Science.gov

Sample records for nonresponders hiv-coinfected patients

  1. Hepatitis C virus–HIV-coinfected patients and liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kardashian, Ani A.; Price, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the experience to date and unique challenges associated with liver transplantation in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-coinfected patients. Recent findings The prevalence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma is rising among HIV-infected individuals. With careful patient selection and in the absence of HCV infection, HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected liver transplant recipients have comparable posttransplant outcomes. However, in the presence of HCV infection, patient and graft survival are significantly poorer in HIV-infected recipients, who have a higher risk of aggressive HCV recurrence, acute rejection, sepsis, and multiorgan failure. Outcomes may be improved with careful recipient and donor selection and with the availability of new highly potent all-oral HCV direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Although all-oral DAAs have not been evaluated in HIV/HCV-coinfected transplant patients, HIV does not adversely impact treatment success in nontransplant populations. Therefore, there is great hope that HCV can be successful eradicated in HIV/HCV-coinfected transplant patients and will result in improved outcomes. Careful attention to drug–drug interactions with HIV antiretroviral agents, DAAs, and posttransplant immunosuppressants is required. Summary Liver transplant outcomes are poorer in HIV/HCV-coinfected recipients compared with those with HCV-monoinfection. The new HCV DAAs offer tremendous potential to improve outcomes in this challenging population. PMID:25944240

  2. Modulation of HCV Replication After Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HCV/HIV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Guedj, Jeremie; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Blackard, Jason T.; Rouster, Susan D.; Castro, Mario; Feinberg, Judith; Sterling, Richard K.; Goodman, Zachary; Aronow, Bruce J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Coinfection results in increased HCV replication and more rapid rates of liver disease progression. The effect of HIV combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on HCV replication has not been studied in depth. To address this issue, we enrolled a small cohort of HCV/HIV coinfected patients into a cART initiation trial, and used dynamic modeling combined with evaluation of immune responses and microarray profiles to determine how effective treatment of HIV affects HCV. Treatment with cART resulted in HCV flare and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increase (2× or more increase from baseline) in a subset of treated patients. Subjects with evidence of hepatic injury (increased ALT) were more likely to have HCV-specific immune responses directed against HCV epitopes. Over time, HCV viral loads declined. Reproducible and biologically important gene expression changes occurred in patients who underwent successful cART, particularly with respect to downregulation of genes with known antiviral roles. Our findings suggest that the effective suppression of HIV by cART initiates a cascade of early and late events in treated patients with HCV. Early events involving downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes may lead to transiently increased viral replication and hepatic injury. At later time points, HCV viral load declines to levels comparable to those seen in the setting of HCV monoinfection. These findings support early antiretroviral therapy in those with HCV/HIV coinfection. PMID:25101888

  3. Granzyme B as a diagnostic marker of tuberculosis in patients with and without HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Pronoti; Mitra, Soumik; Pant, Priyannk; Kotwal, Aarti; Kakati, Barnali; Masih, Victor; Sindhwani, Girish; Biswas, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) are based on the estimation of interferon γ (IFN-γ) or IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) T cells following ex vivo stimulation with ESAT6 and CFP-10. Sensitivity of these tests is likely to be compromised in CD4(+) T-cell-depleted situations, like HIV-TB coinfection. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, isolated from 3 groups, viz., HIV-negative patients with active TB, HIV-TB coinfected patients, and healthy household contacts (HHCs) were cocultivated with autologous dendritic cells, and the cytokine response to rESAT6 stimulation was compared between groups in supernatants. While CD4(+) T-cell stimulation yielded significantly elevated levels of IFN-γ and interleukin 4 in HIV-negative TB patients, compared to HHCs, the levels of both these cytokines were nondiscriminatory between HIV-positive TB patients and HHCs. However, CD8(+) T-cell stimulation yielded significantly elevated granzyme B titers in both groups of patients, irrespective of HIV coinfection status. Hence, contrary to IFN-γ, granzyme B might be a useful diagnostic marker for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection particularly in HIV coinfected patients. PMID:26915636

  4. Sustained Long-term Antiviral Maintenance Therapy in HCV/HIV Coinfected Patients (SLAM-C)

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E; Andersen, Janet W; Butt, Adeel A; Umbleja, Triin; Alston, Beverly; Koziel, Margaret J; Peters, Marion G; Sulkowski, Mark; Goodman, Zachary D; Chung, Raymond T

    2010-01-01

    Background HCV/HIV coinfection treatment is suboptimal with low SVR rates to standard therapies. A multicenter randomized clinical trial designed to assess the efficacy/safety of pegylated-interferon maintenance therapy was performed by the NIH-funded ACTG network. Methods HCV treatment naïve and non-responding interferon-experienced subjects with confirmed HCV and HIV, CD4>200 cells/mm3, and at least Stage 1 fibrosis were enrolled, and treated for 12 weeks with pegylated interferon alfa 2a 180 mcg/week (PEG) + weight-based ribavirin to determine response status. Non-responder subjects (failure to clear HCV RNA or achieve 2-log drop) underwent liver biopsy and were randomized to receive full dose PEG or observation only for 72 weeks. Paired biopsies were evaluated by a central pathologist. Results 330 subjects were enrolled; median age was 48 years; 43% White, 37% Black, non-Hispanic; 83% male; CD4+ 498 cells/mm3; 32% were interferon experienced; 74% had entry HIV RNA<50 cp/ml. EVR was observed in 55.9% and 42.5% achieved cEVR. A planned interim analysis of occurred when 84 subjects were randomized. With data on 40 paired biopsies available, a safety monitoring board stopped the trial due to lack of fibrosis progression (median = 0 Metavir units/year) in the observation arm. Conclusion Lack of fibrotic progression in the control arm was unexpected, and may represent a short-term PEG/ribavirin therapy effect, high levels of HIV viral suppression and use of antiretroviral regimens that may be less toxic than prior generations of therapy. PMID:20921898

  5. Cytokine Response Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Clearance in HIV Coinfected Patients Initiating Peg Interferon-α Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Truong Tam; Niloofar, Reihani; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Nils, Kuster; Bollore, Karine; Ducos, Jacques; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Reynes, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on peginterferon-α (pegIFNα) and ribavirin induces important changes in cytokine release and T cell activation. Objective Immune response to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy was explored in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. Methods Concentrations of 25 cytokines and CD8+ T cell activation were monitored in HCV/HIV coinfected patients classified as sustained virological responders (SVR, n=19) and non-responders (NR, n=11). Results High pretreatment concentrations of IP-10 (CXCL-10) and MCP-1 (CCL-2) were associated with a poor anti-HCV response. PegIFNα-ribavirin therapy increased CD8+ T cell activation and induced significant changes in levels of eleven cytokines related to both Th1 and Th2 responses in SVR (IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, IP-10, eotaxin, MCP-1) but of only six cytokines in NR (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, eotaxin). The highest rise in MIP-1β and MCP-1 levels was observed four weeks after anti-HCV treatment initiation in SVR compared to NR (p=0.002 and p=0.03, respectively), whereas a decrease in IL-8 concentration was associated with treatment failure (p= 0.052). Conclusions Higher and broader cytokine responses to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy were observed in SVR patients compared to NR. Changes in IL-8, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 serum concentrations may be associated with efficacy of pegIFNα- and ribavirin-based therapies in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. PMID:26740864

  6. Successful Treatment of Hepatitis C with Simeprevir, Sofosbuvir, and Ribavirin in an HIV Coinfected Liver Transplant Patient with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Anna; Hussaini, Trana; Partovi, Nilufar; Erb, Siegfried R.; Azalgara, Vladimir Marquez; Zalunardo, Nadia; Hull, Mark; Yoshida, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Although major advances have occurred in treating patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the development of new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), treatment of liver transplant recipients with HCV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection, and renal disease is challenging due to the lack of efficacy and safety data in this population. We report a case of successful HCV therapy in a postliver transplant HIV coinfected patient, with stage 4 chronic kidney disease, using an all-oral regimen of simeprevir, sofosbuvir, and ribavirin. The 51-year-old male achieved SVR24, and no specific HIV-related or transplant-related adverse events were documented during the treatment period. The new DAAs show promise for HIV coinfected patients and those with severe to end-stage renal disease (ESRD); however, robust clinical trials or large cohort studies will need to be conducted to confirm the efficacy and safety of these newer agents in this setting. PMID:27366182

  7. Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Judith; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Källenius, Gunilla

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) constitute the main burden of infectious disease in resource-limited countries. In the individual host, the two pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV, potentiate one another, accelerating the deterioration of immunological functions. In high-burden settings, HIV coinfection is the most important risk factor for developing active TB, which increases the susceptibility to primary infection or reinfection and also the risk of TB reactivation for patients with latent TB. M. tuberculosis infection also has a negative impact on the immune response to HIV, accelerating the progression from HIV infection to AIDS. The clinical management of HIV-associated TB includes the integration of effective anti-TB treatment, use of concurrent antiretroviral therapy (ART), prevention of HIV-related comorbidities, management of drug cytotoxicity, and prevention/treatment of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). PMID:25722472

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of the genotype MTBDRsl assay for rapid diagnosis of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Kontsevaya, Irina; Ignatyeva, Olga; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Balabanova, Yanina; Kovalyov, Alexander; Kritsky, Andrey; Matskevich, Olesya; Drobniewski, Francis

    2013-01-01

    The Russian Federation is a high-tuberculosis (TB)-burden country with high rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis multidrug resistance (MDR) and extensive drug resistance (XDR), especially in HIV-coinfected patients. Rapid and reliable diagnosis for detection of resistance to second-line drugs is vital for adequate patient management. We evaluated the performance of the GenoType MTBDRsl (Hain Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany) assay on smear-positive sputum specimens obtained from 90 HIV-infected MDR TB patients from Russia. Test interpretability was over 98%. Specificity was over 86% for all drugs, while sensitivity varied, being the highest (71.4%) for capreomycin and lowest (9.4%) for kanamycin, probably due to the presence of mutations in the eis gene. The sensitivity of detection of XDR TB was 13.6%, increasing to 42.9% if kanamycin (not commonly used in Western Europe) was excluded. The assay is a highly specific screening tool for XDR detection in direct specimens from HIV-coinfected TB patients but cannot be used to rule out XDR TB. PMID:23152552

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of the GenoType MTBDRsl Assay for Rapid Diagnosis of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in HIV-Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kontsevaya, Irina; Ignatyeva, Olga; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Balabanova, Yanina; Kovalyov, Alexander; Kritsky, Andrey; Matskevich, Olesya

    2013-01-01

    The Russian Federation is a high-tuberculosis (TB)-burden country with high rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis multidrug resistance (MDR) and extensive drug resistance (XDR), especially in HIV-coinfected patients. Rapid and reliable diagnosis for detection of resistance to second-line drugs is vital for adequate patient management. We evaluated the performance of the GenoType MTBDRsl (Hain Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany) assay on smear-positive sputum specimens obtained from 90 HIV-infected MDR TB patients from Russia. Test interpretability was over 98%. Specificity was over 86% for all drugs, while sensitivity varied, being the highest (71.4%) for capreomycin and lowest (9.4%) for kanamycin, probably due to the presence of mutations in the eis gene. The sensitivity of detection of XDR TB was 13.6%, increasing to 42.9% if kanamycin (not commonly used in Western Europe) was excluded. The assay is a highly specific screening tool for XDR detection in direct specimens from HIV-coinfected TB patients but cannot be used to rule out XDR TB. PMID:23152552

  10. Evolution of hepatitis C virus in HIV coinfected patients under antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sede, Mariano; Parra, Micaela; Manrique, Julieta M; Laufer, Natalia; Jones, Leandro R; Quarleri, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Five patients (P) were followed-up for an average of 7.73years after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation. Patients' immune and virological status were determined by periodical CD4+T-cell counts and HIV and HCV viral load. HCV populations were studied using longitudinal high throughput sequence data obtained in parallel by virological and immunological parameters. Two patients (P7, P28) with sub-optimal responses to HAART presented HCV viral loads significantly higher than those recorded for two patients (P1, P18) that achieved good responses to HAART. Interestingly, HCV populations from P7 and P28 displayed a stable phylogenetic structure, whereas HCV populations from P1 and P18showeda significant increase in their phylogenetic structure, followed by a decrease after achieving acceptable CD4+T-cell counts (>500 cell/μl). The fifth patient (P25) presented high HCV viral loads, preserved CD4+T-cell counts from baseline and all along the follow-up, and displayed a constant viral phylogenetic structure. These results strongly suggest that HAART-induced immune recovery induces a decrease in HCV viral load and an increase in the HCV population phylogenetic structure likely reflecting the virus diversification in response to the afresh immune response. The relatively low HCV viral load observed in the HAART responder patients suggests that once HCV is adapted it reaches a maximum number of haplotypes higher than that achieved during the initial stages of the immune response as inferred from the two recovering patients. Future studies using larger number of patients are needed to corroborate these hypotheses. PMID:27234841

  11. Major Challenges in Clinical Management of TB/HIV Coinfected Patients in Eastern Europe Compared with Western Europe and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Efsen, Anne Marie W.; Schultze, Anna; Post, Frank A.; Panteleev, Alexander; Furrer, Hansjakob; Miller, Robert F.; Losso, Marcelo H.; Toibaro, Javier; Skrahin, Aliaksandr; Miro, Jose M.; Caylà, Joan A.; Girardi, Enrico; Bruyand, Mathias; Obel, Niels; Podlekareva, Daria N.; Lundgren, Jens D.; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Rates of TB/HIV coinfection and multi-drug resistant (MDR)-TB are increasing in Eastern Europe (EE). We aimed to study clinical characteristics, factors associated with MDR-TB and predicted activity of empiric anti-TB treatment at time of TB diagnosis among TB/HIV coinfected patients in EE, Western Europe (WE) and Latin America (LA). Design and Methods Between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013, 1413 TB/HIV patients (62 clinics in 19 countries in EE, WE, Southern Europe (SE), and LA) were enrolled. Results Significant differences were observed between EE (N = 844), WE (N = 152), SE (N = 164), and LA (N = 253) in the proportion of patients with a definite TB diagnosis (47%, 71%, 72% and 40%, p<0.0001), MDR-TB (40%, 5%, 3% and 15%, p<0.0001), and use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) (17%, 40%, 44% and 35%, p<0.0001). Injecting drug use (adjusted OR (aOR) = 2.03 (95% CI 1.00–4.09), prior anti-TB treatment (3.42 (1.88–6.22)), and living in EE (7.19 (3.28–15.78)) were associated with MDR-TB. Among 585 patients with drug susceptibility test (DST) results, the empiric (i.e. without knowledge of the DST results) anti-TB treatment included ≥3 active drugs in 66% of participants in EE compared with 90–96% in other regions (p<0.0001). Conclusions In EE, TB/HIV patients were less likely to receive a definite TB diagnosis, more likely to house MDR-TB and commonly received empiric anti-TB treatment with reduced activity. Improved management of TB/HIV patients in EE requires better access to TB diagnostics including DSTs, empiric anti-TB therapy directed at both susceptible and MDR-TB, and more widespread use of cART. PMID:26716686

  12. Influence of IL28B Polymorphisms on Response to a Lower-Than-Standard Dose peg-IFN-α 2a for Genotype 3 Chronic Hepatitis C in HIV-Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Ruiz-Valderas, Rosa; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis; González-Escribano, María F.; Torres-Cornejo, Almudena; Mata, Rosario; Rivero, Antonio; Pineda, Juan A.; Marquez-Solero, Manuel; Viciana, Pompeyo

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on which to base definitive recommendations on the doses and duration of therapy for genotype 3 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients are scarce. We evaluated the efficacy of a lower peginterferon-α 2a dose and a shorter duration of therapy than the current standard of care in genotype 3 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients. Methods and Findings Pilot, open-label, single arm clinical trial which involved 58 Caucasian HCV/HIV-coinfected patients who received weekly 135 µg peginterferon-α 2a plus ribavirin 400 mg twice daily during 20 weeks after attaining undetectable viremia. The relationships between baseline patient-related variables, including IL28B genotype, plasma HCV-RNA, ribavirin dose/kg, peginterferon-α 2a and ribavirin levels with virological responses were analyzed. Only 4 patients showed lack of response and 5 patients dropped out due to adverse events related to the study medication. Overall, sustained virologic response (SVR) rates were 58.3% by intention-to-treat and 71.4% by per protocol analysis, respectively. Among patients with rapid virologic response (RVR), SVR and relapses rates were 92.6% and 7.4%, respectively. No relationships were observed between viral responses and ribavirin dose/kg, peginterferon-α 2a concentrations, ribavirin levels or rs129679860 genotype. Conclusions Weekly 135 µg pegIFN-α 2a could be as effective as the standard 180 µg dose, with a very low incidence of severe adverse events. A 24-week treatment duration appears to be appropriate in patients achieving RVR, but extending treatment up to just 20 weeks beyond negativization of viremia is associated with a high relapse rate in those patients not achieving RVR. There was no influence of IL28B genotype on the virological responses. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00553930 PMID:22235243

  13. Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV Coinfection in the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Monge-Maillo, Begoña; Norman, Francesca F.; Cruz, Israel; Alvar, Jorge; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is hypoendemic in Mediterranean countries, where it is caused by the flagellate protozoan Leishmania infantum. VL cases in this area account for 5%–6% of the global burden. Cases of Leishmania/HIV coinfection have been reported in the Mediterranean region, mainly in France, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. Since highly active antiretroviral therapy was introduced in 1997, a marked decrease in the number of coinfected cases in this region has been reported. The development of new diagnostic methods to accurately identify level of parasitemia and the risk of relapse is one of the main challenges in improving the treatment of coinfected patients. Clinical trials in the Mediterranean region are needed to determine the most adequate therapeutic options for Leishmania/HIV patients as well as the indications and regimes for secondary prophylaxis. This article reviews the epidemiological, diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of Leishmania/HIV coinfection in the Mediterranean region. PMID:25144380

  14. The effect of HIV coinfection, HAART and TB treatment on cytokine/chemokine responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens in active TB patients and latently Mtb infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Desta; de Jager, Wilco; Gebremichael, Gebremedhin; Alemayehu, Yodit; Ran, Leonie; Fransen, Justin; Wolday, Dawit; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Tegbaru, Belete; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Baarle, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of Mtb specific induced cytokine/chemokine host biomarkers could assist in developing novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools for TB. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, IL-10, IP-10 and MIP-1α were measured in supernatants of whole blood stimulated with Mtb specific fusion protein ESAT-6/CFP-10 using xMAP technology. The study groups were HIV positive TB patients (HIV(+)TB(+)), HIV negative TB patients (HIV(-)TB(+)), HIV positive tuberculin skin test positive (TST+) (HIV(+)TST(+)), HIV negative TST+ (HIV(-)TST(+)), and HIV(-)TST(-) individuals. Compared to HIV(-)TST(-), latent TB infection led to increased levels of IP-10, IFN-γ and IL-17, while levels of IL-2 and IP-10 were increased with active TB. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, MIP-1α, and IL-10 were increased in HIV(-)TST(+) individuals compared to HIV(-)TB(+) patients. HIV coinfection decreased the level of IFN-γ, IL-17, IP-10 and IL-2. After six months (M6) of anti-TB treatment (ATT) in HIV(-)TB(+) patients, IFN-γ, IL-10, and MIP-1α levels normalized. After M6 and M18 of ATT plus HAART in HIV(+)TB(+) patients, levels of MIP-1α and IL-10 normalized, while this was not the case for IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, and IP-10 levels. In HIV(+)TST(+) patients on HAART, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-10 and MIP-1α normalized, while no change in the levels of IL-2 and IP-10 were observed. In conclusion, the simultaneous measurement of IFN-γ, IL-17 and IP-10 may assist in diagnosing LTBI; IL-2 and IP-10 may assist in diagnosing active TB; while IFN-γ, IL-17, MIP-1α, and IL-10 levels could help to discriminate LTBI and active TB. In addition, IL-10 and MIP-1α levels could help to monitor responses to TB treatment and HAART. PMID:26631832

  15. Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV Coinfection in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Lindoso, José Angelo; Cota, Gláucia Fernandes; da Cruz, Alda Maria; Goto, Hiro; Maia-Elkhoury, Ana Nilce Silveira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra; de Sousa-Gomes, Márcia Leite; Santos-Oliveira, Joanna Reis; Rabello, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an endemic zoonotic disease in Latin America caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum, which is transmitted by sand flies from the genus Lutzomyia. VL occurs in 12 countries of Latin America, with 96% of cases reported in Brazil. Recently, an increase in VL, primarily affecting children and young adults, has been observed in urban areas of Latin America. The area in which this spread of VL is occurring overlaps regions with individuals living with HIV, the number of whom is estimated to be 1.4 million people by the World Health Organization. This overlap is suggested to be a leading cause of the increased number of reported VL-HIV coinfections. The clinical progression of HIV and L. infantum infections are both highly dependent on the specific immune response of an individual. Furthermore, the impact on the immune system caused by either pathogen and by VL-HIV coinfection can contribute to an accelerated progression of the diseases. Clinical presentation of VL in HIV positive patients is similar to patients without HIV, with symptoms characterized by fever, splenomegaly, and hepatomegaly, but diarrhea appears to be more common in coinfected patients. In addition, VL relapses are higher in coinfected patients, affecting 10% to 56.5% of cases and with a lethality ranging from 8.7% to 23.5% in Latin America, depending on the study. With regards to the diagnosis of VL, parasitological tests of bone marrow aspirates have proven to be the most sensitive test in HIV-infected patients. Serologic tests have demonstrated a variable sensitivity according to the method and antigens used, with the standard tests used for diagnosing VL in Latin America displaying lower sensitivity. For this review, few articles were identified that related to VL-HIV coinfections and originated from Latin America, highlighting the need for improving research within the regions most greatly affected. We strongly support the formation of a Latin American network for

  16. The Need to Reevaluate Nonresponding Ergonomic Patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip J.; Field, Steven A.

    1999-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Environmental Health (EH) contractor performs ergonomic evaluations under its Ergonomic Program. Any KSC employee may request one or the reviewing physician may request one for a patient during a visit to an onsite medical facility. As part of the ergonomic evaluation, recommendations are given to the patient to help reduce any ergonomic problems they experience. The recommendations, if implemented, are successful in the majority of KSC patients; however, a group of patients do not seem to improve. Those who don't improve may be identified by reevaluations, which are performed to implement maximum resolution of ergonomic problems.

  17. Comparison between histopathologic features of leprosy in reaction lesions in HIV coinfected and non-coinfected patients*

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; de Miranda, Mario Fernando Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy and HIV are diseases that have a major impact on public health in Brazil. Patients coinfected with both diseases, appear to be at higher risk to develop leprosy reactions. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the histopathological aspects of cutaneous lesions during reactional states in a group of patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection, compared to patients with leprosy, without coinfection. METHODS Two groups were established: group 1 comprised of 40 patients coinfected with HIV-leprosy; group 2, comprised of 107 patients with leprosy only. Patients presenting reactional states of leprosy had their lesions biopsied and comparatively evaluated. RESULTS Reversal reaction was the most frequent feature in both groups, with dermis edema as the most common histopathological finding. Giant cells were seen in all group 1 histopathological examinations. Dermis edema was the most common finding in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum. CONCLUSION Few histopathological differences were found in both groups, with reversal reaction as the most significant one, although this fact should be analyzed considering the predominant BT clinical form in the coinfected group and BB form in the group without HIV. Larger prospective studies in patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection are needed to confirm and broaden these results. PMID:25672296

  18. HBV lamivudine resistance among hepatitis B and HIV coinfected patients starting lamivudine, stavudine and nevirapine in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kim, H N; Scott, J; Cent, A; Cook, L; Morrow, R A; Richardson, B; Tapia, K; Jerome, K R; Lule, G; John-Stewart, G; Chung, M H

    2011-10-01

    Widespread use of lamivudine in antiretroviral therapy may lead to hepatitis B virus resistance in HIV-HBV coinfected patients from endemic settings where tenofovir is not readily available. We evaluated 389 Kenyan HIV-infected adults before and for 18 months after starting highly active antiretroviral therapy with stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine. Twenty-seven (6.9%) were HBsAg positive and anti-HBs negative, 24 were HBeAg negative, and 18 had HBV DNA levels ≤ 10,000 IU/mL. Sustained HBV suppression to <100 IU/mL occurred in 89% of 19 evaluable patients. Resistance occurred in only two subjects, both with high baseline HBV DNA levels. Lamivudine resistance can emerge in the setting of incomplete HBV suppression but was infrequently observed among HIV-HBV coinfected patients with low baseline HBV DNA levels. PMID:21914062

  19. Impact of Lopinavir-Ritonavir or Nevirapine on Bedaquiline Exposures and Potential Implications for Patients with Tuberculosis-HIV Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kelly E.; Karlsson, Mats O.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV is recommended and improves outcomes. Bedaquiline is a novel drug for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB; combined use with antiretroviral drugs, nevirapine, or ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r) is anticipated, but no clinical data from coinfected patients are available. Plasma concentrations of bedaquiline and its M2 metabolite after single doses were obtained from interaction studies with nevirapine or LPV/r in healthy volunteers. The antiretrovirals' effects on bedaquiline and M2 pharmacokinetics were assessed by nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Potential dose adjustments were evaluated with simulations. No significant effects of nevirapine on bedaquiline pharmacokinetics were identified. LPV/r decreased bedaquiline and M2 clearances to 35% (relative standard error [RSE], 9.2%) and 58% (RSE, 8.4%), respectively, of those without comedication. As almost 3-fold (bedaquiline) and 2-fold (M2) increases in exposures during chronic treatment with LPV/r are expected, dose adjustments are suggested for evaluation. Efficacious, safe bedaquiline dosing for MDR-TB patients receiving antiretrovirals is important. Modeling results suggest that bedaquiline can be coadministered with nevirapine without dose adjustments. The predicted elevation of bedaquiline and M2 levels during LPV/r coadministration may be a safety concern, and careful monitoring is recommended. Further data are being collected in coinfected patients to determine whether dose adjustments are needed. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration numbers NCT00828529 [study C110] and NCT00910806 [study C117].) PMID:25114140

  20. Frequent injection cocaine use increases the risk of renal impairment among hepatitis C and HIV coinfected patients

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Carmine; Cox, Joseph; Cooper, Curtis; Martel-Laferrière, Valérie; Walmsley, Sharon; Gill, John; Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth; Moodie, Erica E.M.; Klein, Marina B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between injection cocaine use, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and chronic renal impairment (CRI). Design: Prospective observational cohort study of HIV–HCV coinfected patients. Methods: Data from 1129 participants in the Canadian Co-Infection Cohort with baseline and follow-up serum creatinine measurements between 2003 and 2014 were analyzed. Prevalent and incident cohorts were created to examine the association between self-reported past, current, and cumulative cocaine use and chronic HCV with CRI. CRI was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 70 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, and discrete-time proportional-hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios for cocaine use, in the two respective cohorts, adjusted for HCV RNA and important demographic, HIV disease stage, and comorbidity confounders. Results: Eighty-seven participants (8%) had prevalent CRI. Past injection cocaine use was associated with a two-fold greater risk of prevalent CRI [odds ratio 2.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96, 4.32]. During follow-up, 126 of 1061 participants (12%) developed incident CRI (31 per 1000 person-years). Compared to nonusers, heavy (≥ 3 days/week) and frequent injection cocaine users (≥75% of follow-up time) experienced more rapid progression to CRI (hazard ratio 2.65, 95% CI 1.35, 5.21; and hazard ratio 1.82, 95% CI 1.07, 3.07, respectively). There was no association between chronic HCV and CRI in either cohort. Conclusion: After accounting for HCV RNA, frequent and cumulative injection cocaine abuse was associated with CRI progression and should be taken into consideration when evaluating impaired renal function in HIV–HCV coinfection. PMID:26859371

  1. Pharmacokinetics of para-Aminosalicylic Acid in HIV-Uninfected and HIV-Coinfected Tuberculosis Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy, Managed for Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    de Kock, Lizanne; Sy, Sherwin K. B.; Diacon, Andreas H.; Prescott, Kim; Hernandez, Kenneth R.; Yu, Mingming; Derendorf, Hartmut; Donald, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis prompted the reintroduction of para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) to protect companion anti-tuberculosis drugs from additional acquired resistance. In sub-Saharan Africa, MDR/XDR tuberculosis with HIV coinfection is common, and concurrent treatment of HIV infection and MDR/XDR tuberculosis is required. Out of necessity, patients receive multiple drugs, and PAS therapy is frequent; however, neither potential drug interactions nor the effects of HIV infection are known. Potential drug-drug interaction with PAS and the effect of HIV infection was examined in 73 pulmonary tuberculosis patients; 22 (30.1%) were HIV coinfected. Forty-one pulmonary MDR or XDR tuberculosis patients received 4 g PAS twice daily, and in a second crossover study, another 32 patients were randomized, receiving 4 g PAS twice daily or 8 g PAS once daily. A PAS population pharmacokinetic model in two dosing regimens was developed; potential covariates affecting its pharmacokinetics were examined, and Monte Carlo simulations were conducted evaluating the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic index. The probability of target attainment (PTA) to maintain PAS levels above MIC during the dosing interval was estimated by simulation of once-, twice-, and thrice-daily dosing regimens not exceeding 12 g daily. Concurrent efavirenz (EFV) medication resulted in a 52% increase in PAS clearance and a corresponding >30% reduction in mean PAS area under the concentration curve in 19 of 22 HIV-M. tuberculosis-coinfected patients. Current practice recommends maintenance of PAS concentrations at ≥1 μg/ml (the MIC of M. tuberculosis), but the model predicts that at only a minimum dose of 4 g twice daily can this PTA be achieved in at least 90% of the population, whether or not EFV is concomitantly administered. Once-daily dosing of 12 g PAS will not provide PAS concentrations exceeding the MIC over the entire dosing

  2. Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality of Severe Malaria in HIV-Coinfected Children and Adults in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Ferro, Josefo; Montoya, Pablo; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Seni, Amir; Gomes, Ermelinda; Silamut, Kamolrat; Lee, Sue J.; Lucas, Marcelino; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Fanello, Caterina I.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Severe falciparum malaria with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is common in settings with a high prevalence of both diseases, but there is little information on whether HIV affects the clinical presentation and outcome of severe malaria. Methods. HIV status was assessed prospectively in hospitalized parasitemic adults and children with severe malaria in Beira, Mozambique, as part of a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (ISRCTN50258054). Clinical signs, comorbidity, complications, and disease outcome were compared according to HIV status. Results. HIV-1 seroprevalence was 11% (74/655) in children under 15 years and 72% (49/68) in adults with severe malaria. Children with HIV coinfection presented with more severe acidosis, anemia, and respiratory distress, and higher peripheral blood parasitemia and plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2). During hospitalization, deterioration in coma score, convulsions, respiratory distress, and pneumonia were more common in HIV-coinfected children, and mortality was 26% (19/74) versus 9% (53/581) in uninfected children (P < .001). In an age- and antimalarial treatment–adjusted logistic regression model, significant, independent predictors for death were renal impairment, acidosis, parasitemia, and plasma PfHRP2 concentration. Conclusions. Severe malaria in HIV-coinfected patients presents with higher parasite burden, more complications, and comorbidity, and carries a higher case fatality rate. Early identification of HIV coinfection is important for the clinical management of severe malaria. PMID:22752514

  3. Update on Hepatitis C Virus and HIV Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Chirch, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has historically been difficult to treat in the HIV-infected population, owing to generally poor responses to interferon-based therapies. The recent rapid development of directly acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against HCV has the potential to revolutionize treatment of this infection in the HIV population by improving tolerability and outcome, and, ultimately, reducing the significant burden of liver-related morbidity and mortality in this population. Clinical trials to address the safety and efficacy of novel DAAs in the HCV/HIV coinfected population are ongoing, and show much promise. The rapidity of current drug discovery in the field of HCV is both impressive and daunting for clinicians who will have to master these drugs. Going forward, the inclusion of individuals from this large and growing patient population in clinical trials will be of paramount importance. PMID:26355698

  4. Regression of liver fibrosis is progressive after sustained virological response to HCV therapy in patients with hepatitis C and HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Casado, J L; Quereda, C; Moreno, A; Pérez-Elías, M J; Martí-Belda, P; Moreno, S

    2013-12-01

    There are few data about the long-term histological outcome of HIV-/HCV-coinfected patients after therapy with interferon and ribavirin. We performed an observational study of 216 patients who received therapy against HCV and who had at least three successive transient elastographies (TE) during the follow-up. The primary endpoint was confirmed fibrosis regression, defined as a reduction of at least 1 point in Metavir fibrosis score, confirmed and without worsening in successive TE. At baseline, 23% had fibrosis stage 4 or cirrhosis. Overall, 82 (38%) achieved sustained virological response (SVR), without differences in baseline fibrosis or time of follow-up. Confirmed fibrosis regression was observed in 55% of patients, higher for SVR (71% vs 44%; P < 0.01), and the likelihood of achieving fibrosis regression at 3, 5 and 7 years was 0.17, 0.51 and 0.67, respectively, for SVR patients, in comparison with 0.02, 0.23 and 0.41 for no SVR patients (P < 0.01, log-rank test at any time point). Progressive regression, defined as continuous improvement in successive TE, was observed in 62% of patients with advanced liver fibrosis or cirrhosis who achieved SVR. In a Cox regression model, only SVR (HR, 4.01; 95% CI, 2.33-7.57; P < 0.01) and a younger age (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.05-1.25; P < 0.01; per year) were associated with fibrosis regression. This study confirms that the rate of liver fibrosis regression increases during the follow-up after SVR to interferon therapy in HIV-/HCV-coinfected patients. PMID:24304452

  5. Analysis of sequences of hepatitis C virus NS5A genotype 1 in HIV-coinfected patients with a null response to nitazoxanide or peg-interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Sede, M; Laufer, N; Ojeda, D; Gun, A; Cahn, P; Quarleri, J

    2013-09-01

    Even though new drugs have been approved for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the risk of drug-drug interactions and concern about overlapping toxicities has hindered the development of studies in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals. Traditional treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (peg-IFN + RBV) is very expensive and has a low rate of sustained virological response in coinfected patients, especially if they are infected with HCV genotype 1. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a drug that is being evaluated for the treatment of chronic HCV infection, both in HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Understanding the NTZ resistance mechanism could allow the development of resistance to be minimized and would expand the treatment options, mainly in special populations such as HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Similarly to IFN, NTZ increases the activity of the cellular protein kinase activated by double-stranded RNA (PKR), a key kinase in the innate antiviral response. In order to elucidate whether sequence heterogeneity in the PKR-binding domain of HCV NS5A genotype 1 could influence the antiviral activity of either NTZ monotherapy or peg-IFN + RBV, baseline and end-of-therapy plasma samples from two groups of eleven non-responder HIV/HCV-coinfected patients that had received NTZ or peg-IFN + RBV were studied. Most of the HCV NS5A sequences examined at the end of therapy did not change from the baseline, even after 30 days course of antiviral therapy. An extensive comparison of HCV NS5A genotype 1 and 4 sequences from the database with reported IFN therapy outcome was performed in order to infer their phylogenetic relationships. The HCV genotype 1 NS5A nucleotide sequences from therapy-non-responder patients were intermingled amongst those from the database, irrespective of their IFN-therapy outcome. When comparing NS5A-PKRBD amino acid sequences, significant differences were observed in genotype 4, but not in genotype 1 (p < 0.0001 and p

  6. Plasma Levels of Neopterin and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in Tuberculosis (TB) with and without HIV Coinfection in Relation to CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Skogmar, Sten; Schön, Thomas; Balcha, Taye Tolera; Sturegård, Erik; Jansson, Marianne; Björkman, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background While the risk of TB is elevated in HIV-positive subjects with low CD4 cell counts, TB may in itself be associated with CD4 lymphocytopenia. We investigated markers of immune activation (neopterin) and inflammation (CRP) in TB patients with and without HIV coinfection and their association with CD4 cell levels, and determined their predictive capacity as alternative markers of advanced immunosuppression. Methods Participants selected from a cohort of adults with TB at Ethiopian health centers (195 HIV+/TB+, 170 HIV-/TB+) and 31 controls were tested for plasma levels of neopterin and CRP. Baseline levels of neopterin and CRP were correlated to CD4 cell count before and after anti-TB treatment (ATT). The performance to predict CD4 cell strata for both markers were investigated using receiver operating curves. Results Levels of both biomarkers were elevated in TB patients (neopterin: HIV+/TB+ 54 nmol/l, HIV-/TB+ 23 nmol/l, controls 3.8 nmol/l; CRP: HIV+/TB+ 36 μg/ml, HIV-/TB+ 33 μg/ml, controls 0.5 μg/ml). Neopterin levels were inversely correlated (-0.53, p<0.001) to CD4 cell count, whereas this correlation was weaker for CRP (-0.25, p<0.001). Neither of the markers had adequate predictive value for identification of subjects with CD4 cell count <100 cells/mm3 (area under the curve [AUC] 0.64 for neopterin, AUC 0.59 for CRP). Conclusion Neopterin levels were high in adults with TB, both with and without HIV coinfection, with inverse correlation to CD4 cell count. This suggests that immune activation may be involved in TB-related CD4 lymphocytopenia. However, neither neopterin nor CRP showed promise as alternative tests for immunosuppression in patients coinfected with HIV and TB. PMID:26630153

  7. Hepatitis B Virus-HIV Coinfection: Forgotten but Not Gone

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Owing to shared routes of transmission and common risk factors, coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV is common. As AIDS-related opportunistic infections have declined with successful antiretroviral therapy (ART), liver-related mortality has emerged as the second leading cause of death among patients infected with HIV HIV infection negatively impacts the natural history of HBV, increasing the risks for cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related mortality. With the availability of effective antiviral therapy active against both HIV and HBV and simplified treatment algorithms, it has become easier than ever to treat coinfected patients. However, the issues of suboptimal response, incomplete viral suppression, adverse effects of long-term antiviral treatment, and potential hepatotoxicity of ART remain major challenges.

  8. MRP1 and P-glycoprotein expression assays would be useful in the additional detection of treatment non-responders in CML patients without ABL1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Young Jin; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the ability of the rhodamine-123 efflux assay, multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1) expression assay and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression assay to discriminate chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients who had failed treatment or were at risk of failure. Each assay was performed in blood samples from CML patients (n=224) treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, taken at diagnosis (n=14) and follow-up (n=210). Patient samples were categorized as optimal response (n=120), suboptimal response (n=54), and treatment failure (n=36). Treatment-failed patients had a significantly higher MRP1 expression (5.24% vs. 3.54%, P=0.006) and Pgp expression (5.25% vs. 3.48%, P=0.005) than responders. Both MRP1 (%) and Pgp (%) were highly specific (95.2% and 94.5%) and relatively accurate (83.0% and 82.5%) in the detection of treatment non-responders. Of treatment-failed patients, 41.2% had a positive result in at least one assay and of these patients without ABL1 kinase domain mutation, 51.9% were positive in at least one assay. However, the rhodamine-123 efflux assay failed to discriminate two patient groups. Thus, both MRP1 and Pgp expression assays could be useful for additional identification of treatment non-responders in CML patients without ABL1 mutation. PMID:26248945

  9. The Role of Metformin Response in Lipid Metabolism in Patients with Recent-Onset Type 2 Diabetes: HbA1c Level as a Criterion for Designating Patients as Responders or Nonresponders to Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Kashi, Zahra; Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Alizadeh, Ahad

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated whether response to metformin, the most frequently drug for diabetes treatment, influences the therapeutic effects of antilipidemic medication in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods A total of 150 patients with T2DM were classified into two groups following 3 months of metformin therapy (1000 mg twice daily): responders (patients showing ≥1% reduction in HbA1c from baseline) and nonresponders (patients showing <1% reduction in HbA1c from baseline). The patients received atorvastatin 20 mg, gemfibrozil 300 mg, or atorvastatin 20 mg and gemfibrozil 300 mg daily. Principal Findings HbA1c and fasting glucose levels were significantly different between baseline and 3 months among responders receiving atorvastatin; however, these differences were not statistically significant in nonresponders. Atherogenic ratios of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C/HDL-C; p = 0.002), total cholesterol to HDL-C (TC/HDL-C; p<0.001) and AIP (the atherogenic index of plasma; p = 0.004) decreased significantly in responders receiving atorvastatin than in nonresponders. Moreover, responders receiving atorvastatin showed a significant increase in HDL-C levels but nonresponders receiving atorvastatin did not (p = 0.007). The multivariate model identified a significant association between metformin response (as the independent variable) and TG, TC, HDL-C and LDL-C (dependent variables; Wilk's λ = 0.927, p = 0.036). Conclusions Metformin response affects therapeutic outcomes of atorvastatin on atherogenic lipid markers in patients newly diagnosed with T2DM. Metformin has a greater impact on BMI in responders of metformin compared to nonresponders. Adoption of better therapeutic strategies for reducing atherogenic lipid markers may be necessary for metformin nonresponders. PMID:26978661

  10. Immune regulation in chronically transfused allo-antibody responder and nonresponder patients with sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weili; Zhong, Hui; Li, Xiaojuan; Lee, Margaret T; Schwartz, Joseph; Sheth, Sujit; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2011-12-01

    Red blood cell alloimmunization is a major complication of transfusion therapy. Host immune markers that can predict antibody responders remain poorly described. As regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a role in alloimmunization in mouse models, we analyzed the Treg compartment of a cohort of chronically transfused patients with sickle cell disease (SCD, n = 22) and β-thalassemia major (n = 8) with and without alloantibodies. We found reduced Treg activity in alloantibody responders compared with nonresponders as seen in mice. Higher circulating anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels and lower IFN-γ levels were detected in non-alloimmunized SCD patients. Stimulated sorted CD4+ cells from half of the alloimmunized patients had increased frequency of IL-4 expression compared with nonresponders, indicating a skewed T helper (Th) 2 humoral immune response in a subgroup of antibody responders. All patients had increased Th17 responses, suggesting an underlying inflammatory state. Although small, our study indicates an altered immunoregulatory state in alloantibody responders which may help future identification of potential molecular risk factors for alloimmunization. PMID:21953592

  11. The CYP4502D6 *4 and *6 alleles are the molecular genetic markers for drug response: implications in colchicine non-responder FMF patients.

