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Sample records for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

  1. Pharmacology of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Dick; Kunnathil, Sushama; McBride, Joseph; Koppala, Rajah

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain affects up to 50 million Americans every day. Traditional treatment has included acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or opioids. The combination of NSAIDs and opioids can provide effective treatment for up to 90% of patients with chronic pain, but the NSAIDs have the potential for significant, even life-threatening side effects. Additionally, the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors with 16,000 deaths per year in the United States might not be any safer. The opioids are great for short-term pain, but may need to be adjusted or changed frequently due to the development of tolerance. Understanding of the mechanism of opioids and NSAIDs has improved greatly over the past decade, but is still incomplete. PMID:22550382

  2. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-induced intestinal inflammation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bjarnason, I.; Zanelli, G.; Smith, T.; Prouse, P.; Williams, P.; Smethurst, P.; Delacey, G.; Gumpel, M.J.; Levi, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    This study examines the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the small intestine in humans. Using an /sup 111/In-leukocyte technique in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 90) and osteoarthritis (n = 7), it appears that nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs cause small intestinal inflammation in two-thirds of patients on long-term treatment and on discontinuation, the inflammation may persist for up to 16 mo. The prevalence and magnitude of the intestinal inflammation was unrelated to the type and dose of nonsteroidal drugs and previous or concomitant second-line drug treatment. There was a significant inverse correlation (r = -0.29, p less than 0.05) between fecal /sup 111/In excretion and hemoglobin levels in patients treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. The kinetics of fecal indium 111 excretion in patients treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs was almost identical to that of patients with small bowel Crohn's disease. Eighteen patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs underwent a radiologic examination of the small bowel and 3 were found to have asymptomatic ileal disease with ulceration and strictures. Nineteen patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, 20 healthy controls, and 13 patients with Crohn's ileitis underwent a dual radioisotopic ileal function test with tauro 23 (/sup 75/Se) selena-25-homocholic acid and cobalt 58-labeled cyanocobalamine. On day 4, more than half of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis had evidence of bile acid malabsorption, but the ileal dysfunction was much milder than seen in patients with Crohn's ileitis.

  3. Ketorolac: a parenteral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Resman-Targoff, B H

    1990-11-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine is a pyrrolo-pyrrole nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) with potent analgesic effects when administered intramuscularly for the treatment of acute pain. Ketorolac is well absorbed and has a rapid onset of action. Maximum plasma concentrations are achieved in 45-50 minutes and peak analgesic effects in about one to two hours following intramuscular injection. Ketorolac is more than 99 percent bound to plasma proteins and has a mean apparent volume of distribution of 0.11-0.25 L/kg. About 91 percent of a dose is excreted in urine, mostly as inactive metabolites, and approximately 6 percent is eliminated in feces. The elimination half-life, approximately four to six hours, increases in elderly patients and those with renal impairment. Its analgesic effectiveness was similar or superior to that of morphine, meperidine, or pentazocine in single-dose studies of patients with postoperative pain or renal colic and greater than that of placebo in patients with chronic cancer pain. The adverse effects are generally mild to moderate, self-limiting, and similar to those seen with other prostaglandin inhibitors. Ketorolac has a reversible inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. It can cause dose-related gastric ulcerations, even when administered parenterally. Ketorolac is a promising parenteral alternative to oral NSAIDs and a nonnarcotic alternative to opioid analgesics. Additional multiple-dose studies are needed to more clearly define its place in therapy. PMID:2275236

  4. Colitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, S.; Keat, A. C.; Keat, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of acute proctocolitis associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy are presented. The drugs implicated were flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, naproxen and ibuprofen. After resolution of symptoms and signs of proctocolitis three of the four patients were subsequently rechallenged with the implicated drug: in each there was a rapid relapse. PMID:3774712

  5. The new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Scherbel, A L; Wilke, W S

    1981-10-01

    Most physicians regard to newer short-acting anti-inflammatory drugs as a substitute for aspirin because they are less toxic. Although these drugs cannot induce remissions of rheumatoid arthritis, they do afford symptomatic relief and exert both a moderate algesic and anti-inflammatory effect in conditions like osteoarthritis, gout, pseudogout, and a variety of musculoskeletal syndromes. The many adverse reactions and toxic effects associated with these drugs are probably related to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthetase, which in turn reduces the biosynthesis of prostaglandins in widespread areas of the body. Thus limited in number, these compounds cannot play an effective role in the body's defense mechanisms. Researchers postulate that this failure accounts for the gastrointestinal and renal lesions--as well as other, as yet unexplained toxic manifestations--noted in patients taking these drugs. For safety's sake, the newer anti-inflammatory drugs should be used with large doses of aspirin, other agents that inhibit prostaglandin synthetase, or drugs that are potentially nephro-toxic. PMID:6974117

  6. The Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Leonard H.; Rooney, Theodore W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical pharmacology of the new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help practitioners decide which to use and how to administer them. Indications for and effects of NSAIDs are described. (MT)

  7. Mechanisms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Umar, Asad; Steele, Vernon E; Menter, David G; Hawk, Ernest T

    2016-02-01

    Various clinical and epidemiologic studies show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COXIBs) help prevent cancer. Since eicosanoid metabolism is the main inhibitory targets of these drugs the resulting molecular and biological impact is generally accepted. As our knowledge base and technology progress we are learning that additional targets may be involved. This review attempts to summarize these new developments in the field. PMID:26970125

  8. [Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Valha, P; Zmrhal, J; Feyereisl, J

