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Sample records for nonspecific peptidases

  1. Evolutionary families of peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, N D; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    The available amino acid sequences of peptidases have been examined, and the enzymes have been allocated to evolutionary families. Some of the families can be grouped together in 'clans' that show signs of distant relationship, but nevertheless, it appears that there may be as many as 60 evolutionary lines of peptidases with separate origins. Some of these contain members with quite diverse peptidase activities, and yet there are some striking examples of convergence. We suggest that the classification by families could be used as an extension of the current classification by catalytic type. PMID:8439290

  2. MEROPS: the peptidase database

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.; Barrett, Alan J.

    2000-01-01

    Important additions have been made to the MEROPS database (http://www.bi.bbsrc.ac.uk/Merops/Merops.htm ). These include sequence alignments and cladograms for many of the families of peptidases, and these have proved very helpful in the difficult task of distinguishing the sequences of peptidases that are simply species variants of already known enzymes from those that represent novel enzymes. PMID:10592261

  3. Localization of Peptidases in Lactococci

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Paris S. T.; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Pos, Klaas M.; Rousseau, Micheline; Boquien, Clair-Yves; Gripon, Jean-Claude; Konings, Wil N.

    1992-01-01

    The localization of two aminopeptidases, an X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, an endopeptidase, and a tripeptidase in Lactococcus lactis was studied. Polyclonal antibodies raised against each purified peptidase are specific and do not cross-react with other peptidases. Experiments were performed by immunoblotting after cell fractionation and by electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled peptidases. All peptidases were found to be intracellular. However, immunogold studies showed a peripheral labeling of the X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, the tripeptidase, and the endopeptidase. This peripheral location was further supported by the detection of these three enzymes in cell membrane fractions in which none of the two aminopeptidases was present. Images PMID:16348629

  4. Evolutionary lines of cysteine peptidases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J; Rawlings, N D

    2001-05-01

    The proteolytic enzymes that depend upon a cysteine residue for activity have come from at least seven different evolutionary origins, each of which has produced a group of cysteine peptidases with distinctive structures and properties. We show here that the characteristic molecular topologies of the peptidases in each evolutionary line can be seen not only in their three-dimensional structures, but commonly also in the two-dimensional structures. Clan CA contains the families of papain (C1), calpain (C2), streptopain (C10) and the ubiquitin-specific peptidases (C12, C19), as well as many families of viral cysteine endopeptidases. Clan CD contains the families of clostripain (C11), gingipain R (C25), legumain (C13), caspase-1 (C14) and separin (C50). These enzymes have specificities dominated by the interactions of the S1 subsite. Clan CE contains the families of adenain (C5) from adenoviruses, the eukaryotic Ulp1 protease (C48) and the bacterial YopJ proteases (C55). Clan CF contains only pyroglutamyl peptidase I (C15). The picornains (C3) in clan PA have probably evolved from serine peptidases, which still form the majority of enzymes in the clan. The cysteine peptidase activities in clans PB and CH are autolytic only. In conclusion, we suggest that although almost all the cysteine peptidases depend for activity on catalytic dyads of cysteine and histidine, it is worth noting some important differences that they have inherited from their distant ancestral peptidases. PMID:11517925

  5. Peptidase activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, B; Becker, J M; Naider, F

    1979-01-01

    At least four distinct aminopeptidase activities and a single dipeptidase activity were found in cell extracts of a leucine-lysine auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The assay for peptidase activity involved polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by an enzyme-coupled activity staining procedure. The aminopeptidases had largely overlapping specificities but could be distinguished from one another by their electrophoretic mobilities and activities toward different peptide substrates. Substrates tested included both free and blocked di- and tripeptides and amino acid derivatives. Images PMID:378955

  6. HOW IMMUNE PEPTIDASES CHANGE SPECIFICITY

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Wilfred W.; Trivedi, Neil N.; Makarova, Anastasia; Ray, Manisha; Craik, Charles S.; Caughey, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin G is a major secreted serine peptidase of neutrophils and mast cells. Studies in Ctsg-null mice suggest that cathepsin G supports antimicrobial defenses but can injure host tissues. The human enzyme has unusual “Janus-faced” ability to cleave peptides at basic (tryptic) as well as aromatic (chymotryptic) sites. Tryptic activity has been attributed to acidic Glu226 in the primary specificity pocket and underlies proposed important functions such as activation of pro-urokinase. However, most mammals, including mice, substitute Ala for Glu226, suggesting that human tryptic activity may be anomalous. To test this hypothesis, human cathepsin G was compared with mouse wild type and humanized active site mutants, revealing that mouse primary specificity is markedly narrower than that of human cathepsin G, with much greater Tyr activity and selectivity and near absence of tryptic activity. It also differs from human in resisting tryptic peptidase inhibitors (e.g., aprotinin), while favoring angiotensin destruction at Tyr4 over activation at Phe8. Ala226Glu mutants of mouse cathepsin G acquire tryptic activity and human ability to activate pro-urokinase. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the Ala226Glu missense mutation appearing in primates 31–43 million years ago represented an apparently unprecedented way to create tryptic activity in a serine peptidase. We propose that tryptic activity is not an attribute of ancestral mammalian cathepsin G, which was primarily chymotryptic, and that primate-selective broadening of specificity opposed the general trend of increased specialization by immune peptidases and allowed acquisition of new functions. PMID:20889553

  7. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  8. Extracellular peptidases from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Z L; Lage, Claudia A S; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Dias, Edilma Paraguai de Souza; Caldas, Lucio Ayres; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane B

    2015-09-01

    The extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans wild type R1 produces peptidases (metallo- and serine-) in TGY medium and in the media supplemented with human hair (HMY) and chicken feathers (FMY). Enzymatic screening on agar plates revealed peptidase activity. In TGY medium metallopeptidases were detected corresponding to a molecular mass range of 300-85 kDa (gelatinases); 280-130 (caseinases) and a 300 and a 170 kDa (keratinases); and a gelatinolytic serine peptidase (75 kDa). In HMY medium after 144 h, D. radiodurans produced keratinase (290 U/ml), gelatinase (619 U/ml) and sulfite (26 µg/ml). TGY medium produced higher proteolytic activity: 950 U/ml of gelatinolytic (24 h); 470 U/ml of keratinolytic (24 h) and 110 U/ml of caseinolytic (72 h). In the FMY medium, we found gelatinolytic (317 U/ml), keratinolytic (43 U/ml) and caseinolytic (85 U/ml) activities. The sulfite had a maximum release at 48 h (8.1 µg/ml). Enzymography analysis revealed that the keratinases degraded keratin after 24 h of reaction. The addition of sodium sulfite (1.0 %) improved the keratin degradation. Environmental Scanning Electron microscopy revealed alterations such as damage and holes in the hair fiber cuticle after D. radiodurans growth. This work presents for the first time D. radiodurans as a new keratinolytic microorganism. PMID:26216108

  9. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Ring, David

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness. PMID:25207288

  10. An Essential Signal Peptide Peptidase Identified in an RNAi Screen of Serine Peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Catherine X.; Brown, Elaine; Hamilton, Alana; Van der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2015-01-01

    The serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei have been viewed as potential drug targets. In particular, the S9 prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily is thought to be a good avenue for drug discovery. This is based on the finding that some S9 peptidases are secreted and active in the mammalian bloodstream, and that they are a class of enzyme against which drugs have successfully been developed. We collated a list of all serine peptidases in T. brucei, identifying 20 serine peptidase genes, of which nine are S9 peptidases. We screened all 20 serine peptidases by RNAi to determine which, if any, are essential for bloodstream form T. brucei survival. All S9 serine peptidases were dispensable for parasite survival in vitro, even when pairs of similar genes, coding for oligopeptidase B or prolyl oligopeptidase, were targeted simultaneously. We also found no effect on parasite survival in an animal host when the S9 peptidases oligopeptidase B, prolyl oligopeptidase or dipeptidyl peptidase 8 were targeted. The only serine peptidase to emerge from the RNAi screen as essential was a putative type-I signal peptide peptidase (SPP1). This gene was essential for parasite survival both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defect conferred by RNAi depletion of SPP1 was rescued by expression of a functional peptidase from an RNAi resistant SPP1 gene. However, expression of catalytically inactive SPP1 was unable to rescue cells from the SPP1 depleted phenotype, demonstrating that SPP1 serine peptidase activity is necessary for T. brucei survival. PMID:25816352

  11. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 – an important digestive peptidase in Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) is a proline specific serine peptidase that plays an important role in different regulatory processes in mammals. In this report, we isolated and characterized a unique secreted digestive DPP 4 from the anterior midgut of a stored product pest, Tenebrio molitor larvae ...

  12. Peptidases and peptidase inhibitors in gut of caterpillars and in the latex of their host plants.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Márcio V; Pereira, Danielle A; Souza, Diego P; Silva, Maria-Lídia S; Alencar, Luciana M R; Sousa, Jeanlex S; Queiroz, Juliany-Fátima N; Freitas, Cleverson D T

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating the resistance-susceptibility of crop insects to proteins found in latex fluids have been reported. However, latex-bearing plants also host insects. In this study, the gut proteolytic system of Pseudosphinx tetrio, which feeds on Plumeria rubra leaves, was characterized and further challenged against the latex proteolytic system of its own host plant and those of other latex-bearing plants. The gut proteolytic system of Danaus plexippus (monarch) and the latex proteolytic system of its host plant (Calotropis procera) were also studied. The latex proteins underwent extensive hydrolysis when mixed with the corresponding gut homogenates of the hosted insects. The gut homogenates partially digested the latex proteins of foreign plants. The fifth instar of D. plexippus that were fed diets containing foreign latex developed as well as those individuals who were fed diets containing latex proteins from their host plant. In vitro assays detected serine and cysteine peptidase inhibitors in both the gut homogenates and the latex fluids. Curiously, the peptidase inhibitors of caterpillars did not inhibit the latex peptidases of their host plants. However, the peptidase inhibitors of laticifer origin inhibited the proteolysis of gut homogenates. In vivo analyses of the peritrophic membrane proteins of D. plexippus demonstrate resistance against latex peptidases. Only discrete changes were observed when the peritrophic membrane was directly treated with purified latex peptidases in vitro. This study concludes that peptidase inhibitors are involved in the defensive systems of both caterpillars and their host plants. Although latex peptidase inhibitors inhibit gut peptidases (in vitro), the ability of gut peptidases to digest latex proteins (in vivo) regardless of their origin seems to be important in governing the resistance-susceptibility of caterpillars. PMID:25246317

  13. Peptidase activity of beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Rhazi, N; Galleni, M; Page, M I; Frère, J M

    1999-01-01

    Although beta-lactamases have generally been considered as being devoid of peptidase activity, a low but significant hydrolysis of various N-acylated dipeptides was observed with representatives of each class of beta-lactamases. The kcat/Km values were below 0.1 M(-1). s(-1), but the enzyme rate enhancement factors were in the range 5000-20000 for the best substrates. Not unexpectedly, the best 'peptidase' was the class C beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae P99, but, more surprisingly, the activity was always higher with the phenylacetyl- and benzoyl-d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptides than with the diacetyl- and alpha-acetyl-l-Lys-d-Ala-d-Ala tripeptides, which are the preferred substrates of the low-molecular-mass, soluble dd-peptidases. A comparison between the beta-lactamases and dd-peptidases showed that it might be as difficult for a dd-peptidase to open the beta-lactam ring as it is for the beta-lactamases to hydrolyse the peptides, an observation which can be explained by geometric and stereoelectronic considerations. PMID:10393100

  14. On the substrate specificity of bacterial DD-peptidases: evidence from two series of peptidoglycan-mimetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John W; Adediran, Suara A; Charlier, Paulette; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; Frère, Jean-Marie; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, Rex F

    2003-01-01

    The reactions between bacterial DD-peptidases and beta-lactam antibiotics have been studied for many years. Less well understood are the interactions between these enzymes and their natural substrates, presumably the peptide moieties of peptidoglycan. In general, remarkably little activity has previously been demonstrated in vitro against potential peptide substrates, although in many cases the peptides employed were non-specific and not homologous with the relevant peptidoglycan. In this paper, the specificity of a panel of DD-peptidases against elements of species-specific D-alanyl-D-alanine peptides has been assessed. In two cases, those of soluble, low-molecular-mass DD-peptidases, high activity against the relevant peptides has been demonstrated. In these cases, the high specificity is towards the free N-terminus of the peptidoglycan fragment. With a number of other enzymes, particularly high-molecular-mass DD-peptidases, little or no activity against these peptides was observed. In separate experiments, the reactivity of the enzymes against the central, largely invariant, peptide stem was examined. None of the enzymes surveyed showed high activity against this structural element although weak specificity in the expected direction towards the one structural variable (D-gammaGln versus D-gammaGlu) was observed. The current state of understanding of the activity of these enzymes in vitro is discussed. PMID:12723972

  15. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  16. Assaying nonspecific phospholipase C activity.

    PubMed

    Pejchar, Přemysl; Scherer, Günther F E; Martinec, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Plant nonspecific phospholipase C (NPC) is a recently described enzyme which plays a role in membrane rearrangement during phosphate starvation. It is also involved in responses of plants to brassinolide, abscisic acid (ABA), elicitors, and salt. The NPC activity is decreased in cells treated with aluminum. In the case of salt stress, the molecular mechanism of NPC action is based on accumulation of diacylglycerol (DAG) by hydrolysis of phospholipids and conversion of DAG, the product of NPC activity, to phosphatidic acid (PA) that participates in ABA signaling pathways. Here we describe a step-by-step protocol, which can be used to determine in situ or in vitro NPC activity. Determination is based on quantification of fluorescently labeled DAG as a product of cleavage of the fluorescently labeled substrate lipid, phosphatidylcholine. High-performance thin-layer chromatography is used for separation of fluorescent DAG. The spot is visualized with a laser scanner and the relative amounts of fluorescent DAG are quantified using imaging software. PMID:23681535

  17. Evolution of the Thermopsin Peptidase Family (A5)

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Thermopsin is a peptidase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that is active at low pH and high temperature. From reversible inhibition with pepstatin, thermopsin is thought to be an aspartic peptidase. It is a member of the only family of peptidases to be restricted entirely to the archaea, namely peptidase family A5. Evolution within this family has been mapped, using a taxonomic tree based on the known classification of archaea. Homologues are found only in archaeans that are both hyperthermophiles and acidophiles, and this implies lateral transfer of genes between archaea, because species with homologues are not necessarily closely related. Despite the remarkable stability and activity in extreme conditions, no tertiary structure has been solved for any member of the family, and the catalytic mechanism is unknown. Putative catalytic residues have been predicted here by examination of aligned sequences. PMID:24312173

  18. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    PubMed

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection. PMID:19780820

  19. Cardiovascular effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, M; Tziomalos, K

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are effective glucose-lowering agents that do not increase body weight and are associated with a low risk for hypoglycemia. Also, they appear to exert beneficial effects on other established cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia and hypertension. Moreover, DPP-4 inhibitors exert antiinflammatory and antioxidant actions, improve endothelial function and reduce urinary albumin excretion. In contrast to these favorable cardiovascular effects, three recent large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and established cardiovascular disease or multiple cardiovascular risk factors showed that DPP-4 inhibitors do not affect the risk of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke and might increase the risk of heart failure. The findings of the former randomized studies highlight the limitations of surrogate markers and show that beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors do not necessarily translate into reductions in hard clinical endpoints. Ongoing trials will shed more light on the safety profile of DPP-4 inhibitors and will clarify whether they will improve the cardiovascular outcomes of patients with T2DM. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 195-199. PMID:27418775

  20. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    PubMed

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  1. Structure and Catalysis of Acylaminoacyl Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Harmat, Veronika; Domokos, Klarissza; Menyhárd, Dóra K.; Palló, Anna; Szeltner, Zoltán; Szamosi, Ilona; Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László

    2011-01-01

    Acylaminoacyl peptidase from Aeropyrum pernix is a homodimer that belongs to the prolyl oligopeptidase family. The monomer subunit is composed of one hydrolase and one propeller domain. Previous crystal structure determinations revealed that the propeller domain obstructed the access of substrate to the active site of both subunits. Here we investigated the structure and the kinetics of two mutant enzymes in which the aspartic acid of the catalytic triad was changed to alanine or asparagine. Using different substrates, we have determined the pH dependence of specificity rate constants, the rate-limiting step of catalysis, and the binding of substrates and inhibitors. The catalysis considerably depended both on the kind of mutation and on the nature of the substrate. The results were interpreted in terms of alterations in the position of the catalytic histidine side chain as demonstrated with crystal structure determination of the native and two mutant structures (D524N and D524A). Unexpectedly, in the homodimeric structures, only one subunit displayed the closed form of the enzyme. The other subunit exhibited an open gate to the catalytic site, thus revealing the structural basis that controls the oligopeptidase activity. The open form of the native enzyme displayed the catalytic triad in a distorted, inactive state. The mutations affected the closed, active form of the enzyme, disrupting its catalytic triad. We concluded that the two forms are at equilibrium and the substrates bind by the conformational selection mechanism. PMID:21084296

  2. Trypanosoma brucei has a canonical mitochondrial processing peptidase.

    PubMed

    Desy, Silvia; Schneider, André; Mani, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Most mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane proteins have N-terminal presequences which serve as import signals. After import these presequences are cleaved by the heterodimeric mitochondrial processing peptidase. In the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial protein import relies on presequences that are much shorter than in other eukaryotes. How they are processed is unknown. The trypansomal genome encodes four open reading frames that are annotated as mitochondrial processing peptidase. Here we show that RNAi-mediated ablation of two of these proteins leads to a growth arrest and a concomitant accumulation of mitochondrial precursor proteins inside mitochondria. Import experiments using isolated mitochondria from RNAi cell lines reveals that both proteins are required for efficient import and processing of the tested precursor protein. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the proteins interact with each other. In summary these results show that we have identified the two subunits of the trypanosomal mitochondrial processing peptidase. PMID:22841752

  3. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of peptidase genes in the fish-pathogenic scuticociliate Miamiensis avidus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parasite peptidases have been actively studied as vaccine candidates or drug targets for prevention or treatment of parasitic diseases because of their important roles for survival and/or invasion in the host. Like other parasites, the facultative histophagous ciliate Miamiensis avidus would possess peptidases that are closely associated with the invasion into the host tissue and survival in the host. Results The 17 genes encoding peptidases, including seven cathepsin-like cysteine peptidases, four serine carboxypeptidases, a eukaryotic aspartyl protease family protein, an ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH family protein, three leishmanolysin family proteins and a peptidase family M49 protein were identified from a Miamiensis avidus cDNA library by BLAST X search. Expression of genes encoding two cysteine peptidases, three leishmanolysin-like peptidases and a peptidase family M49 protein was up-regulated in the cell-fed ciliates compared to the starved ciliates. Especially, one cysteine peptidase (MaPro 4) and one leishmanolysin-like peptidase (MaPro 14) were transcribed more than 100-folds in the cell-fed ciliates. Conclusions The genetic information and transcriptional characteristics of the peptidases in the present results would be helpful to elucidate the role of peptidases in the invasion of scuticociliates into their hosts. PMID:23311870

  4. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4: A key player in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Itou, Minoru; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Sata, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is a membrane-associated peptidase, also known as CD26. DPP-4 has widespread organ distribution throughout the body and exerts pleiotropic effects via its peptidase activity. A representative target peptide is glucagon-like peptide-1, and inactivation of glucagon-like peptide-1 results in the development of glucose intolerance/diabetes mellitus and hepatic steatosis. In addition to its peptidase activity, DPP-4 is known to be associated with immune stimulation, binding to and degradation of extracellular matrix, resistance to anti-cancer agents, and lipid accumulation. The liver expresses DPP-4 to a high degree, and recent accumulating data suggest that DPP-4 is involved in the development of various chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C virus infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, DPP-4 occurs in hepatic stem cells and plays a crucial role in hepatic regeneration. In this review, we described the tissue distribution and various biological effects of DPP-4. Then, we discussed the impact of DPP-4 in chronic liver disease and the possible therapeutic effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor. PMID:23613622

  5. Non-Specific Immunotherapies and Adjuvants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and spinal cord. Other drugs that boost the immune system Some other drugs boost the immune system in a non-specific way, similar to cytokines. ... and CTLA-4, which normally help keep the immune system in check. While these checkpoint proteins are important ...

  6. Stretching DNA to quantify nonspecific protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sachin; Fountain, Chandler; Dunlap, David; Family, Fereydoon; Finzi, Laura

    2012-07-01

    Nonspecific binding of regulatory proteins to DNA can be an important mechanism for target search and storage. This seems to be the case for the lambda repressor protein (CI), which maintains lysogeny after infection of E. coli. CI binds specifically at two distant regions along the viral genome and induces the formation of a repressive DNA loop. However, single-molecule imaging as well as thermodynamic and kinetic measurements of CI-mediated looping show that CI also binds to DNA nonspecifically and that this mode of binding may play an important role in maintaining lysogeny. This paper presents a robust phenomenological approach using a recently developed method based on the partition function, which allows calculation of the number of proteins bound nonspecific to DNA from measurements of the DNA extension as a function of applied force. This approach was used to analyze several cycles of extension and relaxation of λ DNA performed at several CI concentrations to measure the dissociation constant for nonspecific binding of CI (˜100 nM), and to obtain a measurement of the induced DNA compaction (˜10%) by CI.

  7. The first crystal structure of the peptidase domain of the U32 peptidase family.

    PubMed

    Schacherl, Magdalena; Montada, Angelika A M; Brunstein, Elena; Baumann, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    The U32 family is a collection of over 2500 annotated peptidases in the MEROPS database with unknown catalytic mechanism. They mainly occur in bacteria and archaea, but a few representatives have also been identified in eukarya. Many of the U32 members have been linked to pathogenicity, such as proteins from Helicobacter and Salmonella. The first crystal structure analysis of a U32 catalytic domain from Methanopyrus kandleri (gene mk0906) reveals a modified (βα)8 TIM-barrel fold with some unique features. The connecting segment between strands β7 and β8 is extended and helix α7 is located on top of the C-terminal end of the barrel body. The protein exhibits a dimeric quaternary structure in which a zinc ion is symmetrically bound by histidine and cysteine side chains from both monomers. These residues reside in conserved sequence motifs. No typical proteolytic motifs are discernible in the three-dimensional structure, and biochemical assays failed to demonstrate proteolytic activity. A tunnel in which an acetate ion is bound is located in the C-terminal part of the β-barrel. Two hydrophobic grooves lead to a tunnel at the C-terminal end of the barrel in which an acetate ion is bound. One of the grooves binds to a Strep-Tag II of another dimer in the crystal lattice. Thus, these grooves may be binding sites for hydrophobic peptides or other ligands. PMID:26627657

  8. Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus glycoprotein precursor is processed by cellular signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaohong; Botting, Catherine H.; Li, Ping; Niglas, Mark; Brennan, Benjamin; Shirran, Sally L.; Szemiel, Agnieszka M.; Elliott, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The M genome segment of Bunyamwera virus (BUNV)—the prototype of both the Bunyaviridae family and the Orthobunyavirus genus—encodes the glycoprotein precursor (GPC) that is proteolytically cleaved to yield two viral structural glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, and a nonstructural protein, NSm. The cleavage mechanism of orthobunyavirus GPCs and the host proteases involved have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the processing of BUNV GPC and found that both NSm and Gc proteins were cleaved at their own internal signal peptides (SPs), in which NSm domain I functions as SPNSm and NSm domain V as SPGc. Moreover, the domain I was further processed by a host intramembrane-cleaving protease, signal peptide peptidase, and is required for cell fusion activities. Meanwhile, the NSm domain V (SPGc) remains integral to NSm, rendering the NSm topology as a two-membrane-spanning integral membrane protein. We defined the cleavage sites and boundaries between the processed proteins as follows: Gn, from residue 17–312 or nearby residues; NSm, 332–477; and Gc, 478–1433. Our data clarified the mechanism of the precursor cleavage process, which is important for our understanding of viral glycoprotein biogenesis in the genus Orthobunyavirus and thus presents a useful target for intervention strategies. PMID:27439867

  9. Identification of peptidases in highly pathogenic vs. weakly pathogenic Naegleria fowleri amebae.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ishan K; Jamerson, Melissa; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba, is the causative agent of Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis. Highly pathogenic mouse-passaged amebae (Mp) and weakly pathogenic axenically grown (Ax) N. fowleri were examined for peptidase activity. Zymography and azocasein peptidase activity assays demonstrated that Mp and Ax N. fowleri exhibited a similar peptidase pattern. Prominent for whole cell lysates, membranes and conditioned medium (CM) from Mp and Ax amebae was the presence of an activity band of approximately 58 kDa that was sensitive to E64, a cysteine peptidase inhibitor. However, axenically grown N. fowleri demonstrated a high level of this peptidase activity in membrane preparations. The inhibitor E64 also reduced peptidase activity in ameba-CM consistent with the presence of secreted cysteine peptidases. Exposure of Mp amebae to E64 reduced their migration through matrigel that was used as an extracellular matrix, suggesting a role for cysteine peptidases in invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). The collective results suggest that the profile of peptidases is not a discriminative marker for distinguishing Mp from Ax N. fowleri. However, the presence of a prominent level of activity for cysteine peptidases in N. fowleri membranes and CM, suggests that these enzymes may serve to facilitate passage of the amebae into the CNS. PMID:25066578

  10. Regulation of the Epithelial Na+ Channel by Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Planès, Carole; Caughey, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Recent investigations point to an important role for peptidases in regulating transcellular ion transport by the epithelial Na+ channel, ENaC. Several peptidases, including furins and proteasomal hydrolases, modulate ENaC maturation and disposal. More idiosyncratically, apical Na+ transport by ENaC in polarized epithelia of kidney, airway, and gut is stimulated constitutively by one or more trypsin-family serine peptidases, as revealed by inhibition of amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport by broad-spectrum antipeptidases, including aprotinin and bikunin/SPINT2. In vitro, the transporting activity of aprotinin-suppressed ENaC can be restored by exposure to trypsin. The prototypical channel-activating peptidase (CAP) is a type 1 membrane-anchored tryptic peptidase first identified in Xenopus kidney cells. Frog CAP1 strongly upregulates Na+ transport when coexpressed with ENaC in oocytes. The amphibian enzyme's apparent mammalian orthologue is prostasin, otherwise known as CAP1, which is coexpressed with ENaC in a variety of epithelia. In airway cells, prostasin is the major basal regulator of ENaC activity, as suggested by inhibition and knockdown experiments. Other candidate regulators of mature ENaC include CAP2/TMPRSS4 and CAP3/matriptase (also known as membrane-type serine protease 1/ST14). Mammalian CAPs are potential targets for treatment of ENaC-mediated Na+ hyperabsorption by the airway in cystic fibrosis (CF) and by the kidney in hypertension. CAPs can be important for mammalian development, as indicated by embryonic lethality in mice with null mutations of CAP1/prostasin. Mice with selectively knocked out expression of CAP1/prostasin in the epidermis and mice with globally knocked out expression of CAP3/matriptase exhibit phenotypically similar defects in skin barrier function and neonatal death from dehydration. In rats, transgenic overexpression of human prostasin disturbs salt balance and causes hypertension. Thus, several converging lines of evidence

  11. Nonspecific cleavage of proteins using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heeyoung; Tran, Minh-Hai; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Han, Jinwoo; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2014-04-15

    In this article, we report the intrinsic catalytic activity of graphene oxide (GO) for the nonspecific cleavage of proteins. We used bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a recombinant esterase (rEstKp) from the cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonas mandelii as test proteins. Cleavage of BSA and rEstKp was nonspecific regarding amino acid sequence, but it exhibited dependence on temperature, time, and the amount of GO. However, cleavage of the proteins did not result in complete hydrolysis into their constituent amino acids. GO also invoked hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters at moderate temperatures lower than those required for peptide hydrolysis regardless of chain length of the fatty acyl esters. Based on the results, the functional groups of GO, including alcohols, phenols, and carboxylates, can be considered as crucial roles in the GO-mediated hydrolysis of peptides and esters via general acid-base catalysis. Our findings provide novel insights into the role of GO as a carbocatalyst with nonspecific endopeptidase activity in biochemical reactions. PMID:24508487

  12. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for steroid-induced diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Hidekatsu; Masui, Yoshinori; Yoshikawa, Reo; Kunimatsu, Junwa; Kaneko, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The addition of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DDP-4) inhibitor has been reported to achieve greater improvements in glucose metabolism with fewer adverse events compared to increasing the metformin dose in type 2 diabetic patients. We present a patient with steroid-induced diabetes whose blood glucose levels were ameliorated by the use of the DPP-4 inhibitor, showing that the DPP-4 inhibitors may be an effective and safe oral anti-diabetic drug for steroid-induced diabetes. PMID:21537433

  13. Cysteine Peptidases as Schistosomiasis Vaccines with Inbuilt Adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem; Selim, Sahar; Donnelly, Sheila; Cotton, Sophie; Gonzales Santana, Bibiana; Dalton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by several worm species of the genus Schistosoma and afflicts up to 600 million people in 74 tropical and sub-tropical countries in the developing world. Present disease control depends on treatment with the only available drug praziquantel. No vaccine exists despite the intense search for molecular candidates and adjuvant formulations over the last three decades. Cysteine peptidases such as papain and Der p 1 are well known environmental allergens that sensitize the immune system driving potent Th2-responses. Recently, we showed that the administration of active papain to mice induced significant protection (P<0.02, 50%) against an experimental challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Since schistosomes express and secrete papain-like cysteine peptidases we reasoned that these could be employed as vaccines with inbuilt adjuvanticity to protect against these parasites. Here we demonstrate that sub-cutaneous injection of functionally active S. mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1), or a cathepsin L from a related parasite Fasciola hepatica (FhCL1), elicits highly significant (P<0.0001) protection (up to 73%) against an experimental challenge worm infection. Protection and reduction in worm egg burden were further increased (up to 83%) when the cysteine peptidases were combined with other S. mansoni vaccine candidates, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH) and peroxiredoxin (PRX-MAP), without the need to add chemical adjuvants. These studies demonstrate the capacity of helminth cysteine peptidases to behave simultaneously as immunogens and adjuvants, and offer an innovative approach towards developing schistosomiasis vaccines PMID:24465551

  14. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and deletion of NAAG peptidase gene enhance memory in novel object recognition test.

    PubMed

    Janczura, Karolina J; Olszewski, Rafal T; Bzdega, Tomasz; Bacich, Dean J; Heston, Warren D; Neale, Joseph H

    2013-02-15

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is inactivated by the extracellular enzyme glutamate carboxypeptidase II. Inhibitors of this enzyme reverse dizocilpine (MK-801)-induced impairment of short-term memory in the novel object recognition test. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that NAAG peptidase inhibition enhances long-term (24h delay) memory of C57BL mice. These mice and mice in which glutamate carboxypeptidase II had been knocked out were presented with two identical objects to explore for 10min on day 1 and tested with one of these familiar objects and one novel object on day 2. Memory was assessed as the degree to which the mice recalled the familiar object and explored the novel object to a greater extent on day 2. Uninjected mice or mice injected with saline prior to the acquisition session on day 1 demonstrated a lack of memory of the acquisition experience by exploring the familiar and novel objects to the same extent on day 2. Mice treated with glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibitors ZJ43 or 2-PMPA prior to the acquisition trial explored the novel object significantly more time than the familiar object on day 2. Consistent with these results, mice in which glutamate carboxypeptidase II had been knocked out distinguished the novel from the familiar object on day 2 while their heterozygous colony mates did not. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II enhances recognition memory, a therapeutic action that might be useful in treatment of memory deficits related to age and neurological disorders. PMID:23200894

  15. Streptococcal C5a peptidase is a highly specific endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, P P; Prahbu, U; Dale, J B; Wexler, D E; Handley, J

    1992-01-01

    Compositional analysis of streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA) cleavage products from a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 20 C-terminal residues of C5a demonstrated that the target cleavage site is His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp, as previously suggested. A C5a peptide analog with Lys replaced by Gln was also subject to cleavage by SCPA. This confirmed that His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp is the scissile bond. Cleavage at histidine is unusual but is the same as that suggested for a peptidase produced by group B streptococci. Native C5 protein was also resistant to SCPA, suggesting that the His-Lys bond is inaccessible prior to proteolytic cleavage by C5 convertase. These experiments showed that the streptococcal C5a peptidase is highly specific for C5a and suggest that its function is not merely to process protein for metabolic consumption but to act primarily to eliminate this chemotactic signal from inflammatory foci. Images PMID:1452354

  16. Extracellular peptidases of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Rohan G. T.; McCorkelle, Owen; Bleackley, Mark; Collins, Christine; Faou, Pierre; Mathivanan, Suresh; Anderson, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum (Fgr) creates economic and health risks in cereals agriculture. Fgr causes head blight (or scab) of wheat and stalk rot of corn, reducing yield, degrading grain quality, and polluting downstream food products with mycotoxins. Fungal plant pathogens must secrete proteases to access nutrition and to breakdown the structural protein component of the plant cell wall. Research into the proteolytic activity of Fgr is hindered by the complex nature of the suite of proteases secreted. We used a systems biology approach comprising genome analysis, transcriptomics and label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize the peptidases deployed by Fgr during growth. A combined analysis of published microarray transcriptome datasets revealed seven transcriptional groupings of peptidases based on in vitro growth, in planta growth, and sporulation behaviors. A high resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis defined the extracellular proteases secreted by F. graminearum. A meta-classification based on sequence characters and transcriptional/translational activity in planta and in vitro provides a platform to develop control strategies that target Fgr peptidases. PMID:26635820

  17. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Semashko, Tatiana A; Vorotnikova, Elena A; Sharikova, Valeriya F; Vinokurov, Konstantin S; Smirnova, Yulia A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Oppert, Brenda; Elpidina, Elena N; Filippova, Irina Y

    2014-03-15

    This study describes the design, synthesis, and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family, important in many biological processes. The structure of the newly synthesized substrates is Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y (where Glp=pyroglutamyl; Xaa=Phe or Val; and Y=pNA [p-nitroanilide], AMC [4-amino-7-methylcoumaride], or AFC [4-amino-7-trifluoromethyl-coumaride]). Substrates were synthesized enzymatically to guarantee selectivity of the reaction and optical purity of the target compounds, simplifying the scheme of synthesis and isolation of products. The hydrolysis of the synthesized substrates was evaluated by C1 cysteine peptidases from different organisms and with different functions, including plant enzymes papain, bromelain, ficin, and mammalian lysosomal cathepsins B and L. The new substrates were selective for C1 cysteine peptidases and were not hydrolyzed by serine, aspartic, or metallo peptidases. We demonstrated an application of the selectivity of the synthesized substrates during the chromatographic separation of a multicomponent set of digestive peptidases from a beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Used in combination with the cysteine peptidase inhibitor E-64, these substrates were able to differentiate cysteine peptidases from peptidases of other classes in midgut extracts from T. molitor larvae and larvae of the genus Tribolium; thus, they are useful in the analysis of complex mixtures containing peptidases from different classes. PMID:24388866

  18. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Karlyshev, A.V.; Thacker, G.; Jones, M.A.; Clements, M.O.; Wren, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection. PMID:24918062

  19. Identification of dipeptidyl peptidase 3 as the Angiotensin-(1-7) degrading peptidase in human HK-2 renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Diaz, Nildris; Wilson, Bryan A; Pirro, Nancy T; Brosnihan, K Bridget; Marshall, Allyson C; Chappell, Mark C

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) is expressed within the kidney and exhibits renoprotective actions that antagonize the inflammatory, fibrotic and pro-oxidant effects of the Ang II-AT1 receptor axis. We previously identified a peptidase activity from sheep brain, proximal tubules and human HK-2 proximal tubule cells that metabolized Ang-(1-7); thus, the present study isolated and identified the Ang-(1-7) peptidase. Utilizing ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, a single 80kDa protein band on SDS-PAGE was purified from HK-2 cells. The 80kDa band was excised, the tryptic digest peptides analyzed by LC-MS and a protein was identified as the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 3 (DPP 3, EC: 3.4.14.4). A human DPP 3 antibody identified a single 80kDa band in the purified enzyme preparation identical to recombinant human DPP 3. Both the purified Ang-(1-7) peptidase and DPP 3 exhibited an identical hydrolysis profile of Ang-(1-7) and both activities were abolished by the metallopeptidase inhibitor JMV-390. DPP 3 sequentially hydrolyzed Ang-(1-7) to Ang-(3-7) and rapidly converted Ang-(3-7) to Ang-(5-7). Kinetic analysis revealed that Ang-(3-7) was hydrolyzed at a greater rate than Ang-(1-7) [17.9 vs. 5.5 nmol/min/μg protein], and the Km for Ang-(3-7) was lower than Ang-(1-7) [3 vs. 12μM]. Finally, chronic treatment of the HK-2 cells with 20nM JMV-390 reduced intracellular DPP 3 activity and tended to augment the cellular levels of Ang-(1-7). We conclude that DPP 3 may influence the cellular expression of Ang-(1-7) and potentially reflect a therapeutic target to augment the actions of the peptide. PMID:27315786

  20. THE CURRENT PROBLEMS OF NONSPECIFIC BACK PAIN.

    PubMed

    Seleznova, S; Zabara, A; Mamuladze, D

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with various aspects of pain in degenerative diseases of the spine and with the actual problems of non-specific back pain. The data on the mechanisms of pain and analgesic treatment algorithms of the patients with radicular syndrome, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies is provided. The effect of structural-modifying drugs in relief of nonspecific back pain was investigated and compared with a traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy in combination with B vitamins, without chondroprotectors. The study population was composed of 85 patients (42 men and 43 women) aged 38 to 68 years (mean age - (46,3±2,6) years) with chronic vertebral pain syndromes (VPS). For objectification assessment of pain, severity of pain, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy we used the visual analog scale (VAS).The majority (88%) of the patients included in the study, complained of a moderately severe pain (from 40 to 70 mm on the VAS). Patients were divided into two groups. The first (primary) group consisted of 55 patients (30 men and 25 women). The following treatment was applied: all patients of the first group, in addition to the NSAID administered with hondroprotektror arbitrarily - Struktum 1000 mg twice a day or 300 mg Piaskledin once a day for 40-60 days.The second (control) group consisted of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women). Patients in the control group administered with a traditional NSAID therapy in combination with B vitamins, without chondroprotectors. The results of the study on the influence of drugs Piaskledin 300, Struktum for the relief of nonspecific back pain revealed that in the treatment of vertebral pain, a combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with structure-modifying agents could achieve rapid rehabilitation of patients with locomotor activity and improve quality of life in general. PMID:26870977

  1. Impaired nonspecific cellular immunity in experimental cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Roughneen, P T; Drath, D B; Kulkarni, A D; Rowlands, B J

    1987-11-01

    The abilities of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), to demonstrate chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and superoxide release after bile duct ligation in the rat were investigated to determine the effect of cholestasis on nonspecific cellular immune mechanisms. Chemotactic response to C5a and FMLP, phagocytosis of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus, and zymosan-induced superoxide release were evaluated 21 days after bile duct ligation (BDL), sham operation, or in normal controls. Serum total bilirubin level was elevated after BDL (p less than 0.01). Chemotactic ability was similar to each group. PMN phagocytic uptake of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus was depressed in BDL (p less than 0.05). BDL rats exhibited impaired PAM phagocytic indices and improved PMN superoxide release (p less than 0.03). PAM superoxide release was similar in each study group. Alterations in phagocytic function with cholestasis are important deficits in nonspecific cellular immunity that may contribute to the high incidence of infective complications associated with obstructive jaundice. PMID:2823730

  2. Impaired nonspecific cellular immunity in experimental cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Roughneen, P T; Drath, D B; Kulkarni, A D; Rowlands, B J

    1987-01-01

    The abilities of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), to demonstrate chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and superoxide release after bile duct ligation in the rat were investigated to determine the effect of cholestasis on nonspecific cellular immune mechanisms. Chemotactic response to C5a and FMLP, phagocytosis of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus, and zymosan-induced superoxide release were evaluated 21 days after bile duct ligation (BDL), sham operation, or in normal controls. Serum total bilirubin level was elevated after BDL (p less than 0.01). Chemotactic ability was similar to each group. PMN phagocytic uptake of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus was depressed in BDL (p less than 0.05). BDL rats exhibited impaired PAM phagocytic indices and improved PMN superoxide release (p less than 0.03). PAM superoxide release was similar in each study group. Alterations in phagocytic function with cholestasis are important deficits in nonspecific cellular immunity that may contribute to the high incidence of infective complications associated with obstructive jaundice. PMID:2823730

  3. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cysteine peptidases are important in many biological processes. In this study, we describe the design, synthesis and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family. The structure of the proposed substrates can be expressed by the general formula Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y, wh...

  4. Excretion/secretion products from Schistosoma mansoni adults, eggs and schistosomula have unique peptidase specificity profiles.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Jan; Fajtová, Pavla; Ulrychová, Lenka; Leontovyč, Adrian; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Suzuki, Brian M; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael; Craik, Charles S; Caffrey, Conor R; O'Donoghue, Anthony J

    2016-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of a number of chronic helminth diseases of poverty that severely impact personal and societal well-being and productivity. Peptidases (proteases) are vital to successful parasitism, and can modulate host physiology and immunology. Interference of peptidase action by specific drugs or vaccines can be therapeutically beneficial. To date, research on peptidases in the schistosome parasite has focused on either the functional characterization of individual peptidases or their annotation as part of global genome or transcriptome studies. We were interested in functionally characterizing the complexity of peptidase activity operating at the host-parasite interface, therefore the excretory-secretory products of key developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni that parasitize the human were examined. Using class specific peptidase inhibitors in combination with a multiplex substrate profiling assay, a number of unique activities derived from endo- and exo-peptidases were revealed in the excretory-secretory products of schistosomula (larval migratory worms), adults and eggs. The data highlight the complexity of the functional degradome for each developmental stage of this parasite and facilitate further enquiry to establish peptidase identity, physiological and immunological function, and utility as drug or vaccine candidates. PMID:26409899

  5. Localization of two post-proline cleaving peptidases in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activit...

  6. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Mimicking Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Linga, Karthika R.; Khoor, Andras; Phelan, Jonathan A.; Mira-Avendano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a known complication after catheter ablation of arrhythmias. Surprisingly, little information is available on its manifestations in the lung. We describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented from an outside hospital with worsening shortness of breath after catheter ablation of pulmonary veins for atrial fibrillation. After an initial diagnosis of pneumonia and its nonimprovement with antibiotics, a surgical lung biopsy was done and interpreted as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with vascular changes consistent with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Later, she was admitted to our institution where a transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and subsequent computed tomography (CT) angiogram of the heart showed severe stenosis of all four pulmonary veins. The previous lung biopsy was rereviewed and reinterpreted as severe parenchymal congestion mimicking NSIP. Our case demonstrates that PVS is an underrecognized complication of catheter ablation, and increased awareness among both clinicians and pathologists is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26779359

  7. Regulatory signals for intestinal amino acid transporters and peptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, R.P.; Kwan, W.W.; Diamond, J. )

    1988-08-01

    Dietary protein ultimately regulates many processes involved in protein digestion, but it is often unclear whether proteins themselves, peptides, or amino acids (AAs) are the proximate regulatory signal. Hence the authors compared several processes involved in protein digestion in mice adapted to one of three rations, identical except for containing 54% of either casein, a partial hydrolysate of casein, or a free AA mixture simulating a complete hydrolysate of casein. The authors measured brush-border uptakes of seven AAs that variously serve as substrates for four AA transporters, and brush-border and cytosolic activities of four peptidases. The three rations yielded essentially the same AA uptake rates. Peptidase activities tended to be lower on the AA ration than on the protein ration. In other studies, all three rations yielded the same rates of brush-border peptide uptake; protein is only modestly more effective than AAs at inducing synthesis of pancreatic proteases; and, depending on the animal species, protein is either much less or much more effective than AAs at stimulating release of cholecystokinin and hence of pancreatic enzymes. Thus the regulators of each process involved in protein digestion are not necessarily that process's substrate.

  8. Sequential processing of hepatitis C virus core protein by host cell signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Pène, V; Hernandez, C; Vauloup-Fellous, C; Garaud-Aunis, J; Rosenberg, A R

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is believed to play critical roles in the virus morphogenesis and pathogenesis. In HCV polyprotein, core protein terminates with a signal peptide followed by E1 envelope protein. It has remained unclear whether cleavage by host cell signal peptidase (SP) at the core-E1 junction to generate the complete form of core protein, which is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is absolutely required for cleavage within the signal peptide by host cell signal peptide peptidase (SPP) to liberate the mature form of core protein, which is then free for trafficking to lipid droplets. In this study, the possible sources of disagreement in published reports have been examined, and we conclude that a product generated upon inhibition of SP-catalysed cleavage at the core-E1 junction in heterologous expression systems was incorrectly identified as mature core protein. Moreover, inhibition of this cleavage in the most relevant model of human hepatoma cells replicating a full-length HCV genome was shown to abolish interaction of core protein with lipid droplets and production of infectious progeny virus. These results firmly establish that SPP-catalysed liberation of mature core protein is absolutely dependent on prior cleavage by SP at the correct core-E1 site to generate the complete form of core protein, consistent with this obligatory order of processing playing a role in HCV infectious cycle. PMID:19281487

  9. Heterogeneous production of metallo-type peptidases in parasites belonging to the family Trypanosomatidae.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Soares, Rosangela Maria de Araújo; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Kneipp, Lucimar Ferreira

    2008-05-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play a central role in the physiology of all living organisms, participating in several metabolic pathways and in different phases of parasite-host interactions. We have identified cell-associated peptidase activities in 33 distinct flagellates, including representatives of almost all known trypanosomatid genera parasitizing insects (Herpetomonas, Crithidia, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Leptomonas, Phytomonas, Blastocrithidia and Endotrypanum) as well as the biflagellate kinetoplastid Bodo, by using SDS-PAGE containing gelatin as co-polymerized substrate and proteolytic inhibitors. Under the alkaline pH (9.0) conditions employed, all the flagellates presented at least one peptidase, with the exception of Crithidia acanthocephali and Phytomonas serpens, which did not display any detectable proteolytic enzyme activity. All the proteolytic activities were completely inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, a zinc-chelating agent, putatively identifying these activities as metallo-type peptidases. EDTA and EGTA, two other metallopeptidase inhibitors, E-64 (a cysteine peptidase inhibitor), pepstatin A (an aspartyl peptidase inhibitor) and PMSF (a serine peptidase inhibitor) did not interfere with the metallopeptidase activities detected in the studied trypanosomatids. Conversely, Bodo-derived peptidases were resistant to 1,10-phenanthroline and only partially inhibited by EDTA, showing a distinct inhibition profile. Together, our data demonstrated great heterogeneity of expression of metallopeptidases in a wide range of parasites belonging to the family Trypanosomatidae. PMID:17942292

  10. Astacin Family Metallopeptidases and Serine Peptidase Inhibitors in Spider Digestive Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Foradori, Matthew J.; Tillinghast, Edward K.; Smith, J. Stephen; Townley, Mark A.; Mooney, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    Digestive fluid of the araneid spider Argiope aurantia is known to contain zinc metallopeptidases. Using anion-exchange chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and gel electrophoresis, we isolated two lower-molecular-mass peptidases, designated p16 and p18. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of p16 (37 residues) and p18 (20 residues) are 85% identical over the first 20 residues and are most similar to the N-terminal sequences of the fully active form of meprin (β subunits) from several vertebrates (47–52% and 50–60% identical, respectively). Meprin is a peptidase in the astacin (M12A) subfamily of the astacin (M12) family. Additionally, a 66-residue internal sequence obtained from p16 aligns with the conserved astacin subfamily domain. Thus, at least some spider digestive peptidases appear related to astacin of decapod crustaceans. However, important differences between spider and crustacean metallopeptidases with regard to isoelectric point and their susceptibility to hemolymph-borne inhibitors are demonstrated. Anomalous behavior of the lower-molecular-mass Argiope peptidases during certain fractionation procedures indicates that these peptidases may take part in reversible associations with each other or with other proteins. A. aurantia digestive fluid also contains inhibitory activity effective against insect digestive peptidases. Here we present evidence for at least thirteen, heat-stable serine peptidase inhibitors ranging in molecular mass from about 15 to 32 kDa. PMID:16458560

  11. Problems with nonspecific binding in radioimmunoassay for fibrinogen fragment D

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, R.D.; Kulkarni, P.; Wilson, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    Because of problems associated with non-specific binding in the competetive inhibition radioimmunoassay, the author, in a letter, recommends running a blank (without the first antibody) for each dilution of the antigen. He adds, further, that normal human plasma can be used a diluent when preparing standard curves if non-specific binding is found. (JMT)

  12. Conditional tonic stimulus control of nonspecific arousal.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, H D; Birbaumer, N; Elbert, T; Lutzenberger, W; Rockstroh, B

    1983-01-01

    Subjects performed a reaction time (RT) task in the presence of colored indirect lighting which had previously been associated with either sporadic electric shock (Unsafe context) or no shock (Safe context). Autonomic and cortical processes were influenced by the visual context in two ways. Nonspecific arousal was elevated in the Unsafe context as compared with the Safe context (larger SCR and more accelerative HR change elicited by the RT warning stimulus, and retarded habituation of the middle component of the slow cortical potential during the warning stimulus). In addition, information processing may have been impaired in the Unsafe as compared to the Safe context, since the earliest component of the SCR and the N100 component of the auditory evoked potential were both reduced. Higher frequency of unelicited SCR was observed following changes from a Safe to an Unsafe context than with reverse changes, during the association of these contexts with shock, but this was the only evidence of direct tonic conditioning. In general, the results demonstrate the degree to which psychophysiological processes may be influenced by tonic environmental conditions. PMID:6622070

  13. Characterization of papaya peptidase A as an enzyme of extreme basicity.

    PubMed

    Kaarsholm, N C; Schack, P

    1983-01-01

    Papaya peptidase A, a papain-like enzyme, has formerly been shown to contain a larger excess of basic amino acids and to have a higher isoelectric point than any of the other enzymes in the papaya latex. Determinations of the free electrophoretic mobility as a function of pH now establishes the isoelectric point of papaya peptidase A as 11.7 and that of succinylated papaya peptidase A as 3.8. Although the specific activity of the enzyme appears only slightly affected by the succinylation, the accompanying change in the charge/mobility ratio seems to indicate a relatively large conformational change upon succinylation. PMID:6362305

  14. Lipoprotein effects of incretin analogs and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jixin; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Elevated post-prandial lipoprotein levels are common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Post-prandial lipoprotein alterations in type 2 diabetics are widely believed to drive inflammation and are considered a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. The incretins glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose insulinotropic peptide (GIP) modulate post-prandial lipoproteins through a multitude of pathways that are independent of insulin and weight loss. Evidence from both animal models and humans seems to suggest an important effect on triglyceride rich lipoproteins (Apo48 containing) with little to no effects on other lipoproteins at least in humans. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitors also appear to share these effects suggesting an important role for incretins in these effects. In this review, we will summarize lipid modulating effects of incretin analogs and DPP-4 inhibitors in both animal models and human studies and provide an overview of mechanisms responsible for these effects. PMID:26005496

  15. Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Panagiota S; Karagiannis, George S; Musrap, Natasha; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-08-01

    The kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent the largest family of serine proteases within the human genome and are expressed in various tissues. Although they regulate several important physiological functions, KLKs have also been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Growing evidence describing the deregulation of KLK expression and secretion, as well as activation in various malignancies, has uncovered their potential as mediators of cancer progression, biomarkers of disease and as candidate therapeutic targets. The diversity of signalling pathways and proteolytic cascades involving KLKs and their downstream targets appears to affect cancer biology through multiple mechanisms, including those related to the hallmarks of cancer. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the importance of KLK-driven molecular pathways in relation to cancer cell traits associated with the hallmarks of cancer and to highlight their potential in personalized therapeutics. PMID:26886390

  16. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and their potential for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Neale, Joseph H; Pomper, Martin G; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2005-12-01

    Modulation of N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate peptidase activity with small-molecule inhibitors holds promise for a wide variety of diseases that involve glutamatergic transmission, and has implications for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. This new class of compounds, of which at least one has entered clinical trials and proven to be well tolerated, has demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of pain, schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and, when appropriately functionalized, can image prostate cancer. Further investigation of these promising drug candidates will be needed to bring them to the marketplace. The recent publication of the X-ray crystal structure for the enzymatic target of these compounds should facilitate the development of other new agents with enhanced activity that could improve both the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:16341066

  17. Nonspecific plasma proteins during sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Zwacka, G; Markert, U R

    2003-01-01

    Usually, specific allergy-related plasma proteins such as immunoglobulin E (IgE) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) are used for estimating the grade of sensitization and follow-up of immunotherapy. In recent years, several nonspecific inflammatory markers, such as sICAM-1 and sIL-2R, have been shown as being suitable for therapy control in allergy. In our investigation of patients under sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), plasma from 42 healthy controls and 133 children with single inhalation allergies to grass pollen, birch pollen or house dust mites was obtained during the symptom-free period. Patients showed symptoms including allergic rhinitis, dermatitis and allergic asthma with one single RAST class 3 or higher. Plasma concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), sE-selectin, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and specific IgG4 were analyzed with the ELISA technique. After 1 year of SLIT, concentrations of sICAM-1, sIL-2R and sE-selectin declined significantly when results from all patients were taken as one group. Regarding the single allergen groups, the sICAM-1 and sIL-2R decrease was significant in the grass and mite group, but not in the birch group, while the sE-selectin decline was only significant in the birch group after 1 year of SLIT, but not in the grass and the mite group. No difference was observed in IL-12 and IgG4 expression. In two groups of controls with a mean age of 9.5 versus 17.5 years, the analyzed parameters were not age-dependent. The increased proteins may be useful as additional markers for the evaluation of immunological effects and follow-up investigations of allergy therapies. PMID:12947996

  18. Elevated nonspecific plasma proteins in allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Niess, J H; Bär, C; Zwacka, G; Markert, U R

    2003-01-01

    Several allergen-specific plasma proteins, such as IgE and IgG subclasses, are commonly used for the evaluation of grade of allergy. In the present investigation, we compared the concentration of various nonspecific plasma proteins, mostly known as inflammation markers, in an allergic and a healthy population. Plasma from 130 children with single inhalation allergies to grass pollen, birch pollen, or house dust mites as well as from 42 healthy children was obtained during the symptom-free period. Patients showed symptoms including allergic rhinitis, dermatitis, and asthma with one single radioallergosorbent test (RAST) class 3 or higher. Plasma concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1(sICAM-1), soluble interleukin-2 receptor(sIL-2R), sE-selectin, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (1sVCAM-1) were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Concentrations of sICAM-1 and sE-selectin were significantly increased in all patients compared to controls. In the single allergen groups, sICAM-1 elevation was significant in the grass and mite groups, but not in the birch group; while sE-selection increase was significant in the birch and mite groups, but not in the grass group. The elevation of sIL-2R in the allergic patients was obvious in each single allergen group, but not significant. No difference was observed in sVCAM-1 expression. In two groups of patients with mean age of 9.5 years versus 17.5 years, the analyzed parameters were not age dependent. The increased proteins may be useful as additional markers for efficacy and follow-up investigations of allergy therapies. PMID:12861853

  19. Idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Belloli, Elizabeth A; Beckford, Rosemarie; Hadley, Ryan; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is an interstitial lung disease that may be idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disease, toxins or numerous other causes. Idiopathic NSIP is a rare diagnosis and requires exclusion of these other possible causes. Patients typically present in mid-adulthood with dyspnoea, cough and often constitutional symptoms including fever and fatigue. The disease has a female predominance, and more than 50% of patients have never smoked. Physical exam features mild hypoxaemia and inspiratory rales. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate restriction and a low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include predominantly lower lobe subpleural reticular changes, traction bronchiectasis and ground-glass opacities; honeycombing is rarely seen. An evaluation of the underlying pathology is necessary for a firm diagnosis. Histologically, alveolar and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation and fibrosis are seen in a temporally uniform pattern with preserved underlying alveolar architecture. NSIP must be differentiated from other parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A thorough exposure history and assessment for underlying connective tissue diseases are highly important, as positive findings in these categories would likely denote a case of secondary NSIP. A multi-disciplinary discussion that includes pulmonologist(s), radiologist(s) and pathologist(s) assists in reaching a consensus diagnosis and improves diagnostic accuracy. Treatment of idiopathic NSIP, although not well proven, is generally instituted in the form of immunosuppression. Prognosis is favourable compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although the diagnosis still carries an attributable mortality. Herein we will summarize the clinical characteristics and management of idiopathic NSIP. PMID:26564810

  20. Type III procollagen peptide and PZ-peptidase serum levels in pre-cirrhotic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Morelli, A; Vedovelli, A; Fiorucci, S; Angelini, G P; Fini, C; Palmerini, C A; Floridi, A

    1985-05-30

    To obtain a dynamic and non-invasive picture of hepatic fibrosis in pre-cirrhotic liver diseases we measured both the concentration of the N-terminal peptide of procollagen III, as a marker of collagen synthesis, and the activity of PZ-peptidase, an enzyme involved in collagen degradation, in the serum of alcoholic or chronic viral hepatitis patients. Peptide serum levels were similar in chronic persistent hepatitis and controls, but significantly higher in chronic active hepatitis. Chronic persistent hepatitis patients had PZ-peptidase levels higher than controls, but similar to chronic active hepatitis. The increase in collagen synthesis without a parallel increase in collagen degradation seen in chronic active hepatitis could be regarded as a sign of impending cirrhosis, whereas the unbalanced rise in PZ-peptidase observed in chronic persistent hepatitis is consistent with the non-progressive character of this disorder. In alcoholic hepatitis both peptide concentration and PZ-peptidase activity were elevated, thus suggesting that both collagen synthesis and degradation are activated. However, the greater increase in PZ-peptidase than in peptide serum levels seen in some patients seems to indicate a minor tendency to progressive fibrosis or a trend towards resolution. Unlike liver disease patients, normal peptide and PZ-peptidase levels were found in patients with pancreatic fibrosis. Since circulating inhibitors and activators of the PZ-peptidase activity can be excluded, as proved by this study, joint peptide and PZ-peptidase serum measurements would seem to offer a simple reliable non-invasive method for differentiating and monitoring progressive and non-progressive forms of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:3888456

  1. Biochemical and antigenic characterization of a new dipeptidyl-peptidase isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, A; Monod, M; Debeaupuis, J P; Diaquin, M; Kobayashi, H; Latgé, J P

    1997-03-01

    A novel dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP V) was purified from the culture medium of Aspergillus fumigatus. This is the first report of a secreted dipeptidyl-peptidase. The enzyme had a molecular mass of 88 kDa and contained approximately 9 kDa of N-linked carbohydrate. The expression and secretion of dipeptidyl-peptidase varied with the growth conditions; maximal intra- and extracellular levels were detected when the culture medium contained only proteins or protein hydrolysates in the absence of sugars. The gene of DPP V was cloned and showed significant sequence homology to other eukaryotic dipeptidyl-peptidase genes. Unlike the other dipeptidyl-peptidases, which are all intracellular, DPP V contained a signal peptide. Like the genes of other dipeptidyl-peptidases, that of DPP V displayed the consensus sequences of the catalytic site of the nonclassical serine proteases. The biochemical properties of native and recombinant DPP V obtained in Pichia pastoris were unique and were characterized by a substrate specificity limited to the hydrolysis of X-Ala, His-Ser, and Ser-Tyr dipeptides at a neutral pH optimum. In addition, we showed that DPP V is identical to one of the two major antigens used for the diagnosis of aspergillosis. PMID:9045640

  2. Comparison of cysteine peptidase activities in Trichobilharzia regenti and Schistosoma mansoni cercariae.

    PubMed

    Kasný, M; Mikes, L; Dalton, J P; Mountford, A P; Horák, P

    2007-10-01

    Cercariae of the bird schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti and of the human schistosome Schistosoma mansoni employ proteases to invade the skin of their definitive hosts. To investigate whether a similar proteolytic mechanism is used by both species, cercarial extracts of T. regenti and S. mansoni were biochemically characterized, with the primary focus on cysteine peptidases. A similar pattern of cysteine peptidase activities was detected by zymography of cercarial extracts and their chromatographic fractions from T. regenti and S. mansoni. The greatest peptidase activity was recorded in both species against the fluorogenic peptide substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, commonly used to detect cathepsins B and L, and was markedly inhibited (> 96%) by Z-Phe-Ala-CHN2 at pH 4.5. Cysteine peptidases of 33 kDa and 33-34 kDa were identified in extracts of T. regenti and S. mansoni cercariae employing a biotinylated Clan CA cysteine peptidase-specific inhibitor (DCG-04). Finally, cercarial extracts from both T. regenti and S. mansoni were able to degrade native substrates present in skin (collagen II and IV, keratin) at physiological pH suggesting that cysteine peptidases are important in the pentration of host skin. PMID:17517170

  3. Nonspecific side effects of oral contraceptives: nocebo or noise?

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2011-01-01

    Side effects of combined oral contraceptives are the most common reason why women discontinue them. Over the past half century, an elaborate mythology about these ill effects has evolved, fueled by rumor, gossip and poor-quality research. In contrast, placebo-controlled randomized trials document that nonspecific side effects are not significantly more common with combined oral contraceptives than with inert pills. These reported nonspecific side effects may reflect the nocebo phenomenon (the inverse of a placebo): if women are told to expect noxious side effects, these complaints occur because of the power of suggestion. Alternatively, nonspecific complaints may simply reflect their background prevalence in the population. Because Level I evidence documents no important increase in nonspecific side effects with oral contraceptives, counseling about these side effects or including them in package labeling is unwarranted and probably unethical. When in doubt, clinicians should err on the side of optimism. PMID:21134497

  4. [Description of an acidic peptidase, insensitive to classical inhibitors, in protein extracts of Trypanosoma cruzi, from a rural area of Venezuela, where Chagas disease is endemic].

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Edgar Armando; de la Cruz, Henry Samuel; Coita, Blanca Elena

    2013-09-01

    Through two peptidase assay methods, one in liquid-phase and another, in gel-phase (gel zymography), an acid peptidase was detected in protein crude extracts of epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, from a rural area of Venezuela where Chagas disease is endemic. The peptidase shows activity at a pH range between 2.0 and 2.9. Under the experimental conditions described, the acid peptidase was insensitive to usual concentrations of peptidase inhibitors of the types: serine, cysteine, aspartic and metallopeptidases. Nevertheless, like porcine pepsin at pH 2.9, the peptidase was inhibited in the presence of 5mM DTT. PMID:24354241

  5. Aspartic Peptidases of Human Pathogenic Trypanosomatids: Perspectives and Trends for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Santos, L.O.; Garcia-Gomes, A.S.; Catanho, M.; Sodré, C.L.; Santos, A.L.S.; Branquinha, M.H.; d’Avila-Levy, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspartic peptidases are proteolytic enzymes present in many organisms like vertebrates, plants, fungi, protozoa and in some retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These enzymes are involved in important metabolic processes in microorganisms/virus and play major roles in infectious diseases. Although few studies have been performed in order to identify and characterize aspartic peptidase in trypanosomatids, which include the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis, Chagas’ disease and sleeping sickness, some beneficial properties of aspartic peptidase inhibitors have been described on fundamental biological events of these pathogenic agents. In this context, aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs) used in the current chemotherapy against HIV (e.g., amprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir) were able to inhibit the aspartic peptidase activity produced by different species of Leishmania. Moreover, the treatment of Leishmania promastigotes with HIV PIs induced several perturbations on the parasite homeostasis, including loss of the motility and arrest of proliferation/growth. The HIV PIs also induced an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species and the appearance of irreversible morphological alterations, triggering parasite death pathways such as programed cell death (apoptosis) and uncontrolled autophagy. The blockage of physiological parasite events as well as the induction of death pathways culminated in its incapacity to adhere, survive and escape of phagocytic cells. Collectively, these results support the data showing that parasites treated with HIV PIs have a significant reduction in the ability to cause in vivo infection. Similarly, the treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi cells with pepstatin A showed a significant inhibition on both aspartic peptidase activity and growth as well as promoted several and irreversible morphological changes. These studies indicate that aspartic peptidases can be promising targets in

  6. Comparative review of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sulphonylureas.

    PubMed

    Deacon, C F; Lebovitz, H E

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a progressive disease, and pharmacotherapy with a single agent does not generally provide durable glycaemic control over the long term. Sulphonylurea (SU) drugs have a history stretching back over 60 years, and have traditionally been the mainstay choice as second-line agents to be added to metformin once glycaemic control with metformin monotherapy deteriorates; however, they are associated with undesirable side effects, including increased hypoglycaemia risk and weight gain. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are, by comparison, more recent, with the first compound being launched in 2006, but the class now globally encompasses at least 11 different compounds. DPP-4 inhibitors improve glycaemic control with similar efficacy to SUs, but do not usually provoke hypoglycaemia or weight gain, are relatively free from adverse side effects, and have recently been shown not to increase cardiovascular risk in large prospective safety trials. Because of these factors, DPP-4 inhibitors have become an established therapy for T2DM and are increasingly being positioned earlier in treatment algorithms. The present article reviews these two classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (DPP-4 inhibitors and SUs), highlighting differences and similarities between members of the same class, as well as discussing the potential advantages and disadvantages of the two drug classes. While both classes have their merits, the choice of which to use depends on the characteristics of each individual patient; however, for the majority of patients, DPP-4 inhibitors are now the preferred choice. PMID:26597596

  7. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 8/9 impairs preadipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruijun; Wang, Xinying; Bachovchin, William; Zukowska, Zofia; Osborn, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Adipocytes are the primary cells in adipose tissue, and adipocyte dysfunction causes lipodystrophy, obesity and diabetes. The dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) 4 family includes four enzymes, DPP4, DPP8, DPP9 and fibroblast activation protein (FAP). DPP4 family inhibitors have been used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes patients, but their role in adipocyte formation are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the DPP8/9 selective inhibitor 1G244 blocks adipogenesis in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F422A, while DPP4 and FAP inhibitors have no effect. In addition, knockdown of DPP8 or DPP9 significantly impairs adipocyte differentiation in preadipocytes. We further uncovered that blocking the expression or activities of DPP8 and DPP9 attenuates PPARγ2 induction during preadipocyte differentiation. Addition of PPARγ agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs), or ectopic expression of PPARγ2, is able to rescue the adipogenic defect caused by DPP8/9 inhibition in preadipocytes. These results indicate the importance of DPP8 and DPP9 on adipogenesis. PMID:26242871

  8. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 8/9 impairs preadipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Han, Ruijun; Wang, Xinying; Bachovchin, William; Zukowska, Zofia; Osborn, John W

    2015-01-01

    Adipocytes are the primary cells in adipose tissue, and adipocyte dysfunction causes lipodystrophy, obesity and diabetes. The dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) 4 family includes four enzymes, DPP4, DPP8, DPP9 and fibroblast activation protein (FAP). DPP4 family inhibitors have been used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes patients, but their role in adipocyte formation are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the DPP8/9 selective inhibitor 1G244 blocks adipogenesis in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F422A, while DPP4 and FAP inhibitors have no effect. In addition, knockdown of DPP8 or DPP9 significantly impairs adipocyte differentiation in preadipocytes. We further uncovered that blocking the expression or activities of DPP8 and DPP9 attenuates PPARγ2 induction during preadipocyte differentiation. Addition of PPARγ agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs), or ectopic expression of PPARγ2, is able to rescue the adipogenic defect caused by DPP8/9 inhibition in preadipocytes. These results indicate the importance of DPP8 and DPP9 on adipogenesis. PMID:26242871

  9. Identification of dipeptidyl peptidase III in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, J; Yamamoto, Y; Kurosawa, H; Nishimura, K; Hazato, T

    2000-07-01

    We have found activity of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) III, one of the most important enkephalin-degrading enzymes in the central nervous system, in human neutrophils. HPLC analysis of the peptide fragments produced by treatment of leucine-enkephalin with isolated neutrophils in the presence of inhibitors of other enkephalin-degrading enzymes revealed that the enzyme in human neutrophils cleaved dipeptides from the NH(2) terminus of leucine-enkephalin, suggesting the presence of DPPIII activity in human neutrophils. Using a specific synthesized substrate and proteinase inhibitors, it was found that the neutrophils have 19.2 +/- 3.6 microM/h/5 x 10(6) cells of beta-naphthylamine for the enzyme. It was also confirmed that spinorphin and tynorphin, both reported to inhibit the activities of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, had potent inhibitory activities (IC(50): 4.0 and 0.029 microg/ml, respectively) against the enzyme. The presence of DPPIII activity in human neutrophils suggests that the biologically active peptides which are associated with enkephalin play a physiological role in regulating enkephalin or inflammatory mechanisms in peripheral tissues. PMID:10873616

  10. Prolyl-specific peptidases for applications in food protein hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Nicole; Zorn, Holger; Rühl, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Various food proteins including, e.g. gluten, collagen and casein are rich in L-proline residues. Due to the cyclic structure of proline, these proteins are well protected from enzymatic degradation by typical digestive enzymes. Proline-specific peptidases (PsP) belong to different families of hydrolases acting on peptide bonds (EC 3.4.x.x). They occur in various organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants and insects. Based on their biochemical characteristics, PsP type enzymes are further grouped into different subclasses of which prolyl aminopeptidases (EC 3.4.11.5, PAP), prolyl carboxypeptidases (EC 3.4.17.16, PCP) and prolyl oligopeptidases/prolyl endopeptidases (EC 3.4.21.26, POP/PEP) are of major interest for applications in food biotechnology. This mini review summarises the biochemical assays employed for these subclasses of PsP and their structural properties and the reaction mechanisms. A special focus was set on PsP derived from fungi and insects and important industrial applications in the field of food biotechnology. The degradation of gluten and collagen as well as the hydrolysis of bitter peptides are discussed. PMID:26239067

  11. Identification of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors: virtual screening, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Junhao; Li, Qing; Zhang, Shengping; Liu, Haomiao; Zhao, Leilei; Cheng, Haibo; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Jinpei; Zhang, Huibin

    2014-09-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV is an important approach for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. In this study, we reported a multistage virtual screening workflow that integrated 3D pharmacophore models, structural consensus docking, and molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area binding energy calculation to identify novel dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors. After screening our in-house database, two hit compounds, HWL-405 and HWL-892, having persistent high performance in all stages of virtual screening were identified. These two hit compounds together with several analogs were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV. The experimental data indicated that most designed compounds exhibited significant dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory activity. Among them, compounds 35f displayed the greatest potency against dipeptidyl peptidase IV in vitro with the IC50 value of 78 nm. In an oral glucose tolerance test in normal male Kunming mice, compound 35f reduced blood glucose excursion in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24674599

  12. Kinetics of Extracellular Peptidases in Sediments of the White Oak River, NC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, A. D.; Kevorkian, R. T.; Alperin, M. J.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2013-12-01

    Recent molecular work has shed light on the mechanisms underlying organoheterotrophy in the marine subsurface, including production of extracellular peptidases by deeply-branching Archaea. Here we present measurements of the potential activity (Vmax) and half-saturation constants (Km) for six extracellular peptidase substrates in sediments from 0 to 83 cm deep in the White Oak River estuary, NC, USA. Potential activities at 83 cm were on average 12% of the values at the surface, but because surface Vmax values were several orders of magnitude greater than comparable values from surface seawater, the deep activities were still substantial. Km values did not display a clear trend with depth. Activities consistent with leucyl aminopeptidase were higher than any other extracellular peptidase, but there was no clear division in activities between endopeptidases (which cleave bonds in the interior of proteins) versus aminopeptidases (which cleave N-terminal amino acids). Competitive inhibition experiments will reveal the extent to which the activities we measured reflect the distinct enzymes. We will also present model-based estimates of organic carbon mineralization rates based on methane and sulfate profiles in order to assess the relative importance of extracellular peptidases as a means to acquire organic carbon in the subsurface. Saturation curves for 5 peptidase substrates at the surface and 83 cm in the White Oak River.

