast lesions with a dedicated three-dimensional breast computed tomography (DBCT) system in comparison to diagnostic two-dimensional digital mammography (dxDM). Materials and Methods: Twenty women were recruited who were to undergo a breast biopsy for a Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 or 5 lesion evaluated with dxDM in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. The enrolled subjects underwent imaging of the breast(s) of concern using DBCT. Seven radiologists reviewed the cases. Each reader compared DBCT to the dxDM and was asked to specify the lesion type and BI-RADS score for each lesion and modality. They also compared lesion characteristics: Shape for masses or morphology for calcifications; and margins for masses or distribution for calcifications between the modalities using confidence scores (0–100). Results: Twenty-four biopsied lesions were included in this study: 17 (70.8%) masses and 7 (29.2%) calcifications. Eight (33.3%) lesions were malignant, and 16 (66.7%) were benign. Across all lesions, there was no significant difference in the margin/distribution (Δ = −0.99, P = 0.84) and shape/morphology (Δ = −0.10, P = 0.98) visualization confidence scores of DBCT in relation to dxDM. However, analysis by lesion type showed a statistically significant increase in reader shape (Δ =11.34, P = 0.013) and margin (Δ =9.93, P = 0.023) visualization confidence with DBCT versus dxDM for masses and significant decrease in reader morphology (Δ = −29.95, P = 0.001) and distribution (Δ = −28.62, P = 0.002) visualization confidence for calcifications. Conclusion: Reader confidence in the characterization of suspicious masses is significantly improved with DBCT, but reduced for calcifications. Further study is needed to determine whether this technology can be used for breast cancer screening. PMID:27195180

  11. [Clarification of breast lesions using core-cut, drill and fine needle biopsy].

    PubMed

    Junkermann, H; Anton, H W; Krapfl, E; Harcos, A; von Fournier, D

    1993-05-01

    Interest in needle biopsy methods (core cut-, drill-, and fine-needle biopsy) has recently increased considerably because of the rise in screening mammography and new developments in the therapy of breast cancer. In order to achieve adequate results using needle biopsy and to avoid complications, certain technical details must be strictly adhered to. An experienced surgeon can achieve a sensitivity of above 90% in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma with all three methods. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of these three methods of needle biopsy, we prefer--based on our own experience--high-speed core-cut biopsy for the morphological evaluation of breast lesions. PMID:8516437

  12. Quantifying heterogeneity of lesion uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahaliou, A.; Vassiou, K.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Kanavou, T.; Yiakoumelos, A.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    The current study investigates whether texture features extracted from lesion kinetics feature maps can be used for breast cancer diagnosis. Fifty five women with 57 breast lesions (27 benign, 30 malignant) were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) on 1.5T system. A linear-slope model was fitted pixel-wise to a representative lesion slice time series and fitted parameters were used to create three kinetic maps (wash out, time to peak enhancement and peak enhancement). 28 grey level co-occurrence matrices features were extracted from each lesion kinetic map. The ability of texture features per map in discriminating malignant from benign lesions was investigated using a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Additional classification was performed by combining classification outputs of most discriminating feature subsets from the three maps, via majority voting. The combined scheme outperformed classification based on individual maps achieving area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curve 0.960±0.029. Results suggest that heterogeneity of breast lesion kinetics, as quantified by texture analysis, may contribute to computer assisted tissue characterization in DCE-MRI.

  13. Effect of Breast Compression on Lesion Characteristic Visibility with Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Faulconer, L.; Parham, C; Connor, D; Kuzmiak, C; Koomen, M; Lee, Y; Cho, K; Rafoth, J; Livasy, C; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional mammography can not distinguish between transmitted, scattered, or refracted x-rays, thus requiring breast compression to decrease tissue depth and separate overlapping structures. Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) uses monochromatic x-rays and perfect crystal diffraction to generate images with contrast based on absorption, refraction, or scatter. Because DEI possesses inherently superior contrast mechanisms, the current study assesses the effect of breast compression on lesion characteristic visibility with DEI imaging of breast specimens. Eleven breast tissue specimens, containing a total of 21 regions of interest, were imaged by DEI uncompressed, half-compressed, or fully compressed. A fully compressed DEI image was displayed on a soft-copy mammography review workstation, next to a DEI image acquired with reduced compression, maintaining all other imaging parameters. Five breast imaging radiologists scored image quality metrics considering known lesion pathology, ranking their findings on a 7-point Likert scale. When fully compressed DEI images were compared to those acquired with approximately a 25% difference in tissue thickness, there was no difference in scoring of lesion feature visibility. For fully compressed DEI images compared to those acquired with approximately a 50% difference in tissue thickness, across the five readers, there was a difference in scoring of lesion feature visibility. The scores for this difference in tissue thickness were significantly different at one rocking curve position and for benign lesion characterizations. These results should be verified in a larger study because when evaluating the radiologist scores overall, we detected a significant difference between the scores reported by the five radiologists. Reducing the need for breast compression might increase patient comfort during mammography. Our results suggest that DEI may allow a reduction in compression without substantially compromising clinical image

  14. Diagnostic evaluation of papillary lesions of the breast on core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Nirmala; Albertini, Ann-Flore; Provan, Pamela J; Milliken, Jane S; Salisbury, Elizabeth L; Bilous, A Michael; Byth, Karen; Balleine, Rosemary L

    2010-07-01

    The management of asymptomatic intraductal papillary lesions of the breast diagnosed on core biopsy poses a challenge for patients and clinicians, as the distinction between common benign lesions and atypical or malignant varieties may be difficult without formal excision. The aim of this study was to determine whether a combination of histopathologic and biomarker features could be used to accurately identify benign papillary lesions on core biopsy. An inclusive group of 127 excised papillary lesions was characterized by detailed histopathologic review and immunohistochemical staining for the basal markers cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) and P63 and the proliferation marker Ki67. Comparison of benign, atypical, and malignant lesions revealed that the combination of broad, sclerotic fibrovascular cores, and epithelial CK5/6 staining was most commonly seen in benign papillomas. Ki67 staining revealed striking intralesional heterogeneity, but there was no difference between the high scores of benign, atypical, or malignant lesions (P=0.173). In a non-overlapping set of 42 cases, a binary classifier specifying benign lesions on the basis of thick fibrovascular cores and epithelial CK5/6 staining on core biopsy gave an overall misclassification rate of 4/42 (10%) when compared with the final excision diagnosis. Misclassified cases included 2/27 lesions ultimately diagnosed as benign and 2/2 atypical papillomas. All malignant lesions (n=13) were correctly assigned. The combined assessment of fibrovascular core thickness and CK5/6 staining on core biopsy distinguished benign from malignant papillary lesions, but did not separate benign from atypical cases. This approach may form a useful addition to the clinicopathologic evaluation of papillary lesions of the breast. PMID:20473278

  15. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  16. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Boone, JM; Abbey, CK; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, KK; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Methods Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33 mm, 0.71 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. Results The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p<0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92 % correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67 % for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the

  17. Automatic ultrasound image enhancement for 2D semi-automatic breast-lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Hall, Christopher S.

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the fastest growing cancer, accounting for 29%, of new cases in 2012, and second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States and worldwide. Ultrasound (US) has been used as an indispensable tool for breast cancer detection/diagnosis and treatment. In computer-aided assistance, lesion segmentation is a preliminary but vital step, but the task is quite challenging in US images, due to imaging artifacts that complicate detection and measurement of the suspect lesions. The lesions usually present with poor boundary features and vary significantly in size, shape, and intensity distribution between cases. Automatic methods are highly application dependent while manual tracing methods are extremely time consuming and have a great deal of intra- and inter- observer variability. Semi-automatic approaches are designed to counterbalance the advantage and drawbacks of the automatic and manual methods. However, considerable user interaction might be necessary to ensure reasonable segmentation for a wide range of lesions. This work proposes an automatic enhancement approach to improve the boundary searching ability of the live wire method to reduce necessary user interaction while keeping the segmentation performance. Based on the results of segmentation of 50 2D breast lesions in US images, less user interaction is required to achieve desired accuracy, i.e. < 80%, when auto-enhancement is applied for live-wire segmentation.

  18. Differential diagnosis of lung lesion in breast carcinoma: a metachronous neoplasm or metastasis?

    PubMed

    Maddala, Raja Naga Mahesh; Udupa, Karthik; Thomas, Joseph; Pai, Kanthilatha

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman-a diagnosed case of pT1N1MO, stage IIa, estrogen and progesterone receptor positive (ER, PR) positive, Her2 negative carcinoma of the left breast-was managed with modified radical mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. While planning for radiotherapy, she was found to have a well-defined enhancing lesion with spiculated margins in the superior segment of the right lower lobe along with a heterogeneously enhancing right hilar lymph node on CT. Histopathological evaluation of the lesion was suggestive of adenocarcinoma. The lesion was negative for ER, PR receptors, mammoglobin and gross cystic disease fluid protein. Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) was positive, suggesting a primary lung adenocarcinoma rather than metastatic lesion from the breast. This case clearly signifies the importance of histopathological diagnosis of suspicious metastatic lesions in the setting of early breast cancer. We would also like to highlight the importance of TTF-1 in differentiating primary lung malignancy from metastasis. PMID:27170610

  19. Noninvasive Evaluation of Nuclear Morphometry in Breast Lesions Using Multispectral Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hajihashemi, Mohammad Reza; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Al-Quran, Samer Z.; Jiang, Huabei

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer and the main cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. There are limitations associated with the existing clinical tools for breast cancer detection and alternative modalities for early detection and classification of breast cancer are urgently needed. Here we describe an optical imaging technique, called multispectral diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and demonstrate its ability of non-invasively evaluating nuclear morphometry for differentiating benign from malignant lesions. Photon densities along the surface of the breast were measured to allow for the extraction of three statistical parameters including the size, elongation and density of nuclei inside the breast tissue. The results from 14 patients (4 malignant and 10 benign lesions) show that there exist significant contrasts between the diseased and surrounding normal nuclei and that the recovered nuclear morphological parameters agree well the pathological findings. We found that the nuclei of cancer cells were less-spherical compared with those of surrounding normal cells, while the nuclear density or volume fraction provided the highest contrast among the three statistical parameters recovered. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of multispectral DOT as a cellular imaging method for accurate determination of breast cancer. PMID:23029196

  20. Breast Lesions Evaluated by Color-Coded Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, JianQiao; Yang, ZhiFang; Zhan, WeiWei; Zhang, JingWen; Hu, Na; Dong, YiJie; Wang, YingYing

    2016-07-01

    The goal of our study was to investigate the value of color-coded Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI) using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technology in the characterization of breast lesions and to compare it with conventional ultrasound (US). Conventional US and color-coded VTI were performed in 196 solid breast lesions in 196 consecutive women (age range 17-91 y; mean 48.17 ± 14.46 y). A four-point scale VTI score was assigned for each lesion according to the color pattern both in the lesion and in the surrounding breast tissue. The mean VTI score was significantly higher for malignant lesions (3.80 ± 0.66, range 1-4) than for benign ones (2.02 ± 1.20, range 1-4) (p < 0.001), and the optimal cut-off value was between score 3 and score 4. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for combined conventional US and VTI (0.945) was significantly higher than that for conventional US (0.902) and for VTI (0.871) (p = 0.0021 and p < 0.001, respectively). It was concluded that color-coded VTI with the proposed four-point scale score system combined with conventional US might have the potential to aid in the characterization of benign and malignant breast lesions. PMID:27131841

  1. Comparative performance of multiview stereoscopic and mammographic display modalities for breast lesion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Lincoln J.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Kim, Connie; Soo, Mary Scott; Walsh, Ruth

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Mammography is known to be one of the most difficult radiographic exams to interpret. Mammography has important limitations, including the superposition of normal tissue that can obscure a mass, chance alignment of normal tissue to mimic a true lesion and the inability to derive volumetric information. It has been shown that stereomammography can overcome these deficiencies by showing that layers of normal tissue lay at different depths. If standard stereomammography (i.e., a single stereoscopic pair consisting of two projection images) can significantly improve lesion detection, how will multiview stereoscopy (MVS), where many projection images are used, compare to mammography? The aim of this study was to assess the relative performance of MVS compared to mammography for breast mass detection. Methods: The MVS image sets consisted of the 25 raw projection images acquired over an arc of approximately 45 deg. using a Siemens prototype breast tomosynthesis system. The mammograms were acquired using a commercial Siemens FFDM system. The raw data were taken from both of these systems for 27 cases and realistic simulated mass lesions were added to duplicates of the 27 images at the same local contrast. The images with lesions (27 mammography and 27 MVS) and the images without lesions (27 mammography and 27 MVS) were then postprocessed to provide comparable and representative image appearance across the two modalities. All 108 image sets were shown to five full-time breast imaging radiologists in random order on a state-of-the-art stereoscopic display. The observers were asked to give a confidence rating for each image (0 for lesion definitely not present, 100 for lesion definitely present). The ratings were then compiled and processed using ROC and variance analysis. Results: The mean AUC for the five observers was 0.614{+-}0.055 for mammography and 0.778{+-}0.052 for multiview stereoscopy. The difference of 0.164{+-}0.065 was statistically significant with a

  2. Significance of Breast Lesion Descriptors in the ACR BI-RADS MRI Lexicon

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Garima; Su, Min-Ying; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Feig, Stephen A.; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has altered the clinical management for women with breast cancer. In March 2007, the American Cancer Society (ACS) issued a new guideline recommending annual MRI screening for high-risk women. This guideline is expected to substantially increase the number of women each year who receive breast MRI. The diagnosis of breast MRI involves the description of morphological and enhancement kinetics features. To standardize the communication language, the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon was developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR). In this article, we will review various appearances of breast lesions on MRI using the standardized terms of ACR BI-RADS MRI lexicon. The purpose is to familiarize all medical professionals with the breast MRI lexicon, since the use of this imaging modality is rapidly growing in the field of breast disease. Using this common language, a comprehensive analysis of both morphological and kinetic features used in image interpretation will help radiologists and other clinicians to communicate more clearly and consistently. This may in turn help physicians and patients to jointly select an appropriate management protocol for each patient’s clinical situation. PMID:19197974

  3. Model-Free Visualization of Suspicious Lesions in Breast MRI Based on Supervised and Unsupervised Learning.

    PubMed

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Lange, Oliver; Foo, Simon; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important tool in breast cancer diagnosis, but evaluation of multitemporal 3D image data holds new challenges for human observers. To aid the image analysis process, we apply supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition techniques for computing enhanced visualizations of suspicious lesions in breast MRI data. These techniques represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems and support the visual exploration of spatial and temporal features of DCE-MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogeneity of cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal signals with malignant, benign and normal kinetics. They also provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue, which is the basis for pseudo-color presentations of the image data. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging. PMID:19255616

  4. Mesenchymal tumors and tumor-like lesions of the breast: a contemporary approach review.

    PubMed

    Stolnicu, Simona; Moldovan, Cosmin; Podoleanu, Cristian; Georgescu, Rares

    2015-01-01

    The classification of the breast tumors has been revised and recently published in 2012 in the WHO blue book. Contrary to the epithelial tumors in the breast, mesenchymal tumors are rare and the classification for benign and malignant tumors is based on the same criteria in both categories, since no other specific diagnostic criteria, which would have an impact on prognosis, exist to date. The present review deals with minor changes mirroring the recent developments in the benign mesenchymal tumors (new additions are nodular fasciitis and atypical vascular lesions, while the haemangiopericytoma is removed) focusing especially on criteria to diagnose sarcomas, which represent a wide spectrum including very difficult lesions. The majority of sarcomas of the breast arise as a component of a malignant phyllodes tumor, while the pure forms are very rare. When a pure primary sarcoma of the breast is diagnosed, pathologists are encouraged to categorize the lesion according to the type of differentiation and to provide to the clinicians all the important prognostic parameters for the best treatment choice. PMID:25533916

  5. Molecular classification of non-invasive breast lesions for personalised therapy and chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Niamh; Boyle, David; McArt, Darragh; Irwin, Gareth; Harkin, D Paul; Lioe, Tong; McQuaid, Stephen; James, Jacqueline A; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter; Mullan, Paul B; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-12-22

    Breast cancer screening has led to a dramatic increase in the detection of pre-invasive breast lesions. While mastectomy is almost guaranteed to treat the disease, more conservative approaches could be as effective if patients can be stratified based on risk of co-existing or recurrent invasive disease.Here we use a range of biomarkers to interrogate and classify purely non-invasive lesions (PNL) and those with co-existing invasive breast cancer (CEIN). Apart from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), relative homogeneity is observed. DCIS contained a greater spread of molecular subtypes. Interestingly, high expression of p-mTOR was observed in all PNL with lower expression in DCIS and invasive carcinoma while the opposite expression pattern was observed for TOP2A.Comparing PNL with CEIN, we have identified p53 and Ki67 as predictors of CEIN with a combined PPV and NPV of 90.48% and 43.3% respectively. Furthermore, HER2 expression showed the best concordance between DCIS and its invasive counterpart.We propose that these biomarkers can be used to improve the management of patients with pre-invasive breast lesions following further validation and clinical trials. p53 and Ki67 could be used to stratify patients into low and high-risk groups for co-existing disease. Knowledge of expression of more actionable targets such as HER2 or TOP2A can be used to design chemoprevention or neo-adjuvant strategies. Increased knowledge of the molecular profile of pre-invasive lesions can only serve to enhance our understanding of the disease and, in the era of personalised medicine, bring us closer to improving breast cancer care. PMID:26657114

  6. Molecular classification of non-invasive breast lesions for personalised therapy and chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    McArt, Darragh; Irwin, Gareth; Harkin, D. Paul; Lioe, Tong; McQuaid, Stephen; James, Jacqueline A.; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter; Mullan, Paul B.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer screening has led to a dramatic increase in the detection of pre-invasive breast lesions. While mastectomy is almost guaranteed to treat the disease, more conservative approaches could be as effective if patients can be stratified based on risk of co-existing or recurrent invasive disease. Here we use a range of biomarkers to interrogate and classify purely non-invasive lesions (PNL) and those with co-existing invasive breast cancer (CEIN). Apart from Ductal Carcinoma in situ (DCIS), relative homogeneity is observed. DCIS contained a greater spread of molecular subtypes. Interestingly, high expression of p-mTOR was observed in all PNL with lower expression in DCIS and invasive carcinoma while the opposite expression pattern was observed for TOP2A. Comparing PNL with CEIN, we have identified p53 and Ki67 as predictors of CEIN with a combined PPV and NPV of 90.48% and 43.3% respectively. Furthermore, HER2 expression showed the best concordance between DCIS and its invasive counterpart. We propose that these biomarkers can be used to improve the management of patients with pre-invasive breast lesions following further validation and clinical trials. p53 and Ki67 could be used to stratify patients into low and high-risk groups for co-existing disease. Knowledge of expression of more actionable targets such as HER2 or TOP2A can be used to design chemoprevention or neo-adjuvant strategies. Increased knowledge of the molecular profile of pre-invasive lesions can only serve to enhance our understanding of the disease and, in the era of personalised medicine, bring us closer to improving breast cancer care. PMID:26657114

  7. In-plane visibility of lesions using breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Timberg, P.; Baath, M.; Andersson, I.; Mattsson, S.; Tingberg, A.; Ruschin, M.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the visibility of simulated lesions in 2D digital mammography (DM) and breast tomosynthesis (BT) images of patients. Methods: Images of the same women were acquired on both a DM system (Mammomat Novation, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and a BT prototype system adapted from the same type of DM system. Using the geometrical properties of the two systems, simulated lesions were projected and added to each DM image as well as to each BT projection image prior to 3D reconstruction. The same beam quality and approximately the same total absorbed dose to the glandular tissue were used for each breast image acquisition on the two systems. A series of four-alternative forced choice human observer experiments was conducted for each of five simulated lesion diameters: 0.2, 1, 3, 8, and 25 mm. An additional experiment was conducted for the 0.2 mm lesion in BT only at twice the dose level (BT{sub 2x}). Threshold signal was defined as the lesion signal intensity required for a detectability index (d{sup '}) of 2.5. Four medical physicists participated in all experiments. One experiment, consisting of 60 cases, was conducted per test condition (i.e., lesion size and signal combination). Results: For the smallest lesions (0.2 mm), the threshold signal for DM was 21% lower than for BT at equivalent dose levels, and BT{sub 2x} was 26% lower than DM. For the lesions larger than 1 mm, the threshold signal increased linearly (in log space) with the lesion diameter for both DM and BT, with DM requiring around twice the signal as BT. The difference in the threshold signal between BT and DM at each lesion size was statistically significant, except for the 0.2 mm lesion between BT{sub 2x} and DM. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that low-signal lesions larger than 1.0 mm may be more visible in BT compared to DM, whereas 0.2 mm lesions may be better visualized with DM compared to BT, when compared at equal dose.

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound improved performance of breast imaging reporting and data system evaluation of critical breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Ji-Dong; Chen, Qing; Yue, Lin-Xian; Zhou, Guo; Lan, Cheng; Li, Yi; Wu, Chi-Hua; Lu, Jing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can improve the precision of breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) categorization. METHODS: A total of 230 patients with 235 solid breast lesions classified as BI-RADS 4 on conventional ultrasound were evaluated. CEUS was performed within one week before core needle biopsy or surgical resection and a revised BI-RADS classification was assigned based on 10 CEUS imaging characteristics. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was then conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of CEUS-based BI-RADS assignment with pathological examination as reference criteria. RESULTS: The CEUS-based BI-RADS evaluation classified 116/235 (49.36%) lesions into category 3, 20 (8.51%), 13 (5.53%) and 12 (5.11%) lesions into categories 4A, 4B and 4C, respectively, and 74 (31.49%) into category 5. Selecting CEUS-based BI-RADS category 4A as an appropriate cut-off gave sensitivity and specificity values of 85.4% and 87.8%, respectively, for the diagnosis of malignant disease. The cancer-to-biopsy yield was 73.11% with CEUS-based BI-RADS 4A selected as the biopsy threshold compared with 40.85% otherwise, while the biopsy rate was only 42.13% compared with 100% otherwise. Overall, only 4.68% of invasive cancers were misdiagnosed. CONCLUSION: This pilot study suggests that evaluation of BI-RADS 4 breast lesions with CEUS results in reduced biopsy rates and increased cancer-to-biopsy yields. PMID:27358689

  9. Combining CRF and multi-hypothesis detection for accurate lesion segmentation in breast sonograms.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhihui; Wang, Qiang; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Lee, Jong-Ha; Ren, Haibing; Kim, Ji-yeun

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of lesion segmentation for breast ultrasound image relies on several diagnostic rules on intensity, texture, etc. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm to achieve a comprehensive decision upon these rules by incorporating image over-segmentation and lesion detection in a pairwise CRF model, rather than a term-by-term translation. Multiple detection hypotheses are used to propagate object-level cues to segments and a unified classifier is trained based on the concatenated features. The experimental results show that our algorithm can avoid the drawbacks of separate detection or bottom-up segmentation, and can deal with very complicated cases. PMID:23285589

  10. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haixia; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing different lesion properties; however, it does not include texture features. In this work, we expand the system by including texture features based on local binary patterns, gray level co-occurrence matrices, and Gabor filters computed from each lesion to be diagnosed. To deal with the resulting large number of features, we proposed a combination of feature-oriented classifiers combining each group of texture features into a single likelihood, resulting in three additional features used for the final classification. The classification was performed using support vector machine classifiers, and the evaluation was done with 10-fold cross validation on a dataset containing 424 lesions (239 benign and 185 malignant lesions). We compared the classification performance of the CAD system with and without texture features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.90 to 0.91 after adding texture features ([Formula: see text]). PMID:26158036

  11. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haixia; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing different lesion properties; however, it does not include texture features. In this work, we expand the system by including texture features based on local binary patterns, gray level co-occurrence matrices, and Gabor filters computed from each lesion to be diagnosed. To deal with the resulting large number of features, we proposed a combination of feature-oriented classifiers combining each group of texture features into a single likelihood, resulting in three additional features used for the final classification. The classification was performed using support vector machine classifiers, and the evaluation was done with 10-fold cross validation on a dataset containing 424 lesions (239 benign and 185 malignant lesions). We compared the classification performance of the CAD system with and without texture features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.90 to 0.91 after adding texture features (p<0.001). PMID:26158036

  12. An unusual breast lesion: the ultrasonographic, mammographic, MRI and nuclear medicine findings of mammary hibernoma.

    PubMed

    Martini, N; Londero, V; Machin, P; Travaini, L L; Zuiani, C; Bazzocchi, M; Paganelli, G

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman being treated for an ovarian cancer who was diagnosed at the age of 40. A CT-positron emission tomography (PET) scan performed as follow-up documented abnormal uptake in the right breast. Mammograms were negative for malignancy, while a focal hyperechoic lesion was observed on ultrasonography in the same breast. Thus, she was referred to our institution for breast MRI, which showed a focal area of enhancement with atypical features. Percutaneous biopsy was performed, and a mammary hibernoma was diagnosed. Radiological and pathological correlation was provided. To our knowledge, this is the only report that describes the features of this rare tumour on four different imaging modalities (mammography, ultrasonography, MRI and CT-PET). PMID:20139247

  13. An unusual breast lesion: the ultrasonographic, mammographic, MRI and nuclear medicine findings of mammary hibernoma

    PubMed Central

    Martini, N; Londero, V; Machin, P; Travaini, L L; Zuiani, C; Bazzocchi, M; Paganelli, G

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman being treated for an ovarian cancer who was diagnosed at the age of 40. A CT–positron emission tomography (PET) scan performed as follow-up documented abnormal uptake in the right breast. Mammograms were negative for malignancy, while a focal hyperechoic lesion was observed on ultrasonography in the same breast. Thus, she was referred to our institution for breast MRI, which showed a focal area of enhancement with atypical features. Percutaneous biopsy was performed, and a mammary hibernoma was diagnosed. Radiological and pathological correlation was provided. To our knowledge, this is the only report that describes the features of this rare tumour on four different imaging modalities (mammography, ultrasonography, MRI and CT–PET). PMID:20139247

  14. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  15. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions.

    PubMed

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Wallis, Matthew G

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature. PMID:26961507

  16. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature.

  17. Automatic ultrasonic breast lesions detection using support vector machine based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Miao, Shan-Jung; Fan, Wei-Che; Chen, Yung-Sheng

    2007-03-01

    It is difficult to automatically detect tumors and extract lesion boundaries in ultrasound images due to the variance in shape, the interference from speckle noise, and the low contrast between objects and background. The enhancement of ultrasonic image becomes a significant task before performing lesion classification, which was usually done with manual delineation of the tumor boundaries in the previous works. In this study, a linear support vector machine (SVM) based algorithm is proposed for ultrasound breast image training and classification. Then a disk expansion algorithm is applied for automatically detecting lesions boundary. A set of sub-images including smooth and irregular boundaries in tumor objects and those in speckle-noised background are trained by the SVM algorithm to produce an optimal classification function. Based on this classification model, each pixel within an ultrasound image is classified into either object or background oriented pixel. This enhanced binary image can highlight the object and suppress the speckle noise; and it can be regarded as degraded paint character (DPC) image containing closure noise, which is well known in perceptual organization of psychology. An effective scheme of removing closure noise using iterative disk expansion method has been successfully demonstrated in our previous works. The boundary detection of ultrasonic breast lesions can be further equivalent to the removal of speckle noise. By applying the disk expansion method to the binary image, we can obtain a significant radius-based image where the radius for each pixel represents the corresponding disk covering the specific object information. Finally, a signal transmission process is used for searching the complete breast lesion region and thus the desired lesion boundary can be effectively and automatically determined. Our algorithm can be performed iteratively until all desired objects are detected. Simulations and clinical images were introduced to

  18. Discrimination between cancers and benign breast lesions by ultrasound disparity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.; Carlson, Donald L.; Zuckerman, Julia A.; Gardner, Judd

    2000-04-01

    Described are quantitative results of an ultrasound imaging method for discrimination between breast cancers and benign lesions. The procedure, called disparity mapping, may provide better medicine at lower cost. 27 in vivo samples were obtained from the Radiology Dept., Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, of which 12 were cancers or were suspicious of being cancers and 15 were benign. Zero errors resulted from the procedure described herein. Undue optimism is unwarranted because of the small sample size, particularly of the cancers, and because the test was not blind. Because DM appears to react to elastic surface characteristics of lesions it also has the potential to disclose sites of active growth on cancerous lesions. This information, prior to surgery, would be valuable to the surgeon in planning the procedure.

  19. Breast-lesion Segmentation Combining B-Mode and Elastography Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pons, Gerard; Martí, Joan; Martí, Robert; Ganau, Sergi; Noble, J Alison

    2016-05-01

    Breast ultrasound (BUS) imaging has become a crucial modality, especially for providing a complementary view when other modalities (i.e., mammography) are not conclusive in the task of assessing lesions. The specificity in cancer detection using BUS imaging is low. These false-positive findings often lead to an increase of unnecessary biopsies. In addition, increasing sensitivity is also challenging given that the presence of artifacts in the B-mode ultrasound (US) images can interfere with lesion detection. To deal with these problems and improve diagnosis accuracy, ultrasound elastography was introduced. This paper validates a novel lesion segmentation framework that takes intensity (B-mode) and strain information into account using a Markov Random Field (MRF) and a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) approach, by applying it to clinical data. A total of 33 images from two different hospitals are used, composed of 14 cancerous and 19 benign lesions. Results show that combining both the B-mode and strain data in a unique framework improves segmentation results for cancerous lesions (Dice Similarity Coefficient of 0.49 using B-mode, while including strain data reaches 0.70), which are difficult images where the lesions appear with blurred and not well-defined boundaries. PMID:26062760

  20. Should needle localization breast biopsy give way to the new technology; the advanced breast biopsy instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, A; Zonca, S; Watt, C; Rebecca, A

    2000-07-01

    Between July 1995 and June 1997, 114 consecutive women underwent 118 breast biopsies for nonpalpable lesions. A limited procedure room and local anesthesia were used in 96.5 per cent of patients. Intravenous access was not established in 95 per cent of patients. Oral diazepam was given to 51 per cent of patients. Needle localization technique was used with a success rate of 97.5 per cent and average operative time of 18 minutes. Breast carcinoma was found in 29 (24.6 per cent) biopsies. A review of 99 of the 118 mammograms showed only 45 per cent of the lesions being amenable to the new technology, the advanced breast biopsy instrumentation. Advantages of the needle localization include short operative time; supine position for the patient; easy access to control bleeding; ability to choose a cosmetic site for the skin incision; minimal tissue removal before reaching the lesion; ability to maintain a sterile field; and applicability to almost any mammographic lesion identified, whether single or multiple. Disadvantages include the need for a separate procedure to place the wire and potential of missing the lesion in 2.5 per cent, requiring additional surgery. PMID:10917475

  1. Validity of breast-specific gamma imaging for Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Jeng; Yu, Yeong Beom; Park, Kyoung Sik; Chung, Hyun Woo; So, Young; Choi, Nami; Kim, Mi Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 162 patients who underwent BSGI in BI-RADS 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound. Results Of the 162 breast lesions, 66 were malignant tumors and 96 were benign tumors. Sensitivity and specificity of BSGI were 90.9% and 78.1%, and positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 74.1% and 92.6%. The sensitivity or specificity of mammography and ultrasound were 74.2% and 56.3% and 87.9% and 19.8%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI for breast lesions ≤1 cm were 88.0% and 86.8%, while the values of beast lesions >1 cm were 92.7% and 61.5%. The sensitivity or specificity of BSGI and mammography for patients with dense breasts were 92.0% and 81.3% and 72.0% and 50.0%, respectively. 26 patients showed neither a nodule nor microcalcification on ultrasound, but showed suspicious calcification on mammography. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI with microcalcification only lesion were 75.0% and 94.4%. Conclusion This study demonstrated that BSGI had shown high sensitivity and specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive values in BI-RADS 4 lesions on ultrasound and/or mammography. BSGI showed excellent results in dense breasts, in lesions that are less than 1 cm in size and lesions with suspicious microcalcification only. PMID:27073789

  2. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: Proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Rakha, Emad A.; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Fox, Stephen B.; Dabbs, David J.; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew HS.; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C.; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M.; Ellis, Ian O.

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are traditionally classified into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey-zone between benign and malignant as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorisation of such lesions is challenging and for some entities is recognised to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over-treatment or under-treatment. The rarity of these lesions makes acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification, behaviour and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions remain of uncertain malignant nature such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of 1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and 2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential, are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed. PMID:26348644

  3. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Emad A; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Fox, Stephen B; Dabbs, David J; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew H S; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are classified traditionally into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey zone between benign and malignant, as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorization of such lesions is challenging, and for some entities is recognized to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over- or undertreatment. The rarity of these lesions makes the acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision-making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification and behaviour, and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential, such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions of uncertain malignant nature remain, such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of (1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and (2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed. PMID:26348644

  4. Multinucleate Giant Cells in FNAC of Benign Breast Lesions: Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    R, Kalyani; Murthy V, Srinivasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleate giant cells are described in breast aspirates. However, due to its rarity very few cases have been described cytologically. Hence recognition and correct interpretation of their presence is difficult, yet crucial for accurate diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The prospective study of FNAC (fine needle aspirate cytology) of breast lumps was conducted for a period of six months. Direct smears were prepared from the material aspirated. In case of fluid aspirates, centrifuge done and cell sediment was used for making smears. Smears were alcohol fixed and stained with PAP/H&E or air dried smears were stained with Leishman stain. Further smears were subjected to immunocytochemistry using vimentin and CD34 markers to know the origin of multinucleate giant cells. Results: We have reported 11 cases of breast lesions, which showed multinucleate giant cells on FNAC. Out of the 11 cases, Cytologically six cases showed granuloma debris with relative proportion of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells. Two cases were diagnosed as acute suppurative granulomatous mastitis. Two cases of fibroadenoma and one case of fat necrosis showed multinucleate giant cells. Immunocytochemistry showed vimentin positivity in both stromal and histiocytic type of multinucleate giant cells and in isolated histiocytes. CD34 was focally positive in histiocytic type of giant cells. Conclusion: An effort is made to distinguish between the stromal and histiocytic type giant cells in non-neoplastic breast lesions. Further molecular studies have to be done to know the exact histogenesis and role of these multinucleate giant cells in benign lesions. PMID:25653953

  5. Polyarteritis Nodosa Presenting as Digital Gangrene and Breast Lesion following Exposure to Silicone Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Homsi, Yamen; Carlson, John Andrew; Homsi, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare systemic necrotizing vasculitis of small and medium sized arteries. We report a case of a 49-year old woman who presented with PAN following exposure to silicone breast implants. Although the relationship between silicone implants and connective tissue diseases has been investigated in the literature, no prior reports were found documenting PAN after silicone mammoplasty. While the pathogenesis of idiopathic PAN is not known yet, responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy may suggest an immunologic mechanism. More robust research is needed to understand the connection between silicone breast implants and autoimmunity. PMID:26844000

  6. Ultrasonographic features and clinical implications of benign palpable breast lesions in young women

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the breast ultrasonography (US) features and to investigate whether performing a core biopsy is warranted in young women having palpable solid breast masses. Methods: A total of 76 solid palpable masses in 68 consecutive women (≤25 years old) underwent tissue diagnosis by percutaneous core biopsy. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the clinical history and histopathology, independently evaluated the US features according to Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. The frequency of benign and malignant descriptor terms that were used to characterize the lesions were compared to the final pathology. Results: All 76 palpable solid masses yielded benign pathology. On the US, the shape of the mass was described by radiologists 1 and 2 as oval or round (63.2% and 71.1%), margin as circumscribed (68.4% and 77.6%) and orientation as parallel (85.5% and 90.8%); the frequency of using all three benign descriptors was 61.8% and 68.5%, respectively. Suspicious descriptors were used less frequently by radiologists 1 and 2 including irregular shape (9.2% and 13.1%), non-circumscribed margin (31.6% and 22.4%) and non-parallel orientation (14.5% and 9.2%); the frequency of using all three suspicious descriptors was 9.2% and 11.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the variable US features, breast malignancy seems extremely low in 25 years or younger women for palpable breast lesions. Using the BI-RADS lexicon, US accurately predicted benignity in about two thirds of our patients, supporting US surveillance as a safe alternative to invasive tissue sampling in this setting. PMID:25475650

  7. Fusion of digital breast tomosynthesis images via wavelet synthesis for improved lesion conspicuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Harishwaran; Pomponiu, Victor; Zheng, Bin; Whiting, Bruce; Gur, David

    2014-03-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is the most common screening procedure for detecting early breast cancer. However, due to complications such as overlapping breast tissue in projection images, the efficacy of FFDM reading is reduced. Recent studies have shown that digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in combination with FFDM, increases detection sensitivity considerably while decreasing false-positive, recall rates. There is a huge interest in creating diagnostically accurate 2-D interpretations from the DBT slices. Most of the 2-D syntheses rely on visualizing the maximum intensities (brightness) from each slice through different methods. We propose a wavelet based fusion method, where we focus on preserving holistic information from larger structures such as masses while adding high frequency information that is relevant and helpful for diagnosis. This method enables the spatial generation of a 2D image from a series of DBT images, each of which contains both smooth and coarse structures distributed in the wavelet domain. We believe that the wavelet-synthesized images, generated from their DBT image datasets, provide radiologists with improved lesion and micro-calcification conspicuity as compared with FFDM images. The potential impact of this fusion method is (1) Conception of a device-independent, data-driven modality that increases the conspicuity of lesions, thereby facilitating early detection and potentially reducing recall rates; (2) Reduction of the accompanying radiation dose to the patient.

  8. An approach to the diagnosis of spindle cell lesions of the breast.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Emad A; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Lee, Andrew H S; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-01-01

    Although most breast spindle cell lesions (BSCLs) are rare, they constitute a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from reactive processes to aggressive malignant tumours. Despite their varied histogenesis and behaviour, some lesions show an overlap of morphological features, making accurate diagnosis a challenging task, particularly in needle core biopsies. Clinical history and immunohistochemistry can help in making a correct diagnosis in morphologically challenging cases. To make an accurate diagnosis, it is important to maintain a wide differential diagnosis and be familiar with the diverse morphological appearances of these different entities. BSCLs can generally be classified into bland-looking and malignant-looking categories. In the former, the commonest diagnosis is scarring. However, it is important to distinguish low-grade spindle cell metaplastic breast carcinoma from other benign entities, as the management is clearly different. In the malignant category, it is important to differentiate metaplastic carcinoma from other malignant primary and metastatic malignant spindle cell tumours of the breast, such as malignant phyllodes tumour, angiosarcoma, and melanoma. This review focuses on the classification and histological and molecular diagnosis of various BSCLs, with an emphasis on the diagnostic approach, including in core biopsies. PMID:26768028

  9. Quantitative evaluation of automatic methods for lesions detection in breast ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcomini, Karem D.; Schiabel, Homero; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton O.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish benign from malignant breast masses, providing more detailed evaluation in dense breasts. Due to the subjectivity in the images interpretation, computer-aid diagnosis (CAD) schemes have been developed, increasing the mammography analysis process to include ultrasound images as complementary exams. As one of most important task in the evaluation of this kind of images is the mass detection and its contours interpretation, automated segmentation techniques have been investigated in order to determine a quite suitable procedure to perform such an analysis. Thus, the main goal in this work is investigating the effect of some processing techniques used to provide information on the determination of suspicious breast lesions as well as their accurate boundaries in ultrasound images. In tests, 80 phantom and 50 clinical ultrasound images were preprocessed, and 5 segmentation techniques were tested. By using quantitative evaluation metrics the results were compared to a reference image delineated by an experienced radiologist. A self-organizing map artificial neural network has provided the most relevant results, demonstrating high accuracy and low error rate in the lesions representation, corresponding hence to the segmentation process for US images in our CAD scheme under tests.

  10. A new background distribution-based active contour model for three-dimensional lesion segmentation in breast DCE-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Yiping; Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhao, Zuowei; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computerized semiautomatic segmentation method for accurate extraction of three-dimensional lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) of the breast. Methods: The authors propose a new background distribution-based active contour model using level set (BDACMLS) to segment lesions in breast DCE-MRIs. The method starts with manual selection of a region of interest (ROI) that contains the entire lesion in a single slice where the lesion is enhanced. Then the lesion volume from the volume data of interest, which is captured automatically, is separated. The core idea of BDACMLS is a new signed pressure function which is based solely on the intensity distribution combined with pathophysiological basis. To compare the algorithm results, two experienced radiologists delineated all lesions jointly to obtain the ground truth. In addition, results generated by other different methods based on level set (LS) are also compared with the authors’ method. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated by several region-based metrics such as the overlap ratio. Results: Forty-two studies with 46 lesions that contain 29 benign and 17 malignant lesions are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinomain situ, scar carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, breast cysts, fibroadenoma, etc. The overlap ratio for BDACMLS with respect to manual segmentation is 79.55% ± 12.60% (mean ± s.d.). Conclusions: A new active contour model method has been developed and shown to successfully segment breast DCE-MRI three-dimensional lesions. The results from this model correspond more closely to manual segmentation, solve the weak-edge-passed problem, and improve the robustness in segmenting different lesions.

  11. Optical imaging as an adjunct to sonograph in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Quing; Conant, Emily F.; Chance, Britton

    2000-04-01

    The role of near infrared (NIR) diffusive light imaging as an adjunct to ultrasound in differentiating benign from malignant lesions was evaluated in 27 mammography patients with infiltrating ductal carcinomas, apocrine metaplasia, fibroadenomas, radial scar and ductal hyperplasia, cysts, and normal tissues. Conventional ultrasound/mammography images were graded based on BI-RADS assessment categories. The spatial NIR measurements were made at wavelengths of 750 and 830 nm. Functional images, such as relative changes of deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb) and total blood concentration, were estimated from the dual wavelength measurements. Maximum relative deoxyHb and blood concentration changes were measured, and spatial correlation of masses in relative deoxyHb and blood concentration images for each breast were calculated. For the five biopsy proven benign lesions, ultrasound/mammography diagnoses were suspicious for malignancy (four cases) and highly suspicious for malignancy (one case). Four lesions showed less than 1.0 V maximum deoxyHb and less than 1.5 V maximum blood concentration levels on average and spatial image correlation showed no correlated masses in both deoxyHb and blood concentration images. For the four biopsy proven malignant lesions, ultrasound/mammography diagnoses were highly suspicious for malignancy. Maximum deoxyHb and blood concentration changes were greater than 2.9 V on average except one lesion which showed smaller deoxyHb signal (maximum 0.85 V) but the deoxyHb mass and blood concentration mass were highly correlated.

  12. Correlative analysis of breast lesions on full-field digital mammography and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yading

    Multi-modality imaging techniques are increasingly being applied in clinical practice to improve the accuracy with which breast cancer can be diagnosed. However, interpreting images from different modalities is not trivial as different images of the same lesion may exhibit different physical lesion attributes, and currently the various image modality acquisitions are performed under different breast positioning protocols. The general objective of this research is to investigate computerized correlative feature analysis (CFA) methods for integrating information from full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) images and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) images by taking advantage of the information from different imaging modalities, and thus improving the diagnostic ability of computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) in breast cancer workup. The main hypothesis to be tested is that by incorporating correlative feature analysis in CADx, one can achieve an accurate and efficient discrimination between corresponding and non-corresponding lesion pairs, and subsequently improve performance in the estimation of computer-estimated probabilities of malignancy. The main contributions of this research work are summarized as follows. (1) A novel active-contour model based algorithm was developed for lesion segmentation on mammograms. This new algorithm yielded a statistically improved segmentation performance as compared to previously developed methods: a region-growing method and a radial gradient index (RGI) based method. (2) A computerized feature-based, supervised-learning driven CFA method was investigated to identify corresponding lesions in different mammographic views. The performance obtained by combining multiple features was found to be statistically better than the use of a distance feature alone, and robust across different mammographic view combinations. (3) A multi-modality CADx method that automatically selects and combines discriminative information from

  13. Fine needle aspiration cytology of radiation-induced changes in nonneoplastic breast lesions. Possible pitfalls in cytodiagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterse, J.L.; Thunnissen, F.B.; van Heerde, P.