    PubMed

    Yalcıntepe, Sinem; Ozdemır, Ozturk; Sılan, Coskun; Ozen, Filiz; Uludag, Ahmet; Candan, Ferhan; Sılan, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    The cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the oxidative biotransformation of the xenobiotics, carcinogens and various clinically important drugs. Patients are evaluated in three sub-groups of extensive (EM), intermediate (IM) and poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes due to their drug-metabolising ability for the target CYP2D6 gene. Colchicine non-responsive FMF patients were prospectively genotyped for the major CYP2D6 alleles in the current study. Major CYP2D6 alleles of *1, *3, *4, *5, and *6 were genotyped for 30 responsive and 60 non-responsive FMF patients by multiplex PCR-based reverse-hybridization StripAssay and real-time PCR methods. DNA banks isolated from blood-EDTA were retrospectively used in the current patients and results were compared statistically. Increased CYP2D6 *4 and *6 allele frequencies were highly detected in the colchicine non-responsive FMF patients when compared to the responsive group. Results showed the frequencies of major CYP2D6 *1(wild), *3(2637A > delA), *4(G1934A), *5(total gene deletion) and *6(1707T del) alleles in 0.550, 0.042, 0.158, 0.025 and 0.225 for non-responder and 0.880 and 0.120 (CYP2D6*1 and *4) for the responder groups, respectively. Despite small sample size, this study suggests that there is an association between CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*6 alleles and drug intoxicants in colchicine non-responder FMF patients. PMID:25645282

  12. Mollicutes/HIV Coinfection and the Development of AIDS: Still Far from a Definitive Response

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycoplasmas are known to cause various infections in humans, mainly in the respiratory and urogenital tracts. The different species are usually host-specific and cause diseases in well-defined sites. New species have been isolated, including those from HIV-infected persons. Summary. Its in vitro properties, combined with clinical findings, have led to the hypothesis that these microorganisms may act as cofactors of HIV in AIDS development. Even today this point of view is quite polemic among infectious disease specialists and many aspects remain to be clarified, in contrast to what happens, for instance, with HIV/Mycobacterium tuberculosis coinfection. Dozens of papers have been published covering aspects of Mollicutes/HIV coinfection, but they add little to no information about the putative contribution of Mollicutes to the evolution of AIDS. Very few researchers have devoted their efforts to trying to answer this question, which remains open. In this review, we discuss the evidences that may support this statement in the light of current knowledge in the field of mycoplasmology. PMID:27413383

  13. Hepatitis C virus genotype and HIV coinfection affect cytokine mRNA levels in unstimulated PBMC but do not shift the T1/T2 balance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Silvia; Watson, Mark W; Clark, Ben; Flexman, James P; Cheng, Wendy; French, Martyn A H; Price, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Rapid progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease in patients with HIV/HCV may reflect different cytokine responses and be influenced by HCV genotype. This is addressed by a study of patients with HIV/HCV coinfection and infection with HCV genotype 2 or 3 (2/3). They are compared with coinfected patients infected with genotype 1 and HCV monoinfected patients matched for HCV genotype. IFN-gamma, IL-10, IL-4 and IL-4delta2 mRNA were quantified by real-time PCR in unstimulated PBMC and after in vitro stimulation with HCV core or nonstructural 3/4A antigen. In unstimulated PBMC, levels of IFN-gamma and IL-4 mRNA were lowest in HIV/HCV genotype 1 patients, intermediate in HIV/HCV genotype 2/3 patients and highest in HCV genotype 2/3 patients. Neither HCV genotype nor HIV affected levels of IL-10 mRNA in unstimulated PBMC or IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10 mRNA in PBMC stimulated with HCV antigens. Levels of IL-4 and IL-4delta2 mRNA correlated in mitogen-stimulated PBMC from all patient groups but both were low in HIV/HCV genotype 1 patients. Serum soluble CD30 levels (a putative marker of a T2 cytokine environment) did not differ between patient groups. The data do not suggest a shift in the T1/T2 balance driven by HIV coinfection or HCV genotype but either may affect IL-4 bioavailability. PMID:16834574

  14. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Differentially Affects Lithium Sensitivity of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Lithium Responder and Non-responder Bipolar Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Hadar, Adva; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Werner, Haim; Shomron, Noam; Gennarelli, Massimo; Schulze, Thomas G; Costa, Marta; Del Zompo, Maria; Squassina, Alessio; Gurwitz, David

    2015-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness with an unknown etiology. Lithium is considered the cornerstone in the management of BD, though about 50-60 % of patients do not respond sufficiently to chronic treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has been identified as a candidate gene for BD susceptibility, and its low expression has been suggested as a putative biomarker for lithium unresponsiveness. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on lithium sensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from lithium responder (R) and non-responder (NR) bipolar patients. Moreover, we evaluated levels of microRNA let-7c, a small RNA predicted to target IGF1. We found that exogenous IGF-1 added to serum-free media increased lithium sensitivity selectively in LCLs from NR BD patients. However, no significant differences were observed when comparing let-7c expression in LCLs from R vs. NR BD patients. Our data support a key role for IGF-1 in lithium resistance/response in the treatment of bipolar disorder. PMID:25740013

  15. Development of Human Anti-Murine T-cell Receptor Antibodies in Both Responding and Non-responding Patients Enrolled in TCR Gene Therapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jeremy L.; Theoret, Marc R.; Zheng, Zhili; Lamers, Cor; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Immune responses to gene-modified cells are a concern in the field of human gene therapy as they may impede effective treatment. We conducted two clinical trials in which cancer patients were treated with lymphocytes genetically engineered to express murine T cell receptors (mTCR) specific for tumor-associated antigens p53 and gp100. Experimental Design Twenty-six patients treated with autologous lymphocytes expressing mTCR had blood and serum samples available for analysis. Patient sera were assayed for development of a humoral immune response. Adoptive cell transfer characteristics were analyzed to identify correlates to immune response. Results Six of 26 (23%) patients post-treatment sera exhibited specific binding of human anti-mTCR antibodies to lymphocytes transduced with the mTCR. Antibody development was found in both responding and non-responding patients. Three of these six patients post-treatment sera mediated a 60 – 99% inhibition of mTCR activity as measured by a reduction in antigen-specific IFN-γ release. Detailed analysis of post-treatment serum revealed that antibody binding was beta chain specific in one patient whereas it was alpha chain specific in another. Conclusions A subset of patients treated with mTCR engineered T-cells developed antibodies directed to the mTCR variable regions and not to the constant region domains common to all mTCR. Overall, the development of a host immune response was not associated with the level of transduced cell persistence or response to therapy. In summary, patients treated with mTCR can develop an immune response to gene-modified cells in a minority of cases, but this may not affect clinical outcome. PMID:21138872

  16. The Proton Pump Inhibitor Non-Responder: A Clinical Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zilla H; Henderson, Emily E; Maradey-Romerao, Carla; George, Nina; Fass, Ronnie; Lacy, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent chronic condition where in stomach contents reflux into the esophagus causing symptoms, esophageal injury, and subsequent complications. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remain the mainstay of therapy for acid suppression. Despite their efficacy, significant proportions of GERD patients are either partial or non-responders to PPI therapy. Patients should be assessed for mechanisms that can lead to PPI failure and may require further evaluation to investigate for alternative causes. This monograph will outline a diagnostic approach to the PPI non-responder, review mechanisms associated with PPI failure, and discuss therapeutic options for those who fail to respond to PPI therapy. PMID:26270485

  17. Serial use of pentamidine and miltefosine for treating Leishmania infantum-HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Jean-François; Morquin, David; Reynes, Jacques; Chirouze, Catherine; Hoen, Bruno; Le Moing, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Liposomal amphotericin B (LAmb) may fail to heal Leishmania infantum visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the immunodeficient host. There are currently no guidelines on how to treat such patients and efficacy of miltefosine monotherapy seems limited in this indication. We present 2 cases of patients with VL and AIDS for which LAmb had to be interrupted (one because of toxicity, one because of treatment failure) and who were treated effectively with pentamidine followed by miltefosine. PMID:27353022

  18. Low Efficacy of Pegylated Interferon plus Ribavirin plus Nitazoxanide for HCV Genotype 4 and HIV Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Juan; López-Cortés, Luis F.; Téllez, Francisco; Recio, Eva; Ojeda-Burgos, Guillermo; Ríos, MªJosé; Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Delgado, Marcial; Jeremías, Rivas-; Pineda, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nitazoxanide (NTZ) plus pegylated interferon and ribavirin (Peg-IFN/RBV) improved the sustained virological response (SVR) achieved with Peg-IFN/RBV in hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4)-monoinfected patients. There are no data currently on the efficacy of Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-4 coinfection. Therefore, the objectives of this clinical trial were to assess the efficacy and to evaluate the safety of Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ in HIV/HCV-4-coinfected patients. Patients and Methods This was an open-label, single arm, multicenter phase II pilot clinical trial (NCT01529073) enrolling HIV-infected individuals with HCV-4 chronic infection, naïve to HCV therapy. Patients were treated with NTZ 500 mg bid for 4 weeks, followed by NTZ 500 mg bid plus Peg-IFN alpha-2b 1.5 μg/kg/week plus weight-adjusted RBV during 48 weeks. Analyses were done by intention-to-treat (ITT, missing = failure). A historical cohort of HIV/HCV-4-infected patients treated with Peg-IFN alpha-2b and RBV at the same area was used as control. Results Two (9.5%) of 21 patients included in the trial compared with 5 (21.7%) of 23 patients included in the historical cohort achieved SVR (SVR risk difference, -12.2%; 95% confidence interval, -33.2% to 8.8%; p = 0.416). Virological failure was due to lack of response in 13 (62%) individuals recruited in the trial. Two (9.5%) patients included in the trial and two (9.5%) individuals from the historical cohort discontinued permanently due to adverse events. Conclusions No increase in SVR was observed among HIV/HCV-4-coinfected patients receiving Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ compared with a historical cohort treated with Peg-IFN/RBV. Interruptions due to adverse events of Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ were similar to those of dual therapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01529073 PMID:26640956

  19. Acute HCV/HIV Coinfection Is Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction and Cerebral Metabolite Disturbance, but Not Increased Microglial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Lucy J.; Pavese, Nicola; Ramlackhansingh, Anil; Thomson, Emma; Allsop, Joanna M.; Politis, Marios; Kulasegaram, Ranjababu; Main, Janice; Brooks, David J.; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; Winston, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Microglial cell activation and cerebral function impairment are described in both chronic hepatitis C viral (HCV) and Human-Immune-Deficiency viral (HIV) infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute HCV infection upon cerebral function and microglial cell activation in HIV-infected individuals. Methods A case-control study was conducted. Subjects with acute HCV and chronic HIV coinfection (aHCV) were compared to matched controls with chronic HIV monoinfection (HIVmono). aHCV was defined as a new positive plasma HCV RNA within 12 months of a negative RNA test. Subjects underwent neuro-cognitive testing (NCT), cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and positron emission tomography (PET) using a 11C-radiolabeled ligand (PK11195), which is highly specific for translocator protein 18 kDA receptors on activated microglial cells. Differences between cases and controls were assessed using linear regression modelling. Results Twenty-four aHCV cases completed NCT and 1H-MRS, 8 underwent PET. Of 57 HIVmono controls completing NCT, 12 underwent 1H-MRS and 8 PET. Subjects with aHCV demonstrated on NCT, significantly poorer executive function (mean (SD) error rate 26.50(17.87) versus 19.09(8.12), p = 0.001) and on 1H-MRS increased myo-inositol/creatine ratios (mI/Cr, a marker of cerebral inflammation) in the basal ganglia (ratio of 0.71(0.22) versus 0.55(0.23), p = 0.03), compared to subjects with HIVmono. On PET imaging, no difference in 11C-PK11195 binding potential (BP) was observed between study groups (p>0.10 all cerebral locations), however lower BPs were associated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use in the parietal (p = 0.01) and frontal (p = 0.03) cerebral locations. Discussion Poorer cognitive performance and disturbance of cerebral metabolites are observed in subjects with aHC,V compared to subjects with HIVmono. Higher 11C-PK11195 BP was not observed in subjects with aHCV, but was

  20. Fatal Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Is Associated with Intravascular Monocytes and Platelets That Are Increased with HIV Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Hochman, Sarah E.; Madaline, Theresa F.; Wassmer, Samuel C.; Mbale, Emmie; Choi, Namjong; Seydel, Karl B.; Whitten, Richard O.; Varughese, Julie; Grau, Georges E. R.; Kamiza, Steve; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.; Lee, Sunhee; Milner, Danny A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Cerebral malaria (CM) is a major contributor to malaria deaths, but its pathophysiology is not well understood. While sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes is thought to be critical, the roles of inflammation and coagulation are controversial. In a large series of Malawian children hospitalized with CM, HIV coinfection was more prevalent than in pediatric population estimates (15% versus 2%, P < 0.0001, chi-square test), with higher mortality than that seen in HIV-uninfected children (23% versus 17%, P = 0.0178, chi-square test). HIV-infected (HIV+) children with autopsy-confirmed CM were older than HIV-uninfected children (median age, 99 months versus 32 months, P = 0.0007, Mann-Whitney U test) and appeared to lack severe immunosuppression. Because HIV infection is associated with dysregulated inflammation and platelet activation, we performed immunohistochemistry analysis for monocytes, platelets, and neutrophils in brain tissue from HIV+ and HIV-uninfected children with fatal CM. Children with autopsy-confirmed CM had significantly (>9 times) more accumulations of intravascular monocytes and platelets, but not neutrophils, than did children with nonmalarial causes of coma. The monocyte and platelet accumulations were significantly (>2-fold) greater in HIV+ children than in HIV-uninfected children with autopsy-confirmed CM. Our findings indicate that HIV is a risk factor for CM and for death from CM, independent of traditional measures of HIV disease severity. Brain histopathology supports the hypotheses that inflammation and coagulation contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric CM and that immune dysregulation in HIV+ children exacerbates the pathological features associated with CM. Importance  There are nearly 1 million malaria deaths yearly, primarily in sub-Saharan African children. Cerebral malaria (CM), marked by coma and sequestered malaria parasites in brain blood vessels, causes half of these deaths, although the mechanisms

  1. Successful Prasugrel Rescue Therapy in Clopidogrel Resistant Patients Who Had Recurrent Stent Thrombosis of Drug-Eluting-Stent: The Role of Prasugrel in Clopidogrel Nonresponders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Oh, Jaewon; Park, Jin Su; Lee, Dong-Jun; Lee, Han-Cheol; Kim, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is a very serious problem after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation even though its incidence is about or less than 1%. As the clopidogrel resistance is expected to play an important role in the occurrence of stent thrombosis, new anti-platelet agents overcoming this issue can give us another choice. We experienced a case of a 58-year-old male with successful prasugrel rescue therapy in a patient with clopidogrel resistance who had recurrent stent thrombosis following DES implantation. PMID:23755082

  2. Switch of anti-VEGF agents is an option for nonresponders in the treatment of AMD

    PubMed Central

    Ehlken, C; Jungmann, S; Böhringer, D; Agostini, H T; Junker, B; Pielen, A

    2014-01-01

    Background Although anti-VEGF therapy of exudative AMD with bevacizumab and ranibizumab proved efficacious in the majority of patients, CNV activity does not respond to continued treatment after repeated injections in a considerable amount of patients. These are referred to as nonresponders. A change of the drug to bevacizumab or ranibizumab could possibly offer an alternative option for the treatment of nonresponding exudative AMD. Methods and materials A total of 138 nonresponders who switched therapy from bevacizumab to ranibizumab (n=114) or vice versa (n=24) were included in a retrospective study. Visual acuity (VA) and foveal thickness before and after the switch of therapy were compared. By means of linear regression analysis, we analyzed possible prognostic factors associated with a favorable outcome for visual acuity. Results Linear regression analysis revealed a statistically significant benefit for nonresponders when treatment was changed to a different anti-VEGF drug (bevacizumab or ranibizumab). VA at the time of the switch was positively correlated with a beneficial development of VA after changing the drug. There was no significant correlation with age, macular thickness, number of injections before the switch, or the development of VA under treatment before the switch. Both patients switching to Avastin and Lucentis benefitted without statistically significant differences. Conclusions An exchange of bevacizumab with ranibizumab or vice versa should be considered in nonresponders in the treatment of exudative AMD. Further prognostic factors may help to identify patients who might benefit from a switch. These factors should be investigated in further studies. PMID:24722504

  3. Antigen binding and capping by lymphocytes of genetic nonresponder mice.

    PubMed

    Dunham, E K; Unanue, E R; Benacerraf, B

    1972-08-01

    Radioautographic study of the binding of GAT-(125)I to spleen cells of genetic responder and nonresponder mice demonstrates that among mice not injected with antigen all strains have approximately the same number of antigen-binding cells; after injection with antigen the number of antigen-binding cells increases in responders but not in nonresponders. Nonresponders are shown to make antibody after injection with GAT complexed with an immunogenic carrier, demonstrating the presence of potentially functional B cells in responders and nonresponders alike. When incubated in the warm, antigen-binding cells of both responders and nonresponders concentrate antigen at one pole of the cell, forming caps. PMID:5043419

  4. Clinical-biochemical correlates of migraine attacks in rizatriptan responders and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, P; Pini, L A; Zanchin, G; Alberti, A; Maggioni, F; Rossi, C; Floridi, A; Calabresi, P

    2006-03-01

    The present study was aimed at verifying the clinical characteristics of a typical attack in 20 migraine patients, 10 responders and 10 non-responders to rizatriptan, and at investigating any differences in the levels of neuropeptides of the trigeminovascular or parasympathetic systems [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) measured by radioimmunoassay methods in external jugular blood] between responders and non-responders. In all responders to rizatriptan, pain was unilateral, severe, and pulsating, and in five of them at least one sign suggestive of parasympathetic system activation was recorded. Five patients who were non-responders to rizatriptan referred bilateral and non-pulsating pain, even though severe in most of them. CGRP and NKA levels measured before rizatriptan administration were significantly higher in responders than in non-responders (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.002, respectively). In the five patients with autonomic signs among rizatriptan responders, detectable VIP levels were found at baseline. One hour after rizatriptan administration, a decrease in CGRP and NKA levels was evident in the external jugular venous blood of rizatriptan responders, and this corresponded to a significant pain relief and alleviation of accompanying symptoms. VIP levels were also significantly reduced at the same time in the five patients with autonomic signs. After rizatriptan administration, CGRP and NKA levels in non-responder patients showed less significant variations at all time points after rizatriptan administration compared with rizatriptan responders. The present study, although carried out on a limited number of patients, supports recent clinical evidence of increased trigeminal activation associated with a better triptan response in migraine patients accompanied by parasympathetic activation in a subgroup of patients with autonomic signs. In contrast, the poor response seems to be correlated with a

  5. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in HIV Coinfected Individuals in Eastern India with Risk Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Soumyabrata; Sarkar, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Biswas, Rahul; SenGupta, Manideepa

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the cause of most genital herpes while HSV-1 is responsible for orolabial and facial lesions. In immunocompromised individuals, like HIV patients, impaired immunity leads to more frequent symptomatic and asymptomatic HSV infection. Fifty-two blood samples from HIV patients with clinically diagnosed HSV infection were taken as cases, while 45 blood samples each from HIV-infected (HIV control) and noninfected patients without any herpetic lesion (non-HIV control) were taken as control. Serum was tested for IgM and IgG antibodies of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 by ELISA. The seroprevalence was compared among the three groups of study population, considering the demographic and socioeconomic parameters. The HSV-2 IgM was significantly higher (p < 0.005) in the HIV patient group (34.6%) than the HIV control (2.2%) and non-HIV control (2.2%) groups, whereas HSV-2 IgG seroprevalence was higher in both HIV patient (61.5%) and HIV control (57.8%) groups than the non-HIV control group (17.8%). The prevalence of HSV-2 was significantly higher in persons with multiple partners and in the reproductive age group. The overall seroprevalence of HSV-1 IgM was too low (<5%), whereas it was too high (about 90%) with HSV-1 IgG in all three study groups. PMID:26557849

  6. Psychodynamic Treatment for Separation Anxiety in a Treatment Nonresponder.

    PubMed

    Busch, Fredric N; Milrod, Barbara L

    2015-10-01

    Separation anxiety, long an area of interest for psychoanalysts, has been included in DSM-5 among general "anxiety disorders" that span across age groups. The syndrome of separation anxiety has been shown to correlate with nonresponse to treatments for anxiety and mood disorders (Milrod et al. 2014). It is therefore of public health importance to develop targeted treatments for this syndrome. Some psychoanalysts have suggested that brief psychoanalytic interventions may be of particular value in addressing separation anxiety. Our clinical work with patients with anxiety disorders with high levels of separation anxiety indicates that they have such intense anger and ambivalence in fraught intimate relationships that they feel stuck and helpless, almost eliminating more positive feelings. This ambivalence and associated unconscious conflicts inevitably emerge in the therapeutic relationship and can threaten to disrupt treatment efforts. We propose a set of focused psychodynamic psychotherapeutic interventions to address separation anxiety, developed as part of Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy-eXtended Range (PFPP-XR; Busch et al. 2012). We present a case from our research study of treatment nonresponders with anxiety disorders and separation anxiety. The patient was successfully treated with PFPP-XR in a 21-session treatment. PMID:26487108

  7. Rapid prediction of sustained virological response in patients chronically infected with HCV by evaluation of RNA decay 48h after the start of treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Parruti, Giustino; Polilli, Ennio; Sozio, Federica; Cento, Valeria; Pieri, Alessandro; Di Masi, Francesco; Mercurio, Fabio; Tontodonati, Monica; Mazzotta, Elena; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Manzoli, Lamberto; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2010-10-01

    The combination of pegylated interferons (PEG-IFNs) and ribavirin represents the standard of care for the treatment of chronic HCV-infected patients, yet with a success rate around 50% in genotypes 1 and 4, high costs and side effects. Therefore, early prediction of sustained virological response (SVR) is a relevant issue for HCV-patients. We evaluated the association between SVR and decline of HCV-RNA at 48h in a prospective cohort of 145 HCV-patients treated with PEG-IFNs and ribavirin (males=69.1%; genotypes 1/4=51.0%; HIV-1 coinfected=6.7%). SVR was obtained in 65.5% of patients, while 16.6% experienced relapse and 17.9% no response. The first-phase of HCV-RNA decline clearly differentiated patients with SVR from relapsers and non-responders, independently of genotype (P<0.001). In univariate and multivariate analyses, different infralogaritmic thresholds of HCV-RNA decay at 48h were tested, observing the highest predictive potential at 0.5log: decays above this threshold showed a 76.2% negative predictive value for SVR, whereas decays >0.5log indicated a 6.8 odds ratio (95% C.I.: 2.0-23.2) for SVR after controlling for genotype, baseline viremia, adherence to therapy and HIV coinfection. Decays beyond the 0.5log threshold were also strongly associated with and highly predictive of early virological response (95.0% positive predictive value, P<0.001). PMID:20708036

  8. Triptan nonresponder studies: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Dodick, David W

    2005-02-01

    The maximum absolute response rate with oral triptans, as measured in clinical trials by the incidence of relief from migraine pain at 2 hours after taking medication, is approximately 70%. Therefore around 30% of patients fail to respond to a particular triptan. Nonresponse is likely to be due to a variety of factors, including low and inconsistent absorption, use of the medication late in an attack, inadequate dosing, and variability in individual response. Evidence from recent clinical trials, however, confirms the common clinical observation that patients with a poor response to one triptan can benefit from subsequent treatment with a different triptan. Two-hour pain-relief rates of 25% to 81% using alternative triptans (naratriptan, almotriptan, eletriptan, zolmitriptan, and rizatriptan) have been reported in patients who were described as poor responders to sumatriptan. Physicians should remain vigilant in assessing the response to acute therapy and take advantage of simple clinical questionnaires that have been developed to facilitate the recognition of those patients who require and may benefit from a change in acute therapy. PMID:15705122

  9. Pilot randomized trial of nutritional supplementation in patients with tuberculosis and HIV–tuberculosis coinfection receiving directly observed short-course chemotherapy for tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sudarsanam, T. D.; John, J.; Kang, G.; Mahendri, V.; Gerrior, J.; Franciosa, M.; Gopal, S.; John, K. R.; Wanke, C. A.; Muliyil, J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of nutritional supplementation on the outcome and nutritional status of south Indian patients with tuberculosis (TB) with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection on anti-tuberculous therapy. METHOD Randomized controlled trial on the effect of a locally prepared cereal–lentil mixture providing 930 kcal and a multivitamin micronutrient supplement during anti-tuberculous therapy in 81 newly diagnosed TB alone and 22 TB–HIV-coinfected patients, among whom 51 received and 52 did not receive the supplement. The primary outcome evaluated at completion of TB therapy was outcome of TB treatment, as classified by the national programme. Secondary outcomes were body composition, compliance and condition on follow-up 1 year after cessation of TB therapy and supplementation. RESULTS There was no significant difference in TB outcomes at the end of treatment, but HIV–TB coinfected individuals had four times greater odds of poor outcome than those with TB alone. Among patients with TB, 1/35 (2.9%) supplemented and 5/42(12%) of those not supplemented had poor outcomes, while among TB–HIV-coinfected individuals, 4/13 (31%) supplemented and 3/7 (42.8%) non-supplemented patients had poor outcomes at the end of treatment, and the differences were more marked after 1 year of follow-up. Although there was some trend of benefit for both TB alone and TB–HIV coinfection, the results were not statistically significant at the end of TB treatment, possibly because of limited sample size. CONCLUSION Nutritional supplements in patients are a potentially feasible, low-cost intervention, which could impact patients with TB and TB–HIV. The public health importance of these diseases in resource-limited settings suggests the need for large, multi-centre randomized control trials on nutritional supplementation. PMID:21418447

  10. Non-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy: the magnitude of the problem and the issues.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, Angelo; Prinzen, Frits W

    2011-01-01

    A variable proportion of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) patients do not benefit from treatment (termed `non-responders'). The problem of non-response to CRT might become increasingly important, because it is anticipated that larger groups of heart failure patients are indicated to the therapy. This article will discuss the definition of response to CRT, the parameters related to response to CRT, and finally whether response to CRT might be predicted. The effort to improve patient selection in order to maximize human and financial resource utilization has fallen short so far. It is, however, conceivable that rather than the identification of a `universally' applicable cut-off value, risk strata-in which inclusion of method for determination of left ventricular volumes, etiology, QRS duration and morphology, etc-might better serve the goal of defining non-responders. Potentially simple clinical scores might help in refining outcome and by doing so, allow to more precisely measure response to CRT in daily practice in the individual patient at the time of CRT implantation. Although sophisticated cardiac imaging modalities have been intensively utilized for improving patient outcome, it seems that many mechanical dyssynchrony measures suffer from technical limitations and from difficult interpretation of the complex signals, which lack reproducibility outside highly specialized laboratories. PMID:21325727

  11. Early identification of non-responding locally advanced breast tumors receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Charehbili, Ayoub; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Kroep, Judith R.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Dijkstra, Jouke; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) may be advantageous for monitoring tumor response during chemotherapy treatment, particularly in the early treatment stages. In this paper we perform a second analysis on the data of a clinical trial with 25 breast cancer patients that received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients were monitored using delayed contrast enhanced MRI and additionally with diffuse optical spectroscopy at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy, halfway therapy and before surgery. In this analysis hemoglobin content between tumor tissue and healthy tissue of the same breast is compared on all four monitoring time points. Furthermore, the predictive power of the tumor-healthy tissue difference of HbO2 for non-responder prediction is assessed. The difference in HbO2 content between tumor and healthy tissue was statistically significantly higher in responding tumors than in non-responding tumors at baseline (10.88 vs -0.57 μM, P=0.014) and after one cycle of chemotherapy (6.45 vs -1.31 μM, P=0.048). Before surgery this difference had diminished. In the data of this study, classification on the HbO2 difference between tumor and healthy tissue was able to predict tumor (non-)response at baseline and after 1 cycle with an area-under-curve of 0.95 and 0.88, respectively. While this result suggests that tumor response can be predicted before chemotherapy onset, one should be very careful with interpreting these results. A larger patient population is needed to confirm this finding.

  12. Management of Hepatitis C/HIV Coinfection in the Era of Highly Effective Hepatitis C Virus Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wyles, David L; Sulkowski, Mark S; Dieterich, Douglas

    2016-07-15

    The increased life expectancy of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in renewed attention to non-HIV-related diseases exacerbated by HIV infection. Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a particular area of concern, as the global prevalence has been estimated at 2.5-5 million people. In this article, we discuss the epidemiology of HCV infection and reinfection, HCV-related liver disease progression in the era of effective ART, and the efficacy of emerging HCV treatment strategies in persons with HIV/HCV coinfection. New data regarding treatment of persons with HIV/HCV coinfection suggest that HCV treatment should be a priority in those with HIV. Results from recent studies using all-oral HCV regimens have shown high rates of sustained virologic response in both clinical trials and real-world settings. A multidisciplinary approach to HCV treatment in those with HIV is recommended for optimal patient management. Following HCV cure, practitioners also need to be mindful of the risks for HCV reinfection and educate patients on protective measures. PMID:27363438

  13. The Human Transcriptome During Nontyphoid Salmonella and HIV Coinfection Reveals Attenuated NFκB-Mediated Inflammation and Persistent Cell Cycle Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Fernanda; Lynn, David J.; Houston, Angela; Peters, Joanna; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; Finlay, Brett B.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Dougan, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Background. Invasive nontyphoid Salmonella (iNTS) disease is common and severe in adults with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Africa. We previously observed that ex vivo macrophages from HIV-infected subjects challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium exhibit dysregulated proinflammatory cytokine responses. Methods. We studied the transcriptional response in whole blood from HIV-positive patients during acute and convalescent iNTS disease compared to other invasive bacterial diseases, and to HIV-positive and -negative controls. Results. During iNTS disease, there was a remarkable lack of a coordinated inflammatory or innate immune signaling response. Few interferon γ (IFNγ)--induced genes or Toll-like receptor/transcription factor nuclear factor κB (TLR/NFκB) gene pathways were upregulated in expression. Ex vivo lipopolysacharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation of whole blood, however, showed that convalescent iNTS subjects and controls were competent to mount prominent TLR/NFκB-associated patterns of mRNA expression. In contrast, HIV-positive patients with other invasive bacterial infections (Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae) displayed a pronounced proinflammatory innate immune transcriptional response. There was also upregulated mRNA expression in cell cycle, DNA replication, translation and repair, and viral replication pathways during iNTS. These patterns persisted for up to 2 months into convalescence. Conclusions. Attenuation of NFκB-mediated inflammation and dysregulation of cell cycle and DNA-function gene pathway expression are key features of the interplay between iNTS and HIV. PMID:21917897

  14. HIV treatment cascade in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lessells, Richard J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, the number of deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection remains unacceptably high. We review the evidence around the impact of strengthening the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients and explore recent findings about how best to deliver integrated TB/HIV services. Recent findings There is clear evidence that the timely provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in TB/HIV coinfected adults. Despite this, globally in 2013, only around a third of known HIV-positive TB cases were treated with ART. Although there is some recent evidence exploring the barriers to achieve high coverage of HIV testing and ART initiation in TB patients, our understanding of which factors are most important and how best to address these within different health systems remains incomplete. There are some examples of good practice in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services to improve the HIV treatment cascade. However, evidence of the impact of such strategies is of relatively low quality for informing integrated TB/HIV programming more broadly. In most settings, there remain barriers to higher-level organizational and functional integration. Summary There remains a need for commitment to patient-centred integrated TB/HIV care in countries affected by the dual epidemic. There is a need for better quality evidence around how best to deliver integrated services to strengthen the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients, both at primary healthcare level and within community settings. PMID:26352390

  15. Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with prednisolone: significant survival advantage for day +5 responders and no advantage for nonresponders receiving anti-thymocyte globulin.

    PubMed

    Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Milone, Giuseppe; Leotta, Salvatore; Uderzo, Cornelio; Scimè, Rosanna; Dallorso, Sandro; Locasciulli, Anna; Guidi, Stefano; Mordini, Nicola; Sica, Simona; Cudillo, Laura; Fagioli, Franca; Selleri, Carmine; Bruno, Barbara; Arcese, William; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2006-05-15

    Newly diagnosed patients with acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD, grades I-IV; n = 211) were given 6-methylprednisolone (6MPred) 2 mg/kg per day for 5 consecutive days; 150 patients (71%) tapered 6MPred on day +5 and were considered responders; 61 patients (29%) could not taper their steroid dose and were considered nonresponders. The cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality (TRM) for responders and nonresponders is, respectively, 27% and 49% (P = .009), and the 5-year survival is 53% and 35% (P = .007). Nonresponders on day +5 (n = 61) were randomized to receive 6MPred 5 mg/kg per day for 10 days alone (n = 34) or in combination with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG, 6.25 mg/kg in 10 days; n = 27). The 2 groups were balanced for clinical and GvHD characteristics. One month after randomization, 26% had a complete response; 23%, a partial response; 33%, stable GvHD; 10%, worsened; and 8%, died. There was no significant difference in response, TRM, and survival between the non-ATG and ATG group. In conclusion, 5 days of prednisolone as first-line therapy of acute GvHD identifies patients with different risk of TRM, and second-line therapy with a combination of 6MPred + ATG does not improve patient outcome, compared with 6MPred alone. PMID:16449522

  16. Magnitude of visceral leishmaniasis and poor treatment outcome among HIV patients: meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alemayehu, Mekuriaw; Wubshet, Mamo; Mesfin, Nebiyu

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) coinfection with HIV/AIDS most often results in unfavorable responses to treatment, frequent relapses, and premature deaths. Scarce data are available, regarding the magnitude and poor treatment outcomes of VL-HIV coinfection. Objective The main objective of this systematic review was to describe the pooled prevalence of VL and poor treatment outcome among HIV patients. Review methods Electronic databases mainly PubMed were searched. Databases, such as Google and Google scholar, were searched for gray literature. Articles were selected based on their inclusion criterion, whether they included HIV-positive individuals with VL diagnosis. STATA 11 software was used to conduct a meta-analysis of pooled prevalence of VL-HIV coinfection. Results Fifteen of the 150 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A majority of the study participants were males between 25 years and 41 years of age. The pooled prevalence of VL-HIV coinfection is 5.2% with 95% confidence interval of (2.45–10.99). Two studies demonstrated the impact of antiretroviral treatment on reduction in relapse rate compared with patients who did not start antiretroviral treatment. One study showed that the higher the baseline CD4+ cell count (>100 cells/mL) the lower the relapse rate. Former VL episodes were identified as risk factors for relapse in two articles. In one of the articles, an earlier bout of VL remains significant in the model adjusted to other variables. Conclusion The pooled prevalence of VL in HIV-infected patients is low and an earlier bout of VL and CD4+ count <100 cells/mL at the time of primary VL diagnosis are factors that predict poor treatment outcome. PMID:27042142

  17. S-adenosyl methionine improves early viral responses and interferon-stimulated gene induction in hepatitis C nonresponders

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Jordan J.; Modi, Apurva A.; El-Diwany, Ramy; Rotman, Yaron; Thomas, Emmanuel; Koh, Christopher; Cherepanov, Vera; Heller, Theo; Ghany, Marc G.; Park, Yoon; Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Fewer than half of patients infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) achieve sustained viral clearance after peginterferon and ribavirin therapy. S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) increases interferon signaling in cell culture. We assessed the effect of SAMe on the kinetics of the early anti-viral response and interferon signaling in patients that did not respond to previous therapy (nonresponders) and investigated its mechanisms. Methods Nonresponders with HCV genotype-1 were given 2 weeks of peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin (Course A, baseline/control). After a 1-month period, patients received SAMe (1600 mg daily) for 2 weeks and then peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks (Course B; completed by 21 of 24 patients). Viral kinetics and interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were compared between courses. Results The decrease in HCV RNA from 0 to 48 hours (phase 1) was similar before and after administration of SAMe. However, the slope increased for the second-phase decrease in HCV between courses A and B (Course A=0.11±0.04 log10IU/mL/week, Course B=0.27±0.06; P=0.009); 11 patients (53%) achieved an early virological response and 10 (48%) had undetectable HCV RNA by week 24. Induction of ISGs in PBMCs was significantly greater after Course B. In cultured cells, SAMe increased induction of ISGs, compared with only peginterferon and ribavirin, and the antiviral effects of interferon by increasing STAT1 methylation, which might promote binding of STAT1 to DNA. Conclusions The addition of SAMe to peginterferon and ribavirin improves the kinetics of the early anti-viral response and induces ISGs in patients with HCV genotype 1 that do not respond to interferon therapy. SAMe might be used with peginterferon-based therapies in patients with chronic HCV infections. PMID:20854821

  18. Non-Responders to Intravenous Immunoglobulin and Coronary Artery Dilatation in Kawasaki Disease: Predictive Parameters in Korean Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Young; Kim, Dongwan; Kim, Yong Hyun; Ryoo, Eell; Sun, Yong Han; Jeon, In-sang; Jung, Mi-Jin; Cho, Hye Kyung; Tchah, Hann; Choi, Deok Young

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives In Kawasaki disease (KD), high dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) significantly lowers the coronary complications. However, some patients either do not respond to initial therapy or develop coronary complications. We aimed to identify the predictive factors for unresponsiveness to initial IVIG therapy and coronary artery dilatation (CAD; defined by Z-score≥2.5) in the acute phase and convalescent phase. Subjects and Methods A retrospective review was conducted of 703 patients with KD, admitted to Gachon University Gil Medical Center between January 2005 and June 2013. The patients were divided into two groups—IVIG responders vs. non-responders—based on the IVIG treatments, and presence of fever after treatment. Further, these groups were divided into two subgroups based on their CAD. Results Among the 703 patients with KD, the rate of non-responders to initial IVIG was 16.8%. Serum total bilirubin, platelet count, and neutrophil proportion were independent predictive parameters of unresponsiveness (p<0.05). CAD was found in 234 patients (33.3%) in the acute phase, and in 32 patients (4.6%) in the convalescent phase. Male gender, fever duration, serum C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count were related to CAD (p<0.05). CAD was detected more frequently in non-responders than in the responders (47.5% vs. 31.5%, p=0.001). Kobayashi, Egami, and Sano scoring systems applied to our study population reflected low sensitivities (28.0-33.9%). Conclusion Several independent parameters were related to unresponsiveness to the initial IVIG or CAD. These parameters might be helpful in establishing more focused and careful monitoring of high-risk KD patients in Korea. PMID:27482264

  19. Characteristics of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV seropositive and seronegative patients in a Northeastern region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Liberato, Isabella Ramos de Oliveira; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fatima P Militão; Campelo, Antônio Roberto Leite; de Melo, Heloísa Ramos Lacerda

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical, epidemiological and bacteriological features present in 60 pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were also infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to compare these with 120 TB patients who were not infected with HIV. The patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and HIV coinfection were mostly male (p = 0.001), showed a higher frequency of weight loss >10 kilos (p <0.001), had a higher rate of non-reaction result to the tuberculin skin test (p <0.001), a higher frequency of negative sputum smear examination for acid-fast bacilli (p = 0.001) and negative sputum culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (p = 0.001). Treatment failure was more common in those who were HIV positive (p <0.000). No higher frequency of resistance to antituberculosis drugs was found to be associated with TB/HIV coinfection (p = 0.407). Association between extrapulmonary and pulmonary tuberculosis was more frequent in those seropositive to HIV than those without HIV virus, 30% and 1.6% respectively. These findings showed a predominance of atypical clinical laboratory features in co-infected patients, and suggest that health care personnel should consider the possibility this diagnosis. PMID:15042183

  20. Understanding Faculty Survey Nonrespondents: Their Characteristics, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors, Workplace Attitudes, and Reasons for Nonparticipation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Kiernan Robert

    2013-01-01

    College and university administrators frequently survey their faculty to inform decisions affecting the academic workplace. Higher education researchers, too, rely heavily on survey methodologies in their scholarly work. Survey response rates, however, have been declining steadily for decades, and when nonrespondents and respondents systematically…

  1. A Comparison of Community College Responders and Nonresponders to the VEDS Student Follow-Up Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carifio, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of respondents and nonrespondents to the Vocational Education Data System's follow-up survey of Massachusetts community college graduates was designed to measure response bias. The survey investigated employment patterns, wages, and degree of job relatedness. Results suggest original data was biased, if at all, toward underestimation, not…

  2. Bacille-Calmette-Guerin non-responders: how to manage

    PubMed Central

    von Rundstedt, Friedrich-Carl

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with bacille-Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is indicated in the treatment of high-risk and intermediate-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Our goal is to describe the various disease states following induction and maintenance BCG and to describe contemporary treatment options and the current and projected clinical trial landscape for patients who recur following BCG therapy. PMID:26816828

  3. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  4. [Prevention of hepatitis B--HLA DR/DQ in HBs Ag nonresponder].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, E; Hoshino, A; Miura, T; Nagahara, N; Kudo, Y; Tamura, M

    1989-11-01

    To evaluate the immunological background in HBs Ag nonresponders against hepatitis B vaccine, the lymphocyte surface marker and HLA-DR/DQ antigen were determined on hospital personnel, 70 males and 256 females, injected hepatitis B vaccine for three times. The vaccine made from the plasma of HBs Ag carriers was injected at the first and second vaccination and recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was injected at the third vaccination. A month after the third vaccination, blood was withdrawn for HBs antigen test by RIA. Border line cases (cut off index 1.0-1.9) are included in nonresponder (cut off index less than 0.9). Both nonresponders and low responders (cut off index 2-49) are more often seen in males than females and high responder (cut off index 50 or more) are seen more often in young females than males. Lymphocyte surface markers were studied by flow cytometry using the following monoclonal antibodies; OKT 3, 4, 8, DR, NK, Ia 1 and B7. No differences between lymphocyte surface markers of nonresponders and responders were noted. HLA-DR/DQ antigens were studied by the cytotoxicity test using Locus DR/DQ, Terasaki Second DR W-60 Tray and using following antibodies; DR 1, DR 2, DRW 15, DR 4, DR 5, DR 7, DR 9, DRW 10, DRW 8, DRW 12, DRW 13, DRW 6, DRW 52, DRW 53, DQW 1, DQW 6, DQW 2, DQW 3, DQW 7 and DQW 4. No significant differences between HLA-DR/DQ of nonresponders and responders were noted. PMID:2601078

  5. Repeated vaccinations do not improve specific immune defenses against Hepatitis B in non-responder health care workers.