    2010-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic (lowering an elevated body temperature and relieving pain without impairing consciousness) and, in higher doses, with anti-inflammatory effects (reducing inflammation). As inhibitors of cyclooxygenase NSAIDs given during pregnancy have the potential to cause adverse maternal and fetal effects. Maternal effects include prolongation of pregnancy and labour, whereas constriction of the ductus arteriosus, renal dysfunction and haemostatic abnormalities can occur in the fetus and neonate. As weak acids, NSAIDs are excreted in small amounts into human breast milk with little risk for adverse effects in the suckling infant. PMID:20437842

  9. EFFECTS OF NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ON OSSEOINTEGRATION: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Aragão, Maria Gerusa Brito; Pinto, Vicente de Paulo Teixeira; Gondim, Delane Viana; Barbosa, Francisco Cesar Barroso; Silva, Antonio Alfredo Rodrigues E; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos

    2013-10-31

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to review the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on osseointegration and determine whether they cause failures in dental implants and whether patients who use them chronically can receive dental implants safely.A bibliographic electronic search was performed using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Medline databases, selecting articles published between January 1982 and December 2012. The search included the following keywords, either alone or combined: "non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs," "dental implants," "bone healing," and "osteoprogenitor cells." The inclusion criteria were the following: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies, in vivo animal model studies of osseointegration, and in vitro studies of the effects of these agents on osteoprogenitor cells. The literature search revealed 360 references. A total of 31 articles met the inclusion criteria, including two clinical trials, 20 animal studies, and nine osteoprogenitor cell studies. The clinical trials revealed that cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitors did not impair osseointegration. The animal studies showed that any drug that is capable of inhibiting COX-2 may impair the osseointegration process. The in vitro studies showed that COX-2 inhibitors are the most potent depressors of osseointegration at the cellular level. Caution must be taken when selecting COX-2 nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs during the postoperative period. PMID:24175941

  10. Photoelectron spectroscopy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Klasinc, Leo; Chong, Delano P.; McGlynn, Sean P.

    2013-08-01

    The electronic structures of eight non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and high-level Green's function (GF) calculations. Our UPS data show that the electronic structure influences the measured biological activity of NSAID, but that it is not the dominating factor. The role of electronic structure needs to be considered in conjunction with other factors like steric properties of the COX active site and orientation of relevant residues in the same site.

  11. Clinical Management of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hypersensitivity diseases caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are relatively common in the population. This article summarizes the present understanding on the various allergic and nonallergic clinical pictures produced through hypersensitivity to these drugs using the pathogenic classification of hypersensitivity reactions recently proposed by the Nomenclature Committee of the World Allergy Organization to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of patients with these conditions. PMID:23283307

  12. Gastrointestinal and Cardiovascular Risk of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saeed, Abdulwahed

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) confer a gastrointestinal (GI) side effect profile and concerns regarding adverse cardiovascular effects have emerged associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. NSAIDs are highly effective in treating pain and inflammation, but it is well recognized that these agents are associated with substantial gastrointestinal toxicity. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors may also reduce the risk for gastrointestinal events, although they may increase cardiovascular adverse events. The selection of an appropriate analgesic or anti-inflammatory agent with or without gastroprotective therapy should be individualized. PMID:22253945

  13. Novel nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Boutsen, Y; Esselinckx, W

    1999-01-01

    The authors first briefly review how the concept of COX-2 selectivity was brought to light, then tested against the known gastrotoxicity ranking of currently used NSAIDs, from the old classics to the most recent. One truly selective COX-2 agent--celecoxib--is now being marketed in an ever increasing number of countries. So far it seems to keep its main promises, i.e. high--albeit not total--safety regarding gastrointestinal adverse effects, and undisturbed platelet function. Association with warfarin drugs seems to raise no problems, but one should still be wary of possible renal side-effects. Efficacy, at least as assessed in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid patients, appears satisfactory. However, treatment of intense inflammatory crises, such as gout or ankylosing spondylitis, has not been assessed, as yet. Another COX-2 agent--rofecoxib--is on the brink of being released. Its even more potent COX-2 selectivity raises new issues. What about some COX-1 activity that several authors detected in rheumatic synovitis? On the other hand, in particular circumstances, organs such as the stomach, the kidney and small blood vessels, seem to have their homeostasis partly controlled by COX-2 mechanisms also. These questions should be answered soon, whilst clinical experience with the COX-2 agent builds up. PMID:10692773

  14. Multiple cutaneous sensitization to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, M A; Revenga, F

    1996-01-01

    The use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is widespread (particularly in countries bordering the Mediterranean). Compared to their wide use, the incidence of published adverse cutaneous effects appears minimal, although they are increasing. Most of them are a form of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Multiple sensitization and/or cross-reactions are rarely reported. Interestingly, our patient presented ACD with diclofenac and etofenamate (both from different chemical groups) and, furthermore, patch tests were positive with bencydamine and indomethacin (both indolacetic acid derivatives), piroxicam and fepradinol. We think that our results could not be explained due to cross-reactivity, and that multiple sensitization was more likely. PMID:8864624

  15. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hörl, Walter H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the isoenzymes COX-1 and COX-2 of cyclooxygenase (COX). Renal side effects (e.g., kidney function, fluid and urinary electrolyte excretion) vary with the extent of COX-2-COX-1 selectivity and the administered dose of these compounds. While young healthy subjects will rarely experience adverse renal effects with the use of NSAIDs, elderly patients and those with co-morbibity (e.g., congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis or chronic kidney disease) and drug combinations (e.g., renin-angiotensin blockers, diuretics plus NSAIDs) may develop acute renal failure. This review summarizes our present knowledge how traditional NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors may affect the kidney under various experimental and clinical conditions, and how these drugs may influence renal inflammation, water transport, sodium and potassium balance and how renal dysfunction or hypertension may result.