  13. S46 Peptidases are the First Exopeptidases to be Members of Clan PA

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Masaki, Mika; Ohta, Kazunori; Okada, Hirofumi; Nonaka, Takamasa; Morikawa, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kazuo T.; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2014-01-01

    The dipeptidyl aminopeptidase BII (DAP BII) belongs to a serine peptidase family, S46. The amino acid sequence of the catalytic unit of DAP BII exhibits significant similarity to those of clan PA endopeptidases, such as chymotrypsin. However, the molecular mechanism of the exopeptidase activity of family S46 peptidase is unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of DAP BII. DAP BII contains a peptidase domain including a typical double β-barrel fold and previously unreported α-helical domain. The structures of peptide complexes revealed that the α-helical domain covers the active-site cleft and the side chain of Asn330 in the domain forms hydrogen bonds with the N-terminus of the bound peptide. These observations indicate that the α-helical domain regulates the exopeptidase activity of DAP BII. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals, we expect that our study will be useful for the design of specific inhibitors of S46 peptidases from pathogens. PMID:24827749

  14. Processing, stability, and kinetic parameters of C5a peptidase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Elizabeth T; Wetherell, Michael G; Winter, Laurie A; Olmsted, Stephen B; Cleary, Patrick P; Matsuka, Yury V

    2002-10-01

    A recombinant streptococcal C5a peptidase was expressed in Escherichia coli and its catalytic properties and thermal stability were subjected to examination. It was shown that the NH2-terminal region of C5a peptidase (Asn32-Asp79/Lys90) forms the pro-sequence segment. Upon maturation the propeptide is hydrolyzed either via an autocatalytic intramolecular cleavage or by exogenous protease streptopain. At pH 7.4 the enzyme exhibited maximum activity in the narrow range of temperatures between 40 and 43 degrees C. The process of heat denaturation of C5a peptidase investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein undergoes biphasic unfolding transition with Tm of 50 and 70 degrees C suggesting melting of different parts of the molecule with different stability. Unfolding of the less stable structures was accompanied by the loss of proteolytic activity. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to the COOH-terminus of human complement C5a we demonstrated that in vitro peptidase catalyzes hydrolysis of two His67-Lys68 and Ala58-Ser59 peptide bonds. The high catalytic efficiency obtained for the SQLRANISHKDMQLGR extended peptide compared to the poor hydrolysis of its derivative Ac-SQLRANISH-pNA that lacks residues at P2'-P7' positions, suggest the importance of C5a peptidase interactions with the P' side of the substrate. PMID:12354115

  15. Heparin reduces nonspecific eosinophil staining artifacts in mass cytometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adeeb H; Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of heterogeneous cell samples by mass cytometry (CyTOF) relies on the assumption that metal labeled antibodies accurately bind to their target antigens. We report a previously unappreciated experimental artifact of non-specific antibody binding by eosinophils during intracellular CyTOF analysis of human whole blood samples. We hypothesized that this non-specific binding results from a charge-based interaction between the metal-labeled antibodies and highly cationic proteins found in eosinophillic granules and found that this non-specific staining artifact could be reduced to background levels with a simple blocking protocol using heparin as a competing anionic protein. This protocol eliminates a potential source of erroneous data interpretation in all experiments involving intracellular staining of human whole blood samples, and allows accurate assessment of dynamic changes in intracellular proteins in eosinophils by CyTOF. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27061608

  16. Specificity and non-specificity in RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by complex networks of interactions between RNAs and proteins. Proteins that interact with RNA have been traditionally viewed as either specific or non-specific; specific proteins interact preferentially with defined RNA sequence or structure motifs, whereas non-specific proteins interact with RNA sites devoid of such characteristics. Recent studies indicate that the binary “specific vs. non-specific” classification is insufficient to describe the full spectrum of RNA–protein interactions. Here, we review new methods that enable quantitative measurements of protein binding to large numbers of RNA variants, and the concepts aimed as describing resulting binding spectra: affinity distributions, comprehensive binding models and free energy landscapes. We discuss how these new methodologies and associated concepts enable work towards inclusive, quantitative models for specific and non-specific RNA–protein interactions. PMID:26285679

  17. Simulation of non-specific protein–mRNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Magee, James; Warwicker, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions exhibit varying degrees of specificity. Relatively high affinity, sequence-specific interactions, can be studied with structure determination, but lower affinity, non-specific interactions are also of biological importance. We report simulations that predict the population of nucleic acid paths around protein surfaces, and give binding constant differences for changes in the protein scaffold. The method is applied to the non-specific component of interactions between eIF4Es and messenger RNAs that are bound tightly at the cap site. Adding a fragment of eIF4G to the system changes both the population of mRNA paths and the protein–mRNA binding affinity, suggesting a potential role for non-specific interactions in modulating translational properties. Generally, the free energy simulation technique could work in harness with characterized tethering points to extend analysis of nucleic acid conformation, and its modulation by protein scaffolds. PMID:16314302

  18. Natural and synthetic inhibitors of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs).

    PubMed

    Goettig, Peter; Magdolen, Viktor; Brandstetter, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Including the true tissue kallikrein KLK1, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent a family of fifteen mammalian serine proteases. While the physiological roles of several KLKs have been at least partially elucidated, their activation and regulation remain largely unclear. This obscurity may be related to the fact that a given KLK fulfills many different tasks in diverse fetal and adult tissues, and consequently, the timescale of some of their physiological actions varies significantly. To date, a variety of endogenous inhibitors that target distinct KLKs have been identified. Among them are the attenuating Zn(2+) ions, active site-directed proteinaceous inhibitors, such as serpins and the Kazal-type inhibitors, or the huge, unspecific compartment forming α(2)-macroglobulin. Failure of these inhibitory systems can lead to certain pathophysiological conditions. One of the most prominent examples is the Netherton syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctional domains of the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 which fail to appropriately regulate KLKs in the skin. Small synthetic inhibitory compounds and natural polypeptidic exogenous inhibitors have been widely employed to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of KLKs and to further investigate their structures and biophysical properties. Overall, this knowledge leads not only to a better understanding of the physiological tasks of KLKs, but is also a strong fundament for the synthesis of small compound drugs and engineered biomolecules for pharmaceutical approaches. In several types of cancer, KLKs have been found to be overexpressed, which makes them clinically relevant biomarkers for prognosis and monitoring. Thus, down regulation of excessive KLK activity in cancer and in skin diseases by small inhibitor compounds may represent attractive therapeutical approaches. PMID:20615447

  19. Navigating the chemical space of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shoombuatong, Watshara; Prachayasittikul, Veda; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Songtawee, Napat; Monnor, Teerawat; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    This study represents the first large-scale study on the chemical space of inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4), which is a potential therapeutic protein target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Herein, a large set of 2,937 compounds evaluated for their ability to inhibit DPP4 was compiled from the literature. Molecular descriptors were generated from the geometrically optimized low-energy conformers of these compounds at the semiempirical AM1 level. The origins of DPP4 inhibitory activity were elucidated from computed molecular descriptors that accounted for the unique physicochemical properties inherently present in the active and inactive sets of compounds as defined by their respective half maximal inhibitory concentration values of less than 1 μM and greater than 10 μM, respectively. Decision tree analysis revealed the importance of molecular weight, total energy of a molecule, topological polar surface area, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, and number of hydrogen-bond donors, which correspond to molecular size, energy, surface polarity, electron acceptors, and hydrogen bond donors, respectively. The prediction model was subjected to rigorous independent testing via three external sets. Scaffold and chemical fragment analysis was also performed on these active and inactive sets of compounds to shed light on the distinguishing features of the functional moieties. Docking of representative active DPP4 inhibitors was also performed to unravel key interacting residues. The results of this study are anticipated to be useful in guiding the rational design of novel and robust DPP4 inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26309399

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the coleopteran-specific Cry3Aa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Larvae digest protein initially with cysteine peptidases in the anterior midgut and further with serine peptidases in middle and poste...

  1. Fluorometric assay using naphthylamide substrates for assessing novel venom peptidase activities.

    PubMed

    Gasparello-Clemente, Elaine; Silveira, Paulo Flávio

    2002-11-01

    In the present study we examined the feasibility of using the fluorometry of naphthylamine derivatives for revealing peptidase activities in venoms of the snakes Bothrops jararaca, Bothrops alternatus, Bothrops atrox, Bothrops moojeni, Bothrops insularis, Crotalus durissus terrificus and Bitis arietans, of the scorpions Tityus serrulatus and Tityus bahiensis, and of the spiders Phoneutria nigriventer and Loxosceles intermedia. Neutral aminopeptidase (APN) and prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV (DPP IV) activities were presented in all snake venoms, with the highest levels in B. alternatus. Although all examined peptidase activities showed relatively low levels in arthropod venoms, basic aminopeptidase (APB) activity from P. nigriventer venom was the exception. Compared to the other peptidase activities, relatively high levels of acid aminopeptidase (APA) activity were restricted to B. arietans venom. B. arietans also exhibited a prominent content of APB activity which was lower in other venoms. Relatively low prolyl endopeptidase and proline iminopeptidase activities were, respectively, detectable only in T. bahiensis and B. insularis. Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase activity was undetectable in all venoms. All examined peptidase activities were undetectable in T. serrulatus venom. In this study, the specificities of a diverse array of peptidase activities from representative venoms were demonstrated for the first time, with a description of their distribution which may contribute to guiding further investigations. The expressive difference between snake and arthropod venoms was indicated by APN and DPP IV activities while APA and APB activities distinguished the venom of B. arietans from those of Brazilian snakes. The data reflected the relatively uniform qualitative distribution of the peptidase activities investigated, together with their unequal quantitative distribution, indicating the evolutionary divergence in the processing of peptides in these different

  2. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    PubMed

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector. PMID:16310789

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase with strict substrate specificity of an anaerobic periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Setsuo; Hirai, Kaname; Shibata, Yukinaga

    2002-03-19

    A dipeptidyl peptidase which hydrolyzed Xaa-Ala-p-nitroanilide was purified to homogeneity by sequential procedures including ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, gel filtration and isoelectric focusing from the cell extract of Porphyromonas gingivalis. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed p-nitroanilide derivatives of Lys-Ala, Ala-Ala, and Val-Ala, but not Xaa-Pro. Enzyme activity was maximum at neutral pHs. Its molecular mass was 64 kDa with an isoelectric point of 5.7. The enzyme belonged to the family of serine peptidases. PMID:12007665

  4. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  5. Non-Specific Microbicide Product Development: Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Joseph W.; Robbiani, Melissa; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Moench, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the identification of HIV-1 as the etiological agent responsible for AIDS nearly 30 years ago, a sterilizing vaccine capable of preventing transmission of the virus remains elusive. In response to struggles on the vaccine development front, significant effort has been devoted to preventing the transmission of HIV with alternative products, technologies, and strategies. One of the early alternative HIV prevention strategies was microbicides, which are topical products that can be used to prevent sexual transmission of HIV either vaginally or rectally. First generation microbicide products were designed to be simple gel formulations comprised of readily available active agents that were inexpensive and broadly active (i.e., non-specific). Unfortunately, despite the clinical investigation of multiple product concepts satisfying these requirements, none were shown to be efficacious in pivotal trials. More recently, microbicide and oral prevention strategies involving highly specific and potent anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs have shown to be efficacious in trials. Although building on these successes continues, these products have a number of issues including potential toxicity with long term use, selection of HIV resistance, and cost. Further, all of the original justifications for non-specific microbicide products remain valid. This review provides a brief history of non-specific microbicide development, outlines the evolution to, and limitations of, ARV based microbicides, and summarizes the current activity on non-specific microbicide product development. PMID:22264041

  6. Nonspecific Verbal Cues Alleviate Forgetting by Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kirstie; Hayne, Harlene

    2007-01-01

    Verbal reminders play a pervasive role in memory retrieval by human adults. In fact, relatively nonspecific verbal information (e.g. "Remember the last time we ate at that restaurant?") will often cue vivid recollections of a past event even when presented outside the original encoding context. Although research has shown that memory retrieval by…

  7. Challenges in urine bioanalytical assays: overcoming nonspecific binding.

    PubMed

    Ji, Allena Ji; Jiang, Zhiping; Livson, Yuliya; Davis, Jennifer Ann; Chu, Jasper Xuegong; Weng, Naidong

    2010-09-01

    Dr Allena Ji is the Director of Bioanalytical Services, XenoBiotic Laboratories, Inc., NJ, USA. She has worked in the bioanalytical field for many years and accumulated rich experience in LC-MS/MS method development, method validation and sample analysis under GLP compliance in large pharmaceutical company and contract laboratory settings. In the past 10 years, Allena worked at Pfizer (Legacy of Wyeth) and investigated many small-molecule drug candidates for their nonspecific binding in urine assays. Nonspecific binding of compounds results in a severe underestimation of the compounds' concentrations and poor precision and accuracy in urine bioanalytical assays. To overcome nonspecific binding in urine assays, Allena and her colleagues developed a series of practical approaches for urine method development. By adding an appropriate anti-adsorptive agent at its optimum concentration to the urine collection containers, the nonspecific binding can be blocked. Urine assays have much higher hurdles than plasma assays due to nonspecific binding and variability of urine pH, salt concentration, volume and solubility of drug(s) in urine. A simple and systematic approach for urine method development is emphasized in this paper. Nonspecific binding is a very serious issue in bioanalytical urine assays where a compound(s) adsorbs to the container wall. The adsorption happens frequently in urine assays because urine lacks proteins and lipids that can bind to the analytes or solubilize lipophilic analytes. Therefore, urine bioanalytical assays tend to suffer from analyte losses more often than plasma assays. In the past decade, there have been many methods described to overcome nonspecific adsorption in urine assays based on individual analyte characteristics. However, a common and simple method development approach for various analytes has not been discussed and summarized. In this article we demonstrate, discuss and summarize a common approach to urine method development with

  8. Discrete Pathophysiology is Uncommon in Patients with Nonspecific Arm Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kortlever, Joost T.P.; Janssen, Stein J.; Molleman, Jeroen; Hageman, Michiel G.J.S.; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific symptoms are common in all areas of medicine. Patients and caregivers can be frustrated when an illness cannot be reduced to a discrete pathophysiological process that corresponds with the symptoms. We therefore asked the following questions: 1) Which demographic factors and psychological comorbidities are associated with change from an initial diagnosis of nonspecific arm pain to eventual identification of discrete pathophysiology that corresponds with symptoms? 2) What is the percentage of patients eventually diagnosed with discrete pathophysiology, what are those pathologies, and do they account for the symptoms? Methods: We evaluated 634 patients with an isolated diagnosis of nonspecific upper extremity pain to see if discrete pathophysiology was diagnosed on subsequent visits to the same hand surgeon, a different hand surgeon, or any physician within our health system for the same pain. Results: There were too few patients with discrete pathophysiology at follow-up to address the primary study question. Definite discrete pathophysiology that corresponded with the symptoms was identified in subsequent evaluations by the index surgeon in one patient (0.16% of all patients) and cured with surgery (nodular fasciitis). Subsequent doctors identified possible discrete pathophysiology in one patient and speculative pathophysiology in four patients and the index surgeon identified possible discrete pathophysiology in four patients, but the five discrete diagnoses accounted for only a fraction of the symptoms. Conclusion: Nonspecific diagnoses are not harmful. Prospective randomized research is merited to determine if nonspecific, descriptive diagnoses are better for patients than specific diagnoses that imply pathophysiology in the absence of discrete verifiable pathophysiology. PMID:27517064

  9. Trelagliptin (SYR-472, Zafatek), novel once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes, inhibits dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) via a non-covalent mechanism

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grimshaw, Charles E.; Jennings, Andy; Kamran, Ruhi; Ueno, Hikaru; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Takuo; Tani, Akiyoshi; Sano, Hiroki; Kinugawa, Yoshinobu; Koumura, Emiko; et al

    2016-06-21

    Trelagliptin (SYR-472), a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, shows sustained efficacy by once-weekly dosing in type 2 diabetes patients. In this study, we characterized in vitro properties of trelagliptin, which exhibited approximately 4-and 12-fold more potent inhibition against human dipeptidyl peptidase-4 than alogliptin and sitagliptin, respectively, and >10,000-fold selectivity over related proteases including dipeptidyl peptidase-8 and dipeptidyl peptidase-9. Kinetic analysis revealed reversible, competitive and slow-binding inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 by trelagliptin (t1/2 for dissociation ≈ 30 minutes). X-ray diffraction data indicated a non-covalent interaction between dipeptidyl peptidase and trelagliptin. Altogether, potent dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitionmay partially contribute to sustained efficacy of trelagliptin.

  10. Trelagliptin (SYR-472, Zafatek), Novel Once-Weekly Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, Inhibits Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) via a Non-Covalent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Andy; Kamran, Ruhi; Ueno, Hikaru; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Takuo; Tani, Akiyoshi; Sano, Hiroki; Kinugawa, Yoshinobu; Koumura, Emiko; Shi, Lihong; Takeuchi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Trelagliptin (SYR-472), a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, shows sustained efficacy by once-weekly dosing in type 2 diabetes patients. In this study, we characterized in vitro properties of trelagliptin, which exhibited approximately 4- and 12-fold more potent inhibition against human dipeptidyl peptidase-4 than alogliptin and sitagliptin, respectively, and >10,000-fold selectivity over related proteases including dipeptidyl peptidase-8 and dipeptidyl peptidase-9. Kinetic analysis revealed reversible, competitive and slow-binding inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 by trelagliptin (t1/2 for dissociation ≈ 30 minutes). X-ray diffraction data indicated a non-covalent interaction between dipeptidyl peptidase and trelagliptin. Taken together, potent dipeptidyl peptidase inhibition may partially contribute to sustained efficacy of trelagliptin. PMID:27328054

  11. Trelagliptin (SYR-472, Zafatek), Novel Once-Weekly Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, Inhibits Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) via a Non-Covalent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, Charles E; Jennings, Andy; Kamran, Ruhi; Ueno, Hikaru; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Takuo; Tani, Akiyoshi; Sano, Hiroki; Kinugawa, Yoshinobu; Koumura, Emiko; Shi, Lihong; Takeuchi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Trelagliptin (SYR-472), a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, shows sustained efficacy by once-weekly dosing in type 2 diabetes patients. In this study, we characterized in vitro properties of trelagliptin, which exhibited approximately 4- and 12-fold more potent inhibition against human dipeptidyl peptidase-4 than alogliptin and sitagliptin, respectively, and >10,000-fold selectivity over related proteases including dipeptidyl peptidase-8 and dipeptidyl peptidase-9. Kinetic analysis revealed reversible, competitive and slow-binding inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 by trelagliptin (t1/2 for dissociation ≈ 30 minutes). X-ray diffraction data indicated a non-covalent interaction between dipeptidyl peptidase and trelagliptin. Taken together, potent dipeptidyl peptidase inhibition may partially contribute to sustained efficacy of trelagliptin. PMID:27328054

  12. Lack of relevance of kinetic parameters for exocellular DD-peptidases to cephalosporin MICs.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, D B; Ott, J L

    1986-01-01

    MICs of a set of cephalosporins against a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens showed no strong correlations with the rate at which these inhibitors acylate or are deacylated by beta-lactam-sensitive DD-peptidases excreted by Streptomyces sp. strain R61 and Actinomadura sp. strain R39. PMID:3729340

  13. Hydrolysis of wheat gluten by combining peptidases of Flammulina velutipes and electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Giesler, Lucienne; Linke, Diana; Rabe, Swen; Appel, Daniel; Berger, Ralf Günter

    2013-09-11

    Wheat gluten hydrolysis, used to generate seasonings, was studied using peptidases from Flammulina velutipes or commercial Flavourzyme. L-amino acids were added in a range from 0.5 to 75.0 mM, and L-isoleucine, L-leucine, L-valine, and L-phenylalanine were identified as the strongest inhibitors for both enzyme mixtures. L-serine inhibited Flammulina velutipes peptidases only, while L-histidine and L-glutamine inhibited Flavourzyme peptidases only. To reduce product inhibition by released L-amino acids, electrodialysis was explored. An increase of the degree of hydrolysis of up to 60% for Flammulina velutipes peptidases and 31% for Flavourzyme compared to that for the best control batch was observed after applying an electrodialysis unit equipped with an ultrafiltration membrane for two times 1 h during the 20 h of hydrolysis. The total transfer of free L-amino acids into the concentrate reached 25-30% per hour. Peptides passed the membrane less easily, although the nominal cutoff was 4 kDa. PMID:23947566

  14. Purification and biochemical characterization of an extracellular serine peptidase from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Biaggio, Rafael Tage; Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues da; Rosa, Nathalia Gonsales da; Leite, Rodrigo Simões Ribeiro; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Cabral, Tatiana Pereira de Freitas; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Cabral, Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    Peptidases are important because they play a central role in pharmaceutical, food, environmental, and other industrial processes. A serine peptidase from Aspergillus terreus was isolated after two chromatography steps that showed a yield of 15.5%. Its molecular mass was determined to be 43 kD, by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This peptidase was active between pH 5.0 to 8.0 and had maximum activity at pH 7.0, at 45°C. When exposited with 1 M of urea, the enzyme maintained 100% activity and used azocasein as substrate. The N-terminal (first 15 residues) showed 33% identity with the serine peptidase of Aspergillus clavatus ES1. The kinetics assays showed that subsite S2 did not bind polar basic amino acids (His and Arg) nonpolar acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu). The subsite S1 showed higher catalytic efficiency than the S2 and S3 subsites. PMID:25830777

  15. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  16. PsoP1, a milk-clotting aspartic peptidase from the basidiomycete fungus Piptoporus soloniensis.

    PubMed

    El-Baky, Hassan Abd; Linke, Diana; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf Günter

    2011-09-28

    The first enzyme of the basidiomycete Piptoporus soloniensis, a peptidase (PsoP1), was characterized after isolation from submerged cultures, purification by fractional precipitation, and preparative native-polyarylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The native molecular mass of PsoP1 was 38 kDa with an isoelectric point of 3.9. Similar to chymosin from milk calves, PsoP1 showed a maximum milk-clotting activity (MCA) at 35-40 °C and was most stable at pH 6 and below 40 °C. The complete inhibition by pepstatin A identified this enzyme as an aspartic peptidase. Electrospray ionization-tandem MS showed an amino acid partial sequence that was more homologous to mammalian milk clotting peptidases than to the chymosin substitute from a fungal species, such as the Zygomycete Mucor miehei. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE patterns, the peptidase cleaved κ-casein in a way similar to chymosin and hydrolyzed β-casein slowly, as it would be expected from an efficient chymosin substitute. PMID:21888369

  17. Chymotrypsin-like peptidases from Tribolium castaneum: A role in molting revealed by RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chymotrypsin-like peptidases (CTLPs) of insects are primarily secreted into the gut lumen where they act as digestive enzymes. We studied the gene family encoding CTLPs in the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Using an extended search pattern, we identified 14 TcCTLP genes that e...

  18. Intestinal peptidases form functional complexes with the neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, Stephen J.; Bröer, Angelika; O'Mara, Megan L.; Bröer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The brush-border membrane of the small intestine and kidney proximal tubule are the major sites for the absorption and re-absorption of nutrients in the body respectively. Transport of amino acids is mediated through the action of numerous secondary active transporters. In the mouse, neutral amino acids are transported by B0AT1 [broad neutral (0) amino acid transporter 1; SLC6A19 (solute carrier family 6 member 19)] in the intestine and by B0AT1 and B0AT3 (SLC6A18) in the kidney. Immunoprecipitation and Blue native electrophoresis of intestinal brush-border membrane proteins revealed that B0AT1 forms complexes with two peptidases, APN (aminopeptidase N/CD13) and ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2). Physiological characterization of B0AT1 expressed together with these peptidases in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that APN increased the substrate affinity of the transporter up to 2.5-fold and also increased its surface expression (Vmax). Peptide competition experiments, in silico modelling and site-directed mutagenesis of APN suggest that the catalytic site of the peptidase is involved in the observed changes of B0AT1 apparent substrate affinity, possibly by increasing the local substrate concentration. These results provide evidence for the existence of B0AT1-containing digestive complexes in the brush-border membrane, interacting differentially with various peptidases, and responding to the dynamic needs of nutrient absorption in the intestine and kidney. PMID:22677001

  19. Evaluation of the catalytic specificity, biochemical properties, and milk clotting abilities of an aspartic peptidase from Rhizomucor miehei.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; Souto, Tatiane Beltramini; de Oliveira, Tássio Brito; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Karcher, Daniel; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; de Oliveira, Arthur H C; Rodrigues, André; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we detail the specificity of an aspartic peptidase from Rhizomucor miehei and evaluate the effects of this peptidase on clotting milk using the peptide sequence of k-casein (Abz-LSFMAIQ-EDDnp) and milk powder. Molecular mass of the peptidase was estimated at 37 kDa, and optimum activity was achieved at pH 5.5 and 55 °C. The peptidase was stable at pH values ranging from 3 to 5 and temperatures of up 45 °C for 60 min. Dramatic reductions in proteolytic activity were observed with exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate, and aluminum and copper (II) chloride. Peptidase was inhibited by pepstatin A, and mass spectrometry analysis identified four peptide fragments (TWSISYGDGSSASGILAK, ASNGGGGEYIFGGYDSTK, GSLTTVPIDNSR, and GWWGITVDRA), similar to rhizopuspepsin. The analysis of catalytic specificity showed that the coagulant activity of the peptidase was higher than the proteolytic activity and that there was a preference for aromatic, basic, and nonpolar amino acids, particularly methionine, with specific cleavage of the peptide bond between phenylalanine and methionine. Thus, this peptidase may function as an important alternative enzyme in milk clotting during the preparation of cheese. PMID:27165660

  20. The midgut of Aedes albopictus females expresses active trypsin-like serine peptidases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus is widely distributed across tropical and sub-tropical regions and is associated with the transmission of several arboviruses. Although this species is increasingly relevant to public health due its ability to successfully colonize both urban and rural habitats, favoring the dispersion of viral infections, little is known about its biochemical traits, with all assumptions made based on studies of A. aegypti. In previous studies we characterized the peptidase profile of pre-imaginal stages of A. albopictus and we reported the first proteomic analysis of the midgut from sugar-fed females of this insect species. Methods In the present work, we further analyzed the peptidase expression in the midgut of sugar-fed females using 1DE-substrate gel zymography, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), mass spectrometry (MS), and protein identification based on similarity. Results The combination of zymography, in solution assays using fluorescent substrates and 2DE-MS/MS allowed us to identify the active serine peptidase “fingerprint” in the midgut of A. albopictus females. Zymographic analysis revealed a proteolytic profile composed of at least 13 bands ranging from ~25 to 250 kDa, which were identified as trypsin-like serine peptidases by using specific inhibitors of this class of enzymes. Concomitant use of the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC and trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors corroborated the zymographic findings. Our proteomic approach allowed the identification of two different trypsin-like serine peptidases and one chymotrypsin in protein spots of the alkaline region in 2DE map of the A. albopictus female midgut. Identification of these protein coding genes was achieved by similarity to the A. aegypti genome sequences using Mascot and OMSSA search engines. Conclusion These results allowed us to detect, identify and characterize the expression of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in the midgut of sugar-fed A. albopictus

  1. Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of protein production in plant cells and roots

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Jérôme; Bouché, Frédéric; Desiron, Carole; Stautemas, Jennifer; de Lemos Esteves, Frédéric; Périlleux, Claire; Tocquin, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based recombinant protein production systems have gained an extensive interest over the past few years, because of their reduced cost and relative safety. Although the first products are now reaching the market, progress are still needed to improve plant hosts and strategies for biopharming. Targeting recombinant proteins toward the extracellular space offers several advantages in terms of protein folding and purification, but degradation events are observed, due to endogenous peptidases. This paper focuses on the analysis of extracellular proteolytic activities in two production systems: cell cultures and root-secretion (rhizosecretion), in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. Proteolytic activities of extracellular proteomes (secretomes) were evaluated in vitro against two substrate proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum immunoglobulins G (hIgGs). Both targets were found to be degraded by the secretomes, BSA being more prone to proteolysis than hIgGs. The analysis of the proteolysis pH-dependence showed that target degradation was mainly dependent upon the production system: rhizosecretomes contained more peptidase activity than extracellular medium of cell suspensions, whereas variations due to plant species were smaller. Using class-specific peptidase inhibitors, serine, and metallopeptidases were found to be responsible for degradation of both substrates. An in-depth in silico analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data from Arabidopsis was then performed and led to the identification of a limited number of serine and metallo-peptidases that are consistently expressed in both production systems. These peptidases should be prime candidates for further improvement of plant hosts by targeted silencing. PMID:25705212

  2. Prokaryote-derived protein inhibitors of peptidases: a sketchy occurrence and mostly unknown function

    PubMed Central

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Rawlings, Neil D.; Potempa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In metazoan organisms protein inhibitors of peptidases are important factors essential for regulation of proteolytic activity. In vertebrates genes encoding peptidase inhibitors constitute up to 1% of genes reflecting a need for tight and specific control of proteolysis especially in extracellular body fluids. In stark contrast unicellular organisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic consistently contain only few, if any, genes coding for putative peptidase inhibitors. This may seem perplexing in the light of the fact that these organisms produce large numbers of proteases of different catalytic classes with the genes constituting up to 6% of the total gene count with the average being about 3%. Apparently, however, a unicellular life-style is fully compatible with other mechanisms of regulation of proteolysis and does not require protein inhibitors to control their intracellular and extracellular proteolytic activity. So in prokaryotes occurrence of genes encoding different types of peptidase inhibitors is infrequent and often scattered among phylogenetically distinct orders or even phyla of microbiota. Genes encoding proteins homologous to alpha-2-macroglobulin (family I39), serine carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor (family I51), alpha-1-peptidase inhibitor (family I4) and ecotin (family I11) are the most frequently represented in Bacteria. Although several of these gene products were shown to possess inhibitory activity, with an exception of ecotin and staphostatins, the biological function of microbial inhibitors is unclear. In this review we present distribution of protein inhibitors from different families among prokaryotes, describe their mode of action and hypothesize on their role in microbial physiology and interactions with hosts and environment. PMID:20558234

  3. Local administration of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) peptidase inhibitors is analgesic in peripheral pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Saito, Osamu; Aoe, Tomohiko; Bartolozzi, Alessandra; Sarva, Jayaprakash; Zhou, Jia; Kozikowski, Alan; Wroblewska, Barbara; Bzdega, Tomasz; Neale, Joseph H

    2007-01-01

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) selectively activates group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Systemic administration of inhibitors of the enzymes that inactivate NAAG results in decreased pain responses in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. These effects are blocked by a group II mGluR antagonist. This research tested the hypothesis that some analgesic effects of NAAG peptidase inhibition are mediated by NAAG acting on sensory neurite mGluRs at the site of inflammation. Group II mGluR agonists, SLx-3095-1, NAAG and APDC, or NAAG peptidase inhibitors, ZJ-43 and 2-PMPA, injected into the rat footpad reduced pain responses in carrageenan or formalin models. The analgesic effects of SLx-3095-1, APDC, ZJ-43, 2-PMPA and NAAG were blocked by co-injection of LY341495, a selective group II mGluR antagonist. Injection of group II mGluR agonists, NAAG or the peptidase inhibitors into the contralateral rat footpad had no effect on pain perception in the injected paw. At 10-100 microm ZJ-43 and 2-PMPA demonstrated no consistent agonist activity at mGluR2 or mGluR3. Consistent with the conclusion that peripherally administered NAAG peptidase inhibitors increase the activation of mGluR3 by NAAG that is released from peripheral sensory neurites, we found that the tissue average concentration of NAAG in the unstimulated rat hind paw was about 6 microm. These data extend our understanding of the role of this peptide in sensory neurons and reveal the potential for treatment of inflammatory pain via local application of NAAG peptidase inhibitors at doses that may have little or no central nervous system effects. PMID:17241276

  4. The astrocyte surface NAAG receptor and NAAG peptidase signaling complex as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Baslow, Morris H

    2008-06-01

    There is evidence that schizophrenia and other neuropathies may involve malfunction of a unique N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) receptor and its associated NAAG peptidase, a receptor and enzyme found together on the astrocyte surface. NAAG is a peptide neurotransmitter released by stimulated neurons and specifically targeted to the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu(3)), activation of which initiates astrocyte Ca(2+) waves responsible for astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-vascular system signaling and induction of vascular hyperemic responses that increase energy supplies to stimulated neurons. In this review, it is hypothesized that the receptor and enzyme exist as a cytostructural unit on the astrocyte surface, and the nature of this proposed mGlu(3)-NAAG peptidase complex is considered in terms of its physiological signaling role, and of the effect of drugs on this role. The mGlu(3) receptor has been the target of extrinsic antagonists and agonists that mimic NAAG structure and compete with natural NAAG for the receptor site. NAAG metabolism has also been the target of extrinsic NAAG-like substances that inhibit NAAG peptidase, competing with NAAG for the enzyme active site. Several drugs that affect the mGlu(3) receptor or NAAG peptidase have reached a stage of human testing. Two are agonists of the mGlu(3) receptor, and another is an NAAG peptidase inhibitor. These substances appear to have potential for treating schizophrenia and other cognitive neuropathies by interfering with a homeostatic NAAG activated neuron-astrocyte-vascular energy supply system. PMID:18596989

  5. Zwitteration: Coating Surfaces with Zwitterionic Functionality to Reduce Nonspecific Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coating surfaces with thin or thick films of zwitterionic material is an effective way to reduce or eliminate nonspecific adsorption to the solid/liquid interface. This review tracks the various approaches to zwitteration, such as monolayer assemblies and polymeric brush coatings, on micro- to macroscopic surfaces. A critical summary of the mechanisms responsible for antifouling shows how zwitterions are ideally suited to this task. PMID:24754399

  6. Phase separation in solutions with specific and nonspecific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, William M.; Frenkel, Daan; Oxtoby, David W.

    2014-05-28

    Protein solutions, which tend to be thermodynamically stable under physiological conditions, can demix into protein-enriched and protein-depleted phases when stressed. Using a lattice-gas model of proteins with both isotropic and specific, directional interactions, we calculate the critical conditions for phase separation for model proteins with up to four patches via Monte Carlo simulations and statistical associating fluid theory. Given a fixed specific interaction strength, the critical value of the isotropic energy, which accounts for dispersion forces and nonspecific interactions, measures the stability of the solution with respect to nonspecific interactions. Phase separation is suppressed by the formation of protein complexes, which effectively passivate the strongly associating sites on the monomers. Nevertheless, we find that protein models with three or more patches can form extended aggregates that phase separate despite the assembly of passivated complexes, even in the absence of nonspecific interactions. We present a unified view of the critical behavior of model fluids with anisotropic interactions, and we discuss the implications of these results for the thermodynamic stability of protein solutions.

  7. Controllable Nonspecific Protein Adsorption by Charged Hyperbranched Polyglycerol Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaming; Frey, Holger

    2015-12-01

    Antifouling thin films derived from charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (hbPG) layers were fabricated and evaluated. The anionic hbPG (a-hbPG) monolayers and cationic hbPG/anionic hbPG (c/a-hbPG) bilayers were adsorbed on the underlying self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of cysteamine and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) by electrostatic interaction, respectively, and their procession was monitored by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR). The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen on the premade a-hbPG and c/a-hbPG thin films was measured and the capability of these thin films to resist nonspecific protein adsorption was evaluated by SPR as well. It is observed that the c/a-hbPG bilayer films possessed good antifouling properties. With c/a-hbPG bilayers consisting of higher molecular weight a-hbPG, the adsorption of BSA and fibrinogen were as low as 0.015 ng/mm(-2) and 0.0076 ng/mm(-2), respectively, comparable to the traditionally ultralow antifouling surfaces (<0.05 ng/mm(-2) of nonspecific protein adsorption). This work proved that the charged hbPG thin films can strongly reduce the nonspecific protein adsorption and have the promise for the antifouling coatings with improved performance. PMID:26562213

  8. Functional analysis of C1 family cysteine peptidases in the larval gut of Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied protein digestion the tenebrionids Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum, pests of stored grains and grain products, to identify potential targets for biopesticide development. Tenebrionid larvae have highly compartmentalized guts, with primarily cysteine peptidases in the acidic anter...

  9. Use of phoA fusions to study the topology of the Escherichia coli inner membrane protein leader peptidase.

    PubMed Central

    San Millan, J L; Boyd, D; Dalbey, R; Wickner, W; Beckwith, J

    1989-01-01

    A topology of the Escherichia coli leader peptidase has been previously proposed on the basis of proteolytic studies. Here, a collection of alkaline phosphatase fusions to leader peptidase is described. Fusions to the periplasmic domain of this protein exhibit high alkaline phosphatase activity, while fusions to the cytoplasmic domain exhibit low activity. Elements within the cytoplasmic domain are necessary to stably anchor alkaline phosphatase in the cytoplasm. The amino-terminal hydrophobic segment of leader peptidase acts as a weak export signal for alkaline phosphatase. However, when this segment is preceded by four lysines, it acts as a highly efficient export signal. The coherence of in vitro studies with alkaline phosphatase fusion analysis of the topology of leader peptidase further indicates the utility of this genetic approach to membrane protein structure and insertion. Images PMID:2551889

  10. Expression patterns of cysteine peptidase genes across the Tribolium castaneum life cycle provide clues to biological function

    PubMed Central

    Elpidina, Elena N.; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a major agricultural pest responsible for considerable loss of stored grain and cereal products worldwide. T. castaneum larvae have a highly compartmentalized gut, with cysteine peptidases mostly in the acidic anterior part of the midgut that are critical to the early stages of food digestion. In previous studies, we described 26 putative cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum (types B, L, O, F, and K) located mostly on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 10. In the present study, we hypothesized that specific cysteine peptidase genes could be associated with digestive functions for food processing based on comparison of gene expression profiles in different developmental stages, feeding and non-feeding. RNA-Seq was used to determine the relative expression of cysteine peptidase genes among four major developmental stages (egg, larvae, pupae, and adult) of T. castaneum. We also compared cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum to those in other model insects and coleopteran pests. By combining transcriptome expression, phylogenetic comparisons, response to dietary inhibitors, and other existing data, we identified key cysteine peptidases that T. castaneum larvae and adults use for food digestion, and thus new potential targets for biologically-based control products. PMID:26819843

  11. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  12. Involvement of Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Normal and Pathologic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Ana Carolina B.; da Cunha, Bianca Rodrigues; Henrique, Tiago; Tajara, Eloiza H.

    2015-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a subgroup of serine proteases that participate in proteolytic pathways and control protein levels in normal physiology as well as in several pathological conditions. Their complex network of stimulatory and inhibitory interactions may induce inflammatory and immune responses and contribute to the neoplastic phenotype through the regulation of several cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. This family of proteases, which includes one of the most useful cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidase 3 or PSA, also has a protective effect against cancer promoting apoptosis or counteracting angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Therefore, they represent attractive therapeutic targets and may have important applications in clinical oncology. Despite being intensively studied, many gaps in our knowledge on several molecular aspects of KLK functions still exist. This review aims to summarize recent data on their involvement in different processes related to health and disease, in particular those directly or indirectly linked to the neoplastic process. PMID:26783378

  13. DNA topology confers sequence specificity to nonspecific architectural proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-11-25

    Topological constraints placed on short fragments of DNA change the disorder found in chain molecules randomly decorated by nonspecific, architectural proteins into tightly organized 3D structures. The bacterial heat-unstable (HU) protein builds up, counter to expectations, in greater quantities and at particular sites along simulated DNA minicircles and loops. Moreover, the placement of HU along loops with the "wild-type" spacing found in the Escherichia coli lactose (lac) and galactose (gal) operons precludes access to key recognition elements on DNA. The HU protein introduces a unique spatial pathway in the DNA upon closure. The many ways in which the protein induces nearly the same closed circular configuration point to the statistical advantage of its nonspecificity. The rotational settings imposed on DNA by the repressor proteins, by contrast, introduce sequential specificity in HU placement, with the nonspecific protein accumulating at particular loci on the constrained duplex. Thus, an architectural protein with no discernible DNA sequence-recognizing features becomes site-specific and potentially assumes a functional role upon loop formation. The locations of HU on the closed DNA reflect long-range mechanical correlations. The protein responds to DNA shape and deformability—the stiff, naturally straight double-helical structure—rather than to the unique features of the constituent base pairs. The structures of the simulated loops suggest that HU architecture, like nucleosomal architecture, which modulates the ability of regulatory proteins to recognize their binding sites in the context of chromatin, may influence repressor-operator interactions in the context of the bacterial nucleoid. PMID:25385626

  14. Recombinant Rp1 genes confer necrotic or nonspecific resistance phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shavannor M; Steinau, Martin; Trick, Harold N; Hulbert, Scot H

    2010-06-01

    Genes at the Rp1 rust resistance locus of maize confer race-specific resistance to the common rust fungus Puccinia sorghi. Three variant genes with nonspecific effects (HRp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19) were found to be generated by intragenic crossing over within the LRR region. The LRR region of most NBS-LRR encoding genes is quite variable and codes for one of the regions in resistance gene proteins that controls specificity. Sequence comparisons demonstrated that the Rp1-Kr1N recombinant gene was identical to the N-terminus of the rp1-kp2 gene and C-terminus of another gene from its HRp1-K grandparent. The Rp1-D*21 recombinant gene consists of the N-terminus of the rp1-dp2 gene and C-terminus of the Rp1-D gene from the parental haplotype. Similarly, a recombinant gene from the Rp1-MD*19 haplotype has the N-terminus of an rp1 gene from the HRp1-M parent and C-terminus of the rp1-D19 gene from the HRp1-D parent. The recombinant Rp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19 genes activated defense responses in the absence of their AVR proteins triggering HR (hypersensitive response) in the absence of the pathogen. The results indicate that the frequent intragenic recombination events that occur in the Rp1 gene cluster not only recombine the genes into novel haplotypes, but also create genes with nonspecific effects. Some of these may contribute to nonspecific quantitative resistance but others have severe consequences for the fitness of the plant. PMID:20443026

  15. Predicting Nonspecific Ion Binding Using DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Ions are an important component of the cell and affect the corresponding biological macromolecules either via direct binding or as a screening ion cloud. Although some ion binding is highly specific and frequently associated with the function of the macromolecule, other ions bind to the protein surface nonspecifically, presumably because the electrostatic attraction is strong enough to immobilize them. Here, we test such a scenario and demonstrate that experimentally identified surface-bound ions are located at a potential that facilitates binding, which indicates that the major driving force is the electrostatics. Without taking into consideration geometrical factors and structural fluctuations, we show that ions tend to be bound onto the protein surface at positions with strong potential but with polarity opposite to that of the ion. This observation is used to develop a method that uses a DelPhi-calculated potential map in conjunction with an in-house-developed clustering algorithm to predict nonspecific ion-binding sites. Although this approach distinguishes only the polarity of the ions, and not their chemical nature, it can predict nonspecific binding of positively or negatively charged ions with acceptable accuracy. One can use the predictions in the Poisson-Boltzmann approach by placing explicit ions in the predicted positions, which in turn will reduce the magnitude of the local potential and extend the limits of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In addition, one can use this approach to place the desired number of ions before conducting molecular-dynamics simulations to neutralize the net charge of the protein, because it was shown to perform better than standard screened Coulomb canned routines, or to predict ion-binding sites in proteins. This latter is especially true for proteins that are involved in ion transport, because such ions are loosely bound and very difficult to detect experimentally. PMID:22735539

  16. Vapor Trace Recognition Using a Single Nonspecific Chemiresistor

    PubMed Central

    Dobrokhotov, Vladimir; Larin, Alexander; Sowell, Dewayne

    2013-01-01

    An application of spectral analysis to the transient response signals of ALD-fabricated conductometric sensors (chemiresistors) upon exposure to short vapor pulses is discussed. It is based on the representation of a response curve in the frequency domain, followed by the multi-dimensional Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) for analyte identification. Compared to the standard steady-state amplitude analysis, this technique does not depend on a short-term sensor drift, does not have limitations for the number of extracted features and has a strict physical validation. Effective recognition of some relatively simple combustible analytes (acetone, toluene, ethanol) was demonstrated using a single nonspecific chemiresistor. PMID:23857265

  17. Retained strabismus suture material masquerading as nonspecific orbital inflammation.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Alison B; Scofield, Stacy M; Gallin, Pamela F; Kazim, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of orbital myositis of the superior rectus muscle-levator complex masquerading as nonspecific orbital inflammation but corresponding in location to a known braided polyester "chicken suture" placed 20 years earlier during strabismus surgery. The orbital inflammation was refractory to oral steroids but resolved promptly on surgical removal of the suture material. Although suture material is known to cause foreign body granulomatous reactions, to our knowledge this is the first reported case of a deep, diffuse orbital inflammation attributable to chicken suture placed during strabismus surgery. PMID:27112911

  18. Identification of peptidase substrates in human plasma by FTMS based differential mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Nathan A.; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Geissler, Wayne; Wiener, Matthew C.; Sachs, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Kenny K.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Sinha Roy, Ranabir; Settlage, Robert E.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 2% of the human genome encodes for proteases. Unfortunately, however, the biological roles of most of these enzymes remain poorly defined, since the physiological substrates are typically unknown and are difficult to identify using traditional methods. We have developed a proteomics experiment based on FTMS profiling and differential mass spectrometry (dMS) to identify candidate endogenous substrates of proteases using fractionated human plasma as the candidate substrate pool. Here we report proof-of-concept experiments for identifying in vitro substrates of aminopeptidase P2, (APP2) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), a peptidase of therapeutic interest for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. For both proteases, previously validated peptide substrates spiked into the human plasma pool were identified. Of note, the differential mass spectrometry experiments also identified novel substrates for each peptidase in the subfraction of human plasma. Targeted MS/MS analysis of these peptides in the complex human plasma pool and manual confirmation of the amino acid sequences led to the identification of these substrates. The novel DPP-4 substrate EPLGRQLTSGP was chemically synthesized and cleavage kinetics were determined in an in vitro DPP-4 enzyme assay. The apparent second order rate constant (kcat/KM) for DPP-4-mediated cleavage was determined to be 2.3 x 105 M-1 s-1 confirming that this peptide is efficiently processed by the peptidase in vitro. Collectively, these results demonstrate that differential mass spectrometry has the potential to identify candidate endogenous substrates of target proteases from a human plasma pool. Importantly, knowledge of the endogenous substrates can provide useful insight into the biology of these enzymes and provides useful biomarkers for monitoring their activity in vivo.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of and Resistance to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the ClpP Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Corey L.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Sauer, Robert T.; Sello, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    There is rapidly mounting evidence that intracellular proteases in bacteria are compelling targets for antibacterial drugs. Multiple reports suggest that the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria may be particularly sensitive to small molecules that perturb the activities of self-compartmentalized peptidases, which catalyze intracellular protein turnover as components of ATP-dependent proteolytic machines. Here, we report chemical syntheses and evaluations of structurally diverse β-lactones, which have a privileged structure for selective, suicide inhibition of the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase. β-lactones with certain substituents on the α- and β-carbons were found to be toxic to M. tuberculosis. Using an affinity-labeled analog of a bioactive β-lactone in a series of chemical proteomic experiments, we selectively captured the ClpP1P2 peptidase from live cultures of two different actinobacteria that are related to M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we found that the growth inhibitory β-lactones also inactivate the M. tuberculosis ClpP1P2 peptidase in vitro via formation of a covalent adduct at the ClpP2 catalytic serine. Given the potent antibacterial activity of these compounds and their medicinal potential, we sought to identify innate mechanisms of resistance. Using a genome mining strategy, we identified a genetic determinant of β-lactone resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor, a non-pathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis. Collectively, these findings validate the potential of ClpP inhibition as a strategy in antibacterial drug development and define a mechanism by which bacteria could resist the toxic effects of ClpP inhibitors. PMID:24047344

  20. Generation of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV-inhibiting peptides from β-lactoglobulin secreted by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Suguru; Oshiro, Kazushi; Wang, Pengfei; Yamamoto, Yoshinari; Wang, Yeqin; Sato, Takashi; Uyeno, Yutaka; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25157356

  1. Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidases found in Aspergillus oryzae show varying substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takuji; Morita, Hiroto; Okamoto, Ayako; Takeuchi, Michio; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamagata, Youhei

    2016-06-01

    Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidase genes, dppB, dppE, and dppF, were unveiled by sequence analysis of the Aspergillus oryzae genome. We investigated their differential enzymatic profiles, in order to gain an understanding of the diversity of these genes. The three dipeptidyl peptidases were expressed using Aspergillus nidulans as the host. Each recombinant enzyme was purified and subsequently characterized. The enzymes displayed similar optimum pH values, but optimum temperatures, pH stabilities, and substrate specificities varied. DppB was identified as a Xaa-Prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase, while DppE scissile substrates were similar to the substrates for Aspergillus fumigatus DPPV (AfDPPV). DppF was found to be a novel enzyme that could digest both substrates for A. fumigatus DPPIV and AfDPPV. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the transcription of dppB in A. oryzae was induced by protein substrates and repressed by the addition of an inorganic nitrogen source, despite the presence of protein substrates. The transcription of dppE depended on its growth time, while the transcription of dppF was not affected by the type of the nitrogen source in the medium, and it started during the early stage of the fungal growth. Based on these results, we conclude that these enzymes may represent the nutrition acquisition enzymes. Additionally, DppF may be one of the sensor peptidases responsible for the detection of the protein substrates in A. oryzae environment. DppB may be involved in nitrogen assimilation control, since the transcription of dppB was repressed by NaNO3, despite the presence of protein substrates. PMID:26846741

  2. Posttranslational signal peptidase cleavage at the flavivirus C-prM junction in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Stocks, C E; Lobigs, M

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the cleavages at the flavivirus capsid-prM protein junction in vitro. When expressed in the absence of the flavivirus proteinase, capsid and prM, which are separated by an internal signal sequence, exist as a membrane-spanning precursor protein. Here we show the induction of posttranslational signal peptidase cleavage of prM by trypsin cleavage of a cytoplasmic region of this precursor protein. PMID:7494334

  3. Effects of NAAG peptidase inhibitor 2-PMPA in model chronic pain - relation to brain concentration.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Jens; Belozertseva, Irina; Greco, Sergio; Kashkin, Vladimir; Malyshkin, Andrey; Jirgensons, Aigars; Shekunova, Elena; Eilbacher, Bernd; Bespalov, Anton; Danysz, Wojciech

    2006-12-01

    N-acetylated-alpha-linked-acidic peptidase (NAAG peptidase) converts N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG, mGluR3 agonist) into N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. The NAAG peptidase inhibitor 2-PMPA (2-(phosphonomethyl)pentanedioic acid) had neuroprotective activity in an animal model of stroke and anti-allodynic activity in CCI model despite its uncertain ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The NAAG concentration in brain ECF under basal conditions and its alteration in relation to the brain ECF concentration of 2-PMPA is unclear. We therefore assessed those brain concentrations after i.p. administration of 2-PMPA, using in vivo microdialysis combined with LC/MS/MS analysis. Administration of 2-PMPA (50mg/kg) produced a mean peak concentration of 2-PMPA of 29.66+/-8.1microM. This concentration is about 100,000 fold more than is needed for inhibition of NAAG peptidase, and indicates very good penetration to the brain. Application of 2-PMPA was followed by a linear increase of NAAG-concentration reaching a maximum of 2.89+/-0.42microM at the end of microdialysis. However, during the time the anti-allodynic effects of 2-PMPA were observed, the NAAG concentration in the ECF did not reach levels which are likely to have an impact on any known target. It appears therefore that the observed behavioural effects of 2-PMPA may not be mediated by NAAG nor, in turn, by mGluR3 receptors. PMID:16926034

  4. Acid, basic, and neutral peptidases present different profiles in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and in oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Lorena; Larrinaga, Gorka; Pérez, Itxaro; López, José I; Gil, Javier; Agirregoitia, Ekaitz; Varona, Adolfo

    2008-04-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are neoplasias with high prevalence and mortality. We previously reported that several peptidases may be involved in the pathophysiology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). Now, to gain insight into the reasons that lead the various RCC types to behave very differently with regard to aggressiveness and response to anticancer treatments, we analyzed subsets of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC), and renal oncocytoma (RO), a benign tumor; as well as different grades and stages of CCRCCs. Particulate APN, APB, and APA activities were decreased in both ChRCC and RO (tumor vs. nontumor tissues). Interestingly, activities were downregulated in a tumor-type specific way and the intensities of the decreases were stronger in the benign tumor than in the malignant type. Moreover, when two key histopathological parameters for tumor prognosis (high vs. low stage and grade) were analyzed, increases of activity were also observed in several of these cell surface peptidases (APN, APB). Some soluble activities (APB, Asp-AP) were also downregulated in the RCCs. With respect to genetic expression, PSA and APN were in a positive correlation related to their activities in both ChRCC and RO; but not APB, Asp-AP, APA, and PGI. These results may suggest an involvement of several peptidases in the pathophysiology of renal cancer, since they presented different patterns of activity and expression in tumors with different behaviors. PMID:18216146

  5. A phytopathogenic cysteine peptidase from latex of wild rubber vine Cryptostegia grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M V; Souza, D P; Gomes, M T R; Freitas, C D T; Carvalho, C P S; Júnior, P A V R; Salas, C E

    2014-04-01

    A 24,118 Da (MALDI-TOF) cysteine peptidase (EC 3.4.22.16) was purified from the latex extract of Cryptostegia grandiflora by two chromatographic steps involving ion exchange and Reverse-phase HPLC. The purified protein (Cg24-I) exhibits a single band profile following reduced SDS-PAGE and a unique amino terminal sequence, 1VPASIDWREKGTVL14, that is similar to other plant cysteine peptidases. Cg24-I displayed optimal proteolytic activity at pH 8.0 with 25 mM phosphate buffer. The proteolytic activity was inhibited with 0.2 mM E-64 and 1 mM iodoacetamide and was stimulated with 1 mM DTT. Cg24-I fully inhibited spore germination of phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium solani at a dose of 28.1 μg/mL. Its toxicity involves the membrane permeabilization of spores as probed by propidium iodide uptake. These results show that latex peptidases are part of the plant's defensive strategy against phytopathogens and that they most likely act synergistically with other recognized defensive proteins. PMID:24596120

  6. Peptidases released by necrotic cells control CD8+ T cell cross-priming

    PubMed Central

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Kapanadze, Tamar; Han, Miaojun; Wissing, Josef; Ma, Chi; Jaensch, Lothar; Manns, Michael P.; Armstrong, Todd; Jaffee, Elizabeth; White, Ayla O.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-priming of CD8+ T cells and generation of effector immune responses is pivotal for tumor immunity as well as for successful anticancer vaccination and therapy. Dead and dying cells produce signals that can influence Ag processing and presentation; however, there is conflicting evidence regarding the immunogenicity of necrotic cell death. We used a mouse model of sterile necrosis, in which mice were injected with sterile primary necrotic cells, to investigate a role of these cells in priming of CD8+ T cells. We discovered a molecular mechanism operating in Ag donor cells that regulates cross-priming of CD8+ T cells during primary sterile necrosis and thereby controls adaptive immune responses. We found that the cellular peptidases dipeptidyl peptidase 3 (DPP-3) and thimet oligopeptidase 1 (TOP-1), both of which are present in nonimmunogenic necrotic cells, eliminated proteasomal degradation products and blocked Ag cross-presentation. While sterile necrotic tumor cells failed to induce CD8+ T cell responses, their nonimmunogenicity could be reversed in vitro and in vivo by inactivation of DPP-3 and TOP-1. These results indicate that control of cross-priming and thereby immunogenicity of primary sterile necrosis relies on proteasome-dependent oligopeptide generation and functional status of peptidases in Ag donor cells. PMID:24216478

  7. Tripeptidyl Peptidase II Mediates Levels of Nuclear Phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2*

    PubMed Central

    Wiemhoefer, Anne; Stargardt, Anita; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Renner, Maria C.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Stap, Jan; Raspe, Marcel A.; Tomkinson, Birgitta; Kessels, Helmut W.; Ovaa, Huib; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Florea, Bogdan; Reits, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) is a serine peptidase involved in various biological processes, including antigen processing, cell growth, DNA repair, and neuropeptide mediated signaling. The underlying mechanisms of how a peptidase can influence this multitude of processes still remain unknown. We identified rapid proteomic changes in neuroblastoma cells following selective TPP2 inhibition using the known reversible inhibitor butabindide, as well as a new, more potent, and irreversible peptide phosphonate inhibitor. Our data show that TPP2 inhibition indirectly but rapidly decreases the levels of active, di-phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2 in the nucleus, thereby down-regulating signal transduction downstream of growth factors and mitogenic stimuli. We conclude that TPP2 mediates many important cellular functions by controlling ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation. For instance, we show that TPP2 inhibition of neurons in the hippocampus leads to an excessive strengthening of synapses, indicating that TPP2 activity is crucial for normal brain function. PMID:26041847

  8. Comparative structural analysis of the caspase family with other clan CD cysteine peptidases

    PubMed Central

    McLuskey, Karen; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2015-01-01

    Clan CD forms a structural group of cysteine peptidases, containing seven individual families and two subfamilies of structurally related enzymes. Historically, it is most notable for containing the mammalian caspases, on which the structures of the clan were founded. Interestingly, the caspase family is split into two subfamilies: the caspases, and a second subfamily containing both the paracaspases and the metacaspases. Structural data are now available for both the paracaspases and the metacaspases, allowing a comprehensive structural analysis of the entire caspase family. In addition, a relative plethora of structural data has recently become available for many of the other families in the clan, allowing both the structures and the structure–function relationships of clan CD to be fully explored. The present review compares the enzymes in the caspase subfamilies with each other, together with a comprehensive comparison of all the structural families in clan CD. This reveals a diverse group of structures with highly conserved structural elements that provide the peptidases with a variety of substrate specificities and activation mechanisms. It also reveals conserved structural elements involved in substrate binding, and potential autoinhibitory functions, throughout the clan, and confirms that the metacaspases are structurally diverse from the caspases (and paracaspases), suggesting that they should form a distinct family of clan CD peptidases. PMID:25697094

  9. The effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition on microvascular diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Avogaro, Angelo; Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2014-10-01

    We performed a review of the literature to determine whether the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4-I) may have the capability to directly and positively influence diabetic microvascular complications. The literature was scanned to identify experimental and clinical evidence that DPP4-I can ameliorate diabetic microangiopathy. We retrieved articles published between 1 January 1980 and 1 March 2014 in English-language peer-reviewed journals using the following terms: ("diabetes" OR "diabetic") AND ("retinopathy" OR "retinal" OR "nephropathy" OR "renal" OR "albuminuria" OR "microalbuminuria" OR "neuropathy" OR "ulcer" OR "wound" OR "bone marrow"); ("dipeptidyl peptidase-4" OR "dipeptidyl peptidase-IV" OR "DPP-4" OR "DPP-IV"); and ("inhibition" OR "inhibitor"). Experimentally, DPP4-I appears to improve inflammation, endothelial function, blood pressure, lipid metabolism, and bone marrow function. Several experimental studies report direct potential beneficial effects of DPP4-I on all microvascular diabetes-related complications. These drugs have the ability to act either directly or indirectly via improved glucose control, GLP-1 bioavailability, and modifying nonincretin substrates. Although preliminary clinical data support that DPP4-I therapy can protect from microangiopathy, insufficient evidence is available to conclude that this class of drugs directly prevents or decreases microangiopathy in humans independently from improved glucose control. Experimental findings and preliminary clinical data suggest that DPP4-I, in addition to improving metabolic control, have the potential to interfere with the onset and progression of diabetic microangiopathy. Further evidence is needed to confirm these effects in patients with diabetes. PMID:25249673

  10. Interactions of “Bora-Penicilloates” with Serine β-Lactamases and DD-Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Specific boronic acids are generally powerful tetrahedral intermediate/transition state analogue inhibitors of serine amidohydrolases. This group of enzymes includes bacterial β-lactamases and DD-peptidases where there has been considerable development of boronic acid inhibitors. This paper describes the synthesis, determination of the inhibitory activity, and analysis of the results from two α-(2-thiazolidinyl) boronic acids that are closer analogues of particular tetrahedral intermediates involved in β-lactamase and DD-peptidase catalysis than those previously described. One of them, 2-[1-(dihydroxyboranyl)(2-phenylacetamido)methyl]-5,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, is a direct analogue of the deacylation tetrahedral intermediates of these enzymes. These compounds are micromolar inhibitors of class C β-lactamases but, very unexpectedly, not inhibitors of class A β-lactamases. We rationalize the latter result on the basis of a new mechanism of boronic acid inhibition of the class A enzymes. A stable inhibitory complex is not accessible because of the instability of an intermediate on its pathway of formation. The new boronic acids also do not inhibit bacterial DD-peptidases (penicillin-binding proteins). This result strongly supports a central feature of a previously proposed mechanism of action of β-lactam antibiotics, where deacylation of β-lactam-derived acyl-enzymes is not possible because of unfavorable steric interactions. PMID:25302576

  11. Heterologous production of the stain solving peptidase PPP1 from Pleurotus pulmonarius.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Robin-Hagen; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G; Linke, Diana

    2016-05-01

    A novel stain solving subtilisin-like peptidase (PPP1) was identified from the culture supernatant of the agaricomycete Pleurotus pulmonarius. It was purified to homogeneity using a sequence of preparative isoelectric focusing, anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Peptides were identified by ab initio sequencing (nLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS), characterizing the enzyme as a member of the subtilase family (EC 3.4.21.X). An expression system was established featuring the pPIC9K vector, an alternative Kozak sequence, the codon optimized gene ppp1 gene without the native signal sequence with C-terminal hexa-histidine tag, and Pichia pastoris GS115 as expression host. Intracellular active enzyme was obtained from cultivations in shake flasks and in a five liter bioreactor. With reaction optima of 40 °C and a pH > 8.5, considerable bleaching of pre-stained fabrics (blood, milk and India ink), and the possibility of larger-scale production, the heterologous enzyme is well suitable for detergent applications, especially at lower temperatures as part of a more energy- and cost-efficient washing process. Showing little sequence similarity to other subtilases, this unique peptidase is the first subtilisin-like peptidase from Basidiomycota, which has been functionally produced in Pichia pastoris. PMID:26873705

  12. Substrate specificity of mitochondrial intermediate peptidase analysed by a support-bound peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, M.F.M.; Alves, F.M.; Assis, D.M.; Hirata, I.Y.; Juliano, L.; Oliveira, V.; Juliano, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The substrate specificity of recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP) using a synthetic support-bound FRET peptide library is presented. The collected fluorescent beads, which contained the hydrolysed peptides generated by hMIP, were sequenced by Edman degradation. The results showed that this peptidase presents a remarkable preference for polar uncharged residues at P1 and P1′ substrate positions: Ser = Gln > Thr at P1 and Ser > Thr at P1′. Non-polar residues were frequent at the substrate P3, P2, P2′ and P3′ positions. Analysis of the predicted MIP processing sites in imported mitochondrial matrix proteins shows these cleavages indeed occur between polar uncharged residues. Previous analysis of these processing sites indicated the importance of positions far from the MIP cleavage site, namely the presence of a hydrophobic residue (Phe or Leu) at P8 and a polar uncharged residue (Ser or Thr) at P5. To evaluate this, additional kinetic analyses were carried out, using fluorogenic substrates synthesized based on the processing sites attributed to MIP. The results described here underscore the importance of the P1 and P1′ substrate positions for the hydrolytic activity of hMIP. The information presented in this work will help in the design of new substrate-based inhibitors for this peptidase. PMID:26082885

  13. Substrate specificity of mitochondrial intermediate peptidase analysed by a support-bound peptide library.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, M F M; Alves, F M; Assis, D M; Hirata, I Y; Juliano, L; Oliveira, V; Juliano, M A

    2015-01-01

    The substrate specificity of recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP) using a synthetic support-bound FRET peptide library is presented. The collected fluorescent beads, which contained the hydrolysed peptides generated by hMIP, were sequenced by Edman degradation. The results showed that this peptidase presents a remarkable preference for polar uncharged residues at P1 and P1' substrate positions: Ser = Gln > Thr at P1 and Ser > Thr at P1'. Non-polar residues were frequent at the substrate P3, P2, P2' and P3' positions. Analysis of the predicted MIP processing sites in imported mitochondrial matrix proteins shows these cleavages indeed occur between polar uncharged residues. Previous analysis of these processing sites indicated the importance of positions far from the MIP cleavage site, namely the presence of a hydrophobic residue (Phe or Leu) at P8 and a polar uncharged residue (Ser or Thr) at P5. To evaluate this, additional kinetic analyses were carried out, using fluorogenic substrates synthesized based on the processing sites attributed to MIP. The results described here underscore the importance of the P1 and P1' substrate positions for the hydrolytic activity of hMIP. The information presented in this work will help in the design of new substrate-based inhibitors for this peptidase. PMID:26082885

  14. Blockade of N-acetylaspartylglutamate peptidases: a novel protective strategy for brain injuries and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunlong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao

    2014-12-01

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is reported to suppress glutamate release mainly through selective activation of presynaptic Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGluR3). Therefore, strategies of inhibition of NAAG peptidases and subsequent NAAG hydrolysis to elevate levels of NAAG could reduce glutamate release under pathological conditions and be neuroprotective by attenuating excitotoxic cell injury. A series of potent inhibitors of NAAG peptidases has been synthesized and demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of ischemic-hypoxic brain injury, traumatic brain injury, inflammatory pain, diabetic neuropathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and phencyclidine-induced schizophrenia-like behaviors. The excessive glutamatergic transmission has been implicated in all of these neurological disorders. Thus, blockade of NAAG peptidases may augment an endogenous protective mechanism and afford neuroprotection in the brain. This review aims to summarize and provide insight into the current understanding of the novel neuroprotective strategy based on limiting glutamate excitotoxicity for a wide variety of brain injuries and neurological disorders. PMID:24494725

  15. Structural and kinetic contributions of the oxyanion binding site to the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András L; Palló, Anna; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Harmat, Veronika; Polgár, László

    2008-05-01

    It is widely accepted that the catalytic activity of serine proteases depends primarily on the Asp-His-Ser catalytic triad and other residues within the vicinity of this motif. Some of these residues form the oxyanion binding site that stabilizes the tetrahedral intermediate by hydrogen bonding to the negatively charged oxyanion. In acylaminoacyl peptidase from the thermophile Aeropyrum pernix, the main chain NH group of Gly369 is one of the hydrogen bond donors forming the oxyanion binding site. The side chain of His367, a conserved residue in acylaminoacyl peptidases across all species, fastens the loop holding Gly369. Determination of the crystal structure of the H367A mutant revealed that this loop, including Gly369, moves away considerably, accounting for the observed three orders of magnitude decrease in the specificity rate constant. For the wild-type enzyme ln(k(cat)/K(m)) vs. 1/T deviates from linearity indicating greater rate enhancement with increasing temperature for the dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex compared with its decomposition to product. In contrast, the H367A variant provided a linear Arrhenius plot, and its reaction was associated with unfavourable entropy of activation. These results show that a residue relatively distant from the active site can significantly affect the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase without changing the overall structure of the enzyme. PMID:18325786

  16. Analysis of heterogeneity in nonspecific PEGylation reactions of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hakem, Ilhem F; Leech, Anna M; Bohn, Justin; Walker, Jeremy P; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    The compositional heterogeneity associated with polymer conjugation reactions of biomolecules is analyzed for the particular case of nonspecific PEGylation reactions. It is shown that the distribution of the number of PEG moieties grafted to biomolecules such as proteins is a binomial-type function of two parameters-the reaction efficiency as well as the number of binding sites per biomolecule. The nature of this distribution implies that uniform compositions are favored for increasing number of coupling sites per biomolecule as well as for increasing efficiency of the modification process. Therefore, the binomial distribution provides a rationale for the pronounced heterogeneity that is observed for PEGylated small enzyme systems even at high coupling efficiencies. For the particular case of PEGylated trypsin it is shown that the heterogeneity results in a broad distribution of deactivation times that is captured by a stretched exponential decay model. The presented analysis is expected to apply to general modification processes of compounds in which partial functionalization of a fixed number of reactive sites is achieved by means of a nonspecific coupling reaction. PMID:23616211

  17. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  18. Production and partial characterization of serine and metallo peptidases secreted by Aspergillus fumigatus Fresenius in submerged and solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Freitas Cabral, Tatiana Pereira; Rodrigues, André; Cabral, Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme production varies in different fermentation systems. Enzyme expression in different fermentation systems yields important information for improving our understanding of enzymatic production induction. Comparative studies between solid-state fermentation (SSF) using agro-industrial waste wheat bran and submerged fermentation (SmF) using synthetic media were carried out to determinate the best parameters for peptidase production by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Fresen. Variables tested include: the concentration of carbon and protein nitrogen sources, the size of the inoculum, the pH of the media, temperature, and the length of the fermentation process. The best peptidase production during SSF was obtained after 96 hours using wheat bran at 30 °C with an inoculum of 1 × 10(6) spores and yielded 1500 active units (U/mL). The best peptidase production using SmF was obtained after periods of 72 and 96 hours of fermentation in media containing 0.5% and 0.25% of casein, respectively, at a pH of 6.0 and at 30 °C and yielded 40 U/mL. We also found examples of catabolite repression of peptidase production under SmF conditions. Biochemical characterization of the peptidases produced by both fermentative processes showed optimum activity at pH 8.0 and 50 °C, and also showed that their proteolytic activity is modulated by surfactants. The enzymatic inhibition profile using phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) in SmF and SSF indicated that both fermentative processes produced a serine peptidase. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of the ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelating agent on the peptidase produced by SmF indicated that this fermentative process also produced a metallopeptidase. PMID:24159310

  19. Cysteine peptidases in the tomato trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens: influence of growth conditions, similarities with cruzipain and secretion to the extracellular environment.