    PubMed

    Zaffina, Salvatore; Marcellini, Valentina; Santoro, Anna Paola; Scarsella, Marco; Camisa, Vincenzo; Vinci, Maria Rosaria; Musolino, Anna Maria; Nicolosi, Luciana; Rosado, M Manuela; Carsetti, Rita

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a major infectious occupational hazard for health care workers and can be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. The serum titer of anti-HBsAg antibodies is the most commonly used correlate of protection and post-vaccination anti-HBsAg concentrations of ≥ 10 mIU/ml are considered protective. Subjects with post-vaccination anti-HBsAg titers of <10 mIU/ml 1-6 months post-vaccination, who tested negative for HBsAg and anti-HBc, are defined as non-responders. The question of whether non-responders should be repeatedly vaccinated is still open. The aim of the study was to (i) evaluate the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations and the percentage of HBsAg-specific memory B cells in responders and non-responders (ii) assess whether non-responders can be induced to produce antibodies after administration of a booster dose of vaccine (iii) determine whether booster vaccination increases the number of specific memory B cells in non-responders. Combining flow-cytometry, ELISPOT and serology we tested the integrity and function of the immune system in 24 health care workers, confirmed to be non-responders after at least three vaccine injections. We compared the results with those obtained in 21 responders working in the same institution. We found that the great majority of the non-responders had a functional immune system and a preserved ability to respond to other conventional antigens. Our most important findings are that the frequency of HBsAg-specific memory B cells is comparable in non-responders and controls and that booster immunization does not lead either to antibody production or memory B cell increase in non-responders. PMID:25444815

  6. Long-term treatment with the combination of amantadine and ribavirin in hepatitis C nonresponders. A case series.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas R; Taheri, Mohammad R

    2007-12-01

    In this report, we describe five cases of chronic hepatitis C that have been treated with the combination of amantadine and ribavirin for an average of 44 months, emphasizing one case where the patient showed improvement in liver biopsy after treatment, worsening on removal, then a repeated improvement with re-initiation. The five patients in this report belong to a pool of sixty patients from a 6 month pilot study using amantadine and ribavirin where treatment was subsequently continued. The mean ALT was 82.8+/-32 U/L pre-treatment and 33.8+/-17.3 U/L post-treatment (p=0.02). The mean Knodell score was 7+/-1 pre-treatment and 3.6+/-1.5 post-treatment (p=0.13). The mean viral load was 584,155+/-248,027 lU/ml pre-treatment and 225,878+/-190,143 IU/ml post-treatment (p=0.05). In this case series we provide provocative data on the long-term use of ribavirin and amantadine in the HCV non-responder. PMID:17401686

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and hepatitis B nonresponders feature different immunologic mechanisms in response to TBE and influenza vaccination with involvement of regulatory T and B cells and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Garner-Spitzer, Erika; Wagner, Angelika; Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Heinz, Franz X; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Stiasny, Karin; Fischer, Gottfried F; Kundi, Michael; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2013-09-01

    Low responsiveness/nonresponsiveness is characterized by an insufficient immune response upon primary and/or booster vaccination and affects 1-10% of vaccinees. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether nonresponsiveness is an Ag/vaccine-specific phenomenon and to clarify underlying immunological mechanisms. Nonresponders to tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) or hepatitis B Ag with a history of previous TBE vaccinations were booster vaccinated with TBE and influenza vaccine and compared with TBE high responders in terms of humoral and cellular immune response. Postboosters in TBE high responder existing TBE titers increased, and solid humoral responses to influenza vaccine were induced. In TBE nonresponders, low to undetectable prevaccination TBE titers remained low, whereas sufficient influenza Abs were induced. In both TBE groups, a positive correlation of humoral and cellular immune response was seen as high/low TBE titers were associated with sufficient/lack of Ag-specific T cell proliferation. Furthermore, responses to influenza were robust in terms of Abs and cytokine production. In contrast, in hepatitis B nonresponders, sufficient humoral responses to TBE and influenza Ags were induced despite lacking specific IL-2 and IFN-γ production. Importantly, these patients showed high IL-10 baseline levels in vitro. HLA-DR subtypes associated with hepatitis B nonresponsiveness were overrepresented in this group, and high IL-10 levels were linked to these subtypes. Whereas TBE and hepatitis B nonresponders had increased IL-10-producing FOXP3(+) T regulatory cells upon vaccination, only in hepatitis B nonresponders, showing elevated prevaccination IL-10 levels, a prominent population of B regulatory cells was detected. We conclude that immunological pathways of nonresponsiveness follow different patterns depending both on vaccine Ag and genetic predisposition of the vaccinee. PMID:23872054

  8. New use of an old drug: chloroquine reduces viral and ALT levels in HCV non-responders (a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial).

    PubMed

    Peymani, Payam; Yeganeh, Behzad; Sabour, Siamak; Geramizadeh, Bita; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Keyvani, Hossein; Azarpira, Negar; Coombs, Kevin M; Ghavami, Saied; Lankarani, Kamran B

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces autophagy, but the virus assimilates the autophagic response into its own life cycle. Chloroquine (CQ) is an autophagy inhibitor that is clinically used to treat malaria. The aims of this pilot clinical trial were to evaluate the therapeutic potential and short-term safety of CQ in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1, who were unresponsive to a combination of pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin. Ten non-responders to previous antiviral treatment(s) were randomized to receive either CQ (150 mg daily for 8 weeks) or placebo, and were followed for 4 weeks after CQ therapy. HCV RNA load and plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) levels were measured at baseline, week 4 (initial response), week 8 (end-of-treatment response), and at the end of 12 weeks. A significant decrease in HCV RNA after the treatments (week 8) was observed in all patients in the CQ group (P = 0.04). However, HCV RNA levels increased within 4 weeks after discontinuation of CQ treatment although they were still lower than baseline. In addition, the ALT normalized during treatment in the CQ group. However, this response was also lost after treatment cessation. This study provides preliminary evidence that CQ is possibly a safe treatment option for HCV non-responders. PMID:26998724

  9. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Ovarian Cancer Tissue to Identify Potential Biomarkers of Responders and Nonresponders to First-Line Chemotherapy of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Urmila; Pokhriyal, Ruchika; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Hariprasad, Roopa; Khan, Mohd Imran; Gupta, Divya; Naru, Jasmine; Singh, Sundararajan Baskar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Vanamail, Perumal; Kumar, Lalit; Kumar, Sunesh; Hariprasad, Gururao

    2016-01-01

    Conventional treatment for advanced ovarian cancer is an initial debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel. Despite initial high response, three-fourths of these women experience disease recurrence with a dismal prognosis. Patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer who underwent cytoreductive surgery were enrolled and tissue samples were collected. Post surgery, these patients were started on chemotherapy and followed up till the end of the cycle. Fluorescence-based differential in-gel expression coupled with mass spectrometric analysis was used for discovery phase of experiments, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and pathway analysis were performed for expression and functional validation of differentially expressed proteins. While aldehyde reductase, hnRNP, cyclophilin A, heat shock protein-27, and actin are upregulated in responders, prohibitin, enoyl-coA hydratase, peroxiredoxin, and fibrin-β are upregulated in the nonresponders. The expressions of some of these proteins correlated with increased apoptotic activity in responders and decreased apoptotic activity in nonresponders. Therefore, the proteins qualify as potential biomarkers to predict chemotherapy response. PMID:26997873

  10. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  11. What is wrong with non-respondents? Alcohol-, drug- and smoking related mortality and morbidity in a 12-year follow up study of respondents and non-respondents in the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Gray, Linsay; Glümer, Charlotte; Juel, Knud

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Response rates in health surveys have diminished over the last two decades, making it difficult to obtain reliable information on health and health-related risk factors in different population groups. This study compared cause-specific mortality and morbidity among survey respondents and different types of non-respondents to estimate alcohol-, drug- and smoking related mortality and morbidity among non-respondents. Design Prospective follow-up study of respondents and non-respondents in two cross-sectional health surveys. Setting Denmark. Participants A total sample of 39,540 Danish citizens aged 16 or older. Measurements Register-based information on cause-specific mortality and morbidity at the individual level was obtained for respondents (n=28,072) and different types of non-respondents (refusals n=8,954; illness/disabled n=731, uncontactable n=1,593). Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine differences in alcohol-, drug- and smoking-related mortality and morbidity, respectively, in a 12 year follow-up period. Findings Overall, non-response was associated with a significantly increased hazard ratio of 1.56 (95% CI: 1.36–1.78) for alcohol-related morbidity, 1.88 (95% CI: 1.38–2.57) for alcohol-related mortality, 1.55 (95% CI: 1.27–1.88) for drug-related morbidity, 3.04 (95% CI: 1.57–5.89) for drug-related mortality and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.03–1.29) for smoking-related morbidity. The hazard ratio for smoking-related mortality also tended to be higher among non-respondents compared with respondents although no significant association was evident (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.95-1.36). Uncontactable and ill/disabled non-respondents generally had a higher hazard ratio of alcohol-, drug- and smoking related mortality and morbidity compared with refusal non-respondents. Conclusion Health survey non-respondents in Denmark have an increased hazard ratio of alcohol-, drug-, and smoking-related mortality and morbidity compared with respondents

  12. Hepatitis C virus load and expression of a unique subset of cellular genes in circulating lymphoid cells differentiate non-responders from responders to pegylated interferon alpha-ribavirin treatment.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tram N Q; Lin, Dolly M H; Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M; Churchill, Norma D; Kowala-Piaskowska, Arleta; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Machaj, Anna; Pazgan-Simon, Monika; Zalewska, Malgorzata; Simon, Krzysztof; King, Dawn; Reddy, S Bharati; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2013-03-01

    Based on investigations of liver biopsy material, certain cellular genes have been implicated as correlates of success or failure to interferon alpha-ribavirin (IFN/RBV) therapy against hepatitis C. The current study aimed at determining whether expression of host genes thought to be relevant to HCV replication in the liver would be correlated with HCV infection status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and also with patient responsiveness to IFN/RBV treatment. Therefore, PBMCs from patients with chronic hepatitis C responding (n = 35) or not (n = 49) to IFN/RBV and from healthy controls (n = 15) were evaluated for HCV RNA load and cellular gene expression. Non-responders had 3- to 10-fold higher basal levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and Toll-like receptors (TLR)-4, -5, and -7 compared to responders. Non-responders with similar post-treatment follow-ups as responders persistently expressed 6- to 20-fold greater levels of IL-8, ISG15, and OAS after therapy. Higher expression of IFN-α, IFN-γ, and IFN-λ was found in PBMCs of individuals achieving sustained virological response, either before or after therapy. Pre-treatment HCV RNA loads in PBMCs of non-responders were significantly higher (P = 0.016) than those of responders. In conclusion, the data indicate that immune cells of responders and non-responders to IFN/RBV therapy exhibited significantly different virological and host gene expression profiles. Elevated baseline HCV loads and TLR-4, -5, and -7 levels, and persistently high levels of IL-8, ISG15, and OAS were correlated with IFN non-responsiveness. The results warrant further investigations on the utilization of PBMCs for predicting success or failure to IFN-based therapies. PMID:23280583

  13. Antibody response to revaccination among adult non-responders to primary Hepatitis B vaccination in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Jiaye; Lu, Jingjing; Yan, Bingyu; Song, Lizhi; Li, Li; Cui, Fuqiang; Zhang, Guomin; Wang, Fuzhen; Liang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Aiqiang

    2015-01-01

    About 10% adult failed to develop antibody response after primary hepatitis B vaccination, and revaccination may be an option to improve immune response, but the antibody responses to revaccination in adult non-responders have not been fully examined. Adult non-responders to primary 3-dose hepatitis B vaccination were randomly divided into 2 groups and revaccinated with 20 μg hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) derived from Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (HepB-SC) or 20 μg HepB derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells (HepB-CHO), respectively, at 0-, 1-, 6- month. Seroconversion rate and titer of antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) was measured one month after the 1st and 3rd revaccination dose. Anti-HBs seroconversion rates significantly increased from 54.98% [95% confidence interval (CI) 48.60%–61.24%] after the 1st revaccination dose to 89.24% (95% CI: 84.74%–92.79%) after the 3rd revaccination dose (P < 0.001), and the geometric mean titer (GMT) of anti-HBs increased from 12.18mIU/ml (95%CI: 7.81–18.98 mIU/ml) to 208.31 mIU/ml (95% CI: 148.87–291.47 mIU/ml) (P = 0.008).Compared with those with anti-HBs titer <2 mIU/ml after primary vaccination, those with antibody titer ≥2 mIU/ml after primary vaccination had higher seroconversion rate after the 1st dose revaccination (38.36% vs. 78.10%, P < 0.001) and after the 3rd dose of revaccination (84.25% vs. 96.19%, P = 0.003), and had higher antibody titer after the 1st dose of revaccination (3.32mIU/ml vs. 74.21mIU/ml, P < 0.0001) and after the 3rd dose of revaccination (145.73mIU/ml vs. 342.34mIU/ml, P = 0.01). Anti-HBs titer was significantly higher in those revaccinated with HepB-CHO than those revaccinated with HepB-SC after the 3rd dose (131.46 mIU/ml vs. 313.38mIU/ml, P = 0.01). Revaccination on adult HepB non-responders increased the immune response to HepB and may confer further protection against hepatitis B virus infection. If possible, revaccination might be an option to HepB non-responders

  14. Adult separation anxiety in treatment nonresponders with anxiety disorders: delineation of the syndrome and exploration of attachment-based psychotherapy and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Milrod, Barbara; Altemus, Margaret; Gross, Charles; Busch, Fredric; Silver, Gabrielle; Christos, Paul; Stieber, Joshua; Schneier, Franklin

    2016-04-01

    Clinically significant separation anxiety [SA] has been identified as being common among patients who do not respond to psychiatric interventions, regardless of intervention type (pharmacological or psychotherapeutic), across anxiety and mood disorders. An attachment formation and maintenance domain has been proposed as contributing to anxiety disorders. We therefore directly determined prevalence of SA in a population of adult treatment non-responders suffering from primary anxiety. In these separation anxious nonresponders, we pilot-tested an SA-focused, attachment-based psychotherapy for anxiety, Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy-eXtended Range [PFPP-XR], and assessed whether hypothesized biomarkers of attachment were engaged. We studied separation anxiety [SA] in 46 adults (ages 23-70 [mean 43.9 (14.9)]) with clinically significant anxiety symptoms (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [HARS]≥15), and reporting a history of past non-response to psychotherapy and/or medication treatments. Thirty-seven (80%) had clinically significant symptoms of separation anxiety (Structured Clinical Interview for Separation Anxiety Symptoms [SCI-SAS] score≥8). Five of these subjects completed an open clinical trial of Panic Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy eXtended Range [PFPP-XR], a 21-24 session, 12-week manualized attachment-focused anxiolytic psychodynamic psychotherapy for anxiety. Patients improved on "adult threshold" SCI-SAS (current separation anxiety) (p=.016), HARS (p=0.002), and global severity, assessed by the Clinical Global Impression Scale (p=.0006), at treatment termination. Salivary oxytocin levels decreased 67% after treatment (p=.12). There was no significant change in high or low frequency HRV after treatment, but change in high frequency HRV inversely correlated with treatment change in oxytocin (p<.02), and change in low frequency HRV was positively associated with change in oxytocin (p<.02). SA is surprisingly prevalent among non-responders to

  15. The influence of multilevel upper airway surgery on CPAP tolerance in non-responders to obstructive sleep apnea surgery.

    PubMed

    Azbay, Sule; Bostanci, Asli; Aysun, Yasin; Turhan, Murat

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of multilevel upper airway surgery on subsequent continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use and tolerance in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The study cohort enrolled 67 consecutive patients, who underwent septoplasty plus modified uvulopharyngopalatoplasty (mUPPP) with or without modified tongue base suspension (mTBS) due to CPAP intolerance, and who had residual OSA requiring CPAP therapy [non-responders to surgery, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >15 events/h] that had been confirmed by control polysomnography at the sixth month postoperatively. A questionnaire including questions on postoperative CPAP use, problems faced during CPAP use after the surgery, change in OSA symptoms, and satisfaction with the surgery was designed, and filled through interviews. Seventeen (25.4 %) patients had septoplasty plus mUPPP and 50 (74.6 %) had septoplasty plus mUPPP combined with mTBS. Postoperatively, mean AHI (45.00 ± 19.76 vs. 36.60 ± 18.34), Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) score (18.00 ± 4.45 vs. 13.00 ± 4.72), oxygen desaturation index (ODI) (48.98 ± 16.73 vs. 37.81 ± 17.03), and optimal CPAP level (11.80 ± 1.40 vs. 8.96 ± 1.20) were decreased (p < 0.001 for all parameters). Fifty-nine percent of patients reported that they fairly satisfied with the surgery and 49.2 % reported that their symptoms were completely resolved. While none of the cases could tolerate CPAP before surgery, almost half (47.8 %) of the cases used CPAP without problems postoperatively. Postoperative CPAP users had significantly higher postoperative AHI (p = 0.001), supine AHI (p = 0.009), ESS (p = 0.019), and ODI (p = 0.014), and significantly lower postoperative minimum O2 saturation (p = 0.001) compared with non-users. Multilevel upper airway surgery with less invasive techniques may improve CPAP tolerance in well-selected patients. PMID:26714802

  16. Factors Related to Outcome in a School-Based Intensive Mental Health Program: An Examination of Nonresponders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Anne K.; Roberts, Michael C.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Nyre, Joseph E.; Randall, Camille J.; Puddy, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    We examined factors related to treatment responders (n = 35) and nonresponders (n = 16) in a group of 51 children admitted to the Intensive Mental Health Program (IMHP). Children's response to treatment was coded based on their functioning at intake and discharge using total CAFAS scores. Demographic variables, length of treatment, number of…

  17. Total Delay Is Associated with Unfavorable Treatment Outcome among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gebreegziabher, Senedu Bekele; Bjune, Gunnar Aksel; Yimer, Solomon Abebe

    2016-01-01

    Background delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) may worsen the disease, increase mortality and enhance transmission in the community. This study aimed at assessing the association between total delay and unfavorable treatment outcome among newly diagnosed pulmonary TB (PTB) patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in West Gojjam Zone, Amhara Region of Ethiopia from October 2013 to May 2015. Newly diagnosed PTB patients who were ≥15 years of age were consecutively enrolled in the study from 30 randomly selected public health facilities. Total delay (the time period from onset of TB symptoms to first start of anti-TB treatment) was measured. Median total delay was calculated. Mixed effect logistics regression was used to analyze factors associated with unfavorable treatment outcome. Results Seven hundred six patients were enrolled in the study. The median total delay was 60 days. Patients with total delay of > 60 days were more likely to have unfavorable TB treatment outcome than patients with total delay of ≤ 60 days (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–5.26). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive TB patients were 8.46 times more likely to experience unfavorable treatment outcome than HIV negative TB patients (AOR, 8.46; 95% CI, 3.14–22.79). Conclusions Long total delay and TB/HIV coinfection were associated with unfavorable treatment outcome. Targeted interventions that can reduce delay in diagnosis and treatment of TB, and early comprehensive management of TB/HIV coinfection are needed to reduce increased risk of unfavorable treatment outcome. PMID:27442529

  18. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy. PMID:25883486

  19. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy. PMID:25883486

  20. Constraints of nonresponding flows based on cross layers in the networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Dong

    2016-02-01

    In the active queue management (AQM) scheme, core routers cannot manage and constrain user datagram protocol (UDP) data flows by the sliding window control mechanism in the transport layer due to the nonresponsive nature of such traffic flows. However, the UDP traffics occupy a large part of the network service nowadays which brings a great challenge to the stability of the more and more complex networks. To solve the uncontrollable problem, this paper proposes a cross layers random early detection (CLRED) scheme, which can control the nonresponding UDP-like flows rate effectively when congestion occurs in the access point (AP). The CLRED makes use of the MAC frame acknowledgement (ACK) transmitting congestion information to the sources nodes and utilizes the back-off windows of the MAC layer throttling data rate. Consequently, the UDP-like flows data rate can be restrained timely by the sources nodes in order to alleviate congestion in the complex networks. The proposed CLRED can constrain the nonresponsive flows availably and make the communication expedite, so that the network can sustain stable. The simulation results of network simulator-2 (NS2) verify the proposed CLRED scheme.

  1. Recent advances in vaccination of non-responders to standard dose hepatitis B virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Walayat, Saqib; Ahmed, Zohair; Martin, Daniel; Puli, Srinivas; Cashman, Michael; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global health problem. It is estimated there are more than 2 billion individuals exposed to the virus and 250 million are chronically infected. Hepatitis B is the cause of more than 600000 annual deaths due to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. An effective vaccine exists and preventative initiatives center around universal vaccination especially in those at highest risk. Effective vaccination algorithms have led to a significant decline in the development of new infections and its devastating consequences. The vaccine is administered intramuscularly in three doses, with 95% showing long lasting serologic immunity. An additional fourth dose or a repeated higher dose three course regimen is given to those that fail to show immunity. Despite these additional regimens, some remain vulnerable to hepatitis B and are deemed non-responders. Individuals with chronic disease states such as kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes mellitus, as well as those with a genetic predisposition, and those on immunomodulation therapy, have the highest likelihood of non-response. Various strategies have been developed to elicit an immune response in these individuals. These include increased vaccination dose, intradermal administration, alternative adjuvants, alternative routes of administration, co-administration with other vaccines, and other novel therapies. These alternative strategies can show improved response and lasting immunity. In summary, HBV vaccination is a major advance of modern medicine and all individuals at risk should be sought and vaccinated with subsequent adequate titers demonstrated. PMID:26523203

  2. Immune reconstitution visceral leishmaniasis presented as hemophagocytic syndrome in a patient with AIDS from a nonendemic area: a case report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Atul K; Sarda, Parimal; Shah, Bhavin A; Ranjan, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is endemic in the Ganges and Brahmaputra plains of India. Leishmaniasis/HIV coinfection is on the rise in India and may pose a real diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. HIV-related immunosuppression increases the risk of reactivating leishmaniasis by 100 to 1000 times and it also increases the risk of drug resistant leishmaniasis. Immune reconstitution VL is not very well reported in literature. Hemophagocytosis is known to occur with various infectious agents like viruses, bacteria, and parasites, but is rare to occur with leishmaniasis. Here the authors describe a case of VL presenting as immune reconstitution disease and hemophagocytosis in an HIV infected patient coming from a nonendemic area. PMID:19535493

  3. Impaired basophil histamine release from allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Stahl Skov, P; Norn, S; Weeke, B; Nolte, H

    1987-04-01

    A few patients (6-7%) with a verified type I allergic reaction do not respond with histamine release after challenge of their basophils with specific antigen (non-responding basophils from allergic patients). Sera from these non-responding patients were used for passive sensitization of responding cells from healthy controls. When these sensitized cells were challenged with specific antigen, histamine release was observed indicating that the non-responding allergic patients have circulating antigen-specific IgE capable of binding to Fc-receptors on the basophils. These findings suggest the possibility that non-responding basophils have impaired cell functions. We therefore examined the influence of enhanced IgE receptor stimulation on histamine release in non-responding basophils. This was made by stimulating protein kinase C activity by a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate). When the non-responding cells were incubated with the phorbol ester and challenged with either anti-IgE or specific antigen, the cells released histamine. These findings support the hypothesis that the unresponsiveness of basophils in some allergic patients is associated with impaired IgE receptor complex activation or subcellular functioning and not with a lack of cell-bound IgE. PMID:2440283

  4. Impaired peripheral blood T-follicular helper cell function in HIV-infected nonresponders to the 2009 H1N1/09 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Pallikkuth, Suresh; Parmigiani, Anita; Silva, Sandra Y.; George, Varghese K.; Fischl, Margaret; Pahwa, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    The generation of Ab-secreting plasma cells depends critically on CD4 T-follicular helper (TFH) cells during the germinal center reaction. Germinal center TFH cells share functional properties with circulating CXCR5+ CD4 T cells, referred to herein as peripheral TFH (pTFH) cells. Because deficient Ab production and CD4 T-cell loss are recognized features of HIV infection, in the present study, we investigated pTFH cells in 25 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. pTFH frequency was equivalent in patients and healthy controls (HCs), and these cells displayed a central memory phenotype. Sixteen patients and 8 HCs in this group were given a single dose of H1N1/09 influenza vaccine during the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak. In the vaccine responders (n = 8) and HCs, pTFH cells underwent expansion with increased IL-21 and CXCL13 secretion in H1N1-stimulated PBMC culture supernatants at week 4 (T2). These changes were not seen in vaccine nonresponders (n = 8). In coculture experiments, sorted pTFH cells supported HIN1-stimulated IgG production by autologous B cells only in vaccine responders. At T2, frequencies of pTFH were correlated with memory B cells, serum H1N1 Ab titers, and Ag-induced IL-21 secretion. Characterization of pTFH cells may provide additional insight into cellular determinants of vaccine-induced Ab response, which may have relevance for vaccine design. PMID:22692510

  5. Quantifying esophagogastric junction contractility with a novel HRM topographic metric, the EGJ-Contractile Integral: normative values and preliminary evaluation in PPI non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Nicodème, Frédéric; Pipa-Muniz, Maria; Khanna, Kern; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its obvious pathophysiological relevance, the clinical utility of measures of esophagogastric junction (EGJ) contractility is unsubstantiated. High-resolution manometry (HRM) may improve upon this with its inherent ability to integrate the magnitude of contractility over time and length of the EGJ. This study aimed to develop a novel HRM metric summarizing EGJ contractility and test its ability distinguish among subgroups of proton pump inhibitor non-responders (PPI-NRs). Methods 75 normal controls and 88 PPI-NRs were studied. All underwent HRM. PPI-NRs underwent pH-impedance monitoring on PPI therapy scored in terms of acid exposure, number of reflux events, and reflux-symptom correlation and grouped as meeting All Criteria, Some Criteria, or No Criteria of abnormality. Control HRM studies were used to establish normal values for candidate EGJ contractility metrics, which were then compared in their ability to differentiate among PPI-NR subgroups. Results The EGJ contractile integral (EGJ-CI), a metric integrating contractility across the EGJ for three respiratory cycles, best distinguished the All Criteria PPI-NR subgroup from controls and other PPI-NR subgroups. Normal values (median, [IQR]) for this measure were 39 mmHg-cm [25–55 mmHg-cm]. The correlation between the EGJ-CI and a previously proposed metric, the lower esophageal sphincter-pressure integral, that used a fixed 10s time frame and an atmospheric as opposed to gastric pressure reference was weak. Conclusion Among HRM metrics tested, the EGJ-CI was best in distinguishing PPI-NRs meeting All Criteria of abnormality on pH-impedance testing. Future prospective studies are required to explore its utility in management of broader groups of GERD patients. PMID:24460814

  6. P2X7 Receptor Inhibition Improves CD34 T-Cell Differentiation in HIV-Infected Immunological Nonresponders on c-ART.

    PubMed

    Menkova-Garnier, Inna; Hocini, Hakim; Foucat, Emile; Tisserand, Pascaline; Bourdery, Laure; Delaugerre, Constance; Benne, Clarisse; Lévy, Yves; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral CD4+ T-cell levels are not fully restored in a significant proportion of HIV+ individuals displaying long-term viral suppression on c-ART. These immunological nonresponders (INRs) have a higher risk of developing AIDS and non-AIDS events and a lower life expectancy than the general population, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We used an in vitro system to analyze the T- and B-cell potential of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Comparisons of INRs with matched HIV+ patients with high CD4+ T-cell counts (immune responders (IRs)) revealed an impairment of the generation of T-cell progenitors, but not of B-cell progenitors, in INRs. This impairment resulted in the presence of smaller numbers of recent thymic emigrants (RTE) in the blood and lower peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts. We investigated the molecular pathways involved in lymphopoiesis, focusing particularly on T-cell fate specification (Notch pathway), survival (IL7R-IL7 axis) and death (Fas, P2X7, CD39/CD73). P2X7 expression was abnormally strong and there was no CD73 mRNA in the CD34+ cells of INRs, highlighting a role for the ATP pathway. This was confirmed by the demonstration that in vitro inhibition of the P2X7-mediated pathway restored the T-cell potential of CD34+ cells from INRs. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis revealed major differences in cell survival and death pathways between CD34+ cells from INRs and those from IRs. These findings pave the way for the use of complementary immunotherapies, such as P2X7 antagonists, to restore T-cell lymphopoiesis in INRs. PMID:27082982

  7. P2X7 Receptor Inhibition Improves CD34 T-Cell Differentiation in HIV-Infected Immunological Nonresponders on c-ART

    PubMed Central

    Menkova-Garnier, Inna; Hocini, Hakim; Foucat, Emile; Tisserand, Pascaline; Bourdery, Laure; Delaugerre, Constance; Benne, Clarisse; Lévy, Yves; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral CD4+ T-cell levels are not fully restored in a significant proportion of HIV+ individuals displaying long-term viral suppression on c-ART. These immunological nonresponders (INRs) have a higher risk of developing AIDS and non-AIDS events and a lower life expectancy than the general population, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We used an in vitro system to analyze the T- and B-cell potential of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Comparisons of INRs with matched HIV+ patients with high CD4+ T-cell counts (immune responders (IRs)) revealed an impairment of the generation of T-cell progenitors, but not of B-cell progenitors, in INRs. This impairment resulted in the presence of smaller numbers of recent thymic emigrants (RTE) in the blood and lower peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts. We investigated the molecular pathways involved in lymphopoiesis, focusing particularly on T-cell fate specification (Notch pathway), survival (IL7R-IL7 axis) and death (Fas, P2X7, CD39/CD73). P2X7 expression was abnormally strong and there was no CD73 mRNA in the CD34+ cells of INRs, highlighting a role for the ATP pathway. This was confirmed by the demonstration that in vitro inhibition of the P2X7-mediated pathway restored the T-cell potential of CD34+ cells from INRs. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis revealed major differences in cell survival and death pathways between CD34+ cells from INRs and those from IRs. These findings pave the way for the use of complementary immunotherapies, such as P2X7 antagonists, to restore T-cell lymphopoiesis in INRs. PMID:27082982

  8. Visual Motor Integration as a Screener for Responders and Non-Responders in Preschool and Early School Years: Implications for Inclusive Assessment in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Kazem, Ali Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Visual motor integration (VMI) is the ability of the eyes and hands to work together in smooth, efficient patterns. In Oman, there are few effective methods to assess VMI skills in children in inclusive settings. The current study investigated the performance of preschool and early school years responders and non-responders on a VMI test. The full…

  9. An Open Trial of Intensive Family Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Who Are Medication Partial Responders or Nonresponders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Ricketts, Emily; Geffken, Gary R.; Marien, Wendi; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports an open-trial of family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Thirty primarily Caucasian youth with OCD (range = 7-19 years; 15 girls) who were partial responders or nonresponders to two or more medication trials that were delivered either serially or…

  10. D-Cycloserine for Treatment Nonresponders with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norberg, Melissa M.; Gilliam, Christina M.; Villavicencio, Anna; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Tolin, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite being the most effective treatment available, as many as one third of patients who receive exposure and response prevention (ERP) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not initially respond to treatment. Recent research suggests that the n-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor partial agonist D-Cycloserine (DCS) may speed up the course…

  11. Successful Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes among HIV/TB Coinfected Patients Down-Referred from a District Hospital to Primary Health Clinics in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Karen B.; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Shenoi, Sheela V.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and tuberculosis (TB) coinfection remains a major public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Integration and decentralization of HIV and TB treatment services are being implemented, but data on outcomes of this strategy are lacking in rural, resource-limited settings. We evaluated TB treatment outcomes in TB/HIV coinfected patients in an integrated and decentralized system in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods We retrospectively studied a cohort of HIV/TB coinfected patients initiating treatment for drug-susceptible TB at a district hospital HIV clinic from January 2012-June 2013. Patients were eligible for down-referral to primary health clinics(PHCs) for TB treatment completion if they met specific clinical criteria. Records were reviewed for patients’ demographic, baseline clinical and laboratory information, past HIV and TB history, and TB treatment outcomes. Results Of 657(88.7%) patients, 322(49.0%) were female, 558(84.9%) were new TB cases, and 572(87.1%) had pulmonary TB. After TB treatment initiation, 280(42.6%) were down-referred from the district level HIV clinic to PHCs for treatment completion; 377(57.4%) remained at the district hospital. Retained patients possessed characteristics indicative of more severe disease. In total, 540(82.2%) patients experienced treatment success, 69(10.5%) died, and 46(7.0%) defaulted. Down-referred patients experienced higher treatment success, and lower mortality, but were more likely to default, primarily at the time of transfer to PHC. Conclusion Decentralization of TB treatment to the primary care level is feasible in rural South Africa. Treatment outcomes are favorable when patients are carefully chosen for down-referral. Higher mortality in retained patients reflects increased baseline disease severity while higher default among down-referred patients reflects failed linkage of care. Better linkage mechanisms are needed including improved identification of potential defaulters, increased

  12. Successful use of the excimer laser for generalized psoriasis in an ustekinumab non-responder.

    PubMed

    Malakouti, Mona; Brown, Gabrielle Elena; Sorenson, Eric; Leon, Argentina; Koo, John; Levin, Ethan Charles

    2015-03-01

    Effective treatments for moderate to severe psoriasis are phototherapy and biologics. These treatments are similar in that they both decrease cutaneous immune system hyperactivity yet do so via different mechanisms. Our patient, a 63 year old Asian male had a rapid response to treatment with the high dose excimer laser, having previously failed treatment with 28 weeks of ustekinumab therapy. A pre-treatment biopsy of a psoriatic plaque was found to contain relatively low levels of IFN-γ (Th1) and IL-17 (Th17) secreting T cells. Following treatment with the excimer laser, the patient had a quick improvement in PASI that was reflected by a 3-fold reduction in the number of live T cells found in the post-treatment biopsy. Although ustekinumab and the excimer laser both result in decreased levels of these cytokines, the excimer laser directly causes apoptosis of T cells and induces DNA damage in antigen presenting cells. Thus, the broader effects of phototherapy on immune cells compared to the targeted inhibition of IL-12 and IL-23 by ustekinumab likely account for the superior response observed. PMID:25780961

  13. Antihepatitis B response to hepatitis B vaccine administered simultaneously with tetanus toxoid in nonresponder individuals.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, Emine; Sönmez, Ali Suha; Bayindir, Yaşar; Coskun, Diler; Aritürk, Sedat

    2002-12-13

    In this prospective study, our aim was to test the effect of simultaneous administration of preS2 and S containing recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (S2SRHB) with tetanus toxoid (TT) to the individuals who did not respond after three doses of hepatitis B vaccine previously. There were three groups (healthy individuals, pregnant women, hemodialysis patients), each was divided into two subgroups as groups A and B. Group A received S2SRHB+TT and group B received only S2SRHB. We found that in groups receiving both vaccines, both seroconversion rate and antibody titer level were significantly higher (P<0.05). In conclusion, simultaneous administration of S2SRHB+TT is more effective than administration of S2SRHB alone. PMID:12450699

  14. Safety and efficacy of daclatasvir in the management of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Zacharakis, George; Zissis, Miltiadis; Giannakopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (Daklinza™), a new oral direct-acting antiviral, is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS5A protein and has recently been approved in the United States, Europe and Japan in chronic hepatitis C. It shows potent pangenotypic activity and moderately high genetic barrier to resistance improving the sustained virological response (SVR) rates. In COMMAND phase 2 trials, daclatasvir demonstrated high SVR rates in HCV genotype 1-4 chronically infected patients treated with peginterferon-a (pegIFNα) plus ribavirin (RBV). Furthermore, it produced even higher response rates in all-oral combination with sofosbuvir, an interferon-free regimen, with or without ribavirin, in patients with advanced liver disease, HCV/HIV coinfection, liver transplantation in ALLY studies and other real-world studies. This narrative review provides information on the pharmacological properties, role, efficacy and safety of daclatasvir-containing regimens in chronic hepatitis C patients. Daclatasvir administered once-daily in combination with sofosbuvir is an effective 12-week treatment in adult patients with chronic hepatitis C and is generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:27366028

  15. Safety and efficacy of daclatasvir in the management of patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Zacharakis, George; Zissis, Miltiadis; Giannakopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (Daklinza™), a new oral direct-acting antiviral, is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS5A protein and has recently been approved in the United States, Europe and Japan in chronic hepatitis C. It shows potent pangenotypic activity and moderately high genetic barrier to resistance improving the sustained virological response (SVR) rates. In COMMAND phase 2 trials, daclatasvir demonstrated high SVR rates in HCV genotype 1-4 chronically infected patients treated with peginterferon-a (pegIFNα) plus ribavirin (RBV). Furthermore, it produced even higher response rates in all-oral combination with sofosbuvir, an interferon-free regimen, with or without ribavirin, in patients with advanced liver disease, HCV/HIV coinfection, liver transplantation in ALLY studies and other real-world studies. This narrative review provides information on the pharmacological properties, role, efficacy and safety of daclatasvir-containing regimens in chronic hepatitis C patients. Daclatasvir administered once-daily in combination with sofosbuvir is an effective 12-week treatment in adult patients with chronic hepatitis C and is generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:27366028

  16. Management of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Curran, Adrian; Falcó, Vicenç; Pahissa, Albert; Ribera, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    HIV-tuberculosis coinfection is currently one of the greatest health threats, affecting millions of people worldwide, with high morbidity and mortality. Treating both infections can be a challenge and requires some expertise due to multidirectional drug interactions, risk of overlapping side effects, high pill burden and risk of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This article reviews the general management of tuberculosis/HIV coinfection, focusing on the optimal time to start antiretroviral therapy and which treatments can be safely used. The randomized clinical trials designed to answer the question of when to start antiretroviral therapy (SAPIT, CAMELIA, STRIDE and TIME), published in the last two years, are described and discussed in detail. Summarizing these trials' conclusions, antiretroviral therapy should be started within two weeks of starting tuberculosis treatment if the patient has less than 50 CD4/mm3 and wait to the end of the induction phase (8-12 weeks after starting tuberculosis treatment) if higher CD4 cell counts exist. Treatment options for both tuberculosis and HIV, including the newer available drugs and those in clinical trials, are revised and recommendations for dose adjustments are made based on the latest available literature, with special attention to drug-drug interactions and the necessity of dose adjustments with some drug combinations. PMID:23258298

  17. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Sagnelli, Caterina; Filippini, Pietro; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most frequent causes of comorbidity and mortality in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population, and liver-related mortality is now the second highest cause of death in HIV-positive patients, so HCV infection should be countered with adequate antiviral therapy. In 2011 began the era of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) and the HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir were approved to treat HCV-genotype-1 infection, each one in combination with pegylated interferon alfa (Peg-IFN) + ribavirin (RBV). The addition of the first generation DAAs, strongly improved the efficacy of antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-genotype 1, both for the HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected, and the poor response to Peg-IFN + RBV in HCV/HIV coinfection was enhanced. These treatments showed higher rates of sustained virological response than Peg-IFN + RBV but reduced tolerability and adherence due to the high pill burden and the several pharmacokinetic interactions between HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors and antiretroviral drugs. Then in 2013 a new wave of DAAs arrived, characterized by high efficacy, good tolerability, a low pill burden and shortened treatment duration. The second and third generation DAAs also comprised IFN-free regimens, which in small recent trials on HIV-positive patients have shown comforting preliminary results in terms of efficacy, tolerability and adherence. PMID:25674512

  18. [Study of the Response Rate and Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Keita; Sakurai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Hara, Yukiko; Nagashima, Saki; Hirano, Tomohiro; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao

    2015-10-01

    The neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is associated with the outcomes of some cancer patients such as those with digestive cancer. Herein, we examined the relationship between the response rate following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and NLR in breast cancer patients. We recruited 19 primary breast cancer patients who were administered neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We evaluated the effects of this treatment and classified the patients into responder (CR and PR) and non-responder (SD and PD) groups. We measured the value of NLR before or at the start of nab-PTX treatment, and 7 days after nab-PTX (1-1) and nab-PTX (4-3) treatment. The average age was 58.6 years. The responder and non-responder groups comprised 14 and 5 cases, respectively. The average values of NLR before or at the start of the nab-PTX phase were 4.33 and 5.05 in the responder and non-responder groups, respectively. The average NLR values 7 days after nab-PTX (1-1) were 6.72 and 5.60 in the responder and non-responder groups, respectively. The NLR values 7 days after nab-PTX (4-3) were 2.40 and 2.65 for the responder and non-responder groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the responder and non-responder groups for each treatment phase. PMID:26489573

  19. Profile of patients triply infected with HIV and the hepatitis B and C viruses in the HAART era.

    PubMed

    Maida, I; Ríos, M J; Pérez-Saleme, L; Ramos, B; Soriano, V; Pegram, P S; Mura, M S; Sánchez-Margalet, V; Saldívar-Cornejo, I; Wilkin, A; Babudieri, S; Núñez, M

    2008-05-01

    HIV-HCV-HBV-coinfected patients were assessed to characterize the viral interactions in the setting of HIV coinfection and in the HAART era. All positive anti-HCV antibody and HBs antigen-positive HIV-infected patients were identified at five HIV clinics. Antihepatitis delta (HDV) antibody, serum HIV RNA, HCV RNA, and HBV DNA quantification and genotype determinations were performed. Out of 67 patients identified 47 (70%) were receiving anti-HBV therapy. HCV RNA and HBV DNA were detectable in 52.5% and 37% of patients, respectively. All possible patterns were found, regardless of anti-HBV therapy. HDV coinfection was associated with undetectable HCV RNA [RR 9.52 (95% CI 1.85-49.01); p = 0.007]. Independent factors predicting undetectable HBV DNA lacked HBeAg [RR 13.94 (95% CI 3.05-63.72); p = 0.001] and use of anti-HBV therapy [RR 11.42 (95% CI 2.43-53.54); p = 0.002]. Replication and genotypes of HCV or HBV had no impact on the replication of the other virus. In conclusion, in this cohort of triple infection (HBV/HCV/HIV) various viral patterns were identified. Spontaneous HCV clearance was frequent, and it was independently associated with HDV coinfection. In the absence of HBV therapy, HBV most often actively replicates. HBV/HCV replication or genotypes were not related to the replication of the other virus. PMID:18462085

  20. Brief Report: A High Rate of β7+ Gut-Homing Lymphocytes in HIV-Infected Immunological Nonresponders is Associated With Poor CD4 T-Cell Recovery During Suppressive HAART

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Alexandre; Vergnon-Miszczycha, Delphine; Depincé-Berger, Anne-Emmanuelle; Roblin, Xavier; Lutch, Frederic; Lambert, Claude; Rochereau, Nicolas; Bourlet, Thomas; Genin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Correlation between GALT homing markers on lymphocytes and the low blood CD4 T-cell reconstitution in immunological nonresponders (INRs) has been studied. Design: Thirty-one INRs, 19 immunological responders (IRs), and 12 noninfected controls were enrolled in this study. INRs were defined by an undetectable plasma viral load RNA less than 40 copies per milliliter and CD4+ T-cell count <500 cells per cubic milliliter in at least 3 years. Methods: A complete peripheral and mucosal lymphocyte immunophenotyping was performed on these patients with a focus on the CCR9, CCR6, and α4β7 gut-homing markers. Results: A highly significant upregulation of α4β7 on INRs peripheral lymphocytes compared with that of IRs has been observed. This upregulation impacts different lymphocyte subsets namely CD4+, CD8+, and B lymphocytes. The frequency of β7+ Th17 and Treg cells are increased compared with IRs and healthy controls. The frequency of β7+ CD8+ T cells in the blood is negatively correlated with integrated proviral DNA in rectal lymphoid cells in contrast to β7+ CD4+ T cells associated with HIV integration. Conclusions: Alteration of lymphocyte homing abilities would have deleterious effects on GALT reconstitution and could participate to HIV reservoir constitution. These results emphasize the great interest to consider α4β7-targeted therapy in INR patients to block homing of lymphocytes and/or to directly impair gp120-α4β7 interactions. PMID:27306505