  16. Recent developments in nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in cats.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gwendolyn L; Simonson, Stephanie M

    2005-01-01

    Pain, particularly chronic pain, is an underestimated ailment in cats. Veterinarians tend to under-diagnose and under-treat pain in this aloof and stoic species. Until recently, there was only one analgesic (i.e., butorphanol) approved in the United States for use in cats; but many analgesics, particularly opioids, have been used extra-label for this purpose. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been used sparingly in cats because of safety concerns, which are less of an issue with the newer agents. Meloxicam is the only NSAID labeled for use in cats in the United States, but other agents are available in this country and are labeled for use in cats in other countries. PMID:16267058

  17. Risk of stroke associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Bavry, Anthony A

    2014-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), both cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective and nonselective agents, have been associated with the increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The majority of studies have focused on myocardial infarction as the primary cardiovascular outcome. However, the association between NSAIDs and the risk of stroke events is not as clear, although an understanding of this association is important since stroke continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Various factors may contribute to an association between NSAIDs and stroke, including hypertension and thrombosis. Additionally, the risk may vary with different NSAID types. In this review, we discuss the relevant literature assessing the possible association between NSAID use and stroke events, along with the potential mechanisms and the possible directions for future study. PMID:24421643

  18. Actions and toxicity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simon, L S

    1996-05-01

    Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) continues to be an important therapeutic intervention throughout the world for patients with pain and inflammation. The six major classes of NSAIDs (including the salicylates) bear the common property of inhibiting cyclooxygenase, the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic endoperoxides from arachidonic acid to yield prostaglandins. Anecdotal evidence has accumulated that the nonacetylated salicylates are as efficacious as the other NSAIDs, but there have been few controlled trials demonstrating that they are reasonable anti-inflammatory agents. This paper discusses the newest of the available clinical observations that nonacetylated salicylates are as efficacious as one of the newer NSAIDs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Because the nonacetylated salicylates are weak prostaglandin inhibitors, several other non-prostaglandin mediated mechanisms of action for the NSAIDs have been postulated and are described in this paper. In addition to papers describing NSAID effects on cartilage, this year several interesting papers described further effects of tenidap, a novel NSAID presently in development. Other papers reviewed attempts to develop NSAIDs with less severe gastrointestinal effects. Some reports discuss the use of topical NSAIDs, which are not clearly better than oral preparations. Data are also reviewed demonstrating that misoprostol effectively decreased significant poor gastrointestinal outcomes in patients who were treated with this NSAID for 6 months. New treatment regimens for decreasing misoprostol-induced toxicity are also reviewed. Finally, the effects of NSAID prophylaxis in preventing heterotopic bone formation in patients with osteoarthritis who undergo hip replacement surgery are noted. PMID:8796974

  19. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Sanford H

    2011-01-01

    Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less frequent. These complications can be life-threatening in at-risk populations such as older adults, who are common users of long-term oral systemic NSAID therapy. Topical NSAID formulations deliver effective doses of analgesics directly to the affected joints, thereby limiting systemic exposure and potentially the risk of systemic adverse events, such as gastropathy and serious cardiovascular events. There are currently two topical NSAIDs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for osteoarthritis-associated pain, as well as for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. This review discusses the relative safety, and the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risks of chronic oral or systemic NSAID therapy and topical NSAID formulations in patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:21753867

  20. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management. PMID:25851460

  1. Effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on microvascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Slater, C; House, S D

    1993-03-01

    Techniques of intravital microscopy were used to assess the effect of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin and ibuprofen, on the microcirculation. Hemodynamics in venules of the rat mesentery were studied in terms of vessel diameter, red blood cell velocity, and leukocyte-endothelium interactions: leukocyte-endothelium adhesion (LEA), white blood cell (WBC) marginating flux, and WBC velocity. Measurements were made during (1) control conditions (topical suffusion with ringer-gelatin drip), (2) topically suffused indomethacin or ibuprofen, (3) an induced inflammatory response (suffusion with the chemoattractant N-Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine (FMLP)), and (4) concomitant suffusion with FMLP and NSAID. Short term topical suffusion (90 sec) with indomethacin and ibuprofen had little or no effect on control hemodynamics. Five-minute suffusions with indomethacin (5 x 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-4) M) significantly increased LEA while ibuprofen (5 x 10(-3) M) significantly decreased LEA. Topical suffusion with the chemotactic agent FMLP induced inflammation and significantly increased LEA in venules. Treatment with indomethacin during induced inflammation had no effect on the inflammatory reaction in terms of the microvascular hemodynamics measured in this study. Treatment with ibuprofen during induced inflammation significantly reduced LEA and increased red blood cell velocity. In conclusion, although both of the NSAIDs studied here are known to block the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism, the actions of indomethacin and ibuprofen on the inflammatory process are very different with an important effect of ibuprofen being to decrease LEA. PMID:8361400

  2. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Raptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Meteyer, Carol U.

    2012-01-01

    The use of analgesia has become standard, and appropriate, practice in avian medicine. As in mammals, pain control in avian patients is usually accomplished with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used singly or in combination for a multimodal approach. Despite their usefulness, widespread use, and relative safety in clinical use, few controlled studies in birds have been conducted on efficacy, safety, and dosing. The guidelines for the use of NSAIDs in raptors and other birds have mainly been empirical. More recently, NSAIDs in free-living raptors have emerged as a major conservation issue with the discovery that diclofenac sodium was responsible for the population crash of three species of Gyps vultures in southern Asia. In this context, residues of veterinary NSAIDs in domestic animals are now considered environmental contaminants that can be significantly toxic to vultures and possibly other avian scavengers. Ironically, the disaster with Asian vultures has led to a considerable body of research on NSAIDs in raptors to the benefit of clinicians who now have scientific information available to help assess dosing, safety, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of NSAIDs in their raptor patients.