    PubMed

    Elias, Camila G R; Pereira, Fernanda M; Dias, Felipe A; Silva, Thiago L A; Lopes, Angela H C S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2008-12-01

    We have characterized the cysteine peptidase production by Phytomonas serpens, a tomato trypanosomatid. The parasites were cultivated in four distinct media, since growth conditions could modulate the synthesis of bioactive molecules. The proteolytic profile has not changed qualitatively regardless the media, showing two peptidases of 38 and 40kDa; however, few quantitative changes were observed including a drastic reduction (around 70%) on the 40 and 38kDa peptidase activities when parasites were grown in yeast extract and liver infusion trypticase medium, respectively, in comparison with parasites cultured in Warren medium. The time-span of growth did not significantly alter the protein and peptidase expression. The proteolytic activities were blocked by classical cysteine peptidase inhibitors (E-64, leupeptin, and cystatin), being more active at pH 5.0 and showing complete dependence to reducing agents (dithiothreitol and l-cysteine) for full activity. The cysteine peptidases were able to hydrolyze several proteinaceous substrates, including salivary gland proteins from Oncopeltus fasciatus, suggesting broad substrate utilization. By means of agglutination, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting analyses we showed that both cysteine peptidases produced by P. serpens share common epitopes with cruzipain, the major cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, our data suggest that the 40kDa cysteine peptidase was located at the P. serpens cell surface, attached to membrane domains via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. The 40kDa peptidase was also detected in the cell-free culture supernatant, in an active form, which suggests secretion of this peptidase to the extracellular environment. PMID:18793639

  20. Preventing biosensor non-specific adsorption: Static to dynamic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Lucy; Hopkins, Neal

    2012-02-01

    Biosensors are currently being developed for the detection of a wide range of analytes in a variety of scenarios. One such area is that of environmental monitoring for the presence of biological threats, from toxins through to viruses and bacteria. Environmental samples will contain a wide variety of contaminants, dependent on the location and prevalent environmental conditions. The sensing surfaces employed by biosensor instruments must be capable of resisting non-specific adsorption (NSA) of the contaminants whilst specifically capturing targets of interest. The ability to do so reduces the incidence of false positives and negatives increasing confidence in the system. We have assessed a range of biosensor surface chemistries of both two and three dimensional topography using a commercial BIAcore platform, for ability to prevent NSA of soluble materials of medical and military significance. This has highlighted that future solutions may benefit from dynamic interfaces as opposed to the conventional static interface often employed.

  1. Improvement in idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia after smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Tsutomu; Kadota, Naoki; Hino, Hiroyuki; Naruse, Keishi; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of several interstitial lung diseases, the relationship between smoking and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) has not yet been fully elucidated. We here present a case of fibrotic NSIP with mild emphysema in an elderly male with normal pulmonary function, whose symptoms, serum KL-6 level, and high-resolution computed tomography findings of interstitial changes markedly improved without medication following the cessation of smoking. Our case suggests that smoking may be an etiological factor in some patients with NSIP and that early smoking cessation before a clinically detectable decline in pulmonary function may be critical for smokers with idiopathic NSIP. PMID:26029566

  2. Improvement in idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia after smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Tsutomu; Kadota, Naoki; Hino, Hiroyuki; Naruse, Keishi; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of several interstitial lung diseases, the relationship between smoking and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) has not yet been fully elucidated. We here present a case of fibrotic NSIP with mild emphysema in an elderly male with normal pulmonary function, whose symptoms, serum KL-6 level, and high-resolution computed tomography findings of interstitial changes markedly improved without medication following the cessation of smoking. Our case suggests that smoking may be an etiological factor in some patients with NSIP and that early smoking cessation before a clinically detectable decline in pulmonary function may be critical for smokers with idiopathic NSIP. PMID:26029566

  3. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Kazuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Dai; Inui, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a case of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). A 58-year-old Japanese woman presented with oculocutaneous albinism and dyspnea on exertion. A high resolution computed tomography scan showed areas of reticular and ground glass opacity in the lungs, and a surgical lung biopsy revealed fibrotic NSIP. Foamy type 2 pneumocytes and the absence of dense granules in platelets were also observed, consistent with a diagnosis of HPS. Ultimately, a genetic analysis revealed a mutation in the HPS1 gene. The interstitial pneumonia progressed despite treatment with prednisolone, cyclosporine A and pirfenidone. In this report, we discuss the pathological lung features and treatment of HPS associated with interstitial pneumonia. PMID:24583434

  4. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Oliveira, Walmar Roncalli; Carrasco, Solange; Neto, Cyro Festa; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-03-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare disease that usually begins in childhood and is characterized by a generalized infection by human papilloma virus (HPV), frequent associations with cutaneous carcinomas, and abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). We studied nonspecific CMI in 13 patients with EV by bacterial skin tests, allergic reactions to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), measurement of responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and quantification of T lymphocytes and T lymphocytes subsets in peripheral blood. Impairment of CMI was manifested by the cutaneous anergy to a variety of common skin antigens and, by the reduction of the lymphocyte transformation to PHA. There were no correlation between the severity of cases and abnormalities of CMI in our patients, however; the impairment of CMI was lower in cases of short duration, suggesting that the impairment of CMI in EV might reflect a long period of disease. PMID:12692356

  5. Crystal Structure and Activity Studies of the C11 Cysteine Peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the Human Gut Microbiome*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Coombs, Graham H.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other families in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys147, resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys147 to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca2+ for activity. Collectively, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms. PMID:26940874

  6. Crystal Structure and Activity Studies of the C11 Cysteine Peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the Human Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    McLuskey, Karen; Grewal, Jaspreet S; Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Deacon, Ashley M; Coombs, Graham H; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2016-04-29

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other families in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys(147), resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys(147) to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca(2+) for activity. Collectively, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms. PMID:26940874

  7. Crystal structure and activity studies of the C11 cysteine peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the human gut microbiome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McLuskey, Karen; Grewal, Jaspreet S.; Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Coombs, Graham H.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2016-03-03

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other familiesmore » in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys147, resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys147 to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca2+ for activity. Altogether, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms.« less

  8. Differential Effects of Deep Sedation with Propofol on the Specific and Nonspecific Thalamocortical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Lauer, Kathryn K.; Ward, Douglas; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hudetz, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current state of knowledge suggests that disruption of neuronal information integration may be a unitary mechanism of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. A neural system central for information integration is the thalamocortical system whose specific and nonspecific divisions may play the roles for representing and integrating information; respectively. How anesthetics affect the function of these systems individually is not completely understood. We studied the effect of propofol on thalamocortical functional connectivity in the specific and nonspecific systems using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Eight healthy volunteers were instructed to listen to and encode 40 English words during wakeful baseline, light sedation, deep sedation, and recovery in the scanner. Functional connectivity was determined as the temporal correlation of blood oxygen level-dependent signals with seed regions defined within the specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei. Results Thalamocortical connectivity at baseline was dominantly medial and bilateral frontal and temporal for the specific system and medial frontal and medial parietal for the nonspecific system. During deep sedation, propofol reduced functional connectivity by 43% (specific) and 79% (nonspecific), a significantly greater reduction of connections in the nonspecific than in the specific system and in the left hemisphere than in the right. Upon regaining consciousness, functional connectivity increased by 58% (specific) and 123% (nonspecific) during recovery, exceeding their values at baseline. Conclusions Propofol conferred differential changes in functional connectivity of the specific and nonspecific thalamocortical systems. The changes in nonspecific thalamocortical connectivity may correlate with loss and return of consciousness. PMID:23221862

  9. Nonspecific Binding of Complement by Digestion Fragments from Antiviral Gamma Globulin.

    PubMed

    Cremer, N E; Riggs, J L; Lennette, E H; Jensen, F W

    1965-07-01

    The nonspecificity of rabbit gamma-globulin (antibody) to western equine encephalitis virus and the non-specificity of normal rabbit gamma-globulin in complement-fixation tests with anti-gens prepared from chick-embryo cells infected with this virus and normal chick-embryo cells resided primarily in Porter's fragment III. Addition of complement to fragment III from the anti-body globulin, followed by inactivation of the added complement, abolished the complement-fixing ability of fragment III with both specific and nonspecific antigens. Similar treatment of the undigested antibody abolished its complement-fixing ability with nonspecific antigen only. PMID:17737800

  10. PNT1 is a C11 cysteine peptidase essential for replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grewal, Jaspreet S.; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Coombs, Graham H.; et al

    2016-03-03

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrialmore » genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. Furthermore, these data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast.« less

  11. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jaspreet S; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K; Burchmore, Richard J; Coombs, Graham H; Schnaufer, Achim; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2016-04-29

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His(99) and Cys(136)), and an Asp (Asp(134)) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence Factor Gingipain RgpB Shows a Unique Zymogenic Mechanism for Cysteine Peptidases*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Veillard, Florian T.; Guevara, Tibisay; Potempa, Barbara; Sztukowska, Maryta; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Zymogenicity is a regulatory mechanism that prevents inadequate catalytic activity in the wrong context. It plays a central role in maintaining microbial virulence factors in an inactive form inside the pathogen until secretion. Among these virulence factors is the cysteine peptidase gingipain B (RgpB), which is the major virulence factor secreted by the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis that attacks host vasculature and defense proteins. The structure of the complex between soluble mature RgpB, consisting of a catalytic domain and an immunoglobulin superfamily domain, and its 205-residue N-terminal prodomain, the largest structurally characterized to date for a cysteine peptidase, reveals a novel fold for the prodomain that is distantly related to sugar-binding lectins. It attaches laterally to the catalytic domain through a large concave surface. The main determinant for latency is a surface “inhibitory loop,” which approaches the active-site cleft of the enzyme on its non-primed side in a substrate-like manner. It inserts an arginine (Arg126) into the S1 pocket, thus matching the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Downstream of Arg126, the polypeptide leaves the cleft, thereby preventing cleavage. Moreover, the carbonyl group of Arg126 establishes a very strong hydrogen bond with the co-catalytic histidine, His440, pulling it away from the catalytic cysteine, Cys473, and toward Glu381, which probably plays a role in orienting the side chain of His440 during catalysis. The present results provide the structural determinants of zymogenic inhibition of RgpB by way of a novel inhibitory mechanism for peptidases in general and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies in the treatment of human periodontal disease. PMID:23558682

  13. Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 is a biomarker of poor prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, C H; Park, H J; Lee, J R; Kim, H K; Jeon, T Y; Jo, H-J; Kim, D H; Kim, G H; Park, D Y

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a previous study, we reported that serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 (serpinA1) is upregulated in Snail-overexpressing gastric cancer. Although serpinA1 has been studied in several types of cancer, little is known about its roles and mechanisms of action. In this study, we examined the role of serpinA1 in the migration and invasion of gastric cancers and determined its underlying mechanism. Methods: Expression levels were assessed by western blot analyses and real-time PCR. Snail binding to serpinA1 promoter was analysed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The roles of serpinA1 were studied using cell invasion and migration assays. In addition, the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of serpinA1 expression were validated in 400 gastric cancer patients using immunohistochemical analysis. Results: Overexpression of Snail resulted in upregulation of serpinA1 in gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN45, whereas knockdown of Snail inhibited serpinA1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that overexpression of Snail increased Snail recruitment to the serpinA1 promoter. Overexpression of serpinA1 increased the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, whereas knockdown of serpinA1 decreased invasion and migration. Moreover, serpinA1 increased mRNA levels and release of metalloproteinase-8 in gastric cancer cells. Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 was observed in the cytoplasm of tumour cells and the stroma by immunohistochemistry. Enhanced serpinA1 expression was significantly associated with increased tumour size, advanced T stage, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, lymph node metastases, and shorter overall survival. Conclusions: Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 induces the invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells and its expression is associated with the progression of gastric cancer. These results may provide a potential target to prevent invasion and

  14. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Coombs, Graham H.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  15. The cloning and characterization of a second brain enzyme with NAAG peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Bzdega, Tomasz; Crowe, Samantha L; Ramadan, Epolia R; Sciarretta, Kathryn H; Olszewski, Rafal T; Ojeifo, Olumide A; Rafalski, Victoria A; Wroblewska, Barbara; Neale, Joseph H

    2004-05-01

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate is inactivated by extracellular peptidase activity following synaptic release. It is speculated that the enzyme, glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII, EC 3.14.17.21), participates in this inactivation. However, CGCPII knockout mice appear normal in standard neurological tests. We report here the cloning and characterization of a mouse enzyme (tentatively identified as glutamate carboxypeptidase III or GCPIII) that is homologous to an enzyme identified in a human lung carcinoma. The mouse peptidase was cloned from two non-overlapping EST clones and mouse brain cDNA using PCR. The sequence (GenBank, AY243507) is 85% identical to the human carcinoma enzyme and 70% homologous to mouse GCPII. GCPIII sequence analysis suggests that it too is a zinc metallopeptidase. Northern blots revealed message in mouse ovary, testes and lung, but not brain. Mouse cortical and cerebellar neurons in culture expressed GCPIII message in contrast to the glial specific expression of GCPII. Message levels of GCPIII were similar in brains obtained from wild-type mice and mice that are null mutants for GCPII. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with rat GCPII or mouse GCPIII expressed membrane bound peptidase activity with similar V(max) and K(m) values (1.4 micro m and 54 pmol/min/mg; 3.5 micro m and 71 pmol/min/mg, respectively). Both enzymes are activated by a similar profile of metal ions and their activities are blocked by EDTA. GCPIII message was detected in brain and spinal cord by RT-PCR with highest levels in the cerebellum and hippocampus. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that nervous system cells express at least two differentially distributed homologous enzymes with similar pharmacological properties and affinity for NAAG. PMID:15086519

  16. The acylaminoacyl peptidase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 thought to be an exopeptidase displays endopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András L; Hornung, Balázs; Rádi, Krisztina; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Sztáray, Bálint; Juhász, Tünde; Szeltner, Zoltán; Harmat, Veronika; Polgár, László

    2007-04-27

    Mammalian acylaminoacyl peptidase, a member of the prolyl oligopeptidase family of serine peptidases, is an exopeptidase, which removes acylated amino acid residues from the N terminus of oligopeptides. We have investigated the kinetics and inhibitor binding of the orthologous acylaminoacyl peptidase from the thermophile Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApAAP). Complex pH-rate profiles were found with charged substrates, indicating a strong electrostatic effect in the surroundings of the active site. Unexpectedly, we have found that oligopeptides can be hydrolysed beyond the N-terminal peptide bond, demonstrating that ApAAP exhibits endopeptidase activity. It was thought that the enzyme is specific for hydrophobic amino acids, in particular phenylalanine, in accord with the non-polar S1 subsite of ApAAP. However, cleavage after an Ala residue contradicted this notion and demonstrated that P1 residues of different nature may bind to the S1 subsite depending on the remaining peptide residues. The crystal structures of the complexes formed between the enzyme and product-like inhibitors identified the oxyanion-binding site unambiguously and demonstrated that the phenylalanine ring of the P1 peptide residue assumes a position different from that established in a previous study, using 4-nitrophenylphosphate. We have found that the substrate-binding site extends beyond the S2 subsite, being capable of binding peptides with a longer N terminus. The S2 subsite displays a non-polar character, which is unique among the enzymes of this family. The S3 site was identified as a hydrophobic region that does not form hydrogen bonds with the inhibitor P3 residue. The enzyme-inhibitor complexes revealed that, upon ligand-binding, the S1 subsite undergoes significant conformational changes, demonstrating the plasticity of the specificity site. PMID:17350041

  17. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase Family, Prolyl Oligopeptidase, and Prolyl Carboxypeptidase in the Immune System and Inflammatory Disease, Including Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Waumans, Yannick; Baerts, Lesley; Kehoe, Kaat; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Research from over the past 20 years has implicated dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV and its family members in many processes and different pathologies of the immune system. Most research has been focused on either DPPIV or just a few of its family members. It is, however, essential to consider the entire DPP family when discussing any one of its members. There is a substantial overlap between family members in their substrate specificity, inhibitors, and functions. In this review, we provide a comprehensive discussion on the role of prolyl-specific peptidases DPPIV, FAP, DPP8, DPP9, dipeptidyl peptidase II, prolyl carboxypeptidase, and prolyl oligopeptidase in the immune system and its diseases. We highlight possible therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, a condition that lies at the frontier between inflammation and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26300881

  18. Some properties and possible biological role of peptidase inhibitors from the entomopathogenic fungus Tolypocladium cylindrosporum.

    PubMed

    Popova, V V; Dunaevsky, Y E; Domash, V I; Semenova, T A; Beliakova, G A; Belozersky, M A

    2015-10-01

    The activities of secreted and mycelial inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes from fungi of the order Hypocreales have been investigated. Inhibitors of bromelain, papain, and trypsin of low molecular mass (about 1 kDa) and a subtilisin proteinaceous inhibitor with molecular mass of 45 kDa were revealed in the culture liquid of the fungus Tolypocladium cylindrosporum. The subtilisin inhibitor from T. cylindrosporum has antibiotic properties, significantly decreased the activity of purified bacterial enzymes, and prevented the growth of the bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Data suggesting the existence in fungi of the Hypocreales order of two pools of peptidase inhibitors have been obtained. PMID:26210235

  19. Decoding the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Action of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors Using Epimastigotes as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Sangenito, Leandro S.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; d′Avila-Levy, Claudia M.; Branquinha, Marta H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspartic peptidase inhibitors have shown antimicrobial action against distinct microorganisms. Due to an increase in the occurrence of Chagas' disease/AIDS co-infection, we decided to explore the effects of HIV aspartic peptidase inhibitors (HIV-PIs) on Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Methodology and Principal Findings HIV-PIs presented an anti-proliferative action on epimastigotes of T. cruzi clone Dm28c, with IC50 values ranging from 0.6 to 14 µM. The most effective inhibitors, ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir, also had an anti-proliferative effect against different phylogenetic T. cruzi strains. The HIV-PIs induced some morphological alterations in clone Dm28c epimastigotes, as reduced cell size and swollen of the cellular body. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar membrane, mitochondrion and reservosomes are the main targets of HIV-PIs in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Curiously, an increase in the epimastigote-into-trypomastigote differentiation process of clone Dm28c was observed, with many of these parasites presenting morphological alterations including the detachment of flagellum from the cell body. The pre-treatment with the most effective HIV-PIs drastically reduced the interaction process between epimastigotes and the invertebrate vector Rhodnius prolixus. It was also noted that HIV-PIs induced an increase in the expression of gp63-like and calpain-related molecules, and decreased the cruzipain expression in epimastigotes as judged by flow cytometry and immunoblotting assays. The hydrolysis of a cathepsin D fluorogenic substrate was inhibited by all HIV-PIs in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the aspartic peptidase could be a possible target to these drugs. Additionally, we verified that ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir reduced drastically the viability of clone Dm28c trypomastigotes, causing many morphological damages. Conclusions and Significance The results contribute to understand

  20. Whey proteins as source of dipeptidyl dipeptidase IV (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, Giovanni; Sibilia, Valeria; Caroli, Anna Maria; Cocchi, Daniela

    2011-04-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that whey proteins can reduce postprandial glucose levels and stimulate insulin release in healthy subjects and in subjects with type 2 diabetes by reducing dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity in the proximal bowel and hence increasing intact incretin levels. Our aim was to identify DPP-4 inhibitors among short peptides occurring in hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin, the major whey protein found in the milk of ruminants. We proved that the bioactive peptide Ile-Pro-Ala can be regarded as a moderate DPP-4 inhibitor. PMID:21256171

  1. In Vivo Effects of Bradykinin B2 Receptor Agonists with Varying Susceptibility to Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Mélissa; Gera, Lajos; Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François; Bachelard, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    We reported evidence of bradykinin (BK) regeneration from C-terminal extended BK sequences that behave as peptidase-activated B2 receptor (B2R) agonists. Further to these in vitro studies, we carried out in vivo experiments to verify hemodynamic effects of BK analogs exhibiting variable susceptibility toward vascular and blood plasma peptidases. Rats were anesthetized and instrumented to record blood pressure and heart rate responses to bolus intravenous (i.v.) injection of increasing doses of BK, B-9972 (D-Arg-[Hyp3,Igl5,Oic7,Igl8]-BK), BK-Arg, BK-His-Leu or BK-Ala-Pro, in the absence or presence of specific inhibitors. In some experiments, pulsed Doppler flow probes measured hindquarter Doppler shift in response to i.v. injections of kinins. BK caused rapid, transient and dose-related hypotensive effects. These effects were potentiated ∼15-fold by the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, enalaprilat, but extensively inhibited by icatibant (a B2R antagonist) and not influenced by the Arg-carboxypeptidase (CP) inhibitor (Plummer’s inhibitor). The hypotensive responses elicited by the peptidase-resistant B2R agonist, B-9972, were not affected by enalaprilat, but were inhibited by icatibant. The hypotensive responses to BK-Arg were abolished by pre-treatment with either the Arg-CP inhibitor or icatibant, pharmacologically evidencing BK regeneration. The hypotensive effects of BK-His-Leu and BK-Ala-Pro, previously reported as ACE-activated substrates, were abolished by icatibant, but not by enalaprilat. In vivo regeneration of BK from these two C-terminally extended analogs with no affinity for the B2R must follow alternative cleavage rules involving unidentified carboxypeptidase(s) when ACE is blocked. The transient hypotensive responses to BK and three tested analogs coincided with concomitant vasodilation (increased Doppler shift signal). Together, these results provide in vivo evidence that interesting hypotensive and vasodilator effects can be

  2. 40 CFR 261.31 - Hazardous wastes from non-specific sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous wastes from non-specific sources. 261.31 Section 261.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Lists of Hazardous Wastes § 261.31 Hazardous wastes from non-specific sources....

  3. 40 CFR 261.31 - Hazardous wastes from non-specific sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous wastes from non-specific sources. 261.31 Section 261.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Lists of Hazardous Wastes § 261.31 Hazardous wastes from non-specific sources....

  4. Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Are Deconditioned and Have An Increased Body Fat Percentage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodselmans, Audy P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare data on the level of aerobic capacity and body composition of nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with normative data matched for sex, age and level of sporting activity. The study population consisted of 101 outpatients with nonspecific CLBP who had entered a rehabilitation…

  5. Nonspecific uptake and homeostasis drive the oceanic cadmium cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Tristan J.; Lee, Renee B. Y.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2013-02-01

    The global marine distributions of Cd and phosphate are closely correlated, which has led to Cd being considered as a marine micronutrient, despite its toxicity to life. The explanation for this nutrient-like behavior is unknown because there is only one identified biochemical function for Cd, an unusual Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase. Recent developments in Cd isotope mass spectrometry have revealed that Cd uptake by phytoplankton causes isotopic fractionation in the open ocean and in culture. Here we investigate the physiochemical pathways that fractionate Cd isotopes by performing subcellular Cd isotope analysis on genetically modified microorganisms. We find that expression of the Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase makes no difference to the Cd isotope composition of whole cells. Instead, a large proportion of the Cd is partitioned into cell membranes with a similar direction and magnitude of Cd isotopic fractionation to that seen in surface seawater. This observation is well explained if Cd is mistakenly imported with other divalent metals and subsequently managed by binding within the cell to avoid toxicity. This process may apply to other divalent metals, whereby nonspecific uptake and subsequent homeostasis may contribute to elemental and isotopic distributions in seawater, even for elements commonly considered as micronutrients.

  6. The Binding Process of a Nonspecific Enzyme with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-09-07

    Protein-DNA recognition of a nonspecific complex is modeled to understand the nature of the transient encounter states. We consider the structural and energetic features and the role of water in the DNA grooves in the process of protein-DNA recognition. Here we have used the nuclease domain of colicin E7 (N-ColE7) from Escherichia coli in complex with a 12-bp DNA duplex as the model system to consider how a protein approaches, encounters, and associates with DNA. Multiscale simulation studies using Brownian dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations were performed to provide the binding process on multiple length- and timescales. We define the encounter states and identified the spatial and orientational aspects. For the molecular length-scales, we used molecular-dynamics simulations. Several intermediate binding states were found, which have different positions and orientations of protein around DNA including major and minor groove orientations. The results show that the contact number and the hydrated interfacial area are measures that facilitate better understanding of sequence-independent protein-DNA binding landscapes and pathways.

  7. Cell adhesion. Competition between nonspecific repulsion and specific bonding.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Dembo, M; Bongrand, P

    1984-01-01

    We develop a thermodynamic calculus for the modeling of cell adhesion. By means of this approach, we are able to compute the end results of competition between the formation of specific macromolecular bridges and nonspecific repulsion arising from electrostatic forces and osmotic (steric stabilization) forces. Using this calculus also allows us to derive in a straightforward manner the effects of cell deformability, the Young's modulus for stretching of bridges, diffusional mobility of receptors, heterogeneity of receptors, variation in receptor number, and the strength of receptor-receptor binding. The major insight that results from our analysis concerns the existence and characteristics of two phase transitions corresponding, respectively, to the onset of stable cell adhesion and to the onset of maximum cell-cell or cell-substrate contact. We are also able to make detailed predictions of the equilibrium contact area, equilibrium number of bridges, and the cell-cell or cell-substrate separation distance. We illustrate how our approach can be used to improve the analysis of experimental data, by means of two concrete examples. PMID:6743742

  8. The Binding Process of a Nonspecific Enzyme with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    Protein-DNA recognition of a nonspecific complex is modeled to understand the nature of the transient encounter states. We consider the structural and energetic features and the role of water in the DNA grooves in the process of protein-DNA recognition. Here we have used the nuclease domain of colicin E7 (N-ColE7) from Escherichia coli in complex with a 12-bp DNA duplex as the model system to consider how a protein approaches, encounters, and associates with DNA. Multiscale simulation studies using Brownian dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations were performed to provide the binding process on multiple length- and timescales. We define the encounter states and identified the spatial and orientational aspects. For the molecular length-scales, we used molecular-dynamics simulations. Several intermediate binding states were found, which have different positions and orientations of protein around DNA including major and minor groove orientations. The results show that the contact number and the hydrated interfacial area are measures that facilitate better understanding of sequence-independent protein-DNA binding landscapes and pathways. PMID:21889451

  9. Proteomic analysis in usual and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Ichiyo; Aida, Shinsuke; Shimazaki, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hideo; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Toda, Tosifusa; Nakanishi, Kuniaki; Tamai, Seiichi

    2014-03-01

    Differentiating nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) from usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is important for the determination of both treatment and prognosis. Using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we examined 8 UIPs, 8 NSIPs, and 30 normal lung tissues. Comparisons with control in 2D-DIGE showed that (a) in UIP, nine protein spots were significantly upregulated and seven were significantly downregulated, (b) in NSIP, four protein spots were significantly upregulated and nine were significantly downregulated. The detected proteins were analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, allowing qualitative differences in vimentin subtypes to be characterized. One vimentin subtype was upregulated in UIP, while another one was downregulated in NSIP (vs. control). These different characteristics were partially supported by the results of Western blot analysis. Our immunohistochemistry revealed vimentin expression within fibroblasts (a) in fibroblastic foci in UIP and (b) in fibrotic alveolar walls in NSIP. Differences in vimentin subtypes may provide useful biomarkers for separating NSIP from UIP, alongside differences in histological characteristics. PMID:24048960

  10. Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia: What Is the Optimal Approach to Management?

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Sara; Ryu, Jay H; Piciucchi, Sara; Chilosi, Marco; Poletti, Venerino

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed current aspects of the clinical and pathogenic profile of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), to better elucidate the complex issue of management and treatment options for NSIP patients. Recent findings suggest that idiopathic NSIP is a complex clinical entity with a disease spectrum that includes at least three different phenotypes: NSIP associated with autoimmune features, emphysema, and familial interstitial lung disease. This distinction, based mainly on clinical findings, may be of critical importance when it comes to making a decision on patients' management. This hypothesis warrants further studies. Currently, two major radiologic-pathologic different profiles have been well established. First, the "inflammatory type" characterized by prominent lymphocytic inflammation both on biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with mixed NSIP/organizing pneumonia pattern that tends to have a better response to corticosteroid and immunosuppressive treatment. Second, the "highly fibrotic" subgroup that shows prominent reticular changes and traction bronchiectasis by HRCT, high fibrotic background on biopsy, and no lymphocytosis on BAL. The latter fibrotic NSIP is the subgroup with less potential to respond to immunosuppressive treatment and a marginal risk to evolve into "full-blown idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis." The management of patients with fibrotic, progressive, and immunosuppressive treatment, refractory NSIP remains uncertain, and further studies are needed to address the role of antifibrotic drug in this settings. Oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplantation are of importance in the current management of severe, progressive, and refractory NSIP patients. PMID:27231862

  11. Francisella DnaK Inhibits Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Chetty, Senthilnath Lakshmana; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Leonard, Sean; Klose, Karl; Seshu, Janakiram; Cap, Andrew; Valdes, James J.; Chambers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Following pulmonary infection with Francisella tularensis, we observed an unexpected but significant reduction of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme normally up-regulated following inflammation. However, no reduction was observed in mice infected with a closely related Gram-negative pneumonic organism (Klebsiella pneumoniae) suggesting the inhibition may be Francisella-specific. In similar fashion to in vivo observations, addition of Francisella lysate to exogenous alkaline phosphatase (tissue-nonspecific isozyme) was inhibitory. Partial purification and subsequent proteomic analysis indicated the inhibitory factor to be the heat shock protein DnaK. Incubation with increasing amounts of anti-DnaK antibody reduced the inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DnaK contains an adenosine triphosphate binding domain at its N terminus, and addition of adenosine triphosphate enhances dissociation of DnaK with its target protein, e.g. alkaline phosphatase. Addition of adenosine triphosphate resulted in decreased DnaK co-immunoprecipitated with alkaline phosphatase as well as reduction of Francisella-mediated alkaline phosphatase inhibition further supporting the binding of Francisella DnaK to alkaline phosphatase. Release of DnaK via secretion and/or bacterial cell lysis into the extracellular milieu and inhibition of plasma alkaline phosphatase could promote an orchestrated, inflammatory response advantageous to Francisella. PMID:22923614

  12. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  13. Experience of living with nonspecific building-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Söderholm, Anna; Öhman, Ann; Stenberg, Berndt; Nordin, Steven

    2016-10-01

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms (NBRS) is a combination of general, skin and mucosal symptoms related to certain buildings. Despite high prevalence in the general population and severe symptomatology in certain cases there is no scientific documentation of quality of life in NBRS. The purpose of this study was to illuminate how individuals with NBRS experience daily life. Data were collected through descriptive, written texts and through telephone interviews with 11 individuals diagnosed with NBRS, and qualitative content analysis was conducted. Three main content areas were identified: (1) attitudes from the surrounding (categories: being questioned and lack of understanding from others; from zero to full support); (2) consequences (difficulties with daily activities; financial difficulties; affecting family and friends; emotional consequences); and (3) coping (learning to accept and finding solutions; avoiding; struggling; finding the positive; making one's home a sanctuary). As a conclusion, NBRS may affect several aspects of daily life, resulting in considerable alterations, limitations and emotional impact for the afflicted person and his/her family. Both environmental factors and attitudes from the surrounding can contribute to this impact on daily life. Strategies needed to cope with this impact may include both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies, such as struggling, avoiding trigger factors and finding positive aspects. PMID:27532686

  14. [Treatment of non-specific, functional and somatoform bodily complaints].

    PubMed

    Sattel, H; Schaefert, R; Häuser, W; Herrmann, M; Ronel, J; Henningsen, P; Hausteiner-Wiehle, C

    2014-03-01

    In primary and secondary medicine "non-specific, functional, and somatoform bodily complaints" are common and often take a chronic course, with the patients' quality of life usually markedly impaired, and give rise to high direct and indirect costs. They are challenging as they can deteriorate in case of inappropriate behavior on the physician's part. Coordinated by both German professional associations of Psychosomatic Medicine a new evidence based guideline was developed, aiming to transfer relevant diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge to all physicians who are in charge of these patients. After establishing a stable therapeutic alliance a symptom- and coping-oriented attitude could be demonstrated to be helpful. A biopsychosocial diagnostic evaluation combines a thorough assessment of bodily complaints and early introduces a sensitive discussion of signs of psychosocial stress, which can be extended carefully in case problems of this type are present. In less severe courses, physical/social activation is recommended and the patient's explanatory disease model should be extended towards a psychological dimension. More severe and complicated courses require a more structured approach consisting of regular appointments (as opposed to ad-hoc appointments whenever the patient feels worse) and an active cooperation of the patient. A coordinated, multimodal management includes additional measures as graded activation, psychotherapy, relaxation training or--if indicated--temporary medication. PMID:24619719

  15. [Chronic Duodenitis and Celiac Disease: a path between the nonspecific and the early stages of Marsh].

    PubMed

    Passera, Andrea Helena; Passera, Mario Luis; Higa, Antonio Luis; Nuñez, Maria; Armando, Lucas; Barzón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Given the advances in diagnosis for CD, some patients are detected with symptoms and signs of food intolerance, which have positive antibodies and autoantibodies for coeliac disease, whom present proximal bowel biopsies with chronic nonspecific duodenitis and are not associated with stages 0 and 1 Marsh. On the other hand, patients with bloating, abdominal pain, pondostatural delay, negative antibodies for CD, and chronic nonspecific duodenitis in whom removing cow's milk or gluten, the symptoms remit. There are also celiac patients with biopsies before diagnosis, with chronic nonspecific duodenitis. In this paper, we summarize three brothers with different degrees of chronic duodenitis, one with chronic nonspecific duodenitis, and two with histopathological sings of coeliac disease. It is an invitation to think that chronic nonspecific duodenitis in some patients may be an earlier manifestation of celiac disease. PMID:26544059

  16. Fly DPP10 acts as a channel ancillary subunit and possesses peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Yohei; Muto, Tomohiro; Zhang, Zhili; Baihaqie, Ahmad; Yoshizawa, Takamasa; Lee, Hye-In J; Park, Eulsoon; Tsukiji, Shinya; Takimoto, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian DPP6 (DPPX) and DPP10 (DPPY) belong to a family of dipeptidyl peptidases, but lack enzyme activity. Instead, these proteins form complexes with voltage-gated K(+) channels in Kv4 family to control their gating and other properties. Here, we find that the fly DPP10 ortholog acts as an ancillary subunit of Kv4 channels and digests peptides. Similarly to mammalian DPP10, the fly ortholog tightly binds to rat Kv4.3 protein. The association causes negative shifts in voltage dependence of channel activation and steady state inactivation. It also results in faster inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In addition to its channel regulatory role, fly DPP10 exhibits significant dipeptidyl peptidase activity with Gly-Pro-MCA (glycyl-L-proline 4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide) as a substrate. Heterologously expressed Flag-tagged fly DPP10 and human DPP4 show similar Km values towards this substrate. However, fly DPP10 exhibits approximately a 6-times-lower relative kcat value normalized with anti-Flag immunoreactivity than human DPP4. These results demonstrate that fly DPP10 is a dual functional protein, controlling Kv4 channel gating and removing bioactive peptides. PMID:27198182

  17. Potential Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV in the Pathophysiology of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Thiago A.; dos Santos, Leonardo; Barauna, Valério G.; Girardi, Adriana C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) is a widely expressed multifunctional serine peptidase that exists as a membrane-anchored cell surface protein or in a soluble form in the plasma and other body fluids. Numerous substrates are cleaved at the penultimate amino acid by DPPIV, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-α), all of which play important roles in the cardiovascular system. In this regard, recent reports have documented that circulating DPPIV activity correlates with poorer cardiovascular outcomes in human and experimental heart failure (HF). Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that DPPIV inhibitors exert cardioprotective and renoprotective actions in a variety of experimental models of cardiac dysfunction. On the other hand, conflicting results have been found when translating these promising findings from preclinical animal models to clinical therapy. In this review, we discuss how DPPIV might be involved in the cardio-renal axis in HF. In addition, the potential role for DPPIV inhibitors in ameliorating heart disease is revised, focusing on the effects of the main DPPIV substrates on cardiac remodeling and renal handling of salt and water. PMID:25690036

  18. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV by fluoroolefin-containing N-peptidyl-O-hydroxylamine peptidomimetics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Toscano, Paul J.; Welch, John T.

    1998-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5; DPP IV), also known as the leukocyte differentiation antigen CD26 when found as an extracellular membrane-bound proline specific serine protease, cleaves a dipeptide from the N terminus of a polypeptide chain containing a proline residue in the penultimate position. Here we report that known (Z)-Ala-ψ[CF=C]-Pro dipeptide isosteres 1 and 2, which contain O-acylhydroxylamines, were isolated as diastereomeric pairs u-1, l-1, and l-2. The effect of each diastereomeric pair as an inhibitor of human placental dipeptidyl peptidase DPP IV has been examined. The inhibition of DPP IV by these compounds is rapid and efficient. The diastereomeric pair u-1 exhibits very potent inhibitory activity with a Ki of 188 nM. Fluoroolefin containing N-peptidyl-O-hydroxylamine peptidomimetics, by virtue of their inhibitory potency and stability, are superior to N-peptidyl-O-hydroxylamine inhibitors derived from an Ala-Pro dipeptide. PMID:9826645

  19. Overexpression of specific cysteine peptidases confers pathogenicity to a nonpathogenic Entamoeba histolytica clone.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Jenny; Bär, Ann-Katrein; Bartels, Anne-Kathrin; Marien, Dennis; Ofori, Susann; Biller, Laura; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine peptidases (CPs) of Entamoeba histolytica are considered to be important pathogenicity factors. Previous studies have found that under standard axenic culture conditions, only four (ehcp-a1, ehcp-a2, ehcp-a5, and ehcp-a7) out of 35 papain-like ehcp genes present in the E. histolytica genome are expressed at high levels. Little is known about the expression of CPs in E. histolytica during amoebic liver abscess (ALA) formation. In the current study, a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to determine the expression of the various ehcp genes during ALA formation in animal models. Increased expression of four ehcp genes (ehcp-a3, -a4, -a10, and -c13) was detected in the gerbil and mouse models. Increased expression of another three ehcp genes (ehcp-a5, -a6, and -a7) was detected in the mouse model only, and two other ehcp genes (ehcp-b8 and -b9) showed increased expression in the gerbil model only. Trophozoites of the nonpathogenic E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS clone A1, which was unable to induce ALAs, were transfected with vectors enabling overexpression of those CPs that are expressed at high levels under culture conditions or during ALA formation. Interestingly, overexpression of ehcp-b8, -b9, and -c13 restored the pathogenic phenotype of the nonpathogenic clone A1 whereas overexpression of various other peptidase genes had no effect on the pathogenicity of this clone. PMID:23532975

  20. Peptide binding to a bacterial signal peptidase visualized by peptide tethering and carrier-driven crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Yi Tian; Harris, Paul W. R.; Batot, Gaelle; Brimble, Margaret A.; Baker, Edward N.; Young, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type I signal peptidases (SPases) are membrane-anchored serine proteases that process the signal peptides of proteins exported via the Sec and Tat secretion systems. Despite their crucial importance for bacterial virulence and their attractiveness as drug targets, only one such enzyme, LepB from Escherichia coli, has been structurally characterized, and the transient nature of peptide binding has stymied attempts to directly visualize SPase–substrate complexes. Here, the crystal structure of SpsB, the type I signal peptidase from the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, is reported, and a peptide-tethering strategy that exploits the use of carrier-driven crystallization is described. This enabled the determination of the crystal structures of three SpsB–peptide complexes, both with cleavable substrates and with an inhibitory peptide. SpsB–peptide interactions in these complexes are almost exclusively limited to the canonical signal-peptide motif Ala-X-Ala, for which clear specificity pockets are found. Minimal contacts are made outside this core, with the variable side chains of the peptides accommodated in shallow grooves or exposed faces. These results illustrate how high fidelity is retained despite broad sequence diversity, in a process that is vital for cell survival. PMID:26870377

  1. Identification and characterization of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor from aronia juice

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Yamane, Takuya; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Nakagaki, Takenori; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Aronia berries have many potential effects on health, including an antioxidant effect, effect for antimutagenesis, hepatoprotection and cardioprotection, an antidiabetic effect and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Previous human studies have shown that aronia juice may be useful for treatment of obesity disorders. In this study, we found that aronia juice has an inhibitory effect against dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) (EC 3.4.14.5). DPP IV is a peptidase that cleaves the N-terminal region of incretins such as glucagon-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Inactivation of incretins by DPP IV induces reduction of insulin secretion. Furthermore, we identified that cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside as the DPP IV inhibitor in aronia juice. DPP IV was inhibited more strongly by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside than by cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside. The results suggest that DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside present in aronia juice. The antidiabetic effect of aronia juice may be mediated through DPP IV inhibition by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside. - Highlights: • DPP IV activity is inhibited by aronia juice. • DPP IV inhibitor is cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside in aronia juice. • DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside more than cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside.

  2. Fish skin gelatin hydrolysates produced by visceral peptidase and bovine trypsin: Bioactivity and stability.

    PubMed

    Ketnawa, Sunantha; Benjakul, Soottawat; Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2017-01-15

    The peptidase from the viscera of farmed giant catfish was used for producing gelatin hydrolysates (HG) and compared with those produced from commercial bovine trypsin (HB). The degree of hydrolysis (DH) observed suggests that proteolytic cleavage rapidly occurred within the first 120min of incubation, and there was higher DH in HG than in HB. HG demonstrated the highest ACE-inhibitory activity, DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging activity, and FRAP. HB showed the highest FRAP activity. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of HG was quite stable over the pH range of 1-11, but it increased slightly when the heating duration time reached 240min at 100°C. The ACE-inhibitory activity of HG showed the highest stability at a pH of 7, and it remained very stable at 100°C for over 15-240min. The visceral peptidase from farmed giant catfish could be an alternative protease for generating protein hydrolysates with desirable bioactivities. The resulting hydrolysates showed good stability, making them potential functional ingredients for food formulations. PMID:27542490

  3. Identification and characterization of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor from aronia juice.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Yamane, Takuya; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Nakagaki, Takenori; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Aronia berries have many potential effects on health, including an antioxidant effect, effect for antimutagenesis, hepatoprotection and cardioprotection, an antidiabetic effect and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Previous human studies have shown that aronia juice may be useful for treatment of obesity disorders. In this study, we found that aronia juice has an inhibitory effect against dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) (EC 3.4.14.5). DPP IV is a peptidase that cleaves the N-terminal region of incretins such as glucagon-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Inactivation of incretins by DPP IV induces reduction of insulin secretion. Furthermore, we identified that cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside as the DPP IV inhibitor in aronia juice. DPP IV was inhibited more strongly by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside than by cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside. The results suggest that DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside present in aronia juice. The antidiabetic effect of aronia juice may be mediated through DPP IV inhibition by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside. PMID:26296465

  4. SOM 1, a small new gene required for mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Esser, K; Pratje, E; Michaelis, G

    1996-09-25

    IMP1 encodes a subunit of the mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase responsible for the proteolytic processing of cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 (Cox2) and cytochrome b2 (Cytb2). The molecular defect in an imp1 mutation and the characterisation of a high-copy-number suppressor is described. A deletion of the suppressor region causes respiration deficiency. The DNA sequence revealed three very small overlapping ORFs. Constructs which carried termination codons within the ORFs or lacked ATG initiation codons still retained complementing activity on a high-copy-number plasmid. Nevertheless, the possibility that the suppressor acts at DNA or RNA level could be excluded. Subcloning of the ORFs, complementation analysis in low-copy-number plasmids and transcript mapping identified the 222 bp ORF as the suppressor gene designated SOM1. The SOM1 gene is transcribed into a 375 bp polyadenylated RNA and the deduced amino acid sequence predicts a small protein of 8.4 kDa with no significant sequence similarity to known proteins. In the som1 deletion mutant, proteolytic processing of the Cox2 precursor is prevented and Cytb2 is strongly reduced. SOM1 represents a new small gene which encodes a novel factor that is essential for the correct function of the Imp1 peptidase and/or the protein sorting machinery. PMID:8879245

  5. Fly DPP10 acts as a channel ancillary subunit and possesses peptidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Yohei; Muto, Tomohiro; Zhang, Zhili; Baihaqie, Ahmad; Yoshizawa, Takamasa; Lee, Hye-in J.; Park, Eulsoon; Tsukiji, Shinya; Takimoto, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian DPP6 (DPPX) and DPP10 (DPPY) belong to a family of dipeptidyl peptidases, but lack enzyme activity. Instead, these proteins form complexes with voltage-gated K+ channels in Kv4 family to control their gating and other properties. Here, we find that the fly DPP10 ortholog acts as an ancillary subunit of Kv4 channels and digests peptides. Similarly to mammalian DPP10, the fly ortholog tightly binds to rat Kv4.3 protein. The association causes negative shifts in voltage dependence of channel activation and steady state inactivation. It also results in faster inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In addition to its channel regulatory role, fly DPP10 exhibits significant dipeptidyl peptidase activity with Gly-Pro-MCA (glycyl-L-proline 4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide) as a substrate. Heterologously expressed Flag-tagged fly DPP10 and human DPP4 show similar Km values towards this substrate. However, fly DPP10 exhibits approximately a 6-times-lower relative kcat value normalized with anti-Flag immunoreactivity than human DPP4. These results demonstrate that fly DPP10 is a dual functional protein, controlling Kv4 channel gating and removing bioactive peptides. PMID:27198182

  6. Plasma peptidases as prognostic biomarkers in patients with first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Atucha, Ainhoa; Echevarría, Enrique; Larrinaga, Gorka; Gil, Javier; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; González-Pinto, Ana M; Irazusta, Jon; Seco, Jesús

    2015-08-15

    The plasma activity of nine aminopeptidases was monitored over a year in first-episode psychotic patients. We observed significant differences in aminopeptidase B (APB), aminopeptidase N (APN) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), but not in puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PSA), prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), cysteine aminopeptidase (Cys-AP), aspartate aminopeptidase (Asp-AP), glutamate aminopeptidase (Glu) or piroglutamate aminopeptidase (PGI) in these patients compared to controls, and also a progressive increase in plasma activity, correlated to changes in scores on clinical scales, Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), at 1 month of follow-up. At 1 month after diagnosis, the median score obtained by patients on the GAF was negatively associated with the plasma activity of APB and PEP measured at the beginning of the psychotic episode, indicating a role as a negative prognostic factor that can predict psychiatric symptomatology. In the case of HDRS, scores at 1 month after diagnosis were found to be positively associated with the initial plasma activity of DPPIV, APN and PSA, indicating that their initial elevation is a negative prognostic factor that can predict subsequent depressive symptomatology. Taken together, these results suggest a pathophysiological involvement of plasma peptidases and indicate that aminopeptidase activity can predict the course of first-episode psychosis patients, acting as a prognostic indicator. PMID:25997998

  7. Arrabidaea chica Hexanic Extract Induces Mitochondrion Damage and Peptidase Inhibition on Leishmania spp.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Igor A.; Azevedo, Mariana M. B.; Chaves, Francisco C. M.; Alviano, Celuta S.; Alviano, Daniela S.; Vermelho, Alane B.

    2014-01-01

    Currently available leishmaniasis treatments are limited due to severe side effects. Arrabidaea chica is a medicinal plant used in Brazil against several diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of 5 fractions obtained from the crude hexanic extract of A. chica against Leishmania amazonensis and L. infantum, as well as on the interaction of these parasites with host cells. Promastigotes were treated with several concentrations of the fractions obtained from A. chica for determination of their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). In addition, the effect of the most active fraction (B2) on parasite's ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. To evaluate the inhibitory activity of B2 fraction on Leishmania peptidases, parasites lysates were treated with the inhibitory and subinhibitory concentrations of the B2 fraction. The minimum inhibitory concentration of B2 fraction was 37.2 and 18.6 μg/mL for L. amazonensis and L. infantum, respectively. Important ultrastructural alterations as mitochondrial swelling with loss of matrix content and the presence of vesicles inside this organelle were observed in treated parasites. Moreover, B2 fraction was able to completely inhibit the peptidase activity of promastigotes at pH 5.5. The results presented here further support the use of A. chica as an interesting source of antileishmanial agents. PMID:24818162

  8. Cysteine Peptidase B Regulates Leishmania mexicana Virulence through the Modulation of GP63 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Casgrain, Pierre-André; Martel, Caroline; McMaster, W. Robert; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Olivier, Martin; Descoteaux, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine peptidases play a central role in the biology of Leishmania. In this work, we sought to further elucidate the mechanism(s) by which the cysteine peptidase CPB contributes to L. mexicana virulence and whether CPB participates in the formation of large communal parasitophorous vacuoles induced by these parasites. We initially examined the impact of L. mexicana infection on the trafficking of VAMP3 and VAMP8, two endocytic SNARE proteins associated with phagolysosome biogenesis and function. Using a CPB-deficient mutant, we found that both VAMP3 and VAMP8 were down-modulated in a CPB-dependent manner. We also discovered that expression of the virulence-associated GPI-anchored metalloprotease GP63 was inhibited in the absence of CPB. Expression of GP63 in the CPB-deficient mutant was sufficient to down-modulate VAMP3 and VAMP8. Similarly, episomal expression of GP63 enabled the CPB-deficient mutant to establish infection in macrophages, induce the formation of large communal parasitophorous vacuoles, and cause lesions in mice. These findings implicate CPB in the regulation of GP63 expression and provide evidence that both GP63 and CPB are key virulence factors in L. mexicana. PMID:27191844

  9. A Computational Study of the Glycine-Rich Loop of Mitochondrial Processing Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Kučera, Tomáš; Otyepka, Michal; Matušková, Anna; Samad, Abdul; Kutejová, Eva; Janata, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    An all atomic, non-restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit water was used to study in detail the structural features of the highly conserved glycine-rich loop (GRL) of the α-subunit of the yeast mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP) and its importance for the tertiary and quaternary conformation of MPP. Wild-type and GRL-deleted MPP structures were studied using non-restrained MD simulations, both in the presence and the absence of a substrate in the peptidase active site. Targeted MD simulations were employed to study the mechanism of substrate translocation from the GRL to the active site. We demonstrate that the natural conformational flexibility of the GRL is crucial for the substrate translocation process from outside the enzyme towards the MPP active site. We show that the α-helical conformation of the substrate is important not only during its initial interaction with MPP (i.e. substrate recognition), but also later, at least during the first third of the substrate translocation trajectory. Further, we show that the substrate remains in contact with the GRL during the whole first half of the translocation trajectory and that hydrophobic interactions play a major role. Finally, we conclude that the GRL acts as a precisely balanced structural element, holding the MPP subunits in a partially closed conformation regardless the presence or absence of a substrate in the active site. PMID:24058582

  10. Characterization of a novel acylaminoacyl peptidase with hexameric structure and endopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Szeltner, Zoltán; Kiss, András L; Domokos, Klarissza; Harmat, Veronika; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László

    2009-08-01

    We have overexpressed in E. coli, purified and investigated the kinetic, thermodynamic and biophysical properties of an acylaminoacyl peptidase (AAP), from the thermophile Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhAAP). It was shown that the electrostatic environment of the catalytic site of PhAAP substantially influenced the pH dependence of the specificity rate constant (k(cat)/K(m)). However, 0.3 M NaCl, which depressed the electrostatic effects, simplified the complex pH-rate profile. The rate of formation of the enzyme-substrate complex (k(1)) was obtained from a non-linear Arrhenius plot. The lack of substrate leaving group effects indicated that k(1) is the rate determining step in the catalysis. DSC and CD measurements demonstrated that PhAAP displayed a stable structure in the catalytically competent pH range. It was shown that PhAAP is not just an acylaminoacyl peptidase, but it also has an endopeptidase activity and so differs from the mammalian AAPs. Size exclusion chromatography with PhAAP revealed a hexameric structure, which is unique among the known members of the prolyl oligopeptidase family that includes AAPs and suggests that its cellular function may be different from that of the dimeric AAP also found in the same organism. PMID:19303951

  11. Expression patterns of cysteine peptidase genes across the Tribolium castaneum life cycle provide clues to biological function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a major agricultural pest responsible for considerable loss of stored grain and cereal products worldwide. T. castaneum larvae have a highly compartmentalized gut, with cysteine peptidases mostly in the acidic anterior part of the midgut. We have descri...

  12. Differential expression of cysteine peptidase genes in the inner integument and endosperm of developing seeds of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Antônio J; Soares, Emanoella L; Costa, José H; Costa, Washington L G; Soares, Arlete A; Nogueira, Fábio C S; Domont, Gilberto B; Campos, Francisco A P

    2013-12-01

    In several plant tissues, programmed cell death (PCD) is mediated by the combined action of cysteine peptidases, namely KDEL-tailed cysteine peptidases (KDEL-CysEP) and vacuolar processing enzymes (VPE). Here, we performed a search of the draft genome of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) and identified 2 genes for KDEL-CysEP (Jc-CysEP1 and Jc-CysEP2) and 3 genes for VPE (Jc-βVPE, Jc-γVPE and Jc-δVPE) and determined the expression patterns of these genes by RT-qPCR in integument and cellular endosperm of seeds collected at seven different developmental stages. We were able to demonstrate that the expression of Jc-CysEP1, Jc-CysEP2, Jc-βVPE and Jc-γVPE proceeded rapidly from Stage IV, with Jc-CysEP2 displaying the highest relative expression; expression of Jc-δVPE could not be detected in any of the tissues/developmental stages analyzed. Additionally, we showed that the expression pattern of these peptidases correlates with anatomical changes in integument and cellular endosperm, thus suggesting a role for both classes of peptidases in PCD and in protein processing, both of which occur simultaneously in each of these tissues. PMID:24157205

  13. Crucial role of nonspecific interactions in amyloid nucleation.

    PubMed

    Šarić, Anđela; Chebaro, Yassmine C; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Frenkel, Daan

    2014-12-16

    Protein oligomers have been implicated as toxic agents in a wide range of amyloid-related diseases. However, it has remained unsolved whether the oligomers are a necessary step in the formation of amyloid fibrils or just a dangerous byproduct. Analogously, it has not been resolved if the amyloid nucleation process is a classical one-step nucleation process or a two-step process involving prenucleation clusters. We use coarse-grained computer simulations to study the effect of nonspecific attractions between peptides on the primary nucleation process underlying amyloid fibrillization. We find that, for peptides that do not attract, the classical one-step nucleation mechanism is possible but only at nonphysiologically high peptide concentrations. At low peptide concentrations, which mimic the physiologically relevant regime, attractive interpeptide interactions are essential for fibril formation. Nucleation then inevitably takes place through a two-step mechanism involving prefibrillar oligomers. We show that oligomers not only help peptides meet each other but also, create an environment that facilitates the conversion of monomers into the β-sheet-rich form characteristic of fibrils. Nucleation typically does not proceed through the most prevalent oligomers but through an oligomer size that is only observed in rare fluctuations, which is why such aggregates might be hard to capture experimentally. Finally, we find that the nucleation of amyloid fibrils cannot be described by classical nucleation theory: in the two-step mechanism, the critical nucleus size increases with increases in both concentration and interpeptide interactions, which is in direct contrast with predictions from classical nucleation theory. PMID:25453085

  14. A Nonhost Peptidase Inhibitor of ~14 kDa from Butea monosperma (Lam.) Taub. Seeds Affects Negatively the Growth and Developmental Physiology of Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Prabhash K.; Singh, Dushyant; Singh, Sangram; Khan, M. Y.; Jamal, Farrukh

    2014-01-01

    Helicoverpa armigera is one of the major devastating pests of crop plants. In this context a serine peptidase inhibitor purified from the seeds of Butea monosperma was evaluated for its effect on developmental physiology of H. armigera larvae. B. monosperma peptidase inhibitor on 12% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis exhibited a single protein band of ~14 kDa with or without reduction. In vitro studies towards total gut proteolytic enzymes of H. armigera and bovine trypsin indicated measurable inhibitory activity. B. monosperma peptidase inhibitor dose for 50% mortality and weight reduction by 50% were 0.5% w/w and 0.10% w/w, respectively. The IC50 of B. monosperma peptidase inhibitor against total H. armigera gut proteinases activity was 2.0 µg/mL. The larval feeding assays suggested B. monosperma peptidase inhibitor to be toxic as reflected by its retarded growth and development, consequently affecting fertility and fecundity of pest and prolonging the larval-pupal duration of the insect life cycle of H. armigera. Supplementing B. monosperma peptidase inhibitor in artificial diet at 0.1% w/w, both the efficiencies of conversion of ingested as well as digested food were downregulated, whereas approximate digestibility and metabolic cost were enhanced. The efficacy of Butea monosperma peptidase inhibitor against progressive growth and development of H. armigera suggest its usefulness in insect pest management of food crops. PMID:24860667

  15. Characterization of a soluble, catalytically active form of Escherichia coli leader peptidase: requirement of detergent or phospholipid for optimal activity.