  1. Acute hepatitis C in an HIV-infected patient: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Driver, Todd H; Terrault, Norah; Saxena, Varun

    2013-05-01

    With the decrease in transmission via transfusions and injection drug use, acute symptomatic hepatitis C is infrequently seen in developed countries. We report a case of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adult who presented with abdominal pain. His alanine aminotransferase was greater than sixty times the upper limit of normal without any evidence on examination of fulminant hepatic failure. His workup revealed an elevated hepatitis C viral level with a negative hepatitis C antibody. He was discharged once his liver function tests improved. As an outpatient, he had a recurrent bout of symptoms with an elevation of his alanine aminotransferase and hepatitis C viral levels that promoted anti-hepatitis C virus treatment. This case illustrates the importance of considering acute hepatitis C as a cause of acute hepatitis in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. While patients with acute symptomatic hepatitis C generally have a higher rate of spontaneous viral clearance compared to those with an insidious acute infection, most still progress to chronic hepatitis C infection, and patients with HIV coinfection carry a higher risk of progression to chronic disease. PMID:23151989

  2. Predictors of Active Injection Drug Use in a Cohort of Patients Infected With Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Carrie; Bliss, Caleb; Heeren, Timothy; Tumilty, Sheila; Horsburgh, C. Robert; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Cotton, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated potential risk factors for active injection drug use (IDU) in an inner-city cohort of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Methods. We used log-binomial regression to identify factors independently associated with active IDU during the first 3 years of follow-up for the 289 participants who reported ever having injected drugs at baseline. Results. Overall, 142 (49.1%) of the 289 participants reported active IDU at some point during the follow-up period. In a multivariate model, being unemployed (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24, 3.03) and hazardous alcohol drinking (PR = 1.67; 95% CI = 1.34, 2.08) were associated with active IDU. Smoking was associated with IDU but this association was not statistically significant. Patients with all 3 of those factors were 3 times as likely to report IDU during follow-up as those with 0 or 1 factor (PR = 3.3; 95% CI = 2.2, 4.9). Neither HIV coinfection nor history of psychiatric disease was independently associated with active IDU. Conclusions. Optimal treatment of persons with HCV infection will require attention to unemployment, alcohol use, and smoking in conjunction with IDU treatment and prevention. PMID:23153145

  3. Contactable Non-responders Show Different Characteristics Compared to Lost to Follow-Up Participants: Insights from an Australian Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shu-Kay; Scott, Rani; Scuffham, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Objective This research aims to identify predictors of attrition in a longitudinal birth cohort study in Australia and assess differences in baseline characteristics and responses in subsequent follow-up phases between contactable non-responders and uncontactable non-responders deemed "lost to follow-up (LTF)". Methods 3368 women recruited from three public hospitals in Southeast Queensland and Northern New South Wales during antenatal visits in 2006-2011 completed a baseline questionnaire to elicit information on multiple domains of exposures. A follow-up questionnaire was posted to each participant at 1 year after birth to obtain mother's and child's health and development information. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model the association between exposures and respondents' status at 1 year. The effect of an inverse-probability-weighting method to adjust for non-response was studied. Results Overall attrition at 1-year was 35.4 %; major types of attrition were "contactable non-response" (27.6 %) and "LTF" (6.7 %). These two attrition types showed different responses at the 3-year follow-up and involved different predictors. Besides shared predictors (first language not English, higher risk of psychological distress, had smoked during pregnancy, higher levels of family conflict), distinguishable predictors of contactable non-responders were younger age, having moved home in the past year and having children under 16 in the household. Attrition rates increased substantially from 20 % in 2006 to 54 % in 2011. Conclusions This observed trend of increased attrition rates raises concern about the use of traditional techniques, such as "paper-based" questionnaires, in longitudinal cohort studies. The supplementary use of electronic communications, such as online survey tools and smart-device applications, could provide a better alternative. PMID:26976281

  4. Cellular immune responses in multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, M. F.; Rio, J.; Castro, Z.; Sánchez, A.; Montalban, X.; Comabella, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We investigated cellular immune responses at baseline in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β and classified into responders and non-responders according to clinical response criteria. Levels for IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-4 were determined in activated PBMC of 10 responders, 10 non-responders and 10 healthy controls by cytometric bead arrays. Cytokine levels in cell culture supernatants were similar between responders and non-responders, and comparable to those obtained in healthy controls. These findings do not support differential cellular immune responses in PBMC at baseline between IFN-β responders and non-responders. PMID:23379429

  5. Performance of Interferon-Gamma and IP-10 Release Assays for Diagnosing Latent Tuberculosis Infections in Patients with Concurrent Malaria in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Drabe, Camilla H; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Helleberg, Marie; Nyagonde, Nyagonde; Rose, Michala V; Francis, Filbert; Theilgaard, Ola P; Asbjørn, Jens; Amos, Ben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2016-04-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to detect cellular immune recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis The chemokine IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is an alternative diagnostic biomarker to IFN-γ. Several conditions interfere with IGRA test performance. We aimed to assess the possible influence of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the IGRA test QuantiFERON-TB GOLD® In-Tube (QFT) test and an in-house IP-10 release assay. In total, 241 Tanzanian adults were included; 184 patients with uncomplicated malaria (88 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] coinfected) and 57 HIV-infected patients without malaria infection. Malaria was treated with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem®). QFT testing was performed before initiation of malaria treatment and at days 7 and 42. In total, 172 patients completed follow-up. IFN-γ and IP-10 was measured in QFT supernatants. We found that during malaria infection IFN-γ and IP-10 levels in the unstimulated samples were elevated, mitogen responsiveness was impaired, and CD4 cell counts were decreased. These alterations reverted after malaria treatment. Concurrent malaria infection did not affect QFT test results, whereas there were more indeterminate IP-10 results during acute malaria infection. We suggest that IGRA and IP-10 release assay results of malaria patients should be interpreted with caution and that testing preferably should be postponed until after malaria treatment. PMID:26834199

  6. Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2a Strains Among HIV Type 1-Coinfected Patients from Brazil Have Originated Mostly from Brazilian Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is found mainly in Amerindians and in intravenous drug users (IDUs) from urban areas of the United States, Europe, and Latin America. Worldwide, HTLV-2a and HTLV-2b subtypes are the most prevalent. Phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-2 isolates from Brazil showed the HTLV-2a subtype, variant -2c, which spread from Indians to the general population and IDUs. The present study searched for the types of HTLV-2 that predominate among HIV-1-coinfected patients from southern and southeastern Brazil. Molecular characterization of the LTR, env, and tax regions of 38 isolates confirmed the HTLV-2c variant in 37 patients, and one HTLV-2b in a patient from Paraguay. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences showed different clades of HTLV-2 associated with risk factors and geographic region. These clades could represent different routes of virus transmission and/or little diverse evolutionary rates of virus. Taking into account the results obtained in the present study and the lack of the prototypic North American HTLV-2a strain and HTLV-2b subtypes commonly detected among HIV-coinfected individuals worldwide, we could speculate on the introduction of Brazilian HTLV-2 strains in such populations before the introduction of HIV. PMID:23484539

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance rates in commercially insured patients with noncirrhotic chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D S; Valderrama, A; Kamalakar, R; Sansgiry, S S; Babajanyan, S; Lewis, J D

    2015-09-01

    American association for the study of liver diseases (AASLD) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) guidelines recommend biannual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) screening for noncirrhotic patients with chronic hepatitis B infection (HBV), yet there are no data estimating surveillance rates or factors associated with surveillance. We performed a retrospective cohort study of US patients using the Truven Health Analytics databases from 2006 to 2010 and identified patients with noncirrhotic chronic HBV. Surveillance patterns were characterized using categorical and continuous outcomes, with the continuous measure of the proportion of time 'up to date' with surveillance (PUTDS), with the 6-month interval following each ultrasound categorized as 'up to date'. During a median follow-up of 26.0 (IQR: 16.2-40.0) months among 4576 noncirrhotic patients with chronic HBV (median age: 44 years, IQR: 36-52), only 306 (6.7%) had complete surveillance (one ultrasound every 6-month interval), 2727 (59.6%) incomplete (≥1 ultrasound) and 1543 (33.7%) none. The mean PUTDS was 0.34 ± 0.29, and the median was 0.32 (IQR: 0.03-0.52). In multinomial logistic regression models, patients diagnosed by a nongastroenterologist were significantly less likely to have complete surveillance (P < 0.001), as were those coinfected with HBV/HIV (P < 0.001). In linear regression models, nongastroenterologist provider, health insurance subtype, HBV/HIV coinfection, rural status and metabolic syndrome were independently associated with decreased surveillance. Patients with HIV had an absolute decrease in the PUTDS of 0.24, while patients in less populated rural areas had an absolute decrease of 0.10. HCC surveillance rates in noncirrhotic patients with chronic HBV in the United States are poor and lower than reported rates of HCC surveillance in cirrhotic patients. PMID:25581816

  8. Lactate dehydrogenase and its isoenzymes in serum from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Copur, S; Kus, S; Kars, A; Renda, N; Tekuzman, G; Firat, D

    1989-09-01

    Concentrations of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) and LDH isoenzyme patterns were studied in serum of 19 patients with multiple myeloma and in 19 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups (pretreatment, nonresponders, and responders to treatment), based on their clinical status at the time of blood sampling for LDH. The LDH values were found to be significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in the pretreatment group and in the nonresponders than in the responders and the control group, the mean +/- SE values being 445 +/- 35 and 532 +/- 75 units/mL vs 349 +/- 75 and 190 +/- 7.1 units/mL, respectively. Compared with responders and healthy controls, newly diagnosed patients and nonresponders had slight diminutions in LDH-1 and LDH-2, but increased LDH-3. We conclude that determination of LDH and its isoenzymes in serum can be of value as prognostic factors in patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:2776328

  9. Population Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin in Pregnant Women with Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection in Soweto, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Denti, Paolo; Martinson, Neil; Cohn, Silvia; Mashabela, Fildah; Hoffmann, Jennifer; Msandiwa, Reginah; Castel, Sandra; Wiesner, Lubbe; Chaisson, Richard E.; McIlleron, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of tuberculosis during pregnancy is essential for preventing maternal and fetal mortality, but little is known about the effects of pregnancy on the disposition of antituberculosis drugs. We explored the effects of pregnancy on the pharmacokinetics of rifampin, the key sterilizing drug in tuberculosis treatment, in Tshepiso, a prospective cohort study involving pregnant HIV-infected women with or without tuberculosis in Soweto, South Africa. Participants receiving standard first-line tuberculosis treatment underwent sparse sampling for rifampin at 37 weeks' gestation or delivery and then postpartum. Cord blood was collected when possible. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to investigate the effects of pregnancy on rifampin pharmacokinetics. Among the 48 participants, median age and weight were 28 years and 67 kg, respectively. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination, transit compartment absorption, and allometric scaling described the data well. Pregnancy reduced rifampin clearance by 14%. The median (interquartile range) model-estimated rifampin area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h (AUC0–24) during pregnancy or intrapartum was 40.8 h · mg/liter (27.1 to 54.2 h · mg/liter) compared to 37.4 h · mg/liter (26.8 to 50.3 h · mg/liter) postpartum. The maximum concentrations were similar during pregnancy and postpartum. Rifampin was detectable in 36% (8/22) of cord blood samples, and 88% (42/48) of the women had successful treatment outcomes. There was one case of perinatal tuberculosis. In conclusion, rifampin clearance is modestly reduced during the last trimester of pregnancy. Exposures are only slightly increased, so dose adjustment during pregnancy is not needed. Rifampin was detected in cord blood samples when delivery occurred soon after dosing. The consequences of exposure to this potent inducer of metabolizing enzymes among HIV-exposed infants are unclear. PMID:26643345

  10. HIV Coinfection With Hepatitis C Virus: Evolving Epidemiology and Treatment Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lynn E.; Swan, Tracy; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has become a major threat to the survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected persons in areas where antiretroviral therapy is available. In coinfection, viral eradication has been difficult to attain, and HCV therapy is underused. Novel therapies may be particularly beneficial for this population, yet studies lag behind those for HCV monoinfection. Increasingly, incident HCV among HIV-infected men who have sex with men is associated with sexual risk behavior further research should be performed to refine understanding of the causal mechanism of this association. The phenomenon of aggressive hepatic fibrogenesis when HIV infection precedes HCV acquisition requires longer-term observation to ensure optimal timing of HCV therapy. Medical management in coinfection will be improved by enhancing HCV detection, with annual serologic testing, screening with HCV RNA to detect acute infection, and HIV testing of HCV-infected individuals; by addressing HCV earlier in coinfected persons; and by universal consideration for HCV therapy. HCV drug trials in individuals coinfected with HIV should be expedited. HIV/HCV coinfection remains a growing and evolving epidemic; new developments in therapeutics and improved care models offer promise. PMID:22715212

  11. Co-infection assessment in HBV, HCV, and HIV patients in Western Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mughales, Jamil A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed coinfections among HIV, HBV, and HCV infected patients. Retrospective analysis of laboratory records for HIV, HBV, and HCV patients presenting at the HIV outpatient clinic. Serological data including hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg), hepatitis B e-antibody (anti-HBe), antibodies to HIV and HCV, anti-toxoplasmosis IgG and IgM antibodies, and anti-syphilis antibodies (VDRL) were collected. We obtained data for 628 (218 HCV, 268 HBV, and 142 HIV) patients. Male-to-female ratios were 1:1 for HCV, 3:4 for HBV, and 5:3 for HIV. Age means (SD) were 54.24 (16.40), 44.53 (18.83), and 40.39 (15.92) years for HCV, HBV, and HIV, respectively. In HIV group, the prevalence of HBV and HCV coinfections was 8.5% and 2.8%, respectively. In HBV group, the prevalence of HCV and HIV coinfections was 1.1% and 1.5%, respectively. In HCV group, HIV or HBV coinfections occurred at the same frequency (1.4%). An absence of screening for coinfections was detected in 7.0-48.5% patients as per the group and the infectious agent; which represents an estimated proportion of 20 out of 1,000 patients with an undiagnosed coinfection. Despite a relatively low prevalence of coinfections, a significant proportion of cases remain undiagnosed because of a lack of systematic screening. J. Med. Virol. 88:1545-1551, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26895691

  12. Hematological and Biochemistry Profile and Risk Factors Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Rajini; Flemming, Keon; Daniram, Sudish; Marks-James, Shenika; Roberts Martin, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the hematological and biochemistry profile of patients with or without HIV-TB at the Georgetown Chest Clinic, Guyana. Methods. An observational, laboratory based study was designed to assess the relationship of PTB and HIV with patients routine biochemical and hematological values. The study was conducted during the period January 2013 to December 2014; a total sample size of 316 patients was enrolled following exclusion and inclusion criteria. Results. Mean age of study population was 40.1 ± 13.8 (95% CI 38.6–41.7) and most were between 40 and 49 age group (27.8%, 95% CI 23.2–33.0). More males were in the study 74.4% (95% CI 69.3–78.8) than females 81% (95% CI 21.1–30.7). 30% (95% CI 25.3–35.3) had a sputum smear grade of 3+ and 62.5% (95% CI 47.0–75.7) showed a CD4 count <200. The study demonstrated significantly low hemoglobin (Hb) 91.7% (95% CI 78.2–97.1), low WBC 27.8% (95% CI 15.8–44.0), high indirect bilirubin 7.4% (95% CI 2.1–23.3), ALT 41.8% (95% CI 28.4–56.7), and AST 72.2% (95% CI 57.3–83.3) among TB-HIV patients. Homelessness RR (relative risk) 2.2 (95% CI 0.48–12.3), smoking RR 1.09 (95% CI 1.01–1.19), and gender (male) RR 1.2 (95% CI 0.61–2.26) were main associated risk factors. Conclusions. There is slight variation among PTB and PTB-HIV coinfected patients in some hematological and biochemistry parameters. PMID:27190646

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis B markers in Senegalese HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Lô, Gora; Sow-Sall, Amina; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Mandiouba, Nokoa Chadia Ines Danty; Thiam, Moussa; Diop, Fatou; Ndiaye, Ousseynou; Gueye, Sokhna Bousso; Seck, Sidy Mouhamed; Dioura, Abou Abdallah Malick; Mbow, Moustapha; Gaye-Diallo, Aïssatou; Mboup, Souleymane; Touré-Kâne, Coumba

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed to estimate the prevalence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and to describe the HBV virological profiles among Senegalese HIV-1-infected patients. We conducted a retrospective study between 2006 and 2010 among Senegalese HIV-1-infected patients from the antiretroviral therapy cohort. Samples were screened using Determine(®) HBsAg or MONOLISA(®) POC test. The HBsAg positivity status was confirmed by Architect(®) HBsAg. Detection of HBeAg, anti-HBe Ab, and HBV DNA load were done for the HBsAg-positive samples. Then, Anti-HBcAb was tested for the HBsAg-negative samples. Microsoft Excel was used for data collection and statistical analyses were performed using Epi info 3.5.1. Overall, 466 HIV-infected patients were enrolled including 271 women (58.4%), and 193 men (41.6%) with a median age of 39 years (19-74 years). The global prevalence of HIV/HBV coinfection (HBsAg positive) was 8.8% (41/466). For HBsAg positives samples, the prevalence of HBeAg and the anti-HBeAb were, respectively, 24.4 and 69.2% and the median of HBV DNA viral load, for 27 HBsAg-positive samples, was 3.75 log10 copies/ml. The virological profiles were the following: 7, 15, and 5 patients infected, respectively, by a replicative virus, an inactive virus and a probably mutant virus. For HBsAg-negative samples, 83 out of 109 were positive for anti-HBcAb. This study showed a significant decrease of the prevalence of HBV/HIV coinfection between 2004 and 2014 (P = 0.003), which highlighted the performance of the Senegalese HBV vaccine program. However, implementing a systematic quantification of HBV DNA viral load could improve the monitoring of HBV-infected patient. PMID:26252424

  14. Comparing recidivism rates of treatment responders/nonresponders in a sample of 413 child molesters who had completed community-based sex offender treatment in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Beech, Anthony R; Mandeville-Norden, Rebecca; Goodwill, Alasdair

    2012-02-01

    Analysis of psychometric data from a sample of 413 child molesters who had completed a U.K. probation-based sex offender treatment program was carried out to assess (a) the effectiveness of therapy in the short term and (b) the longer term implications of treatment in relation to sexual recidivism. It was found that 12% (51 offenders) of the sample had recidivated within 2 to 4 years. Of these recidivists, 86% (44 offenders) had been reconvicted for a sexually related offense. One hundred thirty-five offenders (33%) demonstrated a treated profile (i.e., demonstrated no offense-specific problems and few, or no, socioaffective problems at the posttreatment stage). This group was compared with a sample of offenders deemed as not responding to treatment, matched by their levels of pretreatment risk/need. It was found that a significantly smaller proportion (n = 12, 9%) of treatment responders had recidivated, compared to the treatment nonresponders (n = 20, 15%), indicating a 40% reduction in recidivism in those who had responded to treatment (effect size = .18). Matching length of treatment to the offenders' level of pretreatment risk/need (i.e., higher risk/treatment-need offenders typically undertook longer treatment) reduced the rate of recidivism among this group to the level of recidivism observed among the lower risk/need offenders. PMID:21187301

  15. Combination chemotherapy followed by surgery or radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, F; Atkinson, K H; Coppleson, J V; Elliott, P M; Green, D; Houghton, R; Murray, J C; Russell, P; Solomon, H J; Friedlander, M

    1987-06-01

    Forty-seven patients with locally advanced cervical cancer at high risk of relapse received three cycles of chemotherapy with PVB (cisplatin, vinblastine and bleomycin) before definitive local treatment with either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Thirty-one of the 47 patients (66%) responded to initial chemotherapy, and 11 of them have relapsed compared with 13 of the 16 non-responders. Median time to recurrence was 31 weeks for PVB non-responders but has not yet been reached for PVB responders. After a median follow-up of 128 weeks, 14 of the 31 responders (45%) are alive and disease free compared with 3 of the 16 non-responders (19%). There was a positive correlation between response to chemotherapy and subsequent response to radiotherapy. PVB was in general well tolerated although one death is probably attributable to chemotherapy. A randomized study comparing radiotherapy alone with initial PVB chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy is in progress. PMID:2441736

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of APRI, FIB-4 and Forns for the detection of liver cirrhosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Merli, Marco; Castagna, Antonella; Salpietro, Stefania; Gianotti, Nicola; Messina, Emanuela; Poli, Andrea; Morsica, Giulia; Bagaglio, Sabrina; Cernuschi, Massimo; Bigoloni, Alba; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Lazzarin, Adriano; Hasson, Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis represents an appealing method to monitor liver disease in HCV-infected patients. Currently, transient elastography (TE) is the most accurate non-invasive tool to measure liver stiffness (LS), with the diagnostic accuracy increasing together with the stage of fibrosis (Friedrich Rust et al., 2008; Degos et al., 2010). Stiffness measurement is widely used in the assessment of fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C given its good reproducibility (Fraquelli et al., 2007) and its association with the risk of liver-related complications and death in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients (Fernandez-Montero et al., 2013) and also in patients with compensated HCV-related liver cirrhosis (with or without concomitant HIV-coinfection) (Pérez-Latorre et al., 2014). In the last decade, direct and indirect biomarkers for predicting liver fibrosis have also been developed. Direct fibrosis biomarkers (e.g. FibroTest, FibroMeter) are calculated using serum molecules produced in the presence of liver fibrosis and released in the circulatory system while indirect biomarkers (e.g. APRI, FIB-4, Forns) result from the combination of routine blood tests. Even though indirect biomarkers had a lower diagnostic performance than direct biomarkers and especially TE (Sánchez-Conde et al., 2010; Degos et al., 2010; Castéra et al., 2014), the absence of additional costs and the ready availability make indirect biomarkers a quick and easy non-invasive method to periodically assess liver fibrosis. Since the early detection of liver cirrhosis has a significant impact on both clinical management and treatment decision regarding chronic hepatitis C, we evaluated the threshold and the diagnostic accuracy of APRI, FIB-4 and Forns for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. PMID:27196548

  17. Changes in CD4+ T-cells and HIV RNA resulting from combination of anti-TB therapy with Dzherelo in TB/HIV dually infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaeva, Lyudmila G; Maystat, Tatyana V; Masyuk, Lilia A; Pylypchuk, Volodymyr S; Volyanskii, Yuri L; Kutsyna, Galyna A

    2008-01-01

    The open-label, phase II clinical trial of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) with or without oral immunomodulator Dzherelo (Immunoxel) was conducted in TB/HIV coinfected, antiretroviral therapy naïve patients to evaluate the effect on CD4 T-lymphocyte counts and viral load. The arm A (n = 20) received isoniazid (H); rimfapicin (R); pyrazinamide (Z); streptomycin (S); and ethambutol (E), and arm B (n = 20) received 50 drops of Dzherelo twice per day in addition to HRZSE. After 2 months in 90% of Dzherelo patients the population of absolute CD4 T-cells expanded by an average of 71.2% (from 174 to 283 cells/μl; P = 0.00003), but declined in ATT-alone patients (182 to 174; P = 0.34). The ratio between CD4/CD8 cells deteriorated in 80% of individuals in arm A (1.213 > 0.943; P = 0.002), but improved in the same proportion of patients in arm B (1.244 > 1.536; P = 0.007). The number of total CD3+ lymphocytes rose from 728 to 921 cells in arm B (P = 0.025) whereas it fell from 650 to 585 cells in arm A (P = 0.25). The viral load, as measured by plasma RNA-PCR, decreased in 70% of Dzherelo recipients (2.174 > 1.558 copies/ml; P = 0.002), but increased in 70% of HRZSE only receivers (1.907 > 2.076 copies/ml; P = 0.03). Dzherelo has a favorable effect on the immune status and viral burden in TB/HIV patients when given as an immunomodulating adjunct to ATT. PMID:19920896

  18. Time trends of seroepidemiology of hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus coinfection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in a Super Specialty Hospital in New Delhi, India: 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Abha; Halim, Jasmin; Jaggi, Tavleen; Mishra, Bibhabati; Thakur, Archana; Dogra, Vinita; Loomba, Poonam Sood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is a major cause of liver diseases worldwide. High prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Asia makes it important to understand HBV and HCV coinfection with HIV in this part of the globe. This study was done with the aim of assessing the time trends of seroepidemiology of HBV and HCV coinfection in HIV patients over the last 3 years. Materials and Methods: Year wise retrospective analysis of data between January 2012 and December 2014 was done. Results: The prevalence of HIV infection among 0–20 years and >60 years age group decreased over the last 3 years (2012–2014), 8.4%, 6.4%, and 3.1% and 3.6%, 3.8%, and 1.5%, respectively. While increasing prevalence was seen among 21–40 years age group, 57.8%, 60.2%, and 67.1%, respectively in 2012, 2013, and 2014. There was no significant relationship between age/gender and HBV/HCV seropositivity among HIV-positive patients. The risk of acquiring HBV infection was more in HIV-positive patients who were >60 years of age (odds ratio = 3.3182; 95% confidence interval: 0.3669–30.005). The prevalence of HCV seropositivity is less in HIV-positive patients as only one case was anti-HCV antibody positive in last 3 years who was a male patient in the age group 21–40 years. A declining trend was observed for HIV positive cases over 2012–2014 while no significant trend change is seen in HBV/HCV seropositivity among HIV patients from 2012 to 2104. Conclusion: It is recommended to screen HIV patients routinely for concurrent HBV/HCV infection as hepatotropic viruses with HIV increase the risk of liver mortalities. PMID:27190410

  19. Treatment outcome expectancies and hypnotic susceptibility as moderators of pain reduction in patients with chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, P; ter Kuile, M M

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hypnotic susceptibility (a) predicts pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and mode of treatment and (b) predicts persistence of pain reduction during the follow-up period. In 169 patients with chronic tension-type headaches randomly allocated to either self-hypnosis or autogenic training, pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up was significantly associated with hypnotic susceptibility independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and treatment condition. Moreover, it was found that early responders obtained significantly higher hypnotic susceptibility scores than nonresponders, although there were no significant differences in hypnotic susceptibility between late responders in comparison to early and nonresponders. However, almost one fourth of those who were nonresponders posttreatment did respond at follow-up. PMID:10902294

  20. Quantification of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in Liver Specimens and Sera from Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection by Using the Versant HCV RNA 3.0 (Branched DNA-Based) DNA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Pivetta, Eliana; Zanussi, Stefania; Bidoli, Ettore; Ros, Mirna; di Gennaro, Giampiero; Nasti, Guglielmo; De Paoli, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    The new generation assay Versant HCV RNA 3.0v (Bayer Diagnostics) was evaluated to quantify hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in liver biopsy specimens from patients with HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. A total of 25 liver biopsies and sera collected at the time of liver biopsy were used. The efficiency of HCV RNA recovery from spiked samples was between 38.6 and 50.7%, and reproducible measurements of viral load were observed (the intra- and interrun coefficients of variation were 0.5 to 13% and 3.5 to 24.7%, respectively), with good specificity and sensitivity. Linearity was evaluated in the range of 96,154 to 769 IU/μg by using a serially diluted high-titer sample. Coinfected patients had high HCV RNA viral loads in serum and liver (498,471 IU/ml and 231,495 IU/μg, respectively), and both levels were correlated (r = 0.63; P < 0.01). The amount of hepatic HCV RNA was significantly higher among patients with genotype 1 than among patients with genotype 3 (P < 0.01). The virological end-of-treatment response in the serum was associated with a lower pretreatment intrahepatic HCV viral load (P = 0.03). The new version of b-DNA is a sensitive, specific, and reproducible method for quantitating HCV RNA in the liver. Given its positive analytical performance, the assay will be used to evaluate the HCV RNA levels in the serum and liver during follow-up of patients treated with an anti-HCV therapeutic regimen. PMID:12843041

  1. Assessment of Lung Recruitment by Electrical Impedance Tomography and Oxygenation in ARDS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Long; He, Huai-wu; Möller, Knut; Frerichs, Inéz; Liu, Dawei; Zhao, Zhanqi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We hypothesized that not all patients with appreciably recruited lung tissue during a recruitment maneuver (RM) show significant improvement of oxygenation. In the present study, we combined electrical impedance tomography (EIT) with oxygenation measurements to examine the discrepancies of lung ventilation and perfusion versus oxygenation after RM. A 2-minute RM (20 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] + 20 cm H2O pressure control) was prospectively conducted in 20 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients from January 2014 to December 2014. A decremental PEEP trial was performed to select the PEEP level after RM. A positive response to RM was identified as PaO2 + PaCO2 ≥400 mm Hg. Relative differences in the distribution of ventilation and perfusion in the most dependent region of interest (ROI4) were monitored with EIT and denoted as the ventilation-perfusion index. Ten patients were found to be responders and 10 patients to be nonresponders. No significant difference in baseline PaO2/FiO2 was observed between nonresponders and responders. A significantly higher PaO2/FiO2 ratio during RM and higher PEEP set after PEEP titration were recorded in responders. In both responders and nonresponders, the proportion of ventilation distributed in ROI4 compared with the global value was lower than the cardiac-related activity before RM, but this situation was reversed after RM (P < 0.01 in each group). Six out of 10 nonresponders exhibited a remarkable increase in ventilation in ROI4. A significant difference in the relative ventilation-perfusion index was found between the patients with remarkable and insufficient lung tissue reopening in the nonresponder group (P < 0.01). A discrepancy between lung tissue reopening and oxygenation improvement after RM was observed. EIT has the potential to evaluate the efficacy of RM by combining oxygenation measurements. PMID:27258527

  2. Assessment of Lung Recruitment by Electrical Impedance Tomography and Oxygenation in ARDS Patients.

    PubMed

    Yun, Long; He, Huai-Wu; Möller, Knut; Frerichs, Inéz; Liu, Dawei; Zhao, Zhanqi

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesized that not all patients with appreciably recruited lung tissue during a recruitment maneuver (RM) show significant improvement of oxygenation. In the present study, we combined electrical impedance tomography (EIT) with oxygenation measurements to examine the discrepancies of lung ventilation and perfusion versus oxygenation after RM.A 2-minute RM (20 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] + 20 cm H2O pressure control) was prospectively conducted in 20 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients from January 2014 to December 2014. A decremental PEEP trial was performed to select the PEEP level after RM. A positive response to RM was identified as PaO2 + PaCO2 ≥400 mm Hg. Relative differences in the distribution of ventilation and perfusion in the most dependent region of interest (ROI4) were monitored with EIT and denoted as the ventilation-perfusion index.Ten patients were found to be responders and 10 patients to be nonresponders. No significant difference in baseline PaO2/FiO2 was observed between nonresponders and responders. A significantly higher PaO2/FiO2 ratio during RM and higher PEEP set after PEEP titration were recorded in responders. In both responders and nonresponders, the proportion of ventilation distributed in ROI4 compared with the global value was lower than the cardiac-related activity before RM, but this situation was reversed after RM (P < 0.01 in each group). Six out of 10 nonresponders exhibited a remarkable increase in ventilation in ROI4. A significant difference in the relative ventilation-perfusion index was found between the patients with remarkable and insufficient lung tissue reopening in the nonresponder group (P < 0.01).A discrepancy between lung tissue reopening and oxygenation improvement after RM was observed. EIT has the potential to evaluate the efficacy of RM by combining oxygenation measurements. PMID:27258527

  3. Patients with Poor Response to Antipsychotics Have a More Severe Pattern of Frontal Atrophy: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of Treatment Resistance in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, Olga; Schiavone, Vittorio; Carotenuto, Barbara; Brunetti, Arturo; Casiello, Margherita; Muscettola, Giovanni; Salvatore, Marco; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of schizophrenia patients do not respond adequately to the therapy. Previous MRI studies have suggested that drug treatment resistance is associated with brain morphological abnormalities, although region-of-interest analysis of MR studies from nonresponder and responder patients failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference between these two schizophrenia subgroups. We have used a voxel-based analysis of segmented MR studies to assess structural cerebral differences in 20 nonresponder and 15 responder patients and 16 age-matched normal volunteers. Differences between the three groups emerged bilaterally mainly at the level of the superior and middle frontal gyri, primarily due to reduced grey matter volumes in nonresponders, as compared to both normal volunteers and responder patients. Post hoc direct comparison between the two schizophrenia subgroups demonstrated significantly reduced grey matter volumes in middle frontal gyrus bilaterally, in the dorsolateral aspects of left superior frontal gyrus extending into postcentral gyrus and in the right medial temporal cortex. Our results extend and integrate previous findings suggesting a more severe atrophy in nonresponder schizophrenia patients, compared to responder patients, mainly at the level of the superior and middle frontal gyri. Longitudinal studies in drug-naïve patients are needed to assess the role of these associations. PMID:25157354

  4. Patients with poor response to antipsychotics have a more severe pattern of frontal atrophy: a voxel-based morphometry study of treatment resistance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Quarantelli, Mario; Palladino, Olga; Prinster, Anna; Schiavone, Vittorio; Carotenuto, Barbara; Brunetti, Arturo; Marsili, Angela; Casiello, Margherita; Muscettola, Giovanni; Salvatore, Marco; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of schizophrenia patients do not respond adequately to the therapy. Previous MRI studies have suggested that drug treatment resistance is associated with brain morphological abnormalities, although region-of-interest analysis of MR studies from nonresponder and responder patients failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference between these two schizophrenia subgroups. We have used a voxel-based analysis of segmented MR studies to assess structural cerebral differences in 20 nonresponder and 15 responder patients and 16 age-matched normal volunteers. Differences between the three groups emerged bilaterally mainly at the level of the superior and middle frontal gyri, primarily due to reduced grey matter volumes in nonresponders, as compared to both normal volunteers and responder patients. Post hoc direct comparison between the two schizophrenia subgroups demonstrated significantly reduced grey matter volumes in middle frontal gyrus bilaterally, in the dorsolateral aspects of left superior frontal gyrus extending into postcentral gyrus and in the right medial temporal cortex. Our results extend and integrate previous findings suggesting a more severe atrophy in nonresponder schizophrenia patients, compared to responder patients, mainly at the level of the superior and middle frontal gyri. Longitudinal studies in drug-naïve patients are needed to assess the role of these associations. PMID:25157354

  5. Rifaximin has a Marginal Impact on Microbial Translocation, T-cell Activation and Inflammation in HIV-Positive Immune Non-responders to Antiretroviral Therapy – ACTG A5286

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio, Allan R.; Chan, Ellen S.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Macatangay, Bernard J. C.; Read, Sarah W.; Yesmin, Suria; Taiwo, Babafemi; Margolis, David M.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Landay, Alan L.; Wilson, Cara C.; Mellors, John W.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rodriguez, Benigno; Aziz, Mariam; Presti, Rachel; Deeks, Steven; Ebiasah, Ruth; Myers, Laurie; Borowski, LuAnn; Plants, Jill; Palm, David A.; Weibel, Derek; Putnam, Beverly; Lindsey, Elizabeth; Player, Amy; Albrecht, Mary; Kershaw, Andrea; Sax, Paul; Keenan, Cheryl; Walton, Patricia; Baum, Jane; Stroberg, Todd; Hughes, Valery; Coster, Laura; Kumar, Princy N.; Yin, Michael T.; Noel-Connor, Jolene; Tebas, Pablo; Thomas, Aleshia; Davis, Charles E.; Redfield, Robert R.; Sbrolla, Amy; Flynn, Teri; Davis, Traci; Whitely, Kim; Singh, Baljinder; Swaminathan, Shobha; McGregor, Donna; Palella, Frank; Aberg, Judith; Cavanagh, Karen; Santana Bagur, Jorge L.; Flores, Olga Méndez; Fritsche, Janice; Sha, Beverly; Slamowitz, Debbie; Valle, Sandra; Tashima, Karen; Patterson, Helen; Harber, Heather; Para, Michael; Eaton, Molly; Maddox, Dale; Currier, Judith; Cajahuaringa, Vanessa; Luetkemeyer, Annie; Dwyer, Jay; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Saemann, Michelle; Ray, Graham; Campbell, Thomas; Fischl, Margaret A.; Bolivar, Hector; Oakes, Jonathan; Chicurel-Bayard, Miriam; Tripoli, Christine; Weinman, D. Renee; Adams, Mary; Hurley, Christine; Dunaway, Shelia; Storey, Sheryl; Klebert, Michael; Royal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic that decreases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cirrhotics, may decrease the elevated levels of microbial translocation, T-cell activation and inflammation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive immune nonresponders to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. HIV-positive adults receiving ART for ≥96 weeks with undetectable viremia for ≥48 weeks and CD4+ T-cell counts <350 cells/mm3 were randomized 2:1 to rifaximin versus no study treatment for 4 weeks. T-cell activation, LPS, and soluble CD14 were measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, and 8. Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes between arms. Results. Compared with no study treatment (n = 22), rifaximin (n = 43) use was associated with a significant difference between study arms in the change from baseline to week 4 for CD8+T-cell activation (median change, 0.0% with rifaximin vs +0.6% with no treatment; P = .03). This difference was driven by an increase in the no-study-treatment arm because there was no significant change within the rifaximin arm. Similarly, although there were significant differences between study arms in change from baseline to week 2 for LPS and soluble CD14, there were no significant changes within the rifaximin arm. Conclusions. In immune nonresponders to ART, rifaximin minimally affected microbial translocation and CD8+T-cell activation. Trial registration number. NCT01466595. PMID:25214516

  6. Non-response in a nationwide follow-up postal survey in Finland: a register-based mortality analysis of respondents and non-respondents of the Health and Social Support (HeSSup) Study

    PubMed Central

    Koskenvuo, Karoliina; Sillanmäki, Lauri; Vahtera, Jussi; Korkeila, Katariina; Kivimäki, Mika; Mattila, Kari J; Virtanen, Pekka; Sumanen, Markku; Rautava, Päivi; Koskenvuo, Markku

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine difference in mortality between postal survey non-respondents and respondents. Design A prospective cohort study with baseline survey in 1998 and comprehensive linkage to national mortality registers until 2005, the Health and Social Support study. Setting A population-based postal survey of the working-aged population in Finland in 1998. Participants The original random sample comprised 64 797 working-aged individuals in Finland (20–24, 30–34, 40–44, 50–54 years of age; 32 059 women and 32 716 men), yielding 25 898 (40.0%) responses in the baseline postal survey in 1998. Primary outcome measure Registry-based primary causes of death encoded with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results In women, HR for total mortality was 1.75 (95% CI 1.40 to 2.19) times higher among the non-respondents compared with the respondents. In men, non-response was associated with a 1.41-fold (1.21–1.65) excess risk of total mortality. Non-response associated in certain age groups with deaths due to diseases in women and with deaths due to external causes in men. The most prominent excess mortality was seen for total mortality for both genders and for mortality due to external causes among men. Conclusions Postal surveys result in slight underestimation of illness prevalence. PMID:22422917

  7. [Treatment of patients with recurrence or who do not respond to the first treatment against hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis

    2002-10-01

    The current criteria to confirm the absence of therapeutic response to HCV is based on the viral findings. Lack of response is defined as the failure to achieve a negative serological response to the virus in peripheral blood (serum or plasma) after 12 weeks of treatment with interferon alpha (2a or 2b), or 24 weeks of treatment with IFN and ribavirin. Up to 60% of patients treated with standard IFN alpha and ribavirin are considered non-responders. According to viral genotype, figures are still worse in the group with genotype 1. Recently, the use of pegylated interferon allowed the reduction of the number of non-responding patients. The investigators propose different approaches in the search for better therapeutic strategies. The most effective of them all are the addition of ribavirin to the therapeutic scheme and the use of pegylated interferon which greatly increased the number of responders. Nevertheless, there are still many patients who are resistant to therapy. These are the proposed therapeutic alternatives for non-respondent patients: 1. Another tretment cycle with standard IFN and ribavirin (low probability) 2. Another treatment cycle with pegylated IFN and ribavirin. 3. Another treatment cycle with IFN, ribavirin and amantadine. 4. Another treatment cycle with IFN, ribavirin and timosine. 5. Other antiviral agents. It's important to clarify that "real non-responders" are those patients who remain positive in the viral load tests after 12-24 months of treatment. On the other hand, patients who "escape from treatment" or those with "recurrence" are not real non-responders, compared to those who are negative after 12-24 weeks of treatment. PMID:12712853

  8. Retinopathy in chronic hepatitis C patients during interferon treatment with ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, K; Lam, W; Waheeb, S; Thai, Q; Heathcote, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the ocular effect of interferon alfa 2b prescribed with ribavirin in patients undergoing therapy for chronic hepatitis C.
METHODS—19 patients with chronic hepatitis C who satisfied the follow up criteria were assessed for ocular complications using slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the treatment at regular intervals.
RESULTS—8/19 patients, while on treatment, developed an asymptomatic retinopathy. Among these 3/8 were relapsers and 5/9 were non-responders to interferon monotherapy. All retinal changes faded, often while the patients continued the therapy. There was no significant association in occurrence of retinopathy with haematological and/or biochemical changes.
CONCLUSION—Retinopathy was more common in interferon monotherapy non-responders than relapsers when treated with interferon alfa 2b with the addition of ribavirin. The changes were transient, disappearing while the patients were still being treated.