  3. Colonic anastomoses and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Slim, K; Joris, J; Beloeil, H

    2016-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) play an important role in the treatment of post-operative pain, particularly in the context of enhanced recovery after colorectal surgery. Several recent articles have suggested that NSAID may have a deleterious effect on colo-colic or colo-rectal anastomoses. The aim of this review is to analyze the evidence based on meta-analyses and cohort studies in the literature. A systematic review of clinical studies identified twelve studies including two meta-analyses and ten comparative cohort studies that included a large number of patients. The data in these studies are heterogeneous, often biased, and do not permit a formal recommendation based on a high level of evidence. The main conclusion of this review is that the balance of benefit vs. risk (analgesic effect/risk of anastomotic disruption) is acceptable; it appears (with a low level of evidence) that a prescription of NSAID for 48h after surgery may be recommended for elective colon surgery. Nevertheless, it is important to respect the specific contra-indications of NSAID and avoid post-operative NSAID use if there are risk factors for anastomotic leakage: advanced age, malnutrition, severe co-morbidities, intra-operative difficulties. PMID:27480526

  4. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and bladder cancer: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Sarah E; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Sigurdson, Alice J; Hayes, Richard B; Leitzmann, Michael; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Silverman, Debra T

    2011-04-01

    Case-control studies have shown that regular use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) decreases bladder cancer risk, but few cohort studies have evaluated this association. The authors investigated NSAID use and bladder cancer in 3 large prospective studies (NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study; Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial; and U.S. Radiologic Technologists Study). Frequency of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use 1 year prior to baseline was ascertained using self-administered questionnaires. Study-specific hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox regression models and were combined using a fixed-effects meta-analytic model. Data from all studies were aggregated, and aggregated hazard ratios were estimated. The analysis included 508,842 individuals, with 2,489 incident cases of bladder cancer. A reduction in risk was observed for individuals who reported regular use (>2 times/week) of nonaspirin NSAIDs compared with those who reported no use (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 1.04). The risk reduction was limited to nonsmokers (HR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.83) (P(trend) = 0.008) (P(interaction) = 0.02). No association was observed between regular aspirin use and bladder cancer risk (HR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.15). Results suggest that nonaspirin NSAIDs, but not aspirin, are associated with a reduction in risk of bladder cancer, particularly for nonsmokers. PMID:21367875

  5. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX)-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children. PMID:20525116

  6. Cardiovascular complications of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fosslien, Egil

    2005-01-01

    Coxibs, such as rofecoxib, celecoxib, and valdecoxib, selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the mainly inducible, pro-inflammatory COX isoform. Unlike traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) most coxibs do not significantly inhibit COX-1 and are therefore less toxic to the gastrointestinal tract. Hence, coxibs widely replaced traditional NSAIDs for treatment of arthritis and other painful inflammatory conditions. In many, but not all, clinical studies, coxibs became associated with higher risks of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Several mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of such complications. First, selective inhibition of COX-1 lowers platelet synthesis of thromboxane (TXA(2)), a thrombogenic and atherogenic eicosanoid. Selective inhibition of COX-2 limits endothelial cell synthesis of prostacyclin (PGI(2)), an arachidonic acid product that opposes the effects of thromboxane. In apoE-/- mice, interruption of TXA(2) signaling by deletion of its receptor (TP) limits atherogenesis, whereas interruption of PGI2 signaling by deletion of its receptor (IP) accelerates atherogenesis. This suggests that selective inhibition of COX-2 can disrupt the physiological balance between thromboxane and prostacyclin and thus increase atherosclerosis, thrombogenesis, and the risk of cardiovascular complications. Second, COX inhibition can raise levels of arachidonic acid, which can inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and increase OXPHOS generation of reactive oxygen species. Several NSAIDs, including coxibs and meloxicam, directly uncouple or inhibit OXPHOS. Studies of apoE-/- mice indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an early role in atherogenesis. Third, many NSAIDs exhibit COX-independent properties. For example, in animal models, short-term treatment with celecoxib reduces monocyte chemotaxis by reducing expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. However, long-term treatment results in the

  7. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration in children with history of wheeze

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Kendra; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Question A child in my clinic who recently sprained his ankle is experiencing pain and having trouble bearing weight on the affected leg. His mother has been giving him acetaminophen, as she was told never to use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) because of his pharmacologically controlled asthma. Is asthma in children a contraindication to giving NSAIDs? Is NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) a real entity? Answer Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are effective analgesic and antipyretic medications. While described in adults with some predisposing conditions, NERD has not been clearly described in a large number of children. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be recommended to children with known wheeze who do not have a history of NERD reaction. PMID:27521389

  8. Effects of salicylates and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Brandt, K D; Palmoski, M J

    1984-07-13

    According to in vivo experimental data, salicylates and several other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents suppress proteoglycan biosynthesis in normal and degenerating articular cartilage. Therapeutic levels of aspirin in vivo had a similar adverse effect on degenerating cartilage, as noted in two canine models of osteoarthritis and cartilage atrophy. Because the effective daily antirheumatic dose of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is lower than that of salicylates, these drugs may have less negative effects on degenerating articular cartilage. However, clinical significance cannot be extrapolated from these experimental data. PMID:6465163

  9. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  10. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  11. Acetylsalicylic-acid-containing drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, M; Smith, R E