    1989-03-01

    The range of radiation-induced changes in fine needle aspiration (FNA) smears of the breast is described. In 41 of more than 800 patients who underwent breast-conserving treatment, a palpable breast lesion developed, and FNA was performed. In six cases, a recurrent carcinoma was present. In the remaining cases, three patterns of nonneoplastic lesions could be discerned: epithelial atypia (14 cases), fat necrosis (10 cases) and poorly cellular smears without epithelial atypia or fat necrosis (13 cases). It is important to be familiar with the patterns of radiation-induced epithelial atypia, since such atypia may lead to a misdiagnosis of recurrent carcinoma. These atypical cells may show impressive anisocytosis and anisonucleosis; however, the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio remains normal and an admixture of bipolar cells is present. Cell dissociation and necrotic cell debris, as often seen in breast cancer smears, were never encountered in FNA smears from radiated nonneoplastic breasts.

  14. A finite element model for simulating acoustic streaming in cystic breast lesions with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, K R; Trahey, G E

    2000-01-01

    Streaming detection is an ultrasonic technique that can be used to distinguish fluid-filled lesions, or cysts, from solid lesions. With this technique, high intensity ultrasound pulses are used to induce acoustic streaming in cyst fluid, and this motion is detected using Doppler flow estimation methods. Results from a pilot clinical study were recently published in which acoustic streaming was successfully induced and detected in 14 of 15 simple breast cysts and four of 14 sonographically indeterminate breast lesions in vivo. In the study, the detected velocities were found to vary considerably among cysts and for different pulsing regimes. A finite element model of streaming detection is presented. This model is utilized to investigate methods of increasing induced acoustic streaming velocity while minimizing patient exposure to high intensity ultrasound during streaming detection. Parameters studied include intensity, frequency, acoustic beam shape, cyst-diameter, cyst fluid protein concentration, and cyst fluid viscosity. The model, which provides both transient and steady-state solutions, is shown to predict trends in streaming velocity accurately. Experimental results from studies investigating the potential for nonlinear streaming enhancement in cysts are also provided. PMID:18238532

  15. Fusion of classifiers for REIS-based detection of suspicious breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, Dror; Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Tublin, Mitchell; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    After developing a multi-probe resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) system aimed at detecting women with breast abnormalities that may indicate a developing breast cancer, we have been conducting a prospective clinical study to explore the feasibility of applying this REIS system to classify younger women (< 50 years old) into two groups of "higher-than-average risk" and "average risk" of having or developing breast cancer. The system comprises one central probe placed in contact with the nipple, and six additional probes uniformly distributed along an outside circle to be placed in contact with six points on the outer breast skin surface. In this preliminary study, we selected an initial set of 174 examinations on participants that have completed REIS examinations and have clinical status verification. Among these, 66 examinations were recommended for biopsy due to findings of a highly suspicious breast lesion ("positives"), and 108 were determined as negative during imaging based procedures ("negatives"). A set of REIS-based features, extracted using a mirror-matched approach, was computed and fed into five machine learning classifiers. A genetic algorithm was used to select an optimal subset of features for each of the five classifiers. Three fusion rules, namely sum rule, weighted sum rule and weighted median rule, were used to combine the results of the classifiers. Performance evaluation was performed using a leave-one-case-out cross-validation method. The results indicated that REIS may provide a new technology to identify younger women with higher than average risk of having or developing breast cancer. Furthermore, it was shown that fusion rule, such as a weighted median fusion rule and a weighted sum fusion rule may improve performance as compared with the highest performing single classifier.

  16. Association between power law coefficients of the anatomical noise power spectrum and lesion detectability in breast imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a parameter extracted from a power function fit to the anatomical noise power spectrum, β, may be predictive of breast mass lesion detectability in x-ray based medical images of the breast. In this investigation, the value of β was compared with a number of other more widely used parameters, in order to determine the relationship between β and these other parameters. This study made use of breast CT data sets, acquired on two breast CT systems developed in our laboratory. A total of 185 breast data sets in 183 women were used, and only the unaffected breast was used (where no lesion was suspected). The anatomical noise power spectrum computed from two-dimensional region of interests (ROIs), was fit to a power function (NPS(f) = α f-β), and the exponent parameter (β) was determined using log/log linear regression. Breast density for each of the volume data sets was characterized in previous work. The breast CT data sets analyzed in this study were part of a previous study which evaluated the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance using simulated spherical lesions and a pre-whitened matched filter computer observer. This ROC information was used to compute the detectability index as well as the sensitivity at 95% specificity. The fractal dimension was computed from the same ROIs which were used for the assessment of β. The value of β was compared to breast density, detectability index, sensitivity, and fractal dimension, and the slope of these relationships was investigated to assess statistical significance from zero slope. A statistically significant non-zero slope was considered to be a positive association in this investigation. All comparisons between β and breast density, detectability index, sensitivity at 95% specificity, and fractal dimension demonstrated statistically significant association with p < 0.001 in all cases. The value of β was also found to be associated with patient age and

  17. Quantitative nucleic features are effective for discrimination of intraductal proliferative lesions of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Saito, Akira; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Cosatto, Eric; Kurata, Atsushi; Nagao, Toshitaka; Tateishi, Ayako; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraductal proliferative lesions (IDPLs) of the breast are recognized as a risk factor for subsequent invasive carcinoma development. Although opportunities for IDPL diagnosis have increased, these lesions are difficult to diagnose correctly, especially atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (LG-DCIS). In order to define the difference between these lesions, many molecular pathological approaches have been performed. However, still we do not have a molecular marker and objective histological index about IDPLs of the breast. Methods: We generated full digital pathology archives from 175 female IDPL patients, including usual ductal hyperplasia (UDH), ADH, LG-DCIS, intermediate-grade (IM)-DCIS, and high-grade (HG)-DCIS. After total 2,035,807 nucleic segmentations were extracted, we evaluated nuclear features using step-wise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and a support vector machine. Results: High diagnostic accuracy (81.8–99.3%) was achieved between pathologists’ diagnoses and two-group LDA predictions from nucleic features for IDPL discrimination. Grouping of nuclear features as size and shape-related or intranuclear texture-related revealed that the latter group was more important when distinguishing between normal duct, UDH, ADH, and LG-DCIS. However, these two groups were equally important when discriminating between LG-DCIS and HG-DCIS. The Mahalanobis distances between each group showed that the smallest distance values occurred between LG-DCIS and IM-DCIS and between ADH and Normal. On the other hand, the distance value between ADH and LG-DCIS was larger than this distance. Conclusions: In this study, we have presented a practical and useful digital pathological method that incorporates nuclear morphological and textural features for IDPL prediction. We expect that this novel algorithm is used for the automated diagnosis assisting system for breast cancer. PMID:26955499

  18. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC): application to breast lesion segmentation on DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agner, Shannon C.; Xu, Jun; Rosen, Mark; Karthigeyan, Sudha; Englander, Sarah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Spectral embedding (SE), a graph-based manifold learning method, has previously been shown to be useful in high dimensional data classification. In this work, we present a novel SE based active contour (SEAC) segmentation scheme and demonstrate its applications in lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhance magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this work, we employ SE on DCE-MRI on a per voxel basis to embed the high dimensional time series intensity vector into a reduced dimensional space, where the reduced embedding space is characterized by the principal eigenvectors. The orthogonal eigenvector-based data representation allows for computation of strong tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space and also yields improved region statistics that serve as optimal stopping criteria for SEAC. We demonstrate both analytically and empirically that the tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space are stronger than the corresponding gradients in the original grayscale intensity space. On a total of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, SEAC yielded a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 3.2+/-2.1 pixels and mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.74+/-0.13 compared to manual ground truth segmentation. An active contour in conjunction with fuzzy c-means (FCM+AC), a commonly used segmentation method for breast DCE-MRI, produced a corresponding MAD of 7.2+/-7.4 pixels and mean DSC of 0.58+/-0.32. In conjunction with a set of 6 quantitative morphological features automatically extracted from the SEAC derived lesion boundary, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.73, for discriminating between 10 benign and 30 malignant lesions; the corresponding SVM classifier with the FCM+AC derived morphological features yielded an AUC of 0.65.

  19. Kinetic Curve Type Assessment for Classification of Breast Lesions Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Geoffrey; Liao, Yen-Hsiu; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to employ a kinetic model with dynamic contrast enhancement-magnetic resonance imaging to develop an approach that can efficiently distinguish malignant from benign lesions. Materials and Methods A total of 43 patients with 46 lesions who underwent breast dynamic contrast enhancement-magnetic resonance imaging were included in this retrospective study. The distribution of malignant to benign lesions was 31/15 based on histological results. This study integrated a single-compartment kinetic model and dynamic contrast enhancement-magnetic resonance imaging to generate a kinetic modeling curve for improving the accuracy of diagnosis of breast lesions. Kinetic modeling curves of all different lesions were analyzed by three experienced radiologists and classified into one of three given types. Receiver operating characteristic and Kappa statistics were used for the qualitative method. The findings of the three radiologists based on the time-signal intensity curve and the kinetic curve were compared. Results An average sensitivity of 82%, a specificity of 65%, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76, and a positive predictive value of 82% and negative predictive value of 63% was shown with the kinetic model (p = 0.017, 0.052, 0.068), as compared to an average sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 55%, an area under the receiver operating characteristic of 0.69, and a positive predictive value of 79% and negative predictive value of 57% with the time-signal intensity curve method (p = 0.003, 0.004, 0.008). The diagnostic consistency of the three radiologists was shown by the κ-value, 0.857 (p<0.001) with the method based on the time-signal intensity curve and 0.826 (p<0.001) with the method of the kinetic model. Conclusions According to the statistic results based on the 46 lesions, the kinetic modeling curve method showed higher sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as compared with

  20. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Methods: Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740–1110 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Results: Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Conclusion: Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Advances in knowledge: Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive

  1. Simulation and assessment of realistic breast lesions using fractal growth models.

    PubMed

    Rashidnasab, A; Elangovan, P; Yip, M; Diaz, O; Dance, D R; Young, K C; Wells, K

    2013-08-21

    A new method of generating realistic three dimensional simulated breast lesions known as diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) is presented, and compared with the random walk (RW) method. Both methods of lesion simulation utilize a physics-based method for inserting these simulated lesions into 2D clinical mammogram images that takes into account the polychromatic x-ray spectrum, local glandularity and scatter. DLA and RW masses were assessed for realism via a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study with nine observers. The study comprised 150 images of which 50 were real pathology proven mammograms, 50 were normal mammograms with RW inserted masses and 50 were normal mammograms with DLA inserted masses. The average area under the ROC curve for the DLA method was 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.59) compared to 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.56-0.63) for the RW method. The observer study results suggest that the DLA method produced more realistic masses with more variability in shape compared to the RW method. DLA generated lesions can overcome the lack of complexity in structure and shape in many current methods of mass simulation. PMID:23892735

  2. Simulation and assessment of realistic breast lesions using fractal growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidnasab, A.; Elangovan, P.; Yip, M.; Diaz, O.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.; Wells, K.

    2013-08-01

    A new method of generating realistic three dimensional simulated breast lesions known as diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) is presented, and compared with the random walk (RW) method. Both methods of lesion simulation utilize a physics-based method for inserting these simulated lesions into 2D clinical mammogram images that takes into account the polychromatic x-ray spectrum, local glandularity and scatter. DLA and RW masses were assessed for realism via a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study with nine observers. The study comprised 150 images of which 50 were real pathology proven mammograms, 50 were normal mammograms with RW inserted masses and 50 were normal mammograms with DLA inserted masses. The average area under the ROC curve for the DLA method was 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.59) compared to 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.56-0.63) for the RW method. The observer study results suggest that the DLA method produced more realistic masses with more variability in shape compared to the RW method. DLA generated lesions can overcome the lack of complexity in structure and shape in many current methods of mass simulation.

  3. Impact of lesion segmentation metrics on computer-aided diagnosis/detection in breast computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsien-Chi; Giger, Maryellen L.; Reiser, Ingrid; Drukker, Karen; Boone, John M.; Lindfors, Karen K.; Yang, Kai; Edwards, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Evaluation of segmentation algorithms usually involves comparisons of segmentations to gold-standard delineations without regard to the ultimate medical decision-making task. We compare two segmentation evaluations methods—a Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) evaluation and a diagnostic classification task–based evaluation method using lesions from breast computed tomography. In our investigation, we use results from two previously developed lesion-segmentation algorithms [a global active contour model (GAC) and a global with local aspects active contour model]. Although similar DSC values were obtained (0.80 versus 0.77), we show that the global + local active contour (GLAC) model, as compared with the GAC model, is able to yield significantly improved classification performance in terms of area under the receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curve in the task of distinguishing malignant from benign lesions. [Area under the ROC curve (AUC)=0.78 compared to 0.63, p≪0.001]. This is mainly because the GLAC model yields better detailed information required in the calculation of morphological features. Based on our findings, we conclude that the DSC metric alone is not sufficient for evaluating segmentation lesions in computer-aided diagnosis tasks. PMID:26158052

  4. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Gillian E.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Banducci, Sarah E.; Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Sarah A.; Sutton, Brad P.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment. PMID:26915025

  5. Proteomic profile of saliva and plasma from women with impalpable breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Delmonico, Lucas; Bravo, Maryah; Silvestre, Rafaele Tavares; Ornellas, Maria Helena Faria; De Azevedo, Carolina Maria; Alves, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the proteomic profile of saliva and plasma from women with impalpable breast lesions using nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight (nLC-Q-TOF) technology. Plasma and saliva from patients with fibroadenoma (n=10), infiltrating ductal carcinoma (n=10) and healthy control groups (n=8) were assessed by combinations of inter/intra-group analyses, revealing significant quantitative and qualitative differences. The major differentially-expressed proteins in the saliva of patients compared with the controls were α2-macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, but the proteins that met the minimum fold-change and P-value cut-offs were leukocyte elastase inhibitor and α-enolase, and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Concerning plasma, α-2-macroglobulin and ceruplasmin were upregulated, while other proteins such as haptoglobin, hemopexin and vitamin D-binding protein were downregulated compared with the control. The changes in immune, molecular transport and signaling pathways were the most representative in the proteomic profile of the saliva and plasma. This is the first study to describe the proteome of saliva and plasma from the same women with impalpable breast lesions. PMID:27602154

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  7. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation for breast lesions under computer-aided MRI guidance: the first experience and initial results

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, M H; Kilic, F; Icten, G E; Aydogan, F; Ozben, V; Halac, M; Olgun, D C; Gazioglu, E; Celik, V; Uras, C; Altug, Z A

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to present an alternative technique for the pre-operative localisation of solely MRI-detected suspicious breast lesions using a computer-assisted MRI-guided radio-guided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) technique. Methods Between January 2009 and June 2010, 25 females with a total of 25 suspicious breast lesions that could be detected only by MRI, and for whom breast surgery was planned, underwent the computer-assisted MRI-guided ROLL technique. A seven-channel biopsy breast array coil and computerised diagnostic workstation were used for the localisation procedure. Three-phase dynamic contrast-enhanced axial images were taken. After investigating the localisation co-ordinates with the help of intervention software on a workstation, an 18 G coaxial cannula was placed in the exact position determined. Following verification of the cannula position by additional axial scans, 99mTc-labelled macroalbumin aggregate and MRI contrast material were injected. Post-procedure MRI scans were used to confirm the correct localisation. Results All the procedures were technically successful. The mean lesion size was 10.8 mm (range: 4–25 mm). The mean total magnet and the mean localisation times were 28.6 min (range: 18–46 min) and 13.1 min (range: 8–20 min), respectively. Grid and pillar methods were used for localisation in 24 procedures and 1 procedure, respectively. On histopathological examination, 6 malignant, 10 high-risk and 9 benign lesions were identified. All patients tolerated the procedure well. There were no major complications. Conclusion This is the first report documenting the application of MRI-guided ROLL. Based on our preliminary results, this technique is very efficient and seems to be a good alternative to wire localisation. PMID:22010030

  8. Development and comparative assessment of Raman spectroscopic classification algorithms for lesion discrimination in stereotactic breast biopsies with microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Barman, Ishan; Saha, Anushree; McGee, Sasha; Galindo, Luis H.; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2014-01-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. Here, we develop and compare different approaches for developing Raman classification algorithms to diagnose invasive and in situ breast cancer, fibrocystic change and fibroadenoma that can be associated with microcalcifications. In this study, Raman spectra were acquired from tissue cores obtained from fresh breast biopsies and analyzed using a constituent-based breast model. Diagnostic algorithms based on the breast model fit coefficients were devised using logistic regression, C4.5 decision tree classification, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) and support vector machine (SVM) analysis, and subjected to leave-one-out cross validation. The best performing algorithm was based on SVM analysis (with radial basis function), which yielded a positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 96% for cancer diagnosis. Importantly, these results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy provides adequate diagnostic information for lesion discrimination even in the presence of microcalcifications, which to the best of our knowledge has not been previously reported. Raman spectroscopy and multivariate classification provide accurate discrimination among lesions in stereotactic breast biopsies, irrespective of microcalcification status. PMID:22815240

  9. Using three-class BANN classifier in the automated analysis of breast cancer lesions in DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhooshan, Neha; Giger, Maryellen; Edwards, Darrin; Drukker, Karen; Jansen, Sanaz; Li, Hui; Lan, Li; Newstead, Gillian

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate three-class Bayesian artificial neural networks (BANN) in dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) CAD in distinguishing different types of breast lesions including ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and benign. The database contains 72 DCIS lesions, 124 IDC lesions, and 131 benign breast lesions (no cysts). Breast MR images were obtained with a clinical DCE-MRI scanning protocol. In 3D, we automatically segmented each lesion and calculated its characteristic kinetic curve using the fuzzy c-means method. Morphological and kinetic features were automatically extracted, and stepwise linear discriminant analysis was utilized for feature selection in four subcategories: DCIS vs. IDC, DCIS vs. benign, IDC vs. benign, and malignant (DCIS + IDC) vs. benign. Classification was automatically performed with the selected features for each subcategory using round-robin-by-lesion two-class BANN and three-class BANN. The performances of the classifiers were assessed with two-class ROC analysis. We failed to show any statistically significant differences between the two-class BANN and three-class BANN for all four classification tasks, demonstrating that the three-class BANN performed similarly to the two-class BANN. A three-class BANN is expected to be more desirable in the clinical arena for both diagnosis and patient management.

  10. Predictive model for contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the breast: Is it feasible in malignant risk assessment of breast imaging reporting and data system 4 lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Ji-Dong; Chen, Qing; Yue, Lin-Xian; Zhou, Guo; Lan, Cheng; Li, Yi; Wu, Chi-Hua; Lu, Jing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To build and evaluate predictive models for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) of the breast to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions. METHODS: A total of 235 breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) 4 solid breast lesions were imaged via CEUS before core needle biopsy or surgical resection. CEUS results were analyzed on 10 enhancing patterns to evaluate diagnostic performance of three benign and three malignant CEUS models, with pathological results used as the gold standard. A logistic regression model was developed basing on the CEUS results, and then evaluated with receiver operating curve (ROC). RESULTS: Except in cases of enhanced homogeneity, the rest of the 9 enhancement appearances were statistically significant (P < 0.05). These 9 enhancement patterns were selected in the final step of the logistic regression analysis, with diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 84.4% and 82.7%, respectively, and the area under the ROC curve of 0.911. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the malignant vs benign CEUS models were 84.38%, 87.77%, 86.38% and 86.46%, 81.29% and 83.40%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The breast CEUS models can predict risk of malignant breast lesions more accurately, decrease false-positive biopsy, and provide accurate BI-RADS classification. PMID:27358688

  11. Progression risk of columnar cell lesions of the breast diagnosed in core needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Verschuur-Maes, Anoek H J; Witkamp, Arjen J; de Bruin, Peter C; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J

    2011-12-01

    Columnar cell lesions (CCLs) of the breast are recognized as putative precursor lesions of invasive carcinoma, but their management remains controversial. We therefore conducted a retrospective study on 311 CCLs, diagnosed in 4,164 14-gauge core needle biopsies (CNB): 221 CCLs without atypia (CCL), 69 with atypia (CCL-A), and 21 atypical ductal hyperplasias originating in CCL (ADH-CCL). Two groups were identified: "immediate treatment" group undergoing excision within four months after the CNB diagnosis of CCL (N = 52) and the "wait-and-see" group followed up to 8 years (median 3.5 years, N = 259). In 7 of 31 women (22.5%, 1 CCL, 4 CCL-A, 2 ADH-CCL) who underwent immediate surgical excision and were initially biopsied for microcalcifications, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was present and in 2/31 women (6.5%, 1 CCL, 1 CCL-A) invasive carcinoma. In 2/21 excisions (9.5%, 1 CCL, 1 CCL-A) initially biopsied for a density, DCIS was present and invasive carcinoma in 5/21 excisions (23.8%, 2 CCL, 3 CCL-A). In the wait-and-see group, 9/259 women (3.5%) developed invasive carcinoma, 6 ipsi, and 3 contralaterally. Progression risks of CCL-A and ADH-CCL were 18% and 22%,versus 2% for CCL without atypia (p < 0.001). In conclusion, CCL-A or ADH-CCL in a CNB were associated with a high risk of DCIS/invasive carcinoma in immediate surgical excision biopsies. The 8-years progression risks for CCL-A and ADH-CCL were around 20%. This illustrates that an atypical CCL in a CNB may signal the presence of concurrent lesions or development of advanced lesions in future and may justify ("mini") surgical excision. PMID:21225627

  12. Medical devices; obstetrical and gynecological devices; classification of the breast lesion documentation system. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-07-28

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the breast lesion documentation system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are discussed later in this document. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). The agency is classifying this device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice of availability of a guidance document that is the special control for this device. PMID:12884877

  13. A modified Seeded Region Growing algorithm for vessel segmentation in breast MRI images for investigating the nature of potential lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotsos, D.; Vassiou, K.; Kostopoulos, S.; Lavdas, El; Kalatzis, I.; Asvestas, P.; Arvanitis, D. L.; Fezoulidis, I. V.; Cavouras, D.

    2014-03-01

    The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as an alternative protocol for screening of breast cancer has been intensively investigated during the past decade. Preliminary research results have indicated that gadolinium-agent administrative MRI scans may reveal the nature of breast lesions by analyzing the contrast-agent's uptake time. In this study, we attempt to deduce the same conclusion, however, from a different perspective by investigating, using image processing, the vascular network of the breast at two different time intervals following the administration of gadolinium. Twenty cases obtained from a 3.0-T MRI system (SIGNA HDx; GE Healthcare) were included in the study. A new modification of the Seeded Region Growing (SRG) algorithm was used to segment vessels from surrounding background. Delineated vessels were investigated by means of their topology, morphology and texture. Results have shown that it is possible to estimate the nature of the lesions with approximately 94.4% accuracy, thus, it may be claimed that the breast vascular network does encodes useful, patterned, information, which can be used for characterizing breast lesions.

  14. A comparison of lesion detection accuracy using digital mammography and flat-panel CT breast imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta; Glick, Stephen J.

    2005-04-01

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a 3D object onto a 2D plane. As an alternative, cone-beam CT breast imaging with a CsI based flat-panel imager (CTBI) has been proposed with the ability to provide 3D visualization of breast tissue. To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy using CTBI over digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through the flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of W/Al 50 kVp for CTBI and Mo/Mo 28 kVp for DM were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total mean glandular dose (MGD) of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in a conventional two-view screening mammography study. Since only one DM view was investigated here, the intensity of the DM x-ray spectra was defined to give 2 mGy MGD. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with 4 observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (Az) was 0.94 for CTBI, and 0.81 for DM. Results indicate that a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom can be detected by CT breast imaging with statistically significant higher confidence than with digital mammography.

  15. Mammotome(®) biopsy system for the resection of breast lesions: Clinical experience in two high-volume teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yangping; Lan, Huanrong; Ye, Qian; Jin, Ketao; Zhu, Min; Hu, Xiaoyan; Teng, Lisong; Cao, Feilin; Lin, Xianfang

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) is regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for the removal of benign breast lesions, without the occurrence of serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome(®) biopsy system in the treatment of breast lesions. The clinical outcomes of 3,681 patients with breast lesions were evaluated following excisions by ultrasound-guided VABB in two high-volume teaching hospitals. From January 2008 to December 2012, a total of 4,867 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in the 3,681 patients, who had a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16-73 years). The parameters examined in this analysis included lesion size, lesion location in the inner breast, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) ultrasound category and histopathological diagnosis. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3-6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. The size of the investigated lesions ranged between 6 and 62 mm and a histopathological diagnosis was made in 100% of cases. The results indicated that the majority of specimens (98.89%) were benign. On average, the ultrasound-guided VABB was performed in 10.3 min (range, 7.5-43 min) and the mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 8.1 (range, 3-32). A complete excision was achieved in the majority of cases (99.7%). The presence of a hematoma was the most common complication following the biopsy, and was observed in 27.5% of patients. The mean follow-up period was 25.5 months (range, 1-60 months), during which the rate of recurrence was 4.4%. The results indicated that ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome biopsy system is an effective and safe procedure that is able to rapidly remove the majority of benign breast lesions using a small incision and without the occurrence of scarring or complications. PMID:24137261

  16. Mammotome® biopsy system for the resection of breast lesions: Clinical experience in two high-volume teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YANGPING; LAN, HUANRONG; YE, QIAN; JIN, KETAO; ZHU, MIN; HU, XIAOYAN; TENG, LISONG; CAO, FEILIN; LIN, XIANFANG

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) is regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for the removal of benign breast lesions, without the occurrence of serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome® biopsy system in the treatment of breast lesions. The clinical outcomes of 3,681 patients with breast lesions were evaluated following excisions by ultrasound-guided VABB in two high-volume teaching hospitals. From January 2008 to December 2012, a total of 4,867 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in the 3,681 patients, who had a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16–73 years). The parameters examined in this analysis included lesion size, lesion location in the inner breast, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) ultrasound category and histopathological diagnosis. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3–6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. The size of the investigated lesions ranged between 6 and 62 mm and a histopathological diagnosis was made in 100% of cases. The results indicated that the majority of specimens (98.89%) were benign. On average, the ultrasound-guided VABB was performed in 10.3 min (range, 7.5–43 min) and the mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 8.1 (range, 3–32). A complete excision was achieved in the majority of cases (99.7%). The presence of a hematoma was the most common complication following the biopsy, and was observed in 27.5% of patients. The mean follow-up period was 25.5 months (range, 1–60 months), during which the rate of recurrence was 4.4%. The results indicated that ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome biopsy system is an effective and safe procedure that is able to rapidly remove the majority of benign breast lesions using a small incision and without the occurrence of scarring or complications. PMID:24137261

  17. Exclusion of the retinoblastoma gene and chromosome 13q as the site of a primary lesion for human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A M; Hall, J M; Hebert, J M; King, M C

    1990-01-01

    Chromosome 13q has been suggested as the site of a gene predisposing to human breast cancer, because loss of heterozygosity of alleles on this chromosome has been observed in some ductal breast tumors and because two breast cancer lines are altered at the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) at 13q14. To test this possibility, linkage of breast cancer susceptibility to 14 loci on chromosome 13q loci was assessed in extended families in which breast cancer is apparently inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. RB1 was excluded as the site of a breast cancer gene by a lod score of Z = -7.60 at close linkage for 13 families. Multipoint analysis yielded negative lod scores throughout the region between 13q12 and 13q34; over most of this distance, Z less than -2.0. Therefore, chromosome 13q appears to be excluded as the site of primary lesion for breast cancer in these families. In addition, comparison of tumor versus normal tissues of nonfamilial breast cancer patients revealed an alteration at the 5' end of RB1 in a mucoid carcinoma but no alterations of RB1 in five informative ductal adenocarcinomas. Linkage data and comparisons of tumor and normal tissues suggest that changes in the RBI locus either are secondary alterations associated with progression of some tumors or occur by chance. Images Figure 2 PMID:2294744

  18. Fluorescence diagnostics of metastatic lesion of regional lymph nodes upon surgical treatment of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonenko, E. V.; Pak, D. D.; Yanikova, A. G.

    2013-06-01

    We have performed intraoperative fluorescence diagnostics of 60 patients for metastases of breast cancer to regional lymph nodes. All the patients were divided into two groups. The first group consisted of 50 patients, which were surgically treated at the first stage. The second group consisted of ten patients, which underwent combined treatment. At the first stage, they received from two to four courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and, at the second stage, the surgical intervention was performed. The intraoperative fluorescence diagnostics was performed using the preparation alasens (precursor of protoporphyrin IX in the human organism). The occurrence of fluorescence of alasens-induced protoporphyrin IX was determined visually and using the local fluorescence spectroscopy method. Altogether, 498 lymph nodes were examined: 408 in the first group and 90 in the second one. For the first group, the sensitivity of the method was found to be 87.2%, and its specificity, 94.8%; in the second group, these parameters were determined to be 77 and 78%, respectively. The first experience of the application of the intraoperative fluorescence diagnostics of metastatic lesion of lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer has shown its high efficiency and application potential.

  19. Can Doppler or contrast-enhanced ultrasound analysis add diagnostically important information about the nature of breast lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Stanzani, Daniela; Chala, Luciano F.; de Barros, Nestor; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite evidence suggesting that Doppler ultrasonography can help to differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions, it is rarely applied in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine whether certain vascular features of breast masses observed by duplex Doppler and color Doppler ultrasonography (before and/or after microbubble contrast injection) add information to the gray-scale analysis and support the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. METHODS: Seventy solid lesions were prospectively evaluated with gray-scale ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. The morphological analysis and lesion vascularity were correlated with the histological results. RESULTS: Percutaneous core biopsies revealed that 25/70 (17.5%) lesions were malignant, while 45 were benign. Hypervascular lesions with tortuous and central vessels, a resistive index (RI)≥0.73 before contrast injection, and an RI≥0.75 after contrast injection were significantly predictive of malignancy (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The combination of gray-scale ultrasonography data with unenhanced or enhanced duplex Doppler and color Doppler US data can provide diagnostically useful information. These techniques can be easily implemented because Doppler devices are already present in most health centers. PMID:24519198

  20. In situ validation of VEGFR-2 and α v ß 3 integrin as targets for breast lesion characterization.

    PubMed

    Ehling, Josef; Misiewicz, Matthias; von Stillfried, Saskia; Möckel, Diana; Bzyl, Jessica; Pochon, Sibylle; Lederle, Wiltrud; Knuechel, Ruth; Lammers, Twan; Palmowski, Moritz; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) and α v ß 3 integrin are the most frequently addressed targets in molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. In preclinical studies, molecular imaging of angiogenesis has shown potential to detect and differentiate benign and malignant lesions of the breast. Thus, in this retrospective clinical study employing patient tissues, the diagnostic value of VEGFR-2, α v ß 3 integrin and vascular area fraction for the diagnosis and differentiation of breast neoplasia was evaluated. To this end, tissue sections of breast cancer (n = 40), pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; n = 8), fibroadenoma (n = 40), radial scar (n = 6) and normal breast tissue (n = 40) were used to quantify (1) endothelial VEGFR-2, (2) endothelial α v ß 3 integrin and (3) total α v ß 3 integrin expression, as well as (4) the vascular area fraction. Sensitivity and specificity to differentiate benign from malignant lesions were calculated for each marker by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses. Whereas vessel density, as commonly used, did not significantly differ between benign and malignant lesions (AUROC: 0.54), VEGFR-2 and α v ß 3 integrin levels were gradually up-regulated in carcinoma versus fibroadenoma versus healthy tissue. The highest diagnostic accuracy for differentiating carcinoma from fibroadenoma was found for total α v ß 3 integrin expression (AUROC: 0.76), followed by VEGFR-2 (AUROC: 0.71) and endothelial α v ß 3 integrin expression (AUROC: 0.68). In conclusion, total α v ß 3 integrin expression is the best discriminator between breast cancer, fibroadenoma and normal breast tissue. With respect to vascular targeting and molecular imaging of angiogenesis, endothelial VEGFR-2 appeared to be slightly superior to endothelial α v ß 3 for differentiating benign from cancerous lesions. PMID:26902100

  1. Touch Imprint Cytology and Stereotactically-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Suspicious Breast Lesions: 15-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Fasching, P. A.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Jud, S.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C.; Wachter, D. L.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.; Uder, M.; Loehberg, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stereotactically-guided core needle biopsies (CNB) of breast tumours allow histological examination of the tumour without surgery. Touch imprint cytology (TIC) of CNB promises to be useful in providing same-day diagnosis for counselling purposes and for planning future surgery. Having addressed the issue of accuracy of immediate microscopic evaluation of TIC, we wanted to re-examine the usefulness of this procedure in light of the present health care climate of cost containment by incorporating the surgical 15-year follow-up data and outcome. Patients and Methods: From January until December 1996 we performed TIC in core needle biopsies of 173 breast tumours in 169 patients, consisting of 122 malignant and 51 benign tumours. Histology of core needle biopsies was proven by surgical histology in all malignant and in 5 benign tumours. Surgical breast biopsy was not performed in 46 patients with 46 benign lesions, as the histological result from the core needle biopsy and the result of the TIC were in agreement with the suspected diagnosis from the complementary breast diagnostics. A 15-year follow-up of these patients followed in 2013 and follow-up data was collected from 40 women. Results: In the 15-year follow-up of the 40 benign lesions primarily confirmed using CNB and TIC, a diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and accuracy of 100 % was found. Conclusion: TIC and stereotactically guided CNB showed excellent long-term follow-up in patients with benign breast lesions. The use of TIC to complement CNB can therefore provide immediate cytological diagnosis of breast lesions. PMID:26855442

  2. Breast Cancer Cells Induce Osteolytic Bone Lesions In vivo through a Reduction in Osteoblast Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Laura S.; Choi, Wilson; Burke, Leslie; Clements, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases are severely debilitating and have a significant impact on the quality of life of women with metastatic breast cancer. Treatment options are limited and in order to develop more targeted therapies, improved understanding of the complex mechanisms that lead to bone lesion development are warranted. Interestingly, whilst prostate-derived bone metastases are characterised by mixed or osteoblastic lesions, breast-derived bone metastases are characterised by osteolytic lesions, suggesting unique regulatory patterns. This study aimed to measure the changes in bone formation and bone resorption activity at two time-points (18 and 36 days) during development of the bone lesion following intratibial injection of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells into the left tibiae of Severely Combined Immuno-Deficient (SCID) mice. The contralateral tibia was used as a control. Tibiae were extracted and processed for undecalcified histomorphometric analysis. We provide evidence that the early bone loss observed following exposure to MDA-MB-231 cells was due to a significant reduction in mineral apposition rate, rather than increased levels of bone resorption. This suggests that osteoblast activity was impaired in the presence of breast cancer cells, contrary to previous reports of osteoclast-dependent bone loss. Furthermore mRNA expression of Dickkopf Homolog 1 (DKK-1) and Noggin were confirmed in the MDA-MB-231 cell line, both of which antagonise osteoblast regulatory pathways. The observed bone loss following injection of cancer cells was due to an overall thinning of the trabecular bone struts rather than perforation of the bone tissue matrix (as measured by trabecular width and trabecular separation, respectively), suggesting an opportunity to reverse the cancer-induced bone changes. These novel insights into the mechanisms through which osteolytic bone lesions develop may be important in the development of new treatment strategies for metastatic breast cancer

  3. Modeling invasive breast cancer: growth factors propel progression of HER2-positive premalignant lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, C-R; Zeisel, A; Köstler, WJ; Lauriola, M; Jacob-Hirsch, J; Haibe-Kains, B; Amariglio, N; Ben-Chetrit, N; Emde, A; Solomonov, I; Neufeld, G; Piccart, M; Sagi, I; Sotiriou, C; Rechavi, G; Domany, E; Desmedt, C; Yarden, Y

    2013-01-01

    The HER2/neu oncogene encodes a receptor-like tyrosine kinase whose overexpression in breast cancer predicts poor prognosis and resistance to conventional therapies. However, the mechanisms underlying aggressiveness of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-overexpressing tumors remain incompletely understood. Because it assists epidermal growth factor (EGF) and neuregulin receptors, we overexpressed HER2 in MCF10A mammary cells and applied growth factors. HER2-overexpressing cells grown in extracellular matrix formed filled spheroids, which protruded outgrowths upon growth factor stimulation. Our transcriptome analyses imply a two-hit model for invasive growth: HER2-induced proliferation and evasion from anoikis generate filled structures, which are morphologically and transcriptionally analogous to preinvasive patients’ lesions. In the second hit, EGF escalates signaling and transcriptional responses leading to invasive growth. Consistent with clinical relevance, a gene expression signature based on the HER2/EGF-activated transcriptional program can predict poorer prognosis of a subgroup of HER2-overexpressing patients. In conclusion, the integration of a three-dimensional cellular model and clinical data attributes progression of HER2-overexpressing lesions to EGF-like growth factors acting in the context of the tumor's microenvironment. PMID:22139081

  4. Early Breast Cancer Precursor Lesions: Lessons Learned from Molecular and Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Hans-Peter; Elsawaf, Zeinab; Helmchen, Birgit; Aulmann, Sebastian

    2010-08-01

    Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), and lobular neoplasia (LN) form a group of early precursor lesions that are part of the low-grade pathway in breast cancer development. This concept implies that the neoplastic disease process begins at a stage much earlier than in situ carcinoma. We have performed a review of the published literature for the upgrade risk to ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma in open biopsy after a diagnosis of ADH, FEA, or LN in core needle biopsy. This has revealed the highest upgrade risk for ADH (28.2% after open biopsy), followed by LN (14.9%), and FEA (10.2%). With LN, the pleomorphic subtype is believed to confer a higher risk than classical LN. With all types of precursor lesions, careful attention must be paid to the clinicopathological correlation for the guidance of the clinical management. Follow-up biopsies are generally indicated in ADH, and if there is any radiological-pathological discrepancy, also in LN or FEA. PMID:22590441

  5. Step by step approach to rare breast lesions containing spindle cells.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Betül; Erdoğan, Gülgün; Karaveli, Fatma Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of spindle cell lesions of breast is challenging for certain reasons. The most important reason is the presence of cytological atypia and mitosis in all three conditions: reactive, benign, and malignant. Patients diagnosed with benign and malignant tumor/tumor-like lesions that had spindle cell components following the histopathological examination were included in the study. The patients' medical records were accessed to obtain the clinical history, follow-up notes, and radiological findings. Following histopathological, immunohistochemical, and clinical evaluations, the patients were diagnosed as follows: pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH), bilateral desmoid-type fibromatosis (FM), adenomyoepithelioma (AME), myofibroblastoma (MFB), malignant phyllodes tumor (MF), high-grade AS, post-chemotherapy osteosarcoma (OS) + Paget's disease, and metaplastic carcinoma (MC). An algorithmic approach should be used in the diagnosis; cellular structure, presence and grade of atypia, growth pattern, mitotic activity, immunohistochemical staining, and clinical and radiological features should be evaluated together. Detection of some molecular changes can be useful in differential diagnosis. PMID:26558181

  6. Transformation of the female breast during compression at mammography with special reference to the importance for localization of a lesion.

    PubMed

    Novak, R

    1988-01-01

    The effects of compression during mammography were studied in 187 breasts. The aims of this study were to investigate: 1) How the skin moves, 2) how the gland tissue is transformed, 3) if there is a relationship between outer and inner alterations and 4) the practical implications for aspiration biopsy. In this study, several experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of compression during clinical mammography in adult female breasts. The transformation of the breast during compression was investigated by means of external skin markings and internal markings using the biopsy needle and the hookwire at preoperative localization. The extent of the mammary gland was measured in the different standard projections during mammography. The calculation of the depth of a lesion during cranio-caudal compression was performed on the latero-medial radiographs. The result was checked with water-soluble radiographic contrast medium. The mean value of differences between observed and calculated depth was 3.7 mm. 1. The breast transforms during compression. 2. The biopsy needle in the breast and the barium markings on the skin incline ventrally in 96 per cent during latero-medial compression. The preoperative hookwire inclines ventrally in 92 per cent. 3. The extension of the gland parenchyma (the longest diagonal) is almost equal in all standard projections, including the medio-lateral oblique one. 4. The skin in the inframammary sulcus is firmly attached to the thoracic wall. This form of fixation determines principally the movements of the breast and limits the transformation during compression. 5. The movements of the skin are connected to the movements of the dense tissue, gland parenchyma. There is a connection between the ventral and descending inclination. These inclinations are caused by the same transformation of the breast. 6. Due to the regular movements of the breast during different compression directions, it is possible to predict the location of a

  7. Investigating the use of texture features for analysis of breast lesions on contrast-enhanced cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xixi; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Conover, David; Ning, Ruola; O'Connell, Avice; Wismueller, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has found use in mammography for imaging the entire breast with sufficient spatial resolution at a radiation dose within the range of that of conventional mammography. Recently, enhancement of lesion tissue through the use of contrast agents has been proposed for cone beam CT. This study investigates whether the use of such contrast agents improves the ability of texture features to differentiate lesion texture from healthy tissue on CBCT in an automated manner. For this purpose, 9 lesions were annotated by an experienced radiologist on both regular and contrast-enhanced CBCT images using two-dimensional (2D) square ROIs. These lesions were then segmented, and each pixel within the lesion ROI was assigned a label - lesion or non-lesion, based on the segmentation mask. On both sets of CBCT images, four three-dimensional (3D) Minkowski Functionals were used to characterize the local topology at each pixel. The resulting feature vectors were then used in a machine learning task involving support vector regression with a linear kernel (SVRlin) to classify each pixel as belonging to the lesion or non-lesion region of the ROI. Classification performance was assessed using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Minkowski Functionals derived from contrastenhanced CBCT images were found to exhibit significantly better performance at distinguishing between lesion and non-lesion areas within the ROI when compared to those extracted from CBCT images without contrast enhancement (p < 0.05). Thus, contrast enhancement in CBCT can improve the ability of texture features to distinguish lesions from surrounding healthy tissue.