 PMID:11567959

  9. Contributions of T Lymphocyte Abnormalities to Therapeutic Outcomes in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guohua; Zhuang, Yun; Qian, Xifeng; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Dajiang; Shen, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    T cell abnormalities have been reported to play an important role in pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) besides specific autoantibodies towards platelet. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical importance of T lymphocyte subsets in adult patients with newly diagnosed ITP before and after first-line treatment. Elderly ITP patients were also studied and we tried to analyze the relationships between these items and therapeutic outcomes. The patients were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) plus corticosteroids and therapeutic responses were evaluated. As a result, compared with the controls, absolute lymphocyte counts in ITP patients decreased significantly before treatment. After treatment, lymphocyte counts restored to control level regardless of their treatment outcomes. In addition, we observed increased IgG and CD19+ cell expression and decreased CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in both whole ITP group and elderly group before treatment. After treatment, the increased IgG and CD19+ cell expression could be reduced in both respond and non-respond group regardless of patient age, while CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio could not be corrected in non-respond ITP patients. In non-respond ITP patients, increased CD8+ cell expression was noticed and could not be corrected by first-line treatment. Furthermore, even lower NK cell expression was found in non-respond elderly patients after treatment when compared with that in controls. Our findings suggest that ITP patients usually had less numbers of peripheral lymphocytes and patients with higher levels of CD8+ cells or lower levels of CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio were less likely to respond to first-line treatment. Lower levels of NK cells made therapies in elderly ITP patients even more difficult. PMID:25978334

  10. Onset of clinical effects and plasma concentration of fluvoxamine in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Shinya; Kawai, Masayoshi; Takei, Noriyoshi; Mori, Norio; Kawakami, Junichi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Shizuo; Namiki, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Hisakuni

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) require 2 to 4 weeks of administration before improvements in emotional symptoms of depression are seen. We evaluated whether early monitoring of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) scores in patients treated with the SSRI fluvoxamine could predict antidepressant response, and also assessed the relationship between the onset of clinical response following the start of fluvoxamine administration and its plasma concentration. Twelve depressed patients (baseline HAMD score ≥15) received an initial dose of fluvoxamine (50 mg/d) followed by an optimized maintenance dose according to their clinical symptoms after 7 d. HAMD scores and plasma drug concentrations were determined at 7 and 28 d after the first administration. There were 7 responders and 5 non-responders on day 28, as evaluated by HAMD scores. The HAMD score for the responders was significantly lower than that for the non-responders on day 7 (mean±S.D., 11.6±6.1 vs. 26.6±6.5, p=0.006). Thus, the reduction in HAMD score on day 7 was clearly divided between responders and non-responders. On day 28, the plasma concentration of fluvoxamine in responders was lower than that in non-responders (14.2±10.5 ng/ml vs. 44.2±28.1 ng/ml, p=0.051). Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis conducted on day 28 revealed an upper concentration threshold of 28.2 ng/ml (p=0.042), with none in the responder group above that level. Our results suggest that HAMD score after the first week of treatment with fluvoxamine and the upper threshold of plasma drug concentration could predict whether a patient is a non-responder. PMID:21139240

  11. Prognosis and treatment of patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vassilios; Burroughs, Andrew K; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2014-07-01

    Despite alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most acute manifestation of alcohol-related liver disease, its treatment remains controversial. Corticosteroids, given either as monotherapy or together with N-acetylecysteine, have been associated with a moderate short-term survival benefit in patients with severe disease. The Maddrey's discriminant function; Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score; age, bilirubin, INR and creatinine score; and the Model for end-stage liver disease have been proposed for stratifying prognosis in AH enabling selection of the patients to treat. Definition of treatment non-responders using the Lille model after 7 days of therapy may prevent a detrimental impact of prolonged corticosteroids. Pentoxifylline is an effective alternative reducing the occurrence of hepatorenal syndrome. Emerging evidence supports use of liver transplantation in a strictly selected subset of corticosteroid non-responders. PMID:24716632

  12. Use of a 12 months' self-referral reminder to facilitate uptake of bowel scope (flexible sigmoidoscopy) screening in previous non-responders: a London-based feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Kerrison, Robert S; McGregor, Lesley M; Marshall, Sarah; Isitt, John; Counsell, Nicholas; Wardle, Jane; von Wagner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: In March 2013, NHS England extended its national Bowel Cancer Screening Programme to include ‘one-off' Flexible Sigmoidoscopy screening (NHS Bowel Scope Screening, BSS) for men and women aged 55. With less than one in two people currently taking up the screening test offer, there is a strong public health mandate to develop system-friendly interventions to increase uptake while the programme is rolling out. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of sending a reminder to previous BSS non-responders, 12 months after the initial invitation, with consideration for its potential impact on uptake. Method: This study was conducted in the ethnically diverse London Boroughs of Brent and Harrow, where uptake is below the national average. Between September and November 2014, 160 previous non-responders were randomly selected to receive a reminder of the opportunity to self-refer 12 months after their initial invitation. The reminder included instructions on how to book an appointment, and provided options for the time and day of the appointment and the gender of the endoscopist performing the test. To address barriers to screening, the reminder was sent with a brief locally tailored information leaflet designed specifically for this study. Participants not responding within 4 weeks were sent a follow-up reminder, after which there was no further intervention. Self-referral rates were measured 8 weeks after the delivery of the follow-up reminder and accepted as final. Results: Of the 155 participants who received the 12 months' reminder (returned to sender, n=5), 30 (19.4%) self-referred for an appointment, of which 24 (15.5%) attended and were successfully screened. Attendance rates differed by gender, with significantly more women attending an appointment than men (20.7% vs 8.8%, respectively; OR=2.73, 95% CI=1.02–7.35, P=0.05), but not by area (Brent vs Harrow) or area-level deprivation. Of the 30 people who self-referred for an appointment, 27 (90

  13. Predictors of biochemical aspirin and clopidogrel resistance in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fong, Joanna; Cheng-Ching, Esteban; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Katzan, Irene; Gupta, Rishi

    2011-01-01

    Variable platelet response to aspirin and clopidogrel is a well-established phenomenon in patients with coronary artery disease. We sought to determine the predictors of an impaired biochemical response to aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ischemic stroke. Patients with established cerebrovascular disease who underwent an aspirin/clopidogrel response panel (ie, light transmittance aggregometry) between June 2003 and March 2007 were identified through an electronic database. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed, and demographic characteristics, medical history, and laboratory results were recorded. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for factors associated with antiplatelet resistance. Of the 465 patients included in this study, 120 (28%) were biochemical aspirin nonresponders and 83 (28%) were biochemical clopidogrel nonresponders. Of the 270 patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, 25 (9.3%) were dual biochemical nonresponders. In binary logistic regression modeling, patients with congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR] = 4.54; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-15.5; P = .02) and those with higher hemoglobin A1c values (OR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.12-1.79; P = .004) had a significantly greater likelihood of having a biochemical nonresponse to aspirin therapy. African-American patients (OR = 2.19; 95% CI = 1.23-3.91; P < .007) were significantly more likely to be nonresponders to clopidogrel. This preliminary study shows that aspirin and clopidogrel biochemical nonresponse frequently occurs in ischemic stroke patients. In addition, some associated variables may affect the biochemical response to antiplatelet therapy. Further study is needed to explore whether this nonresponse has an impact on clinical outcomes. PMID:20621513

  14. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  15. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen-C genotypes in rheumatoid arthritis primary responders and non-responders to anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    McGeough, Cathy M; Berrar, Daniel; Wright, Gary; Mathews, Clare; Gilmore, Paula; Cunningham, Rodat T; Bjourson, Anthony J

    2012-06-01

    The identification of patients who will respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapy will improve the efficacy, safety, and economic impact of these agents. We investigated whether killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes are related to response to anti-TNF-α therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Sixty-four RA patients and 100 healthy controls were genotyped for 16 KIR genes and human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) group 1/2 using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). Each patient received anti-TNF-α therapy (adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab), and clinical responses were evaluated after 3 months using the disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28). We investigated the correlations between the carriership of KIR genes, HLA-C group 1/2 genes, and clinical data with response to therapy. Patients responding to therapy showed a significantly higher frequency of KIR2DS2/KIR2DL2 (67.7% R vs. 33.3% NR; P = 0.012). A positive clinical outcome was associated with an activating KIR-HLA genotype; KIR2DS2 (+) HLA-C group 1/2 homozygous. Inversely, non-response was associated with the relatively inhibitory KIR2DS2 (-) HLA-C group 1/2 heterozygous genotype. The KIR and HLA-C genotype of an RA patient may provide predictive information for response to anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:21373785

  16. Retreatment of patients who do not respond to initial therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Mitchell L

    2004-05-01

    Despite improvements in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, nearly half of all patients do not respond to initial therapy. Retreatment of these patients with pegylated interferon and ribavirin has been successful in only a limited percentage of cases. Factors associated with sustained virologic response (SVR) following retreatment include prior treatment with interferon monotherapy, HCV genotype 2 or 3, a low serum HCV RNA level, and the absence of cirrhosis. Fewer than 6% of nonresponders who were previously treated with interferon and ribavirin and who have cirrhosis, genotype 1, and a high viral load achieve SVR following retreatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. No therapy has been shown to yield SVR in patients who do not respond to pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Long-term maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon is currently being evaluated in nonresponders with advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Its use should be considered investigational at this time. PMID:15468612

  17. Dominant enrichment of phenotypically activated CD38(+) HLA-DR(+) CD8(+) T cells, rather than CD38(+) HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells, in HIV/HCV coinfected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Serafino, Sara; Giustini, Noemi; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; Bianchi, Luigi; Pavone, Paolo; Bellelli, Valeria; Turriziani, Ombretta; Antonelli, Guido; Stroffolini, Tommaso; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    HIV infection may enhance immune-activation, while little is known regarding the role of HCV infection. This study investigates the impact of HCV in HIV coinfected patients with undetectable viraemia under HAART on the levels of peripheral T cell's immune-activation. We determined T lymphocytes subsets to characterize immune-activation defined as CD38 and/or HLA-DR expression in chronic monoinfected HCV, HIV, and HIV/HCV coinfected subjects. One hundred and fifty six patients were divided into three groups: (i) 77 HIV+ patients; (ii) 50 HCV+ patients; and (iii) 29 coinfected HIV/HCV patients. The level of CD4(+) was significantly higher in HCV+ than in HIV+ or in coinfected HIV/HCV subjects. The frequencies of CD4(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(-) , CD4(+) CD38(-) /HLA-DR(+) and CD4(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(+) in HIV+ patients were comparable to those measured in coinfected patients, but statistically higher than those observed in HCV+ subjects. The percentage of CD8(+) was comparable in HIV-1+ patients and coinfected HIV/HCV but the results obtained in both groups were significantly higher compared to the results obtained in HCV patients. The level of CD8(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(-) showed values lower in HIV+ patients than in that monoinfected HCV and coinfected HIV/HCV patients. The frequencies of CD8(+) CD38(-) /HLA-DR(+) were higher in HIV+ patients compared to HCV+ and coinfected HIV/HCV patients. HIV/HCV coinfected group showed highest levels of CD8(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(+) . HIV plays a pivotal role to determine the immune activation in the host. The role of HCV needs of further investigations but our data show that HCV mainly influences the immune-activation of the pool of CD8, but also probably plays a supporting additive effect on CD4 immune-activation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1347-1356, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26765625

  18. Potential determinants of efficacy of mirror therapy in stroke patients – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Maddalena; Morkisch, Nadine; Fritzsch, Claire; Mehnert, Jan; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mirror therapy (MT) was found to improve motor function after stroke. However, there is high variability between patients regarding motor recovery. Objectives: The following pilot study was designed to identify potential factors determining this variability between patients with severe upper limb paresis, receiving MT. Methods: Eleven sub-acute stroke patients with severe upper limb paresis participated, receiving in-patient rehabilitation. After a set of pre-assessments (including measurement of brain activity at the primary motor cortex and precuneus during the mirror illusion, using near-infrared spectroscopy as described previously), four weeks of MT were applied, followed by a set of post-assessments. Discriminant group analysis for MT responders and non-responders was performed. Results: Six out of eleven patients were defined as responders and five as non-responders on the basis of their functional motor improvement. The initial motor function and the activity shift in both precunei (mirror index) were found to discriminate significantly between responders and non-responders. Conclusions: In line with earlier results, initial motor function was confirmed as crucial determinant of motor recovery. Additionally, activity response to the mirror illusion in both precunei was found to be a candidate for determination of the efficacy of MT. PMID:26409402

  19. Genetic Polymorphism of CYP2D6 and Clomiphene Concentrations in Infertile Patients with Ovulatory Dysfunction Treated with Clomiphene Citrate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    CYP2D6 is primarily responsible for the metabolism of clomiphene citrate (CC). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between CYP2D6 genotypes, concentrations of CC and its major metabolites and drug response in infertility patients. We studied 42 patients with ovulatory dysfunction treated with only CC. Patients received a dose of 100 mg/day CC on days 3-7 of the menstrual cycle. CYP2D6 genotyping and measurement of CC and the major metabolite concentrations were performed. Patients were categorized into CC responders or non-responders according to one cycle response for the ovulation. Thirty-two patients were CC responders and 10 patients were non-responders with 1 cycle treatment. The CC concentrations were highly variable within the same group, but non-responders revealed significantly lower (E)-clomiphene concentration and a trend of decreased concentrations of active metabolites compared to the responders. Nine patients with intermediate metabolizer phenotype were all responders. We confirmed that the CC and the metabolite concentrations were different according to the ovulation status. However, our results do not provide evidence for the contribution of CYP2D6 polymorphism to either drug response or CC concentrations. PMID:26839488

  20. The importance of sCD40 and sCD40L concentration in patients with chronic HCV infection and HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Lapiński, Tadeusz Wojciech; Pogorzelska, Joanna; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Swiderska, Magdalena; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Nikliński, Jacek; Flisiak, Robert

    2014-01-01

    CD40 receptor is activated by ligand CD40L (CD154) which is synthesized in inflammation by NK cells, monocytes and lymphocytes B. TRAF proteins are activated in cells by CD40 stimulation and next they stimulate different enzymatic pathways. High concentrations of CD40L stimulate CD40, and consequently STAT enzyme system inhibits the expression ofnonstructural proteins ofHCV NS3 and NS5A and E2 core in infected human hepatocytes. PURPOSE. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of soluble components of the complex: sCD40 and sCD40L in the serum of patients infected with HCV and HCV/HIV-1 co-infected. The effect ofHCV genotype, HIV and HCV viral load and rs12979860 polymorphism on serum sCD40 and sCD40L was established among the patients. The influence of the number of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ on the concentrations of sCD40 and sCD40L was evaluated in the HIV-1 infected group MATERIALS AND METHODS. Serum concentrations of sCD40 and sCD40L were determined using ELISA in 68 HCV infected patients including 39 HCV monoinfected and 29 HCV/HIV-1 co-infected. RESULTS. Serum concentration of sCD40 and sCD40L was significantly higher in HCV and HCV/HIV coinfected patients compared to healthy subjects (25.7 and 23.2 v. 8.5 pg/ml and 12.7 and 7.3 v. 0.79 ng/ml). The concentration of sCD40L in patients with genotype CC rs12979860 was significantly higher compared to patients with Non-CC genotypes (11.8 v. 7.6 ng/ml, p < 0.018). CONCLUSIONS. High levels of sCD40 and sCD40L were detected among patients with chronic HCV and HCV/ HIV-1 infection The high concentration of sCD40L correlates with CC rs12979860 genotype. PMID:25004625

  1. Determinants of Pain Treatment Response and Non-Response: Identification of TMD Patient Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Mark D.; Porto, Felipe B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if we could identify a specific subtype of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients that does not respond to treatment. Patients were 101 men and women with chronic TMD pain recruited from the community and randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions: a standard conservative care (STD) condition or a standard care plus cognitive-behavioral treatment condition (STD+CBT) in which patients received all elements of STD, but also received cognitive-behavioral coping skills training. Growth mixture modeling, incorporating a series of treatment-related predictors, was used to distinguish several distinct classes of responders or non-responders to treatment based on reported pain over a one-year follow-up period. Results indicated that treatment non-responders accounted for 16% of the sample, and did not differ from treatment responders on demographics or temporomandibular joint pathology, but that they reported more psychiatric symptoms, poorer coping, and higher levels of catastrophizing. Treatment-related predictors of membership in treatment responder groups versus the non-responder group included the addition of CBT to standard treatment, treatment attendance, and decreasing catastrophization. It was concluded that CBT may be made more efficacious for TMD patients by placing further emphasis on decreasing catastrophization and on individualizing care. PMID:24094979

  2. High Proportion of HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients with Advanced Liver Fibrosis Requiring Hepatitis C Treatment in Haiphong, Northern Vietnam (ANRS 12262)

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, Karine; Duong Thi, Huong; Pham Thi Hanh, Phuc; Truong Thi Xuan, Lien; Chu Thi, Nga; Luong Que, Anh; Vu Hai, Vinh; Nagot, Nicolas; Tuaillon, Edouard; Dominguez, Stéphanie; Lemoine, Maud

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Aims Screening and treatment for chronic hepatitis C are very limited in Vietnam and clinical data on HCV-related liver disease in HIV-coinfected people are almost inexistent. This study aimed to assess the severity of liver fibrosis and its risk factors in HIV-HCV coinfected patients in Haiphong, Northern Vietnam. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at a HIV outpatient clinic. Consecutive HIV treated adults with positive HCV serology completed a standardised epidemiological questionnaire and had a comprehensive liver assessment including hepatic elastography (Fibroscan®, Echosens). Results From February to March 2014, 104 HIV-HCV coinfected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) were prospectively enrolled (99 males, median age: 35.8 (32.7–39.6) years, median CD4 count: 504 (361–624) /mm3. Of them, 93 (89.4%) had detectable HCV RNA (median 6.19 (4.95–6.83 Log10 IU/mL). Patients were mainly infected with genotypes 1a/1b (69%) and genotypes 6a/6e (26%). Forty-three patients (41.3%) had fibrosis ≥F2 including 24 patients (23.1%) with extensive fibrosis (F3) and/or cirrhosis (F4). In univariate analysis, excessive alcohol consumption, estimated time duration from HCV infection, nevirapine and lopinavir-based ARV regimen and CD4 nadir were associated factors of extensive fibrosis/cirrhosis. Alcohol abuse was the only independent factor of extensive fibrosis in multivariate analysis. Using Fibroscan® as a gold standard, the high thresholds of AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4) had very good performances for the diagnosis of extensive fibrosis/cirrhosis (Se: 90 and 100%, Sp:84 and 81%, AUROCs = 0.93, 95%CI: 0.86–0.99 and 0.96 (0.92–0.99), respectively). Conclusion In this study, nearly 25% of HIV-HCV coinfected patients successfully treated with ART have extensive fibrosis or cirrhosis, and therefore require urgently HCV treatment. PMID:27148964

  3. Decreased expression of let-7c is associated with non-response of muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinall, Ruth L.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Ripoll, Alexandra A. Z.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P.; Yap, Stanley A.; Ghosh, Paramita M.; deVere White, Ralph W.

    2016-01-01

    The identification and development of biomarkers which predict response of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy would likely increase usage of this treatment option and thereby improve patient survival rates. MiRNA array and qRT-PCR validation was used to identify miRNA which are associated with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. RNA was extracted from a total of 41 archival, fully annotated, MIBC patient diagnostic biopsies (20 chemo-responders and 21 non-responders (response is defined as > 5 year survival rate and being pT0 post-chemotherapy)). Microarray and qPCR identified let-7c as being differentially expressed in chemo-responder versus non-responder patients. Patients with higher let-7c expression levels had significantly higher odds of responding to chemotherapy (p = 0.023, OR 2.493, 95% CI 1.121, 5.546), and assessment of let-7c levels allowed for prediction of patient response (AUC 0.72, positive predictive value 59%). Decreased let-7c was associated with MIBC incidence (p < 0.001), and significantly correlated with other related miRNA including those that were not differentially expressed between responders and non-responders. The combined data indicate let-7c plays a role in mediating chemoresistance to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in MIBC patients, and is a modest, yet clinically meaningful, predictor of patient response. PMID:27382433

  4. Decreased expression of let-7c is associated with non-response of muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vinall, Ruth L; Tepper, Clifford G; Ripoll, Alexandra A Z; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Yap, Stanley A; Ghosh, Paramita M; deVere White, Ralph W

    2016-03-01

    The identification and development of biomarkers which predict response of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy would likely increase usage of this treatment option and thereby improve patient survival rates. MiRNA array and qRT-PCR validation was used to identify miRNA which are associated with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. RNA was extracted from a total of 41 archival, fully annotated, MIBC patient diagnostic biopsies (20 chemo-responders and 21 non-responders (response is defined as > 5 year survival rate and being pT0 post-chemotherapy)). Microarray and qPCR identified let-7c as being differentially expressed in chemo-responder versus non-responder patients. Patients with higher let-7c expression levels had significantly higher odds of responding to chemotherapy (p = 0.023, OR 2.493, 95% CI 1.121, 5.546), and assessment of let-7c levels allowed for prediction of patient response (AUC 0.72, positive predictive value 59%). Decreased let-7c was associated with MIBC incidence (p < 0.001), and significantly correlated with other related miRNA including those that were not differentially expressed between responders and non-responders. The combined data indicate let-7c plays a role in mediating chemoresistance to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in MIBC patients, and is a modest, yet clinically meaningful, predictor of patient response. PMID:27382433

  5. Biochemical Response to Ursodeoxycholic Acid Predicts Survival in a North American Cohort of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Craig; Juran, Brian D.; Schlicht, Erik; Chan, Landon L.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Biochemical response to Ursodeoxycholic Acid among patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis remains variable and there is no agreement of an ideal model. Novel assessment of response coupled to histologic progression was recently defined by the Toronto criteria. We retrospectively assessed transplant-free survival and clinical outcomes associated with Ursodeoxycholic Acid response to evaluate the Toronto criteria using a large North American cohort of PBC patients. Methods 398 PBC patients from the Mayo Clinic PBC Genetic Epidemiology (MCPGE) Registry were assessed for Ursodeoxycholic Acid treatment and biochemical response per the Toronto criteria. Responders were defined by reduction in alkaline phosphatase to less than or equal to 1.67 times the upper normal limit by 2 years of treatment, whereas non-responders had alkaline phosphatase values greater than 1.67 times the upper normal limit. Probability of survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results 302 (76%) patients were responders and 96 (24%) were non-responders. Significantly more non-responders developed adverse events related to chronic liver disease compared to responders (Hazard Ratio (HR): 2.77, P = 0.001). Biochemical responders and early-stage disease at treatment start was associated with improved overall transplant-free survival compared to non-responders (HR: 1.9) and patients with late stage disease (HR: 2.7) after age and sex adjustment. Conclusions The Toronto criteria are capable of identifying Ursodeoxycholic Acid-treated Primary Biliary Cirrhosis patients at risk of poor transplant-free survival and adverse clinical outcomes. Our data reveal that despite advanced disease at diagnosis, biochemical response per the Toronto criteria associates with improved overall transplant-free survival. PMID:24317935

  6. Gene Mutation Analysis in EGFR Wild Type NSCLC Responsive to Erlotinib: Are There Features to Guide Patient Selection?

    PubMed Central

    Ulivi, Paola; Delmonte, Angelo; Chiadini, Elisa; Calistri, Daniele; Papi, Maximilian; Mariotti, Marita; Verlicchi, Alberto; Ragazzini, Angela; Capelli, Laura; Gamboni, Alessandro; Puccetti, Maurizio; Dubini, Alessandra; Burgio, Marco Angelo; Casanova, Claudia; Crinò, Lucio; Amadori, Dino; Dazzi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are very efficacious in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, about 10% of EGFR wild type (wt) patients respond to TKI, with unknown molecular mechanisms of sensitivity. We considered a case series of 34 EGFR wt NSCLC patients responsive to erlotinib after at least one line of therapy. Responsive patients were matched with an equal number of non-responsive EGFR wt patients. A panel of 26 genes, for a total of 214 somatic mutations, was analyzed by MassARRAY® System (Sequenom, San Diego, CA, USA). A 15% KRAS mutation was observed in both groups, with a prevalence of G12C in non-responders (80% vs. 40% in responders). NOTCH1, p53 and EGFR-resistance-related mutations were found more frequently in non-responders, whereas EGFR-sensitizing mutations and alterations in genes involved in proliferation pathways were more frequent in responders. In conclusion, our findings indicate that p53, NOTCH1 and exon 20 EGFR mutations seem to be related to TKI resistance. KRAS mutations do not appear to influence the TKI response, although G12C mutation is more frequent in non-responders. Finally, the use of highly sensitive methodologies could lead to the identification of under-represented EGFR mutations potentially associated with TKI sensitivity. PMID:25561229

  7. Does the Degree of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tumor Necrosis following Transarterial Chemoembolization Impact Patient Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Nathan; Gennaro, Kyle; Obert, John; Sauer, Paul F.; Redden, David T.; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J. Kevin; Bolus, David; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen; White, Jared; Eckhoff, Devin E.; DuBay, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The association between transarterial chemoembolization- (TACE-) induced HCC tumor necrosis measured by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (mRECIST) and patient survival is poorly defined. We hypothesize that survival will be superior in HCC patients with increased TACE-induced tumor necrosis. Materials and Methods. TACE interventions were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor response was quantified via dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST categories. Results. Median survival following TACE was significantly greater in responders compared to nonresponders (20.8 months versus 14.9 months, p = 0.011). Survival outcomes also significantly varied among the four mRECIST categories (p = 0.0003): complete, 21.4 months; partial, 20.8; stable, 16.8; and progressive, 7.73. Only progressive disease demonstrated significantly worse survival when compared to complete response. Multivariable analysis showed that progressive disease, increasing total tumor diameter, and non-Child-Pugh class A were independent predictors of post-TACE mortality. Conclusions. Both dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST responses to TACE in patients with HCC were predictive of survival. The main driver of the survival analysis was poor survival in the progressive disease group. Surprisingly, there was small nonsignificant survival benefit between complete, partial, and stable disease groups. These findings may inform HCC treatment decisions following first TACE. PMID:26949394

  8. Extended survival and reduced risk of AML progression in erythroid-responsive lenalidomide-treated patients with lower-risk del(5q) MDS

    PubMed Central

    List, A F; Bennett, J M; Sekeres, M A; Skikne, B; Fu, T; Shammo, J M; Nimer, S D; Knight, R D; Giagounidis, A

    2014-01-01

    Lenalidomide is the approved treatment for patients with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and chromosome 5q deletion (del(5q)). We report the long-term outcomes (median follow-up 3.2 years) in patients treated with lenalidomide in the MDS-003 trial. RBC transfusion independence (TI) ⩾8 weeks was achieved in 97 of 148 treated patients (65.5%), with a median response duration of 2.2 years. Partial or complete cytogenetic response was achieved by 63 of 88 evaluable patients (71.6%). Median overall survival (OS) was longer in patients achieving RBC-TI ⩾8 weeks (4.3 vs 2.0 years in non-responders; P<0.0001) or cytogenetic response (4.9 vs 3.1 years in non-responders; P=0.010). Time to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) progression was longer in patients achieving RBC-TI ⩾8 weeks or any cytogenetic response versus non-responders (P=0.001 and P=0.0002, respectively). In a landmark multivariate analysis, RBC-TI ⩾8 weeks was associated with prolonged OS (P<0.001) and a trend toward reduced relative risk of AML progression (P=0.080). Among these lower-risk MDS patients with del(5q), lenalidomide was associated with prolonged RBC-TI and cytogenetic responses, which were linked to improved OS and reduced risk of AML progression. PMID:24150217

  9. Utility of phenylalanine hydroxylase genotype for tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness classification in patients with phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Meghan E.; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Nelson, Benjamin E.; Coffee, Bradford; Singh, Rani H.

    2014-01-01

    Background A need exists to expand the characterization of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) responsiveness in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), beyond simply evaluating change in blood phenylalanine concentrations. The clinical interpretation of BH4 responsiveness should be evaluated within the context of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype. Aim This investigation seeks to use a modified version of a previously developed PAH genotype severity tool, the assigned value (AV) sum, to assess the molecular basis of responsiveness in a clinical cohort and to explore the tool’s ability to differentiate BH4 responsive groups. Methods BH4 response was previously clinically classified in 58 patients with PKU, with three response groups emerging: definitive responders, provisional responders, and non-responders. Provisional responders represented a clinically ambiguous group, with an initial decrease in plasma phenylalanine concentrations, but limited ability to improve dietary phenylalanine tolerance. In this retrospective analysis, mutations in the PAH gene were identified in each patient. PAH genotype was characterized through the AV sum approach, in which each mutation is given an AV of 1, 2, 4, or 8; the sum of both mutations’ AV corresponds to genotype severity, with a lower number representing a more severe phenotype. An AV sum cutoff of 2 (indicative of the most severe genotypes) was used to dichotomize patients and predict BH4 responsiveness. Provisional responders were classified with the definitive responders then the non-responders to see with which group they best aligned. Results In 17/19 definitive responders, at least one mutation was mild or moderate in severity (AV sum>2). In contrast, 7/9 provisional responders carried two severe or null mutations (AV sum=2), suggesting little molecular basis for responsiveness. Non-responders represent a heterogeneous group with 15/25 patients carrying two severe mutations (AV sum=2), 5/25 patients carrying one

  10. Cognitive remediation for vocational rehabilitation nonresponders.

    PubMed

    McGurk, Susan R; Mueser, Kim T; Xie, Haiyi; Feldman, Karin; Shaya, Yaniv; Klein, Leslie; Wolfe, Rosemarie

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive remediation in people with severe mental illnesses (SMI) that interfere with work, but less research has evaluated its effects in those who have not benefitted from vocational services. Participants with SMI (83% schizophrenia) who had not benefitted from vocational rehabilitation were randomized to vocational services enhanced by training vocational specialists in recognizing cognitive difficulties and providing job-relevant cognitive coping strategies (Enhanced Vocational Rehabilitation: E-VR), or similarly enhanced vocational services and cognitive remediation (Thinking Skills Work: TSW). Cognition and symptoms were assessed at baseline, post-treatment (9months), and follow-up (18months), with work tracked weekly for 3years. Fifty-four participants were randomized to E-VR (N=26) or TSW (N=28). Participants in TSW had high rates of exposure to the program (89%) and improved more than those in E-VR on cognitive functioning post-training, with attenuation of some gains at the 18-months. Participants in TSW and E-VR did not differ significantly in competitive work (57% vs. 48%) or paid employment (61% vs. 48%) over the 3-year study, although those in TSW were more likely to be engaged in any work activity, including paid or volunteer work (75% vs. 50%, p=0.057), and had more weeks of work activity (23.04 vs. 48.82, p=0.051), and improved marginally more on the clinical symptoms. The significantly higher education level of participants in E-VR than TSW at baseline may have obscured the effects of TSW. This study supports the feasibility and potential benefits of cognitive remediation for persons who have not benefited from vocational rehabilitation. PMID:27209526

  11. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, TAM tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands is upregulated in venous leg ulcer patients: a novel insight into chronic wound immunity.

    PubMed

    Filkor, Kata; Németh, Tibor; Nagy, István; Kondorosi, Éva; Urbán, Edit; Kemény, Lajos; Szolnoky, Győző

    2016-08-01

    The systemic host defence mechanisms, especially innate immunity, in venous leg ulcer patients are poorly investigated. The aim of the current study was to measure Candida albicans killing activity and gene expressions of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and innate immune response regulators, TAM receptors and ligands of peripheral blood mononuclear cells separated from 69 venous leg ulcer patients and 42 control probands. Leg ulcer patients were stratified into responder and non-responder groups on the basis of wound healing properties. No statistical differences were found in Candida killing among controls, responders and non-responders. Circulating blood mononuclear cells of patients overexpress pro-inflammatory (IL-1α, TNFα, CXCL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines as well as TAM receptors (Tyro, Axl, MerTK) and their ligands Gas6 and Protein S compared with those of control individuals. IL-1α is notably overexpressed in venous leg ulcer treatment non-responders; in contrast, Axl gene expression is robustly stronger among responders. These markers may be considered as candidates for the prediction of treatment response among venous leg ulcer patients. PMID:26192232

  12. Improvement in the cutaneous disease activity of patients with dermatomyositis is associated with a better quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, E.S.; Feng, R.; Okawa, J.; Werth, V.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cutaneous dermatomyositis (DM) disease activity is associated with a decreased quality of life. Objectives This prospective study assessed if an improvement in quality of life, as measured by the Skindex-29 and patient-reported itch and pain on a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS), correlated with an improvement in cutaneous DM disease activity. Methods Patients with a completed cutaneous DM disease area and severity index (CDASI) at two visits separated by at least two months were classified into responder (n=15) and non-responder (n=30) groups according to the point change in the CDASI activity scores between visits. Responders had at least a four-point improvement in CDASI activity, indicating clinically relevant improvement. Results The change from baseline to the follow-up visit of the Skindex-29 subscale scores for the responders versus the non-responders were significantly different: emotions P=0.0047, functioning P=0.0026, and symptoms P<0.0001. The change in VAS score between responders and non-responders was also significant for itch (P=0.0135) and pain (P=0.0367). The was no significant difference between the groups in terms of disease subtype, sex, race, age, treatment for DM, smoking history, or history of malignancy within five years of DM diagnosis. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that the quality of life of patients with DM improved as their cutaneous disease activity decreased. PMID:24909747

  13. Role of opsonins in clinical response to granulocyte transfusion in granulocytopenic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Keusch, G.T.; Ambinder, E.P.; Kovacs, I.; Goldberg, J.D.; Phillips, D.M.; Holland, J.F.

    1982-10-01

    Fifty febrile severely granulocytopenic patients were given four daily transfusions of 2.2 X 10(10) normal donor granulocytes. Twenty-three responded clinically, although both responders and nonresponders were similar in clinical characteristics at the outset. This study examines the relation between serum opsonic activity before initiation of granulocyte administration and clinical response. Opsonic activity to three test organisms (Escherichia coli 286 and ON 2, and Staphylococcus aureus) and to 15 blood stream isolates from 14 patients was measured as serum-dependent uptake of heat-killed /sup 14/C-labeled bacteria by normal donor leukopheresis granulocytes in an in vitro assay and compared with results obtained with a standard normal serum in each assay. At a concentration of 8 percent serum, all patient groups were equivalent to standard for the three test organisms. When rate-limiting concentrations of serum were employed, opsonic activity remained similar to standard for S. aureus in all patient groups and for the two E. coli strains in responders. In contrast, opsonins for E. coli decreased to 41 to 50 percent of standard in nonresponders. When patients with proved infection were separately analyzed, opsonin activity for E. coli was significantly greater in responders than nonresponders. Eight of 10 patients with 75 percent or greater of standard for opsonic activity against their own blood stream isolates also responded, whereas zero of four with less than 75 percent of standard had a favorable outcome. These results indicate that serum opsonic activity may be a determinant of clinical response to granulocyte transfusion in infected granulocytopenic patients. We conclude that opsonic activity should be assessed in such patients before granulocyte administration and suggest a trial of plasma infusion in opsonin-deficient patients.

  14. Evaluation of positive and negative predictors of seizure outcomes among patients with immune-mediated epilepsy: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Farzal, Zehra; Hays, Ryan; Brown, L Steven; Vernino, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to analyze published literature on autoimmune epilepsy and assess predictors of seizure outcome. Methods: From PubMed and EMBASE databases, two reviewers independently identified publications reporting clinical presentations, management and outcomes of patients with autoimmune epilepsy. A meta-analysis of 46 selected studies was performed. Demographic/clinical variables (sex, age, clinical presentation, epilepsy focus, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] characteristics, time to diagnosis and initiation of immunomodulatory therapy, and type of immunomodulatory therapy) were compared between two outcome groups (responders and nonresponders). Clinical response was defined as >50% reduction in seizure frequency. Unstandardized effect sizes were collected for the studies for responder and nonresponder groups. Sample size was used as the weight in the meta-analysis. The random effects model was used to account for heterogeneity in the studies. Results: The 46 reports included 186 and 96 patients in responder and nonresponder groups respectively. Mean age of the responders and nonresponders was 43 and 31 years (p < 0.01). Responders were more likely to have cell-surface antibodies (68% versus 39%, p < 0.05), particularly voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (p < 0.01). Mean duration from symptom onset to diagnosis, and symptom onset to initiation of immunomodulation was significantly lower among the responders (75 versus 431 days, p < 0.05, and 80 versus 554, p < 0.01, respectively). There was no outcome difference based on gender, MRI characteristics, seizure type, type of acute immunomodulatory therapy, or use of chronic immunomodulation. Conclusions: Among published cases to date, older age, presence of cell-surface antibodies, early diagnosis and immunomodulatory treatment are associated with better seizure outcomes among patients with autoimmune epilepsy. PMID:27582892

  15. Proteomics Approach Identifies Factors Associated With the Response to Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis Therapy in Patients With Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi-Okuma, Emiko; Shibata, Shigeru; Arai, Shigeyuki; Ota, Tatsuru; Watanabe, Sumiyo; Hisaki, Harumi; Okazaki, Tomoki; Toda, Tosifusa; Uchida, Shunya

    2016-04-01

    Low-density lipoprotein apheresis (LDL-A) has been shown to reduce proteinuria in a subgroup of nephrotic syndrome patients refractory to immunosuppressive therapy. Factors influencing the efficacy of LDL-A in nephrotic syndrome are completely unknown. Using a proteomics approach, we aimed to identify biological markers that predict the response to LDL-A in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). Identification of plasma proteins bound to the dextran-sulfate column at the first session of LDL-A was determined by mass spectrometry. To investigate biological factors associated with the response to LDL-A, we compared profiles of column-bound proteins between responders (defined by more than 50% reduction of proteinuria after the treatment) and non-responders by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to mass spectrometry in seven patients with SRNS. Evaluation of proteins adsorbed to LDL-A column in patients with SRNS revealed the identity of 62 proteins, which included apolipoproteins, complement components, and serum amyloid P-component (SAP). Comparative analysis of the column-bound proteins between responders and non-responders by 2-DE demonstrated that apolipoprotein E (APOE) and SAP levels were increased in non-responders as compared with responders. These results were confirmed by western blotting. Moreover, serum levels of APOE and SAP were significantly higher in the non-responder group than in the responder group by ELISA. Our data provide comprehensive analysis of proteins adsorbed by LDL-A in SRNS, and demonstrate that the serum levels of APOE and SAP may be used to predict the response to LDL-A in these patients. PMID:26771065

  16. Presence of anti-HBc is associated to high rates of HBV resolved infection and low threshold for Occult HBV Infection in HIV patients with negative HBsAg in Chile.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jose Ignacio; Jensen, Daniela; Sarmiento, Valeska; Peirano, Felipe; Acuña, Pedro; Fuster, Felipe; Soto, Sabrina; Ahumada, Rodrigo; Huilcaman, Marco; Bruna, Mario; Jensen, Werner; Fuster, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    HBV-HIV coinfection is prevalent. Frequently, anti-HBc is the only serological marker of HBV, which can be indicative of HBV resolved infection, when found together with anti-HBs reactivity; or present as "isolated anti-HBc," related to HBV occult infection with presence of detectable DNA HBV, more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals. Regional data about this condition are scarce. Anti-HBc rapid test has been used as screening, but its performance has not been described in HIV-positive patients. The aim of this study was determine prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive patients, serological pattern of HBV resolved infection and isolated anti-HBc, evaluating presence of HBV occult infection. Assess anti-HBc rapid test compared to ECLIA. Methods included measurement of anti-HBc and anti-HBs in HIV-positive patients with negative HBsAg. Serum HBV DNA quantification and HBV booster vaccination to "isolated anti-HBc" individuals. Detection of anti-HBc by rapid test and ECLIA. In 192 patients, prevalence of anti-HBc was 42.7% (82/192); associated to male gender, drug use, men-sex-men, positive-VDRL, and longer time HIV diagnosis. 34.4% (66/192) had presence of anti-HBs, mean titers of 637 ui/ml. Isolated anti-HBc in 8.3% (16/192), associated to detectable HIV viral load and no-use of HAART; in them, HBV DNA was undetectable, and 60% responded to HBV vaccination booster. Anti-HBc rapid test showed low sensibility (32.9%) compared to ECLIA. These results show that prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive individuals is high, in most cases accompanied with anti-HBs as HBV resolved infection. Low prevalence of "isolated anti-HBc," with undetectable HBV DNA, and most had anamnestic response to HBV vaccination; suggest low possibility of occult HBV infection. Anti-HBc rapid test cannot be recommended as screening method for anti-HBc. PMID:26381185

  17. Is early response by 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography a predictor of long-term outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abadde; Nicolau, Ulisses Ribaldo; Cavicchioli, Marcelo; Lima, Eduardo Nóbrega Pereira; de Mello, Celso Abdon Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background Identify in advance responder patients to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) would allow prompt interruption of ineffective therapies in non-responder patients. Hence, predictive markers are sought in numerous trials to detect responder patients, including tumor shrinkage measured by imaging methods. Usually, Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is used to evaluate tumor response in metastatic CRC, but these criteria are questionable with use of biological agents associated to chemotherapy. Our aim was correlate early metabolic response by 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18FDG-PET-CT) with long-term outcome in metastatic CRC in first-line therapy. Methods We prospectively evaluated 36 patients with metastatic CRC in first-line treatment with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin (folinic acid), oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin (folinic acid), irinotecan (FOLFIRI) associated with cetuximab or bevacizumab. 18FDG-PET-CT was performed at baseline and after two cycles of chemotherapy. The early metabolic response [standardized uptake value (SUV)] was measured to identify responder and non-responder patients and correlated with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results Median age was 58.5 years (range, 41–74 years). PFS was 15.5 months for responder and 13.3 months for non-responder (P=0.42), OS was 55.7 months for responder and not reached for non-responder. There was no correlation between delta-SUV and clinical and pathological variables analyzed. In the subgroup of patients who did not undergo resection of metastasis (45%), PFS was higher for responders (15.3×6.8 months, P=0.02). Conclusions According to our findings, early response by 18FDG-PET-CT was not a predictor of long-term outcome for patients with metastatic CRC treated in the first-line chemotherapy with a monoclonal antibody. PMID:27284468

  18. Pretreatment Diffusion-Weighted MRI Can Predict the Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Yi; Wang, Yue-Jian; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhou, Xin-Han; Xu, Zhi-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Ping; Xu, Tao; Wei, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the potential of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials. Ninety-two consecutive patients with NPC who underwent three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. DW and anatomical MRI were performed before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy. Pretreatment ADCs and percentage increases in ADC after chemotherapy were calculated for the primary lesions and metastatic adenopathies. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to select optimal pretreatment ADCs. Results. Pretreatment mean ADCs were significantly lower for responders than for nonresponders (primary lesions, P = 0.012; metastatic adenopathies, P = 0.013). Mean percentage increases in ADC were higher for responders than for nonresponders (primary lesions, P = 0.008; metastatic adenopathies, P < 0.001). The optimal pretreatment primary lesion and metastatic adenopathy ADCs for differentiating responders from nonresponders were 0.897 × 10−3 mm2/sec and 1.031 × 10−3 mm2/sec, respectively. Conclusions. NPC patients with low pretreatment ADCs tend to respond better to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Pretreatment ADCs could be used as a new pretreatment imaging biomarker of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26413513

  19. Radiographic Response to Locoregional Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Predicts Patient Survival Times

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Khairuddin; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Wang, Edward; Riaz, Ahsun; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent T; Marshall, Karen; Gupta, Ramona; Nikolaidis, Paul; Miller, Frank H; Yaghmai, Vahid; Senthilnathan, Seanthan; Baker, Talia; Gates, Vanessa L; Abecassis, Michael; Benson, Al B; Mulcahy, Mary F; Omary, Reed A; Salem, Riad

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims It is not clear whether survival times of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are associated with their response to therapy. We analyzed the association between tumor response and survival times of patients with HCC who were treated with locoregional therapies (LRTs; chemoembolization and radioembolization). Methods Patients received LRTs over a 9-year period (n=463). Patients with metastases, portal venous thrombosis, or who had received transplants were excluded; 159 patients with Child-Pugh≤B7 were analyzed. Response (based on European Association for Study of the Liver [EASL] or World Health Organization [WHO] criteria) was associated with survival times using the landmark, risk-of-death, and Mantel-Byar methodologies. In a subanalysis, survival times of responders were compared to those of patients with stable disease (SD) and progressive disease (PD). Results Based on 6-month data, in landmark analysis, responders survived longer than nonresponders (based on EASL but not WHO criteria: P=0.002 and 0.0694). The risk of death was also lower for responders (based on EASL but not WHO criteria: P=0.0463 and 0.707). Landmark analysis of 12-month data showed that responders survived longer than nonresponders (P=<0.0001 and 0.004, based on EASL and WHO criteria, respectively). The risk of death was lower for responders (P=0.0132 and 0.010, based on EASL and WHO criteria, respectively). By the Mantel-Byar method, responders had longer survival than nonresponders, based on EASL criteria (P<0.0001; P=0.596 with WHO criteria). In the subanalysis, responders lived longer than patients with SD or PD. Conclusion Radiographic response to LRTs predicts survival time. EASL criteria for response more consistently predicted survival times than WHO criteria. The goal of LRT should be to achieve a radiologic response, rather than to stabilize disease. PMID:21664356

  20. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15546256

  1. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15641210

  2. Efficacy and Tolerability of Telmisartan Plus Amlodipine in Asian Patients Not Adequately Controlled on Either Monotherapy or on Low-Dose Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dingliang; Gao, Pingjin; Yagi, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the telmisartan plus amlodipine (T/A) single-pill combination (SPC) in Asian patients with hypertension whose blood pressure (BP) was not adequately controlled on either monotherapy or on low-dose combination therapy. Patients and Methods. Data are presented from five Boehringer Ingelheim-sponsored phase 3, double-blind, 8-week, studies: two studies in nonresponders to amlodipine (data pooled for amlodipine), two studies on nonresponders to telmisartan (pooled data), and one on nonresponders to low-dose T/A SPC. Results. After 8 weeks' treatment, mean reductions from the reference baseline in diastolic BP (DBP; primary endpoint), systolic BP (SBP), and SBP, DBP goal, and response rates were higher with the T/A SPC than respective monotherapies. The T80/A5 SPC resulted in greater reductions in DBP and SBP, and higher DBP goal and response rate than the low-dose T40/A5 SPC. Peripheral edema incidence was low (amlodipine 0.5%, telmisartan 0.0%, and T/A SPC 0.7%). Discussion and Conclusion. In Asian patients whose BP is not adequately controlled with telmisartan or amlodipine monotherapy, T/A SPC treatment results in greater BP reduction, and higher DBP and SBP goal and response rates. The safety and tolerability of the T/A SPC are comparable to those of the respective monotherapies and consistent with those reported in previous studies. PMID:24719757

  3. Six month abstinence rule for liver transplantation in severe alcoholic liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Obed, Aiman; Stern, Steffen; Jarrad, Anwar; Lorf, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The recovery results of patients transplanted for ALD are often at least as good as those of patients transplanted for other diagnoses and better than those suffering from hepatitis C virus, cryptogenic cirrhosis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the case of medically non-responding patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis or acute-on chronic liver failure, the refusal of LT is often based on the lack of the required alcohol abstinence period of six months. The obligatory abidance of a period of abstinence as a transplant eligibility requirement for medically non-responding patients seems unfair and inhumane, since the majority of these patients will not survive the six-month abstinence period. Data from various studies have challenged the 6-mo rule, while excellent survival results of LT have been observed in selected patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis not responding to medical therapy. Patients with severe advanced ALD should have legal access to LT. The mere lack of pre-LT abstinence should not be an obstacle for being listed. PMID:25892898

  4. The number of regulatory T cells correlates with hemodynamic improvement in patients with inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy after immunoadsorption therapy.