    1997-01-01

    A large number of drugs containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are available by prescription and over the counter in Canada. The possibility of serious side effects and drug interactions is therefore high. The authors have compiled a comprehensive list of products containing these drugs from information supplied by pharmaceutical databases, independent marketing researchers and Health Canada's Drug Directorate. Physicians should ensure that additional ASA-containing drugs or NSAIDs are not inadvertently taken by patients, especially those receiving oral anticoagulant therapy or those with a qualitative platelet defect. Patients at risk should be cautioned to check with their physician before taking any new medication, even over-the-counter products. PMID:9099173

  12. The influence of tissue cross-talking on OA progression: role of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J P

    1999-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is increasingly recognized as a complex illness in which interrelationships between the different tissues of the joint are important. We are still some way from a complete understanding of the pathophysiologic and temporal relationships between bone, synovial tissue and cartilage. Recent evidence points to a significant role for cytokines and growth factors in osteoarthritis that leads to a preponderance of catabolic processes in the joint. In-vitro culture of human cartilage has been used as a model to measure the effects of drugs used in the treatment of osteoarthritis on anabolic and catabolic processes. On this basis, the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs can be categorized into one of three classes depending on whether they are inhibitory (e.g., indomethacin and naproxen), neutral (e.g., diclofenac, aspirin and piroxicam) or stimulatory (e.g., aceclofenac, tenidap and tolmetin) of glycosaminoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes. The marked differences between these nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs suggest that a mechanism other than cyclooxygenase inhibition is involved in their effects on glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Inhibition of IL-1beta and the stimulation of growth factors are suggested as possible mechanisms. Although the significance of these properties of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs awaits confirmation in in-vivo and clinical situations, they do provide the clinician with a new parameter with which to choose therapy in osteoarthritis. PMID:10419771

  13. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of pain in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ventafridda, V.; Fochi, C.; De Conno, D.; Sganzerla, E.

    1980-01-01

    1 Prostaglandins may precipitate or exacerbate pain and they may be produced by several tumours. 2 Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit prostaglandin synthesis and may also inhibit bone metastases and enhance immune responses. 3 NSAIDs alone or in association with narcotics or psychotropics may not only afford the best pain relief in neoplastic disease, but also modify the progress of the tumour. 4 The effect of NSAIDs on the gastrointestinal tract is generally adverse. PMID:7002189

  14. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: An Overview of Cardiovascular Risks

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Inger L.; van de Laar, Mart A.F.J.; Vonkeman, Harald E.

    2010-01-01

    While aspirin may offer protection, other non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious cardiovascular side effects and complications. This has led to a general "black box" warning for cardiovascular adverse events for NSAIDs. This review explores the different mechanisms underlying the protective effects of aspirin, the NSAID associated renovascular effects causing hypertension, edema and heart failure, the cardiovascular effects causing myocardial infarction and stroke, and the possible deleterious interaction between NSAIDs and aspirin.

  15. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    King, Tanya S; Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V; Ferreirós, Nerea; Kynast, Katharina L; Knothe, Claudia; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-09-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated in stages of increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decrease of inflammatory processes and inhibition of disease progression of diabetes and obesity. A recent study suggested that salicylate, the active metabolite of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin), is able to activate AMPK pharmacologically. This observation raised the question whether or not other NSAIDs might also act as AMPK activators and whether this action might contribute to their cyclooxygenase (COX)-independent anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated mouse and human neuronal cells and liver tissue of mice after treatment with various NSAIDs. Our results showed that the non-selective acidic NSAIDs ibuprofen and diclofenac induced AMPK activation similar to aspirin while the COX-2 selective drug etoricoxib and the non-opioid analgesic paracetamol, both drugs have no acidic structure, failed to activate AMPK. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK can be activated by specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, ibuprofen or diclofenac possibly depending on the acidic structure of the drugs. AMPK might therefore contribute to their antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26049010

  16. Dynamic analysis of phospholipid metabolism of mouse macrophages treated with common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haibo; Wu, Xia; Zhao, Lifang; Feng, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Through studying the changes of the total phospholipid components in mouse macrophages under the inflammatory status and the drug intervention status, we found the targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on phospholipids, thus providing the basis for the targets of in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After RAW264.7 cells were pretreated with common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin and ibuprofen) and, respectively, stimulated with KLA for various periods (0.5, 4, 12, 16, and 24 h), the phospholipids were extracted. The dynamic changes of phospholipids in cells under various stimulations were analyzed with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS technique. Through the statistical analysis of Simca-P, we explored the potential targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on phospholipids. Through the dynamic analysis of phospholipids, we found two biomarkers (PC(17:1/18:1), PA(18:0/18:4)) which might be in vitro intervention inflammatory response targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The analysis results show that in anti-inflammatory effects, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit COX, induce the cellular fatty acid desaturation and the changes of phospholipid components, stimulate free fatty acids, activate calcium ion channels of endoplasmic reticulum, and promote cell endocytosis, thus controlling inflammation and activating cells. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can promote endocytosis, alter cell inflammatory response, and activate the process cells, thus realizing the anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26441061

  17. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the neutrophil promoted inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Sacchetti, C

    1992-03-01

    We investigated the effect of some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (aspirin, naproxen and nimesulide) on the ability of neutrophils to oxidatively inactivate the alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). Nimesulide prevented the inactivation of A1PI by effectively scavenging the hypochlorous acid released by neutrophils. Aspirin and naproxen were completely ineffective. We suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of nimesulide may be due at least in part to the rescue of A1PI from neutrophil oxidative attack. The rescue of A1PI may in fact alter the elastase-A1PI balance in favor of the inhibitor, with resulting tissue protection. PMID:1578457