  8. Exploring type II microcalcifications in benign and premalignant breast lesions by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lijia; Zheng, Chao; Zhang, Haipeng; Xu, Shuping; Zhang, Zhe; Hu, Chengxu; Bi, Lirong; Fan, Zhimin; Han, Bing; Xu, Weiqing

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of type II microcalcifications in fibroadenoma (FB), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast tissues has been analyzed by the fingerprint features of Raman spectroscopy. Fresh breast tissues were first handled to frozen sections and then they were measured by normal Raman spectroscopy. Due to inherently low sensitivity of Raman scattering, Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) technique was utilized. A total number of 71 Raman spectra and 70 SHINERS spectra were obtained from the microcalcifications in benign and premalignant breast tissues. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to distinguish the type II microcalcifications between these tissues. This is the first time to detect type II microcalcifications in premalignant (ADH and DCIS) breast tissue frozen sections, and also the first time SHINERS has been utilized for breast cancer detection. Conclusions demonstrated in this paper confirm that SHINERS has great potentials to be applied to the identification of breast lesions as an auxiliary method to mammography in the early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  9. A finite element model of remote palpation of breast lesions using radiation force: factors affecting tissue displacement.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, K R; Nightingale, R W; Palmeri, M L; Trahey, G E

    2000-01-01

    The early detection of breast cancer reduces patient mortality. The most common method of breast cancer detection is palpation. However, lesions that lie deep within the breast are difficult to palpate when they are small. Thus, a method of remote palpation, which may allow the detection of small lesions lying deep within the breast, is currently under investigation. In this method, acoustic radiation force is used to apply localized forces within tissue (to tissue volumes on the order of 2 mm3) and the resulting tissue displacements are mapped using ultrasonic correlation based methods. A volume of tissue that is stiffer than the surrounding medium (i.e., a lesion) distributes the force throughout the tissue beneath it, resulting in larger regions of displacement, and smaller maximum displacements. The resulting displacement maps may be used to image tissue stiffness. A finite-element-model (FEM) of acoustic remote palpation is presented in this paper. Using this model, a parametric analysis of the affect of varying tissue and acoustic beam characteristics on radiation force induced tissue displacements is performed. The results are used to evaluate the potential of acoustic remote palpation to provide useful diagnostic information in a clinical setting. The potential for using a single diagnostic transducer to both generate radiation force and track the resulting displacements is investigated. PMID:10823496

  10. Needle localization breast biopsy: a model for multidisciplinary quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Howe, J R; Monsees, B; Destouet, J; Seib, J; Dehner, L P; Kraybill, W G

    1995-04-01

    As part of the quality assurance role of the Cancer Committee at Barnes Hospital, an institutional audit of Needle Localization Breast Biopsy (NLBB) was performed. Mammographic, operative, and surgical pathology reports from 370 consecutive patients at our institution undergoing both mammography and needle localization biopsy over a 34-month interval were reviewed. Carcinoma was diagnosed pathologically in 103 patients (28%), and 27% of these proved to be noninvasive. Sixteen patients were found to have histologic or clinical involvement of the axillary nodes; no patients with Tis lesions were found to have axillary nodal involvement. Of the patients, 73% were found to have either Stage 0 or Stage I disease, and 61% with an established malignancy had mastectomy (67% of patients with invasive carcinoma, 44% of those with carcinoma-in-situ), whereas 39% had some form of conservation therapy (33% of patients with invasive lesions, 56% of those with carcinoma-in-situ). Our results have been compared with other published studies, and important clinical indicators for evaluating the results of individual centers performing NLBB are discussed. It is concluded that NLBB is a safe and effective method of biopsying nonpalpable breast lesions, which allows for the identification of early stage breast carcinomas. In the present environment of concerns about the quality of care and costs, it is the responsibility of each center performing NLBB periodically to evaluate their results with this multidisciplinary procedure and to bring about change in those areas found to be deficient. PMID:7723366

  11. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  12. Incorporation of clinical data into a computerized method for the assessment of mammographic breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2000-06-01

    We previously developed a computerized method to classify mammographic masses as benign or malignant. In this method, mammographic features that are similar to the ones used by radiologists are automatically extracted to characterize a mass lesion. These features are then merged by an artificial neural network (ANN), which yields an estimated likelihood of malignancy for each mass. The performance of the method was evaluated on an independent database consisting of 110 cases (60 benign and 50 malignant cases). The method achieved an Az of 0.91 from round-robin analysis in the task of differentiating between benign and malignant masses using the computer-extracted features only. As the most important clinical risk factor for breast cancer, age achieved a performance level (Az equals 0.79) similar to that (Az equals 0.77 and 0.80) of the computer-extracted spiculation features, which are the most important indicators for malignancy of a mass, in differentiating between the malignant and benign cases. In this study, age is included as an additional input feature to the ANN. The performance of the scheme (Az equals 0.93) is improved when age is included. However, the improvement is not found to be statistically significant. Our results indicated that age may be a strong feature in predicting malignancy of a mass. For this database, however, the inclusion of age may not have a strong impact on the determination of the likelihood for a mammographic mass lesion when the major mammographic characteristics (e.g., spiculation) of a mass are accurately extracted and analyzed along with other features using an artificial neural network.

  13. A comprehensive evaluation of the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted Mammotome® system for ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy and selective excision of breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P; Jimenez, Rafael E

    2007-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive breast biopsy technology is now considered a standard of care for the diagnostic evaluation of suspicious breast lesions. The aim of the current study was to present a comprehensive evaluation of the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted Mammotome® system for ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy and selective excision of breast lesions. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted of a series of 304 consecutive 8-gauge Mammotome® procedures that were performed under ultrasound guidance by a single surgeon from March 2004 to December 2006. Multiple variables, including patient demographics, characteristics of the breast lesion (based on ultrasound and mammography), procedural and histopathology variables, and interval follow-up variables (based on ultrasound and mammography), were evaluated. Results Among 304 procedures, 235 (77%) were performed with the presumption of complete excision of the ultrasound lesion during Mammotome® core acquisition, while 69 (23%) were performed with only partial excision of the ultrasound lesion during Mammotome® core acquisition (diagnostic tissue sampling only). 100% of all ultrasound lesions were accurately diagnosed, demonstrating no apparent false-negative results among the 256 patients that were compliant with follow-up at a median interval follow-up duration of 11 months (range 1 to 37). Likewise, 89% of all appropriately selected ultrasound lesions were completely excised, as demonstrated on interval follow-up ultrasound at a median time of 6 months (range, 3 to 16). There were no independent predictors of successful complete excision of any given appropriately selected ultrasound lesion by the ultrasound-guided 8-gauge Mammotome® biopsy technique. Conclusion The 8-gauge vacuum-assisted Mammotome® system is highly accurate for ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy of suspicious breast lesions and is highly successful for complete excision of appropriately selected presumed benign breast lesions. This

  14. Development and comparative assessment of Raman spectroscopic classification algorithms for lesion discrimination in stereotactic breast biopsies with microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Barman, Ishan; Saha, Anushree; McGee, Sasha; Galindo, Luis H; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2013-04-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. Here, we develop and compare different approaches for developing Raman classification algorithms to diagnose invasive and in situ breast cancer, fibrocystic change and fibroadenoma that can be associated with microcalcifications. In this study, Raman spectra were acquired from tissue cores obtained from fresh breast biopsies and analyzed using a constituent-based breast model. Diagnostic algorithms based on the breast model fit coefficients were devised using logistic regression, C4.5 decision tree classification, k-nearest neighbor (k -NN) and support vector machine (SVM) analysis, and subjected to leave-one-out cross validation. The best performing algorithm was based on SVM analysis (with radial basis function), which yielded a positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 96% for cancer diagnosis. Importantly, these results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy provides adequate diagnostic information for lesion discrimination even in the presence of microcalcifications, which to the best of our knowledge has not been previously reported. PMID:22815240

  15. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  16. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  17. Identification of error making patterns in lesion detection on digital breast tomosynthesis using computer-extracted image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengyu; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Walsh, Ruth; Johnson, Karen S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can improve lesion visibility by eliminating the issue of overlapping breast tissue present in mammography. However, this new modality likely requires new approaches to training. The issue of training in DBT is not well explored. We propose a computer-aided educational approach for DBT training. Our hypothesis is that the trainees' educational outcomes will improve if they are presented with cases individually selected to address their weaknesses. In this study, we focus on the question of how to select such cases. Specifically, we propose an algorithm that based on previously acquired reading data predicts which lesions will be missed by the trainee for future cases (i.e., we focus on false negative error). A logistic regression classifier was used to predict the likelihood of trainee error and computer-extracted features were used as the predictors. Reader data from 3 expert breast imagers was used to establish the ground truth and reader data from 5 radiology trainees was used to evaluate the algorithm performance with repeated holdout cross validation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to measure the performance of the proposed individual trainee models. The preliminary experimental results for 5 trainees showed the individual trainee models were able to distinguish the lesions that would be detected from those that would be missed with the average area under the ROC curve of 0.639 (95% CI, 0.580-0.698). The proposed algorithm can be used to identify difficult cases for individual trainees.

  18. Improving the Accuracy of Computer-aided Diagnosis for Breast MR Imaging by Differentiating between Mass and Nonmass Lesions.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Ortiz, Cristina; Martel, Anne L

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To determine suitable features and optimal classifier design for a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to differentiate among mass and nonmass enhancements during dynamic contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the breast. Materials and Methods Two hundred eighty histologically proved mass lesions and 129 histologically proved nonmass lesions from MR imaging studies were retrospectively collected. The institutional research ethics board approved this study and waived informed consent. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System classification of mass and nonmass enhancement was obtained from radiologic reports. Image data from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging were extracted and analyzed by using feature selection techniques and binary, multiclass, and cascade classifiers. Performance was assessed by measuring the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity. Bootstrap cross validation was used to predict the best classifier for the classification task of mass and nonmass benign and malignant breast lesions. Results A total of 176 features were extracted. Feature relevance ranking indicated unequal importance of kinetic, texture, and morphologic features for mass and nonmass lesions. The best classifier performance was a two-stage cascade classifier (mass vs nonmass followed by malignant vs benign classification) (AUC, 0.91; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 0.94) compared with one-shot classifier (ie, all benign vs malignant classification) (AUC, 0.89; 95% CI: 0.85, 0.92). The AUC was 2% higher for cascade (median percent difference obtained by using paired bootstrapped samples) and was significant (P = .0027). Our proposed two-stage cascade classifier decreases the overall misclassification rate by 12%, with 72 of 409 missed diagnoses with cascade versus 82 of 409 missed diagnoses with one-shot classifier. Conclusion Separately optimizing feature selection and training classifiers

  19. Is there an Upgrading to Malignancy at Surgery of Mucocele-Like Lesions Diagnosed on Percutaneous Breast Biopsy?

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Provencher, Louise; Morin, Josée; Desbiens, Christine; Poirier, Brigitte; Poirier, Éric; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Jacob, Simon; Côté, Gary

    2016-03-01

    Management of pure mucocele-like lesion (MLL) diagnosed on percutaneous breast biopsy (PBB) is controversial. To assess surgical upgrade rate and clinical outcome of pure MLL obtained as sole diagnosis on PBB. Patients diagnosed with a MLL as the most advanced lesion on PBB from April 1997 to December 2010 were reviewed for radiologic presentation, biopsy technique, and pathologic and clinical outcomes. Of the 21,340 image-guided PBB performed during the study period, 50 women with 51 MLL (0.24%) were identified. Mean age was 53.1 ± 7.7 years. Radiologic findings were mostly microcalcifications (n = 47, 92.2%). Stereotactic PBB was performed for 49 lesions (96.1%). Surgery was performed shortly after biopsy in 35 women, with benign final pathology in 33, and upgrade to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in two patients (2/35, 5.7%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.5 years (3.7 ± 2.1 years for surgical patients; 5.9 ± 2.9 years for follow-up only patients); three women were lost to follow-up (3/50). Three invasive cancers (3/47, 6.4%) were diagnosed 1.2, 1.2, and 2.8 years after biopsy: two in surgical patients, and one in a follow-up only patient. No cancer occurred at the same site as the original MLL. Pure MLL lesion of the breast is a rare entity and is mostly associated with a benign outcome. We observed an upgrade to DCIS slightly superior to 5%, but no invasive cancer. It is therefore unclear if these lesions should be excised or clinically and radiologically followed up when such lesions are found at PBB. PMID:26662058

  20. Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning: Osteolytic versus osteoblastic

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Justin A.; Mendez, Gustavo A.; Ching, Alex; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone. PMID:27274410

  1. Initial Experience with a Wireless Ultrasound-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy Device

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E-Ryung; Han, Boo-Kyung; Ko, Eun Sook; Ko, Eun Young; Choi, Ji Soo; Cho, Eun Yoon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the imaging characteristic of frequent target lesions of wireless ultrasound (US)-guided, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (Wi-UVAB) and to evaluate diagnostic yield, accuracy and complication of the device in indeterminate breast lesions. Materials and Methods From March 2013 to October 2014, 114 women (age range, 29–76 years; mean age, 50.0 years) underwent Wi-UVAB using a 13-gauge needle (Mammotome Elite®; Devicor Medical Products, Cincinnati, OH, USA). In 103 lesions of 96 women with surgical (n = 81) or follow-up (n = 22) data, complications, biopsy procedure, imaging findings of biopsy targets and histologic results were reviewed. Results Mean number of biopsy cores was 10 (range 4–25). Nine patients developed moderate bleeding. All lesions were suspicious on US, and included non-mass lesions (67.0%) and mass lesions (33.0%). Visible calcifications on US were evident in 57.3% of the target lesions. Most of the lesions (93.2%) were nonpalpable. Sixty-six (64.1%) were malignant [ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) rate, 61%] and 12 were high-risk lesions (11.7%). Histologic underestimation was identified in 11 of 40 (27.5%). DCIS cases and in 3 of 9 (33.3%) high-risk lesions necessitating surgery. There was no false-negative case. Conclusion Wi-UVAB is very handy and advantageous for US-unapparent non-mass lesions to diagnose DCIS, especially for calcification cases. Histologic underestimation is unavoidable; still, Wi-UVAB is safe and accurate to diagnose a malignancy. PMID:26630136

  2. Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy using Mammotome biopsy system for detection of breast cancer: results from two high volume hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shaobo; Liu, Wenguang; Jin, Ketao; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) has been recently regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for removal of benign breast lesions without serious complications. The frequency of detection of noninvasive malignant breast lesions by ultrasound-guided VABB is increasing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system in the early detection of breast cancer. Retrospective review between January 2008 to March 2013 the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine and Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College. From January 2008 to March 2013, a total of 5232 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in 3985 patients whose mean ages were 36.3 years (range: 16-73). The histological results of 5232 ultrasound-guided VABB were retrospectively reviewed. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3 to 6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. Two hundred twenty three high risk lesions (comprising 59 papilloma, 57 papillomatosis, and 107 atypical hyperplasia) and 61 malignant lesions (comprising 23 ductal carcinoma in situ, 21 lobular carcinoma in situ, 12 infiltrating ductal carcinoma, and 5 infiltrating mucinous carcinoma) were identified. Sensitivity (100%) and diagnostic accuracy (100%) regarding the detection of malignancy were excellent for ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system. Our results indicate that ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system is an accurate technique for the sampling, diagnosis, and early detection of breast cancer. It is recommended that the Mammotome biopsy system could be as the method of choice for detecting nonpalpable early breast cancer. PMID:24482711

  3. Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy using Mammotome biopsy system for detection of breast cancer: results from two high volume hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shaobo; Liu, Wenguang; Jin, Ketao; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) has been recently regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for removal of benign breast lesions without serious complications. The frequency of detection of noninvasive malignant breast lesions by ultrasound-guided VABB is increasing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system in the early detection of breast cancer. Retrospective review between January 2008 to March 2013 the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine and Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College. From January 2008 to March 2013, a total of 5232 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in 3985 patients whose mean ages were 36.3 years (range: 16-73). The histological results of 5232 ultrasound-guided VABB were retrospectively reviewed. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3 to 6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. Two hundred twenty three high risk lesions (comprising 59 papilloma, 57 papillomatosis, and 107 atypical hyperplasia) and 61 malignant lesions (comprising 23 ductal carcinoma in situ, 21 lobular carcinoma in situ, 12 infiltrating ductal carcinoma, and 5 infiltrating mucinous carcinoma) were identified. Sensitivity (100%) and diagnostic accuracy (100%) regarding the detection of malignancy were excellent for ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system. Our results indicate that ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system is an accurate technique for the sampling, diagnosis, and early detection of breast cancer. It is recommended that the Mammotome biopsy system could be as the method of choice for detecting nonpalpable early breast cancer. PMID:24482711

  4. 3D lacunarity in multifractal analysis of breast tumor lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Soares, Filipe; Janela, Filipe; Pereira, Manuela; Seabra, João; Freire, Mário M

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) of the breast is especially robust for the diagnosis of cancer in high-risk women due to its high sensitivity. Its specificity may be, however, compromised since several benign masses take up contrast agent as malignant lesions do. In this paper, we propose a novel method of 3D multifractal analysis to characterize the spatial complexity (spatial arrangement of texture) of breast tumors at multiple scales. Self-similar properties are extracted from the estimation of the multifractal scaling exponent for each clinical case, using lacunarity as the multifractal measure. These properties include several descriptors of the multifractal spectra reflecting the morphology and internal spatial structure of the enhanced lesions relatively to normal tissue. The results suggest that the combined multifractal characteristics can be effective to distinguish benign and malignant findings, judged by the performance of the support vector machine classification method evaluated by receiver operating characteristics with an area under the curve of 0.96. In addition, this paper confirms the presence of multifractality in DCE-MR volumes of the breast, whereby multiple degrees of self-similarity prevail at multiple scales. The proposed feature extraction and classification method have the potential to complement the interpretation of the radiologists and supply a computer-aided diagnosis system. PMID:24057004

  5. Diagnostic performance and inter-observer concordance in lesion detection with the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Automated whole breast ultrasound scanners of the latest generation have reached a level of comfortable application and high quality volume acquisition. Nevertheless, there is a lack of data concerning this technology. We investigated the diagnostic performance and inter-observer concordance of the Automated Breast Volume Scanner (ABVS) ACUSON S2000™ and questioned its implications in breast cancer diagnostics. Methods We collected 100 volume data sets and created a database containing 52 scans with no detectable lesions in conventional ultrasound (BI-RADS®-US 1), 30 scans with benign lesions (BI-RADS®-US 2) and 18 scans with breast cancer (BI-RADS®-US 5). Two independent examiners evaluated the ABVS data on a separate workstation without any prior knowledge of the patients’ histories. Results The inter-rater reliability reached fair agreement (κ=0.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.19-0.53). With respect to the true category, the conditional inter-rater validity coefficient was κ=0.18 (95% CI: 0.00-0.26) for the benign cases and κ=0.80 (95% CI: 0.61-1.00) for the malignant cases. Combining the assessments of examiner 1 and examiner 2, the diagnostic accuracy (AC), sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) for the experimental ABVS were AC = 79.0% (95% CI: 67.3-86.1), SE = 83.3% (95% CI: 57.7-95.6) and SP = 78.1% (% CI: 67.3-86.1), respectively. However, after the ABVS examination, there were a high number of requests for second-look ultrasounds in up to 48.8% of the healthy women due to assumed suspicious findings in the volume data. In an exploratory analysis, we estimated that an ABVS examination in addition to mammography alone could detect a relevant number of previously occult breast cancers (about 1 cancer in 300 screened and otherwise healthy women). Conclusions The ABVS is a reliable imaging method for the evaluation of the breast with high sensitivity and a fair inter-observer concordance. However, we have to overcome the problem of the

  6. CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and ATM promoter methylation in patients with impalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Delmonico, Lucas; Moreira, Aline dos Santos; Franco, Marco Felipe; Esteves, Eliane Barbosa; Scherrer, Luciano; Gallo, Claúdia Vitória de Moura; do Nascimento, Cristina Moreira; Ornellas, Maria Helena Faria; de Azevedo, Carolina Maria; Alves, Gilda

    2015-10-01

    Early detection of breast cancer increases the chances of cure, but the reliable identification of impalpable lesions is still a challenge. In spite of the advances in breast cancer detection, the molecular basis of impalpable lesions and the corresponding circulating biomarkers are not well understood. Impalpable lesions, classified by radiologists according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System in the categories 3 and 4, can be either benign or malignant (slow growing or aggressive). In this article, we report the DNA methylation pattern in CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and in ATM gene promoters from 62 impalpable lesions, 39 peripheral blood samples, and 39 saliva samples, assessed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction method. ATM showed the greatest percentage of methylation in DNA from lesions (benign and malignant), blood (even with p16(INK4a)), and saliva, followed by p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Among the malignant cases, ATM promoter was the most hypermethylated in lesion DNA and in blood and saliva DNAs, and p14(ARF), the least. The highest percentage of p16(INK4a) methylation was found in the blood. Finally, our data are relevant because they were obtained using impalpable breast lesions from patients who were carefully recruited in 2 public hospitals of Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26255234

  7. Laparoscopic orchidopexy: one-stage alternative for non-palpable testes.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shareef, Z. H.; Al-Shlash, S.; Koneru, S. R.; Towu, E.; Al-Dhohayan, A.; Al-Brekett, K.

    1996-01-01

    Laparoscopy was utilised in the evaluation of 24 non-palpable undescended testes in 19 children. The procedure was accurate in all patients while ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) failed to localise the testes in most cases. At the same time laparoscopic orchidopexy was performed on 15 testes (62.5%). The remaining testes were either absent or atrophic, in which case they were excised. There were no complications from these procedures and the hospital stay was short. Paediatric laparoscopy is safe and effective in the definitive management of non-palpable undescended testes. PMID:8678443

  8. High-intensity focused ultrasound in breast pathology: non-invasive treatment of benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Cavallo Marincola, Beatrice; Pediconi, Federica; Anzidei, Michele; Miglio, Elena; Di Mare, Luisa; Telesca, Marianna; Mancini, Massimiliano; D'Amati, Giulia; Monti, Massimo; Catalano, Carlo; Napoli, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Breast neoplasms are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in women. Even if surgery is the treatment of choice, other forms of less invasive radical treatment are desirable. High-intensity focused ultrasound is already established as a valid non-invasive technique that ensures tumor ablation in various organs. The use of ultrasound or magnetic resonance guidance allows having some advantages such as the capability to treat tumors in moving organs or the possibility to have a real-time monitoring of the temperature increase. The aim of this paper is to report the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound technique with ultrasound and magnetic resonance guidance for the ablation of breast tumors, including both benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25418428

  9. B3-lesions of the breast and cancer risk - an analysis of mammography screening patients

    PubMed Central

    HOFFMANN, OLIVER; STAMATIS, GESINA ATHINA; BITTNER, ANN-KATHRIN; ARNOLD, GEORG; SCHNABEL, ROLF; KRÜGER, KARLGEORG; KIMMIG, RAINER; HEUBNER, MARTIN

    2016-01-01

    The use of mammography screening, followed by needle core biopsy (NCB), is associated with an increasing amount of invasive procedures. A considerable amount of specimens must be classified as lesions with uncertain malignant potential (B3-lesion). In these cases, an open biopsy is indicated for further diagnosis. We evaluated patients with B3-lesions to determine the risk of malignancy corresponding to the histopathological NCB results and the type of radiological lesion identified. A total of 95 patients participating in the German mammography screening program with a B3-lesion following NCB (104 B3-lesions in total) were included in our analysis. We analyzed the correlation between the initial histopathological findings from the NCB specimen and cancer risk. We further analyzed the correlations of malignant results with the type of mammographic lesion. In 23 cases (22%), histopathological examination following excision revealed a malignant lesion, including invasive and in situ carcinoma. The positive predictive value of the subgroups of B3-lesions ranged between 0.11 and 0.31; the B3-lesion associated with the highest cancer risk was the atypical ductal hyperplasia; however, no significant difference was observed between the B3-lesion subgroups (P=0.309) regarding the risk of malignancy. Comparing the different types of mammographic findings, such as radiological mass or microcalcifications, there was no significant difference in the risk for malignancy (P=0.379). The different types of B3-lesions did not exhibit differences in the risk for malignancy, and the morphological type of mammographic lesion does not appear to be correlated with cancer risk; therefore, our results underline the need for open biopsy in patients with B3-lesions following NCB. PMID:27123266

  10. Joint estimation of shape and deformation for the detection of lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Byung-Woo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for simultaneously delineating the boundary of object and estimating its temporal motion in the application of lesion detection in a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI sequence where both the appearance and the shape of region of interest is assumed to change in time. A unified energy functional for a joint segmentation and registration is proposed based on the assumption that the statistical properties of dynamic intensity curves within a region of interest are homogeneous. Our algorithm is designed to provide the morphological properties of the enhanced region and its dynamic intensity profiles, called kinetic signatures, in the analysis of DCE imagery since these features are considered as significant cues in understanding images. The proposed energy comprises a combination of a segmentation energy and a registration energy. The segmentation energy is developed based on a convex formulation being insensitive to the initialization. The registration energy is designed to compensate motion artifacts that are usually involved in the temporal imaging procedure. The major objective of this work is to provide a mathematical framework for a joint segmentation and registration on a dynamic sequence of images, and we demonstrate the mutual benefit of the estimation of temporal deformations for the registration step and the localization of regions of interest for the segmentation step. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm has been demonstrated on a number of clinical DCE breast MRI data in the application of breast lesion detection and the results show its potential to improve the accuracy and the efficiency in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  11. Joint estimation of shape and deformation for the detection of lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hong, Byung-Woo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for simultaneously delineating the boundary of object and estimating its temporal motion in the application of lesion detection in a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI sequence where both the appearance and the shape of region of interest is assumed to change in time. A unified energy functional for a joint segmentation and registration is proposed based on the assumption that the statistical properties of dynamic intensity curves within a region of interest are homogeneous. Our algorithm is designed to provide the morphological properties of the enhanced region and its dynamic intensity profiles, called kinetic signatures, in the analysis of DCE imagery since these features are considered as significant cues in understanding images. The proposed energy comprises a combination of a segmentation energy and a registration energy. The segmentation energy is developed based on a convex formulation being insensitive to the initialization. The registration energy is designed to compensate motion artifacts that are usually involved in the temporal imaging procedure. The major objective of this work is to provide a mathematical framework for a joint segmentation and registration on a dynamic sequence of images, and we demonstrate the mutual benefit of the estimation of temporal deformations for the registration step and the localization of regions of interest for the segmentation step. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm has been demonstrated on a number of clinical DCE breast MRI data in the application of breast lesion detection and the results show its potential to improve the accuracy and the efficiency in the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:24140912

  12. Molecular breast imaging—A phantom study on the impact of collimator selection on the detection of sub-10 mm breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruska, Carrie B.; O'Connor, Michael K.

    2006-12-01

    Molecular breast imaging (MBI) with a dedicated breast gamma camera system can detect small breast lesions with a sensitivity of >85%. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal collimation for tumor detection based on count densities obtained from clinical MBI studies. Seven collimators were evaluated using a cadmium zinc telluride detector designed for breast imaging. These included LEUHR, LEHR, LEGP, LEHS, and LEUHS collimators and two system-specific collimators—a long bore (LB) and general-purpose (GP) collimator with square holes matched to the detector elements. Collimators were evaluated using a breast phantom comprising a 20×20×20 cm plastic box containing 16 glass "tumors" with internal diameters ranging from 4-10 mm. Breast thickness was set to 6 cm and tumor depth was varied from 1-5 cm. The phantom and spheres were filled with water and Tc-99m to give a tumor to background ( T/ B) ratio varying from 3:1 to 35:1. Total counts acquired in each image simulated the range of count densities observed clinically. Counts acquired were adjusted to compensate for differences in collimator sensitivity. Tumor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured through ROI analysis. Images acquired at clinical count densities contained significant amounts of noise, especially at T/ B ratios of 10:1 or less. Highest tumor SNR was obtained with the LEHS collimator for the 6, 8, and 9 mm tumors at depths of 1 and 3 cm. At a tumor depth of 5 cm, the highest SNR was obtained with either the matched GP or LEHS collimators for the 6-9 mm tumors. Low SNR was obtained with all collimators for the 4 mm tumors at 1 and 3 cm and no 4 mm tumors were visible at a depth of 5 cm. High sensitivity collimators may be better than high-resolution collimators for detecting tumors <1 cm in low count images of the breast, especially for tumors located within 1-4 cm of the collimator face, but proper collimator design to eliminate aliasing artifacts is important for pixilated

  13. Imaging Factors That Influence Surgical Margins After Preoperative 125I Radioactive Seed Localization of Breast Lesions: Comparison With Wire Localization

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Mark J.; Dogan, Basak E.; Fox, Patricia; Wang, Cuiyan; Black, Dalliah M.; Hunt, Kelly; Yang, Wei Tse

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the potential Influence of imaging variables on surgical margins after preoperative radioactive seed localization (RSL) and wire localization (WL) techniques. Materials and Methods A total of 565 women with 660 breast lesions underwent RSL or WL between May 16, 2012, and May 30, 2013. Patient age, lesion type (mass, calcifications, mass with associated calcifications, other), lesion size, number of seeds or wires used, surgical margin status (close positive or negative margins), and reexcision and mastectomy rates were recorded. Results Of 660 lesions, 127 (19%) underwent RSL and 533 (81%) underwent WL pre-operatively. Mean lesion size was 1.8 cm in the RSL group and 1.8 cm in the WL group (p = 0.35). No difference in lesion type was identified in the RSL and WL groups (p = 0.63). RSL with a single seed was used in 105 of 127 (83%) RSLs compared with WL with a single wire in 349 of 533 (65%) WLs (p = 0.0003). The number of cases with a close positive margin was similar for RSLs (26/127, 20%) and WLs (104/533, 20%) (p = 0.81). There was no difference between the RSL group and the WL group in close positive margin status (20% each, p = 0.81), reexcision rates (20% vs 16%, respectively; p = 0.36), or mastectomy rates (6% each, p = 0.96). Lesions containing calcifications were more likely to require more than one wire (odds ratio [OR], 4.44; 95% CI, 2.8–7.0) or more than one seed (OR, 7.03; 95% CI, 1.6–30.0) when compared with masses alone (p < 0.0001). Increasing lesion size and the presence of calcifications were significant predictors of positive margins, whereas the use of more than one wire or seed was not (OR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.5–1.5) (p = 0.75). Conclusion Close positive margin, reexcision, and mastectomy rates remained similar in the WL group and RSL group. The presence of calcifications and increasing lesion size increased the odds of a close positive margin in both the WL and RSL groups, whereas the use

  14. Surgical treatment of breast lesions at a Day Centre: Experience of the European Institute of Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ballardini, Bettina; Cavalli, Marta; Manfredi, Giovanni Francesco; Sangalli, Claudia; Galimberti, Viviana; Intra, Mattia; Rossi, Elisabetta Maria Cristina; Seco, Javiera; Campanelli, Giampiero; Veronesi, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy in women worldwide. The reduced aggressiveness of breast cancer surgery has made it possible treat patients in the day surgery setting. The European Institute of Oncology, Milan, opened its new Day Center in May 2010. From May 2010 to December 2014, 17,087 patients with breast conditions were treated by the Institute's Division of Senology, 4132 (24.2%) of these in the day surgery setting, including malignant and benign conditions; 204 (4.9%) were not discharged on the day of surgery, being converted to inpatients; five (0.1%) patients returned to hospital for persistent hematoma. Our experience of performing breast cancer surgery in the day surgery setting is in line that of the literature. It is safe, but requires a well-organized unit and multidisciplinary medical team to function smoothly, with much attention paid to patient comfort and education, so as to ensure maximum patient acceptance and satisfaction. PMID:27123957

  15. Vacuum-assisted stereotactic breast biopsy in the diagnosis and management of suspicious microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Gül; Tutar, Burçin; Uras, Cihan; Calay, Zerrin; İnce, Ümit; Tutar, Onur

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to present our biopsy method and retrospectively evaluate the results, upgrade rate, and follow-up findings of stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) procedures performed in our clinic. METHODS Two hundred thirty-four patients with mammographically detected nonpalpable breast lesions underwent VABB using a 9 gauge biopsy probe and prone biopsy table. A total of 195 patients (median age 53 years, range 32–80 years) with 198 microcalcification-only lesions with a follow-up of at least one year were included in the study. The location of the lesion relative to the needle was determined from the postfire images, and unlike the conventional technique, tissue retrieval was predominantly performed from that location, followed by a complete 360° rotation, if needed. RESULTS The median core number was 8.5. Biopsy results revealed 135 benign, 24 atypical, and 39 malignant lesions. The total upgrade rate at surgery was 7.7% (6.1% for ductal carcinomas in situ and 10.5% for atypical lesions). Patients with benign lesions were followed up for a median period of 27.5 months, with no interval change. At the follow-up, scar formation was seen in 23 patients (17%); three of the scars were remarkable for resembling a malignancy. CONCLUSION Our biposy method is fast and practical, and it is easily tolerated by patients without compromising accuracy. Patients with a diagnosis of atypia still need to undergo a diagnostic surgical procedure and those with a malignancy need to undergo curative surgery, even if the lesion is totally excised at biopsy. VABB may leave a scar in the breast tissue, which may resemble a malignancy, albeit rarely. PMID:27306660

  16. Optimization of spectral shape in digital mammography: dependence on anode material, breast thickness, and lesion type.

    PubMed

    Fahrig, R; Yaffe, M J

    1994-09-01

    It has been proposed that breast cancer detection can be improved through the use of digital mammography. It is hypothesized that the choice of proper shape of the x-ray spectrum incident upon the breast can yield an improved image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given dose. To test this hypothesis, an energy transport model incorporating measured breast tissue attenuation coefficients and published exposure-to-dose conversion values was developed to describe the image acquisition process. The choice of applied kilovoltage and filter for Mo and W target x-ray sources has been optimized with respect to SNR and absorbed dose for detectors based on a Gd2O2S scintillating screen under the conditions of perfect coupling of light between the screen and a solid state photodetector. For the W spectra, the optimum filter-kVp combinations could provide 41%, 13%, and 42% improvements in SNR for 2-cm, 6-cm and 8-cm breasts, respectively, over the conventional Mo filtration, for a practical imaging time of 1.0 s. W and Mo spectra produce similar SNR values for a given filter thickness except for the 4-cm breast. Given the limitations of current technology, however, the W spectra produce the optimum SNRs in a shorter imaging time for breast thicknesses greater than and less than 4 cm. The maximum SNR for imaging both infiltrating ductal carcinoma and calcifications is provided by the same filter-kVp combination, allowing optimization based on breast thickness and composition only. The model can now be used to compare and improve upon novel detector designs. PMID:7838059

  17. EDITORIAL: Optical mammography: Imaging and characterization of breast lesions by pulsed near-infrared laser light (OPTIMAMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2005-06-01

    The Commission of the European Union (EU) conceived its Fifth Framework Programme (FP5) to identify the priorities for the European Union's research, technological development and demonstration activities for the period 1998-2002. By encouraging collaborative research between groups in different member countries, FP5 was intended to help solve problems the EU is facing and respond to major socio-economic challenges. The programme focused on a number of objectives and areas combining technological, industrial, economic, social and cultural aspects. A specific call was made, under its `Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources' section, for proposals which aim to explore improvements in non-invasive methods of imaging for early diagnosis and clinical evaluation of disease. Among the projects successfully funded under the FP5 programme was one entitled `Optical mammography: Imaging and characterization of breast lesions by pulsed near-infrared laser light', known by its acronym OPTIMAMM. The project involved a consortium of nine partners, comprising ten applied science and clinical research groups based in six EU countries, with overall administration and management provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany. The broad aim of the OPTIMAMM project was to combine multi-disciplinary basic (physics, engineering, mathematics, computer science) and clinical (oncology, histology) research to assess the diagnostic potential of time-domain optical and photoacoustic mammography as novel, non-invasive imaging modalities for the detection and clinical evaluation of breast lesions. Funding for the project, at a total cost of about 1.67 MEuro, began in December 2000 for a period of three years, although a zero-cost extension was granted to enable the ongoing project activities to continue until the end of May 2004. The importance of developing new tools for the detection and diagnosis of breast disease is evident from the very high incidence and

  18. Breast Lesions: Quantitative Diagnosis Using Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoxian; Zheng, Yanling; Huang, Guangliang; Lin, Manxia; Shan, Quanyuan; Lu, Ying; Tian, Wenshuo; Xie, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the diagnostic performance of shear wave elastography (SWE) in differentiating malignant from benign breast lesions. A literature search of PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus up to November 2014 was conducted. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed, and pooled weighted estimates of sensitivity and specificity were calculated using a bivariate mixed-effects regression model. Thirty-three studies, which included a total of 5838 lesions (2093 malignant, 3745 benign) from 5397 patients, were finally analyzed. Summary sensitivity and specificity were 0.886 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.858-0.909) and 0.866 (95% CI, 0.833-0.894), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 50.410 (95% CI, 34.972-72.664). And the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of SWE was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.91-0.96). No publication bias existed among these studies (p = 0.245). In the subgroup analysis, sensitivity and specificity were 0.862 (95% CI, 0.811-0.901) and 0.875 (95% CI, 0.793-0.928) among 1552 lesions from 1429 patients in the 12 studies using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 0.897 (95% CI, 0.863-0.923) and 0.863 (95% CI, 0.831-0.889) among another 4436 lesions from 4097 patients in the 21 studies using supersonic shear imaging. When analysis confined to 9 studies evaluated the diagnostic performance of combination SWE and conventional ultrasound, the area under the curve was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94-0.97), yielding a sensitivity of 0.971 (95% CI, 0.941-0.986) and specificity of 0.801 (95% CI, 0.733-0.856). SWE seems to be a good quantitative method for differentiating breast lesions, with promise for integration into routine imaging protocols. PMID:26778289

  19. High-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging for the separation of benign from malignant BI-RADS 4/5 lesions found on breast MRI at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Dorota J.; Rogers, Nathan; Deshpande, Vibhas S.; Newitt, David N.; Laub, Gerhard A.; Porter, David A.; Kornak, John; Joe, Bonnie N.; Hylton, Nola M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion imaging (RESOLVE) improves separation of malignant versus benign lesions compared to standard single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) on BI-RADS 4/5 lesions detected on breast MRI. Materials and Methods Consecutive 3T breast MRI studies with BI-RADS 4/5 designation and subsequent biopsy or benign mastectomy were retrospectively identified. Freehand ROI’s were drawn on lesions and also on normal background fibroglandular tissue for comparison. Lesion-to-background contrast was evaluated by normalizing signal intensity of the lesion ROI by the normal background tissue ROI at b=800. Statistical analysis used the Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon rank-sum test for unpaired and Wilcoxon signed-rank for paired comparisons. Results Of 38 lesions in 32 patients,10 were malignant. Lesion-to-background contrast was higher on RESOLVE than ss-EPI (1.80±0.71 vs. 1.62±0.63, p=0.03). Mean ADC was the same or lower on RESOLVE than ss-EPI, and this effect was largest in malignant lesions (RESOLVE 0.90±0.13; ss-EPI 1.00±0.13; median difference −0.10 (95%CI: −0.17,−0.02) ×10−3mm2/sec; p=0.014). By either diffusion method, there was a statistically significant difference between benign and malignant mean ADC (p<0.001). Conclusion Increased lesion-to-background contrast and improved separation of benign from malignant lesions by RESOLVE compared to standard diffusion, suggest that RESOLVE may show promise as an adjunct to clinical breast MRI. PMID:24214467

  20. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Sanabria-Mondragón, Mónica; Hernández-Beltrán, Lourdes; López-Amador, Noé; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast density (BD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate (χ2) and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170), fibroglandular 29% (87), heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17), and dense pattern 8.6% (26). Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117) and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183). Patterns of high breast density (BD) (dense + heterogeneously dense) were observed in 25.6% (30/117) of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183) of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300). Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300) of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300) of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%), and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%). Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns. PMID:23346398

  1. The differentiation of the character of solid lesions in the breast in the compression sonoelastography. Part I: The diagnostic value of the ultrasound B-mode imaging in the differentiation diagnostics of solid, focal lesions in the breast in relation to the pathomorphological verification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the ultrasound B-mode imaging in the differentiation diagnostics of solid lesions in the breast in relation to the pathomorphological verification. From January to July 2010, 375 ultrasound breast examinations were conducted. The study enrolled 80 women aged 17–83, with 99 solid, focal lesions present in breasts, which were qualified for pathomorphological verification on the basis of the ultrasound examination. All patients underwent: the interview, physical examination, ultrasound examination and sonoelastography. The ultrasound features of the lesions, their vascularization patterns in the Doppler examination as well as the adjacent tissues were determined. Next, the focal lesions were categorized according to the BIRADS-US classification. The obtained results were analyzed statistically. In the group of 80 patients, 99 focal, solid lesions in breasts were visualized, including 39 neoplastic, malignant lesions (group I) and 60 lesions of benign nature (group II). The malignant lesions were often characterized by: greater size, irregular shape (34/39), prevalence of the anteroposterior dimension over the lateral-lateral dimension (22/39), acoustic shadowing (20/39), the margins not well-circumscribed (37/39), spiculated margins (16/39) and the presence of calcifications (14/39). The benign lesions were much more often hyper- and isoechogenic (14/60). In group I the lesions more often demonstrated the features of increased vascularization (29/39) and the presence of irregularly shaped vessels (23/29). This vascularization more often originated in the adjacent tissues. In the surroundings of the malignant neoplastic lesions, the presence of edema (16/39) and skin thickening (6/39) occurred more frequently and the abnormal axillary lymph nodes were more often diagnosed. The lesions of group I were assigned to the following BIRADS categories: BIRADS-US 4 (9 lesions) and BIRADS-US 5 (30 lesions). In group

  2. Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology Can Play a Role in Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garbar, Christian; Curé, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that CNB has been progressively replaced by FNAC in the investigation of nonpalpable lesions or microcalcifications without a clinical or radiological mass lesion, FNAC has yet a role in palpable lesions provided it is associated with the triple diagnosis and experienced cytologist. In these conditions, FNAC is a safe, effective, economical, and accurate technique for breast cancer evaluation. Numerous literature reviews and meta-analyses illustrated the advantages and disadvantages of both methods CNB and FNAC. The difference does not seem significant when noninformative and unsatisfactory FNAC was excluded. Recently, cytological methods using liquid-based cytology (LBC) technology improve immunocytological and molecular tests with the same efficiency as classical immunohistochemistry. The indications of FNAC were, for palpable lesions, relative contraindication of CNB (elderly or frailty), staging of multiple nodules in conjunction or not with CNB, staging of lymph node status, newly appearing lesion in patient under neoadjuvant treatment, decreasing of anxiety with a rapid diagnosis, evaluation of biomarkers and new biomarkers, and chronological evaluation of biomarker following the neoadjuvant therapy response. PMID:23936675

  3. Fine-needle aspiration cytology can play a role in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Garbar, Christian; Curé, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that CNB has been progressively replaced by FNAC in the investigation of nonpalpable lesions or microcalcifications without a clinical or radiological mass lesion, FNAC has yet a role in palpable lesions provided it is associated with the triple diagnosis and experienced cytologist. In these conditions, FNAC is a safe, effective, economical, and accurate technique for breast cancer evaluation. Numerous literature reviews and meta-analyses illustrated the advantages and disadvantages of both methods CNB and FNAC. The difference does not seem significant when noninformative and unsatisfactory FNAC was excluded. Recently, cytological methods using liquid-based cytology (LBC) technology improve immunocytological and molecular tests with the same efficiency as classical immunohistochemistry. The indications of FNAC were, for palpable lesions, relative contraindication of CNB (elderly or frailty), staging of multiple nodules in conjunction or not with CNB, staging of lymph node status, newly appearing lesion in patient under neoadjuvant treatment, decreasing of anxiety with a rapid diagnosis, evaluation of biomarkers and new biomarkers, and chronological evaluation of biomarker following the neoadjuvant therapy response. PMID:23936675

  4. Rapid Discrimination of Malignant Breast Lesions from Normal Tissues Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongyuan; Wei, Zhigong; Xiao, Yue; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Raman spectroscopy system in the detection of malignant breast lesions through a systemic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Embase from 2000 to June 2015. Published studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of Raman spectroscopy in distinguishing malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and normal tissues were included in our study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was derived. A Revised Tool for the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines was used to assess the quality of included studies. Results The initial search produced a total of 157 articles after removing duplicates. Nine studies (8 in vitro and 1 in vivo) were eligible in this meta-analysis. We analyzed the eight in vitro studies with 1756 lesions, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy system for the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions were 0.92 (95% CI 0.86–0.96) and 0.97 (97% CI 0.93–0.98), respectively. Diagnostic odds ratio was 266.70 (95% CI 89.38–795.79), and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was 0.98 (95% CI 0.97–0.99). Significant heterogeneity was found between studies. There was no evidence of considerable publication bias. Conclusions Raman spectroscopy system is an optical diagnostic technology with great value for detecting malignant breast lesions. At the same time, it has advantages of being non-invasive, real-time, and easy to use. Thus it deserves to be further explored for intra-operatory breast tumor margin detection. PMID:27459193

  5. Effect of 18F-FDG uptake time on lesion detectability in PET imaging of early stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Kurland, Brenda F.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Prior reports have suggested that delayed FDG-PET oncology imaging can improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for known lesions. Our goal was to estimate realistic bounds for lesion detectability for static measurements with one to four hours between FDG injection and image acquisition. Tumor and normal tissue kinetic model parameters were estimated from dynamic PET studies of patients with early stage breast cancer. These were used to generate time-activity curves (TACs) out to four hours, for which we assumed both nonreversible and reversible models with different rates of FDG dephosphorylation (k4). For each pair of tumor and normal tissue TACs, 600 PET sinogram realizations were generated, and images were reconstructed using OSEM. Test statistics for each tumor and normal tissue region of interest were output from the computer model observers and evaluated using an ROC analysis with the calculated AUC providing a measure of lesion detectability. For the nonreversible model (k4 = 0), the AUC increased in 11/23 (48%) of patients for one to two hours after the current standard post-radiotracer injection imaging window of one hour. This improvement was driven by increased tumor/normal tissue contrast before the impact of increased noise due to radiotracer decay began to dominate the imaging signal. As k4 was increased from 0 to 0.01 min−1, the time of maximum detectability shifted earlier, as the decreasing FDG concentration in the tumor lowered the CNR. These results imply that delayed PET imaging may reveal low-conspicuity lesions that would have otherwise gone undetected. PMID:26807443

  6. [Improving practice in breast pathology: 34-months experience of the regional SENOPATH network and webinars as a tool for diagnosis of difficult lesions of the breast].