    PubMed

    Bulut, D; Creutzenberg, G; Mügge, A

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory DCM (iDCM) may be related to autoimmune processes. An immunoadsorption (IA) has been reported to improve cardiac hemodynamics. The benefit of IA is probably related to the removal of autoantibodies. A recent study suggests additional effects of IA on the T cell-mediated immune reactions, especially on regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this prospective study, the correlation between the level of Tregs and improvement of myocardial contractility in response to IA in patients with iDCM was investigated. Patients (n = 18) with iDCM, reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (<35%), were enrolled for IA. Before and 6 months after IA, LV systolic function was assessed by echocardiography, and blood levels of Tregs were quantified by FACS analysis. Patients (n = 12) with chronic ischaemic heart failure and comparable reduced LV-EF served as controls. IA improved LV-EF in 12 of 18 patients at 6-month follow-up. These patients were classified as 'IA responder'. In 6 patients, LV-EF remained unchanged. At baseline, IA responder and non-responder subgroups showed similar values for C-reactive protein, white blood cells, lymphocytes and T helper cells, but they differ for the number of circulating Tregs (responder: 2.32 ± 1.38% versus non-responder: 4.86 ± 0.28%; P < 0.01). Tregs increased significantly in the IA responders, but remained unchanged in the IA non-responders. In patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, none of these values changed over time. A low level of Tregs in patients with chronic iDCM may characterize a subset of patients who do best respond to IA therapy. PMID:22998220

  5. Pharmacogenomic study in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Morcillo-Suárez, Carlos; Malhotra, Sunny; Rio, Jordi; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Zettl, Uwe K.; Killestein, Joep; Brassat, David; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio J.; Urcelay, Elena; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Villar, Lusia M.; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Farré, Xavier; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; Drulovic, Jelena S.; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Chan, Andrew; Oksenberg, Jorge; Navarro, Arcadi; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between polymorphisms located in type I interferon (IFN)-induced genes, genes belonging to the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, and genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors and the response to IFN-β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In a first or screening phase of the study, 384 polymorphisms were genotyped in 830 patients with MS classified into IFN-β responders (n = 416) and nonresponders (n = 414) according to clinical criteria. In a second or validation phase, the most significant polymorphisms associated with IFN-β response were genotyped in an independent validation cohort of 555 patients with MS (281 IFN-β responders and 274 nonresponders). Results: Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from the screening phase for further validation: rs832032 (GABRR3; p = 0.0006), rs6597 (STUB1; p = 0.019), rs3747517 (IFIH1; p = 0.010), rs2277302 (PELI3; p = 0.017), rs10958713 (IKBKB; p = 0.003), rs2834202 (IFNAR1; p = 0.030), and rs4422395 (CXCL1; p = 0.017). None of these SNPs were significantly associated with IFN-β response when genotyped in an independent cohort of patients. Combined analysis of these SNPs in all patients with MS (N = 1,385) revealed 2 polymorphisms associated with IFN-β response: rs2277302 (PELI3; p = 0.008) and rs832032 (GABRR3; p = 0.006). Conclusions: These findings do not support an association between polymorphisms located in genes related to the type I IFN or TLR pathways or genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors and the clinical response to IFN-β. Nevertheless, additional genetic and functional studies of PELI3 and GABRR3 are warranted. PMID:26445728

  6. Outcome predictors of intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis – a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment (IAGC) is widely used for symptom relief in arthritis. However, knowledge of factors predicting treatment outcome is limited. The aim of the present study was to identify response predictors of IAGC for knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In this study 121 RA patients with synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injections of 20 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide. They were followed for six months and the rate of clinical relapse was studied. Non-responders (relapse within 6 months) and responders were compared regarding patient characteristics and knee joint damage as determined by the Larsen-Dale index. In addition, matched samples of serum and synovial fluid were analysed for factors reflecting the inflammatory process (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, tumour necrosis factor alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor), joint tissue turnover (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, metalloproteinase 3), and autoimmunity (antinuclear antibodies, antibodies against citrullinated peptides, rheumatoid factor). Results During the observation period, 48 knees relapsed (40%). Non-responders had more radiographic joint damage than responders (P = 0.002) and the pre-treatment vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level in synovial fluid was significantly higher in non-responders (P = 0.002). Conclusions Joint destruction is associated with poor outcome of IAGC for knee synovitis in RA. In addition, higher levels of VEGF in synovial fluid are found in non-responders, suggesting that locally produced VEGF is a biomarker for recurrence of synovial hyperplasia and the risk for arthritis relapse. PMID:24950951

  7. The role of ventriculoperitoneal shunting in patients with supratentorial glioma

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Macarena I; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of ventriculoperitoneal (VPS) in patients with glioma. Methods Retrospective review of patients with grade II-IV glioma who had VPS placement from January 1995 to November 2012. Results We identified 62 patients. At time of VPS, 41 had gait disturbance, 40 cognitive impairment and 16 urinary incontinence; 10 had the classic triad. Thirty-eight (61%) improved after VPS. Median overall survival from VPS was 7 months for all patients, but 11 months for those who improved and 2 months for non-responders. Leptomeningeal disease, glioma grade or radiographic ventricular decompression did not predict benefit. Conclusions VPS can improve functional status in some patients with symptoms suggestive of hydrocephalus. PMID:25356380

  8. Mutations of KRAS/NRAS/BRAF predict cetuximab resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Thiam, Tan Kien; Lu, Yen-Jung; Yeh, Chien Yuh; Tsai, Wen-Sy; You, Jeng Fu; Hung, Hsin Yuan; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Hsu, An; Chen, Hua-Chien; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 45% of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with wild-type KRAS exon 2 are resistant to cetuximab treatment. We set out to identify additional genetic markers that might predict the response to cetuximab treatment. Fifty-three wild-type KRAS exon 2 mCRC patients were treated with cetuximab/irinotecan-based chemotherapy as a first- or third-line therapy. The mutational statuses of 10 EGFR pathway genes were analyzed in primary tumors using next-generation sequencing. BRAF, PIK3CA, KRAS (exons 3 and 4), NRAS, PTEN, and AKT1 mutations were detected in 6, 6, 5, 4, 1, and 1 patient, respectively. Four of the BRAF mutations were non-V600 variants. Four tumors harbored multiple co-existing (complex) mutations. All patients with BRAF mutations or complex mutation patterns were cetuximab non-responders. All patients but one harboring KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF mutations were non-responders. Mutations in any one of these three genes were associated with a poor response rate (7.1%) and reduced survival (PFS = 8.0 months) compared to wild-type patients (74.4% and 11.6 months). Our data suggest that KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations predict response to cetuximab treatment in mCRC patients. PMID:26989027

  9. Young Cervical Cancer Patients May Be More Responsive than Older Patients to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Followed by Radical Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kecheng; Jia, Yao; Tang, Fangxu; Sun, Haiying; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Ma, Ding; Li, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of age and the clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in patients with cervical cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery. Methods A total of 1,014 patients with advanced cervical cancer who received NACT followed by radical surgery were retrospectively selected. Patients were divided into young (aged ≤35 years, n = 177) and older (aged >35 years, n = 837) groups. We compared the short-term responses and survival rates between the groups. The five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were stratified by age, NACT response, and FIGO stage. Results The overall response rate was 86.8% in the young group and 80.9% in the older group. The young patients had an earlier FIGO stage (P<0.001), a higher rate of adenocarcinoma (P = 0.022), and more lymph node metastasis (P = 0.033) than the older patients. The presence of adenocarcinoma as the histological type (P = 0.024) and positive lymph node metastasis (P<0.001) were identified as independent risk factors for survival. When stratified by age and clinical response, young patients with no response to NACT had a worse clinicopathological condition compared with the other subgroups. Compared with non-responders, responders to NACT had a higher five-year DFS rate (80.1% versus 71.8%; P = 0.019) and OS rate (82.6% versus 71.8%; P = 0.003) among the young patients but not among the older patients. Conclusions Responders to NACT aged 35 years or younger benefitted the most from NACT, while the young non-responders benefitted the least. Age might represent an important factor to consider when performing NACT in patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26901776

  10. Factors Associated With Upper Extremity Functional Recovery Following Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the factors related to upper extremity functional improvement following inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in stroke patients. Methods Forty-one stroke patients received low-frequency rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere according to a standard protocol, in addition to conventional physical and occupational therapy. The rTMS-treated patients were divided into two groups according to their responsiveness to rTMS measured by the self-care score of the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI): responded group (n=19) and non-responded group (n=22). Forty-one age-matched stroke patients who had not received rTMS served as controls. Neurological, cognitive and functional assessments were performed before rTMS and 4 weeks after rTMS treatment. Results Among the rTMS-treated patients, the responded group was significantly younger than the non-responded group (51.6±10.5 years and 65.5±13.7 years, respectively; p=0.001). Four weeks after rTMS, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the Brunnstrom recovery stage and upper extremity muscle power scores were significantly more improved in the responded group than in the control group. Besides the self-care score, the mobility score of the K-MBI was also more improved in the responded group than in the non-responded group or controls. Conclusion Age is the most obvious factor determining upper extremity functional responsiveness to low-frequency rTMS in stroke patients. PMID:27446773

  11. Clinical profile and treatment outcome of older (>75 years) patients with systemic AL amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sachchithanantham, Sajitha; Offer, Mark; Venner, Christopher; Mahmood, Shameem A.; Foard, Darren; Rannigan, Lisa; Lane, Thirusha; Gillmore, Julian D.; Lachmann, Helen J.; Hawkins, Philip N.; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic AL amyloidosis, a disease with improving outcomes using novel therapies, is increasingly recognized in the elderly but treatment and outcomes have not been systematically studied in this group of patients in whom comorbidities and frailty may compound morbidity and mortality. We report the outcomes of 295 patients with systemic AL amyloidosis ≥75 years seen at the UK National Amyloidosis Centre from 2005–2012. The median age was 78.5 years. The median overall survival was 20 months. Two hundred and thirty-eight patients received chemotherapy and 57 elected for supportive care only (overall survival – 24 and 8.4 months, respectively). On intention-to-treat analysis, 44% achieved a hematologic response including a very good partial response or better in 23%. The median overall survival was 6.2 years in patients achieving very good partial response or better at the 6-month landmark analysis and 1.5 years in non-responders. Factors independently indicating a poor prognosis were: cardiac involvement, performance status ≥2; systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg and, on landmark analysis, achieving less than a very good partial response. Treatment of systemic AL amyloidosis in the elderly is challenging. Deep clonal responses are associated with excellent survival and organ responses. Achieving a response to the first-line regimen appears particularly important as outcomes of non-responders are similar to those of untreated patients. Prospective trials with lower toxicity, outpatient treatment regimens are needed. PMID:26294730

  12. Improvement in daytime sleepiness with clarithromycin in patients with GABA-related hypersomnia: Clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Saini, Prabhjyot; Freeman, Amanda A; Bliwise, Donald L; García, Paul S; Jenkins, Andrew; Rye, David B

    2013-12-01

    The macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin can enhance central nervous system excitability, possibly by antagonism of GABA-A receptors. Enhancement of GABA signaling has recently been demonstrated in a significant proportion of patients with central nervous system hypersomnias, so we sought to determine whether clarithromycin might provide symptomatic benefit in these patients. We performed a retrospective review of all patients treated with clarithromycin for hypersomnia, in whom cerebrospinal fluid enhanced GABA-A receptor activity in vitro in excess of controls, excluding those with hypocretin deficiency or definite cataplexy. Subjective reports of benefit and objective measures of psychomotor vigilance were collected to assess clarithromycin's effects. Clinical and demographic characteristics were compared in responders and non-responders. In total, 53 patients (38 women, mean age 35.2 (SD 12.8 years)) were prescribed clarithromycin. Of these, 34 (64%) reported improvement in daytime sleepiness, while 10 (19%) did not tolerate its side effects, and nine (17%) found it tolerable but without symptomatic benefit. In those who reported subjective benefit, objective corroboration of improved vigilance was evident on the psychomotor vigilance task. Twenty patients (38%) elected to continue clarithromycin therapy. Clarithromycin responders were significantly younger than non-responders. Clarithromycin may be useful in the treatment of hypersomnia associated with enhancement of GABA-A receptor function. Further evaluation of this novel therapy is needed. PMID:24306133

  13. [Interferon-alpha and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic damage due to hepatitis C virus].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Huezo, María Sarai; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the published information published regarding the effects of interferon alpha therapy on liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver damage secondary to hepatitis C infection. Data reviewed included results of the in vitro effects of interferon on hepatic cell line cultures with regards to indirect markers of fibrosis, activation of hepatic stellate cells and oxidative stress response. In the clinical arena, there is current clear evidence of a favorable histological outcome in patients with sustained viral response to interferon therapy. For this reason, the current review focuses more on the histological outcomes regarding liver fibrosis in patients who have not attained viral response to therapy (non-responders) or who already have biopsy defined cirrhosis. Data in these patients were analyzed according to the results of objective testing of fibrosis through the assessment of liver biopsy and its change during time, specially because the morbidity and mortality of this disease is directly related to the complications of liver cirrhosis and not necessarily to the persistence of the hepatitis C virus. Lastly, it is concluded that the process of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis is a dynamic one and that there is some evidence to support the usefulness of interferon alpha therapy as a means to halt or retard the progression of hepatic fibrosis. The result of current clinical trials in which interferon therapy is being used to modify the progression of fibrosis in non-responders or cirrhotic patients is eagerly awaited. PMID:14702938

  14. Development of a pigtail macaque model of sexually transmitted infection/HIV coinfection using Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and SHIVSF162P3

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Tara; Fakile, Yetunde; Phillips, Christi; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Mitchell, James; Patton, Dorothy; Sturdevant, Gail; Caldwell, Harlan D.; Secor, W. Evan; Papp, John; Hendry, R. Michael; McNicholl, Janet; Kersh, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are associated with an increased risk of HIV infection. To model the interaction between STIs and HIV infection, we evaluated the capacity of the pigtail macaque model to sustain triple infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, and SHIVSF162P3. Methods Seven SHIVSF162P3-infected pigtail macaques were inoculated with T. vaginalis only (n = 2), C. trachomatis only (n = 1), both T. vaginalis and C. trachomatis (n = 2), or control media (no STI; n = 2). Infections were confirmed by culture and/or nucleic acid testing. Genital mucosa was visualized by colposcopy. Results Characteristic gynecologic signs were observed for both STIs, but not in control animals. Manifestations were most prominent at days 7–10 post-infection. STIs persisted between 4 and 6 weeks and were cleared with antibiotics. Conclusions These pilot studies demonstrate the first successful STI-SHIV triple infection of pigtail macaques, with clinical presentation of genital STI symptoms similar to those observed in humans. PMID:21781129

  15. The comparison of stroke volume variation with central venous pressure in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic patients with acute circulatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Angappan, Santhalakshmi; Parida, Satyen; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Badhe, Ashok Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of stroke volume variation (SVV) in predicting fluid responsiveness and compare it to traditional measures of volume status assessment like central venous pressure (CVP). Methods: Forty-five mechanically ventilated patients in sepsis with acute circulatory failure. Patients were not included when they had atrial fibrillation, other severe arrhythmias, permanent pacemaker, or needed mechanical cardiac support. Furthermore, excluded were patients with hypoxemia and a CVP >12. Patients received volume expansion in the form of 500 ml of 6% hydroxyethyl starch. Results: The volume expansion-induced increase in  cardiac index (CI) was >15% in 29 patients (labeled responders) and <15% in 16 patients (labeled nonresponders). Before volume expansion, SVV was higher in responders than in nonresponders. Receiver operating characteristic curves analysis showed that SVV was a more accurate indicator of fluid responsiveness than CVP. Before volume expansion, an SVV value of 13% allowed discrimination between responders and nonresponders with a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 89%. Volume expansion-induced changes in CI weakly and positively correlated with SVV before volume expansion. Volume expansion decreased SVV from 18.86 ± 4.35 to 7.57 ± 1.80 and volume expansion-induced changes in SVV moderately correlated with volume expansion-induced changes in CI. Conclusions: When predicting fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients in septic shock, SVV is more effective than CVP. Nevertheless, the overall correlation of baseline SVV with increases in CI remains poor. Trends in SVV, as reflected by decreases with volume replacement, seem to correlate much better with increases in CI. PMID:26180432

  16. CT Perfusion Imaging Can Predict Patients' Survival and Early Response to Transarterial Chemo-Lipiodol Infusion for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei-Fu; Cheng, De-Lei; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Ni, Ming; Lu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate the performance of computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTPI) in predicting the early response to transarterial chemo-lipiodol infusion (TACLI) and survival of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM). Materials and Methods Computed tomography perfusion imaging was performed before and 1 month after TACLI in 61 consecutive patients. Therapeutic response was evaluated on CT scans 1 month and 4 months after TACLI; the patients were classified as responders and non-responders based on 4-month CT scans after TACLI. The percentage change of CTPI parameters of target lesions were compared between responders and non-responders at 1 month after TACLI. The optimal parameter and cutoff value were determined. The patients were divided into 2 subgroups according to the cutoff value. The log-rank test was used to compare the survival rates of the 2 subgroups. Results Four-month images were obtained from 58 patients, of which 39.7% were responders and 60.3% were non-responders. The percentage change in hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP) 1 month after TACLI was the optimal predicting parameter (p = 0.003). The best cut-off value was -21.5% and patients who exhibited a ≥ 21.5% decrease in HAP had a significantly higher overall survival rate than those who exhibited a < 21.5% decrease (p < 0.001). Conclusion Computed tomography perfusion imaging can predict the early response to TACLI and survival of patients with CRLM. The percentage change in HAP after TACLI with a cutoff value of -21.5% is the optimal predictor. PMID:26175580

  17. Kinetics and distribution of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets in patients with homocystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Zobel, R.L.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Scheffel, U.

    1982-09-23

    Homocystinuria is an inborn error of metabolism involving a high incidence of thromboembolism. It sometimes improves with large doses of pyridoxine. We investigated the kinetics and distribution of /sup 111/Indoxine-labeled platelets in 11 normal volunteers and 12 patients with homocystinuria, none of whom had clinical evidence of acute thrombosis at the time of the study. Six of the patients were resistant to pyridoxine and had homocystinemia. There were no statistical differences in mean platelet-survival times between pyridoxine responders and nonresponders or between normal subjects and pyridoxine responders or nonresponders, regardless of whether a linear, exponential, or multiple-hit model was used to analyze the kinetic data. Plasma homocystine levels had no apparent effect on mean platelet-survival time. There was no abnormal accumulation of platelets in any of the patients, and the distribution of platelets in liver and spleen was similar to that in normal subjects. Our results suggest that the kinetics and distribution of platelets in patients with homocystinuria who have no clinical evidence of thromboembolism are normal. Thus, the data do not provide evidence for disordered platelet function or for an ongoing interaction of platelets with vessel walls in this condition.

  18. Clinical predictive circulating peptides in rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Crotti, Sara; Enzo, Maria Vittoria; Bedin, Chiara; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Maretto, Isacco; Del Bianco, Paola; Traldi, Pietro; Tasciotti, Ennio; Ferrari, Mauro; Rizzolio, Flavio; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Giordano, Antonio; Nitti, Donato; Agostini, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is worldwide accepted as a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Current standard of treatment includes administration of ionizing radiation for 45-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions associated with 5-fluorouracil administration during radiation therapy. Unfortunately, 40% of patients have a poor or absent response and novel predictive biomarkers are demanding. For the first time, we apply a novel peptidomic methodology and analysis in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Circulating peptides (Molecular Weight <3 kDa) have been harvested from patients' plasma (n = 33) using nanoporous silica chip and analyzed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight mass spectrometer. Peptides fingerprint has been compared between responders and non-responders. Random Forest classification selected three peptides at m/z 1082.552, 1098.537, and 1104.538 that were able to correctly discriminate between responders (n = 16) and non-responders (n = 17) before therapy (T0) providing an overall accuracy of 86% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.92. In conclusion, the nanoporous silica chip coupled to mass spectrometry method was found to be a realistic method for plasma-based peptide analysis and we provide the first list of predictive circulating biomarker peptides in rectal cancer patients underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. PMID:25522009

  19. Tuberculosis Treatment Outcome and Drug Resistance in Lambaréné, Gabon: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bélard, Sabine; Remppis, Jonathan; Bootsma, Sanne; Janssen, Saskia; Kombila, Davy U; Beyeme, Justin O; Rossatanga, Elie G; Kokou, Cosme; Osbak, Kara K; Obiang Mba, Régis M; Kaba, Harry M; Traoré, Afsatou N; Ehrhardt, Jonas; Bache, Emmanuel B; Flamen, Arnaud; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Frank, Matthias; Adegnika, Ayôla A; Lell, Bertrand; Niemann, Stefan; Kremsner, Peter G; Loembé, Marguerite M; Alabi, Abraham S; Grobusch, Martin P

    2016-08-01

    Despite overall global progress in tuberculosis (TB) control, TB remains one of the deadliest communicable diseases. This study prospectively assessed TB epidemiology in Lambaréné, Gabon, a Central African country ranking 10th in terms of TB incidence rate in the 2014 World Health Organization TB report. In Lambaréné, between 2012 and 2014, 201 adult and pediatric TB patients were enrolled and followed up; 66% had bacteriologically confirmed TB and 95% had pulmonary TB. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection rate was 42% in adults and 16% in children. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium africanum were identified in 82% and 16% of 108 culture-confirmed TB cases, respectively. Isoniazid (INH) and streptomycin yielded the highest resistance rates (13% and 12%, respectively). The multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB) rate was 4/91 (4%) and 4/13 (31%) in new and retreatment TB cases, respectively. Treatment success was achieved in 53% of patients. In TB/HIV coinfected patients, mortality rate was 25%. In this setting, TB epidemiology is characterized by a high rate of TB/HIV coinfection and low treatment success rates. MDR-TB is a major public health concern; the need to step-up in-country diagnostic capacity for culture and drug susceptibility testing as well as access to second-line TB drugs urgently requires action. PMID:27352879

  20. Comparison of Existing Response Criteria in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Transarterial Chemoembolization Using a 3D Quantitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe; Duran, Rafael; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Lee, Howard; Chapiro, Julius; Chao, Michael; Wang, Zhijun; Frangakis, Constantine; Sohn, Jae Ho; Maltenfort, Mitchell Gil; Pawlik, Timothy; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare currently available non-three-dimensional methods (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST], European Association for Study of the Liver [EASL], modified RECIST [mRECIST[) with three-dimensional (3D) quantitative methods of the index tumor as early response markers in predicting patient survival after initial transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective single-institution HIPAA-compliant and institutional review board–approved study. From November 2001 to November 2008, 491 consecutive patients underwent intraarterial therapy for liver cancer with either conventional TACE or TACE with drug-eluting beads. A diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was made in 290 of these patients. The response of the index tumor on pre- and post-TACE magnetic resonance images was assessed retrospectively in 78 treatment-naïve patients with HCC (63 male; mean age, 63 years ± 11 [standard deviation]). Each response assessment method (RECIST, mRECIST, EASL, and 3D methods of volumetric RECIST [vRECIST] and quantitative EASL [qEASL]) was used to classify patients as responders or nonresponders by following standard guidelines for the uni- and bidimensional measurements and by using the formula for a sphere for the 3D measurements. The Kaplan-Meier method with the log-rank test was performed for each method to evaluate its ability to help predict survival of responders and nonresponders. Uni- and multivariate Cox proportional hazard ratio models were used to identify covariates that had significant association with survival. Results The uni- and bidimensional measurements of RECIST (hazard ratio, 0.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3, 1.0; P = .09), mRECIST (hazard ratio, 0.6; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.0; P = .05), and EASL (hazard ratio, 1.1; 95% CI: 0.6, 2.2; P = .75) did not show a significant difference in survival between responders and nonresponders, whereas vRECIST (hazard ratio, 0.6; 95% CI: 0.3, 1

  1. Amygdala subregions tied to SSRI and placebo response in patients with social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Faria, Vanda; Appel, Lieuwe; Åhs, Fredrik; Linnman, Clas; Pissiota, Anna; Frans, Örjan; Bani, Massimo; Bettica, Paolo; Pich, Emilio M; Jacobsson, Eva; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2012-09-01

    The amygdala is a key structure in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders, and a putative target for anxiolytic treatments. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and placebo seem to induce anxiolytic effects by attenuating amygdala responsiveness. However, conflicting amygdala findings have also been reported. Moreover, the neural profile of responders and nonresponders is insufficiently characterized and it remains unknown whether SSRIs and placebo engage common or distinct amygdala subregions or different modulatory cortical areas. We examined similarities and differences in the neural response to SSRIs and placebo in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15-labeled water was used to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 72 patients with SAD during an anxiogenic public speaking task, before and after 6-8 weeks of treatment under double-blind conditions. Response rate was determined by the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale. Conjunction analysis revealed a common rCBF-attenuation from pre- to post-treatment in responders to SSRIs and placebo in the left basomedial/basolateral and right ventrolateral amygdala. This rCBF pattern correlated with behavioral measures of reduced anxiety and differentiated responders from nonresponders. However, nonanxiolytic treatment effects were also observed in the amygdala. All subgroups, including nonresponders, showed deactivation of the left lateral part of the amygdala. No rCBF differences were found between SSRI responders and placebo responders. This study provides new insights into the brain dynamics underlying anxiety relief by demonstrating common amygdala targets for pharmacologically and psychologically induced anxiety reduction, and by showing that the amygdala is functionally heterogeneous in anxiolysis. PMID:22617357

  2. Amygdala Subregions Tied to SSRI and Placebo Response in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Vanda; Appel, Lieuwe; Åhs, Fredrik; Linnman, Clas; Pissiota, Anna; Frans, Örjan; Bani, Massimo; Bettica, Paolo; Pich, Emilio M; Jacobsson, Eva; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    The amygdala is a key structure in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders, and a putative target for anxiolytic treatments. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and placebo seem to induce anxiolytic effects by attenuating amygdala responsiveness. However, conflicting amygdala findings have also been reported. Moreover, the neural profile of responders and nonresponders is insufficiently characterized and it remains unknown whether SSRIs and placebo engage common or distinct amygdala subregions or different modulatory cortical areas. We examined similarities and differences in the neural response to SSRIs and placebo in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15-labeled water was used to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 72 patients with SAD during an anxiogenic public speaking task, before and after 6–8 weeks of treatment under double-blind conditions. Response rate was determined by the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale. Conjunction analysis revealed a common rCBF-attenuation from pre- to post-treatment in responders to SSRIs and placebo in the left basomedial/basolateral and right ventrolateral amygdala. This rCBF pattern correlated with behavioral measures of reduced anxiety and differentiated responders from nonresponders. However, nonanxiolytic treatment effects were also observed in the amygdala. All subgroups, including nonresponders, showed deactivation of the left lateral part of the amygdala. No rCBF differences were found between SSRI responders and placebo responders. This study provides new insights into the brain dynamics underlying anxiety relief by demonstrating common amygdala targets for pharmacologically and psychologically induced anxiety reduction, and by showing that the amygdala is functionally heterogeneous in anxiolysis. PMID:22617357

  3. The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on the Efficacy of ADP Receptor Blockers in Patients with Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Pilot Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Galajda, Peter; Bolek, Tomáš; Stančiaková, Lucia; Fedorová, Jana; Staško, Ján; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to validate the impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D) on the platelet reactivity in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor blockers. Methods. A pilot prospective study was performed. Totally 67 patients were enrolled. 21 patients had T2D. Among all study population, 33 patients received clopidogrel and 34 patients received prasugrel. The efficacy of ADP receptor blocker therapy had been tested in two time intervals using light transmission aggregometry with specific inducer and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P) flow cytometry assay. Results. There were no significant differences in platelet aggregability among T2D and nondiabetic (ND) group. The platelet reactivity index of VASP-P did not differ significantly between T2D and ND group (59.4 ± 30.9% versus 60.0 ± 25.2% and 33.9 ± 25.3% versus 38.6 ± 29.3% in second testing). The number of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders did not differ significantly between T2D and ND patients. The time interval from ADP receptor blocker loading dosing to the blood sampling was similar in T2D and ND patients in both examinations. Conclusion. This prospective study did not confirm the higher platelet reactivity and higher prevalence of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders in T2D acute STEMI patients. PMID:27493970

  4. Quantitative analysis of interferon alpha receptor subunit 1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene transcription in blood cells of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN)-α receptor 1 (ifnar1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (socs1) transcription levels were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 59 patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and 17 non-infected individuals. Samples were obtained from patients infected with HCV that were either untreated or treated with IFN-α2 plus ribavirin for 1 year and divided into responders and non-responders based on viral load reduction 6 months after treatment. Ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and the fold difference (2-ΔΔCT) with respect to hprt housekeeping gene was calculated. Results Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly in HCV-infected patients either untreated (3.26 ± 0.31), responders (3.1 ± 0.23) and non-responders (2.18 ± 0.23) with respect to non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.34; P = 0.005). Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly (P = 0.003) in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a (4.74 ± 0.25) and 1b (2.81 ± 0.25) but not in 1a1b (1.58 ± 0.21). No association was found of Ifnar1 transcription with disease progress, initial viral load or other clinical factors. With respect to socs1 transcription, values were similar for non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.28) and untreated patients (0.99 ± 0.41) but increased in responders (2.81 ± 0.17) and non-responder patients (1.67 ± 0.41). Difference between responder and non-responder patients was not statistically significant. Socs1 transcription increased in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a and 1b (2.87 ± 0.45 and 2.22 ± 0.17, respectively) but not in 1a1b (1.28 ± 0.40). Socs1 transcript was absent in three patients infected with HCV genotype 1b. A weak correlation between ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was found, when Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated. Conclusion Our results suggest that HCV infection may up-regulate ifnar1 transcription. HCV genotypes differ in their capacity to affect ifnar1 and

  5. Genetic polymorphisms, their allele combinations and IFN-β treatment response in Irish multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Catherine; Favorov, Alexander; Heggarty, Shirley; Graham, Colin; Favorova, Olga; Ochs, Michael; Hawkins, Stanley; Hutchinson, Michael; O’Rourke, Killian; Vandenbroeck, Koen

    2009-01-01

    Introduction IFN-β is widely used as first-line immunomodulatory treatment for multiple sclerosis. Response to treatment is variable (30–50% of patients are nonresponders) and requires a long treatment duration for accurate assessment to be possible. Information about genetic variations that predict responsiveness would allow appropriate treatment selection early after diagnosis, improve patient care, with time saving consequences and more efficient use of resources. Materials & methods We analyzed 61 SNPs in 34 candidate genes as possible determinants of IFN-β response in Irish multiple sclerosis patients. Particular emphasis was placed on the exploration of combinations of allelic variants associated with response to therapy by means of a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based approach (APSampler). Results The most significant allelic combinations, which differed in frequency between responders and nonresponders, included JAK2–IL10RB–GBP1–PIAS1 (permutation p-value was pperm = 0.0008), followed by JAK2–IL10–CASP3 (pperm = 0.001). Discussion The genetic mechanism of response to IFN-β is complex and as yet poorly understood. Data mining algorithms may help in uncovering hidden allele combinations involved in drug response versus nonresponse. PMID:19604093

  6. Therapeutic benefit of decitabine, a hypomethylating agent, in patients with high-risk primary myelofibrosis and myeloproliferative neoplasm in accelerated or blastic/acute myeloid leukemia phase.

    PubMed

    Badar, Talha; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Pierce, Sherry R; Newberry, Kate J; Daver, Naval; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-09-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) transformed to acute myeloid leukemia (MPN-AML), MPN in accelerated phase (MPN-AP), and high-risk primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are associated with a poor response to therapy and very short survival. Several reports have suggested clinical activity of hypomethylating agents in these patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 21 patients with MPN-AML, 13 with MPN-AP and 11 with DIPSS-plus high-risk PMF treated with decitabine at our institution over the last 7 years and evaluated their clinical outcomes. Six patients (29%) with MPN-AML responded to decitabine (3 CR, 2 CRi, and 1 PR); median response duration was 7 months. The median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in those who responded (10.5 vs 4 months). Among patients with MPN-AP, 8 patients (62%) benefited; the median response duration was 6.5 months. The median OS was 11.8 months in responders vs 4.7 months in non-responders. Among patients with DIPSS-plus high-risk PMF, 9 (82%) benefited; the median response duration was 9 months. The median OS was 32 months in responders vs 16.3 months in non-responders. Decitabine is a viable therapeutic option for patients with MPN-AML, MP-AP and high-risk PMF. Prospective clinical studies combining decitabine with other clinically active agents are needed to improve overall outcome. PMID:26183878

  7. Functional FCGR3A 158 V/F and IL-6 -174 C/G polymorphisms predict response to biologic therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Fc gamma receptor 3A (FCGR3A) 158 V/F and interleukin-6 (IL-6) promoter -174 G/C polymorphisms can predict the response to biologic-based therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a meta-analysis of studies on the association between the FCGR3A V/F polymorphism or the IL-6 -174 C/G polymorphism and non-responsiveness to biologic therapy in RA patients. A total of 10 studies involving 1,427 patients were considered. These studies consisted of seven studies on the FCGR3A polymorphism and three studies on the IL-6 polymorphism. Meta-analysis showed no association between the FCGR3A VV+VF genotype and non-responders to biologic therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.881, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.505-1.537, p = 0.655]. However, stratification by biologic type indicated an association between the FCGR3A VV+VF genotype and non-responders to rituximab (OR 0.566, 95 % CI 0.373-0.857, p = 0.007), but no association was found in non-responders to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blockers (OR 1.337, 95 % CI 0.869-2.056, p = 0.186). Meta-analysis revealed no association between the IL-6 CC+CG genotype and non-responders to the biologics (OR 3.233, 95 % CI 0.766-13.64, p = 0.110). However, an association was found between the IL-6 CC+CG genotype and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy (OR 8.030, 95 % CI 1.807-33.68, p = 0.006). This meta-analysis demonstrates that FCGR3A V allele carriers show a better response to rituximab, and individuals carrying the IL-6 -174 C allele show a poorer response to anti-TNF therapy for RA. Genotyping for these polymorphisms may be a useful tool for predicting the response to biologics with respect to personalized medicine. PMID:24728031

  8. Intention-to-treat survival analysis of hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfected liver transplant: Is it the waiting list?