  18. Adverse drug interactions with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Recognition, management and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A G; Seideman, P; Day, R O

    1993-02-01

    The prevalence and incidence of adverse drug interactions involving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remains unknown. To identify those proposed drug interactions of greatest clinical significance, it is appropriate to focus on interactions between commonly used and/or commonly coprescribed drugs, interactions for which there are numerous well documented case reports in reputable journals, interactions validated by well designed in vivo human studies and those affecting high-risk drugs and/or high-risk patients. While most interactions between NSAIDs and other drugs are pharmacokinetic, NSAID-related pharmacodynamic interactions may be considerably more important in the clinical context, and prescriber ignorance is likely to be a major determinant of many adverse drug interactions. Prescribing NSAIDs is relatively contraindicated for patients on oral anticoagulants due to the risk of haemorrhage, and for patients taking high-dose methotrexate due to the dangers of bone marrow toxicity, renal failure and hepatic dysfunction. Combination NSAID therapy cannot be justified as toxicity may be increased without any improvement in efficacy. Where lithium or anti-hypertensives are coprescribed with NSAIDs, close monitoring is mandatory for lithium toxicity and hypertension, respectively, and aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) or sulindac are preferred. Phenytoin or oral hypoglycaemic agents may be administered with NSAIDs other than pyrazoles and salicylates provided that patients are monitored carefully at the initiation and cessation of NSAID treatment. Digoxin, aminoglycosides and probenecid may be coprescribed with NSAIDs, but close monitoring is required, particularly for high-risk patients such as the elderly. Indomethacin and triamterene should be avoided due to the risk of renal failure. High dose aspirin should be replaced by naproxen in patients on valproic acid (sodium valproate) and care is required when corticosteroids are administered to patients

  19. Treatment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Hopkinson, N; Zanelli, G; Prouse, P; Smethurst, P; Gumpel, J M; Levi, A J

    1990-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced small intestinal inflammation may have an adverse effect on the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We therefore assessed small intestinal and joint inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis before and after three to nine months' treatment with sulphasalazine (n = 40) and other second line drugs (n = 20), while keeping the dosage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug at the same level. Sulphasalazine significantly decreased the mean (SD) faecal excretion of 111indium labelled leucocytes from 2.39 (2.22)% to 1.33 (1.13)% (normal less than 1%, p less than 0.01) and improved the joint inflammation as assessed by a variety of parameters. There was no significant correlation between the effects of sulphasalazine treatment on the intestine and the joints. Treatment with other second line drugs had no significant effect on the faecal excretion of 111indium (1.58 (1.04)% and 1.86 (1.51)%, respectively) but improved joint inflammation significantly. The lack of correlation between the intestinal and joint inflammation and their response to treatment suggests that the two are not causally related. PMID:1973396

  20. Management of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sung, J J

    2001-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have superseded Helicobacter pylori infection as the most important cause of peptic ulcer bleeding. Eradication of H. pylori in NSAID users will not affect ulcer healing. In high-risk patients with a history of ulcer bleeding, curing H. pylori infection alone without acid suppression has substantially reduced the risk of rebleeding caused by low-dose aspirin but not nonaspirin NSAIDs. In a study comparing the safety profile of misoprostol in combination with NSAID against nabumetone in high-risk patients with a history of ulcer bleeding, both strategies were unable to confer significant protection against the risk of rebleeding. PMID:11165993

  1. Pain Relief for Acute Urolithiasis: The Case for Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Peter L; Chang, Steven L

    2016-07-01

    Pain from renal colic is often severe and incapacitating. Many patients require emergent hospitalization and aggressive analgesia to relieve such discomfort. For many years, the optimal analgesic strategy has been sought to manage such severe pain. One of the mainstays of therapy for acute renal colic is with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This paper reviews the mechanism by which NSAIDs allow pain relief in renal colic, the evidence for their use in this condition, and the use of NSAIDs combined with other agents in renal colic. PMID:27286841

  2. Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: The Importance of Drug, Delivery, and Therapeutic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain associated with a variety of indications, including arthritic conditions, but their usefulness is often limited by dose-dependent adverse events (AEs), such as gastrointestinal disturbances, cardiovascular events, and renal toxicity. The risk of such effects could be reduced by the use of topical formulations, which offer the potential to deliver analgesic concentrations locally, at the site of inflammation, while minimizing systemic concentrations. The topical preparations currently approved in the United States are diclofenac sodium 1.5% topical solution (containing dimethyl sulfoxide as a penetration enhancer), diclofenac sodium gel 1%, and a diclofenac hydroxyethylpyrrolidine 1.3% patch. Each of these topical NSAIDs provide drug delivery to subcutaneous tissues for the management of pain associated with osteoarthritis or soft-tissue injuries. Furthermore, these formulations are not significantly associated with the systemic AEs associated with oral NSAIDs; the most common AEs associated with topical formulations are local skin reactions, which are usually mild and self-limiting. Other topical NSAID preparations approved in the European Union include ibuprofen creams and gels, ketoprofen gel, felbinac gel and cutaneous foam, and piroxicam gel. Meta-analyses have confirmed the efficacy and safety of these preparations. However, it is important to recognize that pharmacokinetic absorption from topical formulations can vary markedly, even between different formulations of the same drug, depending on the agent, the underlying disorder, and the site of application. It is therefore essential to consider the patient, the drug, and the drug delivery mechanism when selecting a topical NSAID preparation. PMID:22367354