    PubMed

    Tschantz, W R; Paetzel, M; Cao, G; Suciu, D; Inouye, M; Dalbey, R E

    1995-03-28

    Leader peptidase is a novel serine protease in Escherichia coli, which functions to cleave leader sequences from exported proteins. Its catalytic domain extends into the periplasmic space and is anchored to the membrane by two transmembrane segments located at the N-terminal end of the protein. At present, there is no information on the structure of the catalytic domain. Here, we report on the properties of a soluble form of leader peptidase (delta 2-75), and we compare its properties to those of the wild-type enzyme. We find that the truncated leader peptidase has a kcat of 3.0 S-1 and a Km of 32 microM with a pro-OmpA nuclease A substrate. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme (pI of 6.8), delta 2-75 is water-soluble and has an acidic isoelectric point of 5.6. We also show with delta 2-75 that the replacement of serine 90 and lysine 145 with alanine residues results in a 500-fold reduction in activity, providing further evidence that leader peptidase employs a catalytic serine/lysine dyad. Finally, we find that the catalysis of delta 2-75 is accelerated by the presence of the detergent Triton X-100, regardless if the substrate is pro-OmpA nuclease A or a peptide substrate. Triton X-100 is required for optimal activity of delta 2-75 at a level far below the critical micelle concentration. Moreover, we find that E. coli phospholipids stimulate the activity of delta 2-75, suggesting that phospholipids may play an important physiological role in the catalytic mechanism of leader peptidase. PMID:7696258

  16. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  17. Post-injury administration of NAAG peptidase inhibitor prodrug, PGI-02776, in experimental TBI.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-Feng; Van, Ken C; Gurkoff, Gene G; Kopriva, Christina; Olszewski, Rafal T; Song, Minsoo; Sun, Shifeng; Xu, Man; Neale, Joseph H; Yuen, Po-Wai; Lowe, David A; Zhou, Jia; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2011-06-13

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a rapid and excessive increase in glutamate concentration in the extracellular milieu, which is strongly associated with excitotoxicity and neuronal degeneration. N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), a prevalent peptide neurotransmitter in the vertebrate nervous system, is released along with glutamate and suppresses glutamate release by actions at pre-synaptic metabotropic glutamate autoreceptors. Extracellular NAAG is hydrolyzed to N-acetylaspartate and glutamate by peptidase activity. In the present study PGI-02776, a newly designed di-ester prodrug of the urea-based NAAG peptidase inhibitor ZJ-43, was tested for neuroprotective potential when administered intraperitoneally 30 min after lateral fluid percussion TBI in the rat. Stereological quantification of hippocampal CA2-3 degenerating neurons at 24 h post injury revealed that 10 mg/kg PGI-02776 significantly decreased the number of degenerating neurons (p<0.05). Both average latency analysis of Morris water maze performance and assessment of 24-hour memory retention revealed significant differences between sham-TBI and TBI-saline. In contrast, no significant difference was found between sham-TBI and PGI-02776 treated groups in either analysis indicating an improvement in cognitive performance with PGI-02776 treatment. Histological analysis on day 16 post-injury revealed significant cell death in injured animals regardless of treatment. In vitro NAAG peptidase inhibition studies demonstrated that the parent compound (ZJ-43) exhibited potent inhibitory activity while the mono-ester (PGI-02749) and di-ester (PGI-02776) prodrug compounds exhibited moderate and weak levels of inhibitory activity, respectively. Pharmacokinetic assays in uninjured animals found that the di-ester (PGI-02776) crossed the blood-brain barrier. PGI-02776 was also readily hydrolyzed to both the mono-ester (PGI-02749) and the parent compound (ZJ-43) in both blood and brain. Overall, these findings

  18. Adrenomedullin for Risk Stratification of Emergency Patients With Nonspecific Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Christian Hans; Messmer, Anna Sarah; Ghanim, Leyla; Ilsemann-Karakoumis, Julia; Giersdorf, Sven; Hertel, Sabine; Ernst, Susanne; Geigy, Nicolas; Bingisser, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with nonspecific complaints (NSC) presenting to the emergency department (ED) are at risk of life-threatening conditions. New stress biomarkers such as the midregional portion of adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) promise to support decision-making. This study tested the following hypotheses: biomarker-assisted disposition of patients with NSC will not increase mortality. Second, discharge from the ED will increase if clinical risk assessment is combined with low MR-proADM levels. Third, inappropriate disposition to a lower level of care will decrease, if clinical assessment is combined with high MR-proADM levels, and fourth that this algorithm is feasible in the ED setting. Prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled interventional feasibility study with a 30-day follow-up, including patients with NSC. Patients were randomly assigned to either the standard group (decision-making solely based on clinical assessment) or the Novum group (biomarker-assisted). Regarding disposition, patients were assigned to 1 of 3 risk classes: high-risk (admission to hospital), intermediate risk (community geriatric hospital), and low-risk patients (discharge). In the Novum group, in addition to clinical risk assessment, the information of the MR-proADM level was used. Unless there were overruling criteria, patients were transferred or discharged according to the risk assessment. Primary endpoint was 30-day mortality. Secondary endpoints were comparisons of patient disposition and related mortality rates, ED, and hospital length of stay and readmission. The final study cohort consisted of 398 patients (210 in the Standard group and 188 in the Novum group). Overruling, that is, disposition not according to the result of the proposed algorithm occurred in 51 cases. Baseline characteristics between Standard and Novum groups were similar. The mortality rate in the Novum group was 4.3%, as compared to the Standard group mortality of 6.2%, which was not significantly

  19. Inhibitors of signal peptide peptidase (SPP) affect HSV-1 infectivity in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sariah J.; Mott, Kevin R.; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2014-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the highly conserved herpes simplex virus glycoprotein K (gK) binds to signal peptide peptidase (SPP), also known as minor histocompatibility antigen H13. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time that inhibitors of SPP, such as L685,458, (Z-LL)2 ketone, aspirin, ibuprofen and DAPT, significantly reduced HSV-1 replication in tissue culture. Inhibition of SPP activity via (Z-LL)2 ketone significantly reduced viral transcripts in the nucleus of infected cells. Finally, when administered during primary infection, (Z-LL)2 ketone inhibitor reduced HSV-1 replication in the eyes of ocularly infected mice. Thus, blocking SPP activity may represent a clinically effective and expedient approach to the reduction of viral replication and the resulting pathology. PMID:24768597

  20. Parasite Cathepsin D-Like Peptidases and Their Relevance as Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Daniel; Hartmann, David; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Dvořák, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Inhibition of aspartic cathepsin D-like peptidases (APDs) has been often discussed as an antiparasite intervention strategy. APDs have been considered as virulence factors of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp., and have been demonstrated to have important roles in protein trafficking mechanisms of apicomplexan parasites. APDs also initiate blood digestion as components of multienzyme proteolytic complexes in malaria, platyhelminths, nematodes, and ticks. Increasing DNA and RNA sequencing data indicate that parasites express multiple APD isoenzymes of various functions that can now be specifically evaluated using new functional-genomic and biochemical tools, from which we can further assess the potential of APDs as targets for novel effective intervention strategies against parasitic diseases that still pose an alarming threat to mankind. PMID:27344362

  1. CPDadh: A new peptidase family homologous to the cysteine protease domain in bacterial MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Lupardus, Patrick J; Garcia, K Christopher; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    A cysteine protease domain (CPD) has been recently discovered in a group of multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxins (MARTX) and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B. These CPDs (referred to as CPDmartx) autocleave the toxins to release domains with toxic effects inside host cells. We report identification and computational analysis of CPDadh, a new cysteine peptidase family homologous to CPDmartx. CPDadh and CPDmartx share a Rossmann-like structural core and conserved catalytic residues. In bacteria, domains of the CPDadh family are present at the N-termini of a diverse group of putative cell-cell interaction proteins and at the C-termini of some RHS (recombination hot spot) proteins. In eukaryotes, catalytically inactive members of the CPDadh family are found in cell surface protein NELF (nasal embryonic LHRH factor) and some putative signaling proteins. PMID:19309740

  2. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Regulation of SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jixin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is a ubiquitously expressed protease that regulates diverse number of physiological functions. As a dipeptidase, it exerts its catalytic effects on proteins/peptides with proline, alanine, or serine in the penultimate (P1) amino acid residue from the amino terminus. The evidence to date supports an important effect of DPP4 in catalytic cleavage of incretin peptides and this perhaps represents the main mechanism by which DPP4 inhibition improves glycemic control. DPP4 also plays an important role in the degradation of multiple chemokines of which stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, also known as CXCL12) is perhaps an increasingly recognized target, given its importance in processes, such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and stem cell homing. In the current review, we will summarize the importance of DPP4-mediated enzymatic processing of cytokines/chemokines with an emphasis on SDF-1 and resultant implications for cardiovascular physiology and disease. PMID:26441982

  3. Role of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in new-onset diabetes after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Jin, Ji Zhe; Jin, Long; Jin, Jian; Li, Can

    2015-01-01

    Despite strict pre- and post-transplantation screening, the incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) remains as high as 60%. This complication affects the risk of cardiovascular events and patient and graft survival rates. Thus, reducing the impact of NODAT could improve overall transplant success. The pathogenesis of NODAT is multifactorial, and both modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors have been implicated. Monitoring and controlling the blood glucose profile, implementing multidisciplinary care, performing lifestyle modifications, using a modified immunosuppressive regimen, administering anti-metabolite agents, and taking a conventional antidiabetic approach may diminish the incidence of NODAT. In addition to these preventive strategies, inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) by the gliptin family of drugs has recently gained considerable interest as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus and NODAT. This review focuses on the role of DPP4 inhibitors and discusses recent literature regarding management of NODAT. PMID:26552451

  4. Three ileus cases associated with the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kanasaki, Keizo; Konishi, Kazunori; Hayashi, Ranji; Shiroeda, Hisakazu; Nomura, Tomoe; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nagai, Takako; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Ito, Hiroki; Tsuda, Shin-Ichi; Kitada, Munehiro; Fujii, Mizue; Kanasaki, Megumi; Nishizawa, Makoto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yasuto; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-11-27

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic drugs that increase incretin hormone levels to enhance blood sugar level-dependent insulinotropic effects, suppress glucagon action, and reduce bowel motility. These incretin effects are ideal for blood sugar control. However, the safety profile of DPP-4 inhibitors is not yet established. Herein, we present three cases of ileus, considered to be closely related to the use of DPP-4 inhibitors, in diabetic patients. Each of the three patients exhibited some risk of a deficiency in bowel movement; the onset of ileus was within 40 days after strengthened inhibition of DPP-4. The use of a DPP-4 inhibitor could be safe, although the cases presented herein enable us to inform the scientific community to some of the potential adverse effects of the use of DPP-4 inhibitors in select populations. PMID:24843724

  5. Role of mitochondrial processing peptidase and AAA proteases in processing of the yeast acetohydroxyacid synthase precursor.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Suvarna; Kölling, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    We studied presequence processing of the mitochondrial-matrix targeted acetohydroxyacid synthase (Ilv2). C-terminal 3HA-tagging altered the cleavage pattern from a single step to sequential two-step cleavage, giving rise to two Ilv2-3HA forms (A and B). Both cleavage events were dependent on the mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). We present evidence for the involvement of three AAA ATPases, m- and i-AAA proteases, and Mcx1, in Ilv2-3HA processing. Both, precursor to A-form and A-form to B-form cleavage were strongly affected in a ∆yme1 mutant. These defects could be suppressed by overexpression of MPP, suggesting that MPP activity is limiting in the ∆yme1 mutant. Our data suggest that for some substrates AAA ATPases could play an active role in the translocation of matrix-targeted proteins. PMID:27398316

  6. Inhibition of kallikrein-related peptidases by the serine protease inhibitor of Kazal-type 6.

    PubMed

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Fischer, Jan; Wu, Zhihong; Declercq, Wim; Reiss, Karina; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of serine proteases, expressed in several tissues. Their activity is regulated by inhibitors including members of the serine protease of Kazal-type (SPINK) family. Recently, we discovered that SPINK6 is expressed in human skin and inhibits KLK5, KLK7, KLK14 but not KLK8. In this study we tested whether SPINK6 inhibits other members of the KLK family and caspase-14. Using chromogenic substrates, SPINK6 exhibited inhibitory activity against KLK12 and KLK13 with K(i) around 1nM, KLK4 with K(i)=27.3nM, KLK6 with K(i)=140nM, caspase-14 with a K(i) approximating 1μM and no activity against KLK1, KLK3 and KLK11. Taken together, SPINK6 is a potent inhibitor of distinct KLKs members. PMID:21439340

  7. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Regulation of SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jixin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is a ubiquitously expressed protease that regulates diverse number of physiological functions. As a dipeptidase, it exerts its catalytic effects on proteins/peptides with proline, alanine, or serine in the penultimate (P1) amino acid residue from the amino terminus. The evidence to date supports an important effect of DPP4 in catalytic cleavage of incretin peptides and this perhaps represents the main mechanism by which DPP4 inhibition improves glycemic control. DPP4 also plays an important role in the degradation of multiple chemokines of which stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, also known as CXCL12) is perhaps an increasingly recognized target, given its importance in processes, such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and stem cell homing. In the current review, we will summarize the importance of DPP4-mediated enzymatic processing of cytokines/chemokines with an emphasis on SDF-1 and resultant implications for cardiovascular physiology and disease. PMID:26441982

  8. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  10. Differential Inhibition of Signal Peptide Peptidase Family Members by Established γ-Secretase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yong; Ladd, Gabriela Z.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jung, Joo In; Greenbaum, Doron; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Golde, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    The signal peptide peptidases (SPPs) are biomedically important proteases implicated as therapeutic targets for hepatitis C (human SPP, (hSPP)), plasmodium (Plasmodium SPP (pSPP)), and B-cell immunomodulation and neoplasia (signal peptide peptidase like 2a, (SPPL2a)). To date, no drug-like, selective inhibitors have been reported. We use a recombinant substrate based on the amino-terminus of BRI2 fused to amyloid β 1-25 (Aβ1-25) (FBA) to develop facile, cost-effective SPP/SPPL protease assays. Co-transfection of expression plasmids expressing the FBA substrate with SPP/SPPLs were conducted to evaluate cleavage, which was monitored by ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation/MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry (IP/MS). No cleavage is detected in the absence of SPP/SPPL overexpression. Multiple γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and (Z-LL)2 ketone differentially inhibited SPP/SPPL activity; for example, IC50 of LY-411,575 varied from 51±79 nM (on SPPL2a) to 5499±122 nM (on SPPL2b), while Compound E showed inhibition only on hSPP with IC50 of 1465±93 nM. Data generated were predictive of effects observed for endogenous SPPL2a cleavage of CD74 in a murine B-Cell line. Thus, it is possible to differentially inhibit SPP family members. These SPP/SPPL cleavage assays will expedite the search for selective inhibitors. The data also reinforce similarities between SPP family member cleavage and cleavage catalyzed by γ-secretase. PMID:26046535

  11. Mechanisms of Intramolecular Communication in a Hyperthermophilic Acylaminoacyl Peptidase: A Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Elena; Renzetti, Giulia; Tiberti, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Protein dynamics and the underlying networks of intramolecular interactions and communicating residues within the three-dimensional (3D) structure are known to influence protein function and stability, as well as to modulate conformational changes and allostery. Acylaminoacyl peptidase (AAP) subfamily of enzymes belongs to a unique class of serine proteases, the prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) family, which has not been thoroughly investigated yet. POPs have a characteristic multidomain three-dimensional architecture with the active site at the interface of the C-terminal catalytic domain and a β-propeller domain, whose N-terminal region acts as a bridge to the hydrolase domain. In the present contribution, protein dynamics signatures of a hyperthermophilic acylaminoacyl peptidase (AAP) of the prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) family, as well as of a deletion variant and alanine mutants (I12A, V13A, V16A, L19A, I20A) are reported. In particular, we aimed at identifying crucial residues for long range communications to the catalytic site or promoting the conformational changes to switch from closed to open ApAAP conformations. Our investigation shows that the N-terminal α1-helix mediates structural intramolecular communication to the catalytic site, concurring to the maintenance of a proper functional architecture of the catalytic triad. Main determinants of the effects induced by α1-helix are a subset of hydrophobic residues (V16, L19 and I20). Moreover, a subset of residues characterized by relevant interaction networks or coupled motions have been identified, which are likely to modulate the conformational properties at the interdomain interface. PMID:22558199

  12. Gene Pyramiding of Peptidase Inhibitors Enhances Plant Resistance to the Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Maria Estrella; Cambra, Inés; Martinez, Manuel; Pozancos, Clara; González-Melendi, Pablo; Grbic, Vojislava; Castañera, Pedro; Ortego, Felix; Diaz, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a damaging pest worldwide with a wide range of host plants and an extreme record of pesticide resistance. Recently, the complete T. urticae genome has been published and showed a proliferation of gene families associated with digestion and detoxification of plant secondary compounds which supports its polyphagous behaviour. To overcome spider mite adaptability a gene pyramiding approach has been developed by co-expressing two barley proteases inhibitors, the cystatin Icy6 and the trypsin inhibitor Itr1 genes in Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The presence and expression of both transgenes was studied by conventional and quantitative real time RT-PCR assays and by indirect ELISA assays. The inhibitory activity of cystatin and trypsin inhibitor was in vitro analysed using specific substrates. Single and double transformants were used to assess the effects of spider mite infestation. Double transformed lines showed the lowest damaged leaf area in comparison to single transformants and non-transformed controls and different accumulation of H2O2 as defence response in the leaf feeding site, detected by diaminobenzidine staining. Additionally, an impact on endogenous mite cathepsin B- and L-like activities was observed after feeding on Arabidopsis lines, which correlates with a significant increase in the mortality of mites fed on transformed plants. These effects were analysed in view of the expression levels of the target mite protease genes, C1A cysteine peptidase and S1 serine peptidase, identified in the four developmental mite stages (embryo, larvae, nymphs and adults) performed using the RNA-seq information available at the BOGAS T. urticae database. The potential of pyramiding different classes of plant protease inhibitors to prevent plant damage caused by mites as a new tool to prevent pest resistance and to improve pest control is discussed. PMID:22900081

  13. Colorimetrical rate assay for urinary dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity using a new substrate.

    PubMed

    Shibuya-Saruta, H; Sugiyama, M; Kasahara, Y

    1995-01-01

    We synthesized a new substrate glycyl-L-proline 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxyanilide (Gly-Pro-DBAP), for dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). Its hydrolysis by DPPIV resulted in the formation of a chromophore, 2,6-dibromophenol-indo-p-xylenol, and its maximal absorption wavelength (600 nm) was longer than that of p-nitroaniline (415 nm) released from conventional substrate, glycyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide (Gly-Pro-pNA). We also established the rate assay for urinary DPPIV activity using Gly-Pro-DBAP. The optimum pH was between 8.5 and 9.0. The apparent Km was 1.1 mmol/1. The detectable range was 2.5-350 U/l. No changes in blank values occurred throughout the enzyme reaction in the optimum pH. Its value was also much lower than Gly-Pro-pNA. CVs for within-run and between-run were 1.1% (n = 10) and 3.0% (n = 10), respectively. Among tested peptidases, only DPPIV could hydrolyze Gly-Pro-DBAP. Among the protease inhibitors, only two, diprotin-A and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSA), could inhibit DPPIV activity. The present method did not interfere with urinary ingredients such as hemoglobin. The correlation between the present (y) and conventional (x) methods is presented by the equation y = 1.121x + 0.096 (r = 0.993). Thus the present method provides practical advantages over the conventional method for routine laboratory use. PMID:7714663

  14. NAAG peptidase as a therapeutic target: Potential for regulating the link between glucose metabolism and cognition.

    PubMed

    Baslow, Morris H

    2006-04-01

    There is a new class of CNS drugs, N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) peptidase inhibitors, that can affect a two-step, neuron-astrocyte/astrocyte-vascular endothelium, signaling mechanism. Using this homeostatic mechanism, activated neurons continuously interact with the vascular system to indicate ongoing requirements for supplies of glucose (Glc) and oxygen needed to maintain cognitive functions. These new drugs impact the first step by inhibiting NAAG peptidase, located on the astrocyte surface, that cleaves glutamate (Glu) from the neuropeptide NAAG after it has docked with the astrocyte surface metabotropic Glu receptor 3 (mGluR3). As a result, this interferes with initiation of the second step, the astrocyte-vascular endothelium signal, activation of which results in a rapid hyperemic response that increases focal availability of energy supplies. Since NAAG is liberated upon each neuron depolarization, its release is linked to the level of neuronal spiking. This insures that its mGluR3 signal function reflects current levels of neuronal stimulation, so that Glc and oxygen can be supplied in a timely manner for metabolic replacement of ATP stocks depleted during the repolarization process. The metabolism of NAAG is very complex, being a component of the only metabolic sequence in the brain requiring three major brain cell types--neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes--for its successful completion. In this review, we describe the unique NAAG tricellular metabolic cycle and survey some reported actions of these new and novel drugs. We also consider their probable site and mode of action and speculate upon their therapeutic potential. PMID:16804566

  15. Nonspecific collagenolytic activity of the femoral bone in immobilized rat extremities.

    PubMed

    Prokopová, D; Tesárek, B; Susta, A

    1975-01-01

    Nonspecific collagenolytic activity was studied in rat bones after immobilization. The left hind limb was immobilized by sectioning the sciatic nerve. Enzyme activity was determined by using synthetic pentapeptide substrate (Pz-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-D-Arg). After immobilization the activity of nonspecific collagenase increased and reached its maximum on the third day after the operation. The activity was decreased after one week and attained levels of control bones three weeks after sciatic nerve section. PMID:167392

  16. Optimal Redundancy Management in Reconfigurable Control Systems Based on Normalized Nonspecificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N.Eva; Klir, George J.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the notion of normalized nonspecificity is introduced. The nonspecifity measures the uncertainty of the estimated parameters that reflect impairment in a controlled system. Based on this notion, a quantity called a reconfiguration coverage is calculated. It represents the likelihood of success of a control reconfiguration action. This coverage links the overall system reliability to the achievable and required control, as well as diagnostic performance. The coverage, when calculated on-line, is used for managing the redundancy in the system.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of bicyclo[3.3.0] octane derivatives as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tang Peng; Gang, Lin Zhi; Long, Yang Fang; Yang, Wang; Qian, Wang; Lei, Zhang; Jing, Luo Jing; Ying, Feng; Ke, Yan Pang; Ying, Leng; Jun, Feng

    2010-06-15

    A series of novel bicyclo[3.3.0]octane derivatives have been synthesized and found to be dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. Compounds 10a and 10b demonstrate good efficacies in oral glucose tolerance tests. PMID:20488704

  18. Peptidase-1 expression in some organs of the salamander Pleurodeles waltl submitted to a 12-day space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautz, A.; Rudolf, E.; Mitashov, V.; Dournon, C.

    In Pleurodeles, the peptidase-1 is a sex-linked enzyme encoded by two codominant genes (Pep-1A and Pep-1B) located on the Z and W sex chromosomes. The sexual genotype can be determined by the electrophoretic pattern of the peptidase from erythrocytes. A_AW_B genotypic females characterized by 3 electrophoretic bands AA, AB and BB were embarked on Cosmos 2229. The pattern in ovary, muscles and gut issued from the embarked or synchrone females displayed the 3 characteristic bands. In heart and kidney, the bands AA and BB were revealed, while the band BB appeared very fainly. The specific enzymatic activity in the same organs was compared. Except for the kidney, no statistical significant difference was observed between flight and synchrone samples. This enzyme can be efficiently used as sexual genotypic marker of Pleurodeles experimentally submitted to the effects of space environment.

  19. Structure and Mechanism of Cysteine Peptidase Gingipain K (Kgp), a Major Virulence Factor of Porphyromonas gingivalis in Periodontitis*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Veillard, Florian; Sztukowska, Maryta N.; Guevara, Tibisay; Potempa, Barbara; Pomowski, Anja; Huntington, James A.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine peptidases are key proteolytic virulence factors of the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, which causes chronic periodontitis, the most prevalent dysbiosis-driven disease in humans. Two peptidases, gingipain K (Kgp) and R (RgpA and RgpB), which differ in their selectivity after lysines and arginines, respectively, collectively account for 85% of the extracellular proteolytic activity of P. gingivalis at the site of infection. Therefore, they are promising targets for the design of specific inhibitors. Although the structure of the catalytic domain of RgpB is known, little is known about Kgp, which shares only 27% sequence identity. We report the high resolution crystal structure of a competent fragment of Kgp encompassing the catalytic cysteine peptidase domain and a downstream immunoglobulin superfamily-like domain, which is required for folding and secretion of Kgp in vivo. The structure, which strikingly resembles a tooth, was serendipitously trapped with a fragment of a covalent inhibitor targeting the catalytic cysteine. This provided accurate insight into the active site and suggested that catalysis may require a catalytic triad, Cys477-His444-Asp388, rather than the cysteine-histidine dyad normally found in cysteine peptidases. In addition, a 20-Å-long solvent-filled interior channel traverses the molecule and links the bottom of the specificity pocket with the molecular surface opposite the active site cleft. This channel, absent in RgpB, may enhance the plasticity of the enzyme, which would explain the much lower activity in vitro toward comparable specific synthetic substrates. Overall, the present results report the architecture and molecular determinants of the working mechanism of Kgp, including interaction with its substrates. PMID:25266723

  20. Beneficial Effects of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors on Fonsecaea pedrosoi: Promising Compounds to Arrest Key Fungal Biological Processes and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Palmeira, Vanila F.; Kneipp, Lucimar F.; Rozental, Sonia; Alviano, Celuta S.; Santos, André L. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Fonsecaea pedrosoi is the principal etiologic agent of chromoblastomycosis, a fungal disease whose pathogenic events are poorly understood. Current therapy for chromoblastomycosis is suboptimal due to toxicity of the available therapeutic agents and the emergence of drug resistance. Compounding these problems is the fact that endemic countries and regions are economically poor. Purpose and Principal Findings In the present work, we have investigated the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) peptidase inhibitors (PIs) on the F. pedrosoi conidial secreted peptidase, growth, ultrastructure and interaction with different mammalian cells. All the PIs impaired the acidic conidial-derived peptidase activity in a dose-dependent fashion, in which nelfinavir produced the best inhibitory effect. F. pedrosoi growth was also significantly reduced upon exposure to PIs, especially nelfinavir and saquinavir. PIs treatment caused profound changes in the conidial ultrastructure as shown by transmission electron microscopy, including invaginations in the cytoplasmic membrane, disorder and detachment of the cell wall, enlargement of fungi cytoplasmic vacuoles, and abnormal cell division. The synergistic action on growth ability between nelfinavir and amphotericin B, when both were used at sub-inhibitory concentrations, was also observed. PIs reduced the adhesion and endocytic indexes during the interaction between conidia and epithelial cells (CHO), fibroblasts or macrophages, in a cell type-dependent manner. Moreover, PIs interfered with the conidia into mycelia transformation when in contact with CHO and with the susceptibility killing by macrophage cells. Conclusions/Significance Overall, by providing the first evidence that HIV PIs directly affects F. pedrosoi development and virulence, these data add new insights on the wide-spectrum efficacy of HIV PIs, further arguing for the potential chemotherapeutic targets for aspartyl-type peptidase produced by this human

  1. Plasma native and peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin responses to restraint stress in rats. Adaptation to repeated restraint.

    PubMed Central

    Pierzchala, K; Van Loon, G R

    1990-01-01

    Met-enkephalin and related proenkephalin A-derived peptides circulate in plasma at picomolar concentration as free, native pentapeptide and at nanomolar concentration in cryptic forms. We have optimized conditions for measurement of immunoreactive Met-enkephalin in plasma and for generation by trypsin and carboxypeptidase B of much greater amounts of total peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin in plasma of rats, dogs, and humans. Free Met-enkephalin (11 pM) is constituted by native pentapeptide and its sulfoxide. Characterization of plasma total Met-enkephalin derived by peptidic hydrolysis revealed a small amount (38 pM) of Met-enkephalin associated with peptides of molecular mass less than 30,000 D, and probably derived from proenkephalin A, but much larger amounts of Met-enkephalin associated with albumin (1.2 nM) and with a globulin-sized protein (2.8 nM). Thus, plasma protein precursors for peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin differ structurally and chemically from proenkephalin A. Met-enkephalin generated from plasma by peptidic hydrolysis showed naloxone-reversible bioactivity comparable to synthetic Met-enkephalin. Prolonged exposure of adult, male rats to restraint stress produced biphasic plasma responses, with peaks occurring at 30 s and 30 min in both free native and total peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin. Repeated daily exposure to this 30-min stress resulted in adaptive loss of responses of both forms to acute restraint. Initial plasma responses of Met-enkephalin paralleled those of epinephrine and norepinephrine, but subsequently showed divergence of response. In conclusion, Met-enkephalin circulates in several forms, some of which may be derived from proteins other than proenkephalin A, and plasma levels of both free native, and peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin are modulated physiologically. PMID:2312729

  2. Structural and mutational analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis reveal the molecular basis for strict substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) belongs to the S46 family of serine peptidases and preferentially cleaves substrates with Asp/Glu at the P1 position. The molecular mechanism underlying the substrate specificity of PgDPP11, however, is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of PgDPP11. The enzyme contains a catalytic domain with a typical double β-barrel fold and a recently identified regulatory α-helical domain. Crystal structure analyses, docking studies, and biochemical studies revealed that the side chain of Arg673 in the S1 subsite is essential for recognition of the Asp/Glu side chain at the P1 position of the bound substrate. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals and the Arg673 is conserved among DPP11s, we anticipate that DPP11s could be utilised as targets for antibiotics. In addition, the present structure analyses could be useful templates for the design of specific inhibitors of DPP11s from pathogenic organisms. PMID:26057589

  3. Reduction of food intake by central administration of cholecystokinin octapeptide in the rat is dependent upon inhibition of brain peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Griesbacher, T.; Leighton, G. E.; Hill, R. G.; Hughes, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8) and caerulein, an amphibian decapeptide structurally related to CCK-8, are inconsistent in the rat. We have therefore investigated the possibility that enzymatic degradation could be responsible for the lack of activity of CCK-8 seen in some studies on food intake. 2. Injections of CCK-8 at doses of 2.5 nmol and 25 nmol into the lateral cerebral ventricle of rats did not reduce the intake of a highly palatable diet whereas injections of the same doses of caerulein reduced food intake potently and dose-dependently. 3. Co-administration of CCK-8 with a combination of the peptidase inhibitors bestatin (70 nmol), captopril (100 nmol) and thiorphan (120 nmol) resulted in an inhibition of feeding similar to that seen after the injection of caerulein alone. The peptidase inhibitors alone did not affect food intake. 4. When caerulein was injected i.c.v. in combination with bestatin, captopril and thiorphan the effect of caerulein was potentiated, suggesting that enzymatic breakdown of caerulein does occur. 5. It is concluded that the effect of centrally administered CCK-8 on food intake is dependent on the activity of cleaving enzymes in the brain. It is emphasized that the action of brain peptidases is a major factor which has to be considered when investigating the role of peptides in the central nervous system. PMID:2647203

  4. Dopamine D3 receptor inhibits the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 to promote NHE3 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Armando, Ines; Villar, Van Anthony M.; Jones, John E.; Lee, Hewang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Asico, Laureano D.; Yu, Peiying; Yang, Jian; Escano, Crisanto S.; Pascua-Crusan, Annabelle M.; Felder, Robin A.; Jose, Pedro A.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) is crucial in the regulation of blood pressure and sodium balance, in that Drd3 gene ablation in mice results in hypertension and failure to excrete a dietary salt load. The mechanism responsible for the renal sodium retention in these mice is largely unknown. We now offer and describe a novel mechanism by which D3R decreases sodium transport in the long term by inhibiting the deubiquitinylating activity of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 (USP48), thereby promoting Na+-H+ exchanger (NHE)-3 degradation. We found that stimulation with the D3R-specific agonist PD128907 (1 μM, 30 min) promoted the interaction and colocalization among D3R, NHE3, and USP48; inhibited USP48 activity (−35±6%, vs. vehicle), resulting in increased ubiquitinylated NHE3 (+140±10%); and decreased NHE3 expression (−50±9%) in human renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTCs). USP48 silencing decreased NHE3's half-life (USP48 siRNA t1/2=6.1 h vs. vehicle t1/2=12.9 h), whereas overexpression of USP48 increased NHE3 half-life (t1/2=21.8 h), indicating that USP48 protects NHE3 from degradation via deubiquitinylation. USP48 accounted for ∼30% of the total deubiquitinylating activity in these cells. Extending our studies in vivo, we found that pharmacologic blockade of D3R via the D3R-specific antagonist GR103691 (1 μg/kg/min, 4 d) in C57Bl/6J mice increased renal NHE3 expression (+310±15%, vs. vehicle), whereas an innovative kidney-restricted Usp48 silencing via siRNA (3 μg/d, 7 d) increased ubiquitinylated NHE3 (+250±30%, vs. controls), decreased total NHE3 (−23±2%), and lowered blood pressure (−24±2 mm Hg), compared with that in control mice that received either the vehicle or nonsilencing siRNA. Our data demonstrate a crucial role for the dynamic interaction between D3R and USP48 in the regulation of NHE3 expression and function.—Armando, I., Villar, V. A. M., Jones J. E., Lee, H., Wang, X., Asico L. D., Yu, P., Yang, J., Escano, C. S. Jr., Pascua

  5. Identification and characterization of a cathepsin-L-like peptidase in Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renqiang; Ma, Xueting; Liu, Aijun; Zhang, Lei; Cai, Jianping; Wang, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Avian coccidiosis, caused by Eimeria spp., is one of the major parasitic diseases in birds. Cysteine protease is a major virulence factor in parasitic protozoa, and it may be a suitable chemotherapeutic target and vaccine candidate molecule. A 100 amino acid (aa.) partial sequence of cathepsin L, which is a cysteine protease, was reported by Katrib et al. (Ac. No. CDJ41293) (2012). A 219 aa. sequence was reported by Reid et al. (Ac. No. AFV92863) (2013). However, the open reading frame (ORF) was not reported. In this study, a full sequence of a cathepsin-L-like peptidase in Eimeria tenella (EtcatL) was obtained and its biochemical characterizations and expression profiles were analyzed across different stages of the parasite's life cycle. Results showed that the EtcatL gene encodes a protein 470 aa. in length, with 47 and 49% identity to Toxoplasma gondii and Eimeria acervulina. Considering the close phylogenetic relationship, TgcatL (PDB. ID 3F75) was selected for use as a template for homology modeling with quality factors of 90.9. Gelatin SDS-PAGE showed it to exert protease activity at ≈38 and ≈26 kDa. Further analysis showed the kinetic parameters of the recombinant peptidase to be K m  = 8.9 μM and V max = 5.7 RFU/s μM at pH 5.5 containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) in the reaction matrix, and the IC50 value of E64 was 65.32 ± 3.02 nM. The recombinant protein was active from 25 to 50 °C, with optimal activity at 42 °C. The RT-PCR and Western blot results showed it to be expressed mainly at the endogenous stages and the initial phase of the sporulation. The protective experiment showed that chickens immunized with 100 and 200 μg rEtcatL had reduction of weight loss values 48.7 and 57.9% those of infected controls, respectively. Their reduction of lesion scores (RLS) were 25.0 and 47.2% that of control chickens, and relative oocyst production (ROP) was 39.6 and 15.5% that of control chickens. These results indicate that the EtcatL can be

  6. Self-harm to preferentially harm the pathogens within: non-specific stressors in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, Edmund K; Day, Judy D

    2016-04-13

    Therapies with increasing specificity against pathogens follow the immune system's evolutionary course in maximizing host defence while minimizing self-harm. Nevertheless, even completely non-specific stressors, such as reactive molecular species, heat, nutrient and oxygen deprivation, and acidity can be used to preferentially harm pathogens. Strategic use of non-specific stressors requires exploiting differences in stress vulnerability between pathogens and hosts. Two basic vulnerabilities of pathogens are: (i) the inherent vulnerability to stress of growth and replication (more immediately crucial for pathogens than for host cells) and (ii) the degree of pathogen localization, permitting the host's use of locally and regionally intense stress. Each of the various types of non-specific stressors is present during severe infections at all levels of localization: (i) ultra-locally within phagolysosomes, (ii) locally at the infected site, (iii) regionally around the infected site and (iv) systemically as part of the acute-phase response. We propose that hosts strategically use a coordinated system of non-specific stressors at local, regional and systemic levels to preferentially harm the pathogens within. With the rising concern over emergence of resistance to specific therapies, we suggest more scrutiny of strategies using less specific therapies in pathogen control. Hosts' active use of multiple non-specific stressors is likely an evolutionarily basic defence whose retention underlies and supplements the well-recognized immune defences that directly target pathogens. PMID:27075254

  7. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.; Simmons, J.T.; Brenner, M.; Gill, V.J.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S.; Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H.

    1987-07-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause.

  8. Self-harm to preferentially harm the pathogens within: non-specific stressors in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Therapies with increasing specificity against pathogens follow the immune system's evolutionary course in maximizing host defence while minimizing self-harm. Nevertheless, even completely non-specific stressors, such as reactive molecular species, heat, nutrient and oxygen deprivation, and acidity can be used to preferentially harm pathogens. Strategic use of non-specific stressors requires exploiting differences in stress vulnerability between pathogens and hosts. Two basic vulnerabilities of pathogens are: (i) the inherent vulnerability to stress of growth and replication (more immediately crucial for pathogens than for host cells) and (ii) the degree of pathogen localization, permitting the host's use of locally and regionally intense stress. Each of the various types of non-specific stressors is present during severe infections at all levels of localization: (i) ultra-locally within phagolysosomes, (ii) locally at the infected site, (iii) regionally around the infected site and (iv) systemically as part of the acute-phase response. We propose that hosts strategically use a coordinated system of non-specific stressors at local, regional and systemic levels to preferentially harm the pathogens within. With the rising concern over emergence of resistance to specific therapies, we suggest more scrutiny of strategies using less specific therapies in pathogen control. Hosts' active use of multiple non-specific stressors is likely an evolutionarily basic defence whose retention underlies and supplements the well-recognized immune defences that directly target pathogens. PMID:27075254

  9. Microbe-dependent and nonspecific effects of procedures to eliminate the resident microbiota from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Emma V; Wong, Adam C N; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-05-01

    Comparisons of animals bearing and lacking microorganisms can offer valuable insight into the interactions between animal hosts and their resident microbiota. Most hosts are naturally infected, and therefore, these comparisons require specific procedures (e.g., antibiotic treatment or physical exclusion of microorganisms) to disrupt the microbiota, but the potential for confounding nonspecific effects of the procedure on the traits of the host exists. Microbe-dependent and nonspecific effects can be discriminated by using multiple procedures: microbe-dependent effects are evident in hosts made microbe free by different procedures, but nonspecific effects are unique to individual procedures. As a demonstration, two procedures, oral administration of chlortetracycline (50 μg ml(-1) diet) and microbiota removal by egg dechorionation, were applied to Drosophila melanogaster in a 2-by-2 factorial design. Microorganisms were undetectable in flies from dechorionated eggs and reduced by >99% in chlortetracycline-treated flies. Drosophila flies subjected to both protocols displayed an extended preadult development time, suggesting that the microbiota promotes the development rate. Female chlortetracycline-treated flies, whether from untreated or dechorionated eggs, displayed reduced protein content and egg fecundity, which could be attributed to the nonspecific effect of the antibiotic. We recommend that procedures used to disrupt the microbiota of animals should be selected, following systematic analysis of alternative mechanistically distinct procedures, on the basis of two criteria: those that achieve the greatest reduction (ideally, elimination) of the microbiota and those that achieve minimal nonspecific effects. PMID:23475620

  10. The Stimulation by Endotoxin of the Nonspecific Resistance of Mice to Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hill, A. W.; Hibbitt, K. G.; Shears, A.

    1974-01-01

    The nonspecific resistance of mice to challenge was enhanced following the administration of an E. coli O55 B5 endotoxin. Although the route of administration of the endotoxin and the challenge organism were varied, the nonspecific resistance of the animal was enhanced in all the experiments. The efficiency of this resistance was highest when the inducing substance and the challenge dose of bacteria were administered intraperitoneally. Poly I: C and double stranded RNA were also studied but were much less effective than endotoxin in stimulating a resistance to infection. Stimulation of the fixed macrophages could not explain fully the enhanced resistance, since the clearance rates of colloidal carbon and radioactively labelled bacteria from the blood were not significantly enhanced after the administration of endotoxin. Furthermore, splenectomized animals, and animals injected with agents which interfere with the RES activity, trypan blue and corticosteroids, still developed a degree of nonspecific resistance to infection. PMID:4599349

  11. Tuneable surface shear forces to physically displace nonspecific molecules in protein biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Rauf, Sakandar; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2014-11-15

    We report a simple method to remove nonspecifically adsorbed species from sensor surface and also improve the detection sensitivity of the sensor using tuneable alternating current (ac) electrohydrodynamics (ac-EHD) forces. These forces generated within few nanometers of an electrode surface (i.e., double layer) engender fluid flow within a serpentine channel containing a long array of the asymmetric electrode pairs, and can easily be tuned externally by changing the frequency and amplitude of the ac-EHD field. Under the optimized experimental conditions, we achieved a 3.5-fold reduction in nonspecific adsorption of non-target proteins with a 1000-fold enhancement in detection sensitivity of the device for the analysis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein spiked in serum. This approach can be applicable in diverse fields including biosensors, cellular and molecular separation systems and biomedical applications to remove/reduce nonspecific adsorption of molecular and cellular species. PMID:24880656

  12. Characterization of a cellular immunostimulating peptide from a soybean protein fraction digested with peptidase R.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Shintaro; Otani, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    An immunostimulating glutamine-rich peptide was purified from a soybean protein fraction digested with Peptidase R produced by Rhizopus oryzae (Ro-digest) by a combination of SP-Sepharose column chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified peptide was supposed to be located at or near the glutamine-rich region 202 to 222 of the glycinin G4 subunit. The peptide significantly increased the number of CD8(+), CD11b(+), and CD49b(+) cells in C3H/HeN mouse spleen cell cultures, while 2 chemically synthesized glutamine-rich peptides corresponding to residues 202 to 213 (QQQQQQKSHGGR) and residues 214 to 225 (KQGQHQQEEEEE) of the glycinin G4 subunit increased the number of interleukin (IL)-12(+)CD11b(+) cells. The peptide 202-213 also significantly increased the number of CD49b(+), IL-2(+)CD4(+), and interferon-gamma(+)CD4(+) cells and stimulated the cytotoxic activity of spleen cells toward the human erythroleukemia cell line K562. These results indicate that the glutamine-rich region of the soybean glycinin G4 subunit stimulates the cellular immune system in mouse spleen cell cultures. PMID:19926930

  13. Isolation and characterisation of dipeptidyl peptidase IV from Prevotella loescheii ATCC 15930.

    PubMed

    Koreeda, Y; Hayakawa, M; Ikemi, T; Abiko, Y

    2001-08-01

    A proline-specific dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5), was purified from a cell sonicate soluble fraction of Prevotella loescheii ATCC 15930 by sequential column chromatography. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was estimated as 160 kDa by high-pressure liquid gel filtration column chromatography and unheated sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The subunit molecular mass was 80 kDa when the enzyme was heated to 100 degrees C in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol before SDS-PAGE, suggesting that the native enzyme consists of two identical subunits and is folded in 2% SDS. The optimum pH, with glycyl-prolyl-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide as the substrate, was 8.0; the isoelectric point was 5.2. Purified enzyme showed a strong preference for dipeptide substrates containing proline and, less efficiently, alanine in the P1 position. The enzyme was markedly inhibited by Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Co(2+), and serine proteinase inhibitor di-isopropylfluorophosphate. PMID:11389867

  14. Prognostic significance of human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases 6 and 10 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolin, David L; Sy, Keiyan; Rotondo, Fabio; Bassily, Mena N; Kovacs, Kalman; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Streutker, Catherine J; Yousef, George M

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of patients following surgery for gastric cancer is often poor and is estimated using traditional clinicopathological parameters, which can be inaccurate predictors of future survival. Kallikreins are a group of serine proteases, which are differentially expressed in many human tumors and are being investigated as potential cancer biomarkers. This study assessed the prognostic utility of human tissue kallikrein-like peptidases 6 and 10 (KLK6 and KLK10) and correlated their expression with histopathological and clinical parameters in gastric cancer. We constructed a gastric tumor tissue microarray from 113 gastrectomy specimens and quantified KLK6 and KLK10 expression using immunohistochemistry. To overcome the problem of inter-observer variability and subjectivity in immunohistochemistry interpretation, a whole-slide scanned image of the tissue microarray was analyzed using an automated algorithm to quantify staining intensity. KLK6 expression was positively correlated with nodal involvement (p=0.002) and was predictive of advanced-stage disease (p<0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that tumors expressing high levels of KLK6 were significantly associated with significantly lower overall survival (p=0.04). KLK10 overexpression was also a predictor of advanced-stage disease (p<0.01), but was not significantly correlated with lymph node involvement or survival period. Our results show the potential ability of KLK6 as a prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:25153389

  15. Substrate complexes of human dipeptidyl peptidase III reveal the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Reithofer, Viktoria; Reisinger, Manuel; Wallner, Silvia; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (hDPP III) is a zinc-dependent hydrolase cleaving dipeptides off the N-termini of various bioactive peptides. Thus, the enzyme is likely involved in a number of physiological processes such as nociception and is also implicated in several forms of cancer. We present high-resolution crystal structures of hDPP III in complex with opioid peptides (Met-and Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2) as well as with angiotensin-II and the peptide inhibitor IVYPW. These structures confirm the previously reported large conformational change of the enzyme upon ligand binding and show that the structure of the closed conformation is independent of the nature of the bound peptide. The overall peptide-binding mode is also conserved ensuring the correct positioning of the scissile peptide bond with respect to the catalytic zinc ion. The structure of the angiotensin-II complex shows, how longer peptides are accommodated in the binding cleft of hDPP III. Differences in the binding modes allow a distinction between real substrates and inhibitory peptides or “slow” substrates. The latter displace a zinc bound water molecule necessitating the energetically much less favoured anhydride mechanism as opposed to the favoured promoted-water mechanism. The structural data also form the necessary framework for the design of specific hDPP III inhibitors. PMID:27025154

  16. Novel Therapeutic Role for Dipeptidyl Peptidase III in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoling; Shimizu, Akio; Kurita, Souichi; Zankov, Dimitar P; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Ishida, Tetsuo; Ogita, Hisakazu

    2016-09-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) cleaves dipeptide residues from the N terminus of polypeptides ranging from 3 to 10 amino acids in length and is implicated in pathophysiological processes through the breakdown of certain oligopeptides or their fragments. In this study, we newly identified the biochemical properties of DPP III for angiotensin II (Ang II), which consists of 8 amino acids. DPP III quickly and effectively digested Ang II with Km = 3.7×10(-6) mol/L. In the in vivo experiments, DPP III remarkably reduced blood pressure in Ang II-infused hypertensive mice without alteration of heart rate. DPP III did not affect hemodynamics in noradrenalin-induced hypertensive mice or normotensive mice, suggesting specificity for Ang II. When DPP III was intravenously injected every other day for 4 weeks after Ang II osmotic minipump implantation in mice, Ang II-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy were significantly attenuated. This DPP III effect was at least similar to that caused by an angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan. Furthermore, administration of DPP III dramatically reduced the increase in urine albumin excretion and kidney injury and inflammation markers caused by Ang II infusion. Both DPP III and candesartan administration showed slight additive inhibition in the albumin excretion. These results reveal a novel potential use of DPP III in the treatment of hypertension and its protective effects on hypertension-sensitive organs, such as the heart and kidneys. PMID:27456521

  17. Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 Inhibition: Linking Metabolic Control to Cardiovascular Protection

    PubMed Central

    Avogaro, Angelo; de Kreutzenberg, Saula; Fadini, Gianpaolo

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidases 4 (DPP4) inhibitors are a new class of oral anti-hyperglycemic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). They are also called “incretins” because they act by inhibiting the degradation of endogenous incretin hormones, in particular GLP-1, that mediates their main metabolic effects. DPP4 is an ubiquitous protease that regulates not only glucose and lipid metabolism, but also exhibits several systemic effects at different site levels. DPP4 inhibition improves endothelial function, reduces the pro-oxidative and the pro-inflammatory state, and exerts renal effects. These actions are mediated by different DPP4 ligands, such as cytokines, growth factors, neuotransmitters etc. Clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that DPP4 inhibitors are efficient in protecting cardiac, renal and vascular systems, through antiatherosclerotic and vasculoprotective mechanisms. For these reasons DDP4 inhibitors are thought to be “cardiovascular protective” as well as anti-diabetic drugs. Clinical trials aimed to demonstrate the efficacy of DPP4 inhibitors in reducing cardiovascular events, independent of their anti-hyperglycemic action, are ongoing. These trials will also give necessary information on their safety. PMID:23844811

  18. Kallikrein-related Peptidase 5 Functions in Proteolytic Processing of Profilaggrin in Cultured Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Mami; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Motoyama, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Ito, Taisuke; Kabashima, Kenji; Hibino, Toshihiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Filaggrin protein is synthesized in the stratum granulosum of the skin and contributes to the formation of the human skin barrier. Profilaggrin is cleaved by proteolytic enzymes and converted to functional filaggrin, but its processing mechanism remains not fully elucidated. Kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5) is a major serine protease found in the skin, which is secreted from lamellar granules following its expression in the stratum granulosum and activated in the extracellular space of the stratum corneum. Here, we searched for profilaggrin-processing protease(s) by partial purification of epidermal extracts and found KLK5 as a possible candidate. We used high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to show that KLK5 cleaves profilaggrin. Furthermore, based on a proximity ligation assay, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy analysis, we reveal that KLK5 and profilaggrin co-localize in the stratum granulosum in human epidermis. KLK5 knockdown in normal cultured human epidermal keratinocytes resulted in higher levels of profilaggrin, indicating that KLK5 potentially functions in profilaggrin cleavage. PMID:23629652

  19. Involvement of dipeptidyl peptidase IV in an in vivo immune response.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Flentke, G R; Bachovchin, W W; Stollar, B D

    1992-08-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV) is a serine protease that selectively cleaves X-Pro dipeptides from polypeptides and proteins. Among blood cells, this enzyme occurs preferentially on the surface of CD4+ T cells and the amount of enzyme activity increases with T cell activation. In previous work, two potent and specific peptidyl-boronic acid inhibitors of DP IV, Ala-boroPro and Pro-boroPro, were synthesized and Pro-boroPro was shown to suppress antigen-specific proliferative responses of T cells in vitro. In this study, we tested the in vivo effects of these inhibitors. Subcutaneous injection of Ala-boroPro or Pro-boroPro into BALB/c mice inhibited DP IV activity in serum and spleen cell suspensions. Repeated injections of more than 10 micrograms of Ala-boroPro or Pro-boroPro at 12 h intervals maintained in vivo DP IV activity at less than 30% of the normal level. Repeated injections of the inhibitors during the primary, secondary or tertiary immune response to bovine serum albumin (BSA) reduced anti-BSA antibody production. Without inhibitor, immunization with BSA was followed by a temporary decrease in serum DP IV activity and then by enhanced serum enzyme activity after several days. These results provide the first direct evidence that DP IV plays an important role in immune response in vivo. PMID:1353423

  20. Synthesis and characterization of constrained peptidomimetic dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors: amino-lactam boroalanines.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jack H; Wu, Wengen; Zhou, Yuhong; Maw, Hlaing H; Liu, Yuxin; Milo, Lawrence J; Poplawski, Sarah E; Henry, Gillian D; Sudmeier, James L; Sanford, David G; Bachovchin, William W

    2007-05-17

    We describe here the epimerization-free synthesis and characterization of a new class of conformationally constrained lactam aminoboronic acid inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV; E.C. 3.4.14.5). These compounds have the advantage that they cannot undergo the pH-dependent cyclization prevalent in most dipeptidyl boronic acids that attenuates their potency at physiological pH. For example, D-3-amino-1-[L-1-boronic-ethyl]-pyrrolidine-2-one (amino-D-lactam-L-boroAla), one of the best lactam inhibitors of DPP IV, is several orders of magnitude less potent than L-Ala-L-boroPro, as measured by Ki values (2.3 nM vs 30 pM, respectively). At physiological pH, however, it is actually more potent than L-Ala-L-boroPro, as measured by IC50 values (4.2 nM vs 1400 nM), owing to the absence of the potency-attenuating cyclization. In an interesting and at first sight surprising reversal of the relationship between stereochemistry and potency observed with the conformationally unrestrained Xaa-boroPro class of inhibitors, the L-L diastereomers of the lactams are orders of magnitude less effective than the D-L lactams. However, this interesting reversal and the unexpected potency of the D-L lactams as DPP IV inhibitors can be understood in structural terms, which is explained and discussed here. PMID:17458948

  1. The Mitochondrial Unfoldase-Peptidase Complex ClpXP Controls Bioenergetics Stress and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jae Ho; Rivadeneira, Dayana B; Caino, M Cecilia; Chae, Young Chan; Speicher, David W; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Vaira, Valentina; Bosari, Silvano; Palleschi, Alessandro; Rampini, Paolo; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Languino, Lucia R; Altieri, Dario C

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria must buffer the risk of proteotoxic stress to preserve bioenergetics, but the role of these mechanisms in disease is poorly understood. Using a proteomics screen, we now show that the mitochondrial unfoldase-peptidase complex ClpXP associates with the oncoprotein survivin and the respiratory chain Complex II subunit succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) in mitochondria of tumor cells. Knockdown of ClpXP subunits ClpP or ClpX induces the accumulation of misfolded SDHB, impairing oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production while activating "stress" signals of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and autophagy. Deregulated mitochondrial respiration induced by ClpXP targeting causes oxidative stress, which in turn reduces tumor cell proliferation, suppresses cell motility, and abolishes metastatic dissemination in vivo. ClpP is universally overexpressed in primary and metastatic human cancer, correlating with shortened patient survival. Therefore, tumors exploit ClpXP-directed proteostasis to maintain mitochondrial bioenergetics, buffer oxidative stress, and enable metastatic competence. This pathway may provide a "drugable" therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27389535

  2. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and fracture risk: an updated meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianying; Zhu, Jianhong; Hao, Yehua; Guo, Chongchong; Zhou, Zhikun

    2016-01-01

    Data on the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on fracture risk are conflicting. Here, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors. Electronic databases were searched for relevant published articles, and unpublished studies presented at ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for relevant clinical data. Eligible studies included prospective randomized trials evaluating DPP-4 inhibitors versus placebo or other anti-diabetic medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Study quality was determined using Jadad scores. Statistical analyses were performed to calculate the risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using fixed-effects models. There were 62 eligible RCTs with 62,206 participants, including 33,452 patients treated with DPP-4 inhibitors. The number of fractures was 364 in the exposed group and 358 in the control group. The overall risk of fracture did not differ between patients exposed to DPP-4 inhibitors and controls (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.83-1.10; P = 0.50). The results were consistent across subgroups defined by type of DPP-4 inhibitor, type of control, and length of follow-up. The study showed that DPP-4 inhibitor use does not modify the risk of bone fracture compared with placebo or other anti-diabetic medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27384445

  3. Saxagliptin: a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor ameliorates streptozotocin induced Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Gali, Chaitanya Chakravarthi; Khatwal, Rizwan Basha; Dubala, Anil; Chinni, Santhivardhan; Holsinger, R M Damian; Madhunapantula, V Subba Rao; Muthureddy Nataraj, Satish Kumar; Basavan, Duraiswamy

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is one of the major risk factors associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have found similarities in molecular mechanisms that underlie the respective degenerative developments in the two diseases. Pharmacological agents, such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which increase the level of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and ameliorate T2D, have become valuable candidates as disease modifying agents in the treatment of AD. In addition, endogenous GLP-1 levels decrease amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and tau phosphorylation in AD. The present study examines the efficacy of Saxagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor in a streptozotocin (STZ) induced rat model of AD. Three months following induction of AD by intracerebral administration of streptozotocin, animals were orally administered Saxagliptin (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg) for 60 days. The effect of the DPP-4 inhibitor on hippocampal GLP-1 levels, Aβ burden, tau phosphorylation, inflammatory markers and memory retention were evaluated. The results reveal an attenuation of Aβ, tau phosphorylation and inflammatory markers and an improvement in hippocampal GLP-1 and memory retention following treatment. This remarkable therapeutic effect of Saxagliptin mediated through DPP-4 inhibition demonstrates a unique mechanism for Aβ and tau clearance by increasing GLP-1 levels and reverses the behavioural deficits and pathology observed in AD. PMID:23603201

  4. Gliptins and their target dipeptidyl peptidase 4: implications for the treatment of vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Remm, Friederike; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Brenner, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Gliptins are accepted as a standard therapy for diabetes mellitus today. By inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), gliptins prolong the GLP1-dependent insulin secretion in the pancreatic β-cells and thus support physiological blood glucose control. Various studies have now raised hope for an additional protective effect of pharmacological DPP4 inhibition in vascular diseases. Besides GLP1, especially, the inhibition of SDF1 cleavage has been shown to depict a relevant mechanism to enhance endothelial regeneration and reduce atherosclerosis progression via the SDF1-CXCR4 axis. Furthermore, several clinical trials have now shown an excellent safety profile of gliptin therapy in cardiovascular risk patients. In this review, we give a comprehensive overview on DPP4-dependent vascular functions and pathophysiological mechanisms with a detailed discussion of the underlying molecular mechanisms. We further analyse the role of pharmacological DPP4 inhibitors and their potential therapeutic impact on endothelial function and regeneration besides their effect during atherosclerosis development. Finally, we discuss presently available data from in vitro and in vivo studies with respect to the results of the recent clinical trials in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. PMID:27533760

  5. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8+ T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127−CD28−CD57+ phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21− CD11c+ phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias. PMID:25414442

  6. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV-Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Val.) Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Ran; Chen, Xiling; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-02-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV)-inhibitory bioactivity of silver carp protein (SCP) hydrolysates were investigated, and their containing efficacious DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides were explored by in silico hydrolysis analysis, peptide separation combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identification, and chemical synthesis. SCP hydrolysates generated by six proteases all showed efficient DPP-IV-inhibitory activities, and Neutrase-generated hydrolysates had the greatest DPP-IV inhibition (IC50 of 1.12 mg/mL). In silico Neutrase hydrolysis revealed hundreds of fragments released from myosin, actin, and collagen of SCPs, which include different Pro-motif peptides but only three reported peptidic DPP-IV inhibitors with moderate or weak bioactivity. In addition, three new DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides were identified using LC-MS/MS; in particular, LPIIDI and APGPAGP showed high DPP-IV-inhibitory activity with IC50 of 105.44 and 229.14 μM, respectively, and behaved in competitive/non-competitive mixed-type DPP-IV inhibition mode. The results indicate that the SCP-derived DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides could be potential functional ingredients in the diabetic diet. PMID:26758401

  7. Rhizobial peptidase HrrP cleaves host-encoded signaling peptides and mediates symbiotic compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Tanner, Houston R.; Dillon, Brett A.; Shabab, Mohammed; Walker, Graham C.; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Legume–rhizobium pairs are often observed that produce symbiotic root nodules but fail to fix nitrogen. Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula symbiotic system, we previously described several naturally occurring accessory plasmids capable of disrupting the late stages of nodule development while enhancing bacterial proliferation within the nodule. We report here that host range restriction peptidase (hrrP), a gene found on one of these plasmids, is capable of conferring both these properties. hrrP encodes an M16A family metallopeptidase whose catalytic activity is required for these symbiotic effects. The ability of hrrP to suppress nitrogen fixation is conditioned upon the genotypes of both the host plant and the hrrP-expressing rhizobial strain, suggesting its involvement in symbiotic communication. Purified HrrP protein is capable of degrading a range of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides encoded by M. truncatula. NCR peptides are crucial signals used by M. truncatula for inducing and maintaining rhizobial differentiation within nodules, as demonstrated in the accompanying article [Horváth B, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1500777112]. The expression pattern of hrrP and its effects on rhizobial morphology are consistent with the NCR peptide cleavage model. This work points to a symbiotic dialogue involving a complex ensemble of host-derived signaling peptides and bacterial modifier enzymes capable of adjusting signal strength, sometimes with exploitative outcomes. PMID:26401024

  8. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  9. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) assembles with substrates and misfolded membrane proteins into distinct oligomeric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schrul, Bianca; Kapp, Katja; Sinning, Irmgard; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    SPP (signal peptide peptidase) is an aspartyl intramembrane cleaving protease, which processes a subset of signal peptides, and is linked to the quality control of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane proteins. We analysed SPP interactions with signal peptides and other membrane proteins by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We found that SPP interacts specifically and tightly with a large range of newly synthesized membrane proteins, including signal peptides, preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins, but not with all co-expressed type II membrane proteins. Signal peptides are trapped by the catalytically inactive SPP mutant SPPD/A. Preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins interact with both SPP and the SPPD/A mutant, and are not substrates for SPP-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. Proteins interacting with SPP are found in distinct complexes of different sizes. A signal peptide is mainly trapped in a 200 kDa SPP complex, whereas a preprotein is predominantly found in a 600 kDa SPP complex. A misfolded membrane protein is detected in 200, 400 and 600 kDa SPP complexes. We conclude that SPP not only processes signal peptides, but also collects preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins that are destined for disposal. PMID:20196774

  10. Signal peptide peptidase functions in ERAD to cleave the unfolded protein response regulator XBP1u.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-yi; Malchus, Nicole S; Hehn, Beate; Stelzer, Walter; Avci, Dönem; Langosch, Dieter; Lemberg, Marius K

    2014-11-01

    Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes intramembrane proteolysis of signal peptides at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but has also been suggested to play a role in ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we show that SPP forms a complex with the ERAD factor Derlin1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRC8 to cleave the unfolded protein response (UPR) regulator XBP1u. Cleavage occurs within a so far unrecognized type II transmembrane domain, which renders XBP1u as an SPP substrate through specific sequence features. Additionally, Derlin1 acts in the complex as a substrate receptor by recognizing the luminal tail of XBP1u. Remarkably, this interaction of Derlin1 with XBP1u obviates the need for ectodomain shedding prior to SPP cleavage, commonly required for intramembrane cuts. Furthermore, we show that XBP1u inhibits the UPR transcription factor XBP1s by targeting it toward proteasomal degradation. Thus, we identify an ERAD complex that controls the abundance of XBP1u and thereby tunes signaling through the UPR. PMID:25239945

  11. Signal peptide peptidase functions in ERAD to cleave the unfolded protein response regulator XBP1u

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-yi; Malchus, Nicole S; Hehn, Beate; Stelzer, Walter; Avci, Dönem; Langosch, Dieter; Lemberg, Marius K

    2014-01-01

    Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes intramembrane proteolysis of signal peptides at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but has also been suggested to play a role in ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we show that SPP forms a complex with the ERAD factor Derlin1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRC8 to cleave the unfolded protein response (UPR) regulator XBP1u. Cleavage occurs within a so far unrecognized type II transmembrane domain, which renders XBP1u as an SPP substrate through specific sequence features. Additionally, Derlin1 acts in the complex as a substrate receptor by recognizing the luminal tail of XBP1u. Remarkably, this interaction of Derlin1 with XBP1u obviates the need for ectodomain shedding prior to SPP cleavage, commonly required for intramembrane cuts. Furthermore, we show that XBP1u inhibits the UPR transcription factor XBP1s by targeting it toward proteasomal degradation. Thus, we identify an ERAD complex that controls the abundance of XBP1u and thereby tunes signaling through the UPR. PMID:25239945

  12. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and fracture risk: an updated meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianying; Zhu, Jianhong; Hao, Yehua; Guo, Chongchong; Zhou, Zhikun

    2016-01-01

    Data on the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on fracture risk are conflicting. Here, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors. Electronic databases were searched for relevant published articles, and unpublished studies presented at ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for relevant clinical data. Eligible studies included prospective randomized trials evaluating DPP-4 inhibitors versus placebo or other anti-diabetic medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Study quality was determined using Jadad scores. Statistical analyses were performed to calculate the risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using fixed-effects models. There were 62 eligible RCTs with 62,206 participants, including 33,452 patients treated with DPP-4 inhibitors. The number of fractures was 364 in the exposed group and 358 in the control group. The overall risk of fracture did not differ between patients exposed to DPP-4 inhibitors and controls (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.83–1.10; P = 0.50). The results were consistent across subgroups defined by type of DPP-4 inhibitor, type of control, and length of follow-up. The study showed that DPP-4 inhibitor use does not modify the risk of bone fracture compared with placebo or other anti-diabetic medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27384445

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition by Pterocarpus marsupium and Eugenia jambolana ameliorates streptozotocin induced Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Madhunapantula, Subbarao V; Chinni, Santhivardhan; Khatwal, Rizwan Basha; Dubala, Anil; Muthureddy Nataraj, Satish Kumar; Basavan, Duraiswamy

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is characterized by the loss of normal functions of brain cells and neuronal death, ultimately leading to memory loss. Recent accumulating evidences have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of anti-diabetic agents, such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), providing opportunities to explore and test the DPP-4 inhibitors for treating this fatal disease. Prior studies determining the efficacy of Pterocarpus marsupium (PM, Fabaceae) and Eugenia jambolana (EJ, Myrtaceae) extracts for ameliorating type 2 diabetes have demonstrated the DPP-4 inhibitory properties indicating the possibility of using of these extracts even for the treating AD. Therefore, in the present study, the neuroprotective roles of PM and EJ for ameliorating the streptozotocin (STZ) induced AD have been tested in rat model. Experimentally, PM and EJ extracts, at a dose range of 200 and 400mg/kg, were administered orally to STZ induced AD Wistar rats and cognitive evaluation tests were performed using radial arm maze and hole-board apparatus. Following 30 days of treatment with the extracts, a dose- and time-dependent attenuation of AD pathology, as evidenced by decreasing amyloid beta 42, total tau, phosphorylated tau and neuro-inflammation with an increase in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels was observed. Therefore, PM and EJ extracts contain cognitive enhancers as well as neuroprotective agents against STZ induced AD. PMID:24667360

  14. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture–based proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  15. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:25919792

  16. The Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase – 4 Inhibitors in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panchapakesan, Usha; Pollock, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin the development of diabetic kidney disease, current best practice still leaves a significant proportion of patients with end-stage kidney disease requiring renal replacement therapy. This is on a background of an increasing diabetes epidemic worldwide. Although kidney failure is a major cause of morbidity the main cause of death remains cardiovascular in nature. Hence, diabetic therapies which are both “cardio-renal” protective seem the logical way forward. In this review, we discuss the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors (DPP4inh), which are glucose-lowering agents used clinically and their role in diabetic kidney disease with specific focus on renoprotection and surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease. We highlight the novel pleiotropic effects of DPP4 that make it an attractive additional target to combat the fibrotic and inflammatory pathways in diabetic kidney disease and also discuss the current literature on the cardiovascular safety profile of DPP4inh. Clearly, these observed renoprotective effects will need to be confirmed by clinical trials to determine whether they translate into beneficial effects to patients with diabetes. PMID:26379674

  17. Molecular insights into mechanisms of intramembrane proteolysis through signal peptide peptidase (SPP).

    PubMed

    Schröder, Bernd; Saftig, Paul

    2010-05-01

    The processing of membrane-anchored signalling molecules and transcription factors by RIP (regulated intramembrane proteolysis) is a major signalling paradigm in eukaryotic cells. Intramembrane cleaving proteases liberate fragments from membrane-bound precursor proteins which typically fulfil functions such as cell signalling and regulation, immunosurveillance and intercellular communication. Furthermore, they are thought to be involved in the development and propagation of several diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and hepatitis C virus infection. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Schrul and colleagues investigate the interaction of the endoplasmic reticulum-resident intramembrane cleaving SPP (signal peptide peptidase) with different type II oriented transmembrane proteins. A combination of co-immunoprecipitation experiments using wild-type and a dominant-negative SPP with electrophoretic protein separations under native conditions revealed selectivity of the interaction. Depending on the interacting protein, SPP formed complexes of different sizes. SPP could build tight interactions not only with signal peptides, but also with pre- and mis-folded proteins. Whereas signal peptides are direct substrates for SPP proteolysis, the study suggests that SPP may be involved in the controlled sequestration of possibly toxic membrane protein species in a proteolysis-independent manner. These large oligomeric membrane protein aggregates may then be degraded by the proteasome or autophagy. PMID:20388122

  18. Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Distribution in the Human Respiratory Tract: Implications for the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K; Lambertz, Allyn M; McCray, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4, CD26), a type II transmembrane ectopeptidase, is the receptor for the Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). MERS emerged in 2012 and has a high mortality associated with severe lung disease. A lack of autopsy studies from MERS fatalities has hindered understanding of MERS-CoV pathogenesis. We investigated the spatial and cellular localization of DPP4 to evaluate an association MERS clinical disease. DPP4 was rarely detected in the surface epithelium from nasal cavity to conducting airways with a slightly increased incidence in distal airways. DPP4 was also found in a subset of mononuclear leukocytes and in serous cells of submucosal glands. In the parenchyma, DPP4 was found principally in type I and II cells and alveolar macrophages and was also detected in vascular endothelium (eg, lymphatics) and pleural mesothelia. Patients with chronic lung disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis, exhibited increased DPP4 immunostaining in alveolar epithelia (type I and II cells) and alveolar macrophages with similar trends in reactive mesothelia. This finding suggests that preexisting pulmonary disease could increase MERS-CoV receptor abundance and predispose individuals to MERS morbidity and mortality, which is consistent with current clinical observations. We speculate that the preferential spatial localization of DPP4 in alveolar regions may explain why MERS is characterized by lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:26597880

  19. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin suppresses mouse colon tumorigenesis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Naoki; Inoue, Takuya; Iguchi, Munetaka; Fujiwara, Kaori; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Kawakami, Ken; Abe, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-02-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to have an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been used as a new therapeutic tool for type 2 diabetes. Since the substrates for DPP-4 include intestinotrophic hormones and chemokines such as GLP-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which are associated with tumor progression, DPP-4 inhibitors may increase the risk of colorectal tumors. However, the influence of DPP-4 inhibitors on colorectal neoplasia in patients with type 2 diabetes remains unknown. In the present study, we show that long-term administration of a DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin (STG), suppressed colon carcinogenesis in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) C57BL/6J mice. Colonic mucosal concentrations of glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-2 were significantly elevated in the ob/ob mice. However, mucosal GLP concentrations and the plasma level of SDF-1 were not affected by the administration of STG. Real‑time PCR analysis revealed that colonic mucosal IL-6 mRNA expression, which was significantly upregulated in the ob/ob mice, was significantly suppressed by the long-term administration of STG. These results suggest that a DPP-4 inhibitor may suppress colon carcinogenesis in mice with type 2 diabetes in a GLP-independent manner. Since DPP-4 has multiple biological functions, further studies analyzing other factors related to colon carcinogenesis are needed. PMID:26573958

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated amino-peptidase 1 and rheumatic disease: genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Remmers, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This article will review the genetic evidence implicating ERAP1, which encodes the endoplasmic reticulum-associated amino-peptidase 1, in susceptibility to rheumatic disease. Recent findings Genetic variants and haplotypes of ERAP1 are associated with ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, and Behçet’s disease in people of varying ancestries. In each of these diseases, disease-associated variants of ERAP1 have been shown to interact with disease-associated class I Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles to influence disease risk. Functionally, disease-associated missense variants of ERAP1 concertedly alter ERAP1 enzymatic function, both quantitatively and qualitatively, while other disease-associated variants influence ERAP1 expression. Therefore, ERAP1 haplotypes (or allotypes) should be examined as functional units. Biologically, this amounts to an examination of the gene regulation and function of the protein encoded by each allotype. Genetically, the relationship between disease risk and ERAP1 allotypes should be examined to determine whether allotypes or individual variants produce the most parsimonious risk models. Summary Future investigations of ERAP1 should focus on comprehensively characterizing naturally-occurring ERAP1 allotypes, examining the enzymatic function and gene expression of each allotype, and identifying specific allotypes that influence disease susceptibility. PMID:26002026

  1. A potential role for tissue kallikrein-related peptidases in human cervico-vaginal physiology.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julie L V; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2008-06-01

    Human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) are a family of 15 genes located on chromosome 19q13.4 that encode secreted serine proteases with trypsin- and/or chymotrypsin-like activity. Relatively large levels of many KLKs are present in human cervico-vaginal fluid (CVF) and in the supernatant of cultured human vaginal epithelial cells. Many KLKs are also hormonally regulated in vaginal epithelial cells, particularly by glucocorticoids and estrogens. The physiological role of KLK in the vagina is currently unknown; however, analysis of the CVF proteome has revealed clues for potential KLK functions in this environment. Here, we detail potential roles for KLKs in cervico-vaginal physiology. First, we suggest that KLKs play a role in the vagina similar to their role in skin physiology: (1) in the desquamation of vaginal epithelial cells, similar to their activity in the desquamation of skin corneocytes; and (2) in their ability to activate antimicrobial proteins in CVF as they do in sweat. Consequently, we hypothesize that dysregulated KLK expression in the vagina could lead to the development of pathological conditions such as desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. Second, we propose that KLKs may play a role in premature rupture of membranes and pre-term birth through their cleavage of fetal membrane extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:18627298

  2. Combination therapy of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and metformin in type 2 diabetes: rationale and evidence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Hong, T

    2014-02-01

    The main pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) includes insulin resistance and pancreatic islet dysfunction. Metformin, which attenuates insulin resistance, has been recommended as the first-line antidiabetic medication. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are novel oral hypoglycaemic agents that protect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from degradation, maintain the bioactivity of endogenous GLP-1, and thus improve islet dysfunction. Results from clinical trials have shown that the combination therapy of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin [as an add-on, an initial combination or a fixed-dose combination (FDC)] provides excellent efficacy and safety in patients with T2DM. Moreover, recent studies have suggested that metformin enhances the biological effect of GLP-1 by increasing GLP-1 secretion, suppressing activity of DPP-4 and upregulating the expression of GLP-1 receptor in pancreatic β-cells. Conversely, DPP-4 inhibitors have a favourable effect on insulin sensitivity in patients with T2DM. Therefore, the combination of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin provides an additive or even synergistic effect on metabolic control in patients with T2DM. This article provides an overview of clinical evidence and discusses the rationale for the combination therapy of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin. PMID:23668534

  3. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP15 regulates human papillomavirus type 16 E6 protein stability.