    PubMed

    Quintyn-Ranty, Marie-Laure; Gordien, Karine; Caveriviere, Paul; Mery, Éliane; Jamme-Lallemand, Muriel; Wuithier, Pascal; Palasse, Julien; Reyre, Joelle; Laborie, Vincent; Despax, Brigitte; Rolland, Véronique; Thibaut, Isabelle; Maissongrosse, Véronique; Escourrou, Ghislaine; Duprez-Paumier, Raphaëlle; Bauvin, Éric; Jacob, Michel; Lacroix-Triki, Magali

    2015-10-01

    Pathologists commonly face breast lesions that are difficult to diagnose. To reduce second opinion delay, erase geographical barrier and provide continuing education, we aimed to develop a telepathology-based regional network of pathologists. With the support of ONCOMIP network, we founded a peer-group named SENOPATH, composed of experienced breast pathologists practising in private laboratories, university hospitals or comprehensive cancer center in the region of Midi-Pyrénées in France. Submitted cases are digitalized at the University Hospital, stored in a shared space with a possible access via Internet prior to the SENOPATH sessions. The group meets monthly, via a synchronized webinar and multihead microscope session. A consensual diagnosis and final pathology report is issued for each case, and sent to the referring clinician via the patient medical file securely hosted by ONCOMIP. Between 2012 and 2014, 142 cases were reviewed, for either diagnostic 'routine' difficulty or rare histological type. The SENOPATH group, also regularly called by oncologists to solve difficult cases, has considerably improved the pathologist network in Southern France. Supported by the webinar tool, its educational impact is prominent, with a considerable progress in the region with regards to standardization of pathology processes, literature review and knowledge sharing. PMID:26384691

  7. Residual analysis of the water resonance signal in breast lesions imaged with high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, William A. Medved, Milica; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: High spectral and spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HiSS MRI) yields information on the local environment of suspicious lesions. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of HiSS (complete fat-suppression, improved image contrast, no required contrast agent, etc.), leading to initial investigations of water resonance lineshape for the purpose of breast lesion classification. The purpose of this study is to investigate a quantitative imaging biomarker, which characterizes non-Lorentzian components of the water resonance in HiSS MRI datasets, for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx). Methods: The inhomogeneous broadening and non-Lorentzian or “off-peak” components seen in the water resonance of proton spectra of breast HiSS images are analyzed by subtracting a Lorentzian fit from the water peak spectra and evaluating the difference spectrum or “residual.” The maxima of these residuals (referred to hereafter as “off-peak components”) tend to be larger in magnitude in malignant lesions, indicating increased broadening in malignant lesions. The authors considered only those voxels with the highest magnitude off-peak components in each lesion, with the number of selected voxels dependent on lesion size. Our voxel-based method compared the magnitudes and frequencies of off-peak components of all voxels from all lesions in a database that included 15 malignant and 8 benign lesions (yielding ∼3900 voxels) based on the lesions’ biopsy-confirmed diagnosis. Lesion classification was accomplished by comparing the average off-peak component magnitudes and frequencies in malignant and benign lesions. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used as a figure of merit for both the voxel-based and lesion-based methods. Results: In the voxel-based task of distinguishing voxels from malignant and benign lesions, off-peak magnitude yielded an AUC of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [0.84, 0.91]). In the lesion-based task of distinguishing malignant and

  8. Lesions with unclear malignant potential (B3) after minimally invasive breast biopsy: evaluation of vacuum biopsies performed in Switzerland and recommended further management

    PubMed Central

    Haueisen, Harald; Kampmann, Gert; Oehlschlegel, Christian; Seifert, B; Rageth, Luzi; Rageth, Christoph; Stadlmann, S; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Histopathological B3 lesions after minimal invasive breast biopsy (VABB) are a particular challenge for the clinician, as there are currently no binding recommendations regarding the subsequent procedure. Purpose To analyze all B3 lesions, diagnosed at VABB and captured in the national central Swiss MIBB database and to provide a data basis for further management in this subgroup of patients. Material and Methods All 9,153 stereotactically, sonographically, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsies, performed in Switzerland between 2009 and 2011, captured in a central database, were evaluated. The rate of B3 lesions and the definitive pathological findings in patients who underwent surgical resection were analyzed. Results The B3 rate was 17.0% (1532 of 9000 biopsies with B classification). Among the 521 lesions with a definitive postoperative diagnosis, the malignancy rate (invasive carcinoma or DCIS) was 21.5%. In patients with atypical ductal hyperplasia, papillary lesions, flat epithelial atypia, lobular neoplasia, and radial scar diagnosed by VABB, the malignancy rates were 25.9%, 3.1%, 18.3%, 26.4%, and 11.1%, respectively. Conclusion B3 lesions, comprising 17%, of all analyzed biopsies, were common and the proportion of malignancies in those lesions undergoing subsequent surgical excision was high (21.5%). PMID:26552694

  9. Pursuing shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) for concomitant detection of breast lesions and microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Shao, Wanting; Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Han, Bing; Fu, Tong; Wu, Di; Bi, Lirong; Xu, Weiqing; Fan, Zhimin; Barman, Ishan

    2015-10-01

    Although tissue staining followed by morphologic identification remains the gold standard for diagnosis of most cancers, such determinations relying solely on morphology are often hampered by inter- and intra-observer variability. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, in contrast, offer objective markers for diagnoses and can afford disease detection prior to alterations in cellular and extracellular architecture by furnishing a rapid ``omics''-like view of the biochemical status of the probed specimen. Here, we report a classification approach to concomitantly detect microcalcification status and local pathological state in breast tissue, featuring a combination of vibrational spectroscopy that focuses on the tumor and its microenvironment, and multivariate data analysis of spectral markers reflecting molecular expression. We employ the unprecedented sensitivity and exquisite molecular specificity offered by Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) to probe the presence of calcified deposits and distinguish between normal breast tissues, fibroadenoma, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). By correlating the spectra with the corresponding histologic assessment, we developed partial least squares-discriminant analysis derived decision algorithm that provides excellent diagnostic power in the fresh frozen sections (overall accuracy of 99.4% and 93.6% using SHINs for breast lesions with and without microcalcifications, respectively). The performance of this decision algorithm is competitive with or supersedes that of analogous algorithms employing spontaneous Raman spectroscopy while enabling facile detection due to the considerably higher intensity of SHINERS. Our results pave the way for rapid tissue spectral pathology measurements using SHINERS that can offer a novel stain-free route to accurate and economical diagnoses without human interpretation.Although tissue staining

  10. Differentiation of Malignant and Benign Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography: Added Value of Quantitative Enhancement Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Pang; Hsu, Hsian-He; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Chu, Chi-Ming; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chang, Tsun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the association between breast lesion morphology and malignancy and to determine the optimal value of lesion enhancement (HU, Hounsfield units) to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer in patients with incidental breast lesions (IBLs). A total of 97 patients with 102 IBLs detected from July 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the presence of malignancy based on the morphology of the lesions alone and in combination with an enhancement value (HU) analysis. There were 36 malignant and 66 benign IBLs. When the morphology and enhancement values were combined, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 92%, 97%, and 95%, respectively, for reader 1 and 89%, 94%, and 92%, respectively, for reader 2. The addition of HU values led to correct changes in the diagnosis; specifically, the accuracy of the diagnosis of reader 1 and reader 2 improved by 6.9% and 11.8%, respectively. The addition of the enhancement value (HU) to the CT morphology improved the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of malignant from benign IBLs by using the region of interest (ROI) to measure the HU within the most suspicious part of the lesion. PMID:27128524

  11. The Automated Breast Volume Scanner (ABVS): initial experiences in lesion detection compared with conventional handheld B-mode ultrasound: a pilot study of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Farrokh, Andre; Hille, Ursula; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Gyapong, Samuel; Soliman, Amr A; Degenhardt, Friedrich; Hillemanns, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The idea of an automated whole breast ultrasound was developed three decades ago. We present our initial experiences with the latest technical advance in this technique, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) ACUSON S2000(™). Volume data sets were collected from 50 patients and a database containing 23 women with no detectable lesions in conventional ultrasound (BI-RADS(®)-US 1), 13 women with clearly benign lesions (BI-RADS(®)-US 2), and 14 women with known breast cancer (BI-RADS(®)-US 5) was created. An independent examiner evaluated the ABVS data on a separate workstation without any prior knowledge of the patients' histories. The diagnostic accuracy for the experimental ABVS was 66.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52.9-79.1). The independent examiner detected all breast cancers in the volume data resulting in a calculated sensitivity of 100% in the described setting (95% CI: 73.2%-100%). After the ABVS examination, there were a high number of requests for second-look ultrasounds in 47% (95% CI: 30.9-63.5) of the healthy women (with either a clearly benign lesion or no breast lesions at all in conventional handheld ultrasound). Therefore, the specificity remained at 52.8% (95% CI: 35.7-69.2). When comparing the concordance of the ABVS with the gold standard (conventional handheld ultrasound), Cohen's Kappa value as an estimation of the inter-rater reliability was κ = 0.37, indicating fair agreement. In conclusion, the ABVS must still be regarded as an experimental technique for breast ultrasound, which definitely needs to undergo further evaluation studies. PMID:22114526

  12. The Automated Breast Volume Scanner (ABVS): initial experiences in lesion detection compared with conventional handheld B-mode ultrasound: a pilot study of 50 cases

    PubMed Central

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Farrokh, Andre; Hille, Ursula; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Gyapong, Samuel; Soliman, Amr A; Degenhardt, Friedrich; Hillemanns, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The idea of an automated whole breast ultrasound was developed three decades ago. We present our initial experiences with the latest technical advance in this technique, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) ACUSON S2000™. Volume data sets were collected from 50 patients and a database containing 23 women with no detectable lesions in conventional ultrasound (BI-RADS®-US 1), 13 women with clearly benign lesions (BI-RADS®-US 2), and 14 women with known breast cancer (BI-RADS®-US 5) was created. An independent examiner evaluated the ABVS data on a separate workstation without any prior knowledge of the patients’ histories. The diagnostic accuracy for the experimental ABVS was 66.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52.9–79.1). The independent examiner detected all breast cancers in the volume data resulting in a calculated sensitivity of 100% in the described setting (95% CI: 73.2%–100%). After the ABVS examination, there were a high number of requests for second-look ultrasounds in 47% (95% CI: 30.9–63.5) of the healthy women (with either a clearly benign lesion or no breast lesions at all in conventional handheld ultrasound). Therefore, the specificity remained at 52.8% (95% CI: 35.7–69.2). When comparing the concordance of the ABVS with the gold standard (conventional handheld ultrasound), Cohen’s Kappa value as an estimation of the inter-rater reliability was κ = 0.37, indicating fair agreement. In conclusion, the ABVS must still be regarded as an experimental technique for breast ultrasound, which definitely needs to undergo further evaluation studies. PMID:22114526

  13. Occult Breast Cancer: Scintimammography with High-Resolution Breast-specific Gamma Camera in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Jocelyn A. Rapelyea; , Gilat Zisman; Kevin Mohtashemi; Joyce Raub; Christine B. Teal; Stan Majewski; Benjamin L. Welch

    2005-08-01

    (12%) patients, invasive carcinoma was diagnosed at US-guided biopsy (9 mm each at pathologic examination). CONCLUSION: High-resolution breast-specific scintimammography can depict small (<1-cm), mammographically occult, nonpalpable lesions in women at increased risk for breast cancer not otherwise identified at mammography or physical examination.

  14. Method and device for intraoperative imaging of lumpectomy specimens to provide feedback to breast surgeon for prompt re-excision during the same procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Hemingway, Susan; Kort, Kara; de la Rosa, Gustavo; Adhikary, Ravi; Masrani, Deepa; Feiglin, David; O'Connell, Avice; Nagarajan, Mahesh; Yang, Chien-Chun; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) of breast cancer is now widely accepted due to improved cosmetic outcome and improved patients' quality of life. One of the critical issues in performing breast-conserving surgery is trying to achieve microscopically clear surgical margins while maintaining excellent cosmesis. Unfortunately, unacceptably close or positive surgical margins occur in at least 20-25% of all patients undergoing BCT requiring repeat surgical excision days or weeks later, as permanent histopathology routinely takes days to complete. Our aim is to develop a better method for intraoperative imaging of non-palpable breast malignancies excised by wire or needle localization. Providing non-deformed three dimensional imaging of the excised breast tissue should allow more accurate assessment of tumor margins and consequently allow further excision at the time of initial surgery thus limiting the enormous financial and emotional burden of additional surgery. We have designed and constructed a device that allows preservation of the excised breast tissue in its natural anatomic position relative to the breast as it is imaged to assess adequate excision. We performed initial tests with needle-guided lumpectomy specimens using micro-CT and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Our device consists of a plastic sphere inside a cylindrical holder. The surgeon inserts a freshly excised piece of breast tissue into the sphere and matches its anatomic orientation with the fiducial markers on the sphere. A custom-shaped foam is placed inside the sphere to prevent specimen deformation due to gravity. DBT followed by micro-CT images of the specimen were obtained. We confirmed that our device preserved spatial orientation of the excised breast tissue and that the location error was lower than 10mm and 10 degrees. The initial obtained results indicate that breast lesions containing microcalcifications allow a good 3D imaging of margins providing immediate intraoperative feedback for

  15. A Pilot Study of Improved Lesion Characterization in Breast MRI Using a 3D Radial Balanced SSFP Technique With Isotropic Resolution and Efficient Fat-Water Separation

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Catherine J.; Kelcz, Frederick; Jung, Youngkyoo; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Fain, Sean B.; Block, Walter F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess a 3D radial balanced steady state free precession technique that provides sub-millimeter isotropic resolution and inherently registered fat and water image volumes in comparison to conventional T2-weighted RARE imaging for lesion characterization in breast MRI. Materials and Methods 3D PRojection SSFP (3DPR-SSFP) combines a dual half-echo radial k-space trajectory with a linear combination fat/water separation technique (Linear Combination SSFP). A pilot study was performed in 20 patients to assess fat suppression and depiction of lesion morphology using 3DPR-SSFP. For all patients fat suppression was measured for the 3DPR-SSFP image volumes and depiction of lesion morphology was compared against corresponding T2-weighted Fast Spin Echo (FSE) datasets for 15 lesions in 11 patients. Results The isotropic 0.63 mm resolution of the 3DPR-SSFP sequence demonstrated improved depiction of lesion morphology in comparison to FSE. The 3DPR-SSFP fat and water datasets were available in a 5 minute scan time while average fat suppression with 3DPR-SSFP was 71% across all twenty patients. Conclusion 3DPR-SSFP has the potential to improve the lesion characterization information available in breast MRI, particularly in comparison to conventional FSE. A larger study is warranted to quantify the effect of 3DPR-SSFP on specificity. PMID:19557728

  16. Automated analysis of non-mass-enhancing lesions in breast MRI based on morphological, kinetic, and spatio-temporal moments and joint segmentation-motion compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie D.; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) represents an established method for the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions. While mass-like enhancing lesions can be easily categorized according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon, a majority of diagnostically challenging lesions, the so called non-mass-like enhancing lesions, remain both qualitatively as well as quantitatively difficult to analyze. Thus, the evaluation of kinetic and/or morphological characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have no well-defined and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these difficulties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphological descriptors separately and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions, and additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  17. Expression of the G2-M checkpoint regulators cyclin B1 and cdc2 in nonmalignant and malignant human breast lesions: immunocytochemical and quantitative image analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, H.; Koizumi, H.; Uchikoshi, T.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo expression of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 (key molecules for G2-M transition during the cell cycle) in nonmalignant and cancerous human breast lesions using immunohistochemistry and quantitative proliferative index (PI) analysis. Breast epithelial cells co-expressed cyclin B1 and Cdc2 in their cytoplasm in the G2 phase and in their nuclei in the M phase. Cyclin B1, but not Cdc2, immunostaining rapidly disappeared from the nuclei during the mitotic metaphase to anaphase transition. Static image analysis revealed the mean proliferative index for cyclin B1/cdc2 for each type of lesion to be as follows: normal glands (n = 20), 2.0/2.5%; benign lesions, including typical ductal hyperplasia (n = 76), 2.5/5.8%; atypical ductal hyperplasia (n = 21), 3.0/6.6%; carcinomas in situ (n = 70), 7.4/14.0%; and invasive carcinomas (n = 58), 10.0/22.9%. Proliferative index data for atypical hyperplasia were virtually identical to those for benign lesions and were significantly lower than those for breast cancer, suggesting that expression levels of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 may be used to distinguish premalignant human breast lesions from advanced disease. Furthermore, the proliferative index for cyclin B1 for comedo-type ductal carcinomas in situ agreed with that for invasive ductal carcinomas (mean, 10.1% versus 9.5%), apparently explaining the clinicopathological aggressiveness of this tumor at the molecular level. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9006317

  18. Characteristics, Malignancy Rate, and Follow-up of BI-RADS Category 3 Lesions Identified at Breast MR Imaging: Implications for MR Image Interpretation and Management.

    PubMed

    Chikarmane, Sona A; Birdwell, Robyn L; Poole, Patricia S; Sippo, Dorothy A; Giess, Catherine S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To (a) evaluate the frequency of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3 assessment in screening and diagnostic breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (b) review findings considered indicative of BI-RADS category 3, and (c) determine outcomes of BI-RADS category 3 lesions, including upgrades, downgrades, and malignancy rates. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The authors retrospectively reviewed the breast MR imaging database (2009-2011) to identify breast MR images classified as showing BI-RADS category 3 lesions. There were 9216 BI-RADS assessments in 5778 examinations (3360 women). Of the 9216 assessments, 567 (6%) in 483 women (average age, 47.2 years; median age, 47.0 years) were assigned BI-RADS category 3. In women with more than one BI-RADS category 3 lesion, the first lesion reported in the impression was used for data analysis. Outcomes data were available for 435 of the 483 women (90.1%). These women comprised the study cohort. Medical records from January 1, 2009, to May 31, 2015, were reviewed to obtain demographic characteristics and outcomes. χ(2) statistics and 95% exact confidence intervals (CIs) were constructed. Results MR imaging was performed for high-risk screening in 240 of the 435 patients (55.2%) and for diagnostic purposes in 195 (44.8%). Findings included mass (n = 125, 28.7%), focus (n = 111, 25.5%), nonmass enhancement (n = 80, 18.3%), moderate or marked background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) (n = 91, 20.9%), posttreatment changes (n = 16, 3.8%), and other findings (n = 12, 2.8%). Outcomes were as follows: 339 of the 435 patients (78%) did not have evidence of malignancy at more than 24 months, 28 (6.4%) underwent mastectomy (all benign), and 68 (15.6%) had lesion upgrades, with 11 cancers (2.5%). All 11 cancers were diagnosed in women with a genetic mutation or a personal history of breast cancer. No cancer was

  19. Radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions: vascular lesions with endothelial cell atypia presenting in the radiation port of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Tschen, Jaime A; MacFarlane, Deborah F

    2014-01-01

    Atypical vascular lesions are an uncommon adverse sequela to the radiotherapy of tumors. Many characteristics are shared between atypical vascular lesions caused by radiation port and well-differentiated radiation-induced angiosarcomas. The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms acquired, atypical, benign, lymphangioma, lymphangioendothelioma, lymphangiomatous, lesion, papules, progressive, and vascular. Patient reports and previous reviews of the subject were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Atypical vascular lesions associated with the radiation port present as clinically innocuous flesh-colored to erythematous papules or plaques. The condition presents within the radiation field, approximately 3 years after initial treatment. While the exact me chanism remains to be elucidated, growing evidence supports an association between radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions and radiation-induced angiosarcomas. Atypical vascular lesions within a radiation port are suggested to be in a state of morphologic continuum, which may progress into the more aggressive, malignant angiosarcoma. The authors recommend consideration for biopsy of new skin lesions within or adjacent to radiation. While it is clear that atypical vascular lesions caused by radiation are not equivalent to angiosarcoma, growing evidence supports that radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions may progress to angiosarcoma in some patients; therefore, the authors recommend excision of the lesion with margins depending on clinical judgment and the lesion encountered. PMID:25823080

  20. Comparison of trace elements in the scalp hair of malignant and benign breast lesions versus healthy women.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Qaisara; Malik, Salman A; Shaheen, Nazia; Shah, Munir H

    2010-05-01

    Trace elements including Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr, and Zn were analyzed in the scalp hair samples of women with malignant breast lesions, women with benign breast lesions, and healthy donors using atomic absorption spectrophotometric method. In the scalp hair of malignant-tumor patients, the highest average concentration was shown by Ca (1,187 microg/g), followed by Na (655 microg/g), Mg (478 microg/g), Zn (391 microg/g), Sr (152 microg/g), Fe (114 microg/g), and K (89.8), while in the case of benign-tumor patients, the average estimated element levels were 1,522, 1,093, 572, 457, 217, 80.4, and 74.7 microg/g, respectively. Most of the elements exhibited non-normal distribution evidenced by large spread, standard error, and skewness values. Mean concentrations of Ca (634 microg/g), Zn (206 microg/g), Mg (162 microg/g), Fe (129 microg/g), and Na (82.1 microg/g) were noteworthy in the scalp hair of healthy women. Average levels of Na, Sr, K, Cd, Co, Pb, Mg, Ca, Zn, Ni, Sb, and Mn were revealed to be significantly higher in the hair of malignant and benign patients compared to the healthy women; however, Fe, Cu, Al, and Cr were not significantly different in the scalp hair of the three groups. The quartile distributions of Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Sr revealed maximum spread in the scalp hair of malignant and benign groups; nevertheless, Al, Cu, Fe, and Zn exhibited almost comparable quartile levels in the three groups. Strong correlation coefficients were found between Fe and Cd, Al and Na, Mn and Sr, Co and Cr, Cd and Cr, Pb and K, Pb and Mn, Cu and Na, and Al and Fe in the scalp hair of malignant-tumor patients, while Fe and K, Cd and Co, Na and Co, and Cr and Pb showed strong correlations in the scalp hair of benign-tumor patients, both of which were significantly different compared with the healthy subjects. Multivariate cluster analysis also revealed divergent clustering of the elements in the scalp hair of

  1. Dedicated Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography and Diagnostic Mammography: Comparison of Radiation Dose, Patient Comfort, And Qualitative Review of Imaging Findings in BI-RADS 4 and 5 Lesions

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Avice M.; Kawakyu-O’Connor, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study was undertaken to compare radiation dose, relative visibility/conspicuity of biopsy-proven lesions, and relative patient comfort in diagnostic mammography and dedicated cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) in Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)® 4 or 5 lesions. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six consecutive patients (37 breasts) with abnormal mammographic and/or ultrasound categorized as BI-RADS® 4 or 5 lesions were evaluated with CBBCT prior to biopsy. Administered radiation dose was calculated for each modality. Mammograms and CBBCT images were compared side-by-side and lesion visibility/conspicuity was qualitatively scored. Histopathology of lesions was reviewed. Patients were administered a survey for qualitative evaluation of comfort between the two modalities. Results: CBBCT dose was similar to or less than diagnostic mammography, with a mean dose of 9.4 mGy (±3.1 SD) for CBBCT vs. 16.9 mGy (±6.9 SD) for diagnostic mammography in a total of 37 imaged breasts (P<0.001). Thirty-three of 34 mammographic lesions were scored as equally or better visualized in CBBCT relative to diagnostic mammography. Characterization of high-risk lesions was excellent. Patients reported greater comfort in CBBCT imaging relative to mammography. Conclusion: Our experience of side-by-side comparison of CBBCT and diagnostic mammography in BI-RADS® 4 and 5 breast lesions demonstrated a high degree of correlation between the two modalities across a variety of lesion types. Owing to favorable radiation dose profile, excellent visualization of lesions, and qualitative benefits including improved patient comfort, excellent field-of-view, and more anatomical evaluation of lesion margins, CBBCT offers a promising modality for diagnostic evaluation of breast lesions. PMID:22439131

  2. Multimodality imaging and state-of-art GPU technology in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions on real time decision support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, S.; Sidiropoulos, K.; Glotsos, D.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Asvestas, P.; Cavouras, D.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to design a pattern recognition system for assisting the diagnosis of breast lesions, using image information from Ultrasound (US) and Digital Mammography (DM) imaging modalities. State-of-art computer technology was employed based on commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards and parallel programming. An experienced radiologist outlined breast lesions on both US and DM images from 59 patients employing a custom designed computer software application. Textural features were extracted from each lesion and were used to design the pattern recognition system. Several classifiers were tested for highest performance in discriminating benign from malignant lesions. Classifiers were also combined into ensemble schemes for further improvement of the system's classification accuracy. Following the pattern recognition system optimization, the final system was designed employing the Probabilistic Neural Network classifier (PNN) on the GPU card (GeForce 580GTX) using CUDA programming framework and C++ programming language. The use of such state-of-art technology renders the system capable of redesigning itself on site once additional verified US and DM data are collected. Mixture of US and DM features optimized performance with over 90% accuracy in correctly classifying the lesions.

  3. Optimal management of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Farley, David R

    2003-12-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) represents a breast lesion that is diagnosed with increasing frequency, mainly due to the wide use of screening mammography. Today, DCIS comprises 15-25% of all breast cancers detected at population screening programs. Consequently, the concepts of properly managing such patients assume a greater importance in everyday practice. Mammographically detected microcalcifications are the most common presentation of DCIS. Despite recent technological advances (including Stereotactic-guided directional vacuum-assisted biopsy), mammographically guided wire biopsy remains the "gold-standard" for obtaining a histological diagnosis in patients with non-palpable, mammographically detected DCIS. Management options include mastectomy, local excision combined with radiation therapy, and local excision alone. Given that DCIS is a heterogeneous group of lesions rather than a single entity, and because patients have a wide variety of personal needs that must be addressed during treatment selection, it is obvious that no single approach will be appropriate for all forms of DCIS or for all patients. Careful patient selection is of key importance in order to achieve the best results in the management of the individual patient with DCIS. Axillary lymph node dissection is unnecessary in the treatment of pure DCIS, but it is indicated when microinvasion is present. In these cases, sentinel lymph node biopsy may be an excellent alternative. In the NSABP B-24 trial, tamoxifen reduced both the invasive and non-invasive breast cancer events in either breast by 37%. Nearly all patients who develop a non-invasive recurrence following breast-sparing surgery are cured with mastectomy, and approximately 75% of those with an invasive recurrence are salvaged. Selected patients initially treated by lumpectomy alone may also undergo breast-conservation therapy at the time of relapse according to the same strict guidelines of tumor margin clearance required for the

  4. Frequent alterations of cell cycle regulators in early-stage breast lesions as detected by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, K. L.; Varley, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Progression through G1 phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle is tightly controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). These proteins form part of a regulatory pathway including the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) p16, D-type cyclins and the product of the retinoblastoma gene pRb. Aberration of any one of these components may lead to uncontrolled proliferation contributing to neoplasia. Three of these proteins, cyclin D1, pRb and p16, were analysed by immunohistochemistry on archival paraffin sections to determine whether expression patterns were different in preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast tumours relative to normal. Genetic analysis of the gene encoding cyclin D1 (CCND1) was also carried out, using an intragenic restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) to assess possible allelic imbalance. A majority of the tumours studied (approximately 90%) showed abnormalities in expression of at least one of these proteins. Overexpression of cyclin D1 was found in approximately 49% cases, reduced expression of p16 in approximately 46% and reduced expression of pRb in approximately 37%. Allelic imbalance of cyclin D1 was found in approximately 57% cases. Images Figure 2 PMID:9652762

  5. Radioguided localisation of impalpable breast lesions using 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin: Lessons learnt during introduction of a new technique to guide preoperative localisation

    SciTech Connect

    Landman, Joanne; Kulawansa, Sagarika; McCarthy, Michael; Troedson, Russell; Phillips, Michael; Tinning, Jill; Taylor, Donna

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative wire-guided localisation (WGL) of impalpable breast lesions is widely used but can be technically difficult. Risks include wire migration, inaccurate placement, and inadequate surgical margins. Research shows that radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) is quicker, easier, and can improve surgical and cosmetic outcomes. An audited introduction of ROLL was conducted to validate the technique as a feasible alternative to WGL. Fifty patients with single impalpable lesions and biopsy proven malignancy or indeterminate histology underwent WGL followed by intralesional radiopharmaceutical injection of 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin. Postprocedural mammography was performed to demonstrate wire position, and scintigraphy to evaluate radiopharmaceutical migration. Lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative sentinel node biopsy were performed if indicated, followed by lesion localisation and excision using a gamma probe. Specimen imaging was performed, with immediate reexcision for visibly inadequate margins. Accurate localisation was achieved in 86% of patients with ROLL compared to 72% with WGL. All lesions were successfully removed, with clear margins in 71.8% of malignant lesions. Reexcision and intraoperative sentinel node localisation rates were equivalent to preaudit figures for WGL. ROLL was easy to perform and problems were infrequent. Inaccurate radiopharmaceutical placement necessitating WGL occurred in four patients. Minor radiopharmaceutical migration was common, but precluded using ROLL in only two cases. ROLL is effective, simple, inexpensive, and easily learnt; however, preoperative confirmation of correct radiopharmaceutical placement using mammography and the gamma probe is important to help ensure successful lesion removal. Insertion of a backup hookwire is recommended during the initial introduction of ROLL.

  6. Bone metastases from prostate, breast and multiple myeloma: differences in lesion conspicuity at short-tau inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, T; Philip, S; Brown, J; Koh, D M; Burn, P R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the relative conspicuity of bone metastases on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) whole-body MR sequences for breast, prostate and myeloma malignancies. Methods 44 whole-body MRI scans were reviewed retrospectively (coronal T1 weighted, STIR and DWI with b=800). On each scan, up to four of the largest bone lesions were identified on T1 weighting, and the region of interest signal intensity was measured on STIR and DWI, as well as the background signal intensity. The mean lesion signal to background ratio was calculated for each patient and then for each malignancy group. Results In prostate cancer patients, the DWI signal/background ratio was greater than that of STIR in 22 out of 24 patients (mean DWI lesion/background ratio 3.91, mean STIR lesion/background ratio 2.31; p=0.0001). In multiple myeloma, the DWI ratio was higher in 6/7 patients (DWI group mean ratio 7.59, STIR group mean ratio 3.7; p=0.0366). In 13 breast cancer patients, mean STIR and DWI signal/background were similar (DWI group mean ratio 4.13, group mean STIR ratio 4.26; p=0.8587). Conclusion Bone lesion conspicuity measured by lesion/background signal intensity was higher on DWI b=800 than on STIR in patients with prostate cancer and multiple myeloma. DWI should be used in whole-body MR oncology protocols in these conditions to maximise lesion detection. PMID:22457319

  7. Evaluation of Tissue Sampling Methods Used for MRI-Detected Contralateral Breast Lesions in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6667 Trial

    PubMed Central

    DeMartini, Wendy B.; Hanna, Lucy; Gatsonis, Constantine; Mahoney, Mary C.; Lehman, Constance D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of our study was to evaluate tissue sampling methods used for MRI-detected suspicious contralateral breast lesions in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6667 trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS Breast MRI was performed at 25 institutions in 969 women who had a recent diagnosis of unilateral breast cancer and negative contralateral mammography and clinical breast examinations. Biopsy was recommended for MRI findings in 135 women, and 121 underwent sampling. Frequencies and positive biopsy rates of sampling methods used for initial diagnosis and imaging guidance techniques were calculated and compared. RESULTS Sampling yielded 30 malignant and 91 benign results. Initial sampling used needle biopsy in 88 of 121 (72.7%) and surgical biopsy in 30 of 121 (24.8%) women. Surgical biopsy was excisional biopsy in 28 of 30 (93.3%) and mastectomy in two of 30 (6.7%). The remaining three of 121 (2.5%) women underwent mastectomy, but it was not documented whether this represented initial tissue sampling. Of imaging-guided procedures, 56 of 106 (52.8%) used MRI; 49 of 106 (46.2%), ultrasound; and one of 106 (1.0%), stereotaxis. MRI-guided sampling was with needle biopsy rather than wire-localized surgical biopsy in 33 of 56 (58.9%) women, whereas ultrasound used needle biopsy in 47 of 49 (95.9%). Positive biopsy rates of sampling methods were 20.5% for needle biopsy, 46.2% for excisional biopsy, and 0% for mastectomy. CONCLUSION The majority of initial biopsies for MRI-detected contralateral breast lesions used needle biopsy rather than surgical biopsy. Contralateral surgery could have been avoided in most cases had needle biopsy been performed because most excisional biopsy and all mastectomy results were benign. MRI-guided biopsy was significantly more likely than ultrasound-guided sampling to use wire-localized surgical biopsy rather than needle biopsy. PMID:22915431

  8. Use of a capillary input function with cardiac output for the estimation of lesion pharmacokinetic parameters: preliminary results on a breast cancer patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giovanni, P.; Ahearn, T. S.; Semple, S. I.; Azlan, C. A.; Lloyd, W. K. C.; Gilbert, F. J.; Redpath, T. W.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work was to propose and demonstrate a novel technique for the assessment of tumour pharmacokinetic parameters together with a regionally estimated vascular input function. A breast cancer patient T2*-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) dataset acquired at high temporal resolution during the first-pass bolus perfusion was used for testing the technique. Extraction of the lesion volume transfer constant Ktrans together with the intravascular plasma volume fraction vp was achieved by optimizing a capillary input function with a measure of cardiac output using the principle of intravascular indicator dilution theory. For a region of interest drawn within the breast lesion a vp of 0.16 and a Ktrans of 0.70 min-1 were estimated. Despite the value of vp being higher than expected, estimated Ktrans was in accordance with the literature values. In conclusion, the technique proposed here, has the main advantage of allowing the estimation of breast tumour pharmacokinetic parameters from first-pass perfusion T2*-weighted DCE-MRI data without the need of measuring an arterial input function. The technique may also have applicability to T1-weighted DCE-MRI data.

  9. Using digital subtraction in computer simulated images as a tool to aid the visual detection of masked lesions in dense breasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiabel, Homero; Guimarães, Luciana T.; Sousa, Maria A. Z.

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes a simulation model involving subtraction of digital mammography images obtained at different X-ray beam levels of energy to aid the detection of breast malignant lesions. Absorption coefficients behavior of 3 main structures of clinical interest - adipose tissue, fiber glandular tissue and the typical carcinoma - as a function of the beam energy from a Mo X-ray tube was the basis to develop a computer simulation of the possible acquired images. The simulation has considered a typical compressed breast with 4.5cm in thickness, and variations of the carcinoma and glandular tissues thicknesses - 0.4 up to 2.0cm and 4.1 to 2.5cm, respectively - were evaluated as a function of the photons mean energy - 14 up to 25 keV, in the typical mammography energy range. Results have shown that: (a) if the carcinoma thickness is over 0.4cm, its detection may be feasible even masked by fiber tissue with exposures in the range of 19 to 25 keV; (b) for masked carcinoma with thickness in the range of 0.4-2.0cm, the proposed procedure can enhance it in the image resulting from the digital subtraction between images obtained at 14 and at 22 keV. Therefore such results indicate that this simulation procedure can be a useful tool in aiding the identification of possible missed malignant lesions which could not be detected in the typical exam, mainly considering dense breasts.

  10. Analysis of breast CT lesions using computer-aided diagnosis: an application of neural networks on extracted morphologic and texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Prionas, Nicolas D.; Lindfors, Karen K.; Boone, John M.

    2012-03-01

    Dedicated cone-beam breast CT (bCT) scanners have been developed as a potential alternative imaging modality to conventional X-ray mammography in breast cancer diagnosis. As with other modalities, quantitative imaging (QI) analysis can potentially be utilized as a tool to extract useful numeric information concerning diagnosed lesions from high quality 3D tomographic data sets. In this work, preliminary QI analysis was done by designing and implementing a computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system consisting of image preprocessing, object(s) of interest (i.e. masses, microcalcifications) segmentation, structural analysis of the segmented object(s), and finally classification into benign or malignant disease. Image sets were acquired from bCT patient scans with diagnosed lesions. Iterative watershed segmentation (IWS), a hybridization of the watershed method using observer-set markers and a gradient vector flow (GVF) approach, was used as the lesion segmentation method in 3D. Eight morphologic parameters and six texture features based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) calculations were obtained per segmented lesion and combined into multi-dimensional feature input data vectors. Artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers were used by performing cross validation and network parameter optimization to maximize area under the curve (AUC) values of the resulting receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Within these ANNs, biopsy-proven diagnoses of malignant and benign lesions were recorded as target data while the feature vectors were saved as raw input data. With the image data separated into post-contrast (n = 55) and pre-contrast sets (n = 39), a maximum AUC of 0.70 +/- 0.02 and 0.80 +/- 0.02 were achieved, respectively, for each data set after ANN application.

  11. Mapping transitions between healthy and pathological lesions in human breast tissues by diffraction enhanced imaging computed tomography (DEI-CT) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Geraldelli, W.; Poletti, M. E.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we have combined the DEI-CT and SAXS technique to study the transition between healthy and pathological breast tissues, which include benign and malignant lesions. The ability of DEI-CT to enhance the contrast between soft tissues was used to localize the tumor region in the sample. Then, the tumor region and its surroundings were scanned by SAXS in order to map the changes promoted by the neoplasias at nano-level.It was clearly observed that pathological tissues present distinguishable SAXS scattering profiles from those of normal tissue. These differences are mainly related to changes in arrangement and diameter of collagen fibrils, evaluated by the higher order of reflection peaks of these fibrils. Differences related to the peak intensities and the total scattered intensity were found by comparing the healthy and pathological regions. The 2nd order of collagen reflection arises only in the healthy region neighboring the benign lesion. A broader peak at q=0.16 nm-1 seems to characterize the malignant lesions. Finally, based on this information, the transition between healthy and pathological human breast tissues was mapped which allowed to get insights into the changes promoted by tumors during growth and progression.