  3. Quantitative systematic review of topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R. A.; Tramèr, M. R.; Carroll, D.; Wiffen, P. J.; McQuay, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the effectiveness and safety of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in acute and chronic pain conditions. DESIGN: Quantitative systematic review of randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES: 86 trials involving 10,160 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures of treatment success approximating at least 50% reduction in pain, local and systemic adverse effects. Analysis at 1 week for acute and 2 weeks for chronic conditions with relative benefit and number needed to treat. RESULTS: In acute pain conditions (soft tissue trauma, strains, and sprains) placebo controlled trials had a relative benefit of 1.7 (1.5 to 1.9), the number needed to treat was 3.9 (3.4 to 4.4). With analysis by drug (at least three trials), ketoprofen (number needed to treat 2.6), felbinac (3.0), ibuprofen (3.5), and piroxicam (4.2) had significant efficacy. Benzydamine and indomethacin were no different from placebo. In chronic pain conditions (osteoarthritis, tendinitis) placebo controlled trials had a relative benefit of 2.0 (1.5 to 2.7); the number needed to treat was 3.1 (2.7 to 3.8). Small trials (< 40 treated patients) exaggerated effectiveness of topical non-steroidals by 33% in acute conditions but not in chronic conditions. There was no relation between trial quality and treatment effect. In both acute and chronic pain local and systemic adverse events and withdrawal from the study related to the drug had a low incidence and were no different from placebo. CONCLUSION: Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are effective in relieving pain in acute and chronic conditions. PMID:9487165

  4. Risk Factors of Drug Interaction between Warfarin and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Practical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Hee; Kim, Ah Jeong; Son, In Ja; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Bong; Ahn, Hyuk

    2010-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to interact with the oral anticoagulant warfarin and can cause a serious bleeding complication. In this study, we evaluated the risk factors for international normalized ratio (INR) increase, which is a surrogate marker of bleeding, after addition of an NSAID in a total of 98 patients who used warfarin. Patient age, sex, body mass index, maintenance warfarin dose, baseline INR, coadministered medications, underlying diseases, and liver and kidney functions were evaluated for possible risk factors with INR increase ≥15.0% as the primary end-point. Of the 98 patients, 39 (39.8%) showed an INR elevation of ≥15.0% after adding a NSAID to warfarin therapy. Multivariate analysis showed that high maintenance dose (>40 mg/week) of warfarin (P=0.001), the presence of coadministered medications (P=0.024), the use of meloxicam (P=0.025) and low baseline INR value (P=0.03) were the risk factors for INR increase in respect to NSAID-warfarin interaction. In conclusion, special caution is required when an NSAID is administered to warfarin users if patients are taking warfarin >40 mg/week and other medications interacting with warfarin. PMID:20191029

  5. The patterns of toxicity and management of acute nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) overdose

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Laura J; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic actions. They are commonly taken in overdose in many areas of the world. The majority of patients with acute NSAID overdose will remain asymptomatic or develop minor self-limiting gastrointestinal symptoms. However, serious clinical sequelae have been reported in patients with acute NSAID overdose and these include convulsions, metabolic acidosis, coma and acute renal failure. There appear to be some differences between the NSAIDs in terms of the relative risk of these complications; in particular mefenamic acid is most commonly associated with convulsions. The management of these serious clinical features is largely supportive and there are no specific antidotes for acute NSAID toxicity. PMID:27147851

  6. Inhibition of amyloidogenesis by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their hybrid nitrates

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Isaac T.; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Wang, Huali; Vanni, Michael; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor blood-brain barrier penetration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been blamed for the failure of the selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) R-flurbiprofen in phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). NO-donor NSAIDs (NO-NSAIDs) provide an alternative, gastric-sparing approach to NSAID SALAs, which may improve bioavailability. NSAID analogs were studied for anti-inflammatory activity and for SALA activity in N2a neuronal cells transfected with human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Flurbiprofen (1) analogs were obtained with enhanced anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic properties compared to 1, however, esterification led to elevated Aβ1–42 levels. Hybrid nitrate prodrugs possessed superior anti-inflammatory activity and reduced toxicity relative to the parent NSAIDs, including clinical candidate, CHF5074. Although hybrid nitrates elevated Aβ1–42 at higher concentration, SALA activity was observed at low concentrations (≤ 1 µM): both Aβ1–42 and the ratio of Aβ1–42/Aβ1–40 were lowered. This biphasic SALA activity was attributed to the intact nitrate drug. For several compounds the selective modulation of amyloidogenesis was tested using an immunoprecipitation MALDI-TOF approach. These data support the development of NO-NSAIDs as an alternative approach towards a clinically useful SALA. PMID:21405086

  7. In vivo selectivity of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Laudanno, O M; Cesolari, J A; Esnarriaga, J; San Miguel, P; Bedini, O A

    2000-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study in vivo COX-2-COX-1 selectivity of 16 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in equipotent ulcerogenic doses in two in vivo experimental models. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, nimesulide, aceclofenac, aspirin, sodium diclofenac, meloxicam, naproxene, paracetamol, piroxicam, tenoxicam, nabumetone, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, etodolac, and ketorolac were administered to female Wistar rats (N = 10 each group). In experiment I, solid food plus subcutaneous NSAIDs were given. In experiment II, NSAIDs were given by oral gavage and in bolus. Macroscopic gastric antral ulcer area (30%) and intestinal erosiva area (295 mm2) in experiment I and necrotic gastric fundus area (65%) and erosive intestinal area (182 mm2), "in vivo" the NSAIDs COX-1 was showed. Neutrofilia assessed in gastric intestinal mucosa where also ibuprofen and paracetamol not given neotrophilic infiltration. In conclusion, COX-2-COX-1 selectivity was demonstrated in vivo with the drugs aceclofenac, nabumetone, meloxicam, nimesulide, and paracetamol. PMID:10961715

  8. Effect of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Jessica; O’Connor, J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Nonspecific and COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) function by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase isoenzymes and effectively reduce pain and inflammation attributed to acute or chronic musculoskeletal pathologies. However, use of NSAIDs as an analgesic is thought to negatively contribute to bone healing. This review strived to provide a thorough unbiased analysis of the current research conducted on animals and humans regarding NSAIDs and their effect on bone healing. Specifically, this review discusses the role of animal models, dosing regiments, and outcome parameters when examining discrepancies about NSAIDS and their effects on bone regeneration. The role of COX-2 in bone regeneration needs to be better defined in order to further elucidate the impact of NSAIDs on bone healing.