    PubMed

    Vos, Robin M; Altreuter, Jennifer; White, Elizabeth A; Howley, Peter M

    2009-09-01

    Proteomic identification of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6-interacting proteins revealed several proteins involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In addition to the well-characterized E6AP ubiquitin-protein ligase, a second HECT domain protein (HERC2) and a deubiquitylating enzyme (USP15) were identified by tandem affinity purification of HPV16 E6-associated proteins. This study focuses on the functional consequences of the interaction of E6 with USP15. Overexpression of USP15 resulted in increased levels of the E6 protein, and the small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of USP15 decreased E6 protein levels. These results implicate USP15 directly in the regulation of E6 protein stability and suggest that ubiquitylated E6 could be a substrate for USP15 ubiquitin peptidase activity. It remains possible that E6 could affect the activity of USP15 on specific cellular substrates, a hypothesis that can be tested as more is learned about the substrates and pathways controlled by USP15. PMID:19553310

  4. Purification and Characterization of an X-Prolyl-Dipeptidyl Peptidase from Lactobacillus sakei

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Yolanda; Toldrá, Fidel

    2001-01-01

    An X-prolyl-dipeptidyl peptidase has been purified from Lactobacillus sakei by ammonium sulfate fractionation and five chromatographic steps, which included hydrophobic interaction, anion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. This procedure resulted in a recovery yield of 7% and an increase in specificity of 737-fold. The enzyme appeared to be a dimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 88 kDa. Optimal activity was shown at pH 7.5 and 55°C. The enzyme was inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors and several divalent cations (Cu2+, Hg2+, and Zn2+). The enzyme almost exclusively hydrolyzed X-Pro from the N terminus of each peptide as well as fluorescent and colorimetric substrates; it also hydrolyzed X-Ala at the N terminus, albeit at lower rates. Km s for Gly-Pro- and Lys-Ala-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin were 29 and 88 μM, respectively; those for Gly-Pro- and Ala-Pro-p-nitroanilide were 192 and 50 μM, respectively. Among peptides, β-casomorphin 1-3 was hydrolyzed at the highest rates, while the relative hydrolysis of the other tested peptides was only 1 to 12%. The potential role of the purified enzyme in the proteolytic pathway by catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide bonds involving proline is discussed. PMID:11282638

  5. Metabolic role of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) in primary human (pre)adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zilleßen, Pia; Celner, Jennifer; Kretschmann, Anita; Pfeifer, Alexander; Racké, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) is the target of the gliptins, a recent class of oral antidiabetics. DPP4 (also called CD26) was previously characterized in immune cells but also has important metabolic functions which are not yet fully understood. Thus, we investigated the function of DPP4 in human white preadipocytes and adipocytes. We found that both cell types express DPP4 in high amounts; DPP4 release markedly increased during differentiation. In preadipocytes, lentiviral DPP4 knockdown caused significant changes in gene expression as determined by whole-genome DNA-array analysis. Metabolic genes were increased, e.g. PDK4 18-fold and PPARγC1α (=PGC1α) 6-fold, and proliferation-related genes were decreased (e.g. FGF7 5-fold). These effects, contributing to differentiation, were not inhibited by the PPARγ antagonist T0070907. Vice versa, the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone induced a different set of genes (mainly FABP4). DPP4 knockdown also affected growth factor signaling and, accordingly, retarded preadipocyte proliferation. In particular, basal and insulin-induced ERK activation (but not Akt activation) was markedly diminished (by around 60%). This indicates that DPP4 knockdown contributes to adipocyte maturation by mimicking growth factor withdrawal, an early step in fat cell differentiation. In mature adipocytes, DPP4 becomes liberated so that adipose tissue may constitute a relevant source of circulating DPP4. PMID:26983599

  6. The Mitochondrial Unfoldase-Peptidase Complex ClpXP Controls Bioenergetics Stress and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Ho; Rivadeneira, Dayana B.; Caino, M. Cecilia; Chae, Young Chan; Speicher, David W.; Vaira, Valentina; Bosari, Silvano; Rampini, Paolo; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria must buffer the risk of proteotoxic stress to preserve bioenergetics, but the role of these mechanisms in disease is poorly understood. Using a proteomics screen, we now show that the mitochondrial unfoldase-peptidase complex ClpXP associates with the oncoprotein survivin and the respiratory chain Complex II subunit succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) in mitochondria of tumor cells. Knockdown of ClpXP subunits ClpP or ClpX induces the accumulation of misfolded SDHB, impairing oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production while activating “stress” signals of 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and autophagy. Deregulated mitochondrial respiration induced by ClpXP targeting causes oxidative stress, which in turn reduces tumor cell proliferation, suppresses cell motility, and abolishes metastatic dissemination in vivo. ClpP is universally overexpressed in primary and metastatic human cancer, correlating with shortened patient survival. Therefore, tumors exploit ClpXP-directed proteostasis to maintain mitochondrial bioenergetics, buffer oxidative stress, and enable metastatic competence. This pathway may provide a “drugable” therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27389535

  7. Kallikrein-related peptidase 8 is expressed in myocardium and induces cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Buqing; Yu, Qing; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Zhiping; Cong, Binghai; Du, Jiankui; Lu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The tissue kallikrein-related peptidase family (KLK) is a group of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like serine proteases that share a similar homology to parent tissue kallikrein (KLK1). KLK1 is identified in heart and has anti-hypertrophic effects. However, whether other KLK family members play a role in regulating cardiac function remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that KLK8 was expressed in myocardium. KLK8 expression was upregulated in left ventricle of cardiac hypertrophy models. Both intra-cardiac adenovirus-mediated and transgenic-mediated KLK8 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. In primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, KLK8 knockdown inhibited phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas KLK8 overexpression promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via a serine protease activity-dependent but kinin receptor-independent pathway. KLK8 overexpression increased epidermal growth factor (EGF) production, which was blocked by the inhibitors of serine protease. EGF receptor (EGFR) antagonist and EGFR knockdown reversed the hypertrophy induced by KLK8 overexpression. KLK8-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also significantly decreased by blocking the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) or PAR2 pathway. Our data suggest that KLK8 may promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through EGF signaling- and PARs-dependent but a kinin receptor-independent pathway. It is implied that different KLK family members can subtly regulate cardiac function and remodeling. PMID:26823023

  8. Identification of novel dipeptidyl peptidase 9 substrates by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Maqsudi, Sadiqa; Rainczuk, Adam; Duffield, Nadine; Lawrence, Josie; Keane, Fiona M; Justa-Schuch, Daniela; Geiss-Friedlander, Ruth; Gorrell, Mark D; Stephens, Andrew N

    2015-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 (DPP9) is a member of the S9B/DPPIV (DPP4) serine protease family, which cleaves N-terminal dipeptides at an Xaa-Pro consensus motif. Cytoplasmic DPP9 has roles in epidermal growth factor signalling and in antigen processing, whilst the role of the recently discovered nuclear form of DPP9 is unknown. Mice lacking DPP9 proteolytic activity die as neonates. We applied a modified 2D differential in-gel electrophoresis approach to identify novel DPP9 substrates, using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking endogenous DPP9 activity. A total of 111 potential new DPP9 substrates were identified, with nine proteins/peptides confirmed as DPP9 substrates by MALDI-TOF or immunoblotting. Moreover, we also identified the dipeptide Val-Ala as a consensus site for DPP9 cleavage that was not recognized by DPP8, suggesting different in vivo roles for these closely related enzymes. The relative kinetics for the cleavage of these nine candidate substrates by DPP9, DPP8 and DPP4 were determined. This is the first identification of DPP9 substrates from cells lacking endogenous DPP9 activity. These data greatly expand the potential roles of DPP9 and suggest different in vivo roles for DPP9 and DPP8. PMID:26175140

  9. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV dependent water-soluble prodrugs of highly lipophilic bicyclic nucleoside analogues.

    PubMed

    Diez-Torrubia, Alberto; Balzarini, Jan; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; De Meester, Ingrid; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2011-03-24

    We present the first report of the application of the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) based prodrug approach to hydroxy-containing drug derivatives. In particular, we applied this strategy to the highly lipophilic antiviral drug family of bicyclic furanopyrimidine nucleoside analogues (BCNA) in order to improve their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Our stability data demonstrated that the prodrugs efficiently release the parent BCNA drug upon selective conversion by purified DPPIV/CD26 and by soluble DPPIV/CD26 present in bovine, murine, and human serum. Vildagliptin, a specific inhibitor of DPPIV/CD26, was able to completely block the hydrolysis of the prodrugs in the presence of purified DPPIV/CD26 human, murine, and bovine serum. Several novel prodrugs showed remarkable increases in water solubility (up to more than 3 orders of magnitude) compared to the poorly soluble parent drug. We also demonstrated a markedly enhanced oral bioavailability of the prodrugs versus the parent drug in mice. PMID:21332170

  10. Emerging role of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Bernd; Bandeira-Echtler, Elizabeth; Bergerhoff, Karla; Lerch, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background: In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) there is a progressive loss of β-cell function. One new approach yielding promising results is the use of the orally active dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. However, every new compound for T2DM has to prove long-term safety especially on cardiovascular outcomes. Objectives: Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of sitagliptin and vildagliptin therapy on main efficacy parameters and safety. Selection criteria, data collection, and analysis: Randomized controlled clinical studies of at least 12 weeks’ duration in T2DM. Results: DPP-4 inhibitors versus placebo showed glycosylated hemoglobin A1c(A1c) improvements of 0.7% versus placebo but not compared to monotherapy with other hypoglycemic agents (0.3% in favor of controls). The overall risk profile of DPP-4 inhibitors was low, however a 34% relative risk increase (95% confidence interval 10% to 64%, P = 0.004) was noted for all cause infection associated with sitagliptin use. No data on immune function, health-related quality of life and diabetic complications could be extracted. Conclusions: DPP-4 inhibitors have some theoretical advantages over existing therapies with oral antidiabetic compounds but should currently be restricted to individual patients. Long-term data on cardiovascular outcomes and safety are needed before widespread use of these new agents. PMID:19065993

  11. Prostate Cancer-Associated Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 4 Activates Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 and Thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman-Luck, Ruth A; Stansfield, Scott H; Stephens, Carson R; Loessner, Daniela; Clements, Judith A

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis to bone is terminal; thus, novel therapies are required to prevent end-stage disease. Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a serine protease that is overproduced in localized prostate cancer and is abundant in prostate cancer bone metastases. In vitro, KLK4 induces tumor-promoting phenotypes; however, the underlying proteolytic mechanism is undefined. The protein topography and migration analysis platform (PROTOMAP) was used for high-depth identification of KLK4 substrates secreted by prostate cancer bone metastasis-derived PC-3 cells to delineate the mechanism of KLK4 action in advanced prostate cancer. Thirty-six putative novel substrates were determined from the PROTOMAP analysis. In addition, KLK4 cleaved the established substrate, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, thus validating the approach. KLK4 activated matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1), a protease that promotes prostate tumor growth and metastasis. MMP1 was produced in the tumor compartment of prostate cancer bone metastases, highlighting its accessibility to KLK4 at this site. KLK4 further liberated an N-terminal product, with purported angiogenic activity, from thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) and cleaved TSP1 in an osteoblast-derived matrix. This is the most comprehensive analysis of the proteolytic action of KLK4 in an advanced prostate cancer model to date, highlighting KLK4 as a potential multifunctional regulator of prostate cancer progression. PMID:27378148

  12. A misassembled transmembrane domain of a polytopic protein associates with signal peptide peptidase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exerts a quality control over newly synthesized proteins and a variety of components have been implicated in the specific recognition of aberrant or misfolded polypeptides. We have exploited a site-specific cross-linking approach to search for novel ER components that may specifically recognize the misassembled transmembrane domains present in truncated polytopic proteins. We find that a single probe located in the transmembrane domain of a truncated opsin fragment is cross-linked to several ER proteins. These components are distinct from subunits of the Sec61 complex and represent a ‘post-translocon’ environment. In this study, we identify one of these post-translocon cross-linking partners as the signal peptide peptidase (SPP). We find that the interaction of truncated opsin chains with SPP is mediated by its second transmembrane domain, and propose that this interaction may contribute to the recognition of misassembled transmembrane domains during membrane protein quality control at the ER. PMID:15373738

  13. An inhibitory antibody against dipeptidyl peptidase IV improves glucose tolerance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Majeti, Jiangwen; Sudom, Athena; Xiong, Yumei; Lu, Mei; Liu, Qiang; Higbee, Jared; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Wang, Wei; Cao, Ping; Xia, Zhen; Johnstone, Sheree; Min, Xiaoshan; Yang, Xiaoping; Shao, Hui; Yu, Timothy; Sharkov, Nik; Walker, Nigel; Tu, Hua; Shen, Wenyan; Wang, Zhulun

    2013-01-11

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) degrades the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Small molecule DPP-IV inhibitors have been used as treatments for type 2 diabetes to improve glucose tolerance. However, each of the marketed small molecule drugs has its own limitation in terms of efficacy and side effects. To search for an alternative strategy of inhibiting DPP-IV activity, we generated a panel of tight binding inhibitory mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against rat DPP-IV. When tested in vitro, these mAbs partially inhibited the GLP-1 cleavage activity of purified enzyme and rat plasma. To understand the partial inhibition, we solved the co-crystal structure of one of the mAb Fabs (Ab1) in complex with rat DPP-IV. Although Ab1 does not bind at the active site, it partially blocks the side opening, which prevents the large substrates such as GLP-1 from accessing the active site, but not small molecules such as sitagliptin. When Ab1 was tested in vivo, it reduced plasma glucose and increased plasma GLP-1 concentration during an oral glucose tolerance test in rats. Together, we demonstrated the feasibility of using mAbs to inhibit DPP-IV activity and to improve glucose tolerance in a diabetic rat model. PMID:23184939

  14. An Inhibitory Antibody against Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Improves Glucose Tolerance in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jie; Majeti, Jiangwen; Sudom, Athena; Xiong, Yumei; Lu, Mei; Liu, Qiang; Higbee, Jared; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Wang, Wei; Cao, Ping; Xia, Zhen; Johnstone, Sheree; Min, Xiaoshan; Yang, Xiaoping; Shao, Hui; Yu, Timothy; Sharkov, Nik; Walker, Nigel; Tu, Hua; Shen, Wenyan; Wang, Zhulun

    2013-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) degrades the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Small molecule DPP-IV inhibitors have been used as treatments for type 2 diabetes to improve glucose tolerance. However, each of the marketed small molecule drugs has its own limitation in terms of efficacy and side effects. To search for an alternative strategy of inhibiting DPP-IV activity, we generated a panel of tight binding inhibitory mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against rat DPP-IV. When tested in vitro, these mAbs partially inhibited the GLP-1 cleavage activity of purified enzyme and rat plasma. To understand the partial inhibition, we solved the co-crystal structure of one of the mAb Fabs (Ab1) in complex with rat DPP-IV. Although Ab1 does not bind at the active site, it partially blocks the side opening, which prevents the large substrates such as GLP-1 from accessing the active site, but not small molecules such as sitagliptin. When Ab1 was tested in vivo, it reduced plasma glucose and increased plasma GLP-1 concentration during an oral glucose tolerance test in rats. Together, we demonstrated the feasibility of using mAbs to inhibit DPP-IV activity and to improve glucose tolerance in a diabetic rat model. PMID:23184939

  15. Structure and catalysis of acylaminoacyl peptidase: closed and open subunits of a dimer oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Harmat, Veronika; Domokos, Klarissza; Menyhárd, Dóra K; Palló, Anna; Szeltner, Zoltán; Szamosi, Ilona; Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László

    2011-01-21

    Acylaminoacyl peptidase from Aeropyrum pernix is a homodimer that belongs to the prolyl oligopeptidase family. The monomer subunit is composed of one hydrolase and one propeller domain. Previous crystal structure determinations revealed that the propeller domain obstructed the access of substrate to the active site of both subunits. Here we investigated the structure and the kinetics of two mutant enzymes in which the aspartic acid of the catalytic triad was changed to alanine or asparagine. Using different substrates, we have determined the pH dependence of specificity rate constants, the rate-limiting step of catalysis, and the binding of substrates and inhibitors. The catalysis considerably depended both on the kind of mutation and on the nature of the substrate. The results were interpreted in terms of alterations in the position of the catalytic histidine side chain as demonstrated with crystal structure determination of the native and two mutant structures (D524N and D524A). Unexpectedly, in the homodimeric structures, only one subunit displayed the closed form of the enzyme. The other subunit exhibited an open gate to the catalytic site, thus revealing the structural basis that controls the oligopeptidase activity. The open form of the native enzyme displayed the catalytic triad in a distorted, inactive state. The mutations affected the closed, active form of the enzyme, disrupting its catalytic triad. We concluded that the two forms are at equilibrium and the substrates bind by the conformational selection mechanism. PMID:21084296

  16. Histoplasma capsulatum Encodes a Dipeptidyl Peptidase Active against the Mammalian Immunoregulatory Peptide, Substance P

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Kendal G.; Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum secretes dipeptidyl peptidase (Dpp) IV enzyme activity and has two putative DPPIV homologs (HcDPPIVA and HcDPPIVB). We previously showed that HcDPPIVB is the gene responsible for the majority of secreted DppIV activity in H. capsulatum culture supernatant, while we could not detect any functional contribution from HcDPPIVA. In order to determine whether HcDPPIVA encodes a functional DppIV enzyme, we expressed HcDPPIVA in Pichia pastoris and purified the recombinant protein. The recombinant enzyme cleaved synthetic DppIV substrates and had similar biochemical properties to other described DppIV enzymes, with temperature and pH optima of 42°C and 8, respectively. Recombinant HcDppIVA cleaved the host immunoregulatory peptide substance P, indicating the enzyme has the potential to affect the immune response during infection. Expression of HcDPPIVA under heterologous regulatory sequences in H. capsulatum resulted in increased secreted DppIV activity, indicating that the encoded protein can be expressed and secreted by its native organism. However, HcDPPIVA was not required for virulence in a murine model of histoplasmosis. This work reports a fungal enzyme that can function to cleave the immunomodulatory host peptide substance P. PMID:19384411

  17. BSA modification to reduce CTAB induced nonspecificity and cytotoxicity of aptamer-conjugated gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasun, Emir; Li, Chunmei; Barut, Inci; Janvier, Denisse; Qiu, Liping; Cui, Cheng; Tan, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    Aptamer-conjugated gold nanorods (AuNRs) are excellent candidates for targeted hyperthermia therapy of cancer cells. However, in high concentrations of AuNRs, aptamer conjugation alone fails to result in highly cell-specific AuNRs due to the presence of positively charged cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a templating surfactant. Besides causing nonspecific electrostatic interactions with the cell surfaces, CTAB can also be cytotoxic, leading to uncontrolled cell death. To avoid the nonspecific interactions and cytotoxicity triggered by CTAB, we report the further biologically inspired modification of aptamer-conjugated AuNRs with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. Following this modification, interaction between CTAB and the cell surface was efficiently blocked, thereby dramatically reducing the side effects of CTAB. This approach may provide a general and simple method to avoid one of the most serious issues in biomedical applications of nanomaterials: nonspecific binding of the nanomaterials with biological cells.Aptamer-conjugated gold nanorods (AuNRs) are excellent candidates for targeted hyperthermia therapy of cancer cells. However, in high concentrations of AuNRs, aptamer conjugation alone fails to result in highly cell-specific AuNRs due to the presence of positively charged cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a templating surfactant. Besides causing nonspecific electrostatic interactions with the cell surfaces, CTAB can also be cytotoxic, leading to uncontrolled cell death. To avoid the nonspecific interactions and cytotoxicity triggered by CTAB, we report the further biologically inspired modification of aptamer-conjugated AuNRs with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. Following this modification, interaction between CTAB and the cell surface was efficiently blocked, thereby dramatically reducing the side effects of CTAB. This approach may provide a general and simple method to avoid one of the most serious issues in biomedical applications

  18. Inhibition of DD-Peptidases by a Specific Trifluoroketone: Crystal Structure of a Complex with the Actinomadura R39 DD-Peptidase†

    PubMed Central

    Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Adediran, S. A.; Herman, Raphael; Kerff, Frédéric; Duez, Colette; Charlier, Paulette; Sauvage, Eric; Pratt, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of bacterial DD-peptidases represent potential antibiotics. In the search for alternatives to β-lactams, we have investigated a series of compounds designed to generate transition state analogue structures on reaction with DD-peptidases. The compounds contain a combination of a peptidoglycan-mimetic specificity handle and a warhead capable of delivering a tetrahedral anion to the enzyme active site. The latter include a boronic acid, two alcohols, an aldehyde and a trifluoroketone. The compounds were tested against two low molecular mass class C DD-peptidases. As expected from previous observations, the boronic acid was a potent inhibitor, but, rather unexpectedly from precedent, the trifluoroketone [D-α-aminopimelyl-(1,1,1-trifluoro-3-amino)butan-2-one] was also very effective. Taking into account competing hydration, the trifluoroketone was the strongest inhibitor of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase, with a subnanomolar (free ketone) inhibition constant. A crystal structure of the complex between the trifluoroketone and the R39 enzyme showed that a tetrahedral adduct had indeed formed with the active site serine nucleophile. The trifluoroketone moiety, therefore, should be considered along with boronic acids and phosphonates, as a warhead that can be incorporated into new and effective DD-peptidase inhibitors and therefore, perhaps, antibiotics. PMID:23484909

  19. [Humoral nonspecific immunity in patients with post-burn cicatrical strictures of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Mumladze, R B; Babaian, S S; Bobkov, Iu I; Chernyshev, V S; Taratuta, O V

    1983-03-01

    The authors have studied the significance of factors of the humoral non-specific defense (HND) in 37 patients with cicatricial constrictions of the oesophagus and stomach. The data obtained were used for choosing the optimum terms for gastrostoma and oesophagoplasty. In 14 patients treatment with lysozyme was performed due to decreased indices of HND. PMID:6857955

  20. Nonspecific airway hyperreactivity in nonsmoking bituminous coal miners demonstrated by quantitative methacholine inhalation challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgel, D.W.; Roe, R.

    1988-06-01

    Because nonsmoking underground bituminous coal miners often have symptoms of chronic bronchitis and because a high proportion of patients with chronic bronchitis have nonspecific airway hyperreactivity, we hypothesized that coal miners would have a higher prevalence of nonspecific airway hyperreactivity than nonminer nonsmoking control subjects. By use of a quantitative methacholine provocative inhalation challenge test, we evaluated 22 underground bituminous coal miners and 41 nonminer age- and sex-matched control subjects from the same community. We found that a significantly higher proportion of miners had reactivity to inhalation of 100 mg/ml or less of methacholine, X2 = 6.19, p less than 0.02. The slope of phase III of the single-breath nitrogen washout test was higher in the reactive miners than in the nonreactive miners and reactive control subjects, even though the reactive miners had only been working underground 8 +/- 3 (SEM) years. Within the reactive miner subgroup, the higher the reactivity to methacholine, the more abnormal the slope of phase III of the single-breath nitrogen test, r = 0.79. Miners had more symptoms than controls; the presence of methacholine reactivity was not associated with increased symptoms. We conclude that the bituminous coal miners in our study had an increased prevalence of nonspecific airway hyperreactivity and that within the reactive miner subgroup there was evidence of early airways disease. We speculate that the nonspecific airway hyperreactivity may be related to, and also be an indicator of, lung injury in coal miners.

  1. Infantile Autism and Computerized Tomography Brain-Scan Findings: Specific versus Nonspecific Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balottin, Umberto; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The study of computerized tomography brain-scan findings with 45 autistic and 19 control subjects concluded that autism is nonspecifically associated with brain-scan abnormalities, and that other nonorganic, as well as organic, factors should be taken into account. (Author/DB)

  2. Nonspecificity of the rim sign in the scintigraphic diagnosis of missed testicular torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieras, F.; Kuhn, C.R.

    1983-02-01

    Causes of a hyperemic peritesticular rim on dynamic and static scintigrams are reviewed. Of 6 patients exhibiting such a pattern, 3 had missed testicular torsion; the other 3 had tumor, trauma, or inflamation. The authors conclude that a hyperemic peritesticular rim is a nonspecific finding reflecting underlying pathophysiological changes and is not pathognomonic of missed torsion.

  3. Nonspecificity of the rim sign in the scintigraphic diagnosis of missed testicular torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieras, F.; Kuhn, C.R.

    1983-02-01

    Causes of a hyperemic peritesticular rim on dynamic and static scintigrams are reviewed. Of 6 patients exhibiting such a pattern, 3 had missed testicular torsion; the other 3 had tumor, trauma, or inflammation. The authors conclude that a hyperemic peritesticular rim is a nonspecific finding reflecting underlying pathophysiological changes and is not pathognomonic of missed torsion.

  4. EFFECTS OF PCB (AROCLORR 1254) ON NON-SPECIFIC IMMUNE PARAMETERS IN RHESUS (MACACA MULATA) MONKEYS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of low level chronic polychlorinated biphenyl - Aroclor 1254 - (PCB) exposure were investigated on nonspecific immune parameters in female rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys. Five groups of monkeys were orally administered PCB at concentrations of 0, 5, 20, 40, or 80 ug/...

  5. Effectiveness of dry needling for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Torres-Lacomba, María; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Perez-Muñoz, Milagros; Mayoral-Del-Moral, Orlando; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Chronic neck pain attributed to a myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of muscle contractures referred to as myofascial trigger points. In this randomized, parallel-group, blinded, controlled clinical trial, we examined the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of myofascial trigger points in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. The study was conducted at a public Primary Health Care Centre in Madrid, Spain, from January 2010 to December 2014. A total of 130 participants with nonspecific neck pain presenting with active myofascial trigger points in their cervical muscles were included. These participants were randomly allocated to receive: DDN plus stretching (n = 65) or stretching only (control group [n = 65]). Four sessions of treatment were applied over 2 weeks with a 6-month follow-up after treatment. Pain intensity, mechanical hyperalgesia, neck active range of motion, neck muscle strength, and perceived neck disability were measured at baseline, after 2 sessions of intervention, after the intervention period, and 15, 30, 90, and 180 days after the intervention. Significant and clinically relevant differences were found in favour of dry needling in all the outcomes (all P < 0.001) at both short and long follow-ups. Deep dry needling and passive stretching is more effective than passive stretching alone in people with nonspecific neck pain. The results support the use of DDN in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. PMID:27537209

  6. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and parts 178 and 180 of this subchapter, a non-specification metal tank permanently secured to a... used to transport a flammable cryogenic liquid, hazardous substance, hazardous waste, or a marine...) or (c) of this section, conform to all requirements in part 180 (except for § 180.405(g)) of...

  7. A Comparison of Oral Narratives in Children with Specific Language and Non-Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Wendy M.; James, Deborah G. H.; McCormack, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) and non-specific language impairment (NLI) could be differentiated by their oral narrative characteristics. Oral narrative samples were collected from 69 children and comparisons were made among four groups of participants. The two language impairment groups (SLI…

  8. Lessons learned from cardiovascular outcome clinical trials with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Sesti, Giorgio

    2016-08-01

    Previous trials of glucose-lowering strategies in subjects with type 2 diabetes have demonstrated a beneficial effect of intensive glycemic control on microvascular complications but failed to show a clear benefit on cardiovascular complications. The findings of meta-analyses of rosiglitazone trials suggesting that rosiglitazone might increase the risk of myocardial infarction have cast doubt on the cardiovascular safety of glucose-lowering drugs. In 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration has implemented rigorous criteria to approve new glucose-lowering drugs, requiring proof of cardiovascular safety. These regulatory requirements have led to a considerable increase in the number of cardiovascular outcome trials in type 2 diabetes to ensure that newer glucose-lowering drugs are not associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Incretin-based therapies including dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and injectable glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are novel treatment options for patients with inadequate glucose control. Although DPP-4 inhibitors have shown neutral effects on risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, it remains unclear whether treatment with these new glucose-lowering agents might be associated with a reduction in cardiovascular events. The results of the three cardiovascular outcome trials comparing DPP-4 inhibitors treatment to placebo in addition to other glucose-lowering drugs have been published. All the three DPP-4 inhibitor cardiovascular outcome trials have shown non-inferiority with regard to cardiovascular safety, compared with placebo, when added to usual care. In this review, we summarize cardiovascular outcome trials of DPP-4 inhibitors, and provide an overview of these trials and their limitations. PMID:26611248

  9. Clinical significance of kallikrein-related peptidase-4 in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Papagerakis, Petros; Pannone, Giuseppe; Zheng, L I; Athanassiou-Papaefthymiou, Maria; Yamakoshi, Yashuo; McGuff, Howard Stan; Shkeir, Omar; Ghirtis, Konstantinos; Papagerakis, Silvana

    2015-04-01

    Kallikrein-related-peptidase-4 (KLK4), a serine protease originally discovered in developing tooth with broad target sequence specificity, serves vital functions in dental enamel formation. KLK4 is involved in degradation of extracellular matrix proteins and it is thought that this proteolytic activity could also promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Recent studies have associated KLK4 expression with tumor progression and clinical outcome, particularly in prostate and ovarian cancer. Very little is known in regard KLK4 involvement in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). Our objective was to investigate KLK4 expression in OSCC pathogenesis and disease progression. KLK4 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blots and zymograms in OSCC lines. Invasion assays using high versus low/undetectable KLK4-expressing OSCC cell lines were performed jointly with KLK4 siRNA inhibition. A large collection of OSCC specimens was evaluated for KLK4 expression and correlation with patients' characteristics and outcomes were determined. Our data indicate that KLK4 is differentially expressed in oral carcinomas. OSCC cell lines with high invasive and metastatic potential have the highest levels of KLK4 expression. KLK4 mRNA and protein expression correlated with enzyme activity detected by zymograms. Inhibition of KLK4 expression results in diminished invasive potential in OSCC cell lines. Consistently, KLK4 expression is stronger in primary tumors that later either recurred or developed metastases, suggesting that its preferential expression in OSCC might contribute to individual tumor biology. Therefore, this study provides supportive evidence in favor of a prognostic value for KLK4 in OSCC and suggests that KLK4 could serve as a potential therapeutic target in patients with oral cancer. PMID:25862839

  10. Dipeptidyl Peptidases as Survival Factors in Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Congyi; Tilan, Jason U.; Everhart, Lindsay; Czarnecka, Magdalena; Soldin, Steven J.; Mendu, Damodara R.; Jeha, Dima; Hanafy, Jailan; Lee, Christina K.; Sun, Junfeng; Izycka-Swieszewska, Ewa; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) is a group of aggressive pediatric malignancies driven by the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein, an aberrant transcription factor up-regulating specific target genes, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its Y1 and Y5 receptors (Y5Rs). Previously, we have shown that both exogenous NPY and endogenous NPY stimulate ESFT cell death via its Y1 and Y5Rs. Here, we demonstrate that this effect is prevented by dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), which cleave NPY to its shorter form, NPY3–36, not active at Y1Rs. We have shown that NPY-induced cell death can be abolished by overexpression of DPPs and enhanced by their down-regulation. Both NPY treatment and DPP blockade activated the same cell death pathway mediated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Moreover, the decrease in cell survival induced by DPP inhibition was blocked by Y1 and Y5R antagonists, confirming its dependence on endogenous NPY. Interestingly, similar levels of NPY-driven cell death were achieved by blocking membrane DPPIV and cytosolic DPP8 and DPP9. Thus, this is the first evidence of these intracellular DPPs cleaving releasable peptides, such as NPY, in live cells. In contrast, another membrane DPP, fibroblast activation protein (FAP), did not affect NPY actions. In conclusion, DPPs act as survival factors for ESFT cells and protect them from cell death induced by endogenous NPY. This is the first demonstration that intracellular DPPs are involved in regulation of ESFT growth and may become potential therapeutic targets for these tumors. PMID:21680731

  11. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  12. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  13. Effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibition with MK-0431 on Syngeneic Mouse Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Liu, Ying-Hsiu; Chang, Han-Ying; Chen, Chiung-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors increase circulating levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide which may promote β-cell proliferation and survival. This study tested if DPP-4 inhibition with MK-0431 is beneficial for diabetic mice syngeneically transplanted with a marginal number of islets. We syngeneically transplanted 150 C57BL/6 mouse islets under the kidney capsule of each streptozotocin-diabetic mouse and then treated recipients with (n = 21) or without (n = 17) MK-0431 (30 mg/kg/day, po) for 6 weeks. After islet transplantation, blood glucose levels decreased in both MK-0431-treated and control groups. However, the blood glucose and area under the curve of the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test at 2, 4, and 6 weeks were not significantly different between MK-0431-treated mice and controls. During 6 weeks, both groups exhibited increased body weights over time. However, the weight between two groups did not differ throughout the study period. At 6 weeks after transplantation, the graft beta-cell mass (0.024 ± 0.005 versus 0.023 ± 0.007 mg, P = 0.8793) and insulin content (140 ± 48 versus 231 ± 63 ng, P = 0.2939) were comparable in the MK-0431-treated group and controls. Our results indicate posttransplant DPP-4 inhibition with MK-0431 in the diabetic recipient with a marginal number of islets is not beneficial to transplantation outcome or islet grafts. PMID:25165473

  14. Serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPINB5) haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Chou, Ying-Erh; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Liu, Yu-Fan

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The serpin peptidase inhibitor SERPINB5 is a tumour-suppressor gene that promotes the development of various cancers in humans. However, whether SERPINB5 gene variants play a role in HCC susceptibility remains unknown. In this study, we genotyped 6 SNPs of the SERPINB5 gene in an independent cohort from a replicate population comprising 302 cases and 590 controls. Additionally, patients who had at least one rs2289520 C allele in SERPINB5 tended to exhibit better liver function than patients with genotype GG (Child-Pugh grade A vs. B or C; P = 0.047). Next, haplotype blocks were reconstructed according to the linkage disequilibrium structure of the SERPINB5 gene. A haplotype “C-C-C” (rs17071138 + rs3744941 + rs8089204) in SERPINB5-correlated promoter showed a significant association with an increased HCC risk (AOR = 1.450 P = 0.031). Haplotypes “T-C-A” and “C-C-C” (rs2289519 + rs2289520 + rs1455555) located in the SERPINB5 coding region had a decreased (AOR = 0.744 P = 0.031) and increased (AOR = 1.981 P = 0.001) HCC risk, respectively. Finally, an additional integrated in silico analysis confirmed that these SNPs affected SERPINB5 expression and protein stability, which significantly correlated with tumour expression and subsequently with tumour development and aggressiveness. Taken together, our findings regarding these biomarkers provide a prediction model for risk assessment.

  15. The contributions of dipeptidyl peptidase IV to inflammation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Salles, Thiago; Zogbi, Camila; de Lima, Thais Martins; de Godoi Carneiro, Camila; Garcez, Alexandre Teles; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Dos Santos, Leonardo; da Costa Pereira, Alexandre; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; de Paula Faria, Daniele; Soriano, Francisco Garcia; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa

    2016-06-01

    Circulating dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity correlates with cardiac dysfunction in humans and experimental heart failure (HF) models. Similarly, inflammatory markers are associated with poorer outcomes in HF patients. However, the contributions of DPPIV to inflammation in HF remain elusive. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether the cardioprotective effects of DPPIV inhibition after myocardial injury are accompanied by reduced cardiac inflammation, whether circulating DPPIV activity correlates with the levels of systemic inflammatory markers in HF patients, and whether leukocytes and/or splenocytes may be one of the sources of circulating DPPIV in HF. Experimental HF was induced in male Wistar rats by left ventricular myocardial injury after radiofrequency catheter ablation. The rats were divided into three groups: sham, HF, and HF + DPPIV inhibitor (sitagliptin). Six weeks after surgery, cardiac function, perfusion and inflammatory status were evaluated. Sitagliptin treatment improved cardiac function and perfusion, reduced macrophage infiltration, and diminished the levels of inflammatory biomarkers including TNF-α, IL-1β, and CCL2. In HF patients, serum DPPIV activity correlated with CCL2, suggesting that leukocytes may be the source of circulating DPPIV in HF. Unexpectedly, DPPIV release was higher in splenocytes from HF rats and similar in HF circulating mononuclear cells compared with those from sham, suggesting an organ-specific modulation of DPPIV in HF. Collectively, our data provide new evidence that the cardioprotective effects of DPPIV inhibition in HF may be due to suppression of inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, they suggest that a vicious circle between DPPIV and inflammation may contribute to HF development and progression. PMID:27199127

  16. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  17. Proctolin degradation by membrane peptidases from nervous tissues of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria).

    PubMed

    Isaac, R E

    1987-07-15

    The hydrolysis of the insect neuropeptide proctolin (Arg-Tyr-Leu-Pro-Thr) by enzyme preparations from the nervous tissue of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) was investigated. Neural homogenate degraded proctolin (100 microM) at neutral pH by cleavage of the Arg-Tyr and Tyr-Leu bonds to yield Tyr-Leu-Pro-Thr, Arg-Tyr and free tyrosine. Arg-Tyr was detected as a major metabolite when the aminopeptidase inhibitors amastatin and bestatin were present to prevent Arg-Tyr breakdown. Around 50% of the proctolin-degrading activity was isolated in a 30,000 g membrane fraction and was shown to be almost entirely due to aminopeptidase activity. The aminopeptidase had an apparent Km of 23 microM, a pH optimum of 7.0 and was inhibited by 1 mM-EDTA and amastatin [IC50 = 0.3 microM], but was relatively insensitive to bestatin, actinonin and puromycin. Phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride (1 mM) and p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonic acid (1 mM) had no effect on this enzyme activity. Although the bulk of the Tyr-Leu hydrolytic activity was located in the 30,000 g supernatant, some weak activity was detected in a washed membrane preparation. This peptidase displayed a high affinity for proctolin (Km = 0.35 microM) and optimal activity at around pH 7.0. Synaptosome- and mitochondria-rich fractions were prepared from crude neural membranes. The aminopeptidase activity was concentrated in the synaptic-membrane preparation, whereas activity giving rise to Arg-Tyr was predominantly localized in the mitochondrial fraction. The subcellular localization of the membrane aminopeptidase is consistent with a possible physiological role for this enzyme in the inactivation of synaptically released proctolin. PMID:2889451

  18. Structure of the nisin leader peptidase NisP revealing a C-terminal autocleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yueyang; Li, Xin; Li, Ruiqing; Li, Shanshan; Ni, Hongqian; Wang, Hui; Xu, Haijin; Zhou, Weihong; Saris, Per E J; Yang, Wen; Qiao, Mingqiang; Rao, Zihe

    2014-06-01

    Nisin is a widely used antibacterial lantibiotic polypeptide produced by Lactococcus lactis. NisP belongs to the subtilase family and functions in the last step of nisin maturation as the leader-peptide peptidase. Deletion of the nisP gene in LAC71 results in the production of a non-active precursor peptide with the leader peptide unremoved. Here, the 1.1 Å resolution crystal structure of NisP is reported. The structure shows similarity to other subtilases, which can bind varying numbers of Ca atoms. However, no calcium was found in this NisP structure, and the predicted calcium-chelating residues were placed so as to not allow NisP to bind a calcium ion in this conformation. Interestingly, a short peptide corresponding to its own 635-647 sequence was found to bind to the active site of NisP. Biochemical assays and native mass-spectrometric analysis confirmed that NisP possesses an auto-cleavage site between residues Arg647 and Ser648. Further, it was shown that NisP mutated at the auto-cleavage site (R647P/S648P) had full catalytic activity for nisin leader-peptide cleavage, although the C-terminal region of NisP was no longer cleaved. Expressing this mutant in L. lactis LAC71 did not affect the production of nisin but did decrease the proliferation rate of the bacteria, suggesting the biological significance of the C-terminal auto-cleavage of NisP. PMID:24914961

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 greatly contributes to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in human liver.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-04-01

    The major metabolic pathway of vildagliptin in mice, rats, dogs, and humans is hydrolysis at the cyano group to produce a carboxylic acid metabolite M20.7 (LAY151), whereas the major metabolic enzyme of vildagliptin has not been identified. In the present study, we determined the contribution rate of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in the liver. We performed hydrolysis assay of the cyano group of vildagliptin using mouse, rat, and human liver samples. Additionally, DPP-4 activities in each liver sample were assessed by DPP-4 activity assay using the synthetic substrate H-glycyl-prolyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Gly-Pro-AMC). M20.7 formation rates in liver microsomes were higher than those in liver cytosol. M20.7 formation rate was significantly positively correlated with the DPP-4 activity using Gly-Pro-AMC in liver samples (r = 0.917, P < 0.01). The formation of M20.7 in mouse, rat, and human liver S9 fraction was inhibited by sitagliptin, a selective DPP-4 inhibitor. These findings indicate that DPP-4 is greatly involved in vildagliptin hydrolysis in the liver. Additionally, we established stable single expression systems of human DPP-4 and its R623Q mutant, which is the nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism of human DPP-4, in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells to investigate the effect of R623Q mutant on vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. M20.7 formation rate in HEK293 cells expressing human DPP-4 was significantly higher than that in control HEK293 cells. Interestingly, R623Q mutation resulted in a decrease of the vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. Our findings might be useful for the prediction of interindividual variability in vildagliptin pharmacokinetics. PMID:25597851

  20. Clinical pharmacology of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wu; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Yin-Xue; Duan, Wei; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a class of oral antidiabetic drugs that improve glycaemic control without causing weight gain or increasing hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The eight available DPP-4 inhibitors, including alogliptin, anagliptin, gemigliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin, teneligliptin, and vildagliptin, are small molecules used orally with identical mechanism of action and similar safety profiles in patients with T2DM. DPP-4 inhibitors may be used as monotherapy or in double or triple combination with other oral glucose-lowering agents such as metformin, thiazolidinediones, or sulfonylureas. Although DPP-4 inhibitors have the same mode of action, they differ by some important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that may be clinically relevant in some patients. The main differences between the eight gliptins include: potency, target selectivity, oral bioavailability, elimination half-life, binding to plasma proteins, metabolic pathways, formation of active metabolite(s), main excretion routes, dosage adjustment for renal and liver insufficiency, and potential drug-drug interactions. The off-target inhibition of selective DPP-4 inhibitors is responsible for multiorgan toxicities such as immune dysfunction, impaired healing, and skin reactions. As a drug class, the DPP-4 inhibitors have become accepted in clinical practice due to their excellent tolerability profile, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, a neutral effect on body weight, and once-daily dosing. It is unknown if DPP-4 inhibitors can prevent disease progression. More clinical studies are needed to validate the optimal regimens of DPP-4 inhibitors for the management of T2DM when their potential toxicities are closely monitored. PMID:26173919

  1. Effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in insulin-resistant rats with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Inthachai, Tharnwimol; Lekawanvijit, Suree; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-06-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) leads to progressive heart failure. Obese-insulin resistance increases risks of MI and heart failure. Although dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor is known to exert cardioprotection, its effects on adverse remodeling after MI in obese-insulin-resistant rats are unclear. We hypothesized that DPP4 inhibitor reduces adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling and LV dysfunction in obese-insulin-resistant rats with MI. Rats were fed either normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks to induce obese-insulin resistance, followed by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation to induce MI. Then, rats in each dietary group were divided into five subgroups to receive vehicle, enalapril (10mg/kg/day), metformin (30mg/kg/day), DPP4 inhibitor vildagliptin (3mg/kg/day), or combined metformin and vildagliptin for 8 weeks. Heart rate variability (HRV), LV function, pathological and biochemical studies for LV remodeling, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were determined. Obese-insulin-resistant rats had severe insulin resistance and LV dysfunction. HFD rats had a higher mortality rate than ND rats, and all treatments reduced the mortality rate in obese-insulin-resistant rats. Although all drugs improved insulin resistance, HRV, LV function as well as reduced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, vildagliptin effectively reduced cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas more than enalapril and was related to markedly decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In ND rats with MI, metformin neither improved LV ejection fraction nor reduced cardiac fibrosis. The infarct size and transforming growth factor-β expression were not different among groups. In obese-insulin-resistant rats with chronic MI, DPP4 inhibitor vildagliptin exerts better cardioprotection than enalapril in attenuating adverse LV remodeling. PMID:27044778

  2. Serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPINB5) haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Chou, Ying-Erh; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Liu, Yu-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The serpin peptidase inhibitor SERPINB5 is a tumour-suppressor gene that promotes the development of various cancers in humans. However, whether SERPINB5 gene variants play a role in HCC susceptibility remains unknown. In this study, we genotyped 6 SNPs of the SERPINB5 gene in an independent cohort from a replicate population comprising 302 cases and 590 controls. Additionally, patients who had at least one rs2289520 C allele in SERPINB5 tended to exhibit better liver function than patients with genotype GG (Child-Pugh grade A vs. B or C; P = 0.047). Next, haplotype blocks were reconstructed according to the linkage disequilibrium structure of the SERPINB5 gene. A haplotype “C-C-C” (rs17071138 + rs3744941 + rs8089204) in SERPINB5-correlated promoter showed a significant association with an increased HCC risk (AOR = 1.450; P = 0.031). Haplotypes “T-C-A” and “C-C-C” (rs2289519 + rs2289520 + rs1455555) located in the SERPINB5 coding region had a decreased (AOR = 0.744; P = 0.031) and increased (AOR = 1.981; P = 0.001) HCC risk, respectively. Finally, an additional integrated in silico analysis confirmed that these SNPs affected SERPINB5 expression and protein stability, which significantly correlated with tumour expression and subsequently with tumour development and aggressiveness. Taken together, our findings regarding these biomarkers provide a prediction model for risk assessment. PMID:27221742

  3. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV as a Potential Target for Selective Prodrug Activation and Chemotherapeutic Action in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is often offset by severe side effects attributable to poor selectivity and toxicity to normal cells. Recently, the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) was considered as a potential target for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting chemotherapeutic drugs to DPPIV as a strategy to enhance their specificity. The expression profile of DPPIV was obtained for seven cancer cell lines using DNA microarray data from the DTP database, and was validated by RT-PCR. A prodrug was then synthesized by linking the cytotoxic drug melphalan to a proline-glycine dipeptide moiety, followed by hydrolysis studies in the seven cell lines with a standard substrate, as well as the glycyl-prolyl-melphalan (GP-Mel). Lastly, cell proliferation studies were carried out to demonstrate enzyme-dependent activation of the candidate prodrug. The relative RT-PCR expression levels of DPPIV in the cancer cell lines exhibited linear correlation with U95Av2 Affymetrix data (r2 = 0.94), and with specific activity of a standard substrate, glycine-proline-p-nitroanilide (r2 = 0.96). The significantly higher antiproliferative activity of GP-Mel in Caco-2 cells (GI50 = 261 μM) compared to that in SK-MEL-5 cells (GI50 = 807 μM) was consistent with the 9-fold higher specific activity of the prodrug in Caco-2 cells (5.14 pmol/min/μg protein) compared to SK-MEL-5 cells (0.68 pmol/min/μg protein) and with DPPIV expression levels in these cells. Our results demonstrate the great potential to exploit DPPIV as a prodrug activating enzyme for efficient chemotherapeutic drug targeting. PMID:25365774

  4. Insertion of leader peptidase into the thylakoid membrane during synthesis in a chloroplast translation system

    PubMed Central

    Houben, E; de Gier JW; van Wijk KJ

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of targeting and insertion of chloroplast-encoded thylakoid membrane proteins are poorly understood. In this study, we have used a translation system isolated from chloroplasts to begin to investigate these mechanisms. The bacterial membrane protein leader peptidase (Lep) was used as a model protein because its targeting and insertion mechanisms are well understood for Escherichia coli and for the endoplasmic reticulum. Lep could thus provide insight into the functional homologies between the different membrane systems. Lep was efficiently expressed in the chloroplast translation system, and the protein could be inserted into thylakoid membranes with the same topology as in E. coli cytoplasmic membranes, following the positive-inside rule. Insertion of Lep into the thylakoid membrane was stimulated by the trans-thylakoid proton gradient and was strongly inhibited by azide, suggesting a requirement for SecA activity. Insertion most likely occurred in a cotranslational manner, because insertion could only be observed if thylakoid membranes were present during translation reactions but not when thylakoid membranes were added after translation reactions were terminated. To halt the elongation process at different stages, we translated truncated Lep mRNAs without a stop codon, resulting in the formation of stable ribosome nascent chain complexes. These complexes showed a strong, salt-resistant affinity for the thylakoid membrane, implying a functional interaction of the ribosome with the membrane and supporting a cotranslational insertion mechanism for Lep. Our study supports a functional homology for the insertion of Lep into the thylakoid membrane and the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:10449587

  5. Identification and Characterization of Prokaryotic Dipeptidyl-peptidase 5 from Porphyromonas gingivalis *

    PubMed Central

    Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Rouf, Shakh M. A.; Naito, Mariko; Yanase, Amie; Tetsuo, Fumi; Ono, Toshio; Kobayakawa, Takeshi; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu; Nakayama, Koji; Saiki, Keitarou; Konishi, Kiyoshi; Nemoto, Takayuki K.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative asaccharolytic anaerobe, is a major causative organism of chronic periodontitis. Because the bacterium utilizes amino acids as energy and carbon sources and incorporates them mainly as dipeptides, a wide variety of dipeptide production processes mediated by dipeptidyl-peptidases (DPPs) should be beneficial for the organism. In the present study, we identified the fourth P. gingivalis enzyme, DPP5. In a dpp4-7-11-disrupted P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, a DPP7-like activity still remained. PGN_0756 possessed an activity indistinguishable from that of the mutant, and was identified as a bacterial orthologue of fungal DPP5, because of its substrate specificity and 28.5% amino acid sequence identity with an Aspergillus fumigatus entity. P. gingivalis DPP5 was composed of 684 amino acids with a molecular mass of 77,453, and existed as a dimer while migrating at 66 kDa on SDS-PAGE. It preferred Ala and hydrophobic residues, had no activity toward Pro at the P1 position, and no preference for hydrophobic P2 residues, showed an optimal pH of 6.7 in the presence of NaCl, demonstrated Km and kcat/Km values for Lys-Ala-MCA of 688 μm and 11.02 μm−1 s−1, respectively, and was localized in the periplasm. DPP5 elaborately complemented DPP7 in liberation of dipeptides with hydrophobic P1 residues. Examinations of DPP- and gingipain gene-disrupted mutants indicated that DPP4, DPP5, DPP7, and DPP11 together with Arg- and Lys-gingipains cooperatively liberate most dipeptides from nutrient oligopeptides. This is the first study to report that DPP5 is expressed not only in eukaryotes, but also widely distributed in bacteria and archaea. PMID:24398682

  6. Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors as new drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mest, H-J; Mentlein, R

    2005-04-01

    Inhibitors of the regulatory protease dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) are currently under development in preclinical and clinical studies (several pharmaceutical companies, now in Phase III) as potential drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Their development is based on the observation that DPP-IV rapidly inactivates the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which is released postprandially from the gut and increases insulin secretion. DPP-IV inhibitors stabilise endogenous GLP-1 at physiological concentrations, and induce insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner; therefore, they do not demonstrate any hypoglycaemic effects. Furthermore, they are orally bioavailable. In addition to their ability to protect GLP-1 against degradation, DPP-IV inhibitors also stabilise other incretins, including gastric inhibitory peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide. They also reduce the antagonistic and desensitising effects of the fragments formed by truncation of the incretins. In clinical studies, when used for the treatment of diabetes over a 1-year period, DPP-IV inhibitors show improved efficacy over time. This finding can be explained by a GLP-1-induced increase in the number of beta cells. Potential risks associated with DPP-IV inhibitors include the prolongation of the action of other peptide hormones, neuropeptides and chemokines cleaved by the protease, and their interaction with DPP-IV-related proteases. Based on their mode of action, DPP-IV inhibitors seem to be of particular value in early forms of type 2 diabetes, either alone or in combination with other types of oral agents. PMID:15770466

  7. Neural peptidase endothelin-converting enzyme 1 regulates endothelin 1–induced pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Kempkes, Cordula; Ikoma, Akihiko; Cevikbas, Ferda; Akiyama, Tasuku; Nunes, Frank; Seeliger, Stephan; Hasdemir, Burcu; Mess, Christian; Buhl, Timo; Sulk, Mathias; Müller, Frank-Ulrich; Metze, Dieter; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Bhargava, Aditi; Carstens, Earl; Furue, Masutaka; Steinhoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In humans, pruritus (itch) is a common but poorly understood symptom in numerous skin and systemic diseases. Endothelin 1 (ET-1) evokes histamine-independent pruritus in mammals through activation of its cognate G protein–coupled receptor endothelin A receptor (ETAR). Here, we have identified neural endothelin–converting enzyme 1 (ECE-1) as a key regulator of ET-1–induced pruritus and neural signaling of itch. We show here that ETAR, ET-1, and ECE-1 are expressed and colocalize in murine dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and human skin nerves. In murine DRG neurons, ET-1 induced internalization of ETAR within ECE-1–containing endosomes. ECE-1 inhibition slowed ETAR recycling yet prolonged ET-1–induced activation of ERK1/2, but not p38. In a murine itch model, ET-1–induced scratching behavior was substantially augmented by pharmacological ECE-1 inhibition and abrogated by treatment with an ERK1/2 inhibitor. Using iontophoresis, we demonstrated that ET-1 is a potent, partially histamine-independent pruritogen in humans. Immunohistochemical evaluation of skin from prurigo nodularis patients confirmed an upregulation of the ET-1/ETAR/ECE-1/ERK1/2 axis in patients with chronic itch. Together, our data identify the neural peptidase ECE-1 as a negative regulator of itch on sensory nerves by directly regulating ET-1–induced pruritus in humans and mice. Furthermore, these results implicate the ET-1/ECE-1/ERK1/2 pathway as a therapeutic target to treat pruritus in humans. PMID:24812665

  8. NAAG peptidase inhibitor reduces cellular damage in a model of TBI with secondary hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-Feng; Gurkoff, Gene G; Van, Ken C; Song, Minsoo; Lowe, David A; Zhou, Jia; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2012-08-21

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a rapid and excessive glutamate elevation in the extracellular milieu, resulting in neuronal degeneration and astrocyte damage. Posttraumatic hypoxia is a clinically relevant secondary insult that increases the magnitude and duration of glutamate release following TBI. N-acetyl-aspartyl glutamate (NAAG), a prevalent neuropeptide in the CNS, suppresses presynaptic glutamate release by its action at the mGluR3 (a group II metabotropic glutamate receptor). However, extracellular NAAG is rapidly converted into NAA and glutamate by the catalytic enzyme glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) reducing presynaptic inhibition. We previously reported that the GCPII inhibitor ZJ-43 and its prodrug di-ester PGI-02776 reduce the deleterious effects of excessive extracellular glutamate when injected systemically within the first 30 min following injury. We now report that PGI-02776 (10mg/kg) is neuroprotective when administered 30 min post-injury in a model of TBI plus 30 min of hypoxia (FiO(2)=11%). 24h following TBI with hypoxia, significant increases in neuronal cell death in the CA1, CA2/3, CA3c, hilus and dentate gyrus were observed in the ipsilateral hippocampus. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in the number of astrocytes in the ipsilateral CA1, CA2/3 and in the CA3c/hilus/dentate gyrus. Administration of PGI-02776 immediately following the cessation of hypoxia significantly reduced neuronal and astrocytic cell death across all regions of the hippocampus. These findings indicate that NAAG peptidase inhibitors administered post-injury can significantly reduce the deleterious effects of TBI combined with a secondary hypoxic insult. PMID:22750589

  9. Chaperone-assisted Post-translational Transport of Plastidic Type I Signal Peptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Endow, Joshua K; Singhal, Rajneesh; Fernandez, Donna E; Inoue, Kentaro

    2015-11-27

    Type I signal peptidase (SPase I) is an integral membrane Ser/Lys protease with one or two transmembrane domains (TMDs), cleaving transport signals off translocated precursor proteins. The catalytic domain of SPase I folds to form a hydrophobic surface and inserts into the lipid bilayers at the trans-side of the membrane. In bacteria, SPase I is targeted co-translationally, and the catalytic domain remains unfolded until it reaches the periplasm. By contrast, SPases I in eukaryotes are targeted post-translationally, requiring an alternative strategy to prevent premature folding. Here we demonstrate that two distinct stromal components are involved in post-translational transport of plastidic SPase I 1 (Plsp1) from Arabidopsis thaliana, which contains a single TMD. During import into isolated chloroplasts, Plsp1 was targeted to the membrane via a soluble intermediate in an ATP hydrolysis-dependent manner. Insertion of Plsp1 into isolated chloroplast membranes, by contrast, was found to occur by two distinct mechanisms. The first mechanism requires ATP hydrolysis and the protein conducting channel cpSecY1 and was strongly enhanced by exogenously added cpSecA1. The second mechanism was independent of nucleoside triphosphates and proteinaceous components but with a high frequency of mis-orientation. This unassisted insertion was inhibited by urea and stroma extract. During import-chase assays using intact chloroplasts, Plsp1 was incorporated into a soluble 700-kDa complex that co-migrated with the Cpn60 complex before inserting into the membrane. The TMD within Plsp1 was required for the cpSecA1-dependent insertion but was dispensable for association with the 700-kDa complex and also for unassisted membrane insertion. These results indicate cooperation of Cpn60 and cpSecA1 for proper membrane insertion of Plsp1 by cpSecY1. PMID:26446787

  10. Dissociation free-energy profiles of specific and nonspecific DNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2013-06-27

    DNA-binding proteins recognize DNA sequences with at least two different binding modes: specific and nonspecific. Experimental structures of such complexes provide us a static view of the bindings. However, it is difficult to reveal further mechanisms of their target-site search and recognition only from static information because the transition process between the bound and unbound states is not clarified by static information. What is the difference between specific and nonspecific bindings? Here we performed adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics simulations with the specific and nonspecific structures of DNA-Lac repressor complexes to investigate the dissociation process. The resultant free-energy profiles showed that the specific complex has a sharp, deep well consistent with tight binding, whereas the nonspecific complex has a broad, shallow well consistent with loose binding. The difference in the well depth, ~5 kcal/mol, was in fair agreement with the experimentally obtained value and was found to mainly come from the protein conformational difference, particularly in the C-terminal tail. Also, the free-energy profiles were found to be correlated with changes in the number of protein-DNA contacts and that of surface water molecules. The derived protein spatial distributions around the DNA indicate that any large dissociation occurs rarely, regardless of the specific and nonspecific sites. Comparison of the free-energy barrier for sliding [~8.7 kcal/mol; Furini J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 2238] and that for dissociation (at least ~16 kcal/mol) calculated in this study suggests that sliding is much preferred to dissociation. PMID:23713479

  11. Synergy of local, regional, and systemic non-specific stressors for host defense against pathogens.

    PubMed

    Day, J D; LeGrand, E K

    2015-02-21

    The immune brinksmanship conceptual model postulates that many of the non-specific stressful components of the acute-phase response (e.g. fever, loss of appetite, iron and zinc sequestration) are host-derived systemic stressors used with the "hope" that pathogens will be harmed relatively more than the host. The concept proposes that pathogens, needing to grow and replicate in order to invade their host, should be relatively more vulnerable to non-specific systemic stress than the host and its cells. However, the conceptual model acknowledges the risk to the host in that the gamble to induce systemic self-harming stress to harm pathogens may not pay off in the end. We developed an agent-based model of a simplified host having a local infection to evaluate the utility of non-specific stress, harming host and pathogen alike, for host defense. With our model, we explore the benefits and risks of self-harming strategies and confirm the immune brinksmanship concept of the potential of systemic stressors to be an effective but costly host defense. Further, we extend the concept by including in our model the effects of local and regional non-specific stressors at sites of infection as additional defenses. These include the locally hostile inflammatory environment and the stress of reduced perfusion in the infected region due to coagulation and vascular leakage. In our model, we found that completely non-specific stressors at the local, regional, and systemic levels can act synergistically in host defense. PMID:25457230

  12. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Tynan, Christopher J; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation). Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion. PMID:24066121

  13. From Nonspecific DNA–Protein Encounter Complexes to the Prediction of DNA–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    DNA–protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA–protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA–protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA–protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA–protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA–protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Cα deviation from native is up to 5 Å from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA–protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein. PMID:19343221

  14. Quantitation in inflammatory pleural disease to distinguish tuberculous and paramalignant from chronic non-specific pleuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Capelozzi, V L; Saldiva, P H; Antonângelo, L; de Carvalho, T S; Logulo, A; de Carvalho, C R; Deheinzelin, D

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine by morphometry if pleural biopsies with the histopathological diagnosis of "non-specific pleuritis", malignant, and tuberculous disease could be distinguished morphologically from those with truly non-specific disease. METHODS: Each pleural biopsy was reviewed taking into account three compartments of reference: the visceral/parietal mesothelial compartment, the submesothelial screen compartment, and the submesothelial adipose tissue compartment. Normal connective tissue, granulation tissue, fibrocellular proliferation, fibrin, polymorphonuclear cells, mononuclear cells, and mesothelial cells were measured using conventional point counting procedures in terms of the fractional area occupied by each parameter within each compartment of reference. Ranking was carried out on 164 patients, based on their diagnosis: chronic non-specific disease (n = 57), tuberculosis (n = 27), malignant disease (n = 58), and conditions associated with transudative effusions (n = 22). RESULTS: Stepwise discriminant analysis of the resulting data showed that biopsies from patients with tuberculosis, malignant disease, and chronic non-specific disease could be distinguished between themselves and normal cases. Statistical differences among the four groups were observed for eight morphometric parameters related to components of inflammation and extension throughout the three pleural anatomical compartments. A robust discriminant function permitted an adequate classification of the three groups of disease in 88.41% of the cases. Pleural biopsies with fibrin incorporated within granulation tissue on the submesothelial screen compartment showed 100% specificity for patients with tuberculosis, while mononuclear cells in a band-like infiltrate on the submesothelial adipose tissue compartment showed 93.1% specificity for patients with malignant disease. The truly non-specific pleuritis was characterised by deposits of fibrin in the subpleural compartment and discrete signs of

  15. Crystal Structures of Complexes of Bacterial DD-Peptidases with Peptidoglycan-mimetic Ligands: The Substrate Specificity Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Eric; Powell, Ailsa J.; Heilemann, Jason; Josephine, Helen R.; Charlier, Paulette; Davies, Christopher; Pratt, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The X-ray crystal structures of covalent complexes of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase and Escherichia coli penicillin-binding protein 5 with β-lactams bearing peptidoglycan-mimetic side chains have been determined. The structure of the hydrolysis product of an analogous peptide bound non-covalently to the former enzyme has also been obtained. The R39 DD-peptidase structures reveal the presence of a specific binding site for the D-α-aminopimelyl side chain, characteristic of the stem peptide of Actinomadura R39. This binding site features a hydrophobic cleft for the pimelyl methylene groups and strong hydrogen bonding to the polar terminus. Both of these elements of the site are provided by amino acid side chains from two separate domains of the protein. In contrast, no clear electron density corresponding to the terminus of the peptidoglycan-mimetic side chains is present when these β-lactams are covalently bound to penicillin-binding protein 5. There is, therefore, no indication of a specific side chain binding site in this enzyme. These results are in agreement with those from kinetics studies published earlier and support the general prediction made at the time of a direct correlation between the kinetics and structural evidence. The essential high molecular weight penicillin binding proteins have demonstrated, to date, no specific reactivity with peptidoglycan-mimetic peptide substrates and β-lactam inhibitors and thus probably do not possess a specific substrate binding site of the type demonstrated here with the R39 DD-peptidase. This striking deficiency may represent a sophisticated defense mechanism against low molecular weight substrate-analogue inhibitors/antibiotics; its discovery should focus new inhibitor design. PMID:18602645

  16. INTERMEDIATE CLEAVAGE PEPTIDASE55 Modifies Enzyme Amino Termini and Alters Protein Stability in Arabidopsis Mitochondria1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaobai; Nelson, Clark J.; Li, Lei; Taylor, Nicolas L.; Ströher, Elke; Petereit, Jakob; Millar, A. Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Precursor proteins containing mitochondrial peptide signals are cleaved after import by a mitochondrial processing peptidase. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens), INTERMEDIATE CLEAVAGE PEPTIDASE55 (ICP55) plays a role in stabilizing mitochondrial proteins by the removal of single amino acids from mitochondrial processing peptidase-processed proteins. We have investigated the role of a metallopeptidase (At1g09300) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that has sequence similarity to yeast ICP55. We identified this protein in mitochondria by mass spectrometry and have studied its function in a transfer DNA insertion line (icp55). Monitoring of amino-terminal peptides showed that Arabidopsis ICP55 was responsible for the removal of single amino acids, and its action explained the −3 arginine processing motif of a number of mitochondrial proteins. ICP55 also removed single amino acids from mitochondrial proteins known to be cleaved at nonconserved arginine sites, a subset of mitochondrial proteins specific to plants. Faster mitochondrial protein degradation rates not only for ICP55 cleaved protein but also for some non-ICP55 cleaved proteins were observed in Arabidopsis mitochondrial samples isolated from icp55 than from the wild type, indicating that a complicated protease degradation network has been affected. The lower protein stability of isolated mitochondria and the lack of processing of target proteins in icp55 were complemented by transformation with the full-length ICP55. Analysis of in vitro degradation rates and protein turnover rates in vivo of specific proteins indicated that serine hydroxymethyltransferase was affected in icp55. The maturation of serine hydroxymethyltransferase by ICP55 is unusual, as it involves breaking an amino-terminal diserine that is not known as an ICP55 substrate in other organisms and that is typically considered a sequence that stabilizes rather than destabilizes a protein. PMID:25862457

  17. NAAG peptidase inhibition in the periaqueductal gray and rostral ventromedial medulla reduces flinching in the formalin model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been identified as significant analgesic targets. Systemic treatments with inhibitors of the enzymes that inactivate the peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), an mGluR3 agonist, have an analgesia-like effect in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to begin defining locations within the central pain pathway at which NAAG activation of its receptor mediates this effect. Results NAAG immunoreactivity was found in neurons in two brain regions that mediate nociceptive processing, the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). Microinjection of the NAAG peptidase inhibitor ZJ43 into the PAG contralateral, but not ipsilateral, to the formalin injected footpad reduced the rapid and slow phases of the nociceptive response in a dose-dependent manner. ZJ43 injected into the RVM also reduced the rapid and slow phase of the response. The group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 blocked these effects of ZJ43 on the PAG and RVM. NAAG peptidase inhibition in the PAG and RVM did not affect the thermal withdrawal response in the hot plate test. Footpad inflammation also induced a significant increase in glutamate release in the PAG. Systemic injection of ZJ43 increased NAAG levels in the PAG and RVM and blocked the inflammation-induced increase in glutamate release in the PAG. Conclusion These data demonstrate a behavioral and neurochemical role for NAAG in the PAG and RVM in regulating the spinal motor response to inflammation and that NAAG peptidase inhibition has potential as an approach to treating inflammatory pain via either the ascending (PAG) and/or the descending pain pathways (PAG and RVM) that warrants further study. PMID:22971334

  18. NAAG peptidase inhibitor reduces acute neuronal degeneration and astrocyte damage following lateral fluid percussion TBI in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunlong; Zhao, Xueren; Sarva, Jayaprakash; Kozikowski, Alan; Neale, Joseph H; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2005-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces a rapid and excessive elevation in extracellular glutamate associated with excitotoxicity and secondary brain pathology. The peptide neurotransmitter Nacetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) suppresses glutamate transmission through selective activation of presynaptic Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGluR3). Thus, inhibition of NAAG peptidase activity and the prolong presence of synaptic NAAG were hypothesized to have significant potential for cellular protection following TBI. In the present study, a novel NAAG peptidase inhibitor, ZJ-43, was used in four different doses (0, 50, 100, or 150 mg/kg). Each dose was repeatedly administered i.p. (n=5/group) by multiple injections at three times (0 time, 8 h, 16 h) after moderate lateral fluid percussion TBI in the rat. An additional group was co-administered ZJ-43 (150 mg/kg) and the Group II mGluR antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg), which was predicted to abolish any protective effects of ZJ-43. Rats were euthanized at 24 h after TBI, and brains were processed with a selective marker for degenerating neurons (Fluoro-Jade B) and a marker for astrocytes (GFAP). Ipsilateral neuronal degeneration and bilateral astrocyte loss in the CA2/3 regions of the hippocampus were quantified using stereological techniques. Compared with vehicle, ZJ-43 significantly reduced the number of the ipsilateral degenerating neurons (p<0.01) with the greatest neuroprotection at the 50 mg/kg dose. Moreover, LY341495 successfully abolished the protective effects of ZJ-43. 50 mg/kg of ZJ-43 also significantly reduced the ipsilateral astrocyte loss (p<0.05). We conclude that the NAAG peptidase inhibitor ZJ-43 is a potential novel strategy to reduce both neuronal and astrocyte damage associated with the glutamate excitotoxicity after TBI. PMID:15716632

  19. NAAG peptidase inhibitor improves motor function and reduces cognitive dysfunction in a model of TBI with secondary hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Gurkoff, Gene G; Feng, Jun-Feng; Van, Ken C; Izadi, Ali; Ghiasvand, Rahil; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Song, Minsoo; Lowe, David A; Zhou, Jia; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2013-06-17

    Immediately following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and TBI with hypoxia, there is a rapid and pathophysiological increase in extracellular glutamate, subsequent neuronal damage and ultimately diminished motor and cognitive function. N-acetyl-aspartyl glutamate (NAAG), a prevalent neuropeptide in the CNS, is co-released with glutamate, binds to the presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGluR3) and suppresses glutamate release. However, the catalytic enzyme glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) rapidly hydrolyzes NAAG into NAA and glutamate. Inhibition of the GCP II enzyme with NAAG peptidase inhibitors reduces the concentration of glutamate both by increasing the duration of NAAG activity on mGluR3 and by reducing degradation into NAA and glutamate resulting in reduced cell death in models of TBI and TBI with hypoxia. In the following study, rats were administered the NAAG peptidase inhibitor PGI-02776 (10mg/kg) 30 min following TBI combined with a hypoxic second insult. Over the two weeks following injury, PGI-02776-treated rats had significantly improved motor function as measured by increased duration on the rota-rod and a trend toward improved performance on the beam walk. Furthermore, two weeks post-injury, PGI-02776-treated animals had a significant decrease in latency to find the target platform in the Morris water maze as compared to vehicle-treated animals. These findings demonstrate that the application of NAAG peptidase inhibitors can reduce the deleterious motor and cognitive effects of TBI combined with a second hypoxic insult in the weeks following injury. PMID:23562458

  20. Insecticidal effect of Canavalia ensiformis major urease on nymphs of the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus and characterization of digestive peptidases.