  12. Assessment of Functional Differences in Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions and Improvement of Diagnostic Accuracy by Using US-guided Diffuse Optical Tomography in Conjunction with Conventional US.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quing; Ricci, Andrew; Hegde, Poornima; Kane, Mark; Cronin, Edward; Merkulov, Alex; Xu, Yan; Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Tannenbaum, Susan

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To investigate ultrasonography (US)-guided diffuse optical tomography to distinguish the functional differences of hemoglobin concentrations in a wide range of malignant and benign breast lesions and to improve breast cancer diagnosis in conjunction with conventional US. Materials and Methods The study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards and was HIPAA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients (288 women; mean age, 50 years; range, 17-94 years) who underwent US-guided biopsy were imaged with a handheld US and optical probe. The US-imaged lesion was used to guide reconstruction of light absorption maps at four wavelengths, and total hemoglobin (tHb), oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb), and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) were computed from the absorption maps. A threshold (80 μmol/L) was chosen on the basis of this study population. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated US images on the basis of the US Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon, and a lesion was considered malignant when a score of 4C or 5 was given or a lesion had tHb greater than 80 μmol/L. A two-sample t test was used to calculate significance between groups, and Spearman ρ was computed between hemoglobin parameters and tumor pathologic grades. Results Three tumors were Tis, 37 were T1, 19 were T2-T4 carcinomas, and 233 were benign lesions. The mean maximum tHb, oxyHb, and deoxyHb of Tis-T1 and T2-T4 groups were 89.3 μmol/L ± 20.2 (standard deviation), 65.0 μmol/L ± 20.8, and 33.5 μmol/L ± 11.3, respectively, and 84.7 μmol/L ± 32.8, 57.1 μmol/L ± 19.8, and 34.7 μmol/L ± 18.9, respectively. The corresponding values of benign lesions were 54.1 μmol/L ± 23.5, 38.0 μmol/L ± 17.4, and 25.2 μmol/L ± 13.8, respectively. The mean maximum tHb, oxyHb, and deoxyHb were significantly higher in the malignant groups than the benign group (P <.001, <.001, and .041, respectively). For malignant lesions, the mean maximum t

  13. Does flat epithelial atypia have rounder nuclei than columnar cell change/hyperplasia? A morphometric approach to columnar cell lesions of the breast.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoshiko; Ichihara, Shu; Moritani, Suzuko; Yoon, Han-Seung; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Columnar cell lesions of the breast encompass columnar cell change/hyperplasia (CCC/CCH) and flat epithelial atypia (FEA). These have attracted researchers because emerging data suggest that FEA may represent the earliest histologically detectable non-obligate precursor of breast cancer. However, it is occasionally difficult to distinguish FEA from CCC/CCH because of similar histology. Although the nuclei of FEA are frequently described as relatively round compared with those of CCC/CCH, there are few morphometric studies to support this statement. The aim of this study was to provide objective data as to the nuclear shape in columnar cell lesions. As a shape descriptor, we adopted ellipticity that is defined by the formula 2b/2a, where a is the length of the long axis of the ellipse and b is the length of the short axis. Contrary to circularity, ellipticity reflects the overall configuration of an ellipse irrespective of surface irregularity. Our image analysis included generating whole slide images, extracting glandular cell nuclei, measuring nuclear ellipticity, and superimposing graded colors based on execution of results on the captured images. A total of 7917 nuclei extracted from 22 FEA images and 5010 nuclei extracted from 13 CCC/CCH images were analyzed. There was a significant difference in nuclear roundness between FEA and CCC/CCH with mean ellipticity values of 0.723 and 0.679, respectively (p < 0.001, Welch's t test). Furthermore, FEA with malignancy had significantly rounder nuclei than FEA without malignancy (p < 0.001). Our preliminary results suggest that nuclear ellipticity is a key parameter in reproducibly classifying columnar cell lesions of the breast. PMID:27026270

  14. Examining the Relationship between Pre-Malignant Breast Lesions, Carcinogenesis and Tumor Evolution in the Mammary Epithelium Using an Agent-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Chapa, Joaquin; An, Gary; Kulkarni, Swati A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer, the product of numerous rare mutational events that occur over an extended time period, presents numerous challenges to investigators interested in studying the transformation from normal breast epithelium to malignancy using traditional laboratory methods, particularly with respect to characterizing transitional and pre-malignant states. Dynamic computational modeling can provide insight into these pathophysiological dynamics, and as such we use a previously validated agent-based computational model of the mammary epithelium (the DEABM) to investigate the probabilistic mechanisms by which normal populations of ductal cells could transform into states replicating features of both pre-malignant breast lesions and a diverse set of breast cancer subtypes. Methods The DEABM consists of simulated cellular populations governed by algorithms based on accepted and previously published cellular mechanisms. Cells respond to hormones, undergo mitosis, apoptosis and cellular differentiation. Heritable mutations to 12 genes prominently implicated in breast cancer are acquired via a probabilistic mechanism. 3000 simulations of the 40-year period of menstrual cycling were run in wild-type (WT) and BRCA1-mutated groups. Simulations were analyzed by development of hyperplastic states, incidence of malignancy, hormone receptor and HER-2 status, frequency of mutation to particular genes, and whether mutations were early events in carcinogenesis. Results Cancer incidence in WT (2.6%) and BRCA1-mutated (45.9%) populations closely matched published epidemiologic rates. Hormone receptor expression profiles in both WT and BRCA groups also closely matched epidemiologic data. Hyperplastic populations carried more mutations than normal populations and mutations were similar to early mutations found in ER+ tumors (telomerase, E-cadherin, TGFB, RUNX3, p < .01). ER- tumors carried significantly more mutations and carried more early mutations in BRCA1, c-MYC and genes

  15. Value of Virtual Touch Tissue Imaging Quantification for Evaluation of Ultrasound Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System Category 4 Lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Long; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Liu, Bo-Ji; Huang, Xian; Li, Dan-Dan; Guo, Le-Hang; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Li-Ping; Fang, Lin; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the value of 2-D shear wave elastography (SWE) of virtual touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ) for ultrasound (US) Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4 lesions. One hundred sixteen lesions were subject to conventional US, conventional strain elastography (SE) of elasticity imaging (EI), acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced SE of virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and VTIQ before biopsies. Of the 116 lesions, 69 (59.5%) were benign and 47 (40.5%) were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant lesions in EI score, VTI score and shear wave speed (SWS) on VTIQ (both p < 0.05). The cut-off values were EI score ≥4, VTI score ≥4 and SWS ≥3.49 m/s, respectively. The diagnostic performance of VTIQ in terms of area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) were the highest (i.e., AUROC = 0.907), in comparison with EI, VTI alone or a combination of both. The associated sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 87.2%, 82.6% and 84.5%, respectively. The combination of VTI and VTIQ, however, was similar with US BI-RADS (p = 0.475) in sensitivity in that only two (4.3%) of 47 malignant lesions were misdiagnosed as benign that were BI-RADS category 4b on US. VTIQ is valuable to differentiate benign from malignant BI-RADS category 4 lesions, and the combination of VTI and VTIQ might be useful for patient selection before biopsy. PMID:27174418

  16. Diagnosis of Columnar Cell Lesions and Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia by Ultrasound-Guided Core Biopsy: Findings Associated with Underestimation of Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye Shin; Jang, Mijung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eun Young; Park, So Yeon

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study described here was to determine underestimation rates and identify radiologic predictors of underestimation for columnar cell lesions (CCLs) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) detected by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy. A total of 103 CCLs and ADH lesions in 100 patients diagnosed by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy were evaluated. Breast sonographic and mammographic findings were reviewed, and underestimation rates were determined by surgical excision, percutaneous vacuum-assisted excision or 2-y imaging follow-up. All underestimated lesions were ductal carcinoma in situ, and the underestimation rates of flat epithelial atypia (FEA), FEA + ADH and ADH were 5.9% (1/17), 44.4% (4/9) and 27.3% (12/44), respectively. There was no underestimation of CCLs without atypia. The presence of calcifications on ultrasound was significantly associated with underestimation (p = 0.010). Therefore, except for CCLs without atypia, all other lesions may require excision, especially when calcification is present on ultrasound or when FEA + ADH is found. PMID:27067419

  17. An MMP13-Selective Inhibitor Delays Primary Tumor Growth and the Onset of Tumor-Associated Osteolytic Lesions in Experimental Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manisha; Huang, Dexing; Blick, Tony; Connor, Andrea; Reiter, Lawrence A.; Hardink, Joel R.; Lynch, Conor C.; Waltham, Mark; Thompson, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13)-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy)-5-(2-methoxyethyl) pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (Cmpd-1), on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis. PMID:22253746

  18. Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy and Efficiency of Categories 4 and 5 of the Second Edition of the BI-RADS Ultrasound Lexicon in Diagnosing Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuebin; Wang, Jianwei; Lan, Xiaowen; Lin, Qingguang; Han, Feng; Liu, Longzhong; Li, Anhua

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of categories 4 and 5 of the second edition of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) ultrasound (US) lexicon in diagnosing breast lesions. In our retrospective study, 579 lesions in 544 patients were assessed by US as the preliminary diagnosis and classified in subcategories 4a-4c and category 5 based on the second edition of the BI-RADS US lexicon with some obvious changes, such as the redefined margin, new calcification type, associated features and some special cases. Inter-observer agreement was determined. Ultrasound results were compared with the pathologic results for confirmation. Positive predictive values (PPVs) of subcategories 4a-4c were compared with theoretical values using the χ(2) test; the binomial test was used for category 5 lesions. Of the 579 lesions, 212 were confirmed as benign (36.61%), and the remaining 367 lesions were confirmed as borderline/malignant (63.39%). Inter-observer agreement was moderate for subcategories 4a-4c (κ = 0.52), moderate for subcategories 4a-4c and category 5 (κ = 0.56) and substantial for categories 4 and 5 (κ = 0.67). The PPVs for subcategories 4a-4c were 23.74%, 70.67% and 81.25%, respectively. In addition, the total PPV for category 4 was 46.92% (183/390), and the total PPV for category 5 was 97.35% (184/189). Statistical results revealed that the PPVs of subcategories 4a and 4b differed significantly from the theoretical values (p < 0.05); the PPVs of subcategory 4c and category 5 were significantly correlated with the theoretical PPVs (p > 0.05). In conclusion, subcategories 4a and 4b have lower diagnostic efficiency than subcategory 4c and category 5. Inter-observer agreement for subcategories 4a-4c remains to be improved. The most common features of subcategories 4a-4c differ, but overlap. It is recommended that inexperienced doctors in primary hospitals not classify lesions into subcategories in

  19. Biofield potential simulation as a novel adjunt modality for continuous monitoring of breast lesions: a 3D numerical model.

    PubMed

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Acharya, U Rajendra

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease characterized by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Early detection of this disease is the most effective way to reduce mortality. Although several new technologies show promise for improved capability of diagnosis, none have yet proved superior to traditional, X-ray film mammography in screening for breast cancer. More evaluation and development of new imaging tools and of promising skin surface electrical potential techniques is required and warranted. In the present study, we propose a theoretical three-dimensional, simplified and realistic model of the female breast to distinguish the surface biopotential in different types of breast abnormalities. We developed an inhomogeneous female breast model, closer to the actual, by considering the breast as a hemisphere with various layers of unequal thickness in supine condition. In order to determine the potential distribution developed, isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method. Richardson extrapolation for grid invariance test was used to ensure the results are of reliable accuracy. The simulation results show that the surface potentials are sensitive to the presence of tumour, location and placement of the electrodes. PMID:18183519

  20. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine and other lesions along the coding strand of the exon 5 of the tumour suppressor gene P53 in a breast cancer case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Brancato, Beniamino; Munnia, Armelle; Cellai, Filippo; Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Bianchi, Simonetta; Catarzi, Sandra; Risso, Gabriella G.; Galli, Andrea; Peluso, Marco E.M.

    2016-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing studies of breast cancer have reported that the tumour suppressor P53 (TP53) gene is mutated in more than 40% of the tumours. We studied the levels of oxidative lesions, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), along the coding strand of the exon 5 in breast cancer patients as well as in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-attacked breast cancer cell line using the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique. We detected a significant ‘in vitro’ generation of 8-oxodG between the codons 163 and 175, corresponding to a TP53 region with high mutation prevalence, after treatment with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase, a ROS-generating system. Then, we evaluated the occurrence of oxidative lesions in the DNA-binding domain of the TP53 in the core needle biopsies of 113 of women undergoing breast investigation for diagnostic purpose. An increment of oxidative damage at the −G− residues into the codons 163 and 175 was found in the cancer cases as compared to the controls. We found significant associations with the pathological stage and the histological grade of tumours. As the major news of this study, this largest analysis of genomic footprinting of oxidative lesions at the TP53 sequence level to date provided a first roadmap describing the signatures of oxidative lesions in human breast cancer. Our results provide evidence that the generation of oxidative lesions at single nucleotide resolution is not an event highly stochastic, but causes a characteristic pattern of DNA lesions at the site of mutations in the TP53, suggesting causal relationship between oxidative DNA adducts and breast cancer. PMID:27260513

  1. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and other lesions along the coding strand of the exon 5 of the tumour suppressor gene P53 in a breast cancer case-control study.

    PubMed

    Brancato, Beniamino; Munnia, Armelle; Cellai, Filippo; Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Bianchi, Simonetta; Catarzi, Sandra; Risso, Gabriella G; Galli, Andrea; Peluso, Marco E M

    2016-08-01

    The next-generation sequencing studies of breast cancer have reported that the tumour suppressor P53 (TP53) gene is mutated in more than 40% of the tumours. We studied the levels of oxidative lesions, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), along the coding strand of the exon 5 in breast cancer patients as well as in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-attacked breast cancer cell line using the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique. We detected a significant 'in vitro' generation of 8-oxodG between the codons 163 and 175, corresponding to a TP53 region with high mutation prevalence, after treatment with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase, a ROS-generating system. Then, we evaluated the occurrence of oxidative lesions in the DNA-binding domain of the TP53 in the core needle biopsies of 113 of women undergoing breast investigation for diagnostic purpose. An increment of oxidative damage at the -G- residues into the codons 163 and 175 was found in the cancer cases as compared to the controls. We found significant associations with the pathological stage and the histological grade of tumours. As the major news of this study, this largest analysis of genomic footprinting of oxidative lesions at the TP53 sequence level to date provided a first roadmap describing the signatures of oxidative lesions in human breast cancer. Our results provide evidence that the generation of oxidative lesions at single nucleotide resolution is not an event highly stochastic, but causes a characteristic pattern of DNA lesions at the site of mutations in the TP53, suggesting causal relationship between oxidative DNA adducts and breast cancer. PMID:27260513

  2. Potential of Computer-aided Diagnosis of High Spectral and Spatial (HiSS) MRI in the Classification of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhooshan, Neha; Giger, Maryellen; Medved, Milica; Li, Hui; Wood, Abbie; Yuan, Yading; Lan, Li; Marquez, Angelica; Karczmar, Greg; Newstead, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of CADx analysis of pre-contrast HiSS MRI to that of clinical DCE-MRI in the diagnostic classification of breast lesions. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four malignant and seven benign lesions were scanned using 2D HiSS and clinical 4D DCE-MRI protocols. Lesions were automatically segmented. Morphological features were calculated for HiSS whereas both morphological and kinetic features were calculated for DCE-MRI. After stepwise feature selection, Bayesian artificial neural networks merged selected features, and ROC analysis evaluated the performance with leave-one-lesion-out validation. Results: AUC values of 0.92 ± 0.06 and 0.90 ± 0.05 were obtained using CADx on HiSS and DCE-MRI, respectively, in the task of classifying benign and malignant lesions. While we failed to show that the higher HiSS performance was significantly better than DCE-MRI, non-inferiority testing confirmed that HiSS was not worse than DCE-MRI. Conclusion: CADx of HiSS (without contrast) performed similarly to CADx on clinical DCE-MRI; thus, computerized analysis of HiSS may provide sufficient information for diagnostic classification. The results are clinically important for patients in whom contrast agent is contra-indicated. Even in the limited acquisition mode of 2D single slice HiSS, by using quantitative image analysis to extract characteristics from the HiSS images, similar performance levels were obtained as compared to those from current clinical 4D DCE-MRI. As HiSS acquisitions become possible in 3D, CADx methods can also be applied. Since HiSS and DCE-MRI are based on different contrast mechanisms, the use of the two protocols in combination may increase diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24023011

  3. Presence of papillomavirus sequences in condylomatous lesions of the mamillae and in invasive carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    de Villiers, Ethel-Michele; Sandstrom, Robert E; zur Hausen, Harald; Buck, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    Background Viruses including Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a human equivalent of murine mammary tumour virus (MMTV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) have been implicated in the aetiology of human breast cancer. We report the presence of HPV DNA sequences in areolar tissue and tumour tissue samples from female patients with breast carcinoma. The presence of virus in the areolar–nipple complex suggests to us a potential pathogenic mechanism. Methods Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was undertaken to amplify HPV types in areolar and tumour tissue from breast cancer cases. In situ hybridisation supported the PCR findings and localised the virus in nipple, areolar and tumour tissue. Results Papillomavirus DNA was present in 25 of 29 samples of breast carcinoma and in 20 of 29 samples from the corresponding mamilla. The most prevalent type in both carcinomas and nipples was HPV 11, followed by HPV 6. Other types detected were HPV 16, 23, 27 and 57 (nipples and carcinomas), HPV 20, 21, 32, 37, 38, 66 and GA3-1 (nipples only) and HPV 3, 15, 24, 87 and DL473 (carcinomas only). Multiple types were demonstrated in seven carcinomas and ten nipple samples. Conclusions The data demonstrate the occurrence of HPV in nipple and areolar tissues in patients with breast carcinoma. The authors postulate a retrograde ductular pattern of viral spread that may have pathogenic significance. PMID:15642157

  4. Estimation and imaging of breast lesions using a two-layer tissue structure by ultrasound-guided optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2015-06-01

    A new two-step estimation and imaging method is developed for a two-layer breast tissue structure consisting of a breast tissue layer and a chest wall underneath. First, a smaller probe with shorter distance source-detector pairs was used to collect the reflected light mainly from the breast tissue layer. Then, a larger probe with 9×14 source-detector pairs and a centrally located ultrasound transducer was used to collect reflected light from the two-layer tissue structure. The data collected from the smaller probe were used to estimate breast tissue optical properties. With more accurate estimation of the average breast tissue properties, the second layer properties can be assessed from data obtained from the larger probe. Using this approach, the unknown variables have been reduced from four to two and the estimated bulk tissue optical properties are more accurate and robust. In addition, a two-step reconstruction using a genetic algorithm and conjugate gradient method is implemented to simultaneously reconstruct the absorption and reduced scattering maps of targets inside a two-layer tissue structure. Simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to validate the new reconstruction method, and a clinical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  5. Estimation and imaging of breast lesions using a two-layer tissue structure by ultrasound-guided optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A new two-step estimation and imaging method is developed for a two-layer breast tissue structure consisting of a breast tissue layer and a chest wall underneath. First, a smaller probe with shorter distance source-detector pairs was used to collect the reflected light mainly from the breast tissue layer. Then, a larger probe with 9×14 source-detector pairs and a centrally located ultrasound transducer was used to collect reflected light from the two-layer tissue structure. The data collected from the smaller probe were used to estimate breast tissue optical properties. With more accurate estimation of the average breast tissue properties, the second layer properties can be assessed from data obtained from the larger probe. Using this approach, the unknown variables have been reduced from four to two and the estimated bulk tissue optical properties are more accurate and robust. In addition, a two-step reconstruction using a genetic algorithm and conjugate gradient method is implemented to simultaneously reconstruct the absorption and reduced scattering maps of targets inside a two-layer tissue structure. Simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to validate the new reconstruction method, and a clinical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. PMID:26046722

  6. Evaluation of radioactive phosphorus in the palliation of metastatic bone lesions from carcinoma of the breast and prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, A.; Driedger, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive phosphorus effected substantial palliation of intractable bone pain in 17 of 33 (51.5%) women with metastatic carcinoma of the breast and in 14 of 15 (93.3%) men with metastatic carcinoma of the prostate. No significant difference in the overall response rate was found between androgen and paralthormone priming prior to radiophosphorus therapy. The degree of response was not dependent on total dose of /sup 32/P within the range of 9 to 18 mCi (333 to 666 MPq). Myelosuppression was a transient complication in 9 of 33 patients with metastatic breast carcinoma and in 7 of 15 patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma. Symptomatic hypercalcemia was an infrequent complication of radiophosphorus therapy irrespective of the priming regimen.

  7. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features. PMID:27079888

  8. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features. PMID:27079888

  9. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features.

  10. Audit system on Quality of breast cancer diagnosis and Treatment (QT): results of quality indicators on screen-detected lesions in Italy, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Antonio; Mano, Maria Piera; Tomatis, Mariano; Baiocchi, Diego; Barca, Alessandra; Berti, Rosa; Casella, Denise; D'Ambrosio, Enrico; Delos, Erika; Donati, Giovanni; Falcini, Fabio; Frammartino, Brunella; Frigerio, Alfonso; Giudici, Fabiola; Mantellini, Paola; Naldoni, Carlo; Olla Atzeni, Carlo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Pagano, Giovanni; Pietribiasi, Francesca; Pitarella, Sabina; Ravaioli, Alessandra; Silvestri, Anna; Taffurelli, Mario; Tidone, Enrica; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Segnan, Nereo

    2015-01-01

    This annual survey, conducted by the Italian group for mammography screening (GISMa), collects individual data on diagnosis and treatment of about 50% of screen-detected, operated lesions in Italy. The 2011-2012 results show good overall quality and an improving trend over time. A number of critical issues have been identified, including waiting times (which have had a worsening trend over the years) and compliance with the recommendation of not performing frozen section examination on small lesions. Pre-operative diagnosis improved constantly over time, but there is still a large variation between Regions and programmes. For almost 90% of screen-detected invasive cancers a sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy was performed on the axilla, avoiding a large number of potentially harmful dissections. On the other hand, potential overuse of SLN dissection for ductal carcinoma in situ, although apparently starting to decline, deserves further investigation. The detailed results have been distributed, among other ways by means of a web-based data-warehouse, to regional and local screening programmes, in order to allow multidisciplinary discussion and identification of the appropriate solutions to any issues documented by the data. The problem of waiting times should be assigned priority. Specialist Breast Units with adequate case volume and enough resources would provide the best setting for making monitoring effective in producing quality improvements with shorter waiting times. PMID:26405775

  11. Microglandular adenosis associated with triple-negative breast cancer is a neoplastic lesion of triple-negative phenotype harbouring TP53 somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Geyer, Felipe C; De Filippo, Maria R; Eberle, Carey A; Akram, Muzaffar; Fusco, Nicola; Ichihara, Shu; Sakr, Rita A; Yatabe, Yasushi; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Wen, Y Hannah; Weigelt, Britta; Schnitt, Stuart J; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-04-01

    Microglandular adenosis (MGA) is a rare proliferative lesion of the breast composed of small glands lacking myoepithelial cells and lined by S100-positive, oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and HER2-negative epithelial cells. There is evidence to suggest that MGA may constitute a non-obligate precursor of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We sought to define the genomic landscape of pure MGA and of MGA, atypical MGA (AMGA) and associated TNBCs, and to determine whether synchronous MGA, AMGA, and TNBCs would be clonally related. Two pure MGAs and eight cases of MGA and/or AMGA associated with in situ or invasive TNBC were collected, microdissected, and subjected to massively parallel sequencing targeting all coding regions of 236 genes recurrently mutated in breast cancer or related to DNA repair. Pure MGAs lacked clonal non-synonymous somatic mutations and displayed limited copy number alterations (CNAs); conversely, all MGAs (n = 7) and AMGAs (n = 3) associated with TNBC harboured at least one somatic non-synonymous mutation (range 3-14 and 1-10, respectively). In all cases where TNBCs were analyzed, identical TP53 mutations and similar patterns of gene CNAs were found in the MGA and/or AMGA and in the associated TNBC. In the MGA/AMGA associated with TNBC lacking TP53 mutations, somatic mutations affecting PI3K pathway-related genes (eg PTEN, PIK3CA, and INPP4B) and tyrosine kinase receptor signalling-related genes (eg ERBB3 and FGFR2) were identified. At diagnosis, MGAs associated with TNBC were found to display subclonal populations, and clonal shifts in the progression from MGA to AMGA and/or to TNBC were observed. Our results demonstrate the heterogeneity of MGAs, and that MGAs associated with TNBC, but not necessarily pure MGAs, are genetically advanced, clonal, and neoplastic lesions harbouring recurrent mutations in TP53 and/or other cancer genes, supporting the notion that a subset of MGAs and AMGAs may constitute

  12. GPCALMA: implementation in Italian hospitals of a computer aided detection system for breast lesions by mammography examination.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Adele

    2009-06-01

    We describe the implementation in several Italian hospitals of a computer aided detection (CAD) system, named GPCALMA (grid platform for a computer aided library in mammography), for the automatic search of lesions in X-ray mammographies. GPCALMA has been under development since 1999 by a community of physicists of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) in collaboration with radiologists. This CAD system was tested as a support to radiologists in reading mammographies. The main system components are: (i) the algorithms implemented for the analysis of digitized mammograms to recognize suspicious lesions, (ii) the database of digitized mammographic images, and (iii) the PC-based digitization and analysis workstation and its user interface. The distributed nature of data and resources and the prevalence of geographically remote users suggested the development of the system as a grid application: the design of this networked version is also reported. The paper describes the system architecture, the database of digitized mammographies, the clinical workstation and the medical applications carried out to characterize the system. A commercial CAD was evaluated in a comparison with GPCALMA by analysing the medical reports obtained with and without the two different CADs on the same dataset of images: with both CAD a statistically significant increase in sensitivity was obtained. The sensitivity in the detection of lesions obtained for microcalcification and masses was 96% and 80%, respectively. An analysis in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was performed for massive lesion searches, achieving an area under the ROC curve of A(z)=0.783+/-0.008. Results show that the GPCALMA CAD is ready to be used in the radiological practice, both for screening mammography and clinical studies. GPCALMA is a starting point for the development of other medical imaging applications such as the CAD for the search of pulmonary nodules, currently under

  13. Diagnostic underestimation of atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous core needle and vacuum-assisted biopsies of the breast in a Brazilian reference institution*

    PubMed Central

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Roveda Júnior, Decio; Piato, Sebastião; Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Campos, Mário Sérgio Dantas; Pecci, Carlos Alberto Ferreira; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Trocoli; D'Ávila, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of diagnostic underestimation at stereotactic percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNB) and vacuum-assisted biopsies (VABB) of nonpalpable breast lesions, with histopathological results of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subsequently submitted to surgical excision. As a secondary objective, the frequency of ADH and DCIS was determined for the cases submitted to biopsy. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 40 cases with diagnosis of ADH or DCIS on the basis of biopsies performed between February 2011 and July 2013, subsequently submitted to surgery, whose histopathological reports were available in the internal information system. Biopsy results were compared with those observed at surgery and the underestimation rate was calculated by means of specific mathematical equations. Results The underestimation rate at CNB was 50% for ADH and 28.57% for DCIS, and at VABB it was 25% for ADH and 14.28% for DCIS. ADH represented 10.25% of all cases undergoing biopsy, whereas DCIS accounted for 23.91%. Conclusion The diagnostic underestimation rate at CNB is two times the rate at VABB. Certainty that the target has been achieved is not the sole determining factor for a reliable diagnosis. Removal of more than 50% of the target lesion should further reduce the risk of underestimation. PMID:26929454

  14. Laparoscopy-assisted orchiopexy versus laparoscopic two-stage fowler stephens orchiopexy for nonpalpable testes: Comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Alzahem, Abdulrahman

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose: To assess the outcome of the primary laparoscopy-assisted orchiopexy (LAO) and the laparoscopic two-stage Fowler Stephens orchiopexy (FSO) for managing patients with nonpalpable testis in terms of safety, feasibility and efficacy. Materials and Methods: This study included 94 patients (110 nonpalpable testes) who underwent laparoscopy at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh between July 1998 and June 2012. Patients were evaluated postoperatively to check the location and size of testes and to exclude any other complications. Results: Mean age at presentation was 24+/−19 months (9-96 months). Orchiectomy was done for 5 atrophic testes. 36 open orchiopexy was done for 29 canalicular testes and 7 peeping testes. 35 LAO were done for 1 canalicular testis, 5 peeping testes, 16 low intraabdominal testes and 13 high intraabdominal testes. 34 FSO were done for 23 high intraabdominal testes, 9 low intraabdominal testes and 2 peeping testes. Median follow up was 12 months (1-84 months) and 6 patients were lost to follow up. The overall success rates for LAO and FSO were 88% and 63%, respectively. Overall testicular atrophy rates were 3% and 30% for LAO and FSO, respectively (OR 0.08 [95% CI, 0.01-0.69], P = 0.006). For high intraabdominal testes, the atrophy rates were 3% and 20% for LAO and FSO, respectively (OR 0.14 [95% CI, 0.02-1.21, P = 0.049).Testicular displacement rates were 9% and 7% for LAO and FSO, respectively (OR 1.5, 95% CI, 0.24-9.59, P = 0.514). Conclusions: Laparoscopy provides a safe and accurate modality for diagnosing and managing patients with nonpalpable testes. LAO appears to be feasible and effective in management of high intraabdominal testes. Further well-conducted comparative studies are needed. PMID:23798870

  15. The utility of MYC and FLT4 in the diagnosis and treatment of postradiation atypical vascular lesion and angiosarcoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Kristine M; Deng, April; Wu, Hong; Cosar, Ediz F; Khan, Ashraf; St Cyr, Maryann; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Dresser, Karen; O'Donnell, Patrick; Hutchinson, Lloyd

    2015-06-01

    Atypical vascular lesions (AVLs) and angiosarcomas (ASs) are well-recognized complications of radiotherapy for breast cancer. Early diagnosis may be challenging, particularly on small biopsies, and the treatment options are limited. Recently, MYC and sometimes FLT4 gene amplification has been reported in AS, but not in AVL, and FLT4 may be a target for therapy. We evaluated the MYC/FLT4 status in AVL and AS by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), determined its utility in differentiating these 2 entities in small biopsies, and ascertained the value of FLT4 as a potential marker for targeted therapy. Thirty-five vascular neoplasms were reviewed from 21 breast cancer patients who received radiotherapy (AVL, n = 18; AS, n = 17). MYC expression by IHC and/or gene amplification by FISH were identified in 13 (77%) of 17 ASs, but none of the AVL cases. Four patients had biopsies with follow-up excisions, of which 1 showed the morphology of an AVL on biopsy and AS on excision, both positive for MYC. Of 17 ASs, 3 (18%) showed strong and diffuse 3+ cytoplasmic FLT4 staining by IHC and FLT4 gene amplification by FISH. All 3 cases were coamplified for the MYC gene. Focal and weak FLT4 cytoplasmic immunoreactivity was present in 2 (12%) of 17 AVL cases and 12 (70%) of 17 AS cases. Although MYC is a valuable ancillary tool in distinguishing AS from AVL, FLT4 IHC may be used to screen for patients with FLT4 gene amplification who might benefit from targeted therapy, as only diffuse strong FLT4 immunoreactivity correlated with FLT4 gene amplification. PMID:25864386

  16. A morphometric approach in breast cytology--geometrical descriptors in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Mihalache, Daniela; Giuşcă, Simona Eliza; Balan, Raluca; Amălinei, Cornelia; Grigoraş, Adriana; Căruntu, Irina Draga

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of geometric descriptors that can be applied in breast cytology, and their correlation with the qualitative features, with the aim to underline the differences between the benign and malignant cell profile. The morphometric investigation was performed on smears obtained by fine needle aspiration, 10 cases (group 1) diagnosed as benign and 10 cases (group 2) as malignant. For group 2, the malignancy was histopathologically confirmed on the surgical resection specimen. The sequence of automated operation, previously reported by us, permitted the extraction of the following geometrical descriptors: cytoplasmic area, nuclear area, nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, equivalent diameter and form factor. We analyzed the differences between the benign and malignant morphometric features, and the correlation between the malignant morphometric features and cytological, respectively histological grading. Statistically significant difference in cytoplasmic areas, nuclear areas, value of nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio and equivalent diameter was noted between group I and II. For the form factor, we did not register statistically significant differences. For group 2, the correlation between the morphometric features and cytological grading revealed that the nuclear area is the most valuable descriptor, due to the significant differences between the three successive grades of cytological severity, followed by the cytoplasmic area and equivalent diameter, their numerical values presenting significant differences between cytological grade 1 and 3, and 2 and 3, respectively. The statistical analysis between the morphometric features and histological grading showed that nuclear area and equivalent diameter are the most viable indicators, due to the significant differences present between the three successive grades of pathologic severity, followed by cytoplasmic area (significant differences only for grade 2 versus 3) and for nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio (significant

  17. An Exploratory Study on 99mTc-RGD-BBN Peptide Scintimammography in the Assessment of Breast Malignant Lesions Compared to 99mTc-3P4-RGD2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qianqian; Ma, Qingjie; Chen, Minglong; Chen, Bin; Wen, Qiang; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Sun, Butong; Gao, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to explore the diagnostic performance of single photon emission computed tomography / computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) using a new radiotracer 99mTc-RGD-BBN for breast malignant tumor compared with 99mTc-3P4-RGD2. Methods 6 female patients with breast malignant tumors diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology biopsy (FNAB) who were scheduled to undergo surgery were included in the study. 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 and 99mTc-RGD-BBN were performed with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 1 hour after intravenous injection of 299 ± 30 MBq and 293 ± 32 MBq of radiotracers respectively at separate day. The results were evaluated by the Tumor to non-Tumor ratios (T/NT). 99mTc-RGD-BBN and 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT/CT images were interpreted independently by 3 experienced nuclear medicine physicians using a 3-point scale system. All of the samples were analyzed immunohistochemically to evaluate the integrin αvβ3 and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) expression. The safety, biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of 99mTc-RGD-BBN were also evaluated in the healthy volunteers. Results No serious adverse events were reported in any of the patients during the study. The effective radiation dose entirely conformed to the relevant standards. A total of 6 palpable malignant lesions were detected using 99mTc-RGD-BBN SPECT/CT with clear uptake. All malignant lesions were also detected using 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT/CT. The results showed that five malignant lesions were with clear uptake and the other one with barely an uptake. 4 malignant cases were found with both αvβ3 and GRPR expression, 1 case with only GRPR positive expression (integrin αvβ3 negative) and 1 case with only integrin αvβ3 positive expression (GRPR negative). Conclusion 99mTc-RGD-BBN is a safe agent for detecting breast cancer. 99mTc-RGD-BBN may have the potential to make up for the deficiency of 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 in the detection of breast cancer with only GRPR positive

  18. Comparisons between glucose analogue 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose and 18F-sodium fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography in breast cancer patients with bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Capitanio, Selene; Bongioanni, Francesca; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Campus, Claudio; Gonella, Roberta; Tixi, Lucia; Naseri, Mehrdad; Pennone, Michele; Altrinetti, Vania; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Bossert, Irene; Fiz, Francesco; Bruno, Andrea; DeCensi, Andrea; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Morbelli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose(18F-FDG) and 18F-sodium (18F-NaF) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) accuracy in breast cancer patients with clinically/radiologically suspected or known bone metastases. METHODS: A total of 45 consecutive patients with breast cancer and the presence or clinical/biochemical or radiological suspicion of bone metastatic disease underwent 18F-FDG and 18F-fluoride PET/CT. Imaging results were compared with histopathology when available, or clinical and radiological follow-up of at least 1 year. For each technique we calculated: Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), overall accuracy, positive and negative predictive values, error rate, and Youden’s index. McNemar’s χ2 test was used to test the difference in sensitivity and specificity between the two diagnostic methods. All analyses were computed on a patient basis, and then on a lesion basis, with consideration ofthe density of independent lesions on the co-registered CT (sclerotic, lytic, mixed, no-lesions) and the divergent site of disease (skull, spine, ribs, extremities, pelvis). The impact of adding 18F-NaF PET/CT to the work-up of patients was also measured in terms of change in their management due to 18F-NaF PET/CT findings. RESULTS: The two imaging methods of 18F-FDG and 18F-fluoride PET/CT were significantly different at the patient-based analysis: Accuracy was 86.7% and 84.4%, respectively (McNemar’s χ2 = 6.23, df = 1, P = 0.01). Overall, 244 bone lesions were detected in our analysis. The overall accuracy of the two methods was significantly different at lesion-based analysis (McNemar’s χ2 = 93.4, df = 1, P < 0.0001). In the lesion density-based and site-based analysis, 18F-FDG PET/CT provided more accurate results in the detection of CT-negative metastasis (P < 0.002) and vertebral localizations (P < 0.002); 18F-NaF PET/CT was more accurate in detecting sclerotic (P < 0.005) and rib lesions (P < 0.04). 18F-NaF PET/CT led to a

  19. Metastases to the breast

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, E.S.; Johnston, C.; Haney, P.J.

    1983-10-01

    Metastases to the breast are uncommon, wtih about 250 cases reported from clinical and autopsy series. The mammographic findings in 16 new cases revealed a spectrum of changes that included solitary of multiple lesions, well demarcated or poorly marginated masses, and diffuse involvement of skin or parenchyma or both. Diffuse disease was seen more frequently in this series (4/16), at times simulating inflammatory breast cancer. Although diagnosis of a primary malignancy usually preceded detection of the breast lesion, 40% (6/16) had no history of malignancy. Prognosis remains poor; however, it was improved in the lymphoma-leukemia group due to improved immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic regimes. The clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features are discussed. Some of the lesions encountered can be confused with a primary breast malignancy or a benign lesion, necessitating prompt and accurate biopsy to preclude unnecessary major surgery and to improve survival in cancers amenable to current therapy.

  20. Paired Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Invasive Breast Cancer Lesions in the D-Loop of the Mitochondrial Genome Indicate a Cancerization Field Effect

    PubMed Central

    Maggrah, Andrea; Robinson, Kerry; Creed, Jennifer; Wittock, Roy; Gehman, Ken; Gehman, Teresa; Brown, Helen; Harbottle, Andrew; Froberg, M. Kent; Klein, Daniel; Reguly, Brian; Parr, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the mitochondrial genome have been chronicled in most solid tumors, including breast cancer. The intent of this paper is to compare and document somatic mitochondrial D-loop mutations in paired samples of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC) indicating a potential breast ductal epithelial cancerization field effect. Paired samples of these histopathologies were laser-captured microdissected (LCM) from biopsy, lumpectomy, and mastectomy tissues. Blood samples were collected as germplasm control references. For each patient, hypervariable region 1 (HV1) in the D-loop portion of the mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) was sequenced for all 3 clinical samples. Specific parallel somatic heteroplasmic alterations between these histopathologies, particularly at sites 16189, 16223, 16224, 16270, and 16291, suggest the presence of an epithelial, mitochondrial cancerization field effect. These results indicate that further characterization of the mutational pathway of DCIS and IBC may help establish the invasive potential of DCIS. Moreover, this paper indicates that biofluids with low cellularity, such as nipple aspirate fluid and/or ductal lavage, warrant further investigation as early and minimally invasive detection mediums of a cancerization field effect within breast tissue. PMID:23509716

  1. Paired ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer lesions in the D-loop of the mitochondrial genome indicate a cancerization field effect.

    PubMed

    Maggrah, Andrea; Robinson, Kerry; Creed, Jennifer; Wittock, Roy; Gehman, Ken; Gehman, Teresa; Brown, Helen; Harbottle, Andrew; Froberg, M Kent; Klein, Daniel; Reguly, Brian; Parr, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the mitochondrial genome have been chronicled in most solid tumors, including breast cancer. The intent of this paper is to compare and document somatic mitochondrial D-loop mutations in paired samples of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC) indicating a potential breast ductal epithelial cancerization field effect. Paired samples of these histopathologies were laser-captured microdissected (LCM) from biopsy, lumpectomy, and mastectomy tissues. Blood samples were collected as germplasm control references. For each patient, hypervariable region 1 (HV1) in the D-loop portion of the mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) was sequenced for all 3 clinical samples. Specific parallel somatic heteroplasmic alterations between these histopathologies, particularly at sites 16189, 16223, 16224, 16270, and 16291, suggest the presence of an epithelial, mitochondrial cancerization field effect. These results indicate that further characterization of the mutational pathway of DCIS and IBC may help establish the invasive potential of DCIS. Moreover, this paper indicates that biofluids with low cellularity, such as nipple aspirate fluid and/or ductal lavage, warrant further investigation as early and minimally invasive detection mediums of a cancerization field effect within breast tissue. PMID:23509716

  2. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeshu; Pei, Jing; Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P; Martin, Edward W; Hitchcock, Charles L; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  3. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)—fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  4. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roganovic, Dragana; Djilas, Dragana; Vujnovic, Sasa; Pavic, Dag; Stojanov, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities. We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. with significant difference between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography (p<0.001), while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20). PMID:26614855

  5. Breast cancer patient with an uncommon lymphatic drainage evidenced by SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Groheux, David; Ferré, Romuald; Rubello, Domenico; Vercellino, Laetitia; Hindié, Elif

    2014-02-01

    SPECT/CT reinforces the role of lymphoscintigraphy in breast cancer by solving some cases with difficult reading on planar scintigraphy. An 80-year-old woman was referred to our institution for management of a screen-detected, nonpalpable, invasive lobular carcinoma of lower inner quadrant of the left breast. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed before surgery. Planar images showed an axillary sentinel node and 2 medially located hot spots. SPECT/CT allowed determining that one of the extra-axillary drainage sites was to the internal mammary basin, while the second corresponded to a mediastinal lymph node. Although this drainage was unexpected, mediastinum is a common site of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23797233

  6. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole Ma; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-02-10

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing "blind" surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant breast

  7. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole MA; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing “blind” surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant

  8. Imaging Guided Breast Interventions.

    PubMed

    Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista; Sufian, Saira Naz

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging is a developing field, with new and upcoming innovations, decreasing the morbidity and mortality related to breast pathologies with main emphasis on breast cancer. Breast imaging has an essential role in the detection and management of breast disease. It includes a multimodality approach, i.e. mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine techniques and interventional procedures, done for the diagnosis and definitive management of breast abnormalities. The range of methods to perform biopsy of a suspicious breast lesion found on imaging has also increased markedly from the 1990s with hi-technological progress in surgical as well as percutaneous breast biopsy methods. The image guided percutaneous breast biopsy procedures cause minimal breast scarring, save time, and relieve the patient of the anxiety of going to the operation theatre. The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the different image guided breast biopsy techniques presently employed along with the indications, contraindication, merits and demerits of each method. PMID:27353993

  9. The potential role of dedicated 3D breast CT as a diagnostic tool: Review and early clinical examples

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Avice M.; Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is the gold standard in routine screening for the detection of breast cancer in the general population. However limitations in sensitivity, particularly in dense breasts, has motivated the development of alternative imaging techniques such as digital breast tomosynthesis, whole breast ultrasound, breast specific gamma imaging, and more recently dedicated breast computed tomography or “breast CT”. Virtually all diagnostic work-ups of asymptomatic nonpalpable findings arise from screening mammography. In most cases, diagnostic mammography and ultrasound are sufficient for diagnosis, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) playing an occasional role. Digital breast tomosynthesis, a limited-angle tomographic technique, is increasingly being used for screening. Dedicated breast CT has full three-dimensional (3D) capability with near-isotropic resolution, which could potentially improve diagnostic accuracy. In current dedicated breast CT clinical prototypes, 300-500 low-dose projections are acquired in a circular trajectory around the breast using a flat panel detector, followed by image reconstruction to provide the 3D breast volume. The average glandular dose to the breast from breast CT can range from as little as a two-view screening mammogram to approximately that of a diagnostic mammography examination. Breast CT displays 3D images of the internal structures of the breast; therefore, evaluation of suspicious features like microcalcifications, masses, and asymmetries can be made in multiple anatomical planes from a single scan. The potential role of breast CT for diagnostic imaging is illustrated here through clinical examples such as imaging soft tissue abnormalities and microcalcifications. The potential for breast CT to serve as an imaging tool for extent of disease evaluation and for monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy response is also illustrated. PMID:25199995

  10. The potential role of dedicated 3D breast CT as a diagnostic tool: review and early clinical examples.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Avice M; Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is the gold standard in routine screening for the detection of breast cancer in the general population. However, limitations in sensitivity, particularly in dense breasts, has motivated the development of alternative imaging techniques such as digital breast tomosynthesis, whole breast ultrasound, breast-specific gamma imaging, and more recently dedicated breast computed tomography or "breast CT". Virtually all diagnostic work-ups of asymptomatic nonpalpable findings arise from screening mammography. In most cases, diagnostic mammography and ultrasound are sufficient for diagnosis, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) playing an occasional role. Digital breast tomosynthesis, a limited-angle tomographic technique, is increasingly being used for screening. Dedicated breast CT has full three-dimensional (3D) capability with near-isotropic resolution, which could potentially improve diagnostic accuracy. In current dedicated breast CT clinical prototypes, 300-500 low-dose projections are acquired in a circular trajectory around the breast using a flat panel detector, followed by image reconstruction to provide the 3D breast volume. The average glandular dose to the breast from breast CT can range from as little as a two-view screening mammogram to approximately that of a diagnostic mammography examination. Breast CT displays 3D images of the internal structures of the breast; therefore, evaluation of suspicious features like microcalcifications, masses, and asymmetries can be made in multiple anatomical planes from a single scan. The potential role of breast CT for diagnostic imaging is illustrated here through clinical examples such as imaging soft tissue abnormalities and microcalcifications. The potential for breast CT to serve as an imaging tool for extent of disease evaluation and for monitoring neo-adjuvant chemotherapy response is also illustrated. PMID:25199995

  11. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  12. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast associated with primary breast lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Arlen, Myron; Freiman, Jacob J; Ionescu, Marina

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of an uncommon association of pathologic processes, where an invasive adenocarcinoma of the breast developed concomitantly with a primary lymphoma arising in the same breast. The patient, a 78 year old female, presented with two palpable breast lesions in her left breast and an additional lesion in the right breast. Core needle biopsies of the lesions revealed both ductal carcinoma and lymphoma existing adjacent to each other in the left breast and a second primary lymphoma in her right breast. The mammogram, which also defined the lesions, illustrated collision tumors of the left breast and a separate pathologic process in the right breast. Excision of the lesions confirmed the two independent lesions on the left side, one an infiltrating ductal carcinoma and the second a large B-cell lymphoma. Biopsy of the right breast also demonstrated existence of a large B-cell lymphoma. Left axillary biopsy using sentinel node technology indicated that there was no evidence of nodal metastasis. The question arose as to possible etiologic factors related to viral transfection at the DNA level, that could cause transformation within the ductal epithelium of the breast with similar transfection of the lymphocytes of an adjacent intramammary node, that led to the development of the simultaneous pathologic processes of ductal carcinoma and B-cell lymphoma, defined on biopsy. PMID:21475637

  13. Sampling probability distributions of lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looney, P.; Warren, L. M.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2015-03-01

    One approach to image perception studies in mammography using virtual clinical trials involves the insertion of simulated lesions into normal mammograms. To facilitate this, a method has been developed that allows for sampling of lesion positions across the cranio-caudal and medio-lateral radiographic projections in accordance with measured distributions of real lesion locations. 6825 mammograms from our mammography image database were segmented to find the breast outline. The outlines were averaged and smoothed to produce an average outline for each laterality and radiographic projection. Lesions in 3304 mammograms with malignant findings were mapped on to a standardised breast image corresponding to the average breast outline using piecewise affine transforms. A four dimensional probability distribution function was found from the lesion locations in the cranio-caudal and medio-lateral radiographic projections for calcification and noncalcification lesions. Lesion locations sampled from this probability distribution function were mapped on to individual mammograms using a piecewise affine transform which transforms the average outline to the outline of the breast in the mammogram. The four dimensional probability distribution function was validated by comparing it to the two dimensional distributions found by considering each radiographic projection and laterality independently. The correlation of the location of the lesions sampled from the four dimensional probability distribution function across radiographic projections was shown to match the correlation of the locations of the original mapped lesion locations. The current system has been implemented as a web-service on a server using the Python Django framework. The server performs the sampling, performs the mapping and returns the results in a javascript object notation format.