    PubMed

    Araiz, Juan J; Serrano, M Trinidad; García-Gil, Francisco A; Lacruz, Elena M; Lorente, Sara; Sánchez, José I; Suarez, Miguel A

    2016-09-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients, the accelerated severity of liver disease, associated comorbidities, and mortality on the waiting list could change the possibility and results of liver transplantation (LT). Intention-to-treat survival analysis (ITTA) can accurately estimate the applicability and efficacy of LT. The primary objective of this study was to compare the survival of patients with HCV with and without HIV infection. We analyzed a cohort of 199 patients with HCV infection enrolled for LT between 1998 and 2015; 17 were also infected with HIV. The patients with HCV/HIV coinfection had higher mortality on the waiting list than those with HCV monoinfection (35.3% versus 4.6%; P < 0.001). ITTA at 1, 3, and 4 years was 75%, 64%, and 57% for HCV monoinfection and 52%, 47%, and 39% for HCV/HIV coinfection, respectively (Wilcoxon test P < 0.05). The ITTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months was 96%, 91%, 87%, and 75% for HCV monoinfection and 76%, 70%, 64%, and 52% for HCV/HIV coinfection, respectively (log-rank P < 0.05; Wilcoxon test P < 0.01). A Cox regression analysis was carried out including all variables with predictive value in the univariate analysis, showing that only donor age > 70 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.12; P < 0.05), United Network for Organ Sharing status 1 (HR = 10.1; P < 0.01), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (HR = 1.13; P < 0.001), and HIV coinfection (HR = 2.65; P < 0.05) had independent negative predictive value for survival. In conclusion, our study indicates that HIV coinfection is a factor in mortality prior to transplantation and associated with higher mortality on the waiting list. Liver Transplantation 22 1186-1196 2016 AASLD. PMID:27114030

  9. Non-invasive measurement of pulmonary blood flow during prone positioning in patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reutershan, Jörg; Schmitt, Andre; Dietz, Klaus; Fretschner, Reinhold

    2004-01-01

    In the daily clinical routine at the bedside, information on effective pulmonary blood flow (PBF) is limited and requires invasive monitoring, including a pulmonary artery catheter, to determine both cardiac output and intrapulmonary shunt. Therefore we evaluated a non-invasive method for the measurement of PBF in a clinical setting, including 12 patients with acute respiratory failure (acute respiratory distress syndrome) undergoing prone positioning. PBF was determined before (baseline), during and after prone positioning, by using a foreign gas rebreathing method with a new photoacoustic gas analyser. Values were compared with the cardiac output corrected for intrapulmonary shunt (COeff). Responders to prone positioning were defined according to the improvement of arterial oxygenation. A total of 84 measurements were performed. PBF values correlated well with COeff (R2=0.96; P<0.0001). Bias and limits of agreement (+/- 2 S.D.) for all measurements were -0.11 +/- 0.76 litre/min. At baseline, responders showed significantly lower PBF levels than non-responders (4.8 +/- 1.0 compared with. 6.4 +/- 1.2 litre/min; P=0.03). During prone positioning, PBF increased continuously in responders and remained high after patients had been returned to the supine position. PBF was unaffected in non-responders. Mean total increase in PBF was 1.2 +/- 0.2 litre/min in responders compared with -0.4 +/- 0.2 litre/min in non-responders (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the investigated rebreathing system allows for a non-invasive determination of PBF at the bedside. The accuracy of the measurements is comparable with the thermodilution method. It is able to reliably reflect changes in PBF induced by prone positioning. Moreover, measuring PBF might be a promising tool to identify responders to prone therapy. PMID:12877652

  10. Per cent of patients with chronic migraine who responded per onabotulinumtoxinA treatment cycle: PREEMPT

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Stephen D; Dodick, David W; Aurora, Sheena K; Diener, Hans-Christoph; DeGryse, Ronald E; Lipton, Richard B; Turkel, Catherine C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The approved use of onabotulinumtoxinA for prophylaxis of headaches in patients with chronic migraine (CM) involves treatment every 12 weeks. It is currently unknown whether patients who fail to respond to the first onabotulinumtoxinA treatment cycle will respond to subsequent treatment cycles. To help inform decisions about treating non-responders, we examined the probability of treatment cycle 1 non-responders responding in cycle 2, and cycle 1 and 2 non-responders responding in cycle 3. Methods Pooled PREEMPT data (two studies: a 24-week, 2-cycle, double-blind, randomised (1:1), placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase, followed by a 32-week, 3-cycle, open-label phase) evaluated onabotulinumtoxinA (155–195 U) for prophylaxis of headaches in persons with CM (≥15 days/month with headache ≥4 h/day). End points of interest included the proportion of study patients who first achieved a ≥50% reduction in headache days, moderate/severe headache days, total cumulative hours of headache on headache days, or a ≥5-point improvement in Headache Impact Test (HIT)-6. For treatment cycle 1, all eligible participants were included. For subsequent cycles, responders in a previous cycle were no longer considered first responders. Results Among onabotulinumtoxinA-treated patients (n=688) 49.3% had a ≥50% reduction in headache-day frequency during treatment cycle 1, with 11.3% and 10.3% of patients first responding during cycles 2 and 3, respectively. 54.2%, 11.6% and 7.4% of patients first responded with a ≥50% reduction in cumulative hours of headache, and 56.3%, 14.5% and 7.7% of patients first responded with a ≥5-point improvement in total HIT-6 during treatment cycles 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Conclusions A meaningful proportion of patients with CM treated with onabotulinumtoxinA who did not respond to the first treatment cycle responded in the second and third cycles of treatment. Trial registration number NCT00156910, NCT00168428. PMID

  11. Analysis of Mutations within the 5′ Untranslated Region, Interferon Sensitivity Region, and PePHD Region as a Function of Response to Interferon Therapy in Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Subramani, Murugan; Khaja, Mohammed N.; Madhavi, Chandra; Roy, Swagata; Habibullah, Chittoor M.; Das, Saumitra

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in several subgenomic regions have been implicated in influencing response to interferon therapy; however, a comprehensive picture of Indian patients was lacking. Based on the viral load and clinical factors, 10 out of 15 patients were found to be complete responders, whereas 5 patients were nonresponders. The pretreatment viral RNA load of the patients was found to be between 5.20 and 6.13 log10 IU/ml, which eventually fell to 2.77 log10 IU/ml after 24 weeks of treatment, whereas in the case of nonresponders, the average was 5.38 log10 IU/ml. In order to study the influence of the hepatitis C virus genotype on the response to interferon therapy, the 5′ untranslated region sequences of the samples were analyzed, which showed that genotype 3 patients responded better than genotype 1 patients. Additionally, the mutations in the interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) of the NS5A protein and the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha phosphorylation homology domain (PePHD) of the E2 envelope protein, before and after treatment, were compared with nonresponder prototype J. Although, no clear correlation was found in the case of the mutated ISDR, some significant changes in residues were observed in the PePHD region, which could be helpful in understanding the molecular basis of resistance to therapy. Interestingly, analysis of the quasispecies variations showed a change in genotype in one sample during treatment, which might have contributed to the resistance. The results suggest that the mutations in different regions of the viral genome might have a concerted effect on the response to interferon therapy. PMID:16517843

  12. Analysis of potentially predictive factors of efficacy of adjunct extended-release quetiapine fumarate in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Thase, Michael E; Liu, Sherry; Earley, Willie; Eriksson, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Identification of predictors of treatment response in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may facilitate improved disease management. Data were pooled from two 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of extended-release quetiapine (quetiapine XR; 150 or 300 mg/day) as adjunct to ongoing antidepressant therapy. Effects of psychiatric history and baseline demographic and disease characteristics on efficacy outcomes (Week 6 Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] total score reduction) were evaluated in population subgroups (quetiapine XR both doses pooled, n = 616; placebo, n = 303). Baseline Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) score and previous depressive episodes on Week 6 MADRS total score change, and baseline MADRS individual item scores on Week 6 change in CGI-Improvement score, were also evaluated. No major differences between responders and non-responders to quetiapine XR were observed for patient characteristics or demographic and disease characteristics. No suggestion of a predictive association was found between baseline CGI-S score, number of depressive episodes, and baseline MADRS item scores and efficacy outcomes. These analyses showed no major differences between responders and non-responders, and no predictive association between the parameters assessed and efficacy outcomes for adjunct quetiapine XR in patients with MDD and an inadequate response to prior antidepressant therapy. PMID:25257148

  13. Early sorafenib-related adverse events predict therapy response of TACE plus sorafenib: A multicenter clinical study of 606 HCC patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Li, Hailiang; Bai, Wei; Liu, Jueshi; Lv, Weifu; Sahu, Sonia; Guan, Sheng; Qin, Xiao; Wang, Wenhui; Ren, Weixin; Mu, Wei; Guo, Weidong; Gu, Shanzhi; Ma, Yilong; Yin, Zhanxin; Guo, Wengang; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Yongji; Duran, Rafael; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Zhuoli; Han, Guohong

    2016-08-15

    The purpose of our study was to test the hypothesis that sorafenib-related dermatologic adverse events (AEs) as an early biomarker can predict the long-term outcomes following the combination therapy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) plus sorafenib (TACE-S). The intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma patients who received either TACE-S or TACE-alone treatment were consecutively included into analysis. In the TACE-S group, patients with ≥ grade 2 dermatologic AEs within the first month of sorafenib initiation were defined as responders; whereas those with < grade 2 were defined as nonresponders. In the TACE-S group, the median overall survival (OS) of the responders was significantly longer than that of nonresponders (28.9 months vs. 16.8 months, respectively; p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that nonresponders were significantly associated with an increased risk of death compared with responders (HR = 1.9; 95% confidence Interval-CI: 1.3-2.7; p = 0.001). The survival analysis showed that the median OS was 27.9 months (95% CI: 25.0-30.8) among responders treated with TACE-S vs.18.3 months (95% CI: 14.5-22.1) among those who received TACE-alone (p = 0.046). The median time to progression was 13.1 months (95% CI: 4.4-21.8) in the TACE-S group, a duration that was significantly longer than that in the TACE-alone group [5 months (95% CI: 6.4-13.3), p = 0.014]. This study demonstrated that sorafenib-related dermatologic AEs are clinical biomarkers to identify responders from all of the patients for TACE-S therapy. Sorafenib-related dermatologic AEs, clinical biomarkers, can predict the efficacy of TACE-S in future randomized controlled trials. PMID:27038145

  14. The effect of intravenous ascorbic acid in hemodialysis patients with normoferritinemic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae Woong; Ahn, Chi Yong; Ryu, Bong Kwan; Shin, Byung Chul; Chung, Jong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Lee

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) patients with functional iron deficiency often develop resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO). Recent studies have shown that intravenous ascorbic acid (IVAA) administration could override rhEPO resistance in HD patients. This study was undertaken to test the effects of IVAA in HD patients with normoferritinemic functional iron deficiency accompanied by EPO-hyporesponsive anemia. Methods Fifty-eight HD patients with normoferritinemic anemia (between 100 and 500 μg/L) were included and divided into the control (N=25) and IVAA (N=33) groups. IVAA patients received 500 mg of IVAA with each dialysis session for 3 months and an additional 4-month follow-up after the end of the therapy. Results Twenty patients had a response to IVAA with a significant increase in hemoglobin level (Hgb>1.0 g/dL) and reduction of weekly rhEPO dosage compared with the control group after 3 months of treatment (P<0.05). Compared with non-responders, transferrin saturation (TSAT) was significantly decreased in the responders group (26±11 vs. 35±14%, P<0.05) on baseline data. There was a significant increase in serum iron and TSAT (baseline vs. 3 months, serum iron 57±22 vs. 108±22 μg/dL, TSAT 26±11 vs. 52±7%, P<0.05) and a decrease in serum ferritin (377±146 vs. 233±145 ng/mL, P<0.05) in the responders group (N=20), but no significant changes in the control and non-responders groups (N=13) at 3-month treatment. Conclusion IVAA can be a potent and effective adjuvant therapy for HD patients with rhEPO-resistant normoferritinemic anemia. In addition, IVAA can reduce the dosage of rhEPO for anemia correction. PMID:26889408

  15. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  16. Factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Singh, Vishwajeet; Ali, Wahid; Natu, S. M.; Singh, Bhupendra Pal; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Dalela, Divakar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Filarial chyluria is a common problem in filarial endemic countries. Its management begins with medical therapy but some patients progress to require surgery. The present study aimed to determine factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria. Materials and Methods: This prospective study conducted between August 2008 and November 2012, included conservatively managed patients of chyluria. Demographic profile, clinical presentation, treatment history and urinary triglycerides (TGs) and cholesterol levels at baseline were compared between the responders and non-responders. Apart from the clinical grade of chyluria, hematuria was evaluated as an independent risk factor. Results: Out of the 222 patients (mean age, 37.99 ± 13.29 years, 129 males), 31 patients failed to respond while 35 had a recurrence after initial response; the overall success rate being 70.3% at a mean follow-up of 25 months. No difference was observed in demographics, clinical presentation, presence of hematuria, disease duration and mean urinary TGs loss between responders and non-responders. On multivariate analysis, patients with treatment failure were found to have a higher-grade disease (14.3% Grade-I, 36.6% Grades-II and 60% Grade-III), higher number of pretreatment courses (1.59 ± 1.08 vs. 1.02 ± 0.79) and heavier cholesterol (26.54 ± 23.46 vs. 8.81 ± 8.55 mg/dl) loss at baseline compared with responders (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Conservative management has a success rate in excess of 70%, not affected by the disease chronicity, previous episodes and recurrent nature. However, higher-grade disease, extensive pre-treatment with drugs and higher urinary cholesterol loss at baseline are the predictors of poor response. Hematuria is not an independent poor risk factor for conservative management. PMID:24497677

  17. Efficacy of low-dose intermittent interferon-alpha monotherapy in patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b who were predicted or failed to respond to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Kawamura, Yusuke; Yatsuji, Hiromi; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Mariko; Arase, Yasuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2008-08-01

    The efficacy of interferon (IFN) monotherapy for non-responders to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) combination therapy is still unclear. To evaluate the impact of IFN monotherapy on biochemical response, 200 consecutive patients infected with HCV genotype 1b, who received low-dose intermittent IFN-alpha monotherapy, were investigated. A median IFN dose per day of 3 million units was administered during a median period of 74 weeks. As a whole, the ALT normalization rates were 50.5, 65.9, 58.4, and 61.7% at 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks, respectively. In 40 patients, who had abnormal AFP levels at the start of treatment, 52.5% achieved normalization of AFP within 48 weeks. Multivariate analysis identified indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min as the parameter that influenced significantly and independently ALT normalization. ALT normalization rates of patients who were predicted to be poor responders to PEG-IFN plus RBV combination therapy (but not substitutions of amino acid 70 and/or 91 in the HCV core region, female sex, and lower levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) were similar to others. Furthermore, the ALT normalization rates in non-responders to combination therapy were 29.2, 60.9, 60.0, and 40.0% at 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks, respectively. The results suggest that low-dose intermittent IFN monotherapy is an efficacious therapeutic regimen for patients unsuitable for PEG-IFN plus RBV, including non-responders, because it can lead to ALT normalization and thus a reduced risk of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:18551610

  18. Relationship between pharmacokinetic profile of subcutaneously administered alemtuzumab and clinical response in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, Michela; Montillo, Marco; Avanzini, Maria A.; Tinelli, Carmine; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Visai, Livia; Ricci, Francesca; Vismara, Eleonora; Morra, Enrica; Regazzi, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Alemtuzumab serum levels and clinical response after subcutaneous administration (10 mg 3 times/week for six weeks) have been explored in 29 chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients receiving the monoclonal antibody as consolidation. Serum concentrations after each administration gradually increased during the first week and more markedly during weeks 2 and 3, approaching the steady-state at week 6. Absorption continued slowly through the tissues for about 2–3 weeks after the last administration, starting to decrease thereafter. Difference between Responders and Non-responders was statistically significant: maximal concentration (Cmax) was 1.69 μg/mL vs. 0.44 μg/mL; concentration before subcutaneous administration (Cpre-dose) on day 15 was 0.7 vs. 0.21 μg/mL, area under curve (AUC0−12h) was 11.09 vs. 2.26 μg x h/mL for Responders and Non-responders, respectively. Higher systemic exposure to alemtuzumab correlated with a better clinical response and minimal residual disease. Results suggest that an adjusted schedule according to serum level could improve clinical outcome of patients receiving subcutaneous alemtuzumab. PMID:21330330

  19. Qualitative Immune Modulation by Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Adjuvant Therapy in Immunological Non Responder HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, Francesca; Bandera, Alessandra; Ferrario, Giulio; Trabattoni, Daria; Marchetti, Giulia; Franzetti, Fabio; Clerici, Mario; Gori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of HIV-infected patients with interleukin-2 (IL-2) produces significant increases in CD4 T cell counts; however an associated qualitative improvement in cells function has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. By measuring mycobacterial killing activity, we evaluated IL-2-mediated functional immune enhancement ex vivo in immunological non-responders (INRs). Methods and Findings PBMC from 12 immunological non-responders (INRs) (CD4+<200/µl, HIV-RNA<50 cp/ml) on combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) were collected at baseline, and after 3 IL-2 cycles. Eight INRs receiving only cART were studied as controls. After 21 days of PBMC incubation with a virulent M. avium suspension, counts of residual colony forming units (CFUs) and concentrations of TNF-α, IL-10 and IFN-γ were determined. In IL-2 treated patients, a significant reduction in mean residual CFUs of PBMC cultures was observed (p<0.01). Moreover, following IL-2 treatment, significant increases in PBMC's IFNγ production (p = 0.02) and substantial reductions in IL-10 levels were observed. Conclusions IL-2 therapy restores the ability of the lympho-monocyte system in eliciting an effective response against mycobacterial infections. Our data indicate the possibility of a clinical role held by IL-2 in enhancing the immune function of subjects unable to achieve immune competence through cART alone. PMID:21124762

  20. Splenectomy for primary and recurrent immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Current criteria for patient selection and results.

    PubMed Central

    Akwari, O E; Itani, K M; Coleman, R E; Rosse, W F

    1987-01-01

    Of 565 patients with thrombocytopenia admitted to Duke University Hospital between 1975 and 1985, 100 had splenectomy. Ninety-eight patients had failed chronic immunosuppressive therapy and three patients had acute intracranial bleeding or total absence of platelets in the peripheral blood smear, and had urgent splenectomy. At primary splenectomy, accessory spleens were identified and resected in 18% of patients. There was no operative mortality. Fifty-eight patients had an excellent response to splenectomy and their steroids were tapered off within 3 weeks. Thirteen patients had a poor response to primary splenectomy of whom eight remitted spontaneously and five required accessory splenectomy resulting in complete remission in three patients. Twenty-nine patients were considered nonresponders, 25 of whom had radionuclide scanning for accessory spleens. Seven of these patients had accessory spleens identified but only four consented to accessory splenectomy. In three of the four patients, a complete remission was achieved. Neither platelet antibody titers nor measurements of platelet survival or turnover predicted platelet response to splenectomy. However, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in older patients was significantly less likely to respond to splenectomy. These data support continuing use of splenectomy in selected patients with ITP and an aggressive search for accessory spleens in patients who relapse since they are easily localized at operation by hand-held isotope detector probe. Images Fig. 6. PMID:3662662

  1. Serum concentrations of sIL-2R, IL-6, TGF-beta1, neopterin, and zinc in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Grüngreiff, K; Reinhold, D; Ansorge, S

    1999-12-01

    T lymphocytes and immunoregulatory cytokines play an important role in the host response to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Zinc is required for a wide spectrum of immune functions, including T-cell activity. To determine the clinical significance of the cytokines sIL-2R, IL-6, TGF-beta1, neopterin, and of zinc in chronic heptatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we investigated their concentrations in the serum of 16 patients with chronic HCV infection before, during and at the end of therapy with interferon (IFN) alpha (Roferon A), and after 6 months follow-up. Elevated concentrations of sIL-2R, IL-6, TGF-beta1, and neopterin were found in the serum of all patients prior to therapy, as compared to healthy controls. sIL-2R patterns differed in responders and non-responders. While the mean concentration of sIL-2R (335.75 pg/ml) before therapy was about 40% higher in complete responders (n=4) than in controls (272.20 pg/ml), the mean concentration in non-responders (n=6) was 4-fold higher than in controls (1153.33 pg/ml). During therapy, sIL-2R levels in responders decreased by about 40%. Mean IL-6 concentrations in both complete and partial responders (n=6) decreased continuously during treatment, while mean concentrations in non-responders decreased for only a short time, and increased again after cessation of therapy. Mean levels of TGF-beta1 behaved similarly to those of IL-6. Only negligible differences in mean neopterin levels were found between responders and non-responders over the entire observation time. The mean serum zinc concentrations slightly decreased in all 3 patient groups, the greatest reduction occurring in 3 of the 4 responders. The present findings underscore the importance of the immune system in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. Serum sIL-2R levels may be used as a serological marker of outcome following IFN-alpha treatment. PMID:10623433

  2. Costs and outcomes of treating chronic hepatitis C patients in routine care - results from a nationwide multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Stahmeyer, J T; Krauth, C; Bert, F; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, H; Alshuth, U; Hüppe, D; Mauss, S; Rossol, S

    2016-02-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Long-term consequences are the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the study was to assess outcomes and costs of treating patients with chronic hepatitis C in clinical practice in Germany. We carried out a prospective noninterventional study. Information on treatment outcomes, resource utilization and quality of life was provided by 281 physicians throughout Germany. Data of 3708 monoinfected HCV-patients treated between 2008 and 2011 were analysed. Therapy consisted of peginterferon/ribavirin. Mean age of patients was 43.7 years, 60.3% were male and estimated duration of infection was 13.6 years. Predominantly genotype 1 (61.3%) or 3 (28.5%) infections were observed. Sustained viral response (SVR)-rates in most frequently observed genotypes were 49.2% in GT-1 and 61.9% in GT-3 treatment-naive patients (Relapser: GT-1: 35.3% and GT-3: 57.3%; Nonresponder: GT-1: 25.0% and GT-3: 33.3%). Average treatment costs were lowest in treatment-naive patients (€18 965) and higher in patients who failed previous treatments (relapsers: €24 753; nonresponders: €19 511). Differences according to genotype were observed. Average costs per SVR in treatment-naive patients were €44 744 for GT-1 and €22 218 for GT-3. Treatment was associated with a decrease in quality of life; post-treatment quality of life was higher in patients achieving SVR. Our insight on real-life treatment outcomes and costs can serve as a reference for a comparison with other treatments. There is high need for short-term and long-term cost-effectiveness analysis in real-life settings as newly introduced treatment strategies with direct acting antivirals result in high SVR-rates but are more costly. PMID:26411532

  3. Recovery of Adrenal Function in Patients with Glucocorticoids Induced Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Ha; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2016-01-01

    Background The chronic use of glucocorticoids (GC) suppresses function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and often results in secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI). The present study aimed to determine the recovery rate of adrenal function in patients with secondary AI within 1 to 2 years and to assess the factors predictive of adrenal function recovery. Methods This was a retrospective observational study that enrolled patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI between 2007 and 2013. AI was defined by peak serum cortisol levels <18 µg/dL during a standard-dose short synacthen test (SST). A follow-up SST was performed after 1 to 2 years, and responders were defined as those with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated peak serum cortisol levels ≥18 µg/dL. Results Of the total 34 patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI at first, 20 patients (58.8%) recovered normal adrenal function by the time of the follow-up SST (median follow-up period, 16.5 months). Although the baseline serum ACTH and cortisol levels at the first SST did not differ between responders and non-responders, the incremental cortisol response during the first SST was higher in responders than that of non-responders (7.88 vs. 3.56, P<0.01). Additionally, higher cortisol increments during the first SST were an independent predictive factor of the adrenal function recovery (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.46; P<0.05). Conclusion In the present study, adrenal function recovery was achieved frequently in patients with GC-induced secondary AI within 1 to 2 years. Additionally, an incremental cortisol response at the first SST may be an important predictive factor of adrenal function recovery. PMID:26676337

  4. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bouwense, Stefan AW; Olesen, Søren S; Drewes, Asbjørn M; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain control in chronic pancreatitis is a major challenge; the mechanisms behind analgesic treatment are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the differences in pain sensitivity and modulation in chronic pancreatitis patients, based on their clinical response (responders vs nonresponders) to placebo or pregabalin treatment. Methods This study was part of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the analgesic effects of pregabalin and placebo in chronic pancreatitis. Post hoc, patients were assigned to one of four groups, ie, responders and nonresponders to pregabalin (n=16; n=15) or placebo (n=12; n=17) treatment. Responders were defined as patients with >30% pain reduction after 3 weeks of treatment. We measured change in pain sensitivity before and after the treatment using electric pain detection thresholds (ePDT) in dermatomes C5 (generalized effects) and Ventral T10 (segmental effects). Descending endogenous pain modulation was quantified via conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm. Results Sixty patients were analyzed in a per-protocol analysis. ePDT change in C5 was significant vs baseline and greater in pregabalin (1.3 mA) vs placebo responders (−0.1 mA; P=0.015). This was not so for ePDT in Ventral T10. CPM increased more in pregabalin (9%) vs placebo responders (−17%; P<0.001). CPM changed significantly vs baseline only for pregabalin responders (P=0.006). Conclusion This hypothesis-generating study provides the first evidence that pain relief with pregabalin is associated with anti-hyperalgesic effects and increased endogenous inhibitory modulation. No such effects were observed in patients experiencing pain relief with the placebo treatment. The mechanisms underlying analgesic response to placebo vs drug treatments are different and, together with their interactions, deserve further study. PMID:26203273

  5. Variability of residual platelet function despite clopidogrel treatment in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Schwonberg, Jan; Toennes, Stefan W; Mani, Helen; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2010-04-01

    Residual platelet function despite treatment with clopidogrel may predict an unfavourable cardiovascular outcome. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of clopidogrel administration in conjunction with aspirin in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the platelet response to clopidogrel in the absence of aspirin in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and to investigate whether non-responsiveness to clopidogrel is reproducible during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four clinically stable PAOD patients on a maintenance dose of 75 mg/d clopidogrel were enrolled in this study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 18 months using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) with 2 microM ADP as an agonist. HPLC-coupled mass spectrometry was used to detect clopidogrel and clopidogrel carboxylic acid, the main metabolite of clopidogrel. Residual platelet function, as defined by late aggregation values within the reference range (i.e., >43%), was observed in 35.2% of patients at baseline and 17.6% during follow-up. During the observation period, 26.5% had switched from responder to non-responder status or vice versa. Among non-responders, either clopidogrel or its metabolite was detected in 89.5% and 83.3% of patients at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. We conclude that non-responsiveness to clopidogrel as determined by ADP-induced LTA is not stable over time. This phenomenon cannot be attributed to non-compliance alone. PMID:20153859

  6. Changes in Plasma IL-6, Plasma VEGF and Serum YKL-40 During Treatment with Etanercept and Methotrexate or Etanercept Alone in Patients with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Despite Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Lene Surland; Hetland, Merete Lund; Johansen, Julia Sidenius; Skjødt, Henrik; Peters, Niels Daugaard; Colic, Ada; Grau, Karin; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2009-01-01

    Changes in plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 were determined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients during treatment with etanercept alone or in combination with methotrexate. Twenty-five patients with active RA (DAS28 ≥ 3.2) were randomized to receive etanercept (25 mg sc. biweekly) plus methotrexate (n = 12) or etanercept alone (n = 13). Plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 were determined by ELISA. The 3 biomarkers and DAS28 scores were evaluated at baseline and after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of treatment. At inclusion all patients had significantly (p < 0.001) elevated plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 compared to healthy subjects. Eighteen patients responded to treatment (pooled data from both treatment groups), and they had significant (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001) decreases in plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF, serum YKL-40, ESR and DAS28 after 4 weeks of treatment and throughout the study (except serum YKL-40 at week 16). Plasma IL-6 showed the largest reductions. Non-responders had unchanged biomarkers. At week 16 the patients with DAS28 < 3.2 had lower levels compared to baseline values in plasma IL-6 (p = 0.005), plasma VEGF (p = 0.014), and ESR (p = 0.024). Plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40, which reflect different aspects of the inflammatory process, may provide useful information regarding early differentiation of responders from non-responders. PMID:20029652

  7. The role of IL-28, IFN-γ, and TNF-α in predicting response to pegylated interferon/ribavirin in chronic HCV patients.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Asaad, Nancy Youssef; Ehsan, Nermin; Eltahmody, Mohammad; El-Sabaawy, Maha Mohamed; Elkholy, Shimaa; Elnaidany, Nada Farag

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of HCV therapy is to achieve a sustained virological response (SVR). Many host and viral factors influence the treatment response. Cytokines play an important role in the defense against viral infections, where successful treatment of hepatitis C depends on a complex balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the presence and percentage of some cytokines (IL-28, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) regarding different clinicopathological parameters including response to therapy in chronic HCV patients using immunohistochemical technique. This study was carried out on 64 chronic HCV patients (34 responders and 30 non-responders). Of cases, 54% showed IL-28 expression, which was associated with low AST (p = 0.002) and low HAI score (p = 0.006). Of cases, 67 and 45% showed IFN-γ and TNF-α expression, respectively, where the median percentage of TNF-α expression was higher in grade II spotty necrosis compared to grade I. Some inflammatory cytokines expressed by intrahepatic inflammatory cells in chronic HCV patients promote inflammation and injury (pro-inflammatory) such as TNF-α. Other cytokines aid in resolving inflammation and injury (anti-inflammatory) such as IL-28. The balance between these cytokines will determine the degree of inflammatory state. None of the investigated cytokines proved its clear cut role in affecting response to therapy, however, their levels varied between responders and non-responders for further investigations to clarify. PMID:25131720

  8. 10% Tumor Diameter Shrinkage on the First Follow-Up Computed Tomography Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Angiogenesis Inhibitors: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Franchetti, Yoko; Nishino, Mizuki; Fay, André P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted agents are standard therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), associated with variable tumor shrinkage. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is of limited utility in this setting, and other imaging changes are sought to reliably predict outcome early. We aim to validate 10% tumor shrinkage as the best early indicator of outcome. Methods. In this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study, 66 mRCC patients with 165 lesions on clinical trials of VEGF-targeted agents underwent thoracic and abdominal computed tomography at baseline and at first follow-up after therapy. Measurements were performed according to RECIST and tumor shrinkage of ≥10% decrease in sum of the longest diameter (−10%SLD). Correlation with time-to-treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS) were compared and stratified by response to the radiologic criteria. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis yielded the optimal threshold change in SLD, defining patients with prolonged survival. Results. More than −10%SLD significantly differentiated responders from nonresponders (median TTF 8.4 vs. 4.1 months, p = .001), whereas partial response by RECIST did not (median TTF 6.9 vs. 5.5 months in responders vs. nonresponders, p = .34). −10%SLD was also significantly predictive of OS (median OS 35.1 vs. 15.0 months in responders vs. nonresponders, p = .003). ROC curve analysis yielded −9.3% in SLD as the optimal threshold for response/no response. Conclusion. Ten percent tumor shrinkage is validated as a reliable early predictor of outcome in mRCC patients receiving VEGF-targeted therapies and may provide a practical measure to guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:24755461

  9. Interleukin-10.rs1800896 and Interleukin-18.rs1946518 gene polymorphisms could not predict the outcome of hepatitis C virus infection in Egyptian patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Abdelraheem, Wedad M; Hassuna, Noha A; Abuloyoun, Sahar M; Abdel Ghany, Hend M; Rizk, Hazem A; Abdelwahab, Sayed F

    2016-09-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin (IL)-28B gene was used as a major predictor of the response to treatment in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Data examining the role of IL-10 and IL-18 gene polymorphisms among HCV genotype 4 (G4)-infected Egyptians in response to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) therapy are limited. This study investigated the impact of SNP at IL-10.rs1800896 (at position -1082) and IL-18.rs1946518 genes (at position -607) on the response to PEG-IFN/RBV therapy in HCV-infected Egyptians. This study was carried out on 100 HCV patients treated with PEG-IFN plus RBV and 100 healthy controls. The HCV patients included 50 treatment non-responders (NR) and 50 subjects with sustained virologic response (SVR). Genomic DNA from venous blood of subjects was extracted and IL-10.rs1800896 and IL-18.rs1946518 genotypes were determined using allele-specific amplification and SYBR Green real-time PCR. Linkage disequilibrium between the two SNPs was estimated using Haploview software. The frequency of the IL-10.rs1800896 AA, AG and GG genotypes among non-responders were 16 %, 70 % and 14 % while among SVR subjects, the frequency was 34 %, 60 % and 6 %, respectively (p=0.073). On the other hand, the frequency of the IL-18.rs1946518 AA, AC and CC genotypes among non-responders was 14 %, 50 % and 36 %, respectively, while among responders, these frequencies were 28 %, 44 % and 28 %, (p = 0.220). Both markers were in linkage equilibrium (D' = 0.23; r (2) = 0.052). SNPs in the IL-10.rs1800896 and IL-18.rs1946518 genes could not predict the outcome of HCV infection in Egyptians treated with PEG-IFN/RBV. PMID:27352267

  10. What to Do When Biologic Agents Are Not Working in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Sushila R.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor α and anti-integrin biologic therapies are effective for induction and maintenance of remission in moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. However, clinicians face many challenges in determining the best course of action when a patient does not respond or loses response to a biologic therapy. When patients are found to have continued active inflammation despite having undergone biologic therapy, the first determination should be whether this represents a primary nonresponse to the drug’s mechanism of action or a secondary loss of response due to inadequate drug levels and/or antibody formation to the drug. Primary nonresponders may respond to a drug with a different mechanism of action. Secondary loss of response may be addressed through strategies such as dose escalation or addition of an immunosuppressant. Future options may include changing to a therapy targeting other mechanisms of immune modulation. PMID:27330493

  11. Assessment of treatment response by total tumor volume and global apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with metastatic bone disease: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Blackledge, Matthew D; Collins, David J; Tunariu, Nina; Orton, Matthew R; Padhani, Anwar R; Leach, Martin O; Koh, Dow-Mu

    2014-01-01

    We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI) using a Markov random field (MRF) model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV) and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC); and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change = +0.18, range = -0.07 to +0.78 × 10(-3) mm2/s) after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change = -0.02, range = -0.10 to +0.05 × 10(-3) mm2/s, p = 0.05, Mann-Whitney test), whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change = +26%, range = +3 to +284%) compared to responding patients (median change = -50%, range = -85 to +27%, p = 0.02, Mann-Whitney test). Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment. PMID:24710083

  12. Cytokine profile of autologous platelet-derived eye drops in patients with ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Valentini, C G; Nuzzolo, E R; Orlando, N; Metafuni, E; Bianchi, M; Chiusolo, P; Zini, G; Teofili, L

    2016-02-01

    Ocular chronic GVHD is efficaciously treated with autologous platelet-derived eye drops. We investigated the cytokine content of eye drops produced using a non-gelified lysate obtained from autologous platelet-rich plasma in six patients with ocular GVHD. In both the responding (n = 4) and the resistant (n = 2) patients, the eye drops were significantly enriched with various growth factors, in amounts proportional with the platelet counts. In contrast, chemokine ligand and interleukin levels were similar to those of plasma. The non-responding patients showed the highest levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10. These findings provide possible explanations for beneficial or detrimental effects of eye drops. PMID:26383050

  13. BDNF plasma levels variations in major depressed patients receiving duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Michele; Escelsior, Andrea; Rocchi, Giulio; Conio, Benedetta; Magioncalda, Paola; Marozzi, Valentina; Presta, Andrea; Sterlini, Bruno; Contini, Paola; Amore, Mario; Fornaro, Pantaleo; Martino, Matteo

    2015-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Objective of the study was to investigate BDNF levels variations in MDD patients during antidepressant treatment with duloxetine. 30 MDD patients and 32 healthy controls were assessed using Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) and monitored for BDNF plasma levels at baseline, week 6 and week 12 of duloxetine treatment (60 mg/day) and at baseline, respectively. According to early clinical response to duloxetine (defined at week 6 by reduction >50 % of baseline HAM-D score), MDD patients were distinguished in early responders (ER) and early non-responders (ENR), who reached clinical response at week 12. Laboratory analysis showed significant lower baseline BDNF levels among patients compared to controls. During duloxetine treatment, in ENR BDNF levels increased, reaching values not significantly different compared to controls, while in ER BDNF levels remained nearly unchanged. Lower baseline BDNF levels observed in patients possibly confirm an impairment of the NEI stress-adaptation system and neuroplasticity in depression, while BDNF increase and normalization observed only in ENR might suggest differential neurobiological backgrounds in ER vs. ENR within the depressive syndrome. PMID:25501804

  14. Emergence of telaprevir-resistant variants detected by ultra-deep sequencing after triple therapy in patients infected with HCV genotype 1.

    PubMed

    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Seko, Yuya; Kawamura, Yusuke; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Hara, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Mariko; Saitoh, Satoshi; Arase, Yasuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2013-06-01

    Using ultra-deep sequencing technology, the present was designed to investigate whether the emergence of telaprevir-resistant variants (amino acid substitutions of aa36, aa54, aa155, aa156, and aa170 positions in HCV NS3 region) after commencement of triple therapy of telaprevir/peginterferon (PEG-IFN)/ribavirin could be predicted at baseline in previous non-responders to dual therapy. Fourteen patients infected with HCV genotype 1 who did not respond to previous PEG-IFN/ribavirin, received a 24-week regimen of triple therapy, and were evaluated for appearance of telaprevir-resistant variants (amino acid substitutions of more than 0.2% among the total coverage) by ultra-deep sequencing. The sustained virological response rate was 28.6% (4 of 14 patients), which was significantly higher in patients with Arg70 (substitution at core aa70) and partial response (type of previous response to PEG-IFN/ribavirin) than in other patients. Telaprevir-resistant variants at baseline were detected in 7.1% (1 of 14 patients) by direct sequencing and in 21.4% (3 of 14 patients) by ultra-deep sequencing. The appearance of telaprevir-resistant variants was examined by ultra-deep sequencing in 10 who did not show sustained virological responders. De novo variants emerged at re-elevation of viral load, regardless of variant frequencies at baseline (one patient with very high frequency variants [T54S: 99.9%], two patients with very low frequency variants [V36A: 0.2%; and V170A: 0.4%], and seven patients of undetectable variants). It is concluded that it is difficult to predict at baseline the emergence of telaprevir-resistant variants after commencement of triple therapy in prior non-responders of HCV genotype 1, even with the use of ultra-deep sequencing. PMID:23588728

  15. HLA-C and KIR combined genotype as new response marker for HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients treated with interferon-based combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Stelma, F; Jansen, L; Sinnige, M J; van Dort, K A; Takkenberg, R B; Janssen, H L A; Reesink, H W; Kootstra, N A

    2016-08-01

    Current treatment for chronic hepatitis B infection (CHB) consists of interferon-based therapy. However, for unknown reasons, a large proportion of patients with CHB do not respond to this treatment. Hence, there is a pressing need to establish response markers to select patients who will benefit from therapy and to spare potential nonresponders from unnecessary side effects of antiviral therapy. Here, we assessed whether HLA-C and KIR genotypes were associated with treatment outcome for CHB. Twelve SNPs in or near the HLA-C gene were genotyped in 86 CHB patients (41 HBeAg positive; 45 HBeAg negative) treated with peginterferon alfa-2a + adefovir. Genotyping of killer immunoglobin-like receptors (KIRs) was performed by SSP-PCR. One SNP in HLA-C (rs2308557) was significantly associated with combined response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients (P = 0.003). This SNP is linked to the HLA-C group C1 or C2 classification, which controls KIR binding. The combination of KIR2DL1 with its ligand HLA-C2 was observed significantly more often in HBeAg-positive patients with a combined response (13/14) than in nonresponders (11/27, P = 0.001). Patients with the KIR2DL1/C2 genotype had significantly higher baseline ALT levels (136 vs 50 U/L, P = 0.002) than patients without this combination. Furthermore, KIR2DL1-C2 predicted response independent of HBV genotype and ALT at baseline. HLA-C and KIR genotype is strongly associated with response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients treated with interferon-based therapy. In combination with other known response markers, HLA-C/KIR genotype could enable the selection of patients more likely to respond to interferon-based therapy. PMID:26945896

  16. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a 13C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H. pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×103 million cells/L; P < 0.01), whereas platelet counts in the non-responding patients and uninfected group did not differ after this period of time. H. pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections. PMID:26925898

  17. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a (13)C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×10(3) million cells/L; P < 0.01), whereas platelet counts in the non-responding patients and uninfected group did not differ after this period of time. H. pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections. PMID:26925898

  18. Overexpression of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 is an Independent Predictor of Poor Virological Response to Interferon Therapy in Chronic HCV Genotype 4 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Wafaey M.; Ibrahim, Mohammed A.; Shatat, Mohamed E.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: COX-2 and TGF-β1 are overexpressed in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and are related to hepatitis pathogenesis and hepatic fibrosis. The current study investigated the relationship between pretreatment COX-2 and TGF-β1 hepatic expression in HCV genotype 4 and the virological response to interferon therapy. Patients and Methods: Liver biopsies of 55 patients with HCV infection genotype 4 were selected together with 10 liver biopsies as control. The patients’ clinicopathological data were collected. Immunohistochemistry was done using anti-COX-2 and anti-TGF-β1 antibodies. Statistical tests were used to determine the association between both COX-2 and TGF-β1 expression in relation to clinicopathological parameters and response to interferon therapy. Results: COX-2 was upregulated especially in nonresponders and was an independent predictor of poor virological response. However, COX-2 showed no association with other clinicopathological features. TGF-β1 was upregulated and associated with nonresponders, histological activity, and fibrosis stage. There was no association between TGF-β1 and other clinicopathological features. There was an association between COX-2 and TGF-β1 immunoexpression. Conclusion: Overexpression of COX-2 and TGF-β1 is an independent predictor for poor outcome of interferon and ribavirin therapy and these might be useful markers for the response to treatment. Both molecules are associated together; however, their role during hepatitis treatment has to be clarified. PMID:24496160

  19. Tics Moderate Sertraline, but Not Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients Who Do Not Respond to Cognitive-Behavior Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Scott; Thomsen, Per Hove; Weidle, Bernhard; Dahl, Kitty; Nissen, Judith Becker; Torp, Nor Christian; Hybel, Katja; Melin, Karin Holmgren; Valderhaug, Robert; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Ivarsson, Tord

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the presence of tic disorder is negatively associated with sertraline (SRT) outcomes, but not with continued cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), in a sample of youth who were unresponsive to an initial full course of CBT. Methods: In the Nordic Long-Term OCD Study, children and adolescents with OCD who were rated as nonresponders to 14 weeks of open-label CBT were randomized to continued CBT (n=28) or SRT treatment (n=22) for an additional 16 weeks of treatment. We investigated whether the presence or absence of comorbid tic disorder moderated treatment outcomes on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS). Results: Twelve out of 50 (24.0%) participants were diagnosed with comorbid tic disorder, with 7 receiving continued CBT and 5 receiving SRT, respectively. In patients without tic disorder, results showed no significant between-group differences on average CY-BOCS scores. However, in patients with comorbid tic disorder, those who received SRT had significantly lower average CY-BOCS scores than those who received continued CBT. Conclusions: Children and adolescents with OCD and comorbid tic disorder, who are nonresponders to an initial 14 week course of CBT, may benefit more from a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) than from continued CBT. PMID:26091197

  20. NLRP3 inflammasome is associated with the response to IFN-β in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sunny; Río, Jordi; Urcelay, Elena; Nurtdinov, Ramil; Bustamante, Marta F; Fernández, Oscar; Oliver, Begoña; Zettl, Uwe; Brassat, David; Killestein, Joep; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Drulovic, Jelena; Chan, Andrew; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; García-Merino, Antonio; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Evidence exists for a potential modulation of inflammasome activity by interferon beta. Here, we investigated the roles of inflammasomes [absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2); NLR family, CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4); NLR family, pyrin domain containing 1 and 3 (NLRP1 and NLRP3)] and related cytokines (IL1B, IL10, IL18) in the response to interferon beta in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Ninety-seven patients treated with interferon beta were classified into responders and non-responders according to clinical criteria after 24 months and clinical-radiological criteria after 12 months of treatment. Messenger RNA expression levels of inflammasomes and cytokines were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected before treatment with interferon beta. In a subgroup of patients, NLRP3 and IL1B expression was also determined after 3 months (n = 32) and 12 months (n = 20) of interferon beta treatment. A polymorphism located in the NLRP3 gene, rs35829419, was genotyped in 789 multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon beta. Baseline mRNA expression levels for NLRP3 and IL1B were increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from non-responders compared to responders classified according to clinical criteria after 24 months (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant differences were observed for other inflammasomes and related cytokines. Differences in NLRP3 and IL1B expression remained significant following a clinical-radiological classification after 12 months (P = 0.007 and P = 0.02, respectively). After treatment with interferon beta, NLRP3 and IL1B expression was increased in responders but unchanged in non-responders. A trend for association was observed between rs35829419 and interferon beta response (pM-H = 0.08). These results point to a role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its related cytokine IL1B in the response to interferon beta in patients with relapsing

  1. NLRP3 inflammasome is associated with the response to IFN-β in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sunny; Río, Jordi; Urcelay, Elena; Nurtdinov, Ramil; Bustamante, Marta F; Fernández, Oscar; Oliver, Begoña; Zettl, Uwe; Brassat, David; Killestein, Joep; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Drulovic, Jelena; Chan, Andrew; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; García-Merino, Antonio; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Evidence exists for a potential modulation of inflammasome activity by interferon beta. Here, we investigated the roles of inflammasomes [absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2); NLR family, CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4); NLR family, pyrin domain containing 1 and 3 (NLRP1 and NLRP3)] and related cytokines (IL1B, IL10, IL18) in the response to interferon beta in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Ninety-seven patients treated with interferon beta were classified into responders and non-responders according to clinical criteria after 24 months and clinical-radiological criteria after 12 months of treatment. Messenger RNA expression levels of inflammasomes and cytokines were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected before treatment with interferon beta. In a subgroup of patients, NLRP3 and IL1B expression was also determined after 3 months (n = 32) and 12 months (n = 20) of interferon beta treatment. A polymorphism located in the NLRP3 gene, rs35829419, was genotyped in 789 multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon beta. Baseline mRNA expression levels for NLRP3 and IL1B were increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from non-responders compared to responders classified according to clinical criteria after 24 months (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant differences were observed for other inflammasomes and related cytokines. Differences in NLRP3 and IL1B expression remained significant following a clinical-radiological classification after 12 months (P = 0.007 and P = 0.02, respectively). After treatment with interferon beta, NLRP3 and IL1B expression was increased in responders but unchanged in non-responders. A trend for association was observed between rs35829419 and interferon beta response (pM-H = 0.08). These results point to a role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its related cytokine IL1B in the response to interferon beta in patients with relapsing