    PubMed

    Defferrari, Marina S; Demartini, Diogo R; Marcelino, Thiago B; Pinto, Paulo M; Carlini, Celia R

    2011-06-01

    Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis) ureases are entomotoxic upon the release of internal peptides by insect's digestive enzymes. Here we studied the digestive peptidases of Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug) and its susceptibility to jackbean urease (JBU). O. fasciatus nymphs fed urease showed a mortality rate higher than 80% after two weeks. Homogenates of midguts dissected from fourth instars were used to perform proteolytic activity assays. The homogenates hydrolyzed JBU in vitro, yielding a fragment similar in size to known entomotoxic peptides. The major proteolytic activity at pH 4.0 upon protein substrates was blocked by specific inhibitors of aspartic and cysteine peptidases, but not significantly affected by inhibitors of metallopeptidases or serine peptidases. The optimal activity upon N-Cbz-Phe-Arg-MCA was at pH 5.0, with complete blockage by E-64 in all pH tested. Optimal activity upon Abz-AIAFFSRQ-EDDnp (a substrate for aspartic peptidases) was detected at pH 5.0, with partial inhibition by Pepstatin A in the pH range 2-8. Fluorogenic substrates corresponding to the N- and C-terminal regions flanking a known entomotoxic peptide within urease sequence were also tested. While the midgut homogenate did not hydrolyze the N-terminal peptide, it cleaved the C-terminal peptide maximally at pH 4.0-5.0, and this activity was inhibited by E-64 (10 μM). The midgut homogenate was submitted to ion-exchange chromatography followed by gel filtration. A 22 kDa active fraction was obtained, resolved in SDS-PAGE (12%), the corresponding band was in-gel digested by trypsin, the peptides were analyzed by mass spectrometry, retrieving a cathepsin L protein. The purified cathepsin L was shown to have at least two possible cleavage sites within the urease sequence, and might be able to release a known insecticidal peptide in a single or cascade event. The results suggest that susceptibility of O. fasciatus nymphs to jackbean urease is, like in other insect models, due mostly

  1. NAAG peptidase inhibitors block cognitive deficit induced by MK-801 and motor activation induced by d-amphetamine in animal models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, R T; Janczura, K J; Ball, S R; Madore, J C; Lavin, K M; Lee, J C-M; Lee, M J; Der, E K; Hark, T J; Farago, P R; Profaci, C P; Bzdega, T; Neale, J H

    2012-01-01

    The most widely validated animal models of the positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia involve administration of d-amphetamine or the open channel NMDA receptor blockers, dizocilpine (MK-801), phencyclidine (PCP) and ketamine. The drug ZJ43 potently inhibits glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), an enzyme that inactivates the peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) and reduces positive and negative behaviors induced by PCP in several of these models. NAAG is an agonist at the metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGluR3). Polymorphisms in this receptor have been associated with expression of schizophrenia. This study aimed to determine whether two different NAAG peptidase inhibitors are effective in dopamine models, whether their efficacy was eliminated in GCPII knockout mice and whether the efficacy of these inhibitors extended to MK-801-induced cognitive deficits as assessed using the novel object recognition test. ZJ43 blocked motor activation when given before or after d-amphetamine treatment. (R,S)-2-phosphono-methylpentanedioic acid (2-PMPA), another potent NAAG peptidase inhibitor, also reduced motor activation induced by PCP or d-amphetamine. 2-PMPA was not effective in GCPII knockout mice. ZJ43 and 2-PMPA also blocked MK-801-induced deficits in novel object recognition when given before, but not after, the acquisition trial. The group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 blocked the effects of NAAG peptidase inhibition in these studies. 2-PMPA was more potent than ZJ43 in a test of NAAG peptidase inhibition in vivo. By bridging the dopamine and glutamate theories of schizophrenia with two structurally different NAAG peptidase inhibitors and demonstrating their efficacy in blocking MK-801-induced memory deficits, these data advance the concept that NAAG peptidase inhibition represents a potentially novel antipsychotic therapy. PMID:22850437

  2. The influence of age on intestinal dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV/CD26), disaccharidases, and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Detel, Dijana; Baticic, Lara; Varljen, Jadranka

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and describe the age-related changes in intestinal brush border membrane enzyme activities that occur in C57Bl/6 mice. Specifically, jejunal, duodenal, and ileal dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26, disaccharidase (lactase, sucrase, and maltase), and alkaline phosphatase activities were determined. A significant correlation between analyzed intestinal brush border membrane enzyme activities and animal age was found. Our study revealed that intestinal dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26, lactase, sucrase, maltase, and alkaline phosphatase activities decline significantly with age (p < .05). Nevertheless, the horizontal (duodenum to ileum) enzyme activity patterns are not affected by age. PMID:18189167

  3. A general method for making peptide therapeutics resistant to serine protease degradation: application to dipeptidyl peptidase IV substrates.

    PubMed

    Heard, Kathryn R; Wu, Wengen; Li, Youhua; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Lai, Jack H; Beinborn, Martin; Sanford, David G; Dimare, Matthew T; Chiluwal, Amrita K; Peters, Diane E; Whicher, Danielle; Sudmeier, James L; Bachovchin, William W

    2013-11-14

    Bioactive peptides have evolved to optimally fulfill specific biological functions, a fact which has long attracted attention for their use as therapeutic agents. While there have been some recent commercial successes fostered in part by advances in large-scale peptide synthesis, development of peptides as therapeutic agents has been significantly impeded by their inherent susceptibility to protease degradation in the bloodstream. Here we report that incorporation of specially designed amino acid analogues at the P1' position, directly C-terminal of the enzyme cleavage site, renders peptides, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide (GLP-1) and six other examples, highly resistant to serine protease degradation without significant alteration of their biological activity. We demonstrate the applicability of the method to a variety of proteases, including dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), dipeptidyl peptidase 8 (DPP8), fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα), α-lytic protease (αLP), trypsin, and chymotrypsin. In summary, the "P1' modification" represents a simple, general, and highly adaptable method of generating enzymatically stable peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:24044354

  4. The Arabidopsis Xylem Peptidase XCP1 Is a Tracheary Element Vacuolar Protein That May Be a Papain Ortholog1

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Vanessa; Kositsup, Boonthida; Zhao, Chengsong; Beers, Eric P.

    2002-01-01

    XCP1 is a xylem-specific papain-like cysteine peptidase in Arabidopsis. To determine whether XCP1 could be involved in tracheary element autolysis, promoter activity and localization of XCP1 were investigated using XCP1 promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. A tracheary element expression pattern was detected for XCP1. Results from confocal microscopy and biochemical subcellular fractionation indicated that XCP1 was localized in the vacuole. Ectopic expression of XCP1 resulted in a reduction in plant size in some lines and early leaf senescence, as indicated by early loss of leaf chlorophyll. Reduced plant size was correlated with higher levels of XCP1, as shown by immunoblot and peptidase activity gel analyses. The XCP1 prodomain exhibits exceptionally high similarity (greater than 80%) to the prodomains of papain and other papain-like enzymes isolated from papaya (Carica papaya) laticifers when compared with all other reported papain-like enzymes. The potential for XCP1 and papain to perform common functions as catalysts of autolytic processing following cell death due to programmed suicide or to wounding is discussed. PMID:11788755

  5. Cytosolic γ-Glutamyl Peptidases Process Glutathione Conjugates in the Biosynthesis of Glucosinolates and Camalexin in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Geu-Flores, Fernando; Møldrup, Morten Emil; Böttcher, Christoph; Olsen, Carl Erik; Scheel, Dierk; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2011-01-01

    The defense-related plant metabolites known as glucosinolates play important roles in agriculture, ecology, and human health. Despite an advanced biochemical understanding of the glucosinolate pathway, the source of the reduced sulfur atom in the core glucosinolate structure remains unknown. Recent evidence has pointed toward GSH, which would require further involvement of a GSH conjugate processing enzyme. In this article, we show that an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant impaired in the production of the γ-glutamyl peptidases GGP1 and GGP3 has altered glucosinolate levels and accumulates up to 10 related GSH conjugates. We also show that the double mutant is impaired in the production of camalexin and accumulates high amounts of the camalexin intermediate GS-IAN upon induction. In addition, we demonstrate that the cellular and subcellular localization of GGP1 and GGP3 matches that of known glucosinolate and camalexin enzymes. Finally, we show that the purified recombinant GGPs can metabolize at least nine of the 10 glucosinolate-related GSH conjugates as well as GS-IAN. Our results demonstrate that GSH is the sulfur donor in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates and establish an in vivo function for the only known cytosolic plant γ-glutamyl peptidases, namely, the processing of GSH conjugates in the glucosinolate and camalexin pathways. PMID:21712415

  6. Characterization of a novel family of fibronectin-binding proteins with M23 peptidase domains from Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, C.V.; Francescutti, T.; Cameron, C.E.; Jenkinson, H.F.; Dymock, D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Interactions with fibronectin are important in the virulence strategies of a range of disease-related bacteria. The periodontitis-associated oral spirochaete Treponema denticola expresses at least two fibronectin-binding proteins, designated Msp (major surface protein) and OppA (oligopeptide-binding protein homologue). To identify other T. denticola outer membrane fibronectin-binding proteins, the amino acid sequence of the Treponema pallidum fibronectin-binding protein Tp0155 was used to survey the T. denticola genome. Seven T. denticola genes encoding orthologous proteins were identified. All but two were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified recombinant proteins bound fibronectin. Using antibodies to the N-terminal region of Tp0155, it was demonstrated that T. denticola TDE2318, with highest homology to Tp0155, was cell surface localized. Like Tp0155, the seven T. denticola proteins contained an M23 peptidase domain and four (TDE2318, TDE2753, TDE1738, TDE1297) contained one or two LysM domains. M23 peptidases can degrade peptidoglycan whereas LysM domains recognize carbohydrate polymers. In addition, TDE1738 may act as a bacteriocin based on homology with other bacterial lysins and the presence of an adjacent gene encoding a putative immunity factor. Collectively, these results suggest that T. denticola expresses fibronectin-binding proteins associated with the cell surface that may also have cell wall modifying or lytic functions. PMID:21040511

  7. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  8. Leishmania inhibitor of serine peptidase prevents TLR4 activation by neutrophil elastase promoting parasite survival in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Marilia S.; Reis, Flavia C. G.; Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L.; Morrison, Lesley S.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania major is a protozoan parasite that causes skin ulcerations in cutaneous leishmaniasis. In the mammalian host, the parasite resides in professional phagocytes and has evolved to avoid killing by macrophages. We identified L. major genes encoding inhibitors of serine peptidases, ISPs, which are orthologues of bacterial ecotins and found that ISP2 inhibits trypsin-fold S1A family peptidases. Here we show that L. major mutants deficient in ISP2 and ISP3 (Δisp2/3) trigger higher phagocytosis by macrophages through a combined action of the complement type-3 receptor (CR3), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and unregulated activity of neutrophil elastase (NE), leading to parasite killing. While all three components are required to mediate enhanced parasite uptake, only TLR4 and NE are necessary to promote parasite killing after infection. We found that the production of superoxide by macrophages in the absence of ISP2 is the main mechanism controlling the intracellular infection. Furthermore, we show that NE modulates macrophage infection in vivo, and that the lack of ISP leads to reduced parasite burdens at later stages of the infection. Our findings support the hypothesis that ISPs function to prevent the activation of TLR4 by NE during the Leishmania-macrophage interaction in order to promote parasite survival and growth. PMID:21098233

  9. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  10. Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 substrates and their discovery: current progress and the application of mass spectrometry-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Claire H; Zhang, Hui Emma; Gorrell, Mark D; Abbott, Catherine A

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme members of the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) gene family have the very unusual capacity to cleave the post-proline bond to release dipeptides from the N-terminus of peptide/protein substrates. DPP4 and related enzymes are current and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of type II diabetes, inflammatory conditions and cancer. Despite this, the precise biological function of individual dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), other than DPP4, and knowledge of their in vivo substrates remains largely unknown. For many years, identification of physiological DPP substrates has been difficult due to limitations in the available tools. Now, with advances in mass spectrometry based approaches, we can discover DPP substrates on a system wide-scale. Application of these approaches has helped reveal some of the in vivo natural substrates of DPP8 and DPP9 and their unique biological roles. In this review, we provide a general overview of some tools and approaches available for protease substrate discovery and their applicability to the DPPs with a specific focus on DPP9 substrates. This review provides comment upon potential approaches for future substrate elucidation. PMID:27410463

  11. Identification of novel functional sequence variants in the gene for peptidase inhibitor 3

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Mahboob A; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Romero, Roberto; Edwin, Samuel; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Tromp, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Background Peptidase inhibitor 3 (PI3) inhibits neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3, and has a potential role in skin and lung diseases as well as in cancer. Genome-wide expression profiling of chorioamniotic membranes revealed decreased expression of PI3 in women with preterm premature rupture of membranes. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms contributing to the decreased expression in amniotic membranes, the PI3 gene was searched for sequence variations and the functional significance of the identified promoter variants was studied. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified by direct sequencing of PCR products spanning a region from 1,173 bp upstream to 1,266 bp downstream of the translation start site. Fourteen SNPs were genotyped from 112 and nine SNPs from 24 unrelated individuals. Putative transcription factor binding sites as detected by in silico search were verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using nuclear extract from Hela and amnion cell nuclear extract. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested by χ2 goodness-of-fit test. Haplotypes were estimated using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Results Twenty-three sequence variations were identified by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products covering 2,439 nt of the PI3 gene (-1,173 nt of promoter sequences and all three exons). Analysis of 112 unrelated individuals showed that 20 variants had minor allele frequencies (MAF) ranging from 0.02 to 0.46 representing "true polymorphisms", while three had MAF ≤ 0.01. Eleven variants were in the promoter region; several putative transcription factor binding sites were found at these sites by database searches. Differential binding of transcription factors was demonstrated at two polymorphic sites by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, both in amniotic and HeLa cell nuclear extracts. Differential binding of the transcription factor GATA1 at -689C>G site was confirmed by a

  12. Effects of Inhibiting Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP4) in Cows with Subclinical Ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Kirsten; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Meyer, Ulrich; Rehage, Jürgen; Piechotta, Marion; Meyerholz, Maria; Breves, Gerhard; Reiche, Dania; Sauerwein, Helga; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) via specific inhibitors is known to result in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and decreased accumulation of hepatic fat in type II diabetic human patients. The metabolic situation of dairy cows can easily be compared to the status of human diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver. For both, insulin sensitivity is reduced, while hepatic fat accumulation increases, characterized by high levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and ketone bodies.Therefore, in the present study, a DPP4 inhibitor was employed (BI 14332) for the first time in cows. In a first investigation BI 14332 treatment (intravenous injection at dosages of up to 3 mg/kg body weight) was well tolerated in healthy lactating pluriparous cows (n = 6) with a significant inhibition of DPP4 in plasma and liver. Further testing included primi- and pluriparous lactating cows suffering from subclinical ketosis (β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in serum > 1.2 mM; n = 12). The intension was to offer effects of DPP4 inhibition during comprehensive lipomobilisation and hepatosteatosis. The cows of subclinical ketosis were evenly allocated to either the treatment group (daily injections, 0.3 mg BI 14332/kg body weight, 7 days) or the control group. Under condition of subclinical ketosis, the impact of DPP4 inhibition via BI 14332 was less, as in particular β-hydroxybutyrate and the hepatic lipid content remained unaffected, but NEFA and triglyceride concentrations were decreased after treatment. Owing to lower NEFA, the revised quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (surrogate marker for insulin sensitivity) increased. Therefore, a positive influence on energy metabolism might be quite possible. Minor impacts on immune-modulating variables were limited to the lymphocyte CD4+/CD8+ ratio for which a trend to decreased values in treated versus control animals was noted. In sum, the DPP4 inhibition in cows did not affect glycaemic control like

  13. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Exerts Renoprotective Effects in Rats with Established Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Arruda-Junior, Daniel F; Martins, Flavia L; Dariolli, Rafael; Jensen, Leonardo; Antonio, Ednei L; Dos Santos, Leonardo; Tucci, Paulo J F; Girardi, Adriana C C

    2016-01-01

    Circulating dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes in humans and experimental heart failure (HF) models, suggesting that DPPIV may play a role in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Renal dysfunction is one of the key features of HF, but it remains to be determined whether DPPIV inhibitors are capable of improving cardiorenal function after the onset of HF. Therefore, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that DPPIV inhibition by vildagliptin improves renal water and salt handling and exerts anti-proteinuric effects in rats with established HF. To this end, male Wistar rats were subjected to left ventricle (LV) radiofrequency ablation or sham operation. Six weeks after surgery, radiofrequency-ablated rats who developed HF were randomly divided into two groups and treated for 4 weeks with vildagliptin (120 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by oral gavage. Echocardiography was performed before (pretreatment) and at the end of treatment (post-treatment) to evaluate cardiac function. The fractional area change (FAC) increased (34 ± 5 vs. 45 ± 3%, p < 0.05), and the isovolumic relaxation time decreased (33 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 1 ms; p < 0.05) in HF rats treated with vildagliptin (post-treatment vs. pretreatment). On the other hand, cardiac dysfunction deteriorated further in vehicle-treated HF rats. Renal function was impaired in vehicle-treated HF rats as evidenced by fluid retention, low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and high levels of urinary protein excretion. Vildagliptin treatment restored urinary flow, GFR, urinary sodium and urinary protein excretion to sham levels. Restoration of renal function in HF rats by DPPIV inhibition was associated with increased active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) serum concentration, reduced DPPIV activity and increased activity of protein kinase A in the renal cortex. Furthermore, the anti-proteinuric effect of vildagliptin treatment in rats with established HF was associated with

  14. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes therapy – focus on alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Annalisa; Sportiello, Liberata; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Rossi, Francesco; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex and progressive disease that is showing an apparently unstoppable increase worldwide. Although there is general agreement on the first-line use of metformin in most patients with type 2 diabetes, the ideal drug sequence after metformin failure is an area of increasing uncertainty. New treatment strategies target pancreatic islet dysfunction, in particular gut-derived incretin hormones. Inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) slows degradation of endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and thereby enhances and prolongs the action of the endogenous incretin hormones. The five available DPP-4 inhibitors, also known as ‘gliptins’ (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, alogliptin), are small molecules used orally with similar overall clinical efficacy and safety profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes. The main differences between the five gliptins on the market include: potency, target selectivity, oral bioavailability, long or short half-life, high or low binding to plasma proteins, metabolism, presence of active or inactive metabolites, excretion routes, dosage adjustment for renal and liver insufficiency, and potential drug–drug interactions. On average, treatment with gliptins is expected to produce a mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) decrease of 0.5%–0.8%, with about 40% of diabetic subjects at target for the HbA1c goal <7%. There are very few studies comparing DPP-4 inhibitors. Alogliptin as monotherapy or added to metformin, pioglitazone, glibenclamide, voglibose, or insulin therapy significantly improves glycemic control compared with placebo in adult or elderly patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. In the EXAMINE trial, alogliptin is being compared with placebo on cardiovascular outcomes in approximately 5,400 patients with type 2 diabetes. In clinical studies, DPP-4 inhibitors were generally safe and well tolerated. However, there are limited data on their

  15. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  16. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Exerts Renoprotective Effects in Rats with Established Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Arruda-Junior, Daniel F.; Martins, Flavia L.; Dariolli, Rafael; Jensen, Leonardo; Antonio, Ednei L.; dos Santos, Leonardo; Tucci, Paulo J. F.; Girardi, Adriana C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes in humans and experimental heart failure (HF) models, suggesting that DPPIV may play a role in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Renal dysfunction is one of the key features of HF, but it remains to be determined whether DPPIV inhibitors are capable of improving cardiorenal function after the onset of HF. Therefore, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that DPPIV inhibition by vildagliptin improves renal water and salt handling and exerts anti-proteinuric effects in rats with established HF. To this end, male Wistar rats were subjected to left ventricle (LV) radiofrequency ablation or sham operation. Six weeks after surgery, radiofrequency-ablated rats who developed HF were randomly divided into two groups and treated for 4 weeks with vildagliptin (120 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by oral gavage. Echocardiography was performed before (pretreatment) and at the end of treatment (post-treatment) to evaluate cardiac function. The fractional area change (FAC) increased (34 ± 5 vs. 45 ± 3%, p < 0.05), and the isovolumic relaxation time decreased (33 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 1 ms; p < 0.05) in HF rats treated with vildagliptin (post-treatment vs. pretreatment). On the other hand, cardiac dysfunction deteriorated further in vehicle-treated HF rats. Renal function was impaired in vehicle-treated HF rats as evidenced by fluid retention, low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and high levels of urinary protein excretion. Vildagliptin treatment restored urinary flow, GFR, urinary sodium and urinary protein excretion to sham levels. Restoration of renal function in HF rats by DPPIV inhibition was associated with increased active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) serum concentration, reduced DPPIV activity and increased activity of protein kinase A in the renal cortex. Furthermore, the anti-proteinuric effect of vildagliptin treatment in rats with established HF was associated with

  17. Effectiveness of three contingency-nonspecific stimuli on bathroom graffiti prevention in a college setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Chung, Kyong-Mee

    2013-04-01

    An A-B-A design was adopted to test the effectiveness of different types of contingency-nonspecific stimuli in the prevention of bathroom graffiti in a college setting. The three stimuli examined in this study have been frequently used to prevent bathroom graffiti in South Korea and they were: (a) "Please do not write, draw, or mark on these walls;" (b) a mirror; and (c) "Courteous people keep public places clean." No graffiti was observed when the first and second stimuli were presented. In contrast, a notable increase in bathroom graffiti was observed when the third sign was presented. The results suggest that a contingency non-specific stimuli posting intervention can be effective in the prevention of bathroom graffiti only when appropriate stimuli are used. The practical implications, including cost-effectiveness, are discussed. PMID:23833871

  18. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsugu Ogi,; Hironao Nagai,; Yuji Fukunishi,; Taiji Yanagida,; Masahiko Hirao,; Masayoshi Nishiyama,

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-μm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  19. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Nagai, Hironao; Fukunishi, Yuji; Yanagida, Taiji; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-µm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  20. Modifiers of non-specific symptoms in occupational and environmental syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, A; Gompertz, D; Harrington, J M

    1996-01-01

    Many occupational and environmental health hazards present as an increased reporting of non-specific symptoms such as headache, backache, eye and respiratory irritation, tiredness, memory problems, and poor concentration. The pattern and number of such symptoms is surprisingly constant from hazard to hazard suggesting that common psychological and social factors, not directly related to the exposure may be involved. A recent workshop (see acknowledgements) was held to review the pattern of symptoms in varying hazardous situations and the psychological mechanisms behind the genesis and maintenance of symptoms. The involvement of both direct physicochemical and psychological mechanisms in symptom generation and reporting in any situation was discussed and is reported here. A model that identifies the issues that need to be considered in any epidemiological study based on the incidence or prevalence of non-specific symptoms is proposed. PMID:8758029

  1. Solitary nonspecific ileal ulcer. Diagnosis by coloileoscopy in a patient with previously assumed irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Börsch, G; Jahnke, A; Bergbauer, M; Nebel, W

    1983-11-01

    We present a case of solitary nonspecific ileal ulcer found by coloileoscopy in a patient with previously assumed irritable bowel syndrome. Follow-up endoscopies two weeks after initiation of short-term prednisone therapy, and again four months later, demonstrated rapid and persistent healing. This observation raises the question of whether or not primary ileal ulcers are indeed as rare as previously assumed when only surgical and autopsy findings were taken into consideration. Also, the natural history of this clinical entity, in general, could be somewhat more benign than suggested by those ulcers in which complications make surgery necessary, since these cases may not adequately reflect the full clinical spectrum of nonspecific small-bowel ulcers. PMID:6628147

  2. Rubella serology: a comparison of four methods for exclusion of non-specific serum inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Traavik, T; Spanne, O; Mennen, S

    1981-06-01

    The ability of the pyrogenic silica Aerosil 380R to exclude non-specific serum inhibitors (NSI) of rubella virus haemagglutination was evaluated. The developed procedure was compared with the kaolin, heparin/MnCl2 and dextran sulphate/CaCl2 methods. Aerosil and kaolin were found superior for the elimination of non-specific inhibitors and high density lipoproteins (HDL). The other methods left NSI and HDL in a majority of the sera, occasionally in high titres. Aerosil seemed to be somewhat more efficient than kaolin in NSI and HDL exclusion. The Aerosil method offers the opportunity to detect sera with rubella antibody titres less than 10. Among eight such sera, six were shown to contain rubella antibodies, while two were false positives. PMID:6263970

  3. [Dynamic renal scintigraphy in assessing kidney function in patients with nonspecific colitis].

    PubMed

    Topchiĭ, T V; Moskalenko, N I; Man'kovskaia, O L; Morozova, N L

    1990-11-01

    Research into the morphofunctional status of the kidneys was conducted in patients with nonspecific colitis-NC (nonspecific ulcerative colitis-NUC and Crohn's disease). Urodynamics and partial function of the kidneys were assessed in 74 NC patients (51 NUC patients and 23 patients with Crohn's disease) on the basis of the findings of two-nuclide dynamic renal scintigraphy with 131I-hippuran and 99mTc-pentatech. Despite the absence of clinical symptomatology of urinary tract lesions, marked dysfunction of the kidneys of various degree (depending on severity of disease, tactics of its treatment and a type of surgical intervention) was noted in NC patients. In most cases changes of renal function were without visible clinical manifestations and were frequently undetectable by routine laboratory tests. Therefore dynamic renal scintigraphy was found necessary for investigation on NC patients. PMID:2259285

  4. A case study of apple seed and grape allergy with sensitisation to nonspecific lipid transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ari; Katelaris, Constance H; Baumgart, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Lipid transfer proteins can be an important cause of allergy given their stability and high degree of protein sequence homology. We describe the case of a child who developed two separate episodes of anaphylaxis after consuming apple seed and grape, with evidence that nonspecific lipid transfer proteins may have been responsible for these reactions. Lipid transfer protein allergy should be considered when anaphylaxis is inconsistent, such as in patients who can tolerate fruit pulp but react to fresh whole fruit juices. PMID:27141487

  5. He-Ne laser treatment for 16 cases of nonspecific edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenlou; Liu, Sixian; Cao, Guangyi; Chen, Zhifu; Zhang, Haishui; Wei, Wei; Xia, Xinshe; Sia, Guangyu

    1993-03-01

    Nonspecific edema is a syndrome which is caused by a metabolism disorder of sodium and water. The people who suffer with this are mostly women about 25 - 50 years old. When it happens periodic edema, abdominal distension acratia, and obesity accompany the disease. Through several means of examination, no organic disease was found in the heart, liver, or kidney. Now 16 edema cases have been irradiated with laser and the result is satisfactory. The results are reported in this paper.

  6. The non-specific ion channel in Torpedo ocellata fused synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Yakir, N; Rahamimoff, R

    1995-01-01

    1. Synaptic vesicles were isolated and fused into large structures with a diameter of more than 20 microns to characterize their ionic channels. The 'cell'-attached and inside-out configurations of the patch clamp technique were used. 2. Two types of ion channels were most frequently observed: a low conductance chloride channel and a high conductance non-specific channel. 3. The non-specific channel has a main conducting state and a substate. The main conducting state has a slope conductance of 246 +/- 15 pS (+/- S.E.M., n = 15), in the presence of different combinations of KCl and potassium glutamate. 4. From the reversal potentials of the current-voltage (I-V) relation, it was concluded that this channel conducts both Cl- and K+. 5. The non-specific channel is highly voltage dependent: under steady-state voltages it has a high open probability near 0 mV and does not inactivate; when the membrane is hyperpolarized (pipette side more positive), the open probability decreases dramatically. 6. Voltage pulses showed that upon hyperpolarization (from holding potentials between -20 and + 20 mV), the channels deactivated; when the membrane was stepped back to the holding potential, the channels reactivated rapidly. 7. In a number of experiments, when the pipette side was made more negative than the bath, the open probability also decreased. 8. Frequently, a substate with a conductance of about 44 +/- 4% (+/- S.E.M., n = 3) of the main state was detected. 9. We speculate that this non-specific ion channel may have different roles at the various stages of the life cycle of the synaptic vesicle. When the synaptic vesicle is an intracellular structure, it might help its transmitter-concentrating capacity by dissipating the polarization. After fusion with the surface membrane, it might constitute an additional conductance pathway, taking part in frequency modulation of synaptic transmission. PMID:7562610

  7. In vivo activity of a nonspecific T cell-replacing factor.

    PubMed

    Kindred, B; Bösing-Schneider, R; Corley, R B

    1979-01-01

    Nonspecific T cell-replacing factors prepared as supernatants from mixed lymphocyte cultures or concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells are active in vivo iv injected into nude mice at least 3 days before antigen. The supernatants appear to act by enhancing the week IgM responses that occur in untreated nudes. Secondary responses and IgG antibody were not found. PMID:153929

  8. Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation with macrocephaly and obesity: A further family

    SciTech Connect

    Baraitser, M.; Reardon, W.; Vijeratnam, S.

    1995-07-03

    The phenotypic nonspecificity of many forms of X-linked mental retardation has hampered attempts to classify them into clinically homogeneous groups. One such condition, described by Clark and Baraitser, has been the subject of a single pedigree report to date. We now describe a further pedigree whose affected members share many manifestations with those reported by Clark and Baraitser, and we consider the possible distinction between this condition and Atkin-Flaitz syndrome. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. [SOME ASPECTS OF NON-SPECIFIC PROPHYLAXIS AND THERAPY OF ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS INFECTIONS].

    PubMed

    Filippenko, A V; Omelchenko, N D; Ivanova, I A; Bespalova, I A; Doroshenko, E P; Galicheva, A L

    2015-01-01

    Recently, due to spread of dangerous and especially dangerous infections much attention is given to development of complex approaches to their prophylaxis and therapy. Data on use of immune modulators, cytokines, probiotics, preparations of plant origin for non-specific prophylaxis of especially dangerous infections are analyzed in the review, and expediency of their combined use with specific and emergency prophlaxis of these diseases is evaluated. PMID:26829862

  10. Conservative Therapy for Nonspecific Granuloma of the Larynx Using a Beclomethasone Dipropionate Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Yoshihisa; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kohno, Naoyuki

    1996-01-01

    Nonspecific granuloma of the larynx is a benign tumor that usually occurs on the posterior glottis. Conventional treatment for this laryngeal lesion has consisted of surgical resection. However, this lesion has a strong tendency to recur postoperatively and may require multiple repeated operative procedures. Conservative treatment, consisting mainly of beclomethasone dipropionate inhalation therapy, was instituted in 20 cases with good results. We discussed the effect of beclomethasone dipropionate on this lesion as well as the etiology of this disease. PMID:18493422

  11. A case study of apple seed and grape allergy with sensitisation to nonspecific lipid transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Katelaris, Constance H; Baumgart, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins can be an important cause of allergy given their stability and high degree of protein sequence homology. We describe the case of a child who developed two separate episodes of anaphylaxis after consuming apple seed and grape, with evidence that nonspecific lipid transfer proteins may have been responsible for these reactions. Lipid transfer protein allergy should be considered when anaphylaxis is inconsistent, such as in patients who can tolerate fruit pulp but react to fresh whole fruit juices. PMID:27141487

  12. How large are the nonspecific effects of acupuncture? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While several recent large randomized trials found clinically relevant effects of acupuncture over no treatment or routine care, blinded trials comparing acupuncture to sham interventions often reported only minor or no differences. This raises the question whether (sham) acupuncture is associated with particularly potent nonspecific effects. We aimed to investigate the size of nonspecific effects associated with acupuncture interventions. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials and reference lists were searched up to April 2010 to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for any condition, including both sham and no acupuncture control groups. Data were extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second. Pooled standardized mean differences were calculated using a random effects model with the inverse variance method. Results Thirty-seven trials with a total of 5754 patients met the inclusion criteria. The included studies varied strongly regarding patients, interventions, outcome measures, methodological quality and effect sizes reported. Among the 32 trials reporting a continuous outcome measure, the random effects standardized mean difference between sham acupuncture and no acupuncture groups was -0.45 (95% confidence interval, -0.57, -0.34; I2 = 54%; Egger's test for funnel plot asymmetry, P = 0.25). Trials with larger effects of sham over no acupuncture reported smaller effects of acupuncture over sham intervention than trials with smaller nonspecific effects (β = -0.39, P = 0.029). Conclusions Sham acupuncture interventions are often associated with moderately large nonspecific effects which could make it difficult to detect small additional specific effects. Compared to inert placebo interventions, effects associated with sham acupuncture might be larger, which would have considerable implications for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:21092261

  13. [Multispiral computed tomography in diagnosis of vascular pathology in patients with nonspecific aortoarteritis].

    PubMed

    Bakhritdinov, F Sh; Suiumov, A S

    2015-01-01

    Multispiral computed tomography in the angiographic mode is relatively a new method in diagnosis of arterial lesions in patients presenting with nonspecific aortoarteritis. With virtually no contraindications to carrying out the examination, this method makes it possible to obtain an exclusively clear-cut picture of the vascular bed in both two- and three-dimensional projection, to correlate it with osseous structures. This method of diagnosis may also be used for dynamic follow up of patients in the postoperative period. PMID:26673294

  14. Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to intraperitoneal injection of bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junjie; Zou, Wenzheng; Yan, Qingpi

    2008-08-01

    Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila was studied to 60 individuals in two groups. Each bullfrog in bacterium-injected group was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.2 ml bacterial suspension at a density of 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml, while each one in control group injected i.p. with 0.2 ml sterile saline solution (0.85%, w/v). Three bullfrogs in both groups were sampled at 0, 1, 3, 7, 11, 15 and 20 days post-injection (dpi) for the evaluation of non-specific immune parameters. It was observed that intraperitoneal injection of A. hydrophila significantly increased the number of leucocytes and that of NBT-positive cells in peripheral blood. Significant increases in serum bactericidal activity and serum acid phosphatase activity were also observed in the bacterium-injected frogs when compared with those in the control group. However, a significant reduction was detected in vitro in phagocytosis activity of peripheral blood phagocytes. No significant difference in changes in the number of peripheral erythrocytes, serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lysozyme activity was detected between the two groups. It is suggested that bullfrogs may produce a series of non-specific immune reactions in response to the A. hydrophila infection.

  15. Isozymic variations in specific and nonspecific esterase and its thermostability in silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Biswas, Tapati Datta; Nayak, Sandeepta Kumar; Saha, A K; Majumdar, M K

    2012-09-01

    Esterase isozymic variations were documented in the haemolymph of developed multivoltine and bivoltine silkworm breeds during unfavorable seed crop seasons of May - September using á- and â- napthylacetate separately to identify specific and nonspecific esterase having thermotolerant potentiality. Variations existed in the isozyme pattern with three bands (Est-2, 3 and 4) in pure Nistari race and other developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds. Est-2 and Est-3 were non-specific esterases as they were observed when both á- and â-napthylacetate was used as substrates separately. Est-4 band was observed only with á-napthylacetate as substrate and was therefore confirmed to be specific á-esterase band in the haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. Zymograms showed that the non-specific esterase band (Est-3) with R1 of 0.43 and specific á-esterase band (Est-4) with R(f) of 0.32 predominately withstood a temperature of 70 +/- 2 degrees C for a duration of 10 min and were confirmed as thermostable esterases in haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. This also categorized the presence of thermostable esterases in developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds of silkworm, even though the qualitative activity was more in the former than the latter. The qualitative presence of thermostable esterases and their activity could be adopted as an indicative biochemical marker in relation to thermotolerance in silkworm. PMID:23734447

  16. Effect sizes of non-surgical treatments of non-specific low-back pain

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, J.; Bombardier, C.; van Tulder, M.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous randomized trials have been published investigating the effectiveness of treatments for non-specific low-back pain (LBP) either by trials comparing interventions with a no-treatment group or comparing different interventions. In trials comparing two interventions, often no differences are found and it raises questions about the basic benefit of each treatment. To estimate the effect sizes of treatments for non-specific LBP compared to no-treatment comparison groups, we searched for randomized controlled trials from systematic reviews of treatment of non-specific LBP in the latest issue of the Cochrane Library, issue 2, 2005 and available databases until December 2005. Extracted data were effect sizes estimated as Standardized Mean Differences (SMD) and Relative Risk (RR) or data enabling calculation of effect sizes. For acute LBP, the effect size of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and manipulation were only modest (ES: 0.51 and 0.40, respectively) and there was no effect of exercise (ES: 0.07). For chronic LBP, acupuncture, behavioral therapy, exercise therapy, and NSAIDs had the largest effect sizes (SMD: 0.61, 0.57, and 0.52, and RR: 0.61, respectively), all with only a modest effect. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation and manipulation had small effect sizes (SMD: 0.22 and 0.35, respectively). As a conclusion, the effect of treatments for LBP is only small to moderate. Therefore, there is a dire need for developing more effective interventions. PMID:17619914

  17. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  18. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  19. The Effect of Nonspecific Binding of Lambda Repressor on DNA Looping Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Zurla, Chiara; Dunlap, David D.; Finzi, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The λ repressor (CI) protein-induced DNA loop maintains stable lysogeny, yet allows efficient switching to lysis. Herein, the kinetics of loop formation and breakdown has been characterized at various concentrations of protein using tethered particle microscopy and a novel, to our knowledge, method of analysis. Our results show that a broad distribution of rate constants and complex kinetics underlie loop formation and breakdown. In addition, comparison of the kinetics of looping in wild-type DNA and DNA with mutated o3 operators showed that these sites may trigger nucleation of nonspecific binding at the closure of the loop. The average activation energy calculated from the rate constant distribution is consistent with a model in which nonspecific binding of CI between the operators shortens their effective separation, thereby lowering the energy barrier for loop formation and broadening the rate constant distribution for looping. Similarly, nonspecific binding affects the kinetics of loop breakdown by increasing the number of loop-securing protein interactions, and broadens the rate constant distribution for this reaction. Therefore, simultaneous increase of the rate constant for loop formation and reduction of that for loop breakdown stabilizes lysogeny. Given these simultaneous changes, the frequency of transitions between the looped and the unlooped state remains nearly constant. Although the loop becomes more stable thermodynamically with increasing CI concentration, it still opens periodically, conferring sensitivity to environmental changes, which may require switching to lytic conditions. PMID:23083719

  20. Reduction of nonspecific protein adsorption on cantilever biosensors caused by transverse resonant mode vibration.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake N; Mutharasan, Raj

    2014-03-01

    We examine if vibration of millimeter-sized cantilever sensors can release nonspecifically adsorbed proteins. Integrated electrochemical and mass-change measurement as well as fluorescence assays showed transverse surface vibration released nonspecifically bound proteins in samples prepared at 0.2-3.6 mg bovine serum albumin (BSA) per mL. Extent of release was directly related to magnitude of excitation voltage (Vex) applied to the self-actuating lead zirconate titanate (PZT) cantilever over three log units (0, 10 mV, 100 mV, and 1 V). Vibration-induced release was not instantaneous, but had an apparent first-order rate constant (kapp) which ranged from 0.02-0.1 min(-1). Results suggest significant serum albumin protein release could be achieved using excitation voltages of 1 V in millimeter-sized cantilever sensors. Complementary experiments with thiolated DNA, which binds to surface gold 〈111〉 sites with ∼ four times higher binding energy than BSA, showed negligible release under the same vibration magnitude. The results of the study suggest a direct correlation between surface-adsorbate binding energy and the effectiveness of vibration-induced release. We suggest that the release mechanism includes contributions from surface strain energy, body force, and acoustic streaming-associated hydrodynamic effects. The primary contribution of this study suggests that surface vibration of cantilever sensors may be useful in reducing nonspecific adsorption, especially for biosensing of analytes present in a complex background. PMID:24416758

  1. Tunable "nano-shearing": a physical mechanism to displace nonspecific cell adhesion during rare cell detection.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Rauf, Sakandar; Dray, Eloïse; Tay, Zhikai; Trau, Matt

    2014-02-18

    We report a tunable alternating current electro-hydrodynamic (ac-EHD) force which drives lateral fluid motion within a few nanometers of an electrode surface. Because the magnitude of this fluid shear force can be tuned externally (e.g., via the application of an ac electric field), it provides a new capability to physically displace weakly (nonspecifically) bound cellular analytes. To demonstrate the utility of the tunable nanoshearing phenomenon, we present data on purpose-built microfluidic devices that employ ac-EHD force to remove nonspecific adsorption of molecular and cellular species. Here, we show that an ac-EHD device containing asymmetric planar and microtip electrode pairs resulted in a 4-fold reduction in nonspecific adsorption of blood cells and also captured breast cancer cells in blood, with high efficiency (approximately 87%) and specificity. We therefore feel that this new capability of externally tuning and manipulating fluid flow could have wide applications as an innovative approach to enhance the specific capture of rare cells such as cancer cells in blood. PMID:24446838

  2. Detection and characterization of nonspecific, sparsely-populated binding modes in the early stages of complexation

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, A.; Bornstein, A.; Pant, H. C.; Brady, M.; Sriram, R.; Hassan, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed to study protein-ligand binding in a system governed by specific and non-specific interactions. Strong associations lead to narrow distributions in the proteins configuration space; weak and ultra-weak associations lead instead to broader distributions, a manifestation of non-specific, sparsely-populated binding modes with multiple interfaces. The method is based on the notion that a discrete set of preferential first-encounter modes are metastable states from which stable (pre-relaxation) complexes at equilibrium evolve. The method can be used to explore alternative pathways of complexation with statistical significance and can be integrated into a general algorithm to study protein interaction networks. The method is applied to a peptide-protein complex. The peptide adopts several low-population conformers and binds in a variety of modes with a broad range of affinities. The system is thus well suited to analyze general features of binding, including conformational selection, multiplicity of binding modes, and nonspecific interactions, and to illustrate how the method can be applied to study these problems systematically. The equilibrium distributions can be used to generate biasing functions for simulations of multiprotein systems from which bulk thermodynamic quantities can be calculated. PMID:25782918

  3. Treating non-specific chronic low back pain through the Pilates Method.

    PubMed

    La Touche, Roy; Escalante, Karla; Linares, María Teresa

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this study is to review and analyze scientific articles where the Pilates Method was used as treatment for non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). Articles were searched using the Medline, EMBASE, PEDro, CINAHL, and SPORTDICUS databases. The criteria used for inclusion were randomized controlled trials (RCT) and clinical controlled trials (CCT) published in English where therapeutic treatment was based on the Pilates Method. The analysis was carried out by two independent reviewers using the PEDro and Jadad Scales. Two RCTs and one CCT were selected for a retrospective analysis. The results of the studies analyzed all demonstrate positive effects, such as improved general function and reduction in pain when applying the Pilates Method in treating non-specific CLBP in adults. However, further research is required to determine which specific parameters are to be applied when prescribing exercises based on the Pilates Method with patients suffering from non-specific CLBP. Finally, we believe that more studies must be carried out where the samples are more widespread so as to give a larger representation and more reliable results. PMID:19083695

  4. An RNA chaperone activity of non-specific RNA binding proteins in hammerhead ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, D; Khosla, M; Tsuchihashi, Z; Karpel, R L

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that a protein derived from the p7 nucleocapsid (NC) protein of HIV type-1 increases kcat/Km and kcat for cleavage of a cognate substrate by a hammerhead ribozyme. Here we show directly that the increase in kcat/Km arises from catalysis of the annealing of the RNA substrate to the ribozyme and the increase in kcat arises from catalysis of dissociation of the RNA products from the ribozyme. A peptide polymer derived from the consensus sequence of the C-terminal domain of the hnRNP A1 protein (A1 CTD) provides similar enhancements. Although these effects apparently arise from non-specific interactions, not all non-specific binding interactions led to these enhancements. NC and A1 CTD exert their effects by accelerating attainment of the thermodynamically most stable species throughout the ribozyme catalytic cycle. In addition, NC protein is shown to resolve a misfolded ribozyme-RNA complex that is otherwise long lived. These in vitro results suggest that non-specific RNA binding proteins such as NC and hnRNP proteins may have a biological role as RNA chaperones that prevent misfolding of RNAs and resolve RNAs that have misfolded, thereby ensuring that RNA is accessible for its biological functions. Images PMID:8026476

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of azobicyclo[3.3.0] octane derivatives as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tang Peng; Long, Yang Fang; Gang, Lin Zhi; Yang, Wang; Jun, Lu He; Yuan, Shen Guang; Hong, Fu Jian; Lin, Wang; Liang, Guan Dong; Lei, Zhang; Jing, Luo Jing; Shen, Gong Ai; Hong, She Gao; Dan, Wang; Ying, Feng; Ke, Yan Pang; Ying, Leng; Jun, Feng; Tai, Mong Xian

    2010-06-15

    A series of novel azobicyclo[3.3.0]octane derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. The effort resulted in the discovery of inhibitor 2a, which exhibited excellent efficacies in an oral glucose tolerance test. Introduction of methyl group (2j) could prolong the inhibition of serum DPP-4 activity. PMID:20488702

  6. Complementary Proteomic and Biochemical Analysis of Peptidases in Lobster Gastric Juice Uncovers the Functional Role of Individual Enzymes in Food Digestion.

    PubMed

    Bibo-Verdugo, Betsaida; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Craik, Charles S; García-Carreño, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Crustaceans are a diverse group, distributed in widely variable environmental conditions for which they show an equally extensive range of biochemical adaptations. Some digestive enzymes have been studied by purification/characterization approaches. However, global analysis is crucial to understand how digestive enzymes interplay. Here, we present the first proteomic analysis of the digestive fluid from a crustacean (Homarus americanus) and identify glycosidases and peptidases as the most abundant classes of hydrolytic enzymes. The digestion pathway of complex carbohydrates was predicted by comparing the lobster enzymes to similar enzymes from other crustaceans. A novel and unbiased substrate profiling approach was used to uncover the global proteolytic specificity of gastric juice and determine the contribution of cysteine and aspartic acid peptidases. These enzymes were separated by gel electrophoresis and their individual substrate specificities uncovered from the resulting gel bands. This new technique is called zymoMSP. Each cysteine peptidase cleaves a set of unique peptide bonds and the S2 pocket determines their substrate specificity. Finally, affinity chromatography was used to enrich for a digestive cathepsin D1 to compare its substrate specificity and cold-adapted enzymatic properties to mammalian enzymes. We conclude that the H. americanus digestive peptidases may have useful therapeutic applications, due to their cold-adaptation properties and ability to hydrolyze collagen. PMID:26613762

  7. Type IV prepilin peptidase gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11: presence of a related gene in other piliated and nonpiliated Neisseria strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, B; Pugsley, A P

    1994-01-01

    The assembly of type IV pili in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a complex process likely to require the products of many genes. One of these is the enzyme prepilin peptidase, which cleaves and then N methylates the precursor pilin subunits prior to their assembly into pili. We have used a PCR amplification strategy to clone the N. gonorrhoeae prepilin peptidase gene, pilDNg. A single copy of the gene is shown to be present in the chromosome. Its product promotes correct cleavage of the gonococcal prepillin in Escherichia coli cells carrying both the prepilin peptidase gene and the pilin structural gene. PilDNg also cleaves prePulG, a type IV pilin-like protein of Klebsiella oxytoca. Moreover, PilDNg complements a mutation in the gene coding for the prepilin peptidase-like protein of K. oxytoca, pulO, partially restoring PulG-PulO-dependent extracellular secretion of the enzyme pullulanase. Finally, we show that genes homologous to pilDNg are present and expressed in a variety of species in the genus Neisseria, including some commensal strains. Images PMID:7906688

  8. Effects of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor sitagliptin on immunological parameters of lymphocytes in intact animals and animals with experimental autoimmune process.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M V; Mel'nikova, E V; Trufakin, V A

    2014-11-01

    The effects of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor sitagliptin on immunological parameters were studied in animals with experimental autoimmune process. The effects of the drug administered in preventive (before manifestation of autoimmune processes) and therapeutic (after manifestation of autoimmune process) modes were studied. PMID:25408522

  9. Novel transglutaminase-like peptidase and C2 domains elucidate the structure, biogenesis and evolution of the ciliary compartment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng

    2012-01-01

    In addition to their role in motility, eukaryotic cilia serve as a distinct compartment for signal transduction and regulatory sequestration of biomolecules. Recent genetic and biochemical studies have revealed an extraordinary diversity of protein complexes involved in the biogenesis of cilia during each cell cycle. Mutations in components of these complexes are at the heart of human ciliopathies such as Nephronophthisis (NPHP), Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Joubert syndrome (JBTS). Despite intense studies, proteins in some of these complexes, such as the NPHP1-4-8 and the MKS, remain poorly understood. Using a combination of computational analyses we studied these complexes to identify novel domains in them which might throw new light on their functions and evolutionary origins. First, we identified both catalytically active and inactive versions of transglutaminase-like (TGL) peptidase domains in key ciliary/centrosomal proteins CC2D2A/MKS6, CC2D2B, CEP76 and CCDC135. These ciliary TGL domains appear to have originated from prokaryotic TGL domains that act as peptidases, either in a prokaryotic protein degradation system with the MoxR AAA+ ATPase, the precursor of eukaryotic dyneins and midasins, or in a peptide-ligase system with an ATP-grasp enzyme comparable to tubulin-modifying TTL proteins. We suggest that active ciliary TGL proteins are part of a cilia-specific peptidase system that might remove tubulin modifications or cleave cilia- localized proteins, while the inactive versions are likely to bind peptides and mediate key interactions during ciliogenesis. Second, we observe a vast radiation of C2 domains, which are key membrane-localization modules, in multiple ciliary proteins, including those from the NPHP1-4-8 and the MKS complexes, such as CC2D2A/MKS6, RPGRIP1, RPGRIP1L, NPHP1, NPHP4, C2CD3, AHI1/Jouberin and CEP76, most of which can be traced back to the last eukaryotic ancestor. Identification of these TGL and C2

  10. Discovery of Small Molecule Isozyme Non-specific Inhibitors of Mammalian Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Freeman-Cook, K; Elliott, R; Vajdos, F; Rajamohan, F; Kohls, D; Marr, E; Harwood Jr., H; Esler, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  11. Expression and characterization of Drosophila signal peptide peptidase-like (sppL), a gene that encodes an intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Casso, David J; Liu, Songmei; Biehs, Brian; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2012-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases of the Signal Peptide Peptidase (SPP) family play important roles in developmental, metabolic and signaling pathways. Although vertebrates have one SPP and four SPP-like (SPPL) genes, we found that insect genomes encode one Spp and one SppL. Characterization of the Drosophila sppL gene revealed that the predicted SppL protein is a highly conserved structural homolog of the vertebrate SPPL3 proteases, with a predicted nine-transmembrane topology, an active site containing aspartyl residues within a transmembrane region, and a carboxy-terminal PAL domain. SppL protein localized to both the Golgi and ER. Whereas spp is an essential gene that is required during early larval stages and whereas spp loss-of-function reduced the unfolded protein response (UPR), sppL loss of function had no apparent phenotype. This was unexpected given that genetic knockdown phenotypes in other organisms suggested significant roles for Spp-related proteases. PMID:22439002

  12. Shedding of glycan-modifying enzymes by signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) regulates cellular N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Matthias; Künzel, Ulrike; Higel, Fabian; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Colombo, Alessio; Fukumori, Akio; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Klier, Bärbel; Grammer, Gudula; Seidl, Andreas; Schröder, Bernd; Obst, Reinhard; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Haass, Christian; Fluhrer, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmunity, tumour progression and metastasis. Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is an intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease of the GxGD type. Its physiological function, however, has remained enigmatic, since presently no physiological substrates have been identified. We demonstrate that SPPL3 alters the pattern of cellular N-glycosylation by triggering the proteolytic release of active site-containing ectodomains of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases such as N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V, β-1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 and β-1,4 galactosyltransferase 1. Cleavage of these enzymes leads to a reduction in their cellular activity. In line with that, reduced expression of SPPL3 results in a hyperglycosylation phenotype, whereas elevated SPPL3 expression causes hypoglycosylation. Thus, SPPL3 plays a central role in an evolutionary highly conserved post-translational process in eukaryotes. PMID:25354954

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structure homologs: Contributing factors in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Sedo, Aleksi; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S; Balaziova, Eva; Sedova, Liliana R

    2005-01-01

    Several of the proinflammatory peptides involved in rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis, including peptides induced downstream of tumor necrosis factor-α as well as the monocyte/T cell-attracting chemokines RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α and the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P, have their biological half-lives controlled by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). Proteolysis by DPPIV regulates not only the half-life but also receptor preference and downstream signaling. In this article, we examine the role of DPPIV homologs, including CD26, the canonical DPPIV, and their substrates in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. The differing specific activities of the DPPIV family members and their differential inhibitor response provide new insights into therapeutic design. PMID:16277701

  14. Isolation, characterization, and expression of the gene encoding the beta subunit of the mitochondrial processing peptidase from Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Costa Rocha, C R; Lopes Gomes, S

    1998-08-01

    A 2.3-kb BamHI-KpnI fragment was isolated from a partial genomic library and shown by nucleotide sequence analysis to contain the entire coding region of the gene encoding the beta subunit of the Blastocladiella mitochondrial processing peptidase (beta-MPP). The predicted beta-MPP protein has 465 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 50.8 kDa. S1 nuclease protection assays revealed an intron, 209 bp in size, interrupting the coding region between the putative signal sequence and the mature protein. Northern blot analysis showed that beta-MPP mRNA levels decrease significantly during B. emersonii sporulation, reaching basal levels in the zoospore stage. The amount of beta-MPP protein, determined in Western blots, unlike its mRNA, does not vary significantly throughout the fungal life cycle. PMID:9683495

  15. Drug development from the bench to the pharmacy: with special reference to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor development.

    PubMed

    Carr, R D

    2016-06-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor concept is an example of prospective drug design and development based upon a distinct endocrine hypothesis. The design of enzyme inhibitors is a pragmatic approach to drug design; being compatible with the identification and optimization of small molecules that have properties commensurate with oral administration, as well as acceptable drug metabolism, distribution and elimination characteristics. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a hormone with a spectrum of favourable metabolic actions, including glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin and inhibition of glucagon secretion, provided the endocrine basis from which the idea of using DPP-4 inhibitors as anti-diabetic agents was developed. The origin of the DPP-4 inhibitor concept was inspired by the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor approach, which succeeded in establishing a class of extensively used therapeutic agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26773271

  16. Hepatitis C virus core protein: carboxy-terminal boundaries of two processed species suggest cleavage by a signal peptide peptidase.

    PubMed

    Hüssy, P; Langen, H; Mous, J; Jacobsen, H

    1996-10-01

    The expression and processing of hepatitis C virus core protein was analyzed. Two protein bands, 21 kDa (P21), corresponding to the full-length core, and 19 kDa (P19), were detected as major products when core protein was expressed in the standard rabbit reticulocyte lysate system or in Sf9 insect cells. Core proteins with amino-terminal hexa-histidine tags were expressed which allowed the purification of the hexa-histidine P19 core with NI(2+)-NTA columns. With the help of mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of hexa-histidine-P19 was analyzed and its carboxy-terminus could be calculated. Fusion proteins of truncated core/core-E1 species fused to mouse dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR) showed cleavage in the expected region. Cleavage sites could be determined by amino-terminal protein sequencing of the DHFR-fusion partner. Our data show that there are not one but two core products with an apparent molecular weight of about 19 kDa, ending either at amino acid leucine 179 or leucine 182, respectively. These cleavages in the hydrophobic, carboxy-terminal region of HCV core suggest processing by (a) recently proposed eucaryotic signal peptide peptidase(s) (F. Lyko et al. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19873-19878). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that cleavage at these sites and the formation of the P19 species does not require previous processing at the signalase site (position 191/192) of the HCV-polyprotein. PMID:8862403

  17. Overview of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Analogs and Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pratley, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Context Impairment of incretin activity is now recognized as integral to the metabolic derangement underlying type 2 diabetes. Glucoregulatory agents that target the incretin system have recently been developed, and the place of these drugs in the treatment of type 2 diabetes can be assessed based on a growing body of clinical data. Evidence Acquisition A PubMed search was conducted to identify clinical studies of incretin therapies in type 2 diabetes. Article reference lists were also searched for relevant information, and supplemental material such as conference abstracts, drug prescribing information, and treatment guidelines were included as appropriate. Evidence Synthesis Two classes of therapies target the incretin system. The first, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists (exemplified by exenatide and liraglutide), have demonstrated considerable efficacy in clinical trials, reducing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by up to 1.3%, decreasing fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations, reducing weight by approximately 3.0 kg, and improving cardiovascular risk factors. The second class, the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (such as sitagliptin and vildagliptin) rely on production of endogenous GLP-1 and act by reducing its turnover. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors produce modest reductions in HbA1c (< 1%) compared with GLP-1 agonists and are generally weight-neutral. Neither GLP-1 agonists nor DPP-4 inhibitors cause hypoglycemia unless used with other agents known to increase risk. Conclusions GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors provide a valuable new treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes and may be associated with a wider range of therapeutic benefits than older drugs. PMID:18769687

  18. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  19. A role for nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in reactive oxygen species-dependent DNA damage responses

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Glas, Rickard

    2009-11-27

    Responses to DNA damage are influenced by cellular metabolism through the continuous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), of which most are by-products of mitochondrial respiration. ROS have a strong influence on signaling pathways during responses to DNA damage, by relatively unclear mechanisms. Previous reports have shown conflicting data on a possible role for tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII), a large cytosolic peptidase, within the DNA damage response. Here we show that TPPII translocated into the nucleus in a p160-ROCK-dependent fashion in response to {gamma}-irradiation, and that nuclear expression of TPPII was present in most {gamma}-irradiated transformed cell lines. We used a panel of nine cell lines of diverse tissue origin, including four lymphoma cell lines (T, B and Hodgkins lymphoma), a melanoma, a sarcoma, a colon and two breast carcinomas, where seven out of nine cell lines showed nuclear TPPII expression after {gamma}-irradiation. Further, this required cellular production of ROS; treatment with either N-acetyl-Cysteine (anti-oxidant) or Rotenone (inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration) inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII. The local density of cells was important for nuclear accumulation of TPPII at early time-points following {gamma}-irradiation (at 1-4 h), indicating a bystander effect. Further, we showed that the peptide-based inhibitor Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH, but not its analogue Z-Gly-(D)-Leu-Ala-OH, excluded TPPII from the nucleus. This correlated with reduced nuclear expression of p53 as well as caspase-3 and -9 activation in {gamma}-irradiated lymphoma cells. Our data suggest a role for TPPII in ROS-dependent DNA damage responses, through alteration of its localization from the cytosol into the nucleus.