  14. Locating polyps by endoscopy with or without videolaparoscopy, radioguided occult colonic lesion identification or magnetic endoscopic imaging: the way forward to complete polyp removal.

    PubMed

    D'Annibale, A; Serventi, A; Orsini, C; Morpurgo, E

    2004-12-01

    Endoscopic polypectomy is the gold standard for the treatment of colorectal polyps. In the case of non-palpable lesions or to complete polyp removal, the lesions are located intra-operatively. With the advent of laparoscopy, identifying their position is even more important because there is no opportunity for intestinal palpation. Several methods of preoperative endoscopic marking have been proposed using different types of tattooing and recently using clips followed by ultrasonography detection. Innovative methods are analysed; magnetic endoscopic imaging is a reliable and accurate method for determining the anatomical position of the tip of the endoscope during colonoscopy. Radioguided colonic lesion identification needs a gamma detection probe. Endoscopic removal can be converted to endo-laparoscopic rendezvous, failing which, laparoscopic resection is a reliable and safe choice, offering all the advantages of minimally invasive surgical techniques. PMID:15666110

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  16. Breast-feeding and benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Londero, A P; Bertozzi, S; Driul, L; Marchesoni, D; Petri, R

    2012-01-01

    Benign breast disease (BBD) is very common among women in their fertile age, but its correlation with breast reproductive function remains unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the relation between BBD and breast-feeding. We collected data on 105 women with BBD and 98 controls, focusing on their reproductive history and breast-feeding. We analysed data by R (version 2.12.1) considering p < 0.05 as significant. The results showed that fibroadenoma represented the most frequent BBD (55%), followed by fibrocystic changes (19%), intraductal papilloma (6%) and inflammatory breast disorders (5%). The mean age was 31.5 years (± 6.1), BMI 21.2 kg/m² (± 3.4) and age at menarche 13.0 years (± 1.5). Duration of breast-feeding was not significantly different between controls and BBD types (p = NS). Selecting women with fibroadenoma breast-feeding duration directly correlated with the number of benign lesions (p < 0.05), which remains significant also by multivariate analysis. It was concluded that there seemed to be no difference in breast-feeding among BBDs types, but lactation may influence the number of fibroadenomas. Moreover, prospective studies would better define the correlation between lactation and BBDs. PMID:22185539

  17. Imaging of the Adolescent Breast

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katie N.

    2013-01-01

    The mainstay of breast imaging in the adolescent is ultrasonography. There is occasionally a need for additional imaging, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging of the adolescent breast differs substantially from the adult in both the imaging modalities utilized and the relative likelihood of pathologies encountered. The majority of lesions in the adolescent are benign, but the presence of a breast lesion may cause anxiety to patients and their families due to the wide awareness of breast malignancy in the adult population. It is important to be aware of the imaging modalities available to image the adolescent breast to prevent unnecessary radiation exposure while answering the clinical question. The current recommendations for adolescent diagnostic and screening breast imaging will be reviewed. Benign breast lesions such as fibroadenomas, fibrocystic change, pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia, gynecomastia, and posttraumatic or infectious lesions with their associated imaging findings and management will be outlined. Additionally, review of breast malignancies that can affect adolescents will provide the reader with features to distinguish benign from malignant processes in the adolescent based on imaging findings and clinical presentation. PMID:24872737

  18. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  19. Primary breast adenocarcinoma in ectopic breast tissue in the vulva.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Jason; Dua, Anahita; Dowdy, Sean C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Accessory breast tissue is a rare finding in the general population with an incidence of 1-2%. An even rarer occurrence is accessory breast tissue afflicted with breast carcinoma. We present a brief report discussing diagnosis and management of a patient who presented with primary breast adenocarcinoma in vulval supranumerary tissue. Brief Report. A 60-year-old Caucasian female presented with a lesion in her left vulva that she first identified during adolescence. The lesion began to grow and ulcerate prompting her to receive treatment. Biopsy was inconclusive, and metastatic workup was negative, so her lesion was treated as an isolated breast lump and removed via wide local excision. Conclusion. Primary breast adenocarcinoma of the vulva is exceedingly rare. A paucity of the literature on this topic unfortunately means that strong evidence does not exist detailing the best management of this patient cohort. However, given that histological data confirms these cancers are virtually the same as breast cancers, it logically follows that the best treatment practices for breast cancer may be applied to treat these patients presenting with primary vulva cancers of ectopic breast tissue. PMID:24066246

  20. Evaluation of clinical breast examination and breast ultrasonography among pregnant women in Abakaliki, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka; Ajah, Leonard Ogbonna; Onoh, Robinson Chukwudi; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Enemuo, Vincent Chidi; Agwu, Uzoma MaryRose

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer in pregnancy accounts for 2%–3% of all breast cancers. The increased vascularity and lymphatic drainage from the breast during pregnancy potentiate the metastatic spread of the cancer to the regional lymph nodes. However, the increased breast density in pregnancy makes it difficult to detect breast lesions early. Aim To evaluate and compare the detection rate of breast lesions using clinical breast examination (CBE) and breast ultrasonography among pregnant women. Methodology A cross-sectional comparative study involving antenatal clinic attendees at the Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, was conducted between March 3, 2014, and December 31, 2014. CBE and breast ultrasonography were done in the participants at booking and repeated at 6 weeks postpartum. Fine-needle aspiration cytology and histology were done in women with suspicious breast lesions on CBE or breast ultrasonography or both. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at the 95% confidence level using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 17.0. Test of significance was done using chi-square test. A P-value of less than or equal to 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 320 pregnant women participated in the study. Of these, 267 (83.4%) were aware of breast cancer. Although more lesions were detected with breast ultrasonography than by CBE, there was no statistically significant difference between them (25 versus 17; P=0.26). The histology of the lesions revealed 21 benign lesions and 4 normal breast tissues. The sensitivity of breast ultrasonography was 95.2%, while that of CBE was 66.7%. The specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were similar between CBE and breast ultrasonography. Conclusion The detection rates of breast lesions by both CBE and breast ultrasonography were equivalent during pregnancy and 6 weeks postpartum, making CBE a convenient and very cost

  1. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  2. Digital breast tomosynthesis with minimal breast compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaduto, David A.; Yang, Min; Ripton-Snyder, Jennifer; Fisher, Paul R.; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Breast compression is utilized in mammography to improve image quality and reduce radiation dose. Lesion conspicuity is improved by reducing scatter effects on contrast and by reducing the superposition of tissue structures. However, patient discomfort due to breast compression has been cited as a potential cause of noncompliance with recommended screening practices. Further, compression may also occlude blood flow in the breast, complicating imaging with intravenous contrast agents and preventing accurate quantification of contrast enhancement and kinetics. Previous studies have investigated reducing breast compression in planar mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), though this typically comes at the expense of degradation in image quality or increase in mean glandular dose (MGD). We propose to optimize the image acquisition technique for reduced compression in DBT without compromising image quality or increasing MGD. A zero-frequency signal-difference-to-noise ratio model is employed to investigate the relationship between tube potential, SDNR and MGD. Phantom and patient images are acquired on a prototype DBT system using the optimized imaging parameters and are assessed for image quality and lesion conspicuity. A preliminary assessment of patient motion during DBT with minimal compression is presented.

  3. Histopathologic findings in breast reduction specimens.

    PubMed

    Kececi, Yavuz; Tasli, Funda Alkan; Yagcı, Ayse; Sır, Emin; Canpolat, Selin; Vardar, Enver

    2014-04-01

    Reduction mammaplasty is a commonly performed operation for treatment of breast hypertrophy. It allows examination of specimens from a seemingly healthy population. Although there are many publications reporting the incidence of occult breast carcinomas, only a few studies have specifically examined the incidence of other breast lesions in reduction mammaplasty specimens. The authors conducted a single-centre retrospective chart review examining the incidence of benign and precancerous lesions in breast reduction specimens. Both age and the number of tissue sections were evaluated for the association with important pathologic findings. Of the 95 patients who underwent reduction mammaplasty, eight patients (8.4%) had atypical lesions. Fourteen patients (15%) had proliferative and 54 patients (57%) had non-proliferative breast lesions. No occult invasive breast cancer was identified in the breast reduction specimens. The existence of significant pathologic findings was not associated with age (p = 0.231, student t-test). On the other hand, it was found to be associated with the number of tissue sections (p = 0.046, Mann-Whitney U-test). This study reveals that breast reduction specimens should be analyzed histologically since a considerable amount of patients have breast lesions with increased cancer risk. Therefore, this analysis would guide the management of these patients in the follow-up period. PMID:23879776

  4. Enhanced MRI and MRI-Guided Interventional Procedures in Women with Asymptomatic Silicone-Injected Breasts

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yun-Chung; Chen, Shin-Chih; Lo, Yung-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Asymptomatic women who have received silicone injection for breast augmentation have a risk of underestimating breast cancer by palpation, mammography, or breast sonography. Enhanced breast MRI is sensitive to display certain nonspecific enhanced lesions or suspicious lesions. Such nonspecific MRI-detected lesions could be managed by American College Radiology BI-RADS lexicon and selectively with MRI-guided techniques biopsy to prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:22536144

  5. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  6. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. A breast lift, or mastopexy, is cosmetic breast surgery to lift the breasts. The surgery ... the position of the areola and nipple. Description Cosmetic breast surgery can be done at an outpatient ...

  7. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  8. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  9. Identification of Genes Expressed in Premalignant Breast Disease by Microscopy-Directed Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Page, David L.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    1994-09-01

    Histopathologic study of human breast biopsy samples has identified specific lesions which are associated with a high risk of development of invasive breast cancer. Presumably, these lesions (collectively termed premalignant breast disease) represent the earliest recognizable morphologic expression of fundamental molecular events that lead to the development of invasive breast cancer. To study molecular events underlying premalignant breast disease, we have developed a method for isolating RNA from histologically identified lesions from frozen human breast tissue. This method specifically obtains mRNA from breast epithelial cells and has identified three genes which are differentially expressed in premalignant breast epithelial lesions. One gene identified by this method is overexpressed in four of five noncomedo ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and appears to be the human homologue of the gene encoding the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis.

  10. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  11. Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma Presenting with Two Different Patterns of Cutaneous Metastases: Carcinoma Telangiectaticum and Carcinoma Erysipeloides

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi, Reza; Talaizade, Abdolhasan; Lal, Karan; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Sohrabiaan, Nasibe

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastases can have many different clinical presentations. They are seen in patients with advanced malignant disease; however, they can be the initial manifestation of undetected malignancies. Inflammatory breast carcinoma is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer that has a nonspecific appearance mimicking many benign conditions including mastitis, breast abscesses, and/or dermatitis. The authors report the case of a 40-year-old woman with inflammatory breast carcinoma presenting with violaceous papulovesicular lesions resembling lymphangioma circumscriptum and erythematous patches resembling erysipelas. These lesions represent two different types of cutaneous metastases, both of which were the initial signs of inflammatory breast carcinoma in the patient described herein. Skin biopsy of lesions confirmed invasive breast cancer and further prompted a work up for inflammatory breast carcinoma. This case demonstrates the importance of follow-up for all breast lesions, even those considered to be of benign nature, for they can be presenting signs of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26345728

  12. [Digital imaging in the surgical detection of breast neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Rulli, A; Cirocchi, R; Carli, L; Cagini, L

    1993-12-01

    Microcalcific clusters represent good indicators for breast cancer detection. The Authors evaluated 98 cases of breast microcalcifications in patients with no palpable lesions. The patients had undergone mammography, biopsy and excised specimen's radiography to confirm that the target lesion was adequately removed. The presence of microcalcifications was detected through a computerized instrument which allows the digitalization of the image. PMID:8167081

  13. Magnetic Resonance (MR)-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ... considered if the lesion can be seen on mammography or on ultrasound , where the biopsy can be ...

  14. Surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dooley, W C

    1998-11-01

    Women with breast cancer today have many more therapeutic options available to them for their surgical therapy. Almost all patients with breast cancer have some options for breast conservation. Active patient involvement in analyzing and understanding the pros and cons of each of these options seems extremely important to the long-term emotional and psychological outcome of their breast cancer therapy. Several reports this year have reintroduced the issue of adequate local control. The common philosophy a decade ago was that because systematic therapy (adjuvant chemotherapy) was improving, local therapy would become of lesser importance. Several studies this year have indicated the extreme importance of local control in maximizing survival advantage because of the relationship of increasing local failure and deteriorating survival from systemic disease. Despite significant improvements in treatment, our screening and diagnostic approaches have still failed to identify the majority of lesions prior to the patient's own palpation of the tumor. Using new diagnostic modalities that do not involve surgery, the biopsy of lower probability lesions with great accuracy is expected to improve the efficacy of the current screening measures. Despite all the improvements, the most important therapeutic step in the management of breast cancer remains earlier diagnosis and earlier extirpation of the initial invasive focus of malignancy. PMID:9818228

  15. Breast lump

    MedlinePlus

    ... new lumps or breast changes. Ask about your risk factors for breast cancer, and screening and prevention for breast cancer. When ... from you. You will be asked about your factors that may increase the risk of breast cancer . The provider will perform a thorough breast exam. ...

  16. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy. When is it most beneficial?

    PubMed

    Peterson, I M; Brink, W J

    1990-09-01

    When fine-needle aspiration biopsy is done skillfully, it is an accurate, efficient, and cost-effective method for diagnosing many diseases in selected patients. This article describes its uses for palpable masses of the thyroid, breast, and peripheral lymph nodes and some nonpalpable lesions. The authors also discuss its advantages and disadvantages and technical considerations that affect accuracy. PMID:2399196

  17. Keloidal granuloma faciale with extrafacial lesions.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Das, A L; Vaishampayan, S S; Vaidya, Sachin

    2005-01-01

    Granuloma faciale (GF) is a rare cutaneous disorder characterized by one to several soft, erythematous to livid papules, plaques or nodules, usually occurring on the face. Extrafacial lesions are uncommon. A 52-year-old lady with multiple asymptomatic, variously sized brownish-black colored, firm, sharply circumscribed plaques resembling keloids on both cheeks and extrafacial lesions on the right arm and the right breast is presented for its unusual keloidal appearance and typical histopathological findings. She failed to respond to oral dapsone 100 mg daily administered for 3 months. Local infiltration of triamcinolone combined with cryotherapy led to only partial flattening of the lesions. All the skin lesions were excised surgically followed by flap transfer grafting on both cheeks. The cosmetic outcome was highly satisfactory. PMID:16394461

  18. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma. PMID:27136637

  19. Biologic characteristics of premalignant breast disease

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kimberly; Tabemero, Maria; Anderson, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. While mammography and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) improve detection of early disease, there remains an Ullmet need for biomarkers for risk stratification, early detection, prediction, and disease prognosis. A number of early breast lesions, from atypical hyperplasias to carcinomas in situ, are associated with an increased risk of developing subsequent invasive breast carcinoma. The recent development of genomic, epigenomic, and proteomic tools for tissue biomarker detection, including array CGH, RNA expression microarrays, and proteomic arrays have identified a number of potential biomarkers that both identify patients at increased risk, as well as provided insights into the pathology of early breast cancer development. This chapter focuses on the detection and application of tissue and serum biomarkers for the identification and risk stratification of early breast cancer lesions. PMID:22112476

  20. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  1. Dense Breasts

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman’s breasts. It is most commonly determined using mammography, a diagnostic test that uses low dose x- ... woman’s breasts, which is most commonly determined through mammography. The breast is made up of glandular, connective, ...

  2. Breast lump

    MedlinePlus

    Breast mass ... males and females of all ages have normal breast tissue. This tissue responds to hormone changes. Because of this, lumps can come and go. Breast lumps may appear at any age: Both male ...

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk ...

  4. Breast Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, ...

  5. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Breast ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to examine the breasts. How the Test is ... to the left or right. The device sends sound waves to the breast tissue. The sound waves help ...

  6. Eigenbreasts for statistical breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ketcha, M.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Park, Subok; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    To facilitate rigorous virtual clinical trials using model observers for breast imaging optimization and evaluation, we demonstrated a method of defining statistical models, based on 177 sets of breast CT patient data, in order to generate tens of thousands of unique digital breast phantoms. In order to separate anatomical texture from variation in breast shape, each training set of breast phantoms were deformed to a consistent atlas compressed geometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then performed on the shape-matched breast CT volumes to capture the variation of patient breast textures. PCA decomposes the training set of N breast CT volumes into an N-1-dimensional space of eigenvectors, which we call eigenbreasts. By summing weighted combinations of eigenbreasts, a large ensemble of different breast phantoms can be newly created. Different training sets can be used in eigenbreast analysis for designing basis models to target sub-populations defined by breast characteristics, such as size or density. In this work, we plan to generate ensembles of 30,000 new phantoms based on glandularity for an upcoming virtual trial of lesion detectability in digital breast tomosynthesis. Our method extends our series of digital and physical breast phantoms based on human subject anatomy, providing the capability to generate new, unique ensembles consisting of tens of thousands or more virtual subjects. This work represents an important step towards conducting future virtual trials for tasks-based assessment of breast imaging, where it is vital to have a large ensemble of realistic phantoms for statistical power as well as clinical relevance.

  7. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  8. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  9. Core biopsies of the breast: diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Megha; Reddy, Sriharshan J; Nanavidekar, Manjiri; Russo, John P; Russo, Armand V; Pathak, Ram

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide. In this review article, the authors compare and contrast the incidence of breast cancer, and the inherent differences in the United States (US) and India in screening techniques used for diagnosing breast cancer. In spite of these differences, core biopsies of the breast are common for diagnosis of breast cancer in both countries. The authors describe "Best Practices" in the reporting and processing of core biopsies and in the analysis of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (Her2/neu). The pitfalls in the diagnosis of fibroepithelial lesions of the breast on core biopsy are discussed, as also the significance of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast (PASH) is discussed in core biopsy. In this review, the management and diagnosis of flat epithelial atypia and radiation atypia are elaborated and the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in papillary lesions, phyllodes tumor, and complex sclerosing lesions (radial scars) is illustrated. Rarer lesions such as mucinous and histiocytoid carcinoma are also discussed. PMID:22234089

  10. Whole breast tissue characterization with ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Schmidt, Steve; Seamans, John; Wallen, Andrea; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    A number of clinical trials have shown that screening ultrasound, supplemental to mammography, detects additional cancers in women with dense breasts. However, labor intensity, operator dependence and high recall rates have limited adoption. This paper describes the use of ultrasound tomography for whole-breast tissue stiffness measurements as a first step toward addressing the issue of high recall rates. The validation of the technique using an anthropomorphic phantom is described. In-vivo applications are demonstrated on 13 breast masses, indicating that lesion stiffness correlates with lesion type as expected. Comparison of lesion stiffness measurements with standard elastography was available for 11 masses and showed a strong correlation between the 2 measures. It is concluded that ultrasound tomography can map out the 3 dimensional distribution of tissue stiffness over the whole breast. Such a capability is well suited for screening where additional characterization may improve the specificity of screening ultrasound, thereby lowering barriers to acceptance.

  11. Overview of digital breast tomosynthesis: Clinical cases, benefits and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T; Levy, G; Poncelet, E; Le Thanh, T; Prolongeau, J F; Phalippou, J; Massoni, F; Laurent, N

    2015-09-01

    In France, the national breast cancer-screening program is based on mammography combined with clinical breast examination, and sometimes breast ultrasound for patients with high breast density. Digital breast tomosynthesis is a currently assessed 3D imaging technique in which angular projections of the stationary compressed breast are acquired automatically. When combined with mammography, clinicians can review both conventional (2D) as well as three-dimensional (3D) data. The purpose of this article is to review recent reports on this new breast imaging technique and complements this information with our personal experience. The main advantages of tomosynthesis are that it facilitates the detection and characterization of breast lesions, as well as the diagnosis of occult lesions in dense breasts. However, to do this, patients are exposed to higher levels of radiation than with 2D mammography. In France, the indications for tomosynthesis and its use in breast cancer-screening (individual and organized) are yet to be defined, as is its role in the diagnosis and staging of breast cancer (multiple lesions). Further studies assessing in particular the combined reconstruction of the 2D view using 3D tomosynthesis data acquired during a single breast compression event, and therefore reducing patient exposure to radiation, are expected to provide valuable insight. PMID:26275829

  12. Bilateral Lymphoblastic Lymphoma of Breast Mimicking Inflammatory Breast Cancer: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Sharareh; Esfahani-Monfared, Zahra; Kamalian, Naser; Eshaghi, Faezeh; Khodadad, Kian

    2015-01-01

    We report a 45 year-old woman who had bilateral breast masses with extradural involvement. Pathologic report revealed malignant high-grade lymphoblastic lymphoma. Systemic chemotherapy was performed but 3 months later, lesions indicating relapse in bone and breast re-appeared. She received salvage chemotherapy, but 4 months after that she was expired. PMID:26221154

  13. The relationship between the attenuation properties of breast microcalcifications and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, F.; Van Ongeval, C.; Marshall, N.; Meylaers, T.; Michielsen, K.; Marchal, G.; Bosmans, H.

    2010-02-01

    Screening mammography is one of the most challenging radiological techniques and this is partly due to the difficulty in detecting microcalcifications (MCs) against an anatomical background of varying mammographic tissue density. Further complicating factors in the detection of MCs include the small size and their resemblance to other bright structures in the breast. A number of different microcalcification simulating materials are available and these are often incorporated in test objects used to study some aspects of an imaging system, for example, optimal beam quality selection in digital mammography. Aluminum (Al) has similar x-ray attenuation properties to MCs and therefore Al is extensively used in test objects. However, to the best of our knowledge, the suitability of Al as a substitute material for MCs has not been studied explicitly. The aim of this study was therefore to demonstrate that spectral optimization studies for MCs can be performed with Al sheets. The approach used was twofold. First, contrasts generated by Al and MCs at several exposure settings were compared, and secondly an optimization study was performed with both Al and MCs as the contrasting target using an amorphous selenium (a-Se) based digital mammography unit. Specimens from stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsies of non-palpable lesions with mammographic evidence of MCs were obtained from clinical routine patients. Contrasts generated by these MCs and by Al sheets were measured for Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh anode/filter combinations, for different polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thicknesses at the extremes of the x-ray tube voltages used clinically. A linear regression was then applied between the two measurements of contrast; the ratio of the angular coefficient q obtained from the fitted regression lines for Al and MCs ranged from 0.96 to 0.99 for Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh combinations at 2 and 4 cm PMMA, respectively, and from 0.83 at 4 cm PMMA to 1.14 at 7 cm PMMA for the W/Rh combination

  14. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  15. Columnar cell lesions of the canine mammary gland: pathological features and immunophenotypic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that columnar cell lesions indicate an alteration of the human mammary gland involved in the development of breast cancer. They have not previously been described in canine mammary gland. The aim of this paper is describe the morphologic spectrum of columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland specimens and their association with other breast lesions. Methods A total of 126 lesions were subjected to a comprehensive morphological review based upon the human breast classification system for columnar cell lesions. The presence of preinvasive (epithelial hyperplasia and in situ carcinoma) and invasive lesions was determined and immunophenotypic analysis (estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE-12), E-cadherin, Ki-67, HER-2 and P53) was perfomed. Results Columnar cell lesions were identified in 67 (53.1%) of the 126 canine mammary glands with intraepithelial alterations. They were observed in the terminal duct lobular units and characterized at dilated acini may be lined by several layers of columnar epithelial cells with elongated nuclei. Of the columnar cell lesions identified, 41 (61.2%) were without and 26 (38.8%) with atypia. Association with ductal hyperplasia was observed in 45/67 (67.1%). Sixty (89.5%) of the columnar cell lesions coexisted with neoplastic lesions (20 in situ carcinomas, 19 invasive carcinomas and 21 benign tumors). The columnar cells were ER, PgR and E-cadherin positive but negative for cytokeratin 34βE-12, HER-2 and P53. The proliferation rate as measured by Ki-67 appeared higher in the lesions analyzed than in normal TDLUs. Conclusions Columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland are pathologically and immunophenotypically similar to those in human breast. This may suggest that dogs are a suitable model for the comparative study of noninvasive breast lesions. PMID:20178635

  16. Better Overall Survival for Breast Cancer Patients by Adding Breast Ultrasound to Follow-Up Examinations for Early Detection of Locoregional Recurrence-A Survival Impact Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Wei, Hung-Kuang; Hung, Chen-Fang; Kwang-Jane Lin, Christopher; Hung-Chun Cheng, Skye; Chen, Chii-Ming; Wang, Yong Alison

    2016-09-01

    We retrospectively reviewed patient records to evaluate the effectiveness of our 15 y of ultrasound (US) surveillance of recurrent breast disease in comparison with mammography (MM) and clinical examination. From 4796 stage 0-III breast cancer patients who had received surgical treatment, we identified locoregional recurrence (LRR) in 161 patients. The mean age of the 161 patients was 48 y (27-82 y), and the mean follow-up interval was 77.2 mo (11-167 mo). The methods of LRR detection, sites of LRR and overall survival (OS) were examined. Multivariate Cox survival analysis showed significantly better survival in groups detected by US (hazard ratio = 0.6, p = 0.042). The 10-y LRR OS by detection types for US (n = 69), clinical examination (n = 78) and MM (n = 8) were 58.5%, 33.1% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.0004). US was seen with better OS associated with the effective early detection of non-palpable LRR breast cancer, which is mostly not detectable on MM. PMID:27184247

  17. X-ray stereotactic lesion localization in conjunction with dedicated scintimammography

    SciTech Connect

    Mitali J. More; Deepa Narayanan; Patricia J. Goodale; Stanislaw Majewski; Benjamin Welch; Randolph Wojcik; Mark Williams

    2003-10-01

    We are developing a dual modality system that combines digital X-ray mammography with gamma emission scintigraphy on an upright mammography gantry. The breast is held under mild compression by a support structure that is independent of the detectors. The X-ray source and detectors can be rotated around a fixed rotation axis permitting multiple views of the breast with fixed compression. Two such views can be combined as a stereotactic pair to obtain the three-dimensional location of breast lesions. Information about the location of the lesion within the breast permits corrections for attenuation and detector spatial resolution, resulting in more accurate estimation of the true lesion-to-background concentration ratio, based on the image lesion-to-background counts ratio. In this paper, we describe the model used to make these corrections, and present the results of the phantom experiments designed to test the accuracy of our calculations.

  18. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  19. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  20. Emergent Embolization of Arterial Bleeding after Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, Aaron M.; Epelboym, Yan; Siegelbaum, Robert H. Weintraub, Joshua L. Kim, Edward Nowakowski, Francis S. Lookstein, Robert A.

    2012-02-15

    Vacuum-assisted core breast biopsy has become important in evaluating patients with suspicious breast lesions. It has proven to be a relatively safe procedure that in rare cases can result in vascular complications. These are the first reported cases of transcatheter embolization of uncontrolled breast hemorrhage after vacuum-assisted breast biopsy. With increased use of biopsy and larger-gauge devices, breast imaging groups may consider embolotherapy as a safe alternative for treatment of hemorrhage in a select group of patients.

  1. Breast Elastography: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Gkali, Christina A; Chalazonitis, Athanasios N; Feida, Eleni; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Giannos, Aris; Tsigginou, Alexandra; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the use of elastography in addition to sonography has become a routine clinical tool for the characterization of breast masses. Studies have investigated the improvement of specificity in differentiating benign from malignant breast masses. Therefore, additional use of elastography could help reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in benign breast lesions especially in category IV lesions of the ultrasound breast imaging reporting data system. Ultrasound elastography is a cheap, readily available, useful, quick, noninvasive method, but it needs specific training as well as acknowledging technical and pathological factors, which may influence it. Both strain and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) methods have been evaluated in breast lesions. Whereas strain elastography results in qualitative imaging of tissue stiffness due to induced compression, ARFI elastography displays quantitative and qualitative information of tissue displacement. A standardized imaging protocol is essential for an adequate and effective examination, also helping reduce the dependence from operators. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when ultrasound elastography is performed may help avoid erroneous image interpretation. In this article, we describe a practical examination protocol for both strain and ARFI elastography and demonstrate the elastographic imaging findings in benign and malignant breast lesions. Short video clips displaying the technique are included as supplementary material. PMID:26327432

  2. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  3. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  4. Multiple bone lesions resembling a metastatic origin. An unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Garrido, M José; Mora, A; Andrada, Encarna; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Cánovas, Víctor; Guirado-Risueño, M; Pastor, Elisa; Molina, M Angeles; Molina, M Jesús; Martín Hidalgo, Alberto; Carrato, Alfredo

    2008-04-01

    Lytic and blastic lesions have been associated to malignant tumours, such as solid cancer (breast cancer, renal cancer, prostate cancer, malignant melanoma or thyroid tumours). Although a mixed pattern with lytic and blastic lesions is due to metastatic tumour, this is not the only possible origin. The following case shows a systematic. This case report shows the number of tests that were made in order to discover the origin of osteolytic and osteoblastic lesions and it is notable that there is not an occult neoplasia on every occasion. PMID:18411200

  5. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  6. Breast fibroadenomas in adolescents: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle; Soltanian, Hooman T

    2015-01-01

    Fibroadenomas are one of the most common benign tumors of the breast in the adolescent population. They account for 68% of all breast masses and 44%–94% of all biopsied breast lesions. Fibroadenomas can range from asymptomatic masses to painful and rapidly growing tumors that can cause significant esthetic distortions of the breast. Given the prevalence of fibroadenomas in the adolescent population and the psychosocial morbidity of finding a mass in the adolescent breast, it is imperative for physicians treating adolescent patients to be familiar and up to date with this disease process. The goal of this article is to provide a brief review of the classification, etiology, symptoms, initial work-up, and update on the management of breast fibroadenomas in the adolescent population. PMID:26366109

  7. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement. PMID:26475873

  8. Computer detection of stellate lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The three primary signs for which radiologists search when screening mammograms for breast cancer are stellate lesions, microcalcifications, and circumscribed lesions. Stellate lesions are of particular importance, as they are almost always associated with a malignancy. Further, they are often indicated only by subtle architectural distortions and so are in general easier to miss than the other signs. We have developed a method for the automatic detection of stellate lesions in digitized mammograms, and have tested them on image data where the presence or absence of malignancies is known. We extract image features from the known images, use them to grow binary decision trees, and use those trees to label each pixel of new mammograms with its probability of being located on an abnormality. The primary feature for the detection of stellate lesions is ALOE, analysis of local oriented edges, which is derived from an analysis of the histogram of edge orientations in local windows. Other features, based on the Laws texture energy measures, have been developed to respond to normal tissue, and so improve the false alarm performance of the entire system.

  9. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  10. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  11. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  12. Invasive breast carcinoma arising in microglandular adenosis: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Eun; Bae, Young Kyung

    2013-12-01

    Microglandular adenosis (MGA) is a rare benign disease that shows an infiltrative growth pattern of small glands, and it may progress to include atypia and carcinoma. Here we report two cases of breast carcinoma arising in MGA. Case 1 was a 44-year-old woman with a previous history of ductal carcinoma in situ in her right breast. During a follow-up, a 1.8 cm mass-like lesion was found in her left breast. An excisional biopsy suggested that the lesion was breast carcinoma. Case 2 was a 57-year-old woman with a 2.9 cm mass in her right breast. A core needle biopsy of the lesion suggested invasive carcinoma. Both patients underwent modified radical mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy. Both tumors lacked a myoepithelial cell layer and stained positively for S-100, lysozyme, and α1-antitrypsin, which is typical of MGA. Both cases showed invasive carcinoma arising in MGA. PMID:24454466

  13. The impact of mammographic density and lesion location on detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mousa, Dana; Ryan, Elaine; Lee, Warwick; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz; Reed, Warren; Poulos, Ann; Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the impact of breast density and lesion location on detection. A set of 55 mammographic images (23 abnormal images with 26 lesions and 32 normal images) were examined by 22 expert radiologists. The images were classified by an expert radiologist according to the Synoptic Breast Imaging Report of the National Breast Cancer Centre (NBCC) as having low mammographic density (D1<25% glandular and D2> 25-50% glandular) or high density (D3 51-75% glandular and D4> 75-glandular). The observers freely examined the images and located any malignancy using a 5-point confidence. Performance was defined using the following metrics: sensitivity, location sensitivity, specificity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC Az) curves and jackknife free-response receiver operator characteristics (JAFROC) figures of merit. Significant increases in sensitivity (p= 0.0174) and ROC (p=0.0001) values were noted for the higher density compared with lower density images according to NBCC classification. No differences were seen in radiologists' performance between lesions within or outside the fibroglandular region. In conclusion, analysis of our data suggests that radiologists scored higher using traditional metrics in higher mammographic density images without any improvement in lesion localisation. Lesion location whether within or outside the fibroglandular region appeared to have no impact on detection abilities suggesting that if a masking effect is present the impact is minimal. Eye-tracking analyses are ongoing.

  14. Role of radiological-assisted cytology in intra-abdominal lesions: A 3 years’ experience in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Shilpi; Gupta, Garima; Kawatra, Mallika; Chakrabarti, Preeti Rihal; Agrawal, Purti; Jain, Mukul Raj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fine needle aspiration (FNA) with assistance of radiological tools such as ultrasonography (USG) and computed tomography (CT) is an effective and safe technique for diagnosing intra-abdominal neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions. Aims and Objectives: (1) To assess the utility of image-guided cytology in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal lesions. (2) To categorize various intra-abdominal lesions according to their site of occurrence and study their cytomorphological features. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Pathology between January 2012 and January 2015. A total of 174 cases with intra-abdominal lesions were included in the study. Results: In our study, diagnostic yield was 84.5%. The mean age was found to be 52 years with M: F ratio 1.1:1. We found that 92 (52.87%) cases were in hepatobiliary region, 33 (18.96%) in adnexa, 13 (7.47%) in pancreatic-ampullary region, 14 (8.04%) in unknown abdominal lumps, 8 (4.6%) in lymph nodes, 6 (3.4%) in renal, 5 (2.87%) in retroperitoneum, 2 (1.1%) in omental nodules, and 1 (0.5%) in splenic mass. Of total 174 cases, 106 (61%) cases were malignant, 10 (5.7%) benign, 16 (9.1%) inflammatory, 27 (15.5%) inadequate, and 15 (8.7%) suspicious for malignancy. Conclusion: Ultrasound and CT-guided FNA cytology had a significant role in diagnosis of palpable and nonpalpable intra-abdominal lesions. Being a relatively quick and safe method, it also avoids invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:27127738

  15. Comparative accuracy of mammography and ultrasound in women with breast symptoms according to age and breast density.

    PubMed

    Devolli-Disha, Emine; Manxhuka-Kërliu, Suzana; Ymeri, Halit; Kutllovci, Arben

    2009-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second most common cause of death from cancer in women.The aim of this studywas to determine which is more accurate imaging test mammography or ultrasound for diagnosis of breast cancer based on the women's age and breast density. We examined 546 patients with breast symptoms, by clinical breast examination, mammography and ultrasound. A total of 546 breast lesions were examined by histopathology analyses. Histopathology results revealed the presence of 259 invasive cancers, and 287 benign lesions. Sensitivity varied significantly with age and breast density. In the 259 women who had both tests, ultrasound had a higher sensitivity than mammography in women younger than 45 years, whereas mammography had a higher sensitivity than ultrasound in women older than 60 years. The sensitivity according to age was 52,1% for mammography and 72,6% for ultrasound. The specificity according to age was 88, 5% for ultrasound and 73, 9% for mammography. Comparing the sensitivity of mammography and ultrasound according to the breast density indicates that mammographic sensitivity was 82,2% among women with predominantly fatty breast, but 23.7% in women with heterogeneous dense breasts, with the increase of fibro glandular density the level of sensitivity with mammography decreases, while ultrasonographic sensitivity was 71,1% among women with predominantly fatty breast and 57,0% for heterogeneous dense breasts. Our data indicate that sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound was statistically significantly greater than mammography in patients with breast symptoms for the detection of breast cancer and benign lesions particularly in dense breast and in young women. PMID:19485945

  16. Quantification of osteolytic bone lesions in a preclinical rat trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränzle, Andrea; Bretschi, Maren; Bäuerle, Tobias; Giske, Kristina; Hillengass, Jens; Bendl, Rolf

    2013-10-01

    In breast cancer, most of the patients who died, have developed bone metastasis as disease progression. Bone metastases in case of breast cancer are mainly bone destructive (osteolytic). To understand pathogenesis and to analyse response to different treatments, animal models, in our case rats, are examined. For assessment of treatment response to bone remodelling therapies exact segmentations of osteolytic lesions are needed. Manual segmentations are not only time-consuming but lack in reproducibility. Computerized segmentation tools are essential. In this paper we present an approach for the computerized quantification of osteolytic lesion volumes using a comparison to a healthy reference model. The presented qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed bone volumes show, that the automatically segmented lesion volumes complete missing bone in a reasonable way.

  17. Overdiagnosis and overtreatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Michael; Ozanne, Elissa; Esserman, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Through greater awareness, mammographic screening, and aggressive biopsy of calcifications, the proportion of low-grade, early stage cancers and in situ lesions among all breast cancers has risen substantially. The introduction of molecular testing has increased the recognition of lower risk subtypes, and less aggressive treatments are more commonly recommended for these subtypes. Mammographically detected breast cancers are much more likely to have low-risk biology than symptomatic tumors found between screenings (interval cancers) or that present as clinical masses. Recognizing the lower risk associated with these lesions and the ability to confirm the risk with molecular tests should safely enable the use of less aggressive treatments. Importantly, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions, or what have been called stage I cancers, in and of themselves are not life-threatening. In situ lesions have been treated in a manner similar to that of invasive cancer, but there is little evidence to support that this practice has improved mortality. It is also being recognized that DCIS lesions are heterogeneous, and a substantial proportion of them may in fact be precursors of more indolent invasive cancers. Increasing evidence suggests that these lesions are being overtreated. The introduction of molecular tests should be able to help usher in a change in approach to these lesions. Reclassifying these lesions as part of the spectrum of high-risk lesions enables the use of a prevention approach. Learning from the experience with active surveillance in prostate cancer should empower the introduction of new approaches, with a focus on preventing invasive cancer, especially given that there are effective, United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved breast cancer preventive interventions. PMID:24451829

  18. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  19. Noninfectious penile lesions.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Sea, Jason; Thompson, Ian M; Elston, Dirk M

    2010-01-15

    Family physicians commonly diagnose and manage penile cutaneous lesions. Noninfectious lesions may be classified as inflammatory and papulosquamous (e.g., psoriasis, lichen sclerosus, angiokeratomas, lichen nitidus, lichen planus), or as neoplastic (e.g., carcinoma in situ, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). The clinical presentation and appearance of the lesions guide the diagnosis. Psoriasis presents as red or salmon-colored plaques with overlying scales, often with systemic lesions. Lichen sclerosus presents as a phimotic, hypopigmented prepuce or glans penis with a cellophane-like texture. Angiokeratomas are typically asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, red or blue papules, whereas lichen nitidus usually produces asymptomatic pinhead-sized, hypopigmented papules. The lesions of lichen planus are pruritic, violaceous, polygonal papules that are typically systemic. Carcinoma in situ should be suspected if the patient has velvety red or keratotic plaques of the glans penis or prepuce, whereas invasive squamous cell carcinoma presents as a painless lump, ulcer, or fungating irregular mass. Some benign lesions, such as psoriasis and lichen planus, can mimic carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy is indicated if the diagnosis is in doubt or neoplasm cannot be excluded. The management of benign penile lesions usually involves observation or topical corticosteroids; however, neoplastic lesions generally require surgery. PMID:20082512

  20. Primary angiosarcoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Daniele; Bolletta, Elisa; Falco, Giuseppe; Cadenelli, Pierfrancesco; Rocco, Nicola; Tessone, Ariel; Guarino, Stefania; Accurso, Antonello; Amato, Bruno; Magalotti, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiosarcoma (AS) of the breast is a rare neoplasia that is not related to radiation exposure. It represents less than 0.05% of all malignant breast tumors. This lesion is characterized by aggressive patterns and poor prognosis and by the absence of typical features at radiologic examination. Currently there are not evidence-based guidelines regarding surgical and adjuvant treatment for this tumor even though wide surgical resection followed by chemo- radiotherapy appears to improve both disease free survival and overall survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the available series of AS patients suggesting the most reliable treatment options for this rare neoplasia. PMID:26867719

  1. Operative management of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Sally M.

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare cutaneous tumor with a tendency towards local recurrence. A 26-year-old woman presented with a 3 × 2 cm raised, purple-hued lesion on her left breast. Excisional biopsy identified the lesion as a DFSP. She underwent two additional operations to achieve widely clear margins. Operative excision is the primary treatment of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the breast. PMID:27365884

  2. Operative management of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the breast.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Melissa H; Knox, Sally M

    2016-07-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare cutaneous tumor with a tendency towards local recurrence. A 26-year-old woman presented with a 3 × 2 cm raised, purple-hued lesion on her left breast. Excisional biopsy identified the lesion as a DFSP. She underwent two additional operations to achieve widely clear margins. Operative excision is the primary treatment of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the breast. PMID:27365884

  3. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  4. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  5. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  6. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  7. In vivo breast sound-speed imaging with ultrasound tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1-4. For all four breast types from fatty to dense, the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m{center_dot} s) {sup -1}) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4 fold compared to the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422 {+-} 9 mls (mean{+-} SD) and1487 {+-} 21 mls, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions (1548{+-}17 mls) was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513{+-}27 mls) (one-sided pbreast density (, and therefore, breast cancer risk), as well as detect and help differentiate breast lesions. Finally, our sound-speed tomograms may also be a useful tool to monitor clinical response of breast cancer patients to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

  8. Breast augmentation surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Breast augmentation; Breast implants; Implants - breast; Mammaplasty ... Breast augmentation is done by placing implants behind breast tissue or under the chest muscle. An implant is a sac filled with either sterile salt water (saline) or a ...

  9. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  10. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  11. Breast self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Self-examination of the breast; BSE; Breast cancer - BSE; Breast cancer screening - self exam ... American Cancer Society recommendations for early breast cancer detection in women without breast symptoms. ... . Revised October 20, ...