  2. Study of the effect of antiviral therapy on homocysteinemia in hepatitis C virus- infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the leading causes of chronic liver disease (CLD). About 80% of those exposed to the virus develop a chronic infection. Hyperhomocysteinemia, which is an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease and thromboembolism, may develop in HCV-infected patients although altered alanine amino transferase (ALT) enzyme levels are generally associated with damage to liver cells. The gold standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C patients is pegylated interferon combined with an anti-viral drug (ribavirin). The current study aimed to investigate the effect of antiviral therapy on plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels in HCV patients in addition to other parameters. Methods 532 HCV-infected patients and 70 healthy controls were recruited for the study. All patients were subjected to laboratory investigations including HCV-RNA levels, complete blood cell counts, serum levels of homocysteine, ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lipid profile and liver ultrasonographic examination. The outcome of treatment with pegylated interferon α plus ribavirin treatment and sustained virologic response (SVR) was determined 6–9 months post-therapy. Results Hyperhomocysteinemia was found in 91.35% of HCV-infected patients. The difference in plasma Hcy concentrations reached statistical significance between the patient and control groups. ALT, cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs) levels were found higher than normal in the patients group. After receiving a combined therapy for 24 weeks, 43.66% patients showed an SVR (responders); 30.98% patients were non-responders while 25.35% patients initially responded to therapy but again retrieved positive status of HCV infection six months post-therapy (relapse-cirrhotic patients). The mean levels of plasma Hcy, ALT and ALP were significantly reduced in responders within 10 weeks of therapy when compared with non-responders and relapse-cirrhotic patients. Conclusion Elevated

  3. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  4. S100B Serum Levels Predict Treatment Response in Patients with Melancholic Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bergink, Veerle; Grosse, Laura; Alferink, Judith; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Rothermundt, Matthias; Arolt, Volker; Birkenhäger, Tom K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an ongoing search for biomarkers in psychiatry, for example, as diagnostic tools or predictors of treatment response. The neurotrophic factor S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B) has been discussed as a possible predictor of antidepressant response in patients with major depression, but also as a possible biomarker of an acute depressive state. The aim of the present study was to study the association of serum S100B levels with antidepressant treatment response and depression severity in melancholically depressed inpatients. Methods: After a wash-out period of 1 week, 40 inpatients with melancholic depression were treated with either venlafaxine or imipramine. S100B levels and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) scores were assessed at baseline, after 7 weeks of treatment, and after 6 months. Results: Patients with high S100B levels at baseline showed a markedly better treatment response defined as relative reduction in HAM-D scores than those with low baseline S100B levels after 7 weeks (P=.002) and 6 months (P=.003). In linear regression models, S100B was a significant predictor for treatment response at both time points. It is of interest to note that nonresponders were detected with a predictive value of 85% and a false negative rate of 7.5%. S100B levels were not associated with depression severity and did not change with clinical improvement. Conclusions: Low S100B levels predict nonresponse to venlafaxine and imipramine with high precision. Future studies have to show which treatments are effective in patients with low levels of S100B so that this biomarker will help to reduce patients’ burden of nonresponding to frequently used antidepressants. PMID:26364276

  5. Higher Strength Lanthanum Carbonate Provides Serum Phosphorus Control With a Low Tablet Burden and Is Preferred by Patients and Physicians: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Martin, Kevin J.; Fishbane, Steven; Sprague, Stuart M.; Zeig, Steven; Anger, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Management of hyperphosphatemia, a predictor of mortality in chronic kidney disease, is challenging. Nonadherence to dietary phosphate binders, in part, contributes to uncontrolled serum phosphorus levels. This phase IIIb trial assessed the efficacy of increased dosages (3000 to 4500 mg/d) of reformulated lanthanum carbonate (500-, 750-, and 1000-mg tablets) in nonresponders to dosages of up to 3000 mg/d. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This 8-wk study with a 4-mo open-label extension enrolled 513 patients who were undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Patients who achieved serum phosphorus control at week 4 with ≤3000 mg/d lanthanum carbonate entered cohort A; nonresponders were randomly assigned to receive 3000, 3750, or 4500 mg/d (cohort B). The primary outcome measure was the control rate for predialysis serum phosphorus levels at the end of week 8, among patients in cohort B. Results: At the end of week 4, 54% of patients achieved serum phosphorus control at dosages ≤3000 mg/d administered as one tablet per meal. Among patients who entered cohort B, control rates of 25, 38, and 32% for patients who were randomly assigned to 3000, 3750, or 4500 mg/d lanthanum carbonate, respectively, were achieved, with no increase in adverse events. Patients and physicians reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction with reformulated lanthanum carbonate compared with previous phosphate binders, partly because of reduced tablet burden with higher dosage strengths. Physicians and patients also expressed a preference for lanthanum carbonate over previous medication. Conclusions: Reformulated lanthanum carbonate is an effective phosphate binder that may reduce daily tablet burden. PMID:18579668

  6. Interactions between HIV infection and leprosy: a paradox.

    PubMed

    Ustianowski, Andrew P; Lawn, Stephen D; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2006-06-01

    Early in the HIV epidemic it was feared that the disease would undermine leprosy control, as has occurred with tuberculosis. It was predicted that patients with leprosy and HIV coinfection would have an increased risk of lepromatous disease and a faster clinical evolution, and that the leprosy would be more difficult to treat. None of these concerns have materialised and the interaction between HIV and Mycobacterium leprae seems to be far more subtle than that between HIV and tuberculosis. We review the epidemiological, clinical, and pathological data relating to leprosy/HIV coinfection. The published epidemiological data are limited in quality but show neither an increased HIV prevalence among leprosy cases nor an alteration in clinical spectrum of leprosy among coinfected patients. Some data suggest that immune-mediated reactions that complicate leprosy occur at a higher frequency in coinfected patients. Leprosy has now been reported presenting as immune reconstitution disease among patients commencing highly active antiretroviral treatment. Histopathological observations reveal a normal spectrum of appearances in biopsies of leprosy lesions from coinfected patients, even among those with advanced immunodeficiency. These observations suggest that cell-mediated immune responses to M leprae are preserved at the site of disease despite evidence that these responses are abrogated systemically, by contrast with tuberculosis, in which the host granulomatous response is impaired by HIV coinfection. We speculate that this paradox may relate to differences between the activation state and rates of cell turnover within leprosy and tuberculosis granulomas that differentially affect the susceptibility of the granulomas to HIV. The interactions between leprosy and HIV have been little studied and further research on the clinical, pathological, and management aspects of this coinfection is warranted. PMID:16728321

  7. Treatment of chronic HCV genotype 1 coinfection.

    PubMed

    Boesecke, Christoph; Rockstroh, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Several all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) combination therapies including two fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) have been recently licensed for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection. Results of pivotal trials with these new compounds are now also available in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, highlighting that, in the DAA era, differences no longer do exist in efficacy between HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. This review will give an overview of the key DAA-containing studies in HIV/HCV genotype 1 coinfection and give guidance on how and when these should be used in clinical practice. Simplified DAA-based and potentially interferon-free HCV therapy regimens are characterized by smaller pill burden, better tolerability, shorter treatment durations, and higher cure rates. With first pilot studies in HCV treatment-naive and treatment-experienced persons with HCV/HIV coinfection demonstrating sustained virological response rates above 95 %, interferon (IFN)-free DAA combinations should be considered the new standard of care for chronic HCV. Per both European and US treatment guidelines, HCV treatment indications and DAA drug selection in HIV-coinfected patients are no longer different from HCV-monoinfected patients as cure rates in HCV-monoinfected and HCV-coinfected patients are superimposable. Drug-drug interactions with the new DAAs and concomitant antiretroviral therapy, however, have to be checked carefully prior to selecting DAAs due to commonly shared metabolization pathways. In countries with access to the new DAAs, interferon-free DAA combination therapy for HCV genotype 1 infection is strongly recommended. Agents should be selected based upon HCV genotype and according to current guidelines. Potential drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretrovirals and HCV therapy need to be checked, and if necessary, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has to be adapted to the respective HCV therapy

  8. Early change in glucose metabolic rate measured using FDG-PET in patients with high-grade glioma predicts response to temozolomide but not temozolomide plus radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, Natalie . E-mail: natalie.charnley@mmic.man.ac.uk; West, Catharine M.; Barnett, Carolyn M.; Brock, Catherine; Bydder, Graeme M.; Glaser, Mark; Newlands, Ed S.; Swindell, Ric; Matthews, Julian; Price, Pat

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to predict response to temozolomide vs. temozolomide plus radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with high-grade glioma (HGG) were studied. Patients with recurrent glioma received temozolomide 75 mg/m{sup 2} daily for 7 weeks (n = 8). Newly diagnosed patients received temozolomide 75 mg/m{sup 2} daily plus radiotherapy 60 Gy/30 fractions over 6 weeks, followed by six cycles of adjuvant temozolomide 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day (Days 1-5 q28) starting 1 month after radiotherapy (n = 11). [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) PET scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed at baseline, and 7 and 19 weeks after initiation of temozolomide administration. Changes in glucose metabolic rate (MRGlu) and MRI response were correlated with patient survival. Results: In the temozolomide-alone group, patients who survived >26 vs. {<=}26 weeks showed a greater reduction in MRGlu measured at 7 weeks with median changes of -34% and -4%, respectively (p = 0.02). PET responders, defined as a reduction in MRGlu {>=}25%, survived longer than nonresponders with mean survival times of 75 weeks (95% CI, 34-115 vs. 20 weeks (95% CI, 14-26) (p = 0.0067). In the small group of patients studied, there was no relationship between MRI response and survival (p = 0.52). For patients receiving temozolomide plus radiotherapy, there was no difference in survival between PET responders and nonresponders (p = 0.32). Conclusions: Early changes in MRGlu predict response to temozolomide, but not temozolomide plus radiotherapy.

  9. Genetic polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region and response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors in patients with premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin; Otunctemur, Alper; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Polat, Emre Can; Ozcan, Levent; Köse, Osman; Cekmen, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Serotonin plays a central role in ejaculation and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been successfully used to treat premature ejaculation. Here, we evaluated the relationship between a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the response of patients with premature ejaculation to SSRI medication. METHODS: Sixty-nine premature ejaculation patients were treated with 20 mg/d paroxetine for three months. The Intravaginal Ejaculatory Latency Time and International Index of Erectile Function scores were compared with baseline values. The patients were scored as having responded to therapy when a 2-fold or greater increase was observed in Intravaginal Ejaculatory Latency Time compared with baseline values after three months. Three genotypes of 5-HTTLPR were studied: LL, LS and SS. The appropriateness of the allele frequencies in 5-HTTLPR were analyzed according to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium using the χ2-test. RESULTS: The short (S) allele of 5-HTTLPR was significantly more frequent in responders than in nonresponders (p<0.05). Out of the 69 total PE patients, 41 patients (59%) responded to therapy. There was no significant difference in the International Index of Erectile Function score at the end of therapy between the responder and nonresponder groups. The frequencies of the L allele and S allele were 20% and 39%, respectively, in the responder group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: We conclude that premature ejaculation patients with the SS genotype respond well to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy. Further studies with large patient groups are necessary to confirm this conclusion. PMID:25518026

  10. Using 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET) to Monitor Clinical Outcomes in Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemo-Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Minsig; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Venkatramanamoorthy, Raghu; Lawhorn-Crews, Jawana M.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Shields, Anthony F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic cancer ranks as the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with five year survival ranging from 1-5%. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a metabolic imaging system that is widely used for the initial staging of cancer and detecting residual disease after treatment. There are limited data, however, on the use of this molecular imaging technique to assess early tumor response after treatment in pancreatic cancer. METHODS The objective of the study was to explore the relationship of early treatment response using the 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET with surgical outcome and overall survival in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. FDG-PET measurements of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and kinetic parameters were compared to the clinical outcome. RESULTS Twenty patients were enrolled in the study evaluating neoadjuvant induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. All twenty patients had pre-study PET scans and a total of fifty PET scans were performed. Among patients who were PET responders (≥50% decrease in SUV after cycle 1), 100% (2/2) had complete surgical resection. Only 6% (1/16) had surgical resection in the PET non-responders (<50% decrease). Two patients did not have the second PET scan due to clinical progression or treatment toxicity. Mean survival was 23.2 months for PET responders and 11.3 months for non-responders (p=0.234). Similar differences in survival were also noted when response was measured using Patlak analysis. CONCLUSION FDG-PET can aid in monitoring the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemo-RT. FDG-PET may be used to aid patients who could have complete surgical resection as well as prognosticate patients’ survival. PMID:19806035

  11. Treatment of patients with immune thrombocytopenia admitted to the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Bavunoğlu, Işıl; Eşkazan, Ahmet Emre; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Cengiz, Mahir; Yavuzer, Serap; Salihoğlu, Ayşe; Öngören, Şeniz; Tunçkale, Aydın; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most frequent cause of acquired thrombocytopenia. In adult ITP patients, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) are used as first-line treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate retrospectively the demographic and etiologic characteristics of patients with ITP admitted to the emergency room at our hospital. Seventy-five adult patients with ITP were included, and demographic data, bleeding characteristics, etiologic features and responses to treatments were evaluated retrospectively. Fifty-six patients (75 %) were female, and the median age was 43 years. Eighteen patients had a history of ITP, whereas in 57, thrombocytopenia was identified for the first time. During admission, the median platelet count was 5 × 10(9)/L. Cutaneous and/or mucosal bleeding was the most common clinical feature. High-dose dexamethasone was administered in 60 episodes, whereas IVIg and conventional-dose methylprednisolone were used in nine and six episodes, respectively. The overall response rate of the entire cohort following first-line treatments was 67 %, and complete remission was achieved in 31 patients, 19 patients achieved partial remission, and 25 patients were non-responders. In cases with life-threatening bleeding, concomitant infection, post-traumatic bleeding and need for emergency surgery, IVIg can be used as the first line of treatment option in addition to platelet transfusions. PMID:27129318

  12. A metabolomics approach for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan; Yin, Mingzhu; Sun, Fengyu; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Xiaohua; Li, Huiyan; Zheng, Jian; Chen, Xiuwei; Li, Cong; Ning, Xiaoming; Lou, Ge; Li, Kang

    2014-08-01

    Cervical cancer is a clinical and pathological heterogeneity disease, which requires different types of treatments and leads to a variety of outcomes. In clinical practice, only some patients benefit from chemotherapy treatment. Identifying patients who will be responsive to chemotherapy could increase their survival time, which has important implications in personalized treatment and outcomes, while identifying non-responders may reduce the likelihood for these patients to receive ineffective treatment and thereby enable them to receive other potentially effective treatments. Plasma metabolite profiling was performed in this study to identify the potential biomarkers that could predict the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for cervical cancer patients. The metabolic profiles of plasma from 38 cervical cancer patients with a complete, partial and non-response to NACT were studied using a combination of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multivariate analysis methods. L-Valine and L-tryptophan were finally identified and verified as the potential biomarkers. A prediction model constructed with L-valine and L-tryptophan correctly identified approximately 80% of patients who were non-response to chemotherapy and 87% of patients who were had a pathologically complete response to chemotherapy. The model has an excellent discriminant performance with an AUC of 0.9407. These results show promise for larger studies that could produce more personalized treatment protocols for cervical cancer patients. PMID:24865370

  13. Discordant responses to cART in HIV-1 patients in the era of high potency antiretroviral drugs: clinical evaluation, classification, management prospects.

    PubMed

    Cenderello, Giovanni; De Maria, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The goal of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in HIV-1 patients is immune reconstitution following control of viral replication. CD4+ cell number/proportions are a crude but essential correlate of immune reconstitution. Despite suppression of HIV replication, a fraction of ART-treated patients still fails to fully reconstitute CD4+ T cell numbers (immunological nonresponders, INRs). New drugs, regimens and treatment strategies led to increased efficacy, lower side effects and higher virological success rates in clinical practice. The multitude of described immune defects and clinical events accompanying INR opposed to the marginal effect of antiretroviral intensification or immunotherapy trials underline the need for continuing efforts at understanding the mechanisms that underlie INR. Here, we reassess INR definition, frequency, and the achievements of active clinical and translational research suggesting a shared definition for insufficient, partial and complete CD4+ cell number recovery thus improving homogeneity in patient selection and mechanism identification. PMID:26513236

  14. Serum microRNA-199a/b-3p as a predictive biomarker for treatment response in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing transarterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zelong; Feng, Chao; Hu, Peng; Chen, Yong; He, Xiao-feng; Li, Yanhao; Zhao, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the level of serum microRNA-199a/b-3p (miR-199a/b-3p) can serve as a predictor of treatment response to transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Serum miR-199a/b-3p expression level was measured in 132 patients with HCC before TACE (t1) and 3–5 days after TACE (t2). Additionally, 126 patients of these 132 patients had levels measured 4 weeks after TACE (t3) and 3–5 days after second TACE (t4). Serum miR-199a/b-3p expression levels were compared with those of 50 healthy controls. Correlations between miR-199a/b-3p expression levels and clinicopathologic factors and tumor responsiveness were analyzed. The modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors assessment was conducted at t3. Results A lower mean baseline miR-199a/b-3p expression level was observed in patients with HCC compared with healthy controls (0.68±0.81 vs 2.50±2.16, P<0.001). A negative correlation between baseline miR-199a/b-3p expression levels and tumor size (P<0.001) was observed. The nonresponder group had significantly lower miR-199a/b-3p expression levels than the responder group at t1 (0.77±1.09 vs 1.96±1.32, P<0.001). In addition, the decrease in miR-199a/b-3p at t2 was greater in the responder group than in the nonresponder group (P=0.011). A higher proportion of the responder group achieved a >25% decrease in serum miR-199a/b-3p expression levels compared with the nonresponder group (64% vs 39%). Conclusion Serum miR-199a/b-3p may represent a novel biomarker for predicting efficacy of TACE in patients with HCC. PMID:27226729

  15. Effect of pasireotide on glucose- and growth hormone-related biomarkers in patients with inadequately controlled acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Herbert A; Brue, Thierry; Colao, Annamaria; Gadelha, Mônica R; Shimon, Ilan; Kapur, Karen; Pedroncelli, Alberto M; Fleseriu, Maria

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain more insight into the mechanism of action of pasireotide in patients who completed the PAOLA study. PAOLA was a 24-week, Phase III, randomized, three-arm study of pasireotide LAR 40 and 60 mg versus octreotide LAR 30 mg or lanreotide Autogel 120 mg in patients with inadequately controlled acromegaly. The current work was a planned exploratory objective of the PAOLA study that evaluated changes in levels of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in each treatment arm. Responders to pasireotide LAR (mean GH levels <2.5 μg/L and normal IGF-1 levels at 24 weeks) had lower GH and IGF-1 levels at baseline (GH 5.1 ng/mL, IGF-1 519 ng/mL) than non-responders (GH 7.9 ng/mL, IGF-1 672 ng/mL). Frequency of hyperglycaemia after pasireotide treatment was similar in responders and non-responders and depended more on the baseline FPG level. 47 % of all patients treated with pasireotide LAR (40 or 60 mg) did not receive antidiabetic medication at any time during this study. This is the first study to evaluate the treatment effect of pasireotide on key hormonal and glycaemic biomarkers and to identify potential predictors of pasireotide-associated hyperglycaemia. Pre-treatment glucose status may be predictive of the development of pasireotide-associated hyperglycaemia. A large subset of patients with acromegaly does not experience major disturbances in glucose homeostasis while receiving pasireotide LAR. PMID:26906713

  16. Hepatitis B Vaccination in End-Stage Pulmonary Disease Patients Evaluated for Lung Transplantation: A Retrospective Single-Center Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Alexandra; Deterding, Lea; Maier, Melanie; Liebert, Uwe G; Berg, Thomas; Wirtz, Hubert; Wiegand, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In times of limited organs for transplantation, anti-HBc-positive organs can be accepted for lung transplantation to increase the number of donors. Transplant recipients should be vaccinated against hepatitis B to prevent HBV infection. However, response after HBV vaccination has only been poorly evaluated in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS Anti-HBs titers of 40 anti-HBc negative patients with end-stage pulmonary disease evaluated for lung transplantation were analyzed with the Architect® system (Abbott, Germany). Responders, partial responders, or non-responders after HBV vaccination were defined by anti-HBs titers >100 IU/L, 10-100 IU/L, and <10 IU/L, respectively. RESULTS There were 34/40 individuals (85%) vaccinated against hepatitis B, and 6 were not vaccinated. Response, partial response, and non-response after vaccination were observed in 10/34 (29.4%), 11/34 (32.4%), and 13/34 (38.2%) of patients, respectively. Response to vaccination did not correlate with sex, pulmonary disease, comorbidities, immunosuppressive therapy, or smoking status. CONCLUSIONS Although 85% of patients evaluated for lung transplantation were vaccinated against hepatitis B, 38.2% did not show an anti-HBs titer >10 IU/L. Thus, anti-HBs titers should be regularly monitored. Nonresponders should be considered for booster vaccinations, alternative vaccination schedules, or prophylactic treatment with a nucleos(t)ide analogue in case of transplantation of an anti-HBc-positive organ. PMID:27297788

  17. Outer Segment Thickness Predicts Visual Field Response to QLT091001 in Patients with RPE65 or LRAT Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Birch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the degree of change in Goldmann visual fields (GVFs) following oral administration of QLT091001 was related to baseline measures of retinal structure. Methods Oral QLT091001 was administered once daily for 7 days in all study patients. Comprehensive ophthalmic testing, including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), was conducted in 14 patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and 18 patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) at seven international sites. Average thickness of the outer segment (OS) layer was calculated over central 20°. Both eyes of each subject were evaluated separately. Results Nineteen of 28 eyes (68%) with LCA and 13 of 36 eyes (36%) with RP responded to QLT091001. Among these responders, the average baseline thickness of the OS layer (central 20°) was 13.5 μm in the LCA cohort and 11.7 μm in the RP cohort. Nonresponders had average baseline OS thickness of less than 4.6 μm in both cohorts. The OS thickness in the central 20° was significantly shorter in nonresponders than responders in the LCA cohort (P = 0.01, t-test) and in the RP cohort (P = 0.02, Wilcoxon rank sum test). The OS thickness in the central 20° did not change significantly from baseline during the first 2 months (P = 0.09, t-test, paired). Conclusions The present findings suggest that there is a close parallel between the thickness of the photoreceptor layer and the potential for functional improvement in these patients. Translational Relevance SD-OCT thickness in the central retina may be useful for predicting the visual field response in the peripheral retina to QLT091001. (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01014052 number, NCT01014052) PMID:26448901

  18. Development and Validation of a Gene Expression Score That Predicts Response to Fulvestrant in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Steen; Jensen, Thomas; Hansen, Anker; Mazin, Wiktor; Lindemann, Justin; Kuter, Irene; Laing, Naomi; Anderson, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Fulvestrant is a selective estrogen receptor antagonist. Based on the measured growth inhibition of 60 human cancer cell lines (NCI60) in the presence of fulvestrant, as well as the baseline gene expression of the 60 cell lines, a gene expression score that predicts response to fulvestrant was developed. The score is based on 414 genes, 103 of which show increased expression in sensitive cell lines, while 311 show increased expression in the non-responding cell lines. The sensitivity genes primarily sense signaling through estrogen receptor alpha, whereas the resistance genes modulate the PI3K signaling pathway. The latter genes suggest that resistance to fulvestrant can be overcome by drugs targeting the PI3K pathway. The level of this gene expression score and its correlation with fulvestrant response was measured in a panel of 20 breast cancer cell lines. The predicted sensitivity matched the measured sensitivity well (CC = −0.63, P = 0.003). The predictor was applied to tumor biopies obtained from a Phase II clinical trial. The sensitivity of each patient to treatment with fulvestrant was predicted based on the RNA profile of the biopsy taken before neoadjuvant treatment and without knowledge of the subsequent response. The prediction was then compared to clinical response to show that the responders had a significantly higher sensitivity prediction than the non-responders (P = 0.01). When clinical covariates, tumor grade and estrogen receptor H-score, were included in the prediction, the difference in predicted senstivity between responders and non-responders improved (P = 0.003). Using a pre-defined cutoff to separate patients into predicted sensitive and predicted resistant yielded a positive predictive value of 88% and a negative predictive value of 100% when compared to clinical data. We conclude that pre-screening patients with the new gene expression predictor has the potential to identify those postmenopausal women with locally

  19. Pulse interleukin-2 with famotidine induces CD56+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic melanoma or kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Gagnon, Gregory A; Walker, Paul R; Quan, Francine M

    2011-02-01

    Increased lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell numbers and cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines have been seen in patients receiving high-dose continuous and bolus infusion interleukin-2 (IL-2) regimens. LAK are CD56 positive on flow cytometry. Daily intravenous doses of IL-2 of 18-21.6 MIU/m(2) over 15-30 minutes ("pulses") have been developed to attempt to lessen the toxicity of this therapy. It has been previously shown that the patients with metastatic melanoma or kidney cancer may be treated safely with pulse IL-2 daily for 5 days preceded by intravenous famotidine. Cycles were repeated every 21 days. Because LAK numbers have not been previously described with this regimen, the present study has examined CD56 numbers via peripheral blood flow cytometry in 11 patients with samples scheduled at baseline, after two cycles, and after four cycles. Eight (8) patients had melanoma and 3 had kidney cancer. Median CD56 counts after two cycles was significantly higher than baseline (p = 0.001). Similarly, CD56 counts at 2 months later were also greater than baseline (p = 0.009). There was no difference between median values after two cycles versus after four cycles. Patients who were clinical responders had a median CD56 count of 650 after two cycles when compared with nonresponders who had a median CD56 count of 290 (p = 0.005). CD56 counts are significantly elevated in patients treated with pulse IL-2 with famotidine and clinical responders have significantly higher CD56 than nonresponders. PMID:21348776

  20. Volumetric assessment of tumour response using functional MR imaging in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma treated with a combination of doxorubicin-eluting beads and sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Villalobos, Celia Pamela; Halappa, Vivek Gowdra; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Bonekamp, Susanne; Reyes, Diane; Cosgrove, David; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess treatment response using volumetric functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with the combination of doxorubicin-eluting bead–transarterial chemoembolization (DEB TACE) and sorafenib. Methods A single center study enrolled 41 patients treated with systemic sorafenib, 400 mg twice a day, combined with DEB TACE. All patients had a pre-treatment and 3–4 week post-treatment MRI. Anatomic response criteria (RECIST, mRECIST and EASL) and volumetric functional response (ADC, enhancement) were assessed. Statistical analyses included paired Student’s t-test, Kaplan-Meier curves, Cohen’s Kappa, and multivariate cox proportional hazard model. Results Median tumour size by RECIST remained unchanged post-treatment (8.3±4.1 cm vs. 8.1±4.3 cm, p=0.44). There was no significant survival difference for early response by RECIST (p=0.93). EASL and mRECIST could not be analyzed in 12 patients. Volumetric ADC increased significantly (1.32×10−3 mm2/sec to 1.60×10−3 mm2/sec, p<0.001), and volumetric enhancement decreased significantly in HAP (38.2 % to 17.6 %, p<0.001) and PVP (76.6 % to 41.2 %, p<0.005). Patients who demonstrated ≥65 % decrease PVP enhancement had significantly improved overall survival compared to non-responders (p<0.005). Conclusion Volumetric PVP enhancement was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with survival in the combination of DEB TACE and sorafenib for patients with HCC, enabling precise stratification of responders and non-responders. PMID:25226843

  1. Estimating the monetary value of the annual productivity gained in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis receiving etanercept plus methotrexate: interim results from the PRIZE study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bansback, Nick; Sun, Huiying; Pedersen, Ronald; Kotak, Sameer; Anis, Aslam H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure and value the impact of combined etanercept (ETN) and methotrexate (MTX) therapy on work productivity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 52 weeks. Methods MTX- and biological-naïve patients with RA (symptom onset ≤12 months; Disease Activity Score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28) >3.2) received open-label ETN50/MTX for 52 weeks. The Valuation of Lost Productivity (VOLP) questionnaire, measuring paid and unpaid work productivity impacts, was completed approximately every 13 weeks. Bootstrapping methods were used to test changes in VOLP outcomes over time. One-year productivity impacts were compared between responders (DAS28 ≤3.2) at week 13 and non-responders using zero-inflated models for time loss and two-part models for total costs of lost productivity. Results 196 patients were employed at baseline and had ≥1 follow-up with VOLP. Compared with baseline, at week 52, patients gained 33.4 h per 3 months in paid work and 4.2 h per week in unpaid work. Total monetary productivity gains were €1322 per 3 months. Over the 1-year period, responders gained paid (231 h) and unpaid work loss (122 h) compared with non-responders, which amounted to a gain of €3670 for responders. Conclusions This is the first clinical trial to measure and value the impact of biological treatment on all the labour input components that affect overall productivity. Combination therapy with ETN50/MTX was associated with a significant productivity gain for patients with early RA who were still observed at week 52. Over the 1-year treatment period, responders at week 13 suffered significantly less productivity loss than non-responders suggesting this gain was related to treatment response. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00913458 PMID:26535135

  2. Differential viral kinetics in treated genotype 4 chronic hepatitis C patients according to ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Elefsiniotis, I S; Pavlidis, C; Dimitroulopoulos, D; Vezali, E; Mihas, C; Mariolis-Sapsakos, T; Koutsounas, S; Paraskevas, E; Saroglou, G

    2009-10-01

    Data concerning the efficacy of PEG-IFN alpha 2a plus ribavirin treatment in treatment-naive, genotype 4-infected chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients from Europe are limited. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the viral kinetics as well as the sustained virological response (SVR) rates and their predictors, in these patients. One hundred and twenty-three patients were retrospectively analysed. Early (EVR) and late virological response (LVR) was confirmed by undetectable (<50 IU/mL) serum HCV-RNA at week 12 and week 24 of treatment, respectively. SVR was confirmed by undetectable serum HCV-RNA at the end of treatment as well as 6 months later. Overall, 43.5% of patients exhibited SVR, 42.6% were nonresponders and 13.9% were relapsers. EVR was observed in 40.74% and LVR in 59.25% of them. The positive predictive values of EVR and LVR were 72.97% and 86.27% whereas their negative predictive values were 64.29% and 92.85%, respectively. EVR independently predicted SVR in Caucasian patients (P < 0.001) but not in Egyptian patients (P = 0.613), in whom the only independent predictor of SVR was the absence of cirrhosis (P = 0.004). LVR seems to be a better predictor of SVR than EVR in the vast majority of genotype 4-infected CHC patients, irrespective of ethnicity and all the other baseline parameters. PMID:19413697

  3. Is Response to Radiotherapy in Patients Related to the Severity of Pretreatment Pain?

    SciTech Connect

    Kirou-Mauro, Andrea; Hird, Amanda; Wong, Jennifer; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Chow, Edward

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the severity of pretreatment pain and response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: The database for patients with bone metastases seen at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Center from 1999 to 2006 was analyzed. The proportion of patients with mild (scores 1-4), moderate (scores 5-6), or severe (scores 7-10) pain at baseline who experienced a complete response, partial response, stable response, or progressive response after palliative RT was determined according to International Bone Metastases Consensus definitions. Results: During the 7-year study period 1,053 patients received palliative radiation for bone metastases. The median age was 68 years and the median Karnofsky performance status was 70. Of the patients, 53% had a complete or partial response at 1 month, 52% at 2 months, and 54% at 3 months post-RT. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in terms of the proportion of responders (patients with complete or partial response) and nonresponders in terms of painful bone metastases among patients presenting with mild, moderate, or severe pain. Patients with moderate pain should be referred for palliative RT.

  4. Changes of myocardial gene expression and protein composition in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy after immunoadsorption with subsequent immunoglobulin substitution.

    PubMed

    Ameling, Sabine; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Hammer, Elke; Beug, Daniel; Steil, Leif; Reinke, Yvonne; Weitmann, Kerstin; Grube, Markus; Trimpert, Christiane; Klingel, Karin; Kandolf, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Nauck, Matthias; Dörr, Marcus; Empen, Klaus; Felix, Stephan B; Völker, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    Immunoadsorption with subsequent immunoglobulin substitution (IA/IgG) represents a therapeutic approach for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Here, we studied which molecular cardiac alterations are initiated after this treatment. Transcription profiling of endomyocardial biopsies with Affymetrix whole genome arrays was performed on 33 paired samples of DCM patients collected before and 6 months after IA/IgG. Therapy-related effects on myocardial protein levels were analysed by label-free proteome profiling for a subset of 23 DCM patients. Data were analysed regarding therapy-associated differences in gene expression and protein levels by comparing responders (defined by improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction ≥20 % relative and ≥5 % absolute) and non-responders. Responders to IA/IgG showed a decrease in serum N-terminal proBNP levels in comparison with baseline which was accompanied by a decreased expression of heart failure markers, such as angiotensin converting enzyme 2 or periostin. However, despite clinical improvement even in responders, IA/IgG did not trigger general inversion of DCM-associated molecular alterations in myocardial tissue. Transcriptome profiling revealed reduced gene expression for connective tissue growth factor, fibronectin, and collagen type I in responders. In contrast, in non-responders after IA/IgG, fibrosis-associated genes and proteins showed elevated levels, whereas values were reduced or maintained in responders. Thus, improvement of LV function after IA/IgG seems to be related to a reduced gene expression of heart failure markers and pro-fibrotic molecules as well as reduced fibrosis progression. PMID:27412778

  5. Evidence for a central mode of action for etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-08-01

    The COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib modulates the peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms in animals. This interaction has not been studied in patients with pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, 4-week treatment study investigated the pain mechanisms modulated by etoricoxib in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to group A (60 mg/d etoricoxib followed by placebo) or B (placebo followed by 60 mg/d etoricoxib). The quantitative, mechanistic pain biomarkers were pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation (TS), and conditioning pain modulation. Clinical readouts were Brief Pain Inventory, WOMAC, painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), and time and pain intensity during walking and stair climbing. Etoricoxib as compared with placebo significantly modulated the pressure pain thresholds (P = 0.012, localized sensitization) at the knee and leg (control site) (P = 0.025, spreading sensitization) and TS assessed from the knee (P = 0.038) and leg (P = 0.045). Conditioning pain modulation was not modulated. The Brief Pain Inventory (pain scores), PD-Q, WOMAC, and walking and stair climbing tests were all significantly improved by etoricoxib. Based on a minimum of 30% or 50% pain alleviation (day 0-day 28), responders and nonresponders were defined. The nonresponders showed a significant association between increased facilitation of TS and increased pain alleviation. None of the other parameters predicted the degree of pain alleviation. Generally, a responder to etoricoxib has the most facilitated TS. In conclusion, etoricoxib (1) modulated central pain modulatory mechanisms and (2) improved pain and function in painful osteoarthritis. Stronger facilitation of TS may indicate a better response to etoricoxib, supporting the central mode-of-action of the drug. PMID:27007068

  6. Outcomes and Costs of Treating Hepatitis C Patients in the Era of First Generation Protease Inhibitors – Results from the PAN Study

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Florian; Böker, Klaus H. W.; Bruch, Harald-Robert; Eisenbach, Christoph; Link, Ralph; John, Christine; Mauss, Stefan; Heyne, Renate; Schott, Eckart; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Hüppe, Dietrich; Krauth, Christian

    2016-01-01

    1. Objective Chronic hepatitis C virus infections (HCV) cause a significant public health burden. Introduction of telaprevir (TVR) and boceprevir (BOC) has increased sustained virologic response rates (SVR) in genotype 1 patients but were accompanied by higher treatment costs and more side effects. Aim of the study was to assess outcomes and costs of treating HCV with TVR or BOC in routine care. 2. Material and Methods Data was obtained from a non-interventional study. This analysis relates on a subset of 1,786 patients for whom resource utilisation was documented. Sociodemografic and clinical parameters as well as resource utilisation were collected using a web-based data recording system. Costs were calculated using official remuneration schemes. 3. Results Mean age of patients was 49.2 years, 58.6% were male. In treatment-naive patients SVR-rates of 62.2% and 55.7% for TVR and BOC were observed (prior relapser: 68.5% for TVR and 63.5% for BOC; prior non-responder: 45.6% for TVR and 39.1% for BOC). Treatment costs are dominated by costs for pharmaceuticals and range between €39,081 and €53,491. We calculated average costs per SVR of €81,347 (TVR) and €70,163 (BOC) in treatment-naive patients (prior relapser: 78,089 €/SVR for TVR and 82,077 €/SVR for BOC; prior non-responder: 116,509 €/SVR for TVR and 110,156 €/SVR for BOC). Quality of life data showed a considerable decrease during treatment. 4. Conclusion Our study is one of few investigating both, outcomes and costs, of treating HCV in a real-life setting. Data can serve as a reference in the discussion of increasing costs in recently introduced agents. PMID:27467772

  7. Clinical Response within 12 Weeks as a Predictor of Future Low Disease Activity in Early RA Patients: Results from the TEAR Trial

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; McVie, Theresa; Mikuls, Ted R; Reynolds, Richard J.; Navarro-Millán, Iris; O’Dell, James; Moreland, Larry W; Bridges, S. Louis; Ranganath, Veena K.; Cofield, Stacey S

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapidly predicting future outcomes based upon short-term clinical response would be helpful to optimize RA management in early disease. Objective To derive and validate a clinical prediction rule to predict low disease activity (LDA) at 1 year among patients participating in the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis (TEAR) trial escalating RA therapy by adding either etanercept (E) or sulfasalazine + hydroxychloroquine [triple therapy (TT)] after 6 months of methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Methods Eligible subjects included in the derivation cohort (used for model building, n=186) were participants with moderate or higher disease activity (DAS28ESR>3.2) despite 24 weeks of MTX monotherapy who added either etanercept or sulfasalazine+hydroxychloroquine. Clinical characteristics measured within the next 12 weeks were used to predict LDA 1 year later using multivariable logistic regression. Validation was performed in the cohort of TEAR patients randomized to initially receive either MTX+E or TT. Results The derivation cohort yielded three prediction models of varying complexity that included age, DAS28 at various time points, body mass index, and ESR (AUROC up to 0.83). Accuracy of the prediction models ranged between 80 and 95% in both derivation and validation cohorts, depending on the complexity of the model and the cutpoints chosen for response and non-response. Approximately 80% of patients could be predicted to be responders or non-responders at week 12. Conclusion Clinical data collected early after starting or escalating DMARD/biologic treatment could accurately predict LDA at 1 year in early RA patients. For patients predicted to be non-responders, treatment could be changed at 12 weeks to optimize outcomes. PMID:23588939

  8. Prediction of Response to Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer by Means of Sequential 18FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Vanhove, Christian; Sermeus, Alexandra; Ceulemans, Gaetane; Engels, Benedikt; Vermeersch, Marieke; Verellen, Dirk; Urbain, Daniel; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Morphologic imaging techniques perform poorly in assessing the response to preoperative radiotherapy (RT), mainly because of desmoplastic reactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of sequential 18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG-PET) in assessing the response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant RT and to determine which parameters can be used as surrogate markers for histopathologic response. Methods and Materials: 18FDG-PET scans were acquired before and during the 5th week after the end of RT. Tracer uptake was assessed semiquantitatively using standardized uptake values (SUV). The percentage differences (%{Delta}) between pre- and post-RT scans in SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, metabolic volume (MV), and total glycolytic volume (tGV) were calculated. Results: Forty-five consecutive patients with histologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. After neoadjuvant RT, 20 of the 45 patients were classified as histopathologic responders and 25 as non-responders. Intense 18F-FDG uptake was seen in all tumors before neoadjuvant RT (average SUV{sub max} 12.9 {+-} 6.0). When patients were classified as histologic responders and nonresponders, significant differences in %{Delta}SUV{sub max} (55.8% vs. 37.4%, p = 0.023) and %{Delta}SUV{sub mean} (40.1% vs. 21.0%, p = 0.001) were observed between the two groups. For %{Delta}MV and %{Delta}tGV, decreases were more prominent in responders but were not significantly different from those in nonresponders. As demonstrated by receiver operating characteristic analysis, %{Delta}SUV{sub mean} was a more powerful discriminator than was %{Delta}SUV{sub max}. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for optimal threshold of %{Delta}SUV{sub mean} (24.5%) were 80%, 72%, 76%, 70%, and 82% respectively. Conclusion: Sequential 18FDG-PET allows assessment of the response to preoperative RT. Both %{Delta}SUV{sub mean} and %{Delta}SUV{sub max

  9. Factors Associated With Upper Extremity Motor Recovery After Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Min Ah; Lee, Sook Joung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with motor recovery of the upper extremity after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment in stroke patients. Methods Twenty-nine patients with subacute stroke participated in this study. rTMS was applied to the hand motor cortex for 10 minutes at a 110% resting motor threshold and 10 Hz frequency for two weeks. We evaluated the biographical, neurological, clinical, and functional variables, in addition to the motor-evoked potential (MEP) response. The Manual Function Test (MFT) was performed before, immediately after, and two weeks after, the treatment. Patients were divided into a responder and non-responder group according to their respective improvements on the MFT. Data were compared between the two groups. Results Patients with exclusively subcortical stroke, absence of aphasia, the presence of a MEP response, high scores on the Mini-Mental Status Examination, Motricity Index arm score, Functional Independence Measure, and Functional Ambulatory Classification; and a shorter period from stroke onset to rTMS were found to be significantly associated with a response to rTMS. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that rTMS may have a greater effect on upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients who have a MEP response, suffer an exclusively subcortical stroke, mild paresis, and have good functional status. Applying rTMS early would have additional positive effects in the patients with the identified characteristics. PMID:25932424

  10. The role of intravenous iron in the treatment of anemia in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients resulting in poor physical performance, prognosis and therapy outcome. Initially, erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) were supposed to be the treatment of choice but about one third of patients turned out to be nonresponders and meta-analyses provided evidence of an increased risk of mortality if used excessively. This along with the successful use of intravenous iron for anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease prompted seven clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of intravenous iron as an adjunct to ESAs and four additional studies using intravenous iron only for anemia in cancer patients. These studies confirmed a superior response if ESAs are combined with intravenous iron and revealed iron only to be a useful option in patients with mild and absolute iron deficiency (AID). Currently, best treatment decisions for anemia in cancer might be based on measurements of serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation (TSAT), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), ferritin index (FI = sTfR/log SF), hypochromic reticulocytes (CHR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, there is still an urgent need for trials investigating diagnostic approaches to optimize therapy of anemia in cancer patients with iron and/or ESAs. PMID:23556124