  20. Cleavage Activation of Human-adapted Influenza Virus Subtypes by Kallikrein-related Peptidases 5 and 12*

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the influenza virus replication cycle is the cleavage activation of the HA precursor. Cleavage activation of influenza HA enables fusion with the host endosome, allowing for release of the viral genome into the host cell. To date, studies have determined that HA activation is driven by trypsin-like host cell proteases, as well as yet to be identified bacterial proteases. Although the number of host proteases that can activate HA is growing, there is still uncertainty regarding which secreted proteases are able to support multicycle replication of influenza. In this study, we have determined that the kallikrein-related peptidases 5 and 12 are secreted from the human respiratory tract and have the ability to cleave and activate HA from the H1, H2, and H3 subtypes. Each peptidase appears to have a preference for particular influenza subtypes, with kallikrein 5 cleaving the H1 and H3 subtypes most efficiently and kallikrein 12 cleaving the H1 and H2 subtypes most efficiently. Cleavage analysis using HA cleavage site peptide mimics revealed that the amino acids neighboring the arginine cleavage site affect cleavage efficiency. Additionally, the thrombolytic zymogens plasminogen, urokinase, and plasma kallikrein have all been shown to cleave and activate influenza but are found circulating mainly as inactive precursors. Kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12 were examined for their ability to activate the thrombolytic zymogens, and both resulted in activation of each zymogen, with kallikrein 12 being a more potent activator. Activation of the thrombolytic zymogens may therefore allow for both direct and indirect activation of the HA of human-adapted influenza viruses by kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12. PMID:23612974

  1. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S.; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Goñi, Félix M.

    2015-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  2. A Single Glycan at the 99-Loop of Human Kallikrein-related Peptidase 2 Regulates Activation and Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shihui; Skala, Wolfgang; Magdolen, Viktor; Briza, Peter; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver; Kellermann, Josef; Brandstetter, Hans; Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (KLK2) is a key serine protease in semen liquefaction and prostate cancer together with KLK3/prostate-specific antigen. In order to decipher the function of its potential N-glycosylation site, we produced pro-KLK2 in Leishmania tarentolae cells and compared it with its non-glycosylated counterpart from Escherichia coli expression. Mass spectrometry revealed that Asn-95 carries a core glycan, consisting of two GlcNAc and three hexoses. Autocatalytic activation was retarded in glyco-pro-KLK2, whereas the activated glyco-form exhibited an increased proteolytic resistance. The specificity patterns obtained by the PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage sites) method are similar for both KLK2 variants, with a major preference for P1-Arg. However, glycosylation changes the enzymatic activity of KLK2 in a drastically substrate-dependent manner. Although glyco-KLK2 has a considerably lower catalytic efficiency than glycan-free KLK2 toward peptidic substrates with P2-Phe, the situation was reverted toward protein substrates, such as glyco-pro-KLK2 itself. These findings can be rationalized by the glycan-carrying 99-loop that prefers to cover the active site like a lid. By contrast, the non-glycosylated 99-loop seems to favor a wide open conformation, which mostly increases the apparent affinity for the substrates (i.e. by a reduction of Km). Also, the cleavage pattern and kinetics in autolytic inactivation of both KLK2 variants can be explained by a shift of the target sites due to the presence of the glycan. These striking effects of glycosylation pave the way to a deeper understanding of kallikrein-related peptidase biology and pathology. PMID:26582203

  3. Unravelling the immunological roles of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity and/or structure homologue (DASH) proteins.

    PubMed

    Wagner, L; Klemann, C; Stephan, M; von Hörsten, S

    2016-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) 4 (CD26, DPP4) is a multi-functional protein involved in T cell activation by co-stimulation via its association with adenosine deaminase (ADA), caveolin-1, CARMA-1, CD45, mannose-6-phosphate/insulin growth factor-II receptor (M6P/IGFII-R) and C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXC-R4). The proline-specific dipeptidyl peptidase also modulates the bioactivity of several chemokines. However, a number of enzymes displaying either DPP4-like activities or representing structural homologues have been discovered in the past two decades and are referred to as DPP4 activity and/or structure homologue (DASH) proteins. Apart from DPP4, DASH proteins include fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP), DPP8, DPP9, DPP4-like protein 1 (DPL1, DPP6, DPPX L, DPPX S), DPP4-like protein 2 (DPL2, DPP10) from the DPP4-gene family S9b and structurally unrelated enzyme DPP2, displaying DPP4-like activity. In contrast, DPP6 and DPP10 lack enzymatic DPP4-like activity. These DASH proteins play important roles in the immune system involving quiescence (DPP2), proliferation (DPP8/DPP9), antigen-presenting (DPP9), co-stimulation (DPP4), T cell activation (DPP4), signal transduction (DPP4, DPP8 and DPP9), differentiation (DPP4, DPP8) and tissue remodelling (DPP4, FAP). Thus, they are involved in many pathophysiological processes and have therefore been proposed for potential biomarkers or even drug targets in various cancers (DPP4 and FAP) and inflammatory diseases (DPP4, DPP8/DPP9). However, they also pose the challenge of drug selectivity concerning other DASH members for better efficacy and/or avoidance of unwanted side effects. Therefore, this review unravels the complex roles of DASH proteins in immunology. PMID:26671446

  4. Chronic non-specific low back pain – sub-groups or a single mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Wand, Benedict Martin; O'Connell, Neil Edward

    2008-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a substantial health problem and has subsequently attracted a considerable amount of research. Clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of a variety of interventions for chronic non-specific low back pain indicate limited effectiveness for most commonly applied interventions and approaches. Discussion Many clinicians challenge the results of clinical trials as they feel that this lack of effectiveness is at odds with their clinical experience of managing patients with back pain. A common explanation for this discrepancy is the perceived heterogeneity of patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. It is felt that the effects of treatment may be diluted by the application of a single intervention to a complex, heterogeneous group with diverse treatment needs. This argument presupposes that current treatment is effective when applied to the correct patient. An alternative perspective is that the clinical trials are correct and current treatments have limited efficacy. Preoccupation with sub-grouping may stifle engagement with this view and it is important that the sub-grouping paradigm is closely examined. This paper argues that there are numerous problems with the sub-grouping approach and that it may not be an important reason for the disappointing results of clinical trials. We propose instead that current treatment may be ineffective because it has been misdirected. Recent evidence that demonstrates changes within the brain in chronic low back pain sufferers raises the possibility that persistent back pain may be a problem of cortical reorganisation and degeneration. This perspective offers interesting insights into the chronic low back pain experience and suggests alternative models of intervention. Summary The disappointing results of clinical research are commonly explained by the failure of researchers to adequately attend to sub-grouping of the chronic non-specific low back pain population. Alternatively, current approaches

  5. Item-nonspecific proactive interference in monkeys' auditory short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, James; Poremba, Amy

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies using the delayed matching-to-sample (DMS) paradigm indicate that monkeys' auditory short-term memory (STM) is susceptible to proactive interference (PI). During the task, subjects must indicate whether sample and test sounds separated by a retention interval are identical (match) or not (nonmatch). If a nonmatching test stimulus also occurred on a previous trial, monkeys are more likely to incorrectly make a "match" response (item-specific PI). However, it is not known whether PI may be caused by sounds presented on prior trials that are similar, but nonidentical to the current test stimulus (item-nonspecific PI). This possibility was investigated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, memoranda for each trial comprised tones with a wide range of frequencies, thus minimizing item-specific PI and producing a range of frequency differences among nonidentical tones. In Experiment 2, memoranda were drawn from a set of eight artificial sounds that differed from each other by one, two, or three acoustic dimensions (frequency, spectral bandwidth, and temporal dynamics). Results from both experiments indicate that subjects committed more errors when previously-presented sounds were acoustically similar (though not identical) to the test stimulus of the current trial. Significant effects were produced only by stimuli from the immediately previous trial, suggesting that item-nonspecific PI is less perseverant than item-specific PI, which can extend across noncontiguous trials. Our results contribute to existing human and animal STM literature reporting item-nonspecific PI caused by perceptual similarity among memoranda. Together, these observations underscore the significance of both temporal and discriminability factors in monkeys' STM. PMID:25983219

  6. Identification of Fluorescent Compounds with Non-Specific Binding Property via High Throughput Live Cell Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sangeeta; Spencer, Virginia A.; Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Zhang, Kai; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Anderson, Charles; Hyman, Joel M.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Chang, Young-Tae; Parvin, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. Method Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. Results The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i) mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii) retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii) the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. Conclusion We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented. PMID:22242152

  7. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laria, A; Lurati, A; Scarpellini, M

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  8. Observations on the pathogenesis of chronic non-specific pharyngitis and laryngitis.

    PubMed

    Ward, P H; Berci, G

    1982-12-01

    Repeated analysis of cinephotographic and cinefluorographic studies, correlated with clinical observations, have provided insight into the physiopathology of many cases of chronic non-specific pharyngitis, laryngitis, contact ulcers, granulomas, and pachylaryngitis. Hiatal hernia and gastro-esophageal-pharyngeal reflux appear to be the cause of local irritation. Chronic coughing and habitual harsh throat clearing initiate the contact ulcers and granuloma formation. the successful treatment of this entire family of lesions is dependent upon elimination of vocal abuse and control of the factors that are responsible for the chronic irritations. PMID:7176789

  9. Monostostic fibrous dysplasia with nonspecific cystic degeneration: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Nadaf, Afreen; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Srinath, N

    2013-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) has been regarded as a developmental skeletal disorder characterized by replacement of normal bone with benign cellular fibrous connective tissue. It has now become evident that FD is a genetic disease caused by somatic activating mutation of the Gsα subunit of G protein-coupled receptor. Here we report a case of bilateral monostotic FD in a middle-aged female showing a classic histological picture, but radiologically presenting as a mixed radiolucent radiopaque lesion showing nonspecific cystic degeneration. PMID:24250093

  10. [History of surgical treatment of non-specific inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Serclová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of non-specific inflammatory bowel diseases was from the start accompanied by forced operations. In the 19th and early 20th century operations were burdened with high mortality, but most were more successful than the limited possibilities of conservative treatment. Gradually developed principles for the treatment of Crohns disease, a length of bowel sparing surgery are still valid today. Surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis passed the time of colonic irrigation, bypass surgery, limited resection to todays gold standard - proctocolectomy with ileo-pouch-anal anastomosis. PMID:25130644

  11. Biased expression, under the control of single promoter, of human interferon α-2b and Escherichia coli methionine amino peptidase genes in E. coli, irrespective of their distance from the promoter.

    PubMed

    Arif, Amina; Rashid, Naeem; Aslam, Farheen; Mahmood, Nasir; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Human interferon α-2b and Escherichia coli methionine amino peptidase genes were cloned independently as well as bicistronically in expression plasmid pET-21a (+). Production of human interferon α-2b was comparable to that of E. coli methionine amino peptidase when these genes were expressed independently in E. coli BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIL. However, human interferon α-2b was produced in a much less amount whereas there was no difference in the production of methionine amino peptidase when the encoding genes were expressed bicistronically. It is important to note that human interferon α-2b was the first gene in order, after the promoter and E. coli methionine amino peptidase was the next with a linker sequence of 27 nucleotides between them. PMID:27087087

  12. The efficiency of human cytomegalovirus pp65(495-503) CD8+ T cell epitope generation is determined by the balanced activities of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum-resident peptidases.

    PubMed

    Urban, Sabrina; Textoris-Taube, Kathrin; Reimann, Barbara; Janek, Katharina; Dannenberg, Tanja; Ebstein, Frédéric; Seifert, Christin; Zhao, Fang; Kessler, Jan H; Halenius, Anne; Henklein, Petra; Paschke, Julia; Cadel, Sandrine; Bernhard, Helga; Ossendorp, Ferry; Foulon, Thierry; Schadendorf, Dirk; Paschen, Annette; Seifert, Ulrike

    2012-07-15

    Control of human CMV (HCMV) infection depends on the cytotoxic activity of CD8(+) CTLs. The HCMV phosphoprotein (pp)65 is a major CTL target Ag and pp65(495-503) is an immunodominant CTL epitope in infected HLA-A*0201 individuals. As immunodominance is strongly determined by the surface abundance of the specific epitope, we asked for the components of the cellular Ag processing machinery determining the efficacy of pp65(495-503) generation, in particular, for the proteasome, cytosolic peptidases, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident peptidases. In vitro Ag processing experiments revealed that standard proteasomes and immunoproteasomes generate the minimal 9-mer peptide epitope as well as N-terminal elongated epitope precursors of different lengths. These peptides are largely degraded by the cytosolic peptidases leucine aminopeptidase and tripeptidyl peptidase II, as evidenced by increased pp65(495-503) epitope presentation after leucine aminopeptidase and tripeptidyl peptidase II knockdown. Additionally, with prolyl oligopeptidase and aminopeptidase B we identified two new Ag processing machinery components, which by destroying the pp65(495-503) epitope limit the availability of the specific peptide pool. In contrast to cytosolic peptidases, silencing of ER aminopeptidases 1 and 2 strongly impaired pp65(495-503)-specific T cell activation, indicating the importance of ER aminopeptidases in pp65(495-503) generation. Thus, cytosolic peptidases primarily interfere with the generation of the pp65(495-503) epitope, whereas ER-resident aminopeptidases enhance such generation. As a consequence, our experiments reveal that the combination of cytosolic and ER-resident peptidase activities strongly shape the pool of specific antigenic peptides and thus modulate MHC class I epitope presentation efficiency. PMID:22706083

  13. The Effect of Air Pollution on the Occurrence of Nonspecific Conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiwei; Bian, Xiaoyan; Yin, Jianguang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mu, Guoying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the short-term effect of air pollution on occurrence of nonspecific conjunctivitis. Methods. Data were collected from outpatient visits from cases with conjunctivitis over a period of one year. Regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between the number of outpatient visits and the air quality and the lag effect of air quality on conjunctivitis occurrence. Results. The air quality index on the day of presentation (P = 0.023), one day before presentation (P = 0.049), and two days before presentation day (P = 0.050) had a positive relation with outpatient visits for conjunctivitis. The air quality index (P = 0.001) and outpatient visits number per day (P = 0.013) in autumn and winter (October to March) were significantly higher than those in spring (April) and summer (September). Conclusions. The air quality index within two days before presentation affected the probability of attending the outpatient clinic for nonspecific conjunctivitis. High number of cases can be expected in colder season. PMID:27313867

  14. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods.

    PubMed

    Bizarro, C V; Alemany, A; Ritort, F

    2012-08-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na(+)]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg(2+) salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  15. How many X-linked genes for non-specific mental retardation (MRX) are there?

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Donnelly, A.J.; Mulley, J.C.

    1996-07-12

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is that proportion of mental retardation (MR) showing the distinctive pattern of inheritance associated with the X chromosome. XLMR is subdivided into syndromal and non-specific (MRX) forms. MRX is clinically homogeneous but genetically heterogeneous. Affected males in families segregating MRX have no consistent phenotypic expression apart from their MR to distinguish them from unaffected males or affected males in other MRX families. Syndromal MRs have additional neurological or phenotypic characteristics that define a syndrome, and most of these syndromes are rare. Within some families an affected male may show {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} syndromal signs, but where this is not evident in other affected males from the same family, the MR is diagnosed as non-specific. Delineation from fragile X syndrome or FRAXE MR can now be confidently made with the aid of direct molecular tests which detect the (CCG){sub n} expansion at either FRAXA or FRAXE. MRX can be expressed in carrier females but with milder manifestations. The gene in such cases could be partially dominant or result from a skewed X-inactivation pattern in neural tissue. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. The Nervous System Uses Nonspecific Motor Learning in Response to Random Perturbations of Varying Nature

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Daniel; Körding, Konrad

    2010-01-01

    We constantly make small errors during movement and use them to adapt our future movements. Movement experiments often probe this error-driven learning by perturbing movements and analyzing the after-effects. Past studies have applied perturbations of varying nature such as visual disturbances, position- or velocity-dependent forces and modified inertia properties of the limb. However, little is known about how the specific nature of a perturbation influences subsequent movements. For a single perturbation trial, the nature of a perturbation may be highly uncertain to the nervous system, given that it receives only noisy information. One hypothesis is that the nervous system can use this rough estimate to partially correct for the perturbation on the next trial. Alternatively, the nervous system could ignore uncertain information about the nature of the perturbation and resort to a nonspecific adaptation. To study how the brain estimates and responds to incomplete sensory information, we test these two hypotheses using a trial-by-trial adaptation experiment. On each trial, the nature of the perturbation was chosen from six distinct types, including a visuomotor rotation and different force fields. We observed that corrective forces aiming to oppose the perturbation in the following trial were independent of the nature of the perturbation. Our results suggest that the nervous system uses a nonspecific strategy when it has high uncertainty about the nature of perturbations during trial-by-trial learning. PMID:20861427

  17. Surface polyethylene glycol enhances substrate-mediated gene delivery by nonspecifically immobilized complexes

    PubMed Central

    Pannier, Angela K.; Wieland, Julie A.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2007-01-01

    Substrate-mediated gene delivery describes the immobilization of gene therapy vectors to a biomaterial, which enhances gene transfer by exposing adhered cells to elevated DNA concentrations within the local microenvironment. Surface chemistry has been shown to affect transfection by nonspecifically immobilized complexes using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold. In this report, SAMs were again used to provide a controlled surface to investigate whether the presence of oligo(ethylene glycol) (EG) groups in a SAM could affect complex morphology and enhance transfection. EG groups were included at percentages that did not affect cell adhesion. Nonspecific complex immobilization to SAMs containing combinations of EG- and carboxylic acid-terminated alkanethiols resulted in substantially greater transfection than surfaces containing no EG groups or SAMs composed of EG groups combined with other functional groups. Enhancement in transfection levels could not be attributed to complex binding densities or release profiles. Atomic force microscopy imaging of immobilized complexes revealed that EG groups within SAMs affected complex size and appearance and could indicate the ability of these surfaces to preserve complex morphology upon binding. The ability to control the morphology of the immobilized complexes and influence transfection levels through surface chemistry could be translated to scaffolds for gene delivery in tissue engineering and diagnostic applications. PMID:17920004

  18. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  19. Effects of surgical stress on early nonspecific immune response in children.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, P Santosh; Sridharan, S; Ramesh, S

    2014-02-01

    Surgery alters the body's homeostatic balance and defense mechanisms. In adults transient postoperative cellular and humoral immunosuppression after different degrees of operative stress has been reported. In children the immunologic consequences of operations are not elaborated. This study investigates the effect of minor and major surgery on early nonspecific immune response in terms of neutrophil counts and function. Forty-three children undergoing minor and major elective procedures were studied. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 72 h after surgery. Total white cell count, differential neutrophil count, and neutrophil phagocytic function were studied using nitroblue tetrazolium test. Children were divided into two groups-group 1 underwent minor surgery and group 2 major surgery. In group 1 there was a significant drop in total counts after surgery, but in group 2 total counts were not affected. In both groups, the percentage of neutrophils increased immediately after surgery but fell to near or less than preoperative levels 72 h after surgery. However, the assessment of neutrophil functions by nitroblue tetrazolium test in both unstimulated and stimulated forms revealed it to be unchanged in group 1. In group 2 the unstimulated neutrophil function was elevated 72 h after surgery, whereas stimulated function was elevated immediately after surgery. Minor surgery does not alter the early nonspecific immune response. However, major surgery seems to induce a transient increase in neutrophil phagocytic activity. PMID:24799783

  20. Polymer coatings that display specific biological signals while preventing nonspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Thomas; Fransen, Peter; Bean, Penny; Johnson, Graham; Pereira, Suzanne; Evans, Richard A; Thissen, Helmut; Meagher, Laurence

    2012-02-01

    Control over cell-material surface interactions is the key to many new and improved biomedical devices. It can only be achieved if interactions that are mediated by nonspecifically adsorbed serum proteins are minimized and if cells instead respond to specific ligand molecules presented on the surface. Here, we present a simple yet effective surface modification method that allows for the covalent coupling and presentation of specific biological signals on coatings which have significantly reduced nonspecific biointerfacial interactions. To achieve this we synthesized bottle brush type copolymers consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate and (meth)acrylates providing activated NHS ester groups as well as different spacer lengths between the NHS groups and the polymer backbone. Copolymers containing different molar ratios of these monomers were grafted to amine functionalized polystyrene cell culture substrates, followed by the covalent immobilization of the cyclic peptides cRGDfK and cRADfK using residual NHS groups. Polymers were characterized by GPC and NMR and surface modification steps were analyzed using XPS. The cellular response was evaluated using HeLa cell attachment experiments. The results showed strong correlations between the effectiveness of the control over biointerfacial interactions and the polymer architecture. They also demonstrate that optimized fully synthetic copolymer coatings, which can be applied to a wide range of substrate materials, provide excellent control over biointerfacial interactions. PMID:22076848

  1. Circulating tumor cell detection using carbon nanotube devices: specific versus non-specific interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Benjamin C.; Burkhead, Thomas; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress certain surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines are tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s causes significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes.

  2. Nonspecific DNA Binding and Coordination of the First Two Steps of Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs a wide variety of damaged nucleobases in DNA. This pathway is initiated by a DNA repair glycosylase, which locates the site of damage and catalyzes the excision of the damaged nucleobase. The resulting abasic site is further processed by apurinic/apyrimidinic site endonuclease 1 (APE1) to create a single strand nick with the 3'-hydroxyl that serves as a primer for DNA repair synthesis. Since an abasic site is highly mutagenic it is critical that the steps of the BER pathway be coordinated. Most human glycosylases bind tightly to their abasic product. APE1 displaces the bound glycosylase, thereby stimulating multiple turnover base excision. It has been proposed that direct protein-protein interactions are involved in the stimulation by APE1, but no common interaction motifs have been identified among the glycosylases that are stimulated by APE1. We characterized the APE1 stimulation of alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) using a variety of symmetric and asymmetric lesion-containing oligonucleotides. Efficient stimulation on a wide variety of substrates favors a model whereby both AAG and APE1 can simultaneously bind to DNA, but may not interact directly. Rather, nonspecific DNA binding by both AAG and APE1 enables APE1 to replace AAG at the abasic site. AAG is not displaced into solution, but remains bound to an adjacent undamaged site. We propose that nonspecific DNA binding interactions allow transient exposure of the abasic site so that it can be captured by APE1. PMID:20701268

  3. The Effect of Air Pollution on the Occurrence of Nonspecific Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Bian, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mu, Guoying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the short-term effect of air pollution on occurrence of nonspecific conjunctivitis. Methods. Data were collected from outpatient visits from cases with conjunctivitis over a period of one year. Regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between the number of outpatient visits and the air quality and the lag effect of air quality on conjunctivitis occurrence. Results. The air quality index on the day of presentation (P = 0.023), one day before presentation (P = 0.049), and two days before presentation day (P = 0.050) had a positive relation with outpatient visits for conjunctivitis. The air quality index (P = 0.001) and outpatient visits number per day (P = 0.013) in autumn and winter (October to March) were significantly higher than those in spring (April) and summer (September). Conclusions. The air quality index within two days before presentation affected the probability of attending the outpatient clinic for nonspecific conjunctivitis. High number of cases can be expected in colder season. PMID:27313867

  4. Bookmarking by specific and nonspecific binding of FoxA1 pioneer factor to mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Donahue, Greg; Becker, Justin S; He, Ximiao; Vinson, Charles; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2013-02-01

    While most transcription factors exit the chromatin during mitosis and the genome becomes silent, a subset of factors remains and "bookmarks" genes for rapid reactivation as cells progress through the cell cycle. However, it is unknown whether such bookmarking factors bind to chromatin similarly in mitosis and how different binding capacities among them relate to function. We compared a diverse set of transcription factors involved in liver differentiation and found markedly different extents of mitotic chromosome binding. Among them, the pioneer factor FoxA1 exhibits the greatest extent of mitotic chromosome binding. Genomically, ~15% of the FoxA1 interphase target sites are bound in mitosis, including at genes that are important for liver differentiation. Biophysical, genome mapping, and mutagenesis studies of FoxA1 reveals two different modes of binding to mitotic chromatin. Specific binding in mitosis occurs at sites that continue to be bound from interphase. Nonspecific binding in mitosis occurs across the chromosome due to the intrinsic chromatin affinity of FoxA1. Both specific and nonspecific binding contribute to timely reactivation of target genes post-mitosis. These studies reveal an unexpected diversity in the mechanisms by which transcription factors help retain cell identity during mitosis. PMID:23355396

  5. Effects of N-Acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) Peptidase Inhibition on Release of Glutamate and Dopamine in Prefrontal Cortex and Nucleus Accumbens in Phencyclidine Model of Schizophrenia*

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Daiying; Bzdega, Tomasz; Olszewski, Rafal T.; Moffett, John R.; Neale, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    The “glutamate” theory of schizophrenia emerged from the observation that phencyclidine (PCP), an open channel antagonist of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor, induces schizophrenia-like behaviors in humans. PCP also induces a complex set of behaviors in animal models of this disorder. PCP also increases glutamate and dopamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, brain regions associated with expression of psychosis. Increased motor activation is among the PCP-induced behaviors that have been widely validated as models for the characterization of new antipsychotic drugs. The peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) activates a group II metabotropic receptor, mGluR3. Polymorphisms in this receptor have been associated with schizophrenia. Inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, an enzyme that inactivates NAAG following synaptic release, reduce several behaviors induced by PCP in animal models. This research tested the hypothesis that two structurally distinct NAAG peptidase inhibitors, ZJ43 and 2-(phosphonomethyl)pentane-1,5-dioic acid, would elevate levels of synaptically released NAAG and reduce PCP-induced increases in glutamate and dopamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. NAAG-like immunoreactivity was found in neurons and presumptive synaptic endings in both regions. These peptidase inhibitors reduced the motor activation effects of PCP while elevating extracellular NAAG levels. They also blocked PCP-induced increases in glutamate but not dopamine or its metabolites. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 blocked these behavioral and neurochemical effects of the peptidase inhibitors. The data reported here provide a foundation for assessment of the neurochemical mechanism through which NAAG achieves its antipsychotic-like behavioral effects and support the conclusion NAAG peptidase inhibitors warrant further study as a novel antipsychotic therapy aimed at mGluR3. PMID:22570482

  6. Hydrolysis of Sequenced β-Casein Peptides Provides New Insight into Peptidase Activity from Thermophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Highlights Intrinsic Resistance of Phosphopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Molle, Daniel; Gagnaire, Valérie; Piot, Michel; Atlan, Danièle; Lortal, Sylvie

    2000-01-01

    The peptidases of thermophilic lactic acid bacteria have a key role in the proteolysis of Swiss cheeses during warm room ripening. To compare their peptidase activities toward a dairy substrate, a tryptic/chymotryptic hydrolysate of purified β-casein was used. Thirty-four peptides from 3 to 35 amino acids, including three phosphorylated peptides, constitute the β-casein hydrolysate, as shown by tandem mass spectrometry. Cell extracts prepared from Lactobacillus helveticus ITG LH1, ITG LH77, and CNRZ 32, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ITG LL14 and ITG LL51, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CNRZ 397 and NCDO 1489, and Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ 385, CIP 102303, and TA 060 were standardized in protein. The peptidase activities were assessed with the β-casein hydrolysate as the substrate at pH 5.5 and 24°C (conditions of warm room ripening) by (i) free amino acid release, (ii) reverse-phase chromatography, and (iii) identification of undigested peptides by mass spectrometry. Regardless of strain, L. helveticus was the most efficient in hydrolyzing β-casein peptides. Interestingly, cell extracts of S. thermophilus were not able to release a significant level of free proline from the β-casein hydrolysate, which was consistent with the identification of numerous dipeptides containing proline. With the three lactic acid bacteria tested, the phosphorylated peptides remained undigested or weakly hydrolyzed indicating their high intrinsic resistance to peptidase activities. Finally, several sets of peptides differing by a single amino acid in a C-terminal position revealed the presence of at least one carboxypeptidase in the cell extracts of these species. PMID:11097915

  7. Effects of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) peptidase inhibition on release of glutamate and dopamine in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens in phencyclidine model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Daiying; Bzdega, Tomasz; Olszewski, Rafal T; Moffett, John R; Neale, Joseph H

    2012-06-22

    The "glutamate" theory of schizophrenia emerged from the observation that phencyclidine (PCP), an open channel antagonist of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor, induces schizophrenia-like behaviors in humans. PCP also induces a complex set of behaviors in animal models of this disorder. PCP also increases glutamate and dopamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, brain regions associated with expression of psychosis. Increased motor activation is among the PCP-induced behaviors that have been widely validated as models for the characterization of new antipsychotic drugs. The peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) activates a group II metabotropic receptor, mGluR3. Polymorphisms in this receptor have been associated with schizophrenia. Inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, an enzyme that inactivates NAAG following synaptic release, reduce several behaviors induced by PCP in animal models. This research tested the hypothesis that two structurally distinct NAAG peptidase inhibitors, ZJ43 and 2-(phosphonomethyl)pentane-1,5-dioic acid, would elevate levels of synaptically released NAAG and reduce PCP-induced increases in glutamate and dopamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. NAAG-like immunoreactivity was found in neurons and presumptive synaptic endings in both regions. These peptidase inhibitors reduced the motor activation effects of PCP while elevating extracellular NAAG levels. They also blocked PCP-induced increases in glutamate but not dopamine or its metabolites. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 blocked these behavioral and neurochemical effects of the peptidase inhibitors. The data reported here provide a foundation for assessment of the neurochemical mechanism through which NAAG achieves its antipsychotic-like behavioral effects and support the conclusion NAAG peptidase inhibitors warrant further study as a novel antipsychotic therapy aimed at mGluR3. PMID:22570482

  8. Antinociceptive effects of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) peptidase inhibitors ZJ-11, ZJ-17 and ZJ-43 in the rat formalin test and in the rat neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Hirasawa, Serabi; Wroblewska, Barbara; Grajkowska, Ewa; Zhou, Jia; Kozikowski, Alan; Wroblewski, Jarda; Neale, Joseph H

    2004-07-01

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) acts as an agonist at group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). NAAG is inactivated by extracellular peptidase activity yielding glutamate and N-acetylaspartate. We recently developed a series of potent NAAG peptidase inhibitors, including ZJ-11, ZJ-17 and ZJ-43. In the present study, we examined the effects of intrathecally administered ZJ-11 and ZJ-17 and intravenously administered ZJ-11 and ZJ-43 in the rat formalin test (an inflammatory pain model) and in the rat partial sciatic nerve ligation model (a neuropathic pain model). Intrathecal injection of ZJ-11 or ZJ-17 or intravenous injection of ZJ-11 or ZJ-43 suppressed both phases of the agitation behaviour induced by paw formalin injection. Intrathecal and intravenous injection of ZJ-11 suppressed the expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity, induced by paw formalin injection, in laminae I-II in segments L4-L5 of the spinal cord, suggesting an action on sensory spinal transmission. Partial sciatic nerve ligation induced significant mechanical allodynia 7 days after the nerve injury. Intrathecal injection of ZJ-11 or ZJ-17 or intravenous administration of ZJ-11 or ZJ-43 attenuated the level of mechanical allodynia induced by this nerve ligation. These effects of intrathecally or intravenously administered ZJ compounds in both the formalin test and the partial sciatic nerve ligation model were completely antagonized by pretreatment with LY-341495, a highly selective group II mGluR antagonist. Thus, elevation of extracellular NAAG, induced by the inhibition of NAAG peptidase, activates group II mGluRs and produces an analgesic effect in neuropathic and inflammatory and pain models. In contrast, peptidase inhibition did not affect the threshold for withdrawal from a noxious mechanical stimulus or from an acute thermal stimulus in the hotplate test. PMID:15233757

  9. A cathepsin F-like peptidase involved in barley grain protein mobilization, HvPap-1, is modulated by its own propeptide and by cystatins

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Among the C1A cysteine proteases, the plant cathepsin F-like group has been poorly studied. This paper describes the molecular and functional characterization of the HvPap-1 cathepsin F-like protein from barley. This peptidase is N-glycosylated and has to be processed to become active by its own propeptide being an important modulator of the peptidase activity. The expression pattern of its mRNA and protein suggest that it is involved in different proteolytic processes in the barley plant. HvPap-1 peptidase has been purified in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein is able to degrade different substrates, including barley grain proteins (hordeins, albumins, and globulins) stored in the barley endosperm. It has been localized in protein bodies and vesicles of the embryo and it is induced in aleurones by gibberellin treatment. These three features support the implication of HvPap-1 in storage protein mobilization during grain germination. In addition, a complex regulation exerted by the barley cystatins, which are cysteine protease inhibitors, and by its own propeptide, is also described PMID:22791822

  10. A systematic review of paracetamol for non-specific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Reece A.; Hancock, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of pain and disability in patients with non-specific low back pain. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to assess the efficacy of paracetamol in the treatment of pain and disability in patients with non-specific low back pain. A search for randomized controlled trials was conducted using the Medline, Embase and CINAHL databases. Trials were eligible if they were randomized controlled trials comparing paracetamol to no treatment, placebo or another treatment in patients with non-specific low back pain. Two of the authors independently assessed trials for methodological quality on the PEDro Scale and extracted data. Continuous pain and disability data were converted to a common 0–10 scale; ordinal data were dichotomized (e.g., no pain, pain). The data was analyzed using the MIX version 1.61 meta-analysis software. Out of 205 unique articles found in the searches, 7 eligible trials were identified. The trials enrolled a total of 676 participants with 5 investigating acute low back pain, 1 investigating chronic low back pain and 1 investigating both. No trial provided data comparing paracetamol to placebo and only one trial compared paracetamol to no treatment. In general the trials were small (only 1 trial had >25 subjects per group) and of low methodological quality (only 2 had a score above 6 on the quality scale). All but one of the trials provided imprecise estimates of the effects of treatment with confidence intervals spanning clinically important beneficial and also harmful effects of paracetamol. No trial reported a statistically significant difference in favor of paracetamol. There is insufficient evidence to assess the efficacy of paracetamol in patients with low back pain. There is a clear need for large, high quality randomized controlled trials evaluating paracetamol, to provide reliable evidence of paracetamol

  11. Label-free assay for the assessment of nonspecific binding of positron emission tomography tracer candidates.

    PubMed

    Assmus, Frauke; Seelig, Anna; Gobbi, Luca; Borroni, Edilio; Glaentzlin, Patricia; Fischer, Holger

    2015-11-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable non-invasive technique for the visualization of drug tissue distribution and receptor occupancy at the target site in living animals and men. Many potential PET tracers, however, fail due to an unfavorably high non-specific binding (NSB) to non-target proteins and phospholipid membranes which compromises the sensitivity of PET. Hence, there is a high demand to assess the extent of NSB as early as possible in the PET tracer development process, preferentially before ligands are radiolabeled and elaborate imaging studies are performed. The purpose of this study was to establish a novel Lipid Membrane Binding Assay (LIMBA) for assessing the tendency of potential tracers to bind non-specifically to brain tissue. The assay works with unlabeled compounds and allows the medium-throughput measurement of brain tissue/water distribution coefficients, logDbrain (pH7.4), at minimal expense of animal tissue. To validate LIMBA, logDbrain (pH7.4) values were measured and compared with NSB estimates derived from in vivo PET studies in human brain (n=10 tracers, literature data), and in vitro autoradiography studies in rat and mouse brain slices (n=30 tritiated radioligands). Good agreement between logDbrain (pH7.4) and the volume of distribution in brain of non-specifically bound tracer in PET was achieved, pertaining to compounds classified as non-substrates of P-glycoprotein (R(2)≥0.88). The ability of LIMBA for the prediction of NSB was further supported by the strong correlation between logDbrain (pH7.4) and NSB in brain autoradiography (R(2)≥0.76), whereas octanol/water distribution coefficients, logDoct (pH7.4) were less predictive. In conclusion, LIMBA provides a fast and reliable tool for identifying compounds with unfavorably high NSB in brain tissue. The data may be used in conjunction with other parameters like target affinity, density and membrane permeability for the selection of most promising compounds to be

  12. Classification of patients with incident non-specific low back pain: implications for research

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Giulia; McDonough, Christine M.; Cabral, Howard J.; Shwartz, Michael; Burgess, James F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Comparing research studies of low back pain is difficult because of heterogeneity. There is no consensus among researchers on inclusion criteria or the definition of an episode. PURPOSE This study aimed to determine pattern(s) of recurrent non-specific low back pain from data collected over 27 months. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING This study used retrospective cohort study using administrative claims from multiple payers. Although claims are designed for capturing costs, not clinical complexity, they are valid for describing utilization patterns, which are not affected by potential “upcoding.” PATIENT SAMPLE The patient sample consisted of population-based, nationally generalizable sample of 65,790 adults with continuous medical and pharmaceutical commercial health insurance who received health care for incident, non-specific low back pain. Potential subjects were excluded for plausible cause of the pain, severe mental illness, or cognitive impairment. OUTCOME MEASURES Diagnostic and therapeutic health-care services, including medical, surgical, pharmaceutical, and complementary, received in inpatient, outpatient, and emergency settings were the outcome measures for this study. METHODS The methods used for this study were latent class analysis of health-care utilization over 27 months (9 quarters) following index diagnosis of non-specific low back pain occurring in January–March 2009 and an analysis sample with 60% of subjects (n=39,597) and validation sample of 40% (n=26,193). RESULTS Four distinct groups of patients were identified and validated. One group (53.4%) of patients recovered immediately. One third of patients (31.7%) may appear to recover over 6 months, but maintain a 37–48% likelihood of receiving care for low back pain in every subsequent quarter, implying frequent relapse. Two remaining groups of patients each maintain very high probabilities of receiving care in every quarter (65–78% and 84–90%), predominantly utilizing

  13. Collagenolytic Activities of the Major Secreted Cathepsin L Peptidases Involved in the Virulence of the Helminth Pathogen, Fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark W.; Corvo, Ileana; Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.; Padula, Matthew P.; To, Joyce; Cancela, Martin; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Tort, Jose F.; Roche, Leda; Dalton, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The temporal expression and secretion of distinct members of a family of virulence-associated cathepsin L cysteine peptidases (FhCL) correlates with the entry and migration of the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica in the host. Thus, infective larvae traversing the gut wall secrete cathepsin L3 (FhCL3), liver migrating juvenile parasites secrete both FhCL1 and FhCL2 while the mature bile duct parasites, which are obligate blood feeders, secrete predominantly FhCL1 but also FhCL2. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 exhibit differences in their kinetic parameters towards a range of peptide substrates. Uniquely, FhCL2 and FhCL3 readily cleave substrates with Pro in the P2 position and peptide substrates mimicking the repeating Gly-Pro-Xaa motifs that occur within the primary sequence of collagen. FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 hydrolysed native type I and II collagen at neutral pH but while FhCL1 cleaved only non-collagenous (NC, non-Gly-X-Y) domains FhCL2 and FhCL3 exhibited collagenase activity by cleaving at multiple sites within the α1 and α2 triple helix regions (Col domains). Molecular simulations created for FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 complexed to various seven-residue peptides supports the idea that Trp67 and Tyr67 in the S2 subsite of the active sites of FhCL3 and FhCL2, respectively, are critical to conferring the unique collagenase-like activity to these enzymes by accommodating either Gly or Pro residues at P2 in the substrate. The data also suggests that FhCL3 accommodates hydroxyproline (Hyp)-Gly at P3-P2 better than FhCL2 explaining the observed greater ability of FhCL3 to digest type I and II collagens compared to FhCL2 and why these enzymes cleave at different positions within the Col domains. Conclusions/Significance These studies further our understanding of how this helminth parasite regulates peptidase expression to ensure infection, migration and establishment in host tissues. PMID:21483711

  14. Induction of Protective Immune Responses Against Schistosomiasis haematobium in Hamsters and Mice Using Cysteine Peptidase-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tallima, Hatem; Dalton, John P.; El Ridi, Rashika

    2015-01-01

    One of the major lessons we learned from the radiation-attenuated cercariae vaccine studies is that protective immunity against schistosomiasis is dependent on the induction of T helper (Th)1-/Th2-related immune responses. Since most schistosome larval and adult-worm-derived molecules used for vaccination uniformly induce a polarized Th1 response, it was essential to include a type 2 immune response-inducing molecule, such as cysteine peptidases, in the vaccine formula. Here, we demonstrate that a single subcutaneous injection of Syrian hamsters with 200 μg active papain, 1 h before percutaneous exposure to 150 cercariae of Schistosoma haematobium, led to highly significant (P < 0.005) reduction of >50% in worm burden and worm egg counts in intestine. Immunization of hamsters with 20 μg recombinant glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (rSG3PDH) and 20 μg 2-cys peroxiredoxin-derived peptide in a multiple antigen peptide construct (PRX MAP) together with papain (20 μg/hamster), as adjuvant led to considerable (64%) protection against challenge S. haematobium infection, similar to the levels reported with irradiated cercariae. Cysteine peptidases-based vaccination was also effective in protecting outbred mice against a percutaneous challenge infection with S. haematobium cercariae. In two experiments, a mixture of Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1) and Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 (FhCL1) led to highly significant (P < 0.005) reduction of 70% in challenge S. haematobium worm burden and 60% reduction in liver egg counts. Mice vaccinated with SmCB1/FhCL1/rSG3PDH mixture and challenged with S. haematobium cercariae 3 weeks after the second immunization displayed highly significant (P < 0.005) reduction of 72% in challenge worm burden and no eggs in liver of 8–10 mice/group, as compared to unimmunized mice, associated with production of a mixture of type 1- and type 2-related cytokines and antibody responses. PMID:25852696

  15. A methacrylate-based polymeric imidazole ligand yields quantum dots with low cytotoxicity and low nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Colin M.; Pate, Kayla M.; Shen, Yi; Viswanath, Anand; Tan, Rui; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Moss, Melissa A.; Greytak, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper assesses the biocompatibility for fluorescence imaging of colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) coated with a recently-developed multiply-binding methacrylate-based polymeric imidazole ligand. The QD samples were purified prior to ligand exchange via a highly repeatable gel permeation chromatography (GPC) method. A multi-well plate based protocol was used to characterize nonspecific binding and toxicity of the QDs toward human endothelial cells. Nonspecific binding in 1% fetal bovine serum was negligible compared to anionically-stabilized QD controls, and no significant toxicity was detected on 24 h exposure. The nonspecific binding results were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. This study is the first evaluation of biocompatibility in QDs initially purified by GPC and represents a scalable approach to comparison among nanocrystal-based bioimaging scaffolds. PMID:26247382

  16. [Design of an educational tool for Primary Care patients with chronic non-specific low back pain].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cerrillo, Juan Luis; Rondón-Ramos, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Current scientific evidence on the management of chronic non-specific low back pain highlights the benefits of physical exercise. This goal is frequently undermined due to lack of education of the subjects on the multifactorial, benign, and non-specific nature of low back pain, which can lead to a chronic disease with genuine psychosocial risk factors. Its influence may not only interfere with individual decision to adopt more adaptive coping behaviors, but also with the endogenous mechanisms of pain neuromodulation. Thus, the educational strategies and control of these factors have become important objectives to be incorporated into the management of the disorder and research guidelines. This paper presents the theoretical models and the scientific basis on which it has based the design of an educational tool for patients with chronic non-specific low back pain treated in Primary Care physiotherapy. Structure, content and objectives are also presented. PMID:25159025

  17. Improvement of polymerase chain reaction-based Bt11 maize detection method by reduction of non-specific amplification.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Yanaka, Yuka; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2010-01-01

    The Bt11 maize-specific qualitative detection method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the JAS analytical test handbook has been widely used for administrative monitoring of GM crops and quality control of commercially distributed grains. In the present investigation, some apparently false-positive detections were observed in assays using the Bt11 maize-specific method, and these erroneous results were proved to have been caused by non-specific DNA amplification. We improved the detection method to reduce non-specific amplification by decreasing the concentration of magnesium ions in the PCR mixture. The subsequent evaluation of analytical performance demonstrated no marked difference between the currently used and the improved methods, except for the reduced non-specific amplification. We conclude that the currently used standard method should be replaced with the improved method for the reliable detection of Bt11 maize. PMID:20208407

  18. Effect of Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain on Walking Economy: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Alberito Rodrigo; Ribeiro Bertor, Welds Rodrigo; Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Zanini, Gabriela Matté; Silva, Lígia Inez; Andrade, Alexandro; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of chronic low back pain (LBP) and walking speed (WS) on metabolic power and cost of transport (CT). Subjects with chronic nonspecific LBP (LBP group [LG]; n = 9) and healthy (control group [CG]; n = 9) were included. The test battery was divided into 3 blocks according to WS as follows: preferred self-selected speed (PS), and lower and higher than the PS. In each block, the volunteers walked 5 min, during which oxygen consumption was measured. Although without differences between groups, the LG had CT lower in slower speeds than in faster speeds. Walking speed affected CT only in the LG, which the group had the greatest walking economy at slower speeds. PMID:26403060

  19. 'Nonspecific' rather than 'nonassociative' pathways to phobias: a commentary on Poulton and Menzies.

    PubMed

    Davey, Graham C L

    2002-02-01

    This commentary attempts to clarify the nature of contemporary associative accounts of phobias, and to describe how they might contribute to the explanation of the diversity of phobic aetiologies. It is argued that conditioning-equivalent associations underpin all phobic conditions, and that the role of experimental psychopathology research is to determine how these associations are acquired. The commentary then proceeds to discuss some of the theoretical problems with the nonassociative account of phobias as it is currently described by Poulton and Menzies, and to suggest that some interpretations of their retrospective and prospective data may not be incompatible with contemporary associative accounts. The outcome of this is that it may be more suitable to describe the fourth pathway to phobia acquisition described by Poulton and Menzies as a 'nonspecific' rather than a 'nonassociative' pathway. PMID:11820225

  20. Radiationless deactivation of 6-aminocoumarin from the S1-ICT state in nonspecifically interacting solvents.

    PubMed

    Krystkowiak, Ewa; Dobek, Krzysztof; Burdziński, Gotard; Maciejewski, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a spectral (absorption and emission) and photophysical study of 6-aminocoumarin (6AC) in the solvents with which this molecule interacts only nonspecifically (n-alkanes, tetrachloromethane and 1-chloro-n-alkanes) and in nitriles. The strong effects of the solvents on the emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of 6AC were observed. The results of the steady-state and time-resolved photophysical study suggest the presence of very fast nonradiative deactivation processes. It is concluded that besides fluorescence, the efficient S(1)-ICT → S(0) internal conversion in nonpolar aprotic solvents arises from vibronic interactions between close-lying S(1)-ICT(π,π*) and S(2)(n,π*) states. Moreover, unexpectedly efficient triplet state formation occurs. In nitriles the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions with solvent molecules also facilitate the nonradiative decay process involving the S(1)-exciplex. PMID:22622372

  1. The effects of aquatic exercise on body composition and nonspecific low back pain in elderly males

    PubMed Central

    Irandoust, Khadijeh; Taheri, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aquatic exercises on nonspecific low back pain (LBP) in elderly males. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two elderly men aged 65 or older were recruited and randomly allocated to two groups: aquatic training (3 d/wk for 12 wk) or a control group. Body mass index (BMI), percentage of body fat (PBF), waist-hip ratio (WHR), and trunk muscle mass were measured before and after training. [Results] The results suggested that all obesity variables including BMI, WHR, and PBF of the aquatic training group were decreased significantly, while the trunk muscle mass of the aquatic training group was increased significantly. Furthermore, low back pain was decreased in the subjects after the intervention. [Conclusion] The water-based program improved LBP and body composition in the elderly men. PMID:25729184

  2. Bioassay technique using nonspecific esterase activities of Tetrahymena pyriformis for screening and assessing cytotoxicity of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaerts, P.; Senaud, J.; Bohatier, J. |

    1998-08-01

    A simple and rapid test for screening and assessing the cytotoxicity of xenobiotics was developed with Tetrahymena pyriformis. The method estimates the activities of nonspecific esterases of a cell by concentrating within it a specific amount of fluorescence associated with fluorescein dye. The 2-h median effective concentration (EC50) values of 10 inorganic and eight organic substances are presented and compared to those of three other bioassays: the conventional T. pyriformis proliferation rate 9-h median inhibitory concentrations, the Microtox 30-min EC50s, and the Daphnia magna 4-methylumbelliferyl {beta}-D galactoside 1-h EC50s. A highly significant correlation was found between the results obtained with the fluorescein diacetate test and those obtained with the growth inhibition and Microtox tests. This in vivo enzymatic test showed high sensitivity to all compounds tested except Cr{sup 6+} and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

  3. Bacterial antigen detection in body fluids: methods for rapid antigen concentration and reduction of nonspecific reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Doskeland, S O; Berdal, B P

    1980-01-01

    We sought procedures which would allow a rapid concentration in high yield of bacterial antigens from tissue fluids of patients and which could be applied also to protein-rich fluids like serum. Ethanol precipitation at a subzero temperature with albumin added as an antigen coprecipitant made it possible to achieve a more than 20-fold concentration of antigen in 15 min and a 200-fold concentration in 45 min. Heat-stable antigens could be concentrated from protein-rich fluids (like serum) after the sample had been deproteinized by boiling. Such heating (100 degrees C, 3 min) also liberated bacterial polysaccharides from antibody complexes and elminated the nonspecific interference of serum in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:7372801

  4. Activity of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" in rat serum in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis (preliminary results).

    PubMed

    Kálmán, A; Kálmán, Z; Velösy, G; Vargha, G; Vargha, G; Papp, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain more information on the serum level of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" (PCE) in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in rats. The effects of caerulein stimulation, hepatic duct ligation, bile-pancreatic duct ligation or the effect of retrograde injection of saline, 5% taurocholate and sunflower oil were investigated. The activity of PCE and amylase was measured in the serum, pancreatic tissue, pancreatic juice and ascitic fluid. The changes in PCE activity were greater (both in directions to increase or decrease) than that of amylase, produced by different experimental procedures. The results confirm the thesis that the serum activity of PCE is a more sensitive diagnostic method than that of amylase to detect the inflammatory process in the pancreas or the effect of obstruction of the pancreatic duct. PMID:2480696

  5. Unravelling the nature of non-specific effects of vaccines-A challenge for innate immunologists.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Benn, Christine Stabell; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological observations have shown that vaccines can influence morbidity and mortality more than can be ascribed to target-disease immunity. A growing number of immunological studies have helped identify possible biological mechanisms to explain these so-called nonspecific effects (NSE) of vaccines, including heterologous T-cell reactivity and innate immune memory or 'trained innate immunity', which involves epigenetic reprogramming of innate immune cells. Here, we review the epidemiological evidence for NSE as well as human, animal and in vitro immunological data that could explain these NSE, and discuss priorities for future epidemiologic and immunologic studies to further unravel the biology and optimize the benefits of current and new vaccines. PMID:27354354

  6. Functional identification of the non-specific nuclease from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Lin Shumei; Yanga Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-07-05

    The product encoded by the wsv191 gene from shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is homologous with non-specific nucleases (NSN) of other organisms. To functionally identify the protein, the wsv191 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with 6His-tag at C-terminal. The fusion protein (termed as rWSSV-NSN) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography under denatured conditions, renatured and characterized by three methods. The results showed that rWSSV-NSN could hydrolyze both DNA and RNA. 5'-RACE result revealed that the transcription initiation site of the wsv191 gene was located at nucleotide residue G of the predicted ATG triplet. Therefore, we concluded that the next ATG should be the genuine translation initiation codon of the wsv191 gene. Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular mass of natural WSSV-NSN was 37 kDa.

  7. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlaps organizing pneumonia in lung-dominant connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Ren; Peng, Shou-Chun; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Here, we reported two cases of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlap organizing pneumonia (NSIP/OP) with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-ILD). The first case is a patient with hands of chapped skin, right-sided pleuritic chest discomfort, weakness, positive ANA and antibodies to Ro/SS-A (+++) and Ro-52 (++). In the second case, there were Reynaud's disease, and nucleolus-ANA increased (1:800). Chest high resolution CT scan in both cases showed ground-glass opacifications, predominantly in basal and subpleural region and the pathologic manifestation were correlated with NSIP/OP, which were previously discovered in Sjogren syndrome, PM/DM and other rheumatic diseases. The two cases of NSIP/OP with LD-CTD we reported expand disease spectrum of NSIP/OP pathological types in ILD. However, it is necessary to process large-scale studies. PMID:26617847

  8. Cellular non-specific interstitial pneumonia masquerading as congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saraya, Takeshi; Takata, Saori; Fujiwara, Masachika; Takei, Hidefumi

    2013-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman with a history of myocardial infarction 2 months prior presented to our respiratory department with several days of dry cough and night sweats. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT showed ground glass opacities or consolidation spreading from the hilar area to the peripheral area, suggesting central redistribution. Although neither rales nor abnormal heart sounds were noted, she was tentatively diagnosed with congestive heart failure based on those radiological findings. However, radiographic lung lesions and her symptoms were refractory to intensive diuretic treatment. Thereafter, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was performed, resulting in a diagnosis of cellular non-specific interstitial pneumonia (c-NSIP). After initiating treatment with prednisolone, her symptoms and the radiological findings resolved. In patients with NSIP, a radiological central distribution could rarely occur, especially in cases of c-NSIP. No rales were detected because of its paucity of fibrous components in the lung. PMID:24001730

  9. Nonspecific inhibition of alloantigen-induced proliferation by bone marrow natural regulatory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dorshkind, K.; Rosse, C.

    1981-03-01

    We have previously reported that a lymphocyte-enriched fraction ofmurine bone marrow (BML) contains natural regulatory cells (NRC) that can inhibit in vitro proliferative and cytotoxic responses to alloantigens on a dose-dependent basis. In view of the potential importance of these cells to the outcome of bone marrow transplantation, we have undertaken a series of studies designed to inestigate the properties of the effector cell(s). Since clinical and experimental bone marrow transplantation is often performed by inoculating histoincompatible marrow into irradiated hosts, we have investigated the effects of irradiation on NRC and their ability to function across major and minor histocompatibility barriers. In this brief communication, we report that NRC can nonspecifically inhibit cellular immune responses across histocompatibility barriers and are not affected by high doses of irraddiation. In addition, we report that NRC are not T or B lymphocytes.

  10. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORE ENDURANCE AND BACK DYSFUNCTION IN COLLEGIATE MALE ATHLETES WITH AND WITHOUT NONSPECIFIC LOW BACK PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Abdelraouf, Osama Ragaa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Physical activity and sports can be associated with low back pain. However, little is known about the relationship between core stability and nonspecific low back pain (LBP) among athletes. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between core endurance and back dysfunction in collegiate male athletes with and without nonspecific LBP. Methods Fifty-five male collegiate athletes from a variety of sports were recruited for this study. Their mean age was 21.50 ± (2.54) years, mean weight was 70.96 ± (5.33) kg., and mean height was 174.38 ± (4.37) cm. Thirty athletes with non-specific LBP and twenty five healthy athletes were assessed using McGill's anterior, posterior, and left and right plank core endurance tests (seconds) and for dysfunction using the Micheli functional scale (MFS). Pearson's product moment correlations examined the relationships between core endurance and MFS. Results There were significant differences regarding the measured core endurance tests between the healthy athletes group and the nonspecific LBP group (p < 0.05). Additionally, good negative (r = −0.794) and moderate negative (r = −0.541) correlations were found between MFS and trunk extensor and flexor endurance tests, respectively in the group with nonspecific LBP. Conclusion The results of this study imply that poor core endurance is likely associated with nonspecific LBP in collegiate athletes. Injury risk reduction and back management programs for the athletic population should include strategies that emphasize endurance of the core muscles especially the trunk extensors and flexors. Level of Evidence 2b PMID:27274419

  11. Polyglycerol based coatings to reduce non-specific protein adsorption in sample vials and on SPR sensors.

    PubMed

    Becherer, Tobias; Grunewald, Christian; Engelschalt, Vivienne; Multhaup, Gerhard; Risse, Thomas; Haag, Rainer

    2015-03-31

    Coatings based on dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) were investigated for their use to control nonspecific protein adsorption in an assay targeted to analyze concentrations of a specific protein. We demonstrate that coating of the sample vial with dPG can significantly increase the recovery of an antibody after incubation. First, we determine the concentration dependent loss of an antibody due to nonspecific adsorption to glass via quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Complementary to the QCM measurements, we applied the same antibody as analyte in an surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay to determine the loss of analyte due to nonspecific adsorption to the sample vial. For this purpose, we used two different coatings based on dPG. For the first coating, which served as a matrix for the SPR sensor, carboxyl groups were incorporated into dPG as well as a dithiolane moiety enabling covalent immobilization to the gold sensor surface. This SPR-matrix exhibited excellent protein resistant properties and allowed the immobilization of amyloid peptides via amide bond formation. The second coating which was intended to prevent nonspecific adsorption to glass vials comprised a silyl moiety that allowed covalent grafting to glass. For demonstrating the impact of the vial coating on the accuracy of an SPR assay, we immobilized amyloid beta (Aβ) 1-40 and used an anti-Aβ 1-40 antibody as analyte. Alternate injection of analyte into the flow cell of the SPR device from uncoated and coated vials, respectively gave us the relative signal loss (1-RUuncoated/RUcoated) caused by the nonspecific adsorption. We found that the relative signal loss increases with decreasing analyte concentration. The SPR data correlate well with concentration dependent non-specific adsorption experiments of the analyte to glass surfaces performed with QCM. Our measurements show that rendering both the sample vial and the sensor surface is crucial for accurate results in protein assays. PMID:25813027

  12. Dietary lipid requirement on non-specific immune responses in juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Tian, Li-xia; Zeng, Shuai-lin; Xie, Shi-wei; Yang, Hui-jun; Liang, Gui-ying; Liu, Yong-jian

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dietary lipid requirement and its effects on liver oxidative status and non-specific immune responses of juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Purified diets with five dietary lipid levels (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, fish oil/corn oil = 1:1) were each fed to triplicate groups of grass carp (mean initial weight: 6.57 ± 0.01 g) in a recirculating rearing system maintained at 27.5 ± 0.5 °C for 10 weeks. Percent weight gain was highest (P < 0.05) with 5% lipid and lowest in fish fed the lipid free control diet. Feed efficiency (FE) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) in fish followed the same pattern of percent weight gain. Fish fed with lipid containing diets had better non-specific immune response indexes (e.g. phagocytic activity, plasma peroxidase and lysozyme activity) and low-level of liver oxidation status than fish fed with the control diet. But excess dietary lipid supplement would bring over metabolic burden to liver. After the feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila. Fish fed control diet obtained significantly (P < 0.05) lower survival rate. The survival rate was highest with 7.5% lipid. The results of this study indicated that proper dietary lipid supplementation enhanced the immune response of grass carp and improved the survival rate in the bacterial challenge, but excess dietary lipid may elevate liver oxidation rates of grass carp. Analysis by second-order regression of percent weight gain indicated that the optimal dietary lipid level in juvenile grass carp (6.6-35.5 g) is about 6.5%. PMID:23416225

  13. The encoding of category-specific versus nonspecific information in human inferior temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingbing; Meng, Ming

    2015-08-01

    Several brain areas in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex, such as the fusiform face area (FFA) and parahippocampal place area (PPA), are hypothesized to be selectively responsive to a particular category of visual objects. However, how category-specific and nonspecific information may be encoded at this level of visual processing is still unclear. Using fMRI, we compared averaged BOLD activity as well as multi-voxel activation patterns in the FFA and PPA corresponding to high-contrast and low-contrast face and house images. The averaged BOLD activity in the FFA and PPA was modulated by the image contrast regardless of the stimulus category. Interestingly, unlike the univariate averaged BOLD activity, multi-voxel activation patterns in the FFA and PPA were barely affected by variations in stimulus contrast. In both the FFA and PPA, decoding the categorical information about whether participants saw faces or houses was independent of stimulus contrast. Moreover, the multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) results were highly stable when either the voxels that were more sensitive to stimulus contrast or the voxels that were less sensitive were used. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that both category-specific (face versus house) information and nonspecific (image contrast) information are available to be decoded orthogonally in the same brain areas (FFA and PPA), suggesting that complementary neural mechanisms for processing visual features and categorical information may occur in the same brain areas but respectively be revealed by averaged activity and multi-voxel activation patterns. Whereas stimulus strength, such as contrast, modulates overall activity amplitudes in these brain areas, activity patterns across populations of neurons appear to underlie the representation of object category. PMID:25869859

  14. Physical therapists’ treatment choices for non-specific low back pain in Florida: an electronic survey

    PubMed Central

    Ladeira, Carlos E; Samuel Cheng, M; Hill, Cheryl J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: No study has described low back pain (LBP) treatment choices among physical therapists (PTs) in the United States (US) in the new millennium. Intervention for LBP in the new millennium is largely based on evidence-based practice (EBP) recommendations. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to describe PTs' preferences for treating acute and subacute non-specific LBP in Florida and to compare these preferences to EBP guideline recommendations and (b) to compare outpatient musculoskeletal therapist (MSPT) choices for management of acute and subacute LBP to non-outpatient musculoskeletal therapist (NMSPT) choices. Methods: The data were collected with an electronic survey. Study participants selected treatment choices for acute and subacute LBP clinical vignettes. Results: A total of 327 PTs participated in the study, of which 128 worked in outpatient musculoskeletal settings. The most common treatment choices for acute and subacute LBP were home exercise program, exercise in the clinic, back care education, joint mobilization, ice/heat, and interferential current. The EBP adherence rate for acute LBP was 30% for MSPTs and 15% for NMSPTs. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of MSPTs and 30% of NMSPTs adhered to EBP guidelines for subacute LBP. Discussion: The EBP adherence rate for management of acute and subacute LBP was low. Spinal manipulation was underutilized for management of acute LBP, and passive therapeutic procedures were overutilized for subacute LBP. Physical Therapy schools and professional associations should reemphasize the benefits of spinal manipulation to manage non-specific acute LBP and active interventional procedures to manage subacute LBP. PMID:26109832

  15. The Nonspecific Binding of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors to Human Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kushari; Nair, Pramod C; Rowland, Andrew; Mackenzie, Peter I; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-12-01

    Drugs and other chemicals frequently bind nonspecifically to the constituents of an in vitro incubation mixture, particularly the enzyme source [e.g., human liver microsomes (HLM)]. Correction for nonspecific binding (NSB) is essential for the accurate calculation of the kinetic parameters Km, Clint, and Ki. Many tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are lipophilic organic bases that are nonionized at physiologic pH. Attempts to measure the NSB of several TKIs to HLM by equilibrium dialysis proved unsuccessful, presumably due to the limited aqueous solubility of these compounds. Thus, the addition of detergents to equilibrium dialysis samples was investigated as an approach to measure the NSB of TKIs. The binding of six validation set nonionized lipophilic bases (felodipine, isradipine, loratidine, midazolam, nifedipine, and pazopanib) to HLM (0.25 mg/ml) was shown to be unaffected by the addition of CHAPS (6 mM) to the dialysis medium. This approach was subsequently applied to measurement of the binding of axitinib, dabrafenib, erlotinib, gefitinib, ibrutinib, lapatinib, nilotinib, nintedanib, regorafenib, sorafenib, and trametinib to HLM (0.25 mg/ml). As with the validation set drugs, attainment of equilibrium was demonstrated in HLM-HLM and buffer-buffer control dialysis experiments. Values of the fraction unbound to HLM ranged from 0.14 (regorafenib and sorafenib) to 0.93 (nintedanib), and were generally consistent with the known physicochemical determinants of drug NSB. The extensive NSB of many TKIs to HLM underscores the importance of correction for TKI binding to HLM and, presumably, other enzyme sources present in in vitro incubation mixtures. PMID:26443648

  16. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia: comparison of the clinicopathologic features and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinfu; Liu, Jinming; Yi, Xianghua; Sun, Xiwen; Shi, Jingyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) has recently been proposed as a histologic type of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), but its broad spectrum of clinicopathologic findings and variable prognosis are poorly understood. It is particularly unclear how NSIP and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) are related. The present study investigated the clinicopathologic features and prognosis of NSIP, and its differential diagnosis from UIP. Methods The clinicopathologic findings and prognosis in 21 NSIP and 18 UIP patients who underwent surgical or video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy were reviewed. Results NSIP was more frequent in women and showed nonspecific clinical manifestations. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) demonstrated ground-glass, net-like, and patchy attenuation in both lungs. Semiquantitative HRCT showed a median fibrosis score of 3 (range, 0 to 7) in NSIP patients and 5 (range, 2 to 7) in UIP patients (P<0.01). On histopathologic examination, NSIP cases were heterogeneous and the findings could be categorized into cellular and fibrosing patterns. The mean age of the NSIP and UIP patients was 48 and 60 years, respectively. The frequencies of fibroblast foci, myogelosis, honeycomb lesions, and pulmonary structural destruction in NSIP and UIP patients were 16.7% and 100% (P<0.001), 22.2% and 85.7% (P<0.05), 16.7% and 92.9% (P<0.001), and 27.8% and 100% (P<0.05), respectively. The responses to glucocorticoid treatment and the prognosis were significantly greater in NSIP than those in UIP. Conclusions NSIP was difficult to be differentiated from UIP by general clinical manifestations, but HRCT can be helpful for this purpose. Definitive diagnosis depends on the results of surgical lung biopsy. PMID:25364525

  17. Characterization of a multimeric, eukaryotic prolyl aminopeptidase: an inducible and highly specific intracellular peptidase from the non-pathogenic fungus Talaromyces emersonii.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Cathal S; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Goetz, David H; Murray, Patrick G; Craik, Charles S; Tuohy, Maria G

    2009-11-01

    Fungi are capable of degrading proteins in their environment by secreting peptidases. However, the link between extracellular digestion and intracellular proteolysis has scarcely been investigated. Mycelial lysates of the filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii were screened for intracellular peptidase production. Five distinct proteolytic activities with specificity for the p-nitroanilide (pNA) peptides Suc-AAPF-pNA, Suc-AAA-pNA, K-pNA, F-pNA and P-pNA were identified. The native enzyme responsible for the removal of N-terminal proline residues was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by five successive chromatographic steps. The enzyme, termed Talaromyces emersonii prolyl aminopeptidase (TePAP), displayed a 50-fold specificity for cleaving N-terminal Pro-X (k(cat)/K(m)=2.1 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) compared with Ala-X or Val-X bonds. This intracellular aminopeptidase was optimally active at pH 7.4 and 50 degrees C. Peptide sequencing facilitated the design of degenerate oligonucleotides from homologous sequences encoding putative fungal proline aminopeptidases, enabling subsequent cloning of the gene. TePAP was shown to be relatively uninhibited by classical serine peptidase inhibitors and to be sensitive to selected cysteine- and histidine-modifying reagents, yet gene sequence analysis identified the protein as a serine peptidase with an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. Northern analysis indicated that Tepap mRNA levels were regulated by the composition of the growth medium. Highest Tepap transcript levels were observed when the fungus was grown in medium containing glucose and the protein hydrolysate casitone. Interestingly, both the induction profile and substrate preference of this enzyme suggest potential co-operativity between extracellular and intracellular proteolysis in this organism. Gel filtration chromatography suggested that the enzyme exists as a 270 kDa homo-hexamer, whereas most bacterial prolyl aminopeptidases (PAPs) are

  18. Characterization of a multimeric, eukaryotic prolyl aminopeptidase: an inducible and highly specific intracellular peptidase from the non-pathogenic fungus Talaromyces emersonii

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal S.; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Goetz, David H.; Murray, Patrick G.; Craik, Charles S.; Tuohy, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Fungi are capable of degrading proteins in their environment by secreting peptidases. However, the link between extracellular digestion and intracellular proteolysis has scarcely been investigated. Mycelial lysates of the filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii were screened for intracellular peptidase production. Five distinct proteolytic activities with specificity for the p-nitroanilide (pNA) peptides Suc-AAPF-pNA, Suc-AAA-pNA, K-pNA, F-pNA and P-pNA were identified. The native enzyme responsible for the removal of N-terminal proline residues was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by five successive chromatographic steps. The enzyme, termed Talaromyces emersonii prolyl aminopeptidase (TePAP), displayed a 50-fold specificity for cleaving N-terminal Pro–X (kcat/Km=2.1×106 M−1 s−1) compared with Ala–X or Val–X bonds. This intracellular aminopeptidase was optimally active at pH 7.4 and 50 °C. Peptide sequencing facilitated the design of degenerate oligonucleotides from homologous sequences encoding putative fungal proline aminopeptidases, enabling subsequent cloning of the gene. TePAP was shown to be relatively uninhibited by classical serine peptidase inhibitors and to be sensitive to selected cysteine- and histidine-modifying reagents, yet gene sequence analysis identified the protein as a serine peptidase with an α/β hydrolase fold. Northern analysis indicated that Tepap mRNA levels were regulated by the composition of the growth medium. Highest Tepap transcript levels were observed when the fungus was grown in medium containing glucose and the protein hydrolysate casitone. Interestingly, both the induction profile and substrate preference of this enzyme suggest potential co-operativity between extracellular and intracellular proteolysis in this organism. Gel filtration chromatography suggested that the enzyme exists as a 270 kDa homo-hexamer, whereas most bacterial prolyl aminopeptidases (PAPs) are

  19. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition on circadian blood pressure during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sufiun, Abu; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Rahman, Asadur; Mori, Hirohito; Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohmori, Koji; Masaki, Tsutomu; Kohno, Masakazu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has indicated that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have antihypertensive effects. Here, we aim to examine the effect of vildagliptin, a DPP-4-specific inhibitor, on blood pressure and its circadian-dipping pattern during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats. DSS rats were treated with a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) plus vehicle or vildagliptin (3 or 10 mg kg−1 twice daily by oral gavage) for 7 days. Blood pressure was measured by the telemetry system. High-salt diet for 7 days significantly increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and were also associated with an extreme dipping pattern of blood pressure in DSS rats. Treatment with vildagliptin dose-dependently decreased plasma DPP-4 activity, increased plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels and attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension. Furthermore, vildagliptin significantly increased urine sodium excretion and normalized the dipping pattern of blood pressure. In contrast, intracerebroventricular infusion of vildagliptin (50, 500 or 2500 μg) did not alter MAP and heart rate in DSS rats. These data suggest that salt-dependent hypertension initially develops with an extreme blood pressure dipping pattern. The DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, may elicit beneficial antihypertensive effects, including the improvement of abnormal circadian blood pressure pattern, by enhancing urinary sodium excretion. PMID:25588850

  20. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of hetero-aromatic moieties substituted pyrrole-2-carbonitrile derivatives as dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xun; Su, Mingbo; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Guanghui; Deng, Sisi; Li, Zeng; Tang, Chunlan; Li, Jingya; Li, Jia; Zhao, Linxiang; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Hong

    2014-03-21

    A series of novel hetero-aromatic moieties substituted α-amino pyrrole-2-carbonitrile derivatives was designed and synthesized based on structure-activity relationships (SARs) of pyrrole-2-carbonitrile inhibitors. All compounds demonstrated good dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4) inhibitory activities (IC50 = 0.004-113.6 μM). Moreover, compounds 6h (IC50 = 0.004 μM) and 6n (IC50 = 0.01 μM) showed excellent inhibitory activities against DPP4, good selectivity (compound 6h, selective ratio: DPP8/DPP4 = 450.0; DPP9/DPP4 = 375.0; compound 6n, selective ratio: DPP8/DPP4 = 470.0; DPP9/DPP4 = 750.0) and good efficacy in an oral glucose tolerance test in ICR mice. Furthermore, compounds 6h and 6n demonstrated moderate PK properties (compound 6h, F% = 37.8%, t1/2 = 1.45 h; compound 6n, F% = 16.8%, t1/2 = 3.64 h). PMID:24531224

  1. Cosmid based mutagenesis causes genetic instability in Streptomyces coelicolor, as shown by targeting of the lipoprotein signal peptidase gene

    PubMed Central

    Munnoch, John T.; Widdick, David A.; Chandra, Govind; Sutcliffe, Iain C.; Palmer, Tracy; Hutchings, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are extracellular proteins tethered to cell membranes by covalently attached lipids. Deleting the lipoprotein signal peptidase (lsp) gene in Streptomyces coelicolor results in growth and developmental defects that cannot be restored by reintroducing lsp. This led us to hypothesise that lsp is essential and that the lsp mutant we isolated previously had acquired compensatory secondary mutations. Here we report resequencing of the genomes of wild-type M145 and the cis-complemented ∆lsp mutant (BJT1004) to map and identify these secondary mutations but we show that they do not increase the efficiency of disrupting lsp and are not lsp suppressors. We provide evidence that they are induced by introducing the cosmid St4A10∆lsp, as part of ReDirect PCR mutagenesis protocol, which transiently duplicates a number of important cell division genes. Disruption of lsp using a suicide vector (which does not result in gene duplication) still results in growth and developmental delays and we conclude that loss of Lsp function results in developmental defects due to the loss of all lipoproteins from the cell membrane. Significantly, our results also indicate the use of cosmid libraries for the genetic manipulation of bacteria can lead to phenotypes not necessarily linked to the gene(s) of interest. PMID:27404047

  2. Purification and characterization of macrodontain I, a cysteine peptidase from unripe fruits of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) harms (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    López, L M; Sequeiros, C; Natalucci, C L; Brullo, A; Maras, B; Barra, D; Caffini, N O

    2000-03-01

    A new papain-like cysteine peptidase isolated from fruits of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms, a species closely related to pineapple (Ananas comosus L.), has been purified and characterized. The enzyme, named macrodontain I, is the main proteolytic component present in fruit extracts and was purified by acetone fractionation followed by anion-exchange chromatography. Separation was improved by selecting both an adequate pH value and a narrow saline gradient. Optimum pH range (more than 90% of maximum activity with casein) was achieved at pH 6.1-8.5. Homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by bidimensional electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy (MS). Molecular mass of the enzyme was 23,459 (MS) and its isoelectric point was 6.1. The alanine, glutamine, and tyrosine derivatives were strongly preferred when the enzyme was assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-l-amino acid p-nitrophenyl esters. The N-terminal sequence of macrodontain (by comparison with the N-terminus of 30 plant proteases with more than 50% homology) showed a great deal of sequence similarity to the other pineapple-stem-derived cysteine endopeptidases, being 85.7, 85. 2, and 77.8% identical to comosain, stem bromelain, and ananain, respectively. It seems clear that the Bromeliaceae endopeptidases are more closely related to each other than to other members of the papain family, suggesting relatively recent divergence. PMID:10686143

  3. Economic Impact of Combining Metformin with Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors in Diabetic Patients with Renal Impairment in Spanish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Artieda, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate resource use and health costs due to the combination of metformin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in patients with diabetes and renal impairment in routine clinical practice. Methods An observational, retrospective study was performed. Patients aged ≥30 years treated with metformin who initiated a second oral antidiabetic treatment in 2009 to 2010 were included. Two groups of patients were analysed: metformin+DPP-4 inhibitors and other oral antidiabetics. The main measures were: compliance, persistence, metabolic control (glycosylated hemoglobin< 7%) and complications (hypoglycemia, cardiovascular events) and total costs. Patients were followed up for 2 years. Results We included 395 patients, mean age 70.2 years, 56.5% male: 135 patients received metformin+DPP-4 inhibitors and 260 patients received metformin+other oral antidiabetics. Patients receiving DPP-4 inhibitors showed better compliance (66.0% vs. 60.1%), persistence (57.6% vs. 50.0%), and metabolic control (63.9% vs. 57.3%), respectively, compared with those receiving other oral antidiabetics (P<0.05), and also had a lower rate of hypoglycemia (20.0% vs. 47.7%) and lower total costs (€ 2,486 vs. € 3,002), P=0.001. Conclusion Despite the limitations of the study, patients with renal impairment treated with DPP-4 inhibitors had better metabolic control, lower rates (association) of hypoglycaemia, and lower health costs for the Spanish national health system. PMID:25729716

  4. Association between kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and macroscopic indicators of semen analysis: their relation to sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Emami, Nashmil; Scorilas, Andreas; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Earle, Tammy; Mullen, Brendan; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2009-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a family of proteases, the majority of which are found in seminal plasma and have been implicated in semen liquefaction. Here, we examined the clinical value of seminal KLKs in the evaluation of semen quality and differential diagnosis and etiology of abnormal liquefaction and/or viscosity. KLK1-3, 5-8, 10, 11, 13, and 14 were analyzed, using highly specific ELISA assays. Samples were categorized into four clinical groups, according to their state of liquefaction and viscosity. Data were compared between the clinical groups and in association with other parameters of sperm quality, including number of motile sperms, straight line speed, sperm concentration, volume, pH, and patient age. Seminal KLKs were found to be differentially expressed in the four clinical groups. Combination of KLK2, 3, 13, and 14 and KLK1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, and 14 showed very strong discriminatory potential for semen liquefaction and viscosity, respectively. Liquefaction state was associated with several parameters of sperm motility. Finally, KLK14 was differentially expressed in asthenospermic cases. In conclusion, the expression level of several seminal plasma KLKs correlates with liquefaction and viscosity indicators of semen quality and may aid in their differential diagnosis and etiology. PMID:19558318

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors can minimize the hypoglycaemic burden and enhance safety in elderly people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Avogaro, A; Dardano, A; de Kreutzenberg, S V; Del Prato, S

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among elderly people is increasing. Often associated with disabilities/comorbidities, T2DM lowers the chances of successful aging and is independently associated with frailty and an increased risk of hypoglycaemia, which can be further exacerbated by antihyperglycaemic treatment. From this perspective, the clinical management of T2DM in the elderly is challenging and requires individualization of optimum glycaemic targets depending on comorbidities, cognitive functioning and ability to recognize and self-manage the disease. The lack of solid evidence-based medicine supporting treatment guidelines for older people with diabetes further complicates the matter. Several classes of medicine for the treatment of T2DM are currently available and different drug combinations are often required to achieve individualized glycaemic goals. Many of these drugs, however, carry disadvantages such as the propensity to cause weight gain or hypoglycaemia. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, a recent addition to the pharmacological armamentarium, have become widely accepted in clinical practice because of their efficacy, low risk of hypoglycaemia, neutral effect on body weight, and apparently greater safety in patients with kidney failure. Although more information is needed to reach definitive conclusions, growing evidence suggests that DPP-4 inhibitors may become a valuable component in the pharmacological management of elderly people with T2DM. The present review aims to delineate the potential advantages of this pharmacological approach in the treatment of elderly people with T2DM. PMID:24867662

  6. Dipeptide boronic acid inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV: determinants of potency and in vivo efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Beth A; Sanford, David G; Chiluwal, Amrita K; Healey, Sarah E; Peters, Diane E; Dimare, Matthew T; Wu, Wengen; Liu, Yuxin; Maw, Hlaing; Zhou, Yuhong; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Sudmeier, James L; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W

    2008-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV; E.C. 3.4.14.5), a serine protease that degrades the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP, is now a validated target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Dipeptide boronic acids, among the first, and still among the most potent DPP-IV inhibitors known, suffer from a concern over their safety. Here we evaluate the potency, in vivo efficacy, and safety of a selected set of these inhibitors. The adverse effects induced by boronic acid-based DPP-IV inhibitors are essentially limited to what has been observed previously for non-boronic acid inhibitors and attributed to cross-reactivity with DPP8/9. While consistent with the DPP8/9 hypothesis, they are also consistent with cross-reactivity with some other intracellular target. The results further show that the potency of simple dipeptide boronic acid-based inhibitors can be combined with selectivity against DPP8/9 in vivo to produce agents with a relatively wide therapeutic index (>500) in rodents. PMID:18783201

  7. Methotrexate and Cyclosporine Treatments Modify the Activities of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV and Prolyl Oligopeptidase in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Olivo, R. A.; Nascimento, N. G.; Teixeira, C. F. P.; Silveira, P. F.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the effects of cyclosporine A (25–28 mgkg−1) and/or methotrexate (0.1 mgkg−1) treatments on dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) activities and on algesic response in two distinct status of murine macrophages (Mφs) was undertaken. In resident Mφs, DPPIV and POP were affected by neither individual nor combined treatments. In thioglycolate-elicited Mφs, methotrexate increased DPPIV (99–110%) and POP (60%), while cyclosporine inhibited POP (21%). Combined treatment with both drugs promoted a rise (51–84%) of both enzyme activities. Only cyclosporine decreased (42%) the tolerance to algesic stimulus. Methotrexate was revealed to exert prevalent action over that of cyclosporine on proinflammatory Mφ POP. The opposite effects of methotrexate and cyclosporine on POP activity might influence the availability of the nociceptive mediators bradykinin and substance P in proinflammatory Mφs. The exacerbated response to thermally induced algesia observed in cyclosporine-treated animals could be related to upregulation of those mediators. PMID:18354729

  8. Possible involvement of inefficient cleavage of preprovasopressin by signal peptidase as a cause for familial central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, M; Oiso, Y; Murase, T; Kondo, K; Saito, H; Chinzei, T; Racchi, M; Lively, M O

    1993-01-01

    A transition of G to A at nucleotide position 279 in exon 1 of the vasopressin gene has been identified in patients with familial central diabetes insipidus. The mutation predicts an amino acid substitution of Thr (ACG) for Ala (GCG) at the COOH terminus of the signal peptide in preprovasopression (preproVP). Translation in vitro of wild-type and mutant mRNAs produced 19-kD preproVPs. When translated in the presence of canine pancreatic rough microsomes, wild-type preproVP was converted to a 21-kD protein, whereas the mutant mRNA produced proteins of 21 kD and 23 kD. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the 21-kD proteins from the wild-type and the mutants were proVPs generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the 19-residue signal peptide and the addition of carbohydrate. Accordingly, mutant preproVP was cleaved at the correct site after Thr-19, but the efficiency of cleavage by signal peptidase was < 25% that observed for the wild-type preproVP, resulting in the formation of a predominant glycosylated but uncleaved 23-kD product. These data suggest that inefficient processing of preproVP produced by the mutant allele is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes insipidus in the affected individuals. Images PMID:8514868

  9. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition by gemigliptin prevents abnormal vascular remodeling via NF-E2-related factor 2 activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Park, Sungmi; Oh, Chang Joo; Leem, Jaechan; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2015-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors exert a potent anti-hyperglycemic effect and reduce cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetic patients. Several studies have shown that DPP-4 inhibitors including sitagliptin have beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and cardiac infarction involving reactive oxygen species. Here, we show that gemigliptin can directly attenuate the abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via enhanced NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activity. Gemigliptin dramatically prevented ligation injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia in mouse carotid arteries. Likewise, the proliferation of primary VSMCs was significantly attenuated by gemigliptin in a dose-dependent manner consistent with a decrease in phospho-Rb, resulting in G1 cell cycle arrest. We found that gemigliptin enhanced Nrf2 activity not only by mRNA expression, but also by increasing Keap1 proteosomal degradation by p62, leading to the induction of Nrf2 target genes such as HO-1 and NQO1. The anti-proliferative role of gemigliptin disappeared with DPP-4 siRNA knockdown, indicating that the endogenous DPP-4 in VSMCs contributed to the effect of gemigliptin. In addition, gemigliptin diminished TNF-α-mediated cell adhesion molecules such as MCP-1 and VCAM-1 and reduced MMP2 activity in VSMCs. Taken together, our data indicate that gemigliptin exerts a preventative effect on the proliferation and migration of VSMCs via Nrf2. PMID:26187356

  10. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  11. Treatment with metformin and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor elevates apelin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yujuan; Zhang, Yu; Li, Xuesong; Zheng, Hui; Song, Yuping; Zhang, Ning; Shen, Chunfang; Fan, Xiaofang; Ren, Fengdong; Shen, Jiayi; Ren, Guoguang; Yang, Jialin

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to assess the effects of metformin monotherapy or combined treatment with a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (vildagliptin) on apelin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Twenty-five patients with poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin >6.5% [48 mmol/mol]) taking 1,000 mg of metformin daily and 25 healthy controls matched for age and body mass index were enrolled in this study. Anthropometric parameters, glycemic and lipid profile, insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index), and apelin levels were measured at baseline and at 12-week and 24-week visits. Results At baseline, apelin levels were higher in the T2DM patients than in the controls (1.93±1.81 ng/mL versus 6.09±4.90 ng/mL; P<0.05). After 12 weeks, when vildagliptin was added, fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin decreased, and apelin levels increased further (from 6.09±4.90 ng/mL to 24.23±12.59 ng/mL; P<0.05). Follow-up at 24 weeks showed no further improvement in the glycemic profile and no further increase in apelin levels. Conclusion Both metformin and vildagliptin favorably changed glycemic indices and apelin levels. For patients inadequately controlled on a low dose of metformin, addition of vildagliptin may be helpful. PMID:26316706

  12. Gemigliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-glycation properties in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsoo; Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Sanghwa; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of gemigliptin, a highly selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and AGE cross-links with proteins in in vitro as well as in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. In in vitro assay, gemigliptin dose-dependently inhibited methylglyoxal-modified AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) formation (IC50=11.69 mM). AGE-collagen cross-linking assays showed that gemigliptin had a potent inhibitory effect (IC50=1.39 mM) on AGE-BSA cross-links to rat tail tendon collagen, and its activity was stronger than aminoguanidine (IC50=26.4 mM). In addition, gemigliptin directly trapped methylglyoxal in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. To determine whether gemigliptin inhibits the in vivo glycation processes, gemigliptin (100 mg/kg/day) was orally administered into type 2 diabetic db/db mice for 12 weeks. Elevated serum levels of AGEs in db/db mice were suppressed by the administration of gemigliptin. These inhibitory effects of gemigliptin on the glycation process in both in vitro and in vivo suggest its therapeutic potential for ameliorating AGE-related diabetic complications. PMID:25448307

  13. Comparative Analysis of Binding Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors and Their Relationship to Structure.

    PubMed

    Schnapp, Gisela; Klein, Thomas; Hoevels, Yvette; Bakker, Remko A; Nar, Herbert

    2016-08-25

    The binding kinetics and thermodynamics of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors (gliptins) were investigated using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of gliptins to DPP-4 is a rapid electrostatically driven process. Off-rates were generally slow partly because of reversible covalent bond formation by some gliptins, and partly because of strong and extensive interactions. Binding of all gliptins is enthalpy-dominated due to strong ionic interactions and strong solvent-shielded hydrogen bonds. Using a congeneric series of molecules which represented the intermediates in the lead optimization program of linagliptin, the onset of slow binding kinetics and development of the thermodynamic repertoire were analyzed in the context of incremental changes of the chemical structures. All compounds rapidly associated, and therefore the optimization of affinity and residence time is highly correlated. The major contributor to the increasing free energy of binding was a strong increase of binding enthalpy, whereas entropic contributions remained low and constant despite significant addition of lipophilicity. PMID:27438064

  14. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition on circadian blood pressure during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Sufiun, Abu; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Rahman, Asadur; Mori, Hirohito; Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohmori, Koji; Masaki, Tsutomu; Kohno, Masakazu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has indicated that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have antihypertensive effects. Here, we aim to examine the effect of vildagliptin, a DPP-4-specific inhibitor, on blood pressure and its circadian-dipping pattern during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats. DSS rats were treated with a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) plus vehicle or vildagliptin (3 or 10 mg kg(-1) twice daily by oral gavage) for 7 days. Blood pressure was measured by the telemetry system. High-salt diet for 7 days significantly increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and were also associated with an extreme dipping pattern of blood pressure in DSS rats. Treatment with vildagliptin dose-dependently decreased plasma DPP-4 activity, increased plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels and attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension. Furthermore, vildagliptin significantly increased urine sodium excretion and normalized the dipping pattern of blood pressure. In contrast, intracerebroventricular infusion of vildagliptin (50, 500 or 2500 μg) did not alter MAP and heart rate in DSS rats. These data suggest that salt-dependent hypertension initially develops with an extreme blood pressure dipping pattern. The DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, may elicit beneficial antihypertensive effects, including the improvement of abnormal circadian blood pressure pattern, by enhancing urinary sodium excretion. PMID:25588850

  15. Multi-Organ Damage in Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Transgenic Mice Infected with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongjie; Gao, Tongtong; Zeng, Yang; Guo, Yan; Yu, Hong; Li, Junfeng; Kou, Zhihua; Du, Lanying; Tan, Wenjie; Jiang, Shibo; Sun, Shihui; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe acute respiratory failure and considerable extrapumonary organ dysfuction with substantial high mortality. For the limited number of autopsy reports, small animal models are urgently needed to study the mechanisms of MERS-CoV infection and pathogenesis of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutics against MERS-CoV infection. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model globally expressing codon-optimized human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4), the receptor for MERS-CoV. After intranasal inoculation with MERS-CoV, the mice rapidly developed severe pneumonia and multi-organ damage, with viral replication being detected in the lungs on day 5 and in the lungs, kidneys and brains on day 9 post-infection. In addition, the mice exhibited systemic inflammation with mild to severe pneumonia accompanied by the injury of liver, kidney and spleen with neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. Importantly, the mice exhibited symptoms of paralysis with high viral burden and viral positive neurons on day 9. Taken together, this study characterizes the tropism of MERS-CoV upon infection. Importantly, this hDPP4-expressing transgenic mouse model will be applicable for studying the pathogenesis of MERS-CoV infection and investigating the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral agents designed to combat MERS-CoV infection. PMID:26701103

  16. Expression of CD26 and its association with dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity in lymphocytes of type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Bitencourt, Paula Eliete Rodrigues; de Bona, Karine Santos; Zanette, Régis Adriel; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Moretto, Maria Beatriz

    2011-11-01

    Immune response and inflammation were suggested to play certain roles in the development and complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The main objective of this study was to investigate the CD26 expression and its relationship with adenosine deaminase (ADA), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities in lymphocytes of type 2 diabetics (T2DM) patients. These parameters were assessed in 25 T2DM patients and 20 control subjects. We observed a decrease in CD26 expression and a significant increase in the ADA activity in T2DM patients when compared with control subjects. There were no differences between activities of DPP-IV, NAG, and GGT in lymphocytes of T2DM patients and control subjects. Meanwhile, a significant negative correlation was observed between CD26 expression and DPP-IV activity in lymphocytes of T2DM patients. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between DPPIV and ADA activities. The results suggest that the reduction of CD26 expression may be associated in the regulation of DPP-IV in T2DM patients. PMID:21614532

  17. miR-34b inhibits nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation by targeting ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianyong; Li, Yingying; Zhang, Wenyin; Jiang, Yanni; Du, Biaoyan; Tan, Yuhui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate the precise role of miR-34b in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Materials and methods: The expression of miR-34b and transcription of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 (USP22) were examined using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Western blot analysis was used to measure the protein expression of USP22. A dualluciferase assay was used to investigate the interaction between miR-34b and USP22. Cell viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. The cell cycle was analyzed by propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry analysis. Results miR-34b was significantly downregulated in NPC tissues and NPC cell lines. Overexpression of miR-34b in NPC SUNE-6-10B cells inhibited cell viability and proliferation. USP22 was highly expressed in NPC cells and promoted cell viability and proliferation. Restoration of USP22 expression could reverse the effect of miR-34b on NPC cell viability and proliferation. Conclusion miR-34b acts as a tumor suppressor in NPC, which is mediated via repression of the oncogene USP22. PMID:27051294

  18. Synthesis and glutathione S-transferase structure-affinity relationships of nonpeptide and peptidase-stable glutathione analogues.

    PubMed

    Klotz, P; Slaoui-Hasnaoui, A; Banères, J L; Duckert, J F; Rossi, J C; Kerbal, A

    1998-06-18

    A series of nonpeptidic glutathione analogues where the peptide bonds were replaced by simple carbon-carbon bonds or isosteric E double bonds were prepared. The optimal length for the two alkyl chains on either side of the mercaptomethyl group was evaluated using structure-affinity relationships. Affinities of the analogues 14a-f, 23, and 25 were evaluated for a recombinant GST enzyme using a new affinity chromatography method previously developed in our laboratory. Analysis of these analogues gives an additional understanding for GST affinity requirements: (a) the carbon skeleton must conserve that of glutathione since analogue 14a showed the best affinity (IC50 = 5.2 microM); (b) the GST G site is not able to accommodate a chain length elongation of one methylene group (no affinity for analogues 14c,f); (c) a one-methylene group chain length reduction is tolerated, much more for the "Glu side" (14d, IC50 = 10.1 microM) than for the "Gly side" (14b, IC50 = 1800 microM); (d) the mercaptomethyl group must remain at position 5 as shown from the null affinity of the 6-mercaptomethyl analogue 14e; (e) the additional peptide isosteric E double bond (25) or hydroxyl derivative (23) in 14e did not help to retrieve affinity. This work reveals useful information for the design of new selective nonpeptidic and peptidase-stable glutathione analogues. PMID:9632361

  19. Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a is required for CD74 intramembrane proteolysis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Kruchen, Anne; Fluhrer, Regina; Müller, Ingo; Saftig, Paul; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Martin, Christa L; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The invariant chain (CD74) mediates targeting of the MHCII complex to endosomal compartments, where CD74 undergoes degradation allowing MHCII to acquire peptides. We demonstrated recently that intramembrane proteolysis of the final membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) of CD74 is catalysed by Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) and that this process is indispensable for development and function of B lymphocytes in mice. In SPPL2a−/− mice, homeostasis of these cells is disturbed by the accumulation of the unprocessed CD74 NTF. So far, evidence for this essential role of SPPL2a is restricted to mice. Nevertheless, inhibition of SPPL2a has been suggested as novel approach to target B cells for treating autoimmunity. Here, we characterize human B cell lines with a homozygous microdeletion on chromosome 15. We demonstrate that this deletion disrupts the SPPL2a genomic locus and leads to loss of SPPL2a transcript. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with this deletion exhibit absence of SPPL2a at the protein level and show an accumulation of the CD74 NTF comparable to B cells from SPPL2a−/− mice. By this means, we present evidence that the role of SPPL2a in CD74 proteolysis is conserved in human B cells and provide support for modulation of SPPL2a activity as a therapeutic concept. PMID:25035924

  20. α2 Integrin-Dependent Suppression of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell Invasion Involves Ectodomain Regulation of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase-5

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yao; Marzan, David; Lin, Grace; Goodison, Steve; Silletti, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrate that the α2-integrin (α2) mediates pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell interactions with collagens. We found that while well-differentiated cells use α2 exclusively to adhere and migrate on collagenI, poorly differentiated PDAC cells demonstrate reduced reliance on, or complete loss of, α2. Since well-differentiated PDAC lines exhibit reduced in vitro invasion and α2-blockade suppressed invasion of well-differentiated lines exclusively, we hypothesized that α2 may suppress the malignant phenotype in PDAC. Accordingly, ectopic expression of α2 retarded in vitro invasion and maintenance on collagenI exacerbated this effect. Affymetrix profiling revealed that kallikrein-related peptidase-5 (KLK5) was specifically upregulated by α2, and reduced α2 and KLK5 expression was observed in poorly differentiated PDAC cells in situ. Accordingly, well-differentiated PDAC lines express KLK5, and KLK5 blockade increased the invasion of KLK5-positive lines. The α2-cytoplasmic domain was dispensable for these effects, demonstrating that the α2-ectodomain and KLK5 coordinately regulate a less invasive phenotype in PDAC. PMID:22203845

  1. ASP4000, a slow-binding dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, has antihyperglycemic activity of long duration in Zucker fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Amino, Keiko; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Hatakeyama, Yoshifumi; Takakura, Shoji; Mutoh, Seitaro

    2010-03-01

    ASP4000 ((2S)-1-{[(1R,3S,4S,6R)-6-hydroxy-2-azabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-3-yl]carbonyl}-2-pyrrolidinecarbonitrile hydrochloride) is a novel, potent and selective dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP IV, EC 3.4.14.5) inhibitor (Keiko Tanaka-Amino et al. in Eur J pharmacol 59:444-449, 2008). The aim of the present study was to characterize the kinetic profile of and identify the long duration effect of the antihyperglycemic activity of ASP4000. ASP4000 was found to inhibit human recombinant DPP4 activity with a K(i) of 1.05 nM, a k(on) value of 22.3 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), and a k (off) of 2.35 x 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1), with higher affinity than that of vildagliptin. The kinetic studies indicate that both the formation and dissociation of ASP4000/DPP4 complex were faster than those of vildagliptin, and that ASP4000 slow-bindingly inhibits DPP4 with a different mode of inhibition than vildagliptin. In addition, ASP4000 augmented the insulin response and ameliorated the glucose excursion during the oral glucose tolerance test in Zucker fatty rats at 4 h post dosing. ASP4000 is expected to be a promising, long duration DPP4 inhibitor for type 2 diabetes. PMID:19238312

  2. The Dipeptidyl-Peptidase-Like Protein DPP6 Determines the Unitary Conductance of Neuronal Kv4.2 Channels

    PubMed Central

    De Santiago-Castillo, José A.; Rocha, Carmen A.; Nadal, Marcela S.; Rudy, Bernardo; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The neuronal subthreshold-operating A-type K+ current regulates electrical excitability, spike timing, and synaptic integration and plasticity. The Kv4 channels underlying this current have been implicated in epilepsy, regulation of dopamine release, and pain plasticity. However, the unitary conductance (γ) of neuronal somatodendritic A-type K+ channels composed of Kv4 pore-forming subunits is larger (∼7.5 pS) than that of Kv4 channels expressed singly in heterologous cells (∼4 pS). Here, we examined the putative novel contribution of the dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein-6 DPP6-S to the γ of native [cerebellar granule neuron (CGN)] and reconstituted Kv4.2 channels. Coexpression of Kv4.2 proteins with DPP6-S was sufficient to match the γ of native CGN channels; and CGN Kv4 channels from dpp6 knock-out mice yielded a γ indistinguishable from that of Kv4.2 channels expressed singly. Moreover, suggesting electrostatic interactions, charge neutralization mutations of two N-terminal acidic residues in DPP6-S eliminated the increase in γ. Therefore, DPP6-S, as a membrane protein extrinsic to the pore domain, is necessary and sufficient to explain a fundamental difference between native and recombinant Kv4 channels. These observations may help to understand the molecular basis of neurological disorders correlated with recently identified human mutations in the dpp6 gene. PMID:19279261

  3. The crystal structure of human dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) in complex with the inhibitor Gly-Phe-CHN2

    PubMed Central

    Mølgaard, Anne; Arnau, Jose; Lauritzen, Conni; Larsen, Sine; Petersen, Gitte; Pedersen, John

    2006-01-01

    hDDPI (human dipeptidyl peptidase I) is a lysosomal cysteine protease involved in zymogen activation of granule-associated proteases, including granzymes A and B from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase, and mast cell tryptase and chymase. In the present paper, we provide the first crystal structure of an hDPPI–inhibitor complex. The inhibitor Gly-Phe-CHN2 (Gly-Phe-diazomethane) was co-crystallized with hDPPI and the structure was determined at 2.0 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution. The structure of the native enzyme was also determined to 2.05 Å resolution to resolve apparent discrepancies between the complex structure and the previously published structure of the native enzyme. The new structure of the native enzyme is, within the experimental error, identical with the structure of the enzyme–inhibitor complex presented here. The inhibitor interacts with three subunits of hDPPI, and is covalently bound to Cys234 at the active site. The interaction between the totally conserved Asp1 of hDPPI and the ammonium group of the inhibitor forms an essential interaction that mimics enzyme–substrate interactions. The structure of the inhibitor complex provides an explanation of the substrate specificity of hDPPI, and gives a background for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:17020538

  4. Production of feather hydrolysates with antioxidant, angiotensin-I converting enzyme- and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV-inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Fontoura, Roberta; Daroit, Daniel J; Correa, Ana P F; Meira, Stela M M; Mosquera, Mauricio; Brandelli, Adriano

    2014-09-25

    The antioxidant and antihypertensive activities of feather hydrolysates obtained with the bacterium Chryseobacterium sp. kr6 were investigated. Keratin hydrolysates were produced with different concentrations of thermally denatured feathers (10-75 g l(-1)) and initial pH values (6.0-9.0). Soluble proteins accumulated in high amounts in media with 50 and 75 g l(-1) of feathers, reaching values of 18.5 and 22 mg ml(-1), respectively, after 48 hours of cultivation. In media with 50 g l(-1) of feathers, initial pH had minimal effect after 48 hours. Maximal protease production was observed after 24 hours of cultivation, and feather concentration and initial pH values showed no significant effect on enzyme yields at this time. Feather hydrolysates displayed in vitro antioxidant properties, and optimal antioxidant activities were observed in cultures with 50 g l(-1) feathers, at initial pH 8.0, after 48 hours growth at 30°C. Also, feather hydrolysates were demonstrated to inhibit the angiotesin I-converting enzyme by 65% and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV by 44%. The bioconversion of an abundant agroindustrial waste such as chicken feathers can be utilized as a strategy to obtain hydrolysates with antioxidant and antihypertensive activities. Feather hydrolysates might be employed as supplements in animal feed, and also as a potential source of bioactive molecules for feed, food and drug development. PMID:25038398

  5. Characterization and submitochondrial localization of the alpha subunit of the mitochondrial processing peptidase from the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C R; Gomes, S L

    1999-07-01

    In an effort to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the drastic morphological changes the mitochondria go through during the life cycle of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii, the gene encoding the alpha subunit of the mitochondrial processing peptidase (alpha-MPP) was isolated. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the predicted alpha-MPP polypeptide comprises 474 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 51,900 Da, presenting a characteristic mitochondrial signal sequence. Northern blot analysis indicated a single 1.4-kb transcript encoding the B. emersonii alpha-MPP, whose levels decrease during sporulation, becoming very low in the zoospore, and increase again during germination. Despite these variations in mRNA concentration, B. emersonii alpha-MPP protein levels do not change significantly during the life cycle of the fungus, as observed in Western blots. Experiments to investigate the submitochondrial localization of B. emersonii alpha-MPP and beta-MPP were also carried out, and the results indicated that both subunits are associated with the mitochondrial inner membrane, possibly as part of the bc1 complex, as described for plants. PMID:10400583

  6. Maturation of Streptococcus pneumoniae lipoproteins by a type II signal peptidase is required for ABC transporter function and full virulence

    PubMed Central

    Khandavilli, Suneeta; Homer, Karen A; Yuste, Jose; Basavanna, Shilpa; Mitchell, Timothy; Brown, Jeremy S

    2008-01-01

    Cell surface lipoproteins are important for the full virulence of several bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. Processing of prolipoproteins seems to be conserved among different bacterial species, and requires type II signal peptidase (Lsp) mediated cleavage of the N-terminal signal peptide to form the mature lipoprotein. Lsp has been suggested as a target for new antibiotic therapies, but at present there are only limited data on the function of Lsp for Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. We have investigated the function and role during disease pathogenesis of the S. pneumoniae Lsp, which, blast searches suggest, is encoded by the gene Sp0928. Expression of Sp0928 protected Escherichia coli against the Lsp antagonist globomycin, and proteomics and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that deletion of Sp0928 prevented processing of S. pneumoniae prolipoproteins to mature lipoproteins. These data strongly suggest that Sp0928 encodes the S. pneumoniae Lsp. However, immunoblots of membrane-associated proteins, immunoelectron microscopy and flow cytometry assays all confirmed that in the absence of Lsp, immature lipoproteins were still attached to the cell surface. Despite preservation of lipoprotein attachment to the cell membrane, loss of S. pneumoniae Lsp resulted in several phenotypes associated with impaired lipoprotein function and reduced S. pneumoniae replication in animal models of infection. PMID:18086214

  7. Complete amino acid analysis of peptides and proteins after hydrolysis by a mixture of Sepharose-bound peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, H. P. J.; Elliott, D. F.; Evans, B. E.; Lowry, P. J.; McMartin, C.

    1972-01-01

    Incubation with a mixture of Sepharose-bound peptidases was shown to result in the quantitative release of amino acids from certain peptides and S-aminoethylated proteins. Subtraction of the low background values of amino acids generated by the enzymes enables amino acid ratios of corticotrophin-(1–24)-tetracosapeptide to be determined with a standard deviation on repeat digestions of 3–5%. Good values were obtained for amino acids that are completely or partially destroyed on acid hydrolysis, i.e. tryptophan, tyrosine, serine, asparagine and glutamine. Experiments with peptides containing d-amino acids showed that the enzyme mixture is stereospecific and could therefore be used to detect the presence of d-residues in peptides. The enzyme mixture completely hydrolyses peptide fragments obtained after Edman degradation and should therefore be useful for determining sequences of peptides containing acid-labile amino acid residues. The activities of the bound enzymes were unaltered over a period of 7 months and they provide a simple, reproducible procedure for the quantitative determination of amino acids in peptides and proteins containing l-amino acids. PMID:4349115

  8. Effects of addition of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor to metformin on sirolimus-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Lim, Sun Woo; Jin, Jian; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Chul Woo

    2016-08-01

    The guideline for the management of new-onset diabetes after transplantation recommends metformin (MET) as a first-line drug, and addition of a second-line drug is needed to better control of hyperglycemia. We tested the effect of addition of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) inhibitor to MET on sirolimus (SRL)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM). In animal model of SRL-induced DM, MET treatment improved pancreatic islet function (blood glucose level and insulin secretion) and attenuated oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. Addition of a DPP IV inhibitor to MET improved these parameters more than MET alone. An in vitro study showed that SRL treatment increased pancreas beta cell death and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pretreatment of ROS inhibitor, or p38MAPK inhibitor effectively decreased SRL-induced islet cell death. Exendin-4 (EXD), a substrate of DPP IV or MET significantly improved cell viability and decreased ROS production compared with SRL treatment, and combined treatment with the 2 drugs improved both parameters. At the subcellular level, impaired mitochondrial respiration by SRL were partially improved by MET or EXD and much improved further after addition of EXD to MET. Our data suggest that addition of a DPP IV inhibitor to MET decreases SRL-induced oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial respiration. This finding provides a rationale for the combined use of a DPP IV inhibitor and MET in treating SRL-induced DM. PMID:27059001

  9. Origins of Yersinia pestis Sensitivity to the Arylomycin Antibiotics and the Inhibition of Type I Signal Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Steed, Danielle B.; Liu, Jian; Wasbrough, Elizabeth; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Miller, Jeremy; Somerville, Brandon; Hershfield, Jeremy R.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of the plague. Reports of Y. pestis strains that are resistant to each of the currently approved first-line and prophylactic treatments point to the urgent need to develop novel antibiotics with activity against the pathogen. We previously reported that Y. pestis strain KIM6+, unlike most Enterobacteriaceae, is susceptible to the arylomycins, a novel class of natural-product lipopeptide antibiotics that inhibit signal peptidase I (SPase). In this study, we show that the arylomycin activity is conserved against a broad range of Y. pestis strains and confirm that it results from the inhibition of SPase. We next investigated the origins of this unique arylomycin sensitivity and found that it does not result from an increased affinity of the Y. pestis SPase for the antibiotic and that alterations to each component of the Y. pestis lipopolysaccharide—O antigen, core, and lipid A—make at most only a small contribution. Instead, the origins of the sensitivity can be traced to an increased dependence on SPase activity that results from high levels of protein secretion under physiological conditions. These results highlight the potential of targeting protein secretion in cases where there is a heavy reliance on this process and also have implications for the development of the arylomycins as an antibiotic with activity against Y. pestis and potentially other Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:25896690

  10. In silico screening of novel inhibitors of M17 Leucine Amino Peptidase (LAP) of Plasmodium vivax as therapeutic candidate.

    PubMed

    Rout, Subhashree; Mahapatra, Rajani Kanta

    2016-08-01

    M17 LAP (Leucine Amino Peptidase) plays an important role in the hydrolysis of amino acids essential for growth and development of Plasmodium vivax (Pv), the pathogen causing malaria. In this paper a homology model of PvLAP was generated using MODELLER v9.15. From different in-silico methods such as structure based, ligand based and de novo drug designing a total of 90 compounds were selected for docking studies. A final list of 10 compounds was prepared. The study reported the identification of 2-[(3-azaniumyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoyl) amino]-4-methylpentanoate as the best inhibitor in terms of docking score and pharmacophoric features. The reliability of the binding mode of the inhibitor is confirmed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study with GROMACS software for a simulation time of 20ns in water environment. Finally, in silico ADMET analysis of the inhibitors using MedChem Designer v3 evaluated the drug likeness of the best hits to be considered for industrial pharmaceutical research. PMID:27470355

  11. Mitochondrial intermediate peptidase: Expression in Escherichia coli and improvement of its enzymatic activity detection with FRET substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Marcelo F.; Torquato, Ricardo J.S.; Assis, Diego M.; Juliano, Maria A.; Hayashi, Mirian A.F.; Oliveira, Vitor

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, soluble, functionally-active, recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP), a mitochondrial metalloendoprotease, was expressed in a prokaryotic system. The hMIP fusion protein, with a poly-His-tag (6x His), was obtained by cloning the coding region of hMIP cDNA into the pET-28a expression vector, which was then used to transform Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. After isolation and purification of the fusion protein by affinity chromatography using Ni-Sepharose resin, the protein was purified further using ion exchange chromatography with a Hi-trap resource Q column. The recombinant hMIP was characterized by Western blotting using three distinct antibodies, circular dichroism, and enzymatic assays that used the first FRET substrates developed for MIP and a series of protease inhibitors. The successful expression of enzymatically-active hMIP in addition to the FRET substrates will contribute greatly to the determination of substrate specificity of this protease and to the development of specific inhibitors that are essential for a better understanding of the role of this protease in mitochondrial functioning.

  12. Does estradiol have an impact on the dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria?

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Mervi; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2015-12-01

    Initiation and development of pregnancy-associated gingivitis is seemingly related to the microbial shift towards specific gram-negative anaerobes in subgingival biofilms. It is known that Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to use estradiol as an alternative source of growth instead of vitamin K. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of estradiol on the bacterial dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) enzyme activity in vitro as a virulent factor of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella pallens, and Prevotella aurantiaca. In all experiments, 2 strains of each Prevotella species were used. Bacteria were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol and were allowed to build biofilms at an air-solid interface. DPPIV activities of biofilms were measured kinetically during 20 min using a fluorometric assay. The enzyme activity was later related to the amount of protein produced by the same biofilm, reflecting the biofilm mass. Estradiol significantly increased DPPIV activities of the 8 Prevotella strains in a strain- and dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates the DPPIV enzyme activity of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, P. pallens, and P. aurantiaca strains differently. Our results may, at least partly, explain the role of estradiol to elicit a virulent state which contributes to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. PMID:26386229

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition in diabetic rats leads to activation of the transcription factor CREB in β-cells.

    PubMed

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Qin, LiMei; Bouchard, Ron

    2015-05-15

    Incretin therapies are effective in controlling blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients by improving the survival and function of β-cells. They include dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs. We have previously reported that GLP-1 enhances the survival of cultured human islets by activation of the transcription factor CREB. To test the in vivo relevance of these findings, we examined the effects of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, in Zucker Diabetic rats, a model for type 2 diabetes. The plasma levels of GLP-1 increased in alogliptin-treated diabetic rats leading to normoglycemia. Pancreatic islets of untreated diabetic rats were characterized by decreased immunostaining for insulin and PDX-1. Elevation of GLP-1 in treated diabetic rats resulted in the improved survival of β-cells. Dual immunofluorescent staining showed phosphorylation/activation of CREB in insulin-positive β-cells of islets. This led to increases in the levels of CREB targets including Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic mitochondrial protein, BIRC3, a caspase inhibitor and IRS-2, an adapter protein needed for insulin signaling. Findings from this study suggest potential activation of cytoprotective CREB by GLP-1 in pancreatic β-cells of diabetic patients undergoing incretin-based therapies. PMID:25720341

  14. Ability of Post-endotoxin serum from BCG-infected mice to induce nonspecific resistance and stimulation of granulopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Urbaschek, R; Urbaschek, B

    1983-01-01

    Serum from BCG-infected mice obtained 2 h after injection with endotoxin induced elevated levels of colony-stimulating factor and an increase in splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells in C3H/HeJ mice. The capacity of such serum to stimulate granulopoiesis may be related to its ability to increase nonspecific resistance to lethal irradiation. PMID:6341239

  15. A new approach to decoupling of bacterial adhesion energies measured by AFM into specific and nonspecific components.

    PubMed

    Eskhan, Asma O; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2014-02-01

    A new method to decoupling of bacterial interactions measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) into specific and nonspecific components is proposed. The new method is based on computing the areas under the approach and retraction curves. To test the efficacy of the new method, AFM was used to probe the repulsion and adhesion energies present between L. monocytogenes cells cultured at five pH values (5, 6, 7, 8 and 9) and silicon nitride (Si3N4). Overall adhesion energy was then decoupled into its specific and nonspecific components using the new method as well as using Poisson statistical approach. Poisson statistical method represents the most commonly used approach to decouple bacterial interactions into their components. For all pH conditions investigated, specific energies dominated the adhesion and a transition in adhesion and repulsion energies for cells cultured at pH 7 was observed. When compared, the differences in the specific and nonspecific energies obtained using Poisson analysis and the new method were on average 2.2% and 6.7%, respectively. The relatively close energies obtained using the two approaches demonstrate the efficacy of the new method as an alternative way to decouple adhesion energies into their specific and nonspecific components. PMID:24563576

  16. A new approach to decoupling of bacterial adhesion energies measured by AFM into specific and nonspecific components

    PubMed Central

    Eskhan, Asma O.; Abu-Lail, Nehal I.

    2013-01-01

    A new method to decoupling of bacterial interactions measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) into specific and nonspecific components is proposed. The new method is based on computing the areas under the approach and retraction curves. To test the efficacy of the new method, AFM was used to probe the repulsion and adhesion energies present between L. monocytogenes cells cultured at five pH values (5, 6, 7, 8 and 9) and silicon nitride (Si3N4). Overall adhesion energy was then decoupled into its specific and nonspecific components using the new method as well as using Poisson statistical approach. Poisson statistical method represents the most commonly used approach to decouple bacterial interactions into their components. For all pH conditions investigated, specific energies dominated the adhesion and a transition in adhesion and repulsion energies for cells cultured at pH 7 was observed. When compared, the differences in the specific and nonspecific energies obtained using Poisson analysis and the new method were on average 2.2% and 6.7%, respectively. The relatively close energies obtained using the two approaches demonstrate the efficacy of the new method as an alternative way to decouple adhesion energies into their specific and nonspecific components. PMID:24563576

  17. Hospitalizations of the elderly in the United States for non-specific gastrointestinal diseases: A search for etilogical clues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonspecific gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a common cause of GI-related hospitalizations in U.S. elderly (82.9% of all cases) and it peaks concurrently with viral enteritis, suggesting a lack of diagnostic testing. The lack of etiological specificity in the current coding syste...

  18. The Efficacy of a Perceptive Rehabilitation on Postural Control in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paolucci, Teresa; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Grasso, Maria R.; Spadini, Ennio; Paolucci, Stefano; Saraceni, Vincenzo M.; Morone, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain have a worse posture, probably related to poor control of the back muscles and altered perception of the trunk midline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation in terms of stability and pain relief in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients were…

  19. Conformational Dynamics and the Binding of Specific and Nonspecific DNA by the Autoinhibited Transcription Factor Ets-1.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-07-26

    The affinity of the Ets-1 transcription factor for DNA is autoinhibited by an intrinsically disordered serine-rich region (SRR) and a helical inhibitory module (IM) appended to its winged helix-turn-helix ETS domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, we investigated how Ets-1 recognizes specific versus nonspecific DNA, with a focus on the roles of protein dynamics and autoinhibition in these processes. Upon binding either DNA, the two marginally stable N-terminal helices of the IM predominantly unfold, but still sample partially ordered conformations. Also, on the basis of amide chemical shift perturbation mapping, Ets-1 associates with both specific and nonspecific DNA through the same canonical ETS domain interface. These interactions are structurally independent of the SRR, and thus autoinhibition does not impart DNA-binding specificity. However, relative to the pronounced NMR spectroscopic changes in Ets-1 resulting from specific DNA binding, the spectra of the nonspecific DNA complexes showed conformational exchange broadening and lacked several diagnostic amide and indole signals attributable to hydrogen bonding interactions seen in reported X-ray crystallographic structures of this transcription factor with its cognate DNA sequences. Such differences are highlighted by the chemical shift and relaxation properties of several interfacial lysine and arginine side chains. Collectively, these data support a general model in which Ets-1 interacts with nonspecific DNA via dynamic electrostatic interactions, whereas hydrogen bonding drives the formation of well-ordered complexes with specific DNA. PMID:27362745

  20. The dynamics of pain: Evidence for simultaneous site-specific habituation and site-nonspecific sensitization in thermal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jepma, Marieke; Jones, Matt; Wager, Tor D.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to noxious stimuli changes their painfulness, due to multiple adaptive processes in the peripheral and central nervous system. Somewhat paradoxically, repeated stimulation can produce an increase (sensitization) or a decrease (habituation) in pain. Adaptation processes may also be body-site-specific or operate across body sites, and considering this distinction may help explain the conditions under which habituation vs. sensitization occurs. To dissociate the effects of site-specific and site-nonspecific adaptation processes, we examined reported pain in 100 participants during counterbalanced sequences of noxious thermal stimulation on multiple skin sites. Analysis of pain ratings revealed two opposing sequential effects: repeated stimulations of the same skin site produced temperature-dependent habituation, whereas repeated stimulations across different sites produced sensitization. Stimulation trials were separated by ~20 seconds and sensitization was unrelated to the distance between successively stimulated sites, suggesting that neither temporal nor spatial summation occurred. To explain these effects, we propose a dynamic model with two adaptation processes, one site-specific and one site-nonspecific. The model explains 93% of the variance in the group-mean pain ratings after controlling for current stimulation temperature, with its estimated parameters showing evidence for habituation for the site-specific process and sensitization for the site-nonspecific process. The two pain-adaptation processes revealed in this study, and the ability to disentangle them, may hold keys to understanding multiple pain-regulatory mechanisms and their disturbance in chronic-pain syndromes. Perspective This article presents novel evidence for simultaneous site-specific habituation and site-nonspecific sensitization in thermal pain, which can be disentangled (and the direction and strength of each process estimated) by a dynamic model. The dissociation of site

  1. Influenza infection results in local expansion of memory CD8+ T cells with antigen non-specific phenotype and function

    PubMed Central

    Sckisel, Gail D; Tietze, Julia K; Zamora, Anthony E; Hsiao, Hua-Hui; Priest, Stephen O; Wilkins, Danice E C; Lanier, Louis L; Blazar, Bruce R; Baumgarth, Nicole; Murphy, William J

    2014-01-01

    Primary viral infections induce activation of CD8+ T cells responsible for effective resistance. We sought to characterize the nature of the CD8+ T cell expansion observed after primary viral infection with influenza. Infection of naive mice with different strains of influenza resulted in the rapid expansion of memory CD8+ T cells exhibiting a unique bystander phenotype with significant up-regulation of natural killer group 2D (NKG2D), but not CD25, on the CD44highCD8+ T cells, suggesting an antigen non-specific phenotype. We further confirmed the non-specificity of this phenotype on ovalbumin-specific (OT-I) CD8+ T cells, which are not specific to influenza. These non-specific CD8+ T cells also displayed increased lytic capabilities and were observed primarily in the lung. Thus, influenza infection was shown to induce a rapid, antigen non-specific memory T cell expansion which is restricted to the specific site of inflammation. In contrast, CD8+ T cells of a similar phenotype could be observed in other organs following administration of systemic agonistic anti-CD40 and interleukin-2 immunotherapy, demonstrating that bystander expansion in multiple sites is possible depending on whether the nature of activation is either acute or systemic. Finally, intranasal blockade of NKG2D resulted in a significant increase in viral replication early during the course of infection, suggesting that NKG2D is a critical mediator of anti-influenza responses prior to the initiation of adaptive immunity. These results characterize further the local bystander expansion of tissue-resident, memory CD8+ T cells which, due to their early induction, may play an important NKG2D-mediated, antigen non-specific role during the early stages of viral infection. PMID:23937663

  2. Mechanisms of specific and nonspecific binding of architectural proteins in prokaryotic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Benevides, James M; Danahy, Jessica; Kawakami, Jessica; Thomas, George J

    2008-03-25

    IHF and HU are small basic proteins of eubacteria that bind as homodimers to double-stranded DNA and bend the duplex to promote architectures required for gene regulation. These architectural proteins share a common alpha/beta fold but exhibit different nucleic acid binding surfaces and distinct functional roles. With respect to DNA-binding specificity, for example, IHF is sequence specific, while HU is not. We have employed Raman difference spectroscopy and gel mobility assays to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying such differences in DNA recognition. Parallel studies of solution complexes of IHF and HU with the same DNA nonadecamer (5' --> 3' sequence: TC TAAGTAGTTGATTCATA, where the phage lambda H1 consensus sequence of IHF is underlined) show the following. (i) The structure of the targeted DNA site is altered much more dramatically by IHF than by HU binding. (ii) In the IHF complex, the structural perturbations encompass both the sugar-phosphate backbone and the bases of the consensus sequence, whereas only the DNA backbone is altered by HU binding. (iii) In the presence of excess protein, complexes of order higher than 1 dimer per duplex are detected for HU:DNA, though not for IHF:DNA. The results differentiate structural motifs of IHF:DNA and HU:DNA solution complexes, provide Raman signatures of prokaryotic sequence-specific and nonspecific recognition, and suggest that the architectural role of HU may involve the capability to recruit additional binding partners to even relatively short DNA sequences. PMID:18302340

  3. The nonspecific thalamus: A place in a wedding bed for making memories last?

    PubMed

    Pereira de Vasconcelos, Anne; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-01

    We summarize anatomical, electrophysiological and behavioral evidence that the rostral intralaminar (ILN) and the reuniens and rhomboid (ReRh) nuclei that belong to the nonspecific thalamus, might be part of a hippocampo-cortico-thalamic network underlying consolidation of enduring declarative(-like) memories at systems level. The first part of this review describes the anatomical and functional organization of these thalamic nuclei. The second part presents the theoretical models supporting the active systems-level consolidation, a process that relies upon sleep specific field-potential oscillations occurring during both slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The last part presents data in the rat showing that the lesion of the rostral ILN or of the ReRh specifically hinders the formation of remote spatial memories without affecting task acquisition or retrieval of a recent memory. These results showing a critical role of the ILN and ReRh nuclei in the transformation of a recent memory into a remote one are discussed in the context of their control of cortical arousal (ARAS) and of thalamo-cortico-thalamic synchronization. PMID:25451763

  4. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming α-helix and β-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  5. Patients suffering from nonspecific work-related upper extremity disorders exhibit insufficient movement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bloemsaat, Jules G; Ruijgrok, Joop M; Van Galen, Gerard P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate whether patients experiencing nonspecific complaints of the forearm caused by sustained use of the personal computer exhibit deviant movement strategies as compared to healthy participants. Patients (N=10) and controls (N=24) performed a graphical aiming task combined with an auditory memory task. Force production (pen pressure), kinematic- and performance variables were recorded. During a trial, the control group gradually increased pen pressure from the stationary phases to the dynamic phase. The patients increased their pen pressure much more abruptly and to such a degree that the final pressure during real-time movement far exceeded that of the controls. Memory load led to a greater increase of pen pressure from the stationary phase to the dynamic phase in the patient group. Patients further displayed longer reaction times. The results are discussed within the framework of our recent theory on the role of neuromotor noise in the regulation of task performance under conditions of stress. PMID:14734239

  6. Detection of embryonic stem cell lysate biomarkers by surface plasmon resonance with reduced nonspecific adsorption.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Deependra; Perez, Javier Batista; Nand, Amita; Zhiqiang, Cheng; Wang, Peizhe; Na, Jie; Zhu, Jingsong

    2015-02-15

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) has emerged as a versatile biosensor to detect a wide range of biomolecular interactions with divergent potential applications. However, the use of this advanced-level technology for stem cell lysate study is still not much explored. Cell lysates are significant biological analytes used for disease diagnostics and proteomic studies, but their complex nature limits their use as an analyte for SPRi biosensors. Here, we review the problems associated with the use of SPRi for stem cell lysate study and examine the role of surface chemistry, running buffer, and blocking solution in order to minimize nonspecific adsorption (NSA). We detect the expression of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, Rex1, and Lin28 biomarkers present in mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lysate against their corresponding antibodies immobilized on the sensor surface with reduced NSA. The current study shows that the conjunction of SPRi and microarray can be used as a label-free, high-throughput, and rapid technique for detection of biomarkers and their relative abundance in stem cell lysate study. PMID:25447493

  7. Sensory and sympathetic disorders in chronic non-specific neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; MingϮ, Zhiyong; Närhi, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Summary The signs of sympathetic and sensory nerve-related disorders are not widely investigated in chronic nonspecific neck pain (NNP) patients. Thus, we performed skin temperature (Tsk), evaporation and touch threshold (TT) measurements to reveal possible dysfunctions at the fingertips of NNP patients (n=60) compared with healthy controls (n=11). Neck pain intensity was the main modifier of Tsk, and age the main modifier of TT in a multivariate model. On comparisons of the subgroups of NNP patients with unilateral (n=26) and bilateral (n=34) symptoms and controls, TT differed and Tsk tended to differ, the unilateral pain patients being found to demonstrate higher TT values on both sides. Interrelations between the measured parameters were found in the controls, but not in the patients. The NNP patients exhibited signs of functional impairment of innervation reflected in changes in tactile sensitivity and vasoactive sympathetic function. These changes may be based on both central and peripheral mechanisms, which possibly differ in patients with unilateral and bilateral symptoms. PMID:26415033

  8. Risk Perception of Nonspecific Low Back Pain among Nurses: A Qualitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Sedigheh; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Enjezab, Behnaz; Barkhordari, Abolfazl; Fallahzadeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background:Low back pain (LBP) is a common medical problem among nurses. A better understanding of nurses’ experiences about LBP may help to develop preventative approaches. The study aimed to explore risk perceptions of nonspecific LBP among nurses in Bandar Abbas City, southern Iran. Methods: This qualitative study conducted as directed content analysis in 2013. Private semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 30 nurses with minimum of 1-year working experience in hospital. The interview questions were based on perceived severity and vulnerability structures of Protection Motivation Theory. All interviews were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Perceived Severity had the following sub-themes: developing disorders in one’s own life and profession, psychical and mental consequences, conflicts and problems in family life, and financial problems. Two sub-themes (problems and limitations in hospital’s working system, nature of nursing profession) were identified in relation to perceived vulnerability. Conclusion: Nurses reflected their concerns about the impact of LBP on their job security and their considerations about how their back pain might be interpreted by their employers and co-workers. Importance of transparent medical diagnostic procedure and clinical evidence to justify degree of LBP and its burden on the nurses’ performance was also addressed. PMID:25648952

  9. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  10. An Alien in the Group: Eusocial Male Bees Sharing Nonspecific Reproductive Aggregations

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, C. F.; Ferreira-Caliman, M. J.; Nascimento, F. S.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual selection predicts that individuals competing for access to sexual partners should maximize their chances of mating by looking for sites where the chances of finding partners are more likely to occur. However, males of stingless bees have been observed sharing nonspecific reproductive aggregations. This uncommon behavior appears to confer no obvious increase of individual fitness. It has been suggested that this reproductive strategy is due to the similarity between male odors common to different stingless bee species. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are candidate odors of interest because their nonvolatile pheromone nature allows them to play an important role in sexual behavior and species recognition. Here, we review the literature to evaluate whether any phylogenetic patterns exist among male stingless bees that aggregate with closely or distantly related species. We also compared the CHC profiles of males of Neotropical stingless bee species (Plebeia sp. Schwarz, Trigona spinipes (F.), Tetragona clavipes (F.), Nannotrigona testaceicornis (Lepeletier), Scaptotrigona aff. depilis (Moure), Tetragonisca angustula (Latreille), and Melipona subnitida (Ducke) to reveal any chemical similarities among their male odors. We found males of 21 stingless bee species involved in interspecific interactions mainly from Neotropical and Indo-Malayan/Australasian regions. Alien males did not necessarily visit host aggregations of closely related species. Furthermore, the CHC profiles of different studied species were very distinct from each other and do not overlapped at all. It is unclear yet why this apparently nonadaptive behavior carried out by some stingless bee males. PMID:26518220

  11. Seasonal variations of acute appendicitis and nonspecific abdominal pain in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Ilves, Imre; Fagerström, Anne; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Juvonen, Petri; Miettinen, Pekka; Paajanen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether seasonal changes had an effect on the incidence of acute appendicitis (AA) or nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP). METHODS: We carried out a national register study of all patients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of AA and acute NSAP in Finland. Data were analyzed for the whole country and correlated to seasonal and weather parameters (temperature, humidity). Moreover, additional sub-analyses were performed for five geographically different area of Finland. RESULTS: The observation period spanned 21 years, with 186558 appendectomies, of which 137528 (74%) cases were reported as AA. The incidence of AA declined for 32% over the study period. The average incidence of the NSAP was 34/10000 per year. The mean annual temperature, but not relative humidity, showed clear geographical variations. The incidence of AA decreased significantly during the cold months of the year. No correlation was detected between temperature and incidence of NSAP. Humidity had a statistically significant impact on NSAP. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute appendicitis is declining in Finland. We detected a clear seasonality in the incidence of AA and NSAP. PMID:24833844

  12. Cortisol, Health, and Coping in Patients with Nonspecific Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Sveinsdottir, Vigdis; Eriksen, Hege R; Ursin, Holger; Hansen, Åse M; Harris, Anette

    2016-03-01

    Subjective health complaints (SHC), including nonspecific low back pain (LBP) as the most common single complaint, are the main reasons for long-term sick leave in many western countries. These complaints are often attributed to "stress". Cortisol has frequently been considered a biomarker reflecting sustained physiological HPA-axis activity, and is characterized by a high cortisol awakening response (CAR) and low evening values. The aim of the study was to investigate whether LBP patients had a normal characteristic cortisol profile, and whether possible deviations were related to coping and health. 305 patients on long-term sick leave for LBP participated in the study, and saliva cortisol profiles were compared to a reference population consisting of Danish workers. Cortisol was measured upon awakening, after 30 min, and in the evening. Additionally, patients answered questionnaires about SHC, fatigue, pain, coping, and social support. The patients showed a seemingly normal cortisol profile. However, CAR was larger among patients compared to the reference population. Patients with low cortisol reactivity had more SHC, pain, and fatigue, and those with higher evening cortisol reported higher scores on coping. The results are discussed in terms of theory, practical considerations, and possible mechanisms for the association between cortisol, health, and coping. PMID:26287577

  13. Deposition of PEG onto PMMA microchannel surface to minimize nonspecific adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Li, Yan; Guo, Kai; Chen, Yupeng; Kong, Jilie; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhong, Wei; Liu, Baohong

    2006-06-01

    A protein-resistant surface has been constructed on the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic chips based on a one-step modification. The copolymer of butyl methacrylate (BMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) is synthesized to introduce a dense PEG molecular brush-like coating on the PMMA microchannel surfaces via the anchoring effect of the hydrophobic BMA units. The PEGMA segments could produce hydrophilic domains formed on the interface so as to achieve stable electroosmotic flow, and less nonspecific adsorption toward biomolecules. The modification procedure and the properties of the poly(BMA-co-PEGMA)-coated surface have been characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, confocal fluorescence microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The water contact angle and electroosmotic flow of PEG-modified PMMA microchip are measured to be 36 degrees and 5.4 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), while those of 73 degrees and 1.9 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for native one, respectively. The PEG-modified microchip has been applied for the electrophoresis separation of proteins, corresponding to the theoretical efficiencies about 16 300 and 412 300 plates m(-1). In the interest of achieving efficient separation while minimizing biofoulings from the serum and plasma, the fabrication of PEG-coated microfluidic chips would provide a biocompatible platform for complex biological analysis. PMID:16738729

  14. Brief Exposure to Sensory Cues Elicits Stimulus-Nonspecific General Sensitization in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Violaine; Party, Virginie; Renou, Michel; Anderson, Peter; Gadenne, Christophe; Marion-Poll, Frédéric; Anton, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    The effect of repeated exposure to sensory stimuli, with or without reward is well known to induce stimulus-specific modifications of behaviour, described as different forms of learning. In recent studies we showed that a brief single pre-exposure to the female-produced sex pheromone or even a predator sound can increase the behavioural and central nervous responses to this pheromone in males of the noctuid moth Spodoptera littoralis. To investigate if this increase in sensitivity might be restricted to the pheromone system or is a form of general sensitization, we studied here if a brief pre-exposure to stimuli of different modalities can reciprocally change behavioural and physiological responses to olfactory and gustatory stimuli. Olfactory and gustatory pre-exposure and subsequent behavioural tests were carried out to reveal possible intra- and cross-modal effects. Attraction to pheromone, monitored with a locomotion compensator, increased after exposure to olfactory and gustatory stimuli. Behavioural responses to sucrose, investigated using the proboscis extension reflex, increased equally after pre-exposure to olfactory and gustatory cues. Pheromone-specific neurons in the brain and antennal gustatory neurons did, however, not change their sensitivity after sucrose exposure. The observed intra- and reciprocal cross-modal effects of pre-exposure may represent a new form of stimulus-nonspecific general sensitization originating from modifications at higher sensory processing levels. PMID:22457821

  15. Association of comorbidity and outcome in episodes of nonspecific low back pain in occupational populations.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Margareta; Hiebert, Rudi; Pietrek, Markus; Alexander, Michelle; Crane, Michael; Lewis, Stuart

    2002-07-01

    We examined the relationship between comorbidity and first return to work after episodes of work-disabling, nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP). An inception cohort of workers with new episodes of NSLBP was identified from administratively maintained occupational health records. We compared 6-month return-to-work rates between workers with one or more comorbid conditions with those without documented comorbidity. Workers with comorbidity were 1.31 times more likely to remain work disabled than those with uncomplicated NSLBP, after adjusting for age, gender, lifting demands, and company membership (adjusted hazards ratio [HR] = 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12 to 1.52). Concurrent injury (i.e., sprains or strains of the neck, upper extremity, and lower extremity; contusions; and lacerations) had the strongest association (adjusted HR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.83), followed by musculoskeletal disorders (adjusted HR = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.66). Comorbidities should be routinely evaluated at first visit by occupational health professionals to better manage disability associated with LBP. PMID:12134532

  16. Turbine engine lubricant foaming due to silicone basestock used in