  12. Are Irregular Hypoechoic Breast Masses on Ultrasound Always Malignancies?: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youe Ree; Kim, Hun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Irregular hypoechoic masses in the breast do not always indicate malignancies. Many benign breast diseases present with irregular hypoechoic masses that can mimic carcinoma on ultrasonography. Some of these diseases such as inflammation and trauma-related breast lesions could be suspected from a patient's symptoms and personal history. Careful ultrasonographic examination and biopsy could help to differentiate these from malignancies. PMID:26576116

  13. A developmental hypothesis to explain the multicentricity of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, C R

    1998-07-14

    In this article the author proposes that the multicentricity of breast cancer might be explained by a developmental hypothesis. Genetic alterations ("hits") occurring in epithelial stem cells during the development of the breast may be transmitted to populations of daughter cells during growth. As a result, areas of the breast may be predisposed to malignant transformation with the occurrence of further genetic hits. Areas with the same predisposition should be anatomically connected, and earlier hits during breast development should result in larger areas of predisposition. The multicentricity of breast cancer would be explained if multiple lesions--monoclonal for the predisposing genetic hit and polyclonal for subsequent hits--developed within a predisposed area. Multiple lesions arising from the spread of disease by extension would be expected to share many genetic hits. The author discusses the implications that further evidence supporting the developmental hypothesis would have for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:9679488

  14. A developmental hypothesis to explain the multicentricity of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, C R

    1998-01-01

    In this article the author proposes that the multicentricity of breast cancer might be explained by a developmental hypothesis. Genetic alterations ("hits") occurring in epithelial stem cells during the development of the breast may be transmitted to populations of daughter cells during growth. As a result, areas of the breast may be predisposed to malignant transformation with the occurrence of further genetic hits. Areas with the same predisposition should be anatomically connected, and earlier hits during breast development should result in larger areas of predisposition. The multicentricity of breast cancer would be explained if multiple lesions--monoclonal for the predisposing genetic hit and polyclonal for subsequent hits--developed within a predisposed area. Multiple lesions arising from the spread of disease by extension would be expected to share many genetic hits. The author discusses the implications that further evidence supporting the developmental hypothesis would have for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:9679488

  15. Image cytometry of duct cells from benign and malignant breast disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Gadenne, C.; King, E.B.; Chew, K.L.; Duarte, L.A.; Petrakis, N.L.

    1987-01-22

    We used image cytometry to classify benign and malignant breast lesions, to identify parameters that classify premalignant lesions, and to assess these parameters for a biological association that may be linked with malignancy. Results suggest that quantitative image analysis is able to discriminate ''normal'' from ''abnormal'' breast lesions. Thus image cytometry may provide an objective approach for early detection of malignant changes in the breast. The parameters selected by stepwise discriminant and regression analyses as being most useful for discriminating among breast lesions relate to nuclear size, shape and DNA content. These parameters are robust and easily measured and are similar to those used by others for discriminating benign from malignant lesions. Significantly, no parameter based on nuclear chromatin distribution ranked as highly in this study, unlike our experience with studies of other premalignant lesions. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Low Rates of Additional Cancer Detection by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients Who Undergo Preoperative Mammography and Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jisun; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Ahn, Soo Kyung; Shin, Hee-Chul; You, Jee-Man; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung; Park, In-Ae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the efficacy of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting additional malignancies in breast cancer patients newly diagnosed by breast ultrasonography and mammography. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,038 breast cancer patients who underwent preoperative mammography, bilateral breast ultrasonography, and subsequent breast MRI between August 2007 and December 2010 at single institution in Korea. MRI-detected additional lesions were defined as those lesions detected by breast MRI that were previously undetected by mammography and ultrasonography and which would otherwise have not been identified. Results Among the 1,038 cases, 228 additional lesions (22.0%) and 30 additional malignancies (2.9%) were detected by breast MRI. Of these 228 lesions, 109 were suspected to be malignant (Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System category 4 or 5) on breast MRI and second-look ultrasonography and 30 were pathologically confirmed to be malignant (13.2%). Of these 30 lesions, 21 were ipsilateral to the main lesion and nine were contralateral. Fourteen lesions were in situ carcinomas and 16 were invasive carcinomas. The positive predictive value of breast MRI was 27.5% (30/109). No clinicopathological factors were significantly associated with additional malignant foci. Conclusion Breast MRI was useful in detecting additional malignancy in a small number of patients who underwent ultrasonography and mammography. PMID:25013439

  17. Cutaneous lesions in new born.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Meenakshi; Kaur, Surjeet; Nagpal, Madhu; Dewan, S P

    2002-01-01

    Five hundred unselected newborn babies delivered in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit II of SGBT Hospital attached to Government Medical College, Amritsar during April 2000 to October 2000 were examined for cutaneous lesions daily for the first five days after birth. Different cutaneous lesions were seen in 474(94.8%) newborns. The physiological skin changes observed in order of frequency were Epstein pearls in 305(61%), Mongolian spot in 301(60.2%), superficial cutaneous desquamation in 200(40%), icterus in 128(25.6%), milia in 119(23.8%), sebaceous gland hyperplasia in 107(21.4%), occipital alopecia in 94(18.8%), lanugo in 72(14.4%), peripheral cyanosis in 47(9.4%), breast hypertrophy in 29(5.8%) and miniature puberty in 28(5.6%) newborns. Of the transient non-infective skin diseases, erythema toxicum neonatorum was observed most commonly in 105(21%), followed by miliaria rubra in 103(20.6%) and acne neonatorum in 27(5.4%) newborns. The naevi and other developmental defects in the descending order were salmon patch in 69(13.8%), congenital melanocytic noevi in 10(2%), accessory tragi in 3(0.6%), spina bifida in 2(0.4%), hydrocephalus in 1(0.2%) and poliosis in 1(0.2%) newborns. Cradle cap was the only dermatitis observed in 50(10%) newborns. One (0.2%) case each of Harlequin ichthyosis and labial cyst was seen. PMID:17656992

  18. Breast Tissue 3D Segmentation and Visualization on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiangfei; Sun, Feifei

    2013-01-01

    Tissue segmentation and visualization are useful for breast lesion detection and quantitative analysis. In this paper, a 3D segmentation algorithm based on Kernel-based Fuzzy C-Means (KFCM) is proposed to separate the breast MR images into different tissues. Then, an improved volume rendering algorithm based on a new transfer function model is applied to implement 3D breast visualization. Experimental results have been shown visually and have achieved reasonable consistency. PMID:23983676

  19. PIP breast implants: rupture rate and correlation with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    MOSCHETTA, M.; TELEGRAFO, M.; CORNACCHIA, I.; VINCENTI, L.; RANIERI, V.; CIRILLI, A.; RELLA, L.; IANORA, A.A. STABILE; ANGELELLI, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the incidence of Poly Implant Prosthése (PIP) rupture as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the prevalence of the detected signs and the potential correlation with breast carcinoma. Patients and methods 67 patients with silicone breast implants and clinical indications for breast MRI were evaluated for a total of 125 implants: 40 (32%) PIP in 21 patients and 85 non-PIP in 46 patients (68%), the latest considered as control group. A 1.5-T MR imaging device was used in order to assess implant integrity with dedicated sequences and in 6 cases a dynamic study was performed for characterizing breast lesions. Two radiologists with more than 5 years’ experience in the field of MRI evaluated in consensus all MR images searching for the presence of clear signs of intra or extra-capsular implant rupture. Results 20/40 (50%) PIP implants presented signs of intra-capsular rupture: linguine sign in 20 cases (100%), tear-drop sign in 6 (30%). In 12/20 cases (60%), MRI signs of extra-capsular rupture were detected. In the control group, an intra-capsular rupture was diagnosed in 12/85 cases (14%) associated with extra-capsular one in 5/12 cases (42%). Among the six cases with suspected breast lesions, in 2/21 patients with PIP implants (10%) a breast carcinoma was diagnosed (mucinous carcinoma, n=1; invasive ductal carcinoma, n=1). In 4/46 patients (9%) with non-PIP implants, an invasive ductal carcinoma was diagnosed. Conclusion The rupture rate of PIP breast implants is significantly higher than non-PIP (50% vs 14%). MRI represents the most accurate imaging tool for evaluating breast prostheses and the linguine sign is the most common MRI sign to be searched. The incidence of breast carcinoma does not significantly differ between the PIP and non-PIP implants and a direct correlation with breast cancer can not been demonstrated. PMID:25644728

  20. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Findings after Surgical Lipomodeling in a Breast Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    Daye, Dania; Conant, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting or lipomodeling is a newly-adopted technique that is gaining increasing popularity in the treatment of contour deformities following breast conservation therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with a prior history of breast cancer treated with a lumpectomy and radiation therapy. She underwent lipomodeling not only of her treated breast but also of the contralateral breast. She presented for her annual mammogram which was performed with digital breast tomosynthesis. On imaging, a space-occupying lesion of mixed density was seen, expanding the lumpectomy site. There was also subtle distortion in the contralateral, non-treated breast. This case aims to highlight the mammographic and tomosynthesis findings seen following lipomodeling that may present diagnostic challenges in this patient population. PMID:25426245

  1. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  2. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  3. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  4. [Minimally invasive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Kunos, Csaba; Sávolt, Akos; Farkas, Emil; Szollár, András; Kásler, Miklós

    2014-02-01

    Due to the development in medical science and industrial technology, minimally invasive procedures have appeared in the surgery of benign and malignant breast diseases. In general , such interventions result in significantly reduced breast and chest wall scars, shorter hospitalization and less pain, but they require specific, expensive devices, longer surgical time compared to open surgery. Furthermore, indications or oncological safety have not been established yet. It is quite likely, that minimally invasive surgical procedures with high-tech devices - similar to other surgical subspecialties -, will gradually become popular and it may form part of routine breast surgery even. Vacuum-assisted core biopsy with a therapeutic indication is suitable for the removal of benign fibroadenomas leaving behind an almost invisible scar, while endoscopically assisted skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy, axillary staging and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap are all feasible through the same short axillary incision. Endoscopic techniques are also suitable for the diagnostics and treatment of intracapsular complications of implant-based breast reconstructions (intracapsular fluid, implant rupture, capsular contracture) and for the biopsy of intracapsular lesions with uncertain pathology. Perception of the role of radiofrequency ablation of breast tumors requires further hands-on experience, but it is likely that it can serve as a replacement of surgical removal in a portion of primary tumors in the future due to the development in functional imaging and anticancer drugs. With the reduction of the price of ductoscopes routine examination of the ductal branch system, guided microdochectomy and targeted surgical removal of terminal ducto-lobular units or a "sick lobe" as an anatomical unit may become feasible. The paper presents the experience of the authors and provides a literature review, for the first time in Hungarian language on the subject. Orv. Hetil

  5. Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of parathyroid gland and lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dimashkieh, Haytham; Krishnamurthy, Savitri

    2006-01-01

    Background Parathyroid gland and their tumors comprise a small proportion of non-palpable neck masses that are investigated by ultrasound (US) guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. We reviewed our institution's cases of US guided FNAB of parathyroid gland and their lesions to determine the role of cytology for the preoperative diagnosis of parathyroid gland and their lesions. Method All cases of FNAB of parathyroid gland and lesions in the last 10 years were reviewed in detail with respect to clinical history and correlated with the histopathologic findings in available cases. The cytologic parameters that were evaluated included cellularity assessed semiquantitatively as scant, intermediate or abundant (<50, 51–500 or >500 cells), cellular distribution (loose clusters, single cells/naked nuclei, rounded clusters, two- and three-dimensional clusters, and presence of prominent vascular proliferation), cellular characteristics (cell size, nuclear shape, presence/absence of a nucleolus, degree of mitosis, amount of cytoplasm, and appearance of nuclear chromatin), and background (colloid-like material and macrophages). Immunostaining for parathyroid hormone (PTH) was performed on selected cases using either destained Pap smears or cell block sections. Results Twenty cases of US-guided FNAB of parathyroid glands and their lesions including 13 in the expected locations in the neck, 3 in intrathyroid region, 3 in thyroid bed, and 1 metastatic to liver were studied. Majority of the cases showed intermediate cellularity (51–500 cells) with round to oval cells that exhibited a stippled nuclear chromatin, without significant pleomorphism or mitotic activity. The cells were arranged in loose two dimensional groups with many single cells/naked nuclei around the groups. Occasionally macrophages and colloid like material was also encountered. There was no significant difference in the cytomorphologic features between normal gland, hyperplasia adenoma, or carcinoma

  6. Hand-held and automated breast ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Kimme-Smith, C.

    1985-01-01

    The book is a guide for physicians and technologists who use US as an adjunct to mammography; it carefully outlines the pros and cons of US of the breast and its role in the diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. After an introduction that discusses the philosophy of breast US, the chapters cover the physics of US and instrumentation (both hand-held transducers as well as automated water path scanners), then proceed to a discussion of the normal breast. Sections on benign disorders, malignant lesions, and pitfalls of diagnosis are followed by quiz cases.

  7. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  8. Hypervascular liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Maturen, Katherine E; Tye, Grace A; Liu, Yueyi I; Parti, Naveen N; Desser, Terry S

    2009-10-01

    Hypervascular hepatocellular lesions include both benign and malignant etiologies. In the benign category, focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma are typically hypervascular. In addition, some regenerative nodules in cirrhosis may be hypervascular. Malignant hypervascular primary hepatocellular lesions include hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar carcinoma, and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Vascular liver lesions often appear hypervascular because they tend to follow the enhancement of the blood pool; these include hemangiomas, arteriovenous malformations, angiosarcomas, and peliosis. While most gastrointestinal malignancies that metastasize to the liver will appear hypovascular on arterial and portal-venous phase imaging, certain cancers such as metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors) tend to produce hypervascular metastases due to the greater recruitment of arterial blood supply. Finally, rare hepatic lesions such as glomus tumor and inflammatory pseudotumor may have a hypervascular appearance. PMID:19842564

  9. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Adenosis in the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Gity, Masoumeh; Arabkheradmand, Ali; Shakiba, Madjid; Khademi, Yassaman; Bijan, Bijan; Sadaghiani, Mohammad Salehi; Jalali, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenosis lesions of the breast, including sclerosing adenosis and adenosis tumors, are a group of benign proliferative disorders that may mimic the features of malignancy on imaging. In this study, we aim to describe the features of breast adenosis lesions with suspicious or borderline findings on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods In our database, we identified 49 pathologically proven breast adenosis lesions for which the final assessment of the breast MRI report was classified as either category 4 (n=45) or category 5 (n=4), according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) published by the American College of Radiology (ACR). The lesions had a final diagnosis of either pure adenosis (n=33, 67.3%) or mixed adenosis associated with other benign pathologies (n=16, 32.7%). Results Of the 49 adenosis lesions detected on DCE-MRI, 32 (65.3%) appeared as enhancing masses, 16 (32.7%) as nonmass enhancements, and one (2.1%) as a tiny enhancing focus. Analysis of the enhancing masses based on the ACR BI-RADS lexicon revealed that among the mass descriptors, the most common features were irregular shape in 12 (37.5%), noncircumscribed margin in 20 (62.5%), heterogeneous internal pattern in 16 (50.0%), rapid initial enhancement in 32 (100.0%), and wash-out delayed en-hancement pattern in 21 (65.6%). Of the 16 nonmass enhancing lesions, the most common descriptors included focal distribution in seven (43.8%), segmental distribution in six (37.5%), clumped internal pattern in nine (56.3%), rapid initial enhancement in 16 (100.0%), and wash-out delayed enhancement pattern in eight (50.0%). Conclusion Adenosis lesions of the breast may appear suspicious on breast MRI. Awareness of these suspi-cious-appearing features would be helpful in obviating unnecessary breast biopsies. PMID:26155296

  11. Molecular breast tomosynthesis with scanning focus multi-pinhole cameras.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Jarno; Goorden, Marlies C; Beekman, Freek J

    2016-08-01

    Planar molecular breast imaging (MBI) is rapidly gaining in popularity in diagnostic oncology. To add 3D capabilities, we introduce a novel molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) scanner concept based on multi-pinhole collimation. In our design, the patient lies prone with the pendant breast lightly compressed between transparent plates. Integrated webcams view the breast through these plates and allow the operator to designate the scan volume (e.g. a whole breast or a suspected region). The breast is then scanned by translating focusing multi-pinhole plates and NaI(Tl) gamma detectors together in a sequence that optimizes count yield from the volume-of-interest. With simulations, we compared MBT with existing planar MBI. In a breast phantom containing different lesions, MBT improved tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over planar MBI by 12% and 111% for 4.0 and 6.0 mm lesions respectively in case of whole breast scanning. For the same lesions, much larger CNR improvements of 92% and 241% over planar MBI were found in a scan that focused on a breast region containing several lesions. MBT resolved 3.0 mm rods in a Derenzo resolution phantom in the transverse plane compared to 2.5 mm rods distinguished by planar MBI. While planar MBI cannot provide depth information, MBT offered 4.0 mm depth resolution. Our simulations indicate that besides offering 3D localization of increased tracer uptake, multi-pinhole MBT can significantly increase tumour-to-background CNR compared to planar MBI. These properties could be promising for better estimating the position, extend and shape of lesions and distinguishing between single and multiple lesions. PMID:27384301

  12. Molecular breast tomosynthesis with scanning focus multi-pinhole cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roosmalen, Jarno; Goorden, Marlies C.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2016-08-01

    Planar molecular breast imaging (MBI) is rapidly gaining in popularity in diagnostic oncology. To add 3D capabilities, we introduce a novel molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) scanner concept based on multi-pinhole collimation. In our design, the patient lies prone with the pendant breast lightly compressed between transparent plates. Integrated webcams view the breast through these plates and allow the operator to designate the scan volume (e.g. a whole breast or a suspected region). The breast is then scanned by translating focusing multi-pinhole plates and NaI(Tl) gamma detectors together in a sequence that optimizes count yield from the volume-of-interest. With simulations, we compared MBT with existing planar MBI. In a breast phantom containing different lesions, MBT improved tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over planar MBI by 12% and 111% for 4.0 and 6.0 mm lesions respectively in case of whole breast scanning. For the same lesions, much larger CNR improvements of 92% and 241% over planar MBI were found in a scan that focused on a breast region containing several lesions. MBT resolved 3.0 mm rods in a Derenzo resolution phantom in the transverse plane compared to 2.5 mm rods distinguished by planar MBI. While planar MBI cannot provide depth information, MBT offered 4.0 mm depth resolution. Our simulations indicate that besides offering 3D localization of increased tracer uptake, multi-pinhole MBT can significantly increase tumour-to-background CNR compared to planar MBI. These properties could be promising for better estimating the position, extend and shape of lesions and distinguishing between single and multiple lesions.

  13. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  14. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  15. Petrous Apex Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in treating 69 patients over the past 6 years with pathologic processes involving the petrous apex. These included 25 (36%) primary petrous apex lesions, 40 (58%) lesions that involved the petrous apex by direct invasion from an adjacent region, and four (6%) lesions that were the result of metastatic spread from a distant site. Although lesions of the petrous apex are uncommon, they may present significant morbidity to the patient. The symptoms elicited by these lesions are usually vague and nonlocalizing in the early stages but may progress to include multiple cranial neuropathies. Successful results are contingent on early diagnosis, which requires a high index of suspicion and use of appropriate imaging modalities. Thorough preoperative assessment with use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and carotid arteriography is essential to plan the surgical approach. We present this collection of patients in order to aid in the further preoperative characterization of the differences in primary and secondary lesions of the petrous apex. PMID:17170919

  16. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  17. Breast ultrasound scans – surgeons’ expectations

    PubMed Central

    Bednarski, Piotr; Chrapowicki, Eryk; Jakubowski, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a dynamic development of mammary gland imaging techniques, particularly ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. A challenge related to these studies is the increase in the precision of the anatomical assessment of breast, particularly for early detection of subclinical lesions, performance of ultrasound-guided biopsy procedures, and accurate preoperative location of pathological lesions so as to optimize the surgical treatment. Ultrasound imaging is a primary and baseline diagnostic procedure the patient with suspected pathological lesions within breast is referred to by the surgeon. Lesions visualized in ultrasound scans are classified according to the BI-RADS US assessment categories. The successive categories (2 through 6) encompass individual pathological lesions, estimating the risk of malignancy and provide guidelines for further diagnostic and therapeutic management. This article described the important aspects of ultrasonographic imaging of focal lesions within the breasts as significant from the standpoint of surgical treatment of patients falling within BI-RADS US categories 3, 4, 5, and 6. Attention is drawn to the importance of ultrasound scans in the assessment of axillary fossa lymph nodes before the decision regarding the surgical treatment. PMID:26675118

  18. Spectral lesion characterization on a photon-counting mammography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Klaus; Fredenberg, Erik; Homann, Hanno; Roessl, Ewald

    2014-03-01

    Spectral X-ray imaging allows to differentiate between two given tissue types, provided their spectral absorption characteristics differ measurably. In mammography, this method is used clinically to determine a decomposition of the breast into adipose and glandular tissue compartments, from which the glandular tissue fraction and, hence, the volumetric breast density (VBD) can be computed. Another potential application of this technique is the characterization of lesions by spectral mammography. In particular, round lesions are relatively easily detected by experienced radiologists, but are often difficult to characterize. Here, a method is described that aims at discriminating cystic from solid lesions directly on a spectral mammogram, obtained with a calibrated spectral mammography system and using a hypothesis-testing algorithm based on a maximum likelihood approach. The method includes a parametric model describing the lesion shape, compression height variations and breast composition. With the maximum likelihood algorithm, the model parameters are estimated separately under the cyst and solid hypothesis. The resulting ratio of the maximum likelihood values is used for the final tissue characterization. Initial results using simulations and phantom measurements are presented.

  19. IN VIVO BREAST SOUND-SPEED IMAGING WITH ULTRASOUND TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cuiping; Duric, Nebojsa; Littrup, Peter; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1 through 4. Our analysis showed that the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m · s)−1) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4-fold compared with the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422±9 m/s (mean±SD) and 1487±21 m/s, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions 1548±17 m/s was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513±27 m/s) (one-sided p < 0.001). These results suggest that, clinically, sound-speed tomograms can be used to assess breast density (and therefore, breast cancer risk), as well as detect and help differentiate breast lesions. Finally, our sound-speed tomograms may also be a useful tool to monitor the clinical response of breast cancer patients to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:19647920

  20. Giant pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia presenting in the breast of a prepubertal child.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Tarig; Young, Philippa; Kozyar, Olexandra; Davies, Eleri; Dojcinov, Stefan; Mansel, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Large benign lesions of the breasts are rare in children. We present a case of a 35 cm mass, weighing 2.7 kg in a 13-year-old girl with small developing breasts. Despite the enormity of the lesion, the patient managed to keep it concealed from her parents for 8 months. While initially suspicious of sarcoma a diagnosis of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia was suggested radiologically and confirmed histologically. Excision with reduction mammoplasty was performed, care taken not to disrupt the remaining breast tissue to facilitate future breast development. 18 months on, the cosmetic appearance of the breasts is good, with healthy underlying breast tissue developing. To the best of our knowledge this case is the largest documented breast tumour of this type in a patient of this age and illustrates the challenge of treating such tumours in the developing breast. PMID:26002664

  1. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  2. Prone breast tumor imaging using vertical axis-of-rotation (VAOR) SPECT systems: An initial study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huili; Scarfone, C.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    We propose the use of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system equipped with multiple cameras revolving around a vertical axis-of-rotation (VAOR) to image tumors in a prone-dependent breast. This innovative breast imaging approach has the advantages of a small attenuation volume between breast lesions and gamma detector as well as a minimal radius-of-rotation compared to conventional (horizontal axis-of-rotation) breast SPECT. Small attenuation volume results in improved detected counts and minimal radius-of-rotation leads to increased collimator resolution. Because of no VAOR SPECT system currently available, we conducted our experiments on a conventional SPECT system using an isolated breast phantom to investigate the proposed VAOR breast SPECT. Our experimental setup simulated a VAOR SPECT study with a prone-dependent breast in the camera`s field-of-view. The results of our experiment indicate that VAOR breast SPECT with Trionix LESR parallel hole collimator is capable of detecting a breast lesion with a diameter of 10 mm and a lesion-to-background concentration ratio of 6 to 1. The results also demonstrate that VAOR breast SPECT provides improved lesion visualization over planar scintimammography and conventional breast SPECT.

  3. Lactating Adenoma of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Barco Nebreda, Israel; Vidal, M Carmen; Fraile, Manel; Canales, Lydia; González, Clarisa; Giménez, Nuria; García-Fernández, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Lactating adenoma is an uncommon breast palpable lesion occurring in pregnancy or lactation. Although it is a benign condition, it often requires core biopsy or even surgery to exclude malignancy. As with other solid lesions in pregnancy and lactation, lactating adenoma needs an accurate evaluation in order to ensure its benign nature. Work-up must include both imaging and histologic findings. Ultrasound evaluation remains the first step in assessing the features of the lesion. Some authors consider magnetic resonance imaging as a useful tool in cases of inconclusive evaluation after ultrasound and histologic exam in an attempt to avoid surgery. Most lactating adenomas resolve spontaneously, whereas others persist or even increase in size and must be removed. The authors present a case of a 35-year-old woman at 6 months postpartum with a lactating adenoma in her right breast. After surgical removal, breastfeeding was perfectly continued within the next 24 hours, which highlights the fact that breast surgery is most often compatible with breastfeeding. PMID:27197575

  4. Intracystic papillary breast carcinoma with areas of infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Martín Gutiérrez, Silvia; Nieto Gallo, María Antonia; Noguero Meseguera, Rosario; Rodríguez Prieto, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic papillary carcinoma of the breast associated with areas of infiltration is rare in that it constitutes less than 1% of breast cancers. After initial radiological study, these tumors show lesions with little likelihood of malignancy in a high proportion of cases. Two cases of intracystic papillary carcinoma associated with infiltration were diagnosed at the Breast Unit of Hospital Infanta Cristina. In both cases, the reason for consultation arose after palpation of a nodule and the initial radiographic analyses showed lesions with little likelihood of malignancy. PMID:24893058

  5. Malignant lymphoma of the breast in a male patient: ultrasound imaging features.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tatsuhiko; Bando, Hiroko; Iguchi, Akiko; Tanaka, Yuko; Tohno, Eriko; Hara, Hisato

    2015-03-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) of the breast is a rare disease. Herein, we report a rare case of secondary involvement of the breast by NHL in a male patient and the ultrasound imaging findings. A 70-year-old man noticed an induration of the subareolar region of the right breast. He had been diagnosed as having mantle cell lymphoma 5 years before and treated with several series of chemoradiotherapy. On supine examination, palpation revealed bilateral breast enlargement, but detection of a lump was difficult. Ultrasonography showed a hypoechoic non-mass image-forming lesion in the subareolar region of the right breast. The final pathological diagnosis was recurrence of mantle cell lymphoma in the right breast. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma of the breast by imaging modalities is difficult because there are no specific features. Breast lymphoma should be included with gynecomastia and breast cancer in the differential diagnosis of male patients with breast enlargement. PMID:22396322

  6. Breast Feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on breast-feeding. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, academics and professionals, health personnel and educators, and policy-makers. The contents cover health-related differences between breast and bottle milk; patterns of…

  7. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it. PMID:27533387

  8. Lesion detection and quantitation of positron emission mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-12-01

    A Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) scanner dedicated to breast imaging is being developed at our laboratory. We have developed a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm for this scanner. Here we theoretically study the lesion detection and quantitation. The lesion detectability is studied theoretically using computer observers. We found that for the zero-order quadratic prior, the region of interest observer can achieve the performance of the prewhitening observer with a properly selected smoothing parameter. We also study the lesion quantitation using the test statistic of the region of interest observer. The theoretical expressions for the bias, variance, and ensemble mean squared error of the quantitation are derived. Computer simulations show that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo results for both lesion detection and quantitation.

  9. Diagnostic value of dynamic and morphologic breast MRI analysis in the diagnosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stusińska, Małgorzata; Szabo-Moskal, Jadwiga; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Mammography is the most widely used method of breast imaging. However, its low sensitivity poses a problem. Breast MRI is one of so the called “complementary” breast imaging methods. The purpose of this study was to improve the specificity of breast MRI by combining 2 methods: dynamic and morphologic analysis of enhancing lesions. Material/Methods 222 women aged 19–76 years, who underwent breast MRI examination between November 2002 and April 2004 at the Radiology Department of Oncology Center in Bydgoszcz, were included in this study. Results The pathological examination revealed cancer in 55 women (25%). No cancer was found in 167 women (75%), 56 of which were verified pathologically, 111 by cytology and/or during follow-up (at least 24 months). Results of breast MRI were positive in 80 women (36%), in 54 of which cancer was found during pathological examination, 26 breast MRI results were false positive. Sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI for dynamic analysis were 87% and 72%, respectively; in case of morphologic analysis 98% and 74%, respectively. The combined dynamic and morphologic analysis achieved high (84%) specificity without loss of sensitivity (98%). The difference in specificity between the evaluated methods was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusions The combined dynamic and morphologic breast MRI analysis is a useful method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:24847391

  10. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alex C; Hitt, Austin N; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  11. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  12. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  13. Vitronectin: a promising breast cancer serum biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer in patients.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wende; Zhang, Xuhui; Xiu, Bingshui; Yang, Xiqin; Hu, Shuofeng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Duan, Cuimi; Jin, Shujuan; Ying, Xiaomin; Zhao, Yanfeng; Han, Xiaowei; Hao, Xiaopeng; Fan, Yawen; Johnson, Heather; Meng, Di; Persson, Jenny L; Zhang, Heqiu; Feng, XiaoYan; Huang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, identification of new biomarkers for early diagnosis and detection will improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. In the present study, we determined serum levels of vitronectin (VN) in 93 breast cancer patients, 30 benign breast lesions, 9 precancerous lesions, and 30 healthy individuals by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Serum VN level was significantly higher in patients with stage 0-I primary breast cancer than in healthy individuals, patients with benign breast lesion or precancerous lesions, as well as those with breast cancer of higher stages. Serum VN level was significantly and negatively correlated with tumor size, lymph node status, and clinical stage (p < 0.05 in all cases). In addition, VN displayed higher area under curve (AUC) value (0.73, 95 % confidence interval (CI) [0.62-0.84]) than carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (0.64, 95 % CI [0.52-0.77]) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) (0.69, 95 % CI [0.58-0.81]) when used to distinguish stage 0-I cancer and normal control. Importantly, the combined use of three biomarkers yielded an improvement in receiver operating characteristic curve with an AUC of 0.83, 95 % CI [0.74-0.92]. Taken together, our current study showed for the first time that serum VN is a promising biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer when combined with CEA and CA15-3. PMID:26753956

  14. [Mammographic evaluation of dense breasts: techniques and limits].

    PubMed

    Chérel, P; Hagay, C; Benaim, B; De Maulmont, C; Engerand, S; Langer, A; Talma, V

    2008-09-01

    Breast density is a radiological concept based on the proportion of radiopaque glandular tissue relative to radiolucent fatty tissue. Mammographic evaluation of dense breasts is more difficult, related to technical difficulties, with decreased rates for detection and characterization of breast lesions, resulting in reduced sensitivity with increased number of interval cancers at routine follow-up when compared to radiolucent breasts. We will review the definition of dense breasts and their frequency, especially their relationship with the age of patients. We will discuss the current technical problems and the impact of breast density on the efficacy of conventional mammography. We will discuss the value of digital mammography, the role of computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) systems and tomosynthesis in the evaluation of dense breasts. PMID:18772800

  15. Molecular breast imaging using a dedicated high-performance instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael K.; Wagenaar, Douglas; Hruska, Carrie B.; Phillips, Stephen; Caravaglia, Gina; Rhodes, Deborah

    2006-08-01

    In women with radiographically dense breasts, the sensitivity of mammography is less than 50%. With the increase in the percent of women with dense breasts, it is important to look at alternative screening techniques for this population. This article reviews the strengths and weaknesses of current imaging techniques and focuses on recent developments in semiconductor-based gamma camera systems that offer significant improvements in image quality over that achievable with single-crystal sodium iodide systems. We have developed a technique known as Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) using small field of view Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras that permits the breast to be imaged in a similar manner to mammography, using light pain-free compression. Computer simulations and experimental studies have shown that use of low-energy high sensitivity collimation coupled with the excellent energy resolution and intrinsic spatial resolution of CZT detectors provides optimum image quality for the detection of small breast lesions. Preliminary clinical studies with a prototype dual-detector system have demonstrated that Molecular Breast Imaging has a sensitivity of ~90% for the detection of breast tumors less than 10 mm in diameter. By comparison, conventional scintimammography only achieves a sensitivity of 50% in the detection of lesions < 10 mm. Because Molecular Breast Imaging is not affected by breast density, this technique may offer an important adjunct to mammography in the evaluation of women with dense breast parenchyma.

  16. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  17. Nummular Eczema of Breast: A Potential Dermatologic Complication after Mastectomy and Subsequent Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iwahira, Yoshiko; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Shimizu, Yusuke; Kuwata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Purposes. The present paper reports clinical cases where nummular eczema developed during the course of breast reconstruction by means of implantation and evaluates the occurrence patterns and ratios of this complication. Methods. 1662 patients undergoing breast reconstruction were reviewed. Patients who developed nummular eczema during the treatment were selected, and a survey was conducted on these patients regarding three items: (1) the stage of the treatment at which nummular eczema developed; (2) time required for the lesion to heal; (3) location of the lesion on the reconstructed breast(s). Furthermore, histopathological examination was conducted to elucidate the etiology of the lesion. Results. 48 patients (2.89%) developed nummular eczema. The timing of onset varied among these patients, with lesions developing after the placement of tissue expanders for 22 patients (45.8%); after the tissue expanders were replaced with silicone implants for 12 patients (25%); and after nipple-areola complex reconstruction for 14 patients (29.2%). Nummular eczema developed both in periwound regions (20 cases: 41.7%) and in nonperiwound regions (32 cases: 66.7%). Histopathological examination showed epidermal acanthosis, psoriasiform patterns, and reduction of sebaceous glands. Conclusions. Surgeons should recognize that nummular eczema is a potential complication of breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and silicone implants. PMID:26380109

  18. Tactile imaging of palpable breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanchana, Rujirutana; Wang, Yue J.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Nguyen, Charles C.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a prototype Tactile Mapping Device (TMD) system comprised mainly of a tactile sensor array probe (TSAP), a 3-D camera, and a force/torque sensor, which can provide the means to produce tactile maps of the breast lumps during a breast palpation. Focusing on the key tactile topology features for breast palpation such as spatial location, size/shape of the detected lesion, and the force levels used to demonstrate the palpable abnormalities, these maps can record the results of clinical breast examination with a set of pressure distribution profiles and force sensor measurements due to detected lesion. By combining the knowledge of vision based, neural networks and tactile sensing technology; the TMD is integrated for the investigation of soft tissue interaction with tactile/force sensor, where the hard inclusion (breast cancer) can be characterized through neural network learning capability, instead of using simplified complex biomechanics model with many heuristic assumptions. These maps will serve as an objective documentation of palpable lesions for future comparative examinations. Preliminary results of simulated experiments and limited pre-clinical evaluations of the TMD prototype have tested this hypothesis and provided solid promising data showing the feasibility of the TMD in real clinical applications.

  19. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  20. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  1. Early breast cancer detection method based on a simulation study of single-channel passive microwave radiometry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Spiros A.; Savva, Andonis D.; Asvestas, Pantelis A.; Nikolopoulos, Christos D.; Capsalis, Christos N.; Cavouras, Dionisis A.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to provide a methodology for detecting temperature alterations in human breast, based on single channel microwave radiometer imaging. Radiometer measurements were simulated by modelling the human breast, the temperature distribution, and the antenna characteristics. Moreover, a simulated lesion of variable size and position in the breast was employed to provide for slight temperature changes in the breast. To detect the presence of a lesion, the temperature distribution in the breast was reconstructed. This was accomplished by assuming that temperature distribution is the mixture of distributions with unknown parameters, which were determined by means of the least squares and the singular value decomposition methods. The proposed method was validated in a variety of scenarios by altering the lesion size and location and radiometer position. The method proved capable in identifying temperature alterations caused by lesions, at different locations in the breast.

  2. Breast ultrasound tomography with two parallel transducer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Shin, Junseob; Chen, Ting; Lin, Youzuo; Gao, Kai; Intrator, Miranda; Hanson, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is an emerging imaging modality to reconstruct the sound speed, density, and ultrasound attenuation of the breast in addition to ultrasound reflection/beamforming images for breast cancer detection and characterization. We recently designed and manufactured a new synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography prototype with two parallel transducer arrays consisting of a total of 768 transducer elements. The transducer arrays are translated vertically to scan the breast in a warm water tank from the chest wall/axillary region to the nipple region to acquire ultrasound transmission and reflection data for whole-breast ultrasound tomography imaging. The distance of these two ultrasound transducer arrays is adjustable for scanning breasts with different sizes. We use our breast ultrasound tomography prototype to acquire phantom and in vivo patient ultrasound data to study its feasibility for breast imaging. We apply our recently developed ultrasound imaging and tomography algorithms to ultrasound data acquired using our breast ultrasound tomography system. Our in vivo patient imaging results demonstrate that our breast ultrasound tomography can detect breast lesions shown on clinical ultrasound and mammographic images.

  3. Breast-specific gamma-imaging: molecular imaging of the breast using 99mTc-sestamibi and a small-field-of-view gamma-camera.

    PubMed

    Jones, Elizabeth A; Phan, Trinh D; Blanchard, Deborah A; Miley, Abbe

    2009-12-01

    Breast-specific gamma-imaging (BSGI), also known as molecular breast imaging, is breast scintigraphy using a small-field-of-view gamma-camera and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. There are many different types of breast cancer, and many have characteristics making them challenging to detect by mammography and ultrasound. BSGI is a cost-effective, highly sensitive and specific technique that complements other imaging modalities currently being used to identify malignant lesions in the breast. Using the current Society of Nuclear Medicine guidelines for breast scintigraphy, Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital began conducting BSGI, breast scintigraphy with a breast-optimized gamma-camera. In our experience, optimal imaging has been conducted in the Breast Center by a nuclear medicine technologist. In addition, the breast radiologists read the BSGI images in correlation with the mammograms, ultrasounds, and other imaging studies performed. By modifying the current Society of Nuclear Medicine protocol to adapt it to the practice of breast scintigraphy with these new systems and by providing image interpretation in conjunction with the other breast imaging studies, our center has found BSGI to be a valuable adjunctive procedure in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The development of a small-field-of-view gamma-camera, designed to optimize breast imaging, has resulted in improved detection capabilities, particularly for lesions less than 1 cm. Our experience with this procedure has proven to aid in the clinical work-up of many of our breast patients. After reading this article, the reader should understand the history of breast scintigraphy, the pharmaceutical used, patient preparation and positioning, imaging protocol guidelines, clinical indications, and the role of breast scintigraphy in breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:19914975

  4. Mechanical Imaging of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the physical basis for elasticity imaging of the breast by measuring breast skin stress patterns that result from a force sensor array pressed against the breast tissue. Temporal and spatial changes in the stress pattern allow detection of internal structures with different elastic properties and assessment of geometrical and mechanical parameters of these structures. The method entitled mechanical imaging is implemented in the breast mechanical imager (BMI), a compact device consisting of a hand held probe equipped with a pressure sensor array, a compact electronic unit, and a touchscreen laptop computer. Data acquired by the BMI allows calculation of size, shape, consistency/hardness, and mobility of detected lesions. The BMI prototype has been validated in laboratory experiments on tissue models and in an ongoing clinical study. The obtained results prove that the BMI has potential to become a screening and diagnostic tool that could largely supplant clinical breast examination through its higher sensitivity, quantitative record storage, ease-of-use, and inherent low cost. PMID:18753043

  5. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  6. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the cancer removed (lumpectomy or breast-conserving surgery) might not need reconstruction, but sometimes they do. Breast reconstruction is done by a plastic surgeon. Should I have breast reconstruction? Breast reconstruction ...

  7. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  9. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  10. Premenstrual breast changes

    MedlinePlus

    Premenstrual tenderness and swelling of the breasts; Breast tenderness - premenstrual; Breast swelling - premenstrual ... Symptoms of premenstrual breast tenderness may range from mild to ... most severe just before each menstrual period Improve during ...

  11. Breast enlargement in males

    MedlinePlus

    Gynecomastia; Breast enlargement in a male ... The condition may occur in one or both breasts. It begins as a small lump beneath the nipple, which may be tender. One breast may be larger than the other. Enlarged breasts ...

  12. Fibrocystic breast disease

    MedlinePlus

    Fibrocystic breast disease; Mammary dysplasia; Diffuse cystic mastopathy; Benign breast disease; Glandular breast changes ... made in the ovaries may make a woman's breasts feel swollen, lumpy, or painful before or during ...

  13. Breast augmentation surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the shape of your breasts. Talk with a plastic surgeon if you are considering breast augmentation. Discuss ... mammograms or breast x-rays before surgery. The plastic surgeon will do a routine breast exam. Several ...

  14. Changes to Your Breasts

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ Home Body Puberty Changes to your breasts Changes to your breasts It’s natural for girls to ... of your breasts. What about lumps and other changes? top Most of the changes your breasts will ...

  15. Genital lesions following bestiality.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Shenoi, S D; Kumar, K B; Sharma, P V

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution. PMID:20877040

  16. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) combined with postoperative radiotherapy is a standard therapy for early-stage breast cancer patients. In addition, recent developments in oncoplastic surgery have improved cosmetic outcomes and patient satisfaction. Therefore, a breast surgeon’s current role in BCS is not only to perform a curative resection of cancerous lesions with adequate surgical margins, but also to preserve the shape and appearance of the treated breast. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery (EBCS), which has the advantage of a less noticeable scar, was developed more than ten years ago. Recently, some clinical studies have reported the feasibility, oncological outcomes, aesthetic outcomes, and patient satisfaction of EBCS. Herein, we will review the EBCS clinical studies that have been conducted so far and discuss current issues regarding this operative method. PMID:25083503

  17. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance that you could develop breast cancer: Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family history, you cannot control. The more risk factors you have, the more your risk increases. ...

  18. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Hacker NF, Friedland ML. Breast disease. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 30. Harvey ...

  19. Breast Density and Your Breast Mammogram Report

    MedlinePlus

    Breast Density and Your Mammogram Report Regular mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early. But if ... But in some women, there’s little change. Breast density is very common, and is not abnormal. How ...

  20. A Case of Choroidal Melanoma Metastatic to the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Taran-Munteanu, L.; Hartkopf, A.; Eigentler, T. K.; Vogel, U.; Brucker, S.; Taran, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman developed blurred vision in her left eye in December 2006. A clinical diagnosis of choroidal melanoma was made. The patient underwent excision of the left lens, followed by vitrectomy and stereotactic radiotherapy. She remained systemically healthy until 50 months later when, during a CT scan done for staging purposes, a newly visible lump was noted in the lower quadrant of her left breast. Core needle biopsy of the lesion in the left breast was performed, and histologic examination revealed metastasis from the choroidal melanoma. The patient underwent breast-conserving surgery of the left breast. Definitive histological examination showed clear tumor margins in the resected specimen and one sentinel lymph node without evidence of metastatic cells. Twenty-nine months after surgery, a similar nodule was detected in the upper quadrant of the left breast. Core biopsy again showed metastatic melanoma, and similar breast-conserving surgery was performed. Systemic examination, including magnetic resonance imaging of the head and computed tomography of the pelvis, abdomen, and chest, was done regularly and revealed no significant findings. Solitary breast metastases from choroidal melanoma are extremely rare. Nevertheless, clinicians should be aware of this rare form of metastasis when treating patients with suspicious breast lesions and a history of choroidal melanoma. If solitary metastasis is confirmed, then breast-conserving surgery may be recommended. PMID:27239068

  1. A Case of Secondary Angiosarcoma of the Breast after Breast-conserving Surgery and Radiation: Review of Radiologic and Pathologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Eppelheimer, Christine N; Marti, Jennifer L; Eisenberg, Amanda; Gan, Qiong; Shabalova, Rena; Cohen, Jean-Marc; Fulop, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma of the breast is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It can present as a palpable mass or subtle erythematous lesion, depending on the predisposing clinical factors. Erythematous skin lesions may be confused for a benign process, which may lead to a delay in diagnosis. We present a case of an 80-year-old woman who developed secondary angiosarcoma after undergoing breast-conserving therapy for Stage IA breast cancer. In this article, we review our experience with a case of secondary angiosarcoma of the breast and discuss the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of this disease. This case demonstrates the importance of vigilance regarding erythematous or papular breast lesions in the setting of prior local radiation. PMID:26430538

  2. Descriptive Analysis of Oligometastatic Lesions Treated With Curative-Intent Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T. Katz, Alan W.; Schell, Michael C.; Philip, Abraham; Okunieff, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize oligometastases in patients enrolled on two prospective pilot studies, treating oligometastases with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery to cranial lesions. Methods and Materials: We describe the characteristics and local control (LC) of 293 lesions in 121 patients with five or fewer metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation and/or cranial stereotactic radiosurgery. For each lesion, the primary cancer site, tumor histology, site of metastasis, gross tumor volume, and prescribed dose were ascertained. The prescribed dose is expressed by the biologically effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (BED2), calculated using the linear quadratic model, assuming an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10. Results: Lung lesions were significantly smaller than other lesions in our cohort, whereas liver lesions were significantly larger, possibly reflecting a detection and/or referral bias. The 2-year and 4-year tumor LC rates were 77% and 73% respectively. A larger gross tumor volume was significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with worse lesion LC. Lesions originating from primary pancreatic, biliary or liver cancer exhibited significantly poorer LC, as did lesions from colorectal cancer. Lesions from breast cancer were better controlled. A higher BED2 did not correlate with improved tumor control. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation to aggressively treat oligometastatic lesions results in good local tumor control. Bulkier lesions are more difficult to control and may benefit from dose escalation.