  9. Toxicology of frequently encountered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Safdar A; McLean, Mary Kay

    2012-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds extensively used in both human and veterinary medicine for their antipyretic, anti-inflammation, and analgesic properties. NSAIDs consist of a wide range of pharmacologically active agents with different chemical structures, with similar therapeutic and adverse effects. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center received 22,206 NSAID incidents in dogs and cats (3% of total cases; dogs [15,823] and cats [1244]) during 2005 to 2010. This is roughly equivalent to 4% NSAID incidents reported in humans. The most common NSAID involved was ibuprofen, followed by aspirin, naproxen, deracoxib, meloxicam, diclofenac, piroxicam, indomethacin, nabumetone, and etodolac. This article provides a brief overview of classification, mechanism of action, pharmacologic and toxicologic properties, and treatment information involving frequently encountered human and veterinary NSAIDs in dogs and cats. PMID:22381180

  10. Unilateral conjunctival chemosis as a unique symptom of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug intolerance.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, V; de Frutos, C; de Barrio, M; Barranco, R; Herrero, T; Tornero, P

    2007-01-01

    Patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) intolerance usually have cutanous-mucosal or/and respiratory symptoms. We report the case of a patient who developed several episodes of left-eye conjunctivitis, manifested as conjunctival chemosis, with no other symptoms, after taking metamizole and other unidentified NSAIDs. We performed both a single blind placebo-controlled oral challenge test and conjunctival challenge test with different NSAIDs. The single blind placebo-controlled oral challenge was positive to ketoprofen and diclofenac. The conjunctival challenge with diclofenac and flurbiprofen was negative. The patient tolerated celecoxib and nabumetone. We believe this to be an exceptional case of NSAID intolerance as conjunctival chemosis has not hitherto been included in any of the classic types of pseudoallergic reactions. PMID:17323868

  11. Pressure-assisted electrokinetic supercharging for the enhancement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Meighan, Michelle M; Dawod, Mohamed; Guijt, Rosanne M; Hayes, Mark A; Breadmore, Michael C

    2011-09-23

    Electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) combines field-amplified sample injection with transient isotachophoresis (tITP) to create a powerful on-line preconcentration technique for capillary electrophoresis. In this work, EKS is enhanced with a positive pressure (pressure-assisted EKS, or PA-EKS) during injection to improve stacking of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Several parameters, including buffer composition and concentration, terminating electrolyte, organic modifier, and injection voltage and injection time of both terminating electrolyte and sample were optimized. Detection limits for seven NSAIDs were determined and an enhancement in sensitivity of almost 50,000-fold was obtained. The PA-EKS method has the potential to be a simple MS compatible preconcentration method to improve the sensitivity of CE. PMID:21855878

  12. The iatrogenic cost of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

    PubMed

    De Pouvourville, G

    1995-04-01

    The secondary gastrointestinal effects associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are well documented in the medical literature. Less addressed is the 'iatrogenic' cost due to the treatment of these secondary effects. Epidemiologic and clinical studies report that the cost of NSAIDs is multiplied by a coefficient that ranges from 1.45 to 3, if the cost of treating the induced gastrointestinal complications is considered. A simple methodology incorporating the direct medical cost of treating complications has been developed to calculate a 'shadow price' of an NSAID, thus reflecting the real cost to the payer of NSAID therapy. The model has been used to compare three NSAIDs on the basis of their relative prices and gastroduodenal toxicity. PMID:7780675

  13. Statins, glucocorticoids, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: their influence on implant healing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jia-Hui; Bashutski, Jill D; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-10-01

    This article aimed at exploring the effects of common systemic medications used in the United States and their effects on periimplant bone healing. An electronic search for articles evaluating the influence of systemic medications on periimplant bone healing was conducted using the PubMed (MEDLINE) database. Statins, when administered locally or systemically, were found to increase bone formation and density. A reduction in bone turnover and bone-to-implant contact was observed in animal models examining the effect of glucocorticoids on periimplant bone healing. Continued use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) during or after implant placement was associated with reduced bone-to-implant contact, bone area, and bone density. Evidence seems to suggest that statins improve implant osseointegration. However, glucocorticoids and NSAIDs showed conflicting results. Therefore, more randomized clinical trials are needed to validate the effect of glucocorticoids and NSAIDs on periimplant bone healing. PMID:22968569

  14. [Appropriate prescription, adherence and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Sostres, Carlos; Lanas, Ángel

    2016-03-18

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most numerous category of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action and therapeutic activities (anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic). Despite having similar efficacy for pain relieve, the different available NSAIDs show variability in its safety profile. The risk of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complications varies depending on the dose of NSAID and also the presence of different risk factors. It is necessary, therefore, an individualized case assessment before establishing the indication of the best NSAID for each patient, taking account of the best gastroprotection strategy. Improved prescription and enhanced treatment adherence are central objectives to reduce NSAID-related complications. A recent consensus of the Spanish Association of Gastroenterology and the Spanish societies of Cardiology and Rheumatology intends to promote the rational use of NSAIDs