  3. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Newell, Mary S; Mahoney, Mary C

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tissue sampling of the breast has positively altered the management of breast lesions, both benign and malignant, since its inception in the 1980s and subsequent widespread acceptance in the 1990s. Its safety, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness have been validated in several studies. However, percutaneous biopsy serves a patient best when performed by an operator with full awareness of patient׳s salient imaging findings; a knowledge of the benefits, limitations, and technical requirements of breast ultrasound; and a thorough understanding of what constitutes an adequate and concordant pathologic specimen. This article outlines a general approach to ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous breast biopsy and discusses indications, potential complications, and technical aspects of the procedure. PMID:24636328

  4. The quantitative potential for breast tomosynthesis imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, Christina M.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Due to its limited angular scan range, breast tomosynthesis has lower resolution in the depth direction, which may limit its accuracy in quantifying tissue density. This study assesses the quantitative potential of breast tomosynthesis using relatively simple reconstruction and image processing algorithms. This quantitation could allow improved characterization of lesions as well as image processing to present tomosynthesis images with the familiar appearance of mammography by preserving more low-frequency information. Methods: All studies were based on a Siemens prototype MAMMOMAT Novation TOMO breast tomo system with a 45 deg. total angular span. This investigation was performed using both simulations and empirical measurements. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using the breast tomosynthesis geometry and tissue-equivalent, uniform, voxelized phantoms with cuboid lesions of varying density embedded within. Empirical studies were then performed using tissue-equivalent plastic phantoms which were imaged on the actual prototype system. The material surrounding the lesions was set to either fat-equivalent or glandular-equivalent plastic. From the simulation experiments, the effects of scatter, lesion depth, and background material density were studied. The empirical experiments studied the effects of lesion depth, background material density, x-ray tube energy, and exposure level. Additionally, the proposed analysis methods were independently evaluated using a commercially available QA breast phantom (CIRS Model 11A). All image reconstruction was performed with a filtered backprojection algorithm. Reconstructed voxel values within each slice were corrected to reduce background nonuniformities. Results: The resulting lesion voxel values varied linearly with known glandular fraction (correlation coefficient R{sup 2}>0.90) under all simulated and empirical conditions, including for the independent tests with the QA phantom. Analysis of variance performed

  5. Random forest learning of ultrasonic statistical physics and object spaces for lesion detection in 2D sonomammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheet, Debdoot; Karamalis, Athanasios; Kraft, Silvan; Noël, Peter B.; Vag, Tibor; Sadhu, Anup; Katouzian, Amin; Navab, Nassir; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Ray, Ajoy K.

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Early diagnosis can significantly improve lifeexpectancy and allow different treatment options. Clinicians favor 2D ultrasonography for breast tissue abnormality screening due to high sensitivity and specificity compared to competing technologies. However, inter- and intra-observer variability in visual assessment and reporting of lesions often handicaps its performance. Existing Computer Assisted Diagnosis (CAD) systems though being able to detect solid lesions are often restricted in performance. These restrictions are inability to (1) detect lesion of multiple sizes and shapes, and (2) differentiate between hypo-echoic lesions from their posterior acoustic shadowing. In this work we present a completely automatic system for detection and segmentation of breast lesions in 2D ultrasound images. We employ random forests for learning of tissue specific primal to discriminate breast lesions from surrounding normal tissues. This enables it to detect lesions of multiple shapes and sizes, as well as discriminate between hypo-echoic lesion from associated posterior acoustic shadowing. The primal comprises of (i) multiscale estimated ultrasonic statistical physics and (ii) scale-space characteristics. The random forest learns lesion vs. background primal from a database of 2D ultrasound images with labeled lesions. For segmentation, the posterior probabilities of lesion pixels estimated by the learnt random forest are hard thresholded to provide a random walks segmentation stage with starting seeds. Our method achieves detection with 99.19% accuracy and segmentation with mean contour-to-contour error < 3 pixels on a set of 40 images with 49 lesions.

  6. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  7. Novel lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Longbottom, C; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A

    2009-01-01

    Several non-invasive and novel aids for the detection of (and in some cases monitoring of) caries lesions have been introduced in the field of 'caries diagnostics' over the last 15 years. This chapter focusses on those available to dentists at the time of writing; continuing research is bound to lead to further developments in the coming years. Laser fluorescence is based on measurements of back-scattered fluorescence of a 655-nm light source. It enhances occlusal and (potentially) approximal lesion detection and enables semi-quantitative caries monitoring. Systematic reviews have identified false-positive results as a limitation. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence is another sensitive method to quantitatively detect and measure mineral loss both in enamel and some dentine lesions; again, the trade-offs with lower specificity when compared with clinical visual detection must be considered. Subtraction radiography is based on the principle of digitally superimposing two radiographs with exactly the same projection geometry. This method is applicable for approximal surfaces and occlusal caries involving dentine but is not yet widely available. Electrical caries measurements gather either site-specific or surface-specific information of teeth and tooth structure. Fixed-frequency devices perform best for occlusal dentine caries but the method has also shown promise for lesions in enamel and other tooth surfaces with multi-frequency approaches. All methods require further research and further validation in well-designed clinical trials. In the future, they could have useful applications in clinical practice as part of a personalized, comprehensive caries management system. PMID:19494675

  8. B-Spline Filtering for Automatic Detection of Calcification Lesions in Mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, G.; Sánchez, S.; Ruiz, M.

    2006-10-01

    Breast cancer continues to be an important health problem between women population. Early detection is the only way to improve breast cancer prognosis and significantly reduce women mortality. It is by using CAD systems that radiologist can improve their ability to detect, and classify lesions in mammograms. In this study the usefulness of using B-spline based on a gradient scheme and compared to wavelet and adaptative filtering has been investigated for calcification lesion detection and as part of CAD systems. The technique has been applied to different density tissues. A qualitative validation shows the success of the method.

  9. Breast cancer detection using phase contrast diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qizhi; Li, Changqing; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-02-01

    In this report, a phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography system, which can measure the refractive indices of human breast masses in vivo, is described. To investigate the utility of phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography (PCDOT) for differentiation of malignant and benign breast masses in humans, and to compare PCDOT with conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for analysis of breast masses in humans. 35 breast masses were imaged in 33 patients (mean age = 51 years; range 22-80 years) using PCDOT. Images characterizing the tissue refractive index, absorption and scattering of breast masses were obtained with a finite element-based reconstruction algorithm. The accuracies of absorption and scattering images were compared with images of refractive index in light of the pathology results. Absorption and scattering images were unable to accurately discriminate benign from malignant lesions. Malignant lesions tended to have decreased refractive index allowing them to discriminate from benign lesions in most cases. The sensitivity, specificity, false positive value, and overall accuracy for refractive index were 81.8%, 70.8%, 29.2%, and 74.3%, respectively. Overall we show that benign and malignant breast masses in humans demonstrate different refractive index and differences in refractive index properties can be used to discriminate benign from malignant masses in patients with high accuracy. This opens up a new avenue for improved breast cancer detection using NIR diffusing light.

  10. Histochemical identification of malignant and premalignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebow, Charles; Maloney, M. J.

    1991-06-01

    Malignant and transforming cells can be identified by biochemical parameters which can be used to localize lesions in situ for laser surgery. These cells express unique proteins, proteins in unusual quantities, or other biochemical alterations which can be utilized to image lesions of such cells. Several methods have been identified, both in vitro and in vivo, to identify such lesions. Several antibodies were examined for their properties of tissue identification, including CEA, F36/22, and AE1/AE3. F36/22, an antibody developed by M. T. Chu against human breast cancer cells, associated with two lines of oral cancer (KB and HCPC), and against two naturally occurring human oral squamous cell cancers. CEA, an antibody developed against human colon cancer, also reacted against both cell lines and both pathological samples. AE1/AE3, developed against normal fibrous components, also reacted against the samples, but in a much less regular manner. F36/22 associated with the histologically identifiably most dedifferentiated cells at the leading edge of the invading cancer. CEA, on the other hand, associated with more quiescent, older, established cancer cells. This demonstrates that antibodies developed against cancers of different organs can be used to identify a wide variety of cancers, and may have prognostic value. F36/22 coupled to fluorescein was used to identify oral cancer cells. Other properties of cancers and developing cancers can also be exploited to identify cancers, including their over-expression of tyrosine kinase and tyrosine kinase stimulating hormones such as Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF). A model of premalignant lesion produced in the hamster buccal cheek pouch with 6 week application of DMBA over-expresses constitutive tyrosine kinase which can be demonstrated biochemically. This initiated lesion can be promoted to frank cancer by growth factors released in response to laser surgery. Preliminary results suggest that these lesions can be identified by

  11. Sclerosing Lesions of the Orbit: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lokdarshi, Gautam; Pushker, Neelam; Bajaj, Mandeep S.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital sclerosing inflammation is a distinct group of pathologies characterized by indolent growth with minimal or no signs of inflammation. However, contrary to earlier classifications, it should not be considered a chronic stage of acute inflammation. Although rare, orbital IgG4-related disease has been associated with systemic sclerosing pseudotumor-like lesions. Possible mechanisms include autoimmune and IgG4 related defective clonal proliferation. Currently, there is no specific treatment protocol for IgG4-related disease although the response to low dose steroid provides a good response as compared to non-IgG4 sclerosing pseudotumor. Specific sclerosing inflammations (e.g. Wegener's disease, sarcoidosis, Sjogren's syndrome) and neoplasms (lymphoma, metastatic breast carcinoma) should be ruled out before considering idiopathic sclerosing inflammation as a diagnosis. PMID:26692715

  12. Intelligent computer-aided diagnosis system for breast MRI combining kinetic and morphological aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Lange, Oliver

    2008-04-01

    An intelligent medical systems based on a radial basis neural network is applied to the automatic classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI and compared with two standard mammographic reading methods. Such systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. Intelligent medical systems combining both kinetics and lesions' morphology are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  13. Toward quantification of breast tomosynthesis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Christina M.; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S.; Zerhouni, Moustafa; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2008-03-01

    Due to the high prevalence of breast cancer among women, much is being done to detect breast cancer earlier and more accurately. In current clinical practice, the most widely-used mode of breast imaging is mammography. Its main advantages are high sensitivity and low patient dose, although it is still merely a two-dimensional projection of a three-dimensional object. In digital breast tomosynthesis, a three-dimensional image of the breast can be reconstructed, but x-ray projection images of the breast are taken over a limited angular span. However, the breast tomosynthesis device itself is more similar to a digital mammography system and thus is a feasible replacement for mammography. Because of the angular undersampling in breast tomosynthesis, the reconstructed images are not considered quantitative, so a worthwhile question to answer would be whether the voxel values (VVs) in breast tomosynthesis images can be made to indicate tissue type as Hounsfield units do in CT. through some image processing scheme. To investigate this, simple phantoms were imaged consisting of layers of uniform, tissue-equivalent plastic for the background sandwiching a layer of interest containing multiple, small cuboids of tissue-equivalent plastic. After analyzing the reconstructed tomosynthesis images, it was found that the VV in each lesion increases linearly with tissue glandularity. However, for the two different x-ray tube energies and for the two different beam exposure levels tested, the trend-lines all have different slopes and y-intercepts. Thus, breast tomosynthesis has a definite potential to be quantitative, and it would be worthwhile to study other possible dependent parameters (phantom thickness, overall density, etc.) as well as alternative reconstruction algorithms.

  14. Improving diagnosis of atraumatic splenic lesions, part I: nonneoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Rozenblit, Alla M; Kaul, Bindu; Stein, Marjorie W; Mazzariol, Fernanda S

    2016-01-01

    Focal atraumatic splenic lesions often pose a diagnostic challenge on cross-sectional imaging. They can be categorized based on etiology as nonneoplastic (reviewed in Part I), benign neoplastic, and malignant neoplastic lesions. Lesions can also be characterized based on prevalence as common, uncommon, and rare. Familiarity with pertinent clinical parameters, etiology, pathology, prevalence, and ancillary features such as splenomegaly, concomitant hepatic involvement, and extrasplenic findings, in addition to knowledge of imaging spectra of these lesions, can improve diagnostic confidence. Since the nonneoplastic lesions are usually easily recognized, it is critical that the radiologist identifies them avoiding unnecessary work up. PMID:27317223

  15. Scintimammography as an Adjunctive Breast Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective X-ray mammography (XMM) represents the most useful screening tool in breast cancer detection, especially for patients over 50. Unfortunately, XMM is not reliable in the assessment of dense breast tissue found in approximately 25% of women younger than 50 years of age, or in differentiating scar tissue from a tumor. Currently, ultrasound (US) is being used as an adjunct to XMM, with the purpose of improving sensitivity and specificity of XMM in breast cancer detection. In an attempt to reduce the biopsy rate resulting from false positive tests, other adjunctive technologies are being explored, including scintimammography (SMM). A number of papers in the current literature suggest the high value of SMM in breast cancer detection. This evaluation addresses the clinical indications for and effectiveness of SMM in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The Technology SMM is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that uses radionuclides and has the ability to image malignant breast tumors. SMM requires the administration of a gamma-ray emitting radiopharmaceutical to the patient, and a camera for imaging the lesion. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for SMM is TC-99m-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile MIBI. Review Strategy In the 2003 Medical Advisory Secretariat assessment of SMM in the diagnosis of breast cancer, a structured search was used to identify English-language studies published between 1992 and October 2002. A meta-analysis was then conducted of the literature which compared the diagnostic value of SMM with US as the second line imaging technique. An updated search strategy was developed in order to identify all studies published from October 2002 to January 2007. Summary of Findings The results of the meta-analysis showed that SMM is as effective as US in differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions. However, there may be a role for SMM as a third line adjunctive technique in the evaluation of breast abnormalities, in particular

  16. Classification of breast computed tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas R.; Cervino, Laura I.; Boone, John M.; Lindfors, Karen K.

    2008-03-15

    Differences in breast tissue composition are important determinants in assessing risk, identifying disease in images and following changes over time. This paper presents an algorithm for tissue classification that separates breast tissue into its three primary constituents of skin, fat and glandular tissue. We have designed and built a dedicated breast CT scanner. Fifty-five normal volunteers and patients with mammographically identified breast lesions were scanned. Breast CT voxel data were filtered using a 5 pt median filter and the image histogram was computed. A two compartment Gaussian fit of histogram data was used to provide an initial estimate of tissue compartments. After histogram analysis, data were input to region-growing algorithms and classified as to belonging to skin, fat or gland based on their value and architectural features. Once tissues were classified, a more detailed analysis of glandular tissue patterns and a more quantitative analysis of breast composition was made. Algorithm performance assessment demonstrated very good or excellent agreement between algorithm and radiologist observers in 97.7% of the segmented data. We observed that even in dense breasts the fraction of glandular tissue seldom exceeded 50%. For most individuals the composition is better characterized as being a 70% (fat)-30% (gland) composition than a 50% (fat)-50% (gland) composition.

  17. Evaluation of the possibility to use thick slabs of reconstructed outer breast tomosynthesis slice images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Hannie; Dustler, Magnus; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2016-03-01

    The large image volumes in breast tomosynthesis (BT) have led to large amounts of data and a heavy workload for breast radiologists. The number of slice images can be decreased by combining adjacent image planes (slabbing) but the decrease in depth resolution can considerably affect the detection of lesions. The aim of this work was to assess if thicker slabbing of the outer slice images (where lesions seldom are present) could be a viable alternative in order to reduce the number of slice images in BT image volumes. The suggested slabbing (an image volume with thick outer slabs and thin slices between) were evaluated in two steps. Firstly, a survey of the depth of 65 cancer lesions within the breast was performed to estimate how many lesions would be affected by outer slabs of different thicknesses. Secondly, a selection of 24 lesions was reconstructed with 2, 6 and 10 mm slab thickness to evaluate how the appearance of lesions located in the thicker slabs would be affected. The results show that few malignant breast lesions are located at a depth less than 10 mm from the surface (especially for breast thicknesses of 50 mm and above). Reconstruction of BT volumes with 6 mm slab thickness yields an image quality that is sufficient for lesion detection for a majority of the investigated cases. Together, this indicates that thicker slabbing of the outer slice images is a promising option in order to reduce the number of slice images in BT image volumes.

  18. Differential diagnosis of breast masses in South Korean premenopausal women using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leproux, Anaïs; Kim, You Me; Min, Jun Won; McLaren, Christine E.; Chen, Wen-Pin; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Lee, Seung-ha; Chung, Phil-Sang; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-07-01

    Young patients with dense breasts have a relatively low-positive biopsy rate for breast cancer (˜1 in 7). South Korean women have higher breast density than Westerners. We investigated the benefit of using a functional and metabolic imaging technique, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI), to help the standard of care imaging tools to distinguish benign from malignant lesions in premenopausal Korean women. DOSI uses near-infrared light to measure breast tissue composition by quantifying tissue concentrations of water (ctH2O), bulk lipid (ctLipid), deoxygenated (ctHHb), and oxygenated (ctHbO2) hemoglobin. DOSI spectral signatures specific to abnormal tissue and absent in healthy tissue were also used to form a malignancy index. This study included 19 premenopausal subjects (average age 41±9), corresponding to 11 benign and 10 malignant lesions. Elevated lesion to normal ratio of ctH2O, ctHHb, ctHbO2, total hemoglobin (THb=ctHHb+ctHbO2), and tissue optical index (ctHHb×ctH2O/ctLipid) were observed in the malignant lesions compared to the benign lesions (p<0.02). THb and malignancy index were the two best single predictors of malignancy, with >90% sensitivity and specificity. Malignant lesions showed significantly higher metabolism and perfusion than benign lesions. DOSI spectral features showed high discriminatory power for distinguishing malignant and benign lesions in dense breasts of the Korean population.

  19. Visualization of basement membranes in normal breast and breast cancer tissues using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIUFENG; CHEN, GANG; QIU, JINGTING; LU, JIANPING; ZHU, WEIFENG; CHEN, JIANXIN; ZHUO, SHUANGMU; YAN, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Since basement membranes represent a critical barrier during breast cancer progression, timely imaging of these signposts is essential for early diagnosis of breast cancer. A label-free method using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence signals and second harmonic generation signals for analyzing the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues is likely to enable a better understanding of the pathophysiology of breast cancer and facilitate improved clinical management and treatment of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether MPM has the potential for label-free assessment of the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues. A total of 60 tissue section samples (comprising 30 fresh breast cancer specimens and 30 normal breast tissues) were first imaged (fresh, unfixed and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Comparisons were made between MPM imaging and gold standard sections for each specimen stained with H&E. Simply by visualizing morphological features appearing on multiphoton images, cancerous lesions may be readily identified by the loss of basement membrane and tumor cells characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. These results suggest that MPM has potential as a label-free method of imaging the morphology of basement membranes and cell features to effectively distinguish between normal and cancerous breast tissues. PMID:27313695

  20. Diagnosing breast cancer by using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Shafer-Peltier, Karen E.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Crowe, Joseph; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2005-08-01

    We employ Raman spectroscopy to diagnose benign and malignant lesions in human breast tissue based on chemical composition. In this study, 130 Raman spectra are acquired from ex vivo samples of human breast tissue (normal, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating carcinoma) from 58 patients. Data are fit by using a linear combination model in which nine basis spectra represent the morphologic and chemical features of breast tissue. The resulting fit coefficients provide insight into the chemical/morphological makeup of the tissue and are used to develop diagnostic algorithms. The fit coefficients for fat and collagen are the key parameters in the resulting diagnostic algorithm, which classifies samples according to their specific pathological diagnoses, attaining 94% sensitivity and 96% specificity for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal and benign tissues. The excellent results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in vivo to accurately classify breast lesions, thereby reducing the number of excisional breast biopsies that are performed. Author contributions: M.F., J.C., R.R.D., and M.S.F. designed research; A.S.H. and K.E.S.-P. performed research; A.S.H. and M.F. analyzed data; and A.S.H. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: DEH, ductal epithelial hyperplasia; ROC, receiver operating characteristic; N/C, nuclear-to-cytoplasm.

  1. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses. PMID:27261346

  2. Carcinoma in accessory axillary breast.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Seema; Mishra, Shashi Prakash; Kumar, Satendra; Khanna, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of carcinoma developing in an accessory breast. The patient presented with a progressive lump in her right axilla for 1 year. On examination, there was a well-developed nipple areola complex in the right axilla overlying a hard, fixed 5 × 3 cm lump. On investigation, core biopsy revealed poorly differentiated carcinoma of the breast. Mammography also revealed features of a malignant lesion with skin and muscle infiltration. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered followed by modified radical mastectomy after three cycles. Immunohistochemistry study showed positive status of oestrogen and progesterone receptors, and negative HER-2 neu. Three more cycles of chemotherapy along with 50 Gy radiotherapy were given in an adjuvant setting followed by hormone therapy. PMID:26260957

  3. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Thomas R.; Rumney, Robin M.H.; Schoof, Erwin M.; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M.; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R.; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia1. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions2–5 and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable6. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality6,7. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in ER-negative breast cancer patients. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK Ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonise and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications. PMID:26017313

  4. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  5. Significance of Additional Non-Mass Enhancement in Patients with Breast Cancer on Preoperative 3T Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yun Hee; Cho, Kyu Ran; Park, Eun Kyung; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Cho, Sung Bum; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2016-01-01

    Background In preoperative assessment of breast cancer, MRI has been shown to identify more additional breast lesions than are detectable using conventional imaging techniques. The characterization of additional lesions is more important than detection for optimal surgical treatment. Additional breast lesions can be included in focus, mass, and non-mass enhancement (NME) on MRI. According to the fifth edition of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS®), which includes several changes in the NME descriptors, few studies to date have evaluated NME in preoperative assessment of breast cancer. Objectives We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of BI-RADS descriptors in predicting malignancy for additional NME lesions detected on preoperative 3T dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Patients and Methods Between January 2008 and December 2012, 88 patients were enrolled in our study, all with NME lesions other than the index cancer on preoperative 3T DCE-MRI and all with accompanying histopathologic examination. The MRI findings were analyzed according to the BI-RADS MRI lexicon. We evaluated the size, distribution, internal enhancement pattern, and location of NME lesions relative to the index cancer (i.e., same quadrant, different quadrant, or contralateral breast). Results On histopathologic analysis of the 88 NME lesions, 73 (83%) were malignant and 15 (17%) were benign. Lesion size did not differ significantly between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.410). Malignancy was more frequent in linear (P = 0.005) and segmental (P = 0.011) distributions, and benignancy was more frequent in focal (P = 0.004) and regional (P < 0.001) NME lesions. The highest positive predictive value (PPV) for malignancy occurred in segmental (96.8%), linear (95.1%), clustered ring (100%), and clumped (92.0%) enhancement. Asymmetry demonstrated a high positive predictive value of 85.9%. The frequency of malignancy was higher

  6. Sonographic appearance of a metastasis to the breast from a cerebellar medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ternier, Frédéric; Hadjaj, Djamal; Jacquemier, Jocelyne

    2010-07-01

    We present the case of a 29-year-old woman with a medulloblastoma of the cerebellum who developed a breast mass during the course of her disease. Core biopsy of the breast lesion revealed a metastatic medulloblastoma. Development of metastasis to the breast from medulloblastoma is very rare and the prognosis for such patients is poor. It is important to distinguish primary breast cancer from metastasis to the breast, because the therapeutic options as well as the prognosis are very different. PMID:20544872

  7. Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Dina, R; Eusebi, V

    1999-05-01

    Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast are a heterogeneous group encompassing both epithelial and mesenchymal lesions. A granular appearance of the cytoplasm may be caused by the accumulation of secretory granules, mitochondria, or lysosomes. In the breast, mucoid carcinomas, carcinomas showing apocrine differentiation, and neuroendocrine carcinomas are well known entities, while tumors with oncocytic and acinic cell differentiation have been only recently recognized. An abundance of lysosomes is characteristic of Schwannian granular cell neoplasms, but smooth muscle cell tumors also may have this cytoplasmic feature. Awareness of all these possibilities when granular cells are found in breast lesions improves diagnostic accuracy and helps to avoid misdiagnosis of both benign lesions and malignant tumors. PMID:10452577

  8. Core needle biopsy versus fine needle aspiration biopsy in breast--a historical perspective and opportunities in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Aziza

    2011-05-01

    Breast fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) by palpation is on the decline, due to its limitations in diagnostic accuracy, decreased sensitivity, and its replacement with core needle biopsy (CNB). Despite its decreasing utility, superficial fine-needle aspiration (FNA) in breast is still the main modality for evaluating metastatic lesions, recurrence, and axillary lymph node metastasis. New modalities including proteomic pattern expression and methylation profiling of breast lesions are other promising techniques that can be used as ancillary tests for refining the diagnosis of breast lesions using FNAB. Image-guided breast FNA proves to be a successful alternative with high sensitivity and specificity. In this review, the advantages, disadvantages, and inherent limitations of breast FNA and CNB, and new advanced techniques are discussed. PMID:20949457

  9. Detecting circumscribed lesions with the Hough transform

    SciTech Connect

    Groshong, B.R; Kegelmeyer, W.P., Jr

    1996-01-11

    We have designed and implemented a circumscribed lesion detection algorithm, based on the Hough Transform, which will detect zero or more approximately circular structures in a mammogram over a range of radii from a few pixels to nearly the size of the breast. We address the geometrical behavior of peaks in Hough parameter space (x,y,r) for both the true radius of a circular structure in the image (r = r{sub o}), and for the parameter r as it passes through this radius. In addition, we evaluate peaks in Hough parameter space by re-analyzing the underlying mammogram in the vicinity of the circular disk indicated by the peak. Discs suggested by the resulting peaks are accumulated in a feature image, scaled by a measure of their quality. These results are then rectified with respect to image contrast extremes and average value. The result is a feature with a continuously scaled pixel level output which suggests the likelihood that a pixel is located inside a circular structure, irrespective of the radius of the structure and overall mammogram contrast. These features are evaluated fast qualitative and quantitative performance metrics which permit circumscribed lesion detection features to be initially evaluated without a full end-to-end classification experiment.

  10. Ultrasound Elastography in Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, J; Ewertsen, C; Sletting, S; Vejborg, I; Schäfer, F K W; Cosgrove, D; Bachmann Nielsen, M

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an established method for characterization of focal lesions in the breast. Different techniques and analyses of the images may be used for the characterization. This article addresses the use of ultrasound elastography in breast cancer diagnosis. In the first part of the article the techniques behind both strain- and shear-wave-elastography are explained and followed by a section on how to obtain adequate elastography images and measurements. In the second part of the article the application of elastography as an adjunct to B-mode ultrasound in clinical practice is described, and the potential diagnostic gains and limitations of elastography are discussed. PMID:26274379

  11. Diffusion weighted MRI of the breast: Protocol optimization, guidelines for interpretation, and potential clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Savannah C.; McDonald, Elizabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis There has been increasing interest in the use of diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) for breast imaging. This technique has shown promise for improving the positive predictive value of breast MRI for detection of breast cancer, evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and as a non-contrast MRI alternative for breast cancer screening. However, there is currently no standardized approach to DWI of the breast and data quality varies widely. Prior to implementing DWI into clinical practice, it is important to understand the pertinent technical considerations and current evidence of clinical applications of DWI of the breast. This article provides an overview of basic principles of DWI, optimization of breast DWI protocols, imaging features of benign and malignant breast lesions, promising clinical applications, and potential future directions. PMID:23928248

  12. Prognostic Typing in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hartveit, F.

    1971-01-01

    Infiltrating breast carcinomas in which recurrence takes place 10 years or more after operation are reported to contain tumour cells of characteristic morphology. The cytological features of these tumour cells form the basis of the system of classification described here. Three cytological types are recognized, prognosis being best in type III. Typing is carried out on specimens stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The results of typing were reproducible in over 90% of cases and independent of the histology of the lesion. Correlation to survival time was shown in a total of 222 cases. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4107964

  13. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Merckel, Laura G.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Koehler, Max O.; Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den; Deckers, Roel; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Moonen, Chrit T.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  14. Mixed tumour of salivary gland type of the male breast.

    PubMed

    Simha, M R; Doctor, V M; Udwadia, T E

    1992-03-01

    Benign breast tumours with a mixed cartilaginous and epithelial component are distinctly rare as evident from the literature. A case of Mixed Tumour of the breast presenting pre-operatively as a hard mass in a 65 year old male is reported. Histologically, it was composed of a mixture of benign cartilage, myoepithelial cells, tubules and a myxoid stroma in fat. A brief review of cartilage bearing lesions and mixed tumour in the mammary region is discussed. PMID:1328037

  15. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  17. Classification of ultrasonic B-mode images of breast masses using Nakagami distribution.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P M; Dumane, V A; Reid, J M; Genis, V; Forsberg, F; Piccoli, C W; Goldberg, B B

    2001-03-01

    The Nakagami distribution was proposed recently for modeling the echo from tissue. In vivo breast data collected from patients with lesions were studied using this Nakagami model. Chi-square tests showed that the Nakagami distribution is a better fit to the envelope than the Rayleigh distribution. Two parameters, m (effective number) and alpha (effective cross section), associated with the Nakagami distribution were used for the classification of breast masses. Data from 52 patients with breast masses/lesions were used in the studies. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were calculated for the classification methods based on these two parameters. The results indicate that these parameters of the Nakagami distribution may be useful in classification of the breast abnormalities. The Nakagami distribution may be a reasonable means to characterize the backscattered echo from breast tissues toward a goal of an automated scheme for separating benign and malignant breast masses. PMID:11370371

  18. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-11-11

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as 'exceptional responders' or as 'rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  19. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as ‘exceptional responders' or as ‘rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  20. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000837.htm Breast cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast cancer screenings can help find breast cancer early, before ...

  1. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  2. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  3. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  4. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  5. Breast lump removal

    MedlinePlus

    Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy ... If the breast cancer can be seen on imaging tests but the doctor cannot feel it when examining you, a wire ...

  6. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  7. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... to the breast or the new nipple. Having cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of ...

  8. Aspiration cytology of radiation-induced changes of normal breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Bondeson, L.

    1987-05-01

    From a case illustrated, it appears that irradiation may induce changes in normal breast epithelium indistinguishable from malignancy by means of aspiration cytology. This fact must be considered in the choice of diagnostic methods for the evaluation of lesions in irradiated breast tissue.

  9. Bilateral Gigantomastia, Multiple Synchronous Nodular Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia Involving Breast and Bilateral Axillary Accessory Breast Tissue, and Perianal Mammary-Type Hamartoma of Anogenital Mammary-Like Glands: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Malcolm M; Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Kreuzberg, Boris; Suvova, Bozena; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2016-05-01

    Mammary-type fibroepithelial lesions involving ectopic breast and anogenital region are rare and usually coexist with normal orthotopic breast. We present what we believe to be a unique case of synchronous bilateral gestational gigantomastia resembling fibrous mastopathy, synchronous rapidly growing pregnancy-associated nodular pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia involving right breast and bilateral axillary ectopic breast tissue, and metachronous perianal mammary-type hamartoma involving anogenital mammary-like glands occurring in a 34-year-old patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Also, we review the literature concerning these lesions. PMID:26863057

  10. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia in a complex neoplastic lesion involving anogenital mammary-like glands.

    PubMed

    Vazmitel, Marina; Pavlovsky, Michal; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2009-10-01

    Anogenital mammary-like glands (AMLG) may give rise to various pathologic lesions identical to those known in mammary pathology. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH), a relatively frequent hormonal change associated with different benign and malignant processes in the breast, was only once mentioned in the literature concerning the pathology of AMLG. We present here a new case of PASH in a lesion of AMLG. The present case of PASH is remarkable because of its occurrence within a complex lesion evidencing the changes identical to or reminiscent of blunt duct adenosis, fibroadenoma and hidradenoma papilliferum. PMID:19508499

  11. Benign breast disease and consumption of beverages containing methylxanthines.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, C; Franceschi, S; Parazzini, F; Regallo, M; Decarli, A; Gallus, G; Di Pietro, S; Tognoni, G

    1985-05-01

    The relationship between methylxanthine (Mx) consumption and benign breast disease was evaluated in a case-control study of 288 women with histologically confirmed benign breast lumps (203 dysplastic lesions and 85 benign tumors) and 2 groups of control women--285 patients in the hospital for acute conditions apparently unrelated to the consumption of Mx-containing beverages and 291 outpatients. The relative risk estimates of dysplastic breast lesions (fibrocystic disease), with allowance for all identified potential distorting factors, for women who drank 1-2 or 3 or more cups of coffee per day were 4.1 and 6.4, respectively, when the hospital controls were the comparison group and 2.0 and 3.7, respectively, when the outpatient controls were the comparison group. The relationship was even stronger when the total consumption of Mx-containing beverages (coffee plus tea) was considered and increased with increasing duration of use. The association was not explained by any of the major risk factors for fibrocystic breast diseases or by differences in general characteristics or other lifestyle habits between cases and controls. Mx consumption was not related to the risk of benign breast tumors (fibroadenomas). These findings support the hypothesis that Mx consumption is related to the risk of dysplastic lesions of the breast. PMID:3858587

  12. Tumoral Calcinosis: An Uncommon Cause for a Mass in a Reconstructed Breast

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Nicola R.; Watson, David I.; Carter, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Tumoral calcinosis is a rare clinical and histopathological syndrome whose exact etiology is unknown. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman who presents with a painful lump in her right chest after bilateral breast reconstructions for bilateral asynchronous breast cancers. It is important to be aware of all possible differential diagnoses in a patient presenting with a chest mass after mastectomy and reconstruction for breast cancer as not all lesions of this type represent recurrent cancer.

  13. Tumoral Calcinosis: An Uncommon Cause for a Mass in a Reconstructed Breast.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eugene; Dean, Nicola R; Watson, David I; Carter, Christopher D

    2016-05-01

    Tumoral calcinosis is a rare clinical and histopathological syndrome whose exact etiology is unknown. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman who presents with a painful lump in her right chest after bilateral breast reconstructions for bilateral asynchronous breast cancers. It is important to be aware of all possible differential diagnoses in a patient presenting with a chest mass after mastectomy and reconstruction for breast cancer as not all lesions of this type represent recurrent cancer. PMID:27579225

  14. The expanding role of pathologists in the diagnosis and management of breast cancer: Worldwide Excellence in Breast Pathology Program.

    PubMed

    Masood, Shahla

    2003-01-01

    Pathology is the study of human illness and it involves the morphologic and biologic recognition of abnormalities that are associated with a disease. Breast pathology represents an excellent example of this discipline. By providing diagnostic information and by characterizing the biologic behavior of a breast lesion, a pathologist plays a critical role in a patient's life. Any mistake in this exercise is associated with serious consequences. In addition, there are many unresolved issues in breast pathology, which contribute to our limited understanding of the biology of breast cancer, variability in diagnostic criteria, and significant diversity in breast cancer management and therapy. Furthermore, breast pathology has remained an underrecognized discipline, and its importance in diagnosis and disease management is not fully realized. In order to better serve our patients, particularly medically underserved women and those living in countries with limited resources, we must place emphasis on effectively using the talent and expertise of pathologists around the globe. For example, to provide a cost-effective way to diagnose breast cancer, particularly at advanced stages, pathologists can sample lesions by fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), stain the resulting smears, and provide an immediate bedside diagnosis. This is a valid contribution; however, this exercise requires the availability of a pathologist with experience in breast cytopathology. Alternatively the pathologist may seek consultations from more experienced pathologists. Developing strategies to better recognize the importance of high-quality breast pathology services and to train qualified and innovative breast pathologists is an ambitious task. The proposed Worldwide Excellence in Breast Pathology Program may provide such an opportunity. PMID:12713504

  15. Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Urmila; Das, Siddharth K

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged male patient developed acute back pain and a lumbar vertebral lesion following trivial physical trauma. The lesion was considered as tuberculous on vertebral x-rays and MRI. After biopsy of the lesion and spinal fixation, the patient was kept on empirical antituberculous treatment (ATT) to which he did not respond. On re-evaluation he was diagnosed to have an Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). ATT was stopped and he was successfully managed by rest, steroids, methotrexate and sulfasalazine. A careful look at the patient's plain x-ray spine and awareness about the lesion can avoid misdiagnosis of this characteristic vertebral lesion found in AS. PMID:23559648

  16. Columnar cell change with atypia (flat epithelial atypia) on breast core biopsy-outcomes following open excision.

    PubMed

    Biggar, Magdalena A; Kerr, Kris M; Erzetich, Lisa M; Bennett, Ian C

    2012-01-01

    Columnar cell change with atypia (CCCA) is a relatively recently recognized pathologic breast entity considered to be a risk factor for subsequent development of breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of finding CCCA on breast core biopsy, by establishing the frequency of other breast pathology on subsequently performed surgical excision specimens. All cases with CCCA as the most advanced lesion on core biopsy were reviewed. After excision, another advanced proliferative lesion was identified in 17 (33%) patients, including three patients (6%) with in situ or invasive carcinoma. An additional five patients (10%) were concurrently diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma at other sites. These findings indicate that when CCCA is found on core biopsy, open surgical biopsy of the relevant area should be performed and that workup of both breasts should be undertaken to exclude coexistent breast carcinoma at alternative sites. PMID:23078374

  17. Focal lesions in normal liver.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Richard C; Martin, Diego R; Balci, N Cem

    2005-10-01

    A variety of lesions occur in the normal liver. This review will describe the most common benign, malignant, and infectious lesions. Illustration will be made of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the most common of these. Due to the high accuracy for liver lesion detection and characterization, and the intrinsic safety of the modality, MR should be considered the primary imaging tool to investigate liver diseases. PMID:16174062

  18. Malignant adenomyoepithelioma of the breast: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Nasrollah; Negahban, Shahrzad; Aledavood, Azita; Daneshbod, Khosrow; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Malignant adenomyoepithelioma (MAME) of the breast is a rare lesion characterized by dual population of epithelial and myoepithelial cells which one or both components show malignant features. We report a case of MAME of the breast in a 46-year-old woman diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration with extensive review of the literature. Classification, clinical presentation, cyto-pathologic, and immunohistochemical features are described. This lesion showed both malignant components of epithelial and myoepithelial cells in cytology and histology. The malignancy was convincingly supported by high mitotic figures, pleomorphism, and invasion in tissue sections. This review of MAMEs showed that cyto-histologic diagnosis is difficult and should be supported by immunohistochemical study. PMID:25772218

  19. Phyllodes Tumor in a Lactating Breast

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Sudha S.; Raju, K. V. V. N.; Nair, Haripreetha G.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is attributed to a small fraction of primary tumors of the breast. Such tumors occur rarely in pregnancy and lactation. We report a case of a 25-year-old lactating mother presenting with a lump in the left breast. Core needle biopsy was opined as phyllodes tumor with lactational changes, and subsequent wide local excision confirmed the diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor with lactational changes. The characteristic gross and microscopic findings of a well-circumscribed lesion with leaf-like fibroepithelial growth pattern and typical nonuniform or diffuse stromal proliferation with periductal accentuation even in the absence of mitotic figures can help clinch the diagnosis. Benign phyllodes is known for its recurrence and requires wide excision and close follow-up. It is vital to identify these lesions even on limited biopsies as therapeutic options differ. This case is presented for its rarity and the diagnostic challenge it poses in limited biopsy. PMID:27081326

  20. Phyllodes Tumor in a Lactating Breast.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Sudha S; Raju, K V V N; Nair, Haripreetha G

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is attributed to a small fraction of primary tumors of the breast. Such tumors occur rarely in pregnancy and lactation. We report a case of a 25-year-old lactating mother presenting with a lump in the left breast. Core needle biopsy was opined as phyllodes tumor with lactational changes, and subsequent wide local excision confirmed the diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor with lactational changes. The characteristic gross and microscopic findings of a well-circumscribed lesion with leaf-like fibroepithelial growth pattern and typical nonuniform or diffuse stromal proliferation with periductal accentuation even in the absence of mitotic figures can help clinch the diagnosis. Benign phyllodes is known for its recurrence and requires wide excision and close follow-up. It is vital to identify these lesions even on limited biopsies as therapeutic options differ. This case is presented for its rarity and the diagnostic challenge it poses in limited biopsy. PMID:27081326

  1. Radiographic Implications of Fat Grafting to the Reconstructed Breast.

    PubMed

    Pinell-White, Ximena A; Etra, Joanna; Newell, Mary; Tuscano, Daymen; Shin, Kyungmin; Losken, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer is often used to smooth contour irregularities in the reconstructed breast. A potential concern with this technique is that it results in calcified lesions in the breast that can complicate subsequent cancer surveillance. The purpose of this review was to determine how fat grafting to the reconstructed breast impacts postoperative breast imaging. This is a matched cohort analysis of patients who underwent postmastectomy breast reconstruction with and without fat grafting as a secondary procedure. Nonfat grafted reconstructive patients were matched based on age, year of initial reconstruction, and type of reconstruction. Postoperative imaging at our institution was required for inclusion. The two groups were compared in terms of incidence and distribution of radiographic studies performed in follow-up and the need for biopsies. Fifty-one reconstructed breasts with a history of fat grafting were compared to 51 nonfat grafted, reconstructed breasts. The fat grafted group underwent a total of 204 breast imaging studies over a mean follow-up of 4.2 years, while the nonfat grafted group underwent 167 studies over 4.1 years (p = 0.21). More mammograms, ultrasounds, and magnetic resonance images were performed after fat grafting, but a significant difference was evident only for mammography (34 versus 12, p = 0.05). The incidence of breast biopsy to clarify abnormal imaging was nonsignificantly higher in the fat grafted group (17.6% versus 7.8%, p = 0.14). Fewer than 10 percent of imaging studies in the fat grafted cohort were performed to investigate a clinical or radiographic abnormality occupying the same breast quadrant as prior fat injection. Breast cancer patients treated with fat grafting required more breast imaging and biopsies than their nonfat grafted counterparts, but the areas of suspicion poorly corresponded to the site of prior fat grafting. Multimodal breast reconstruction may drive the additional diagnostic burden and not the fat

  2. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  3. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  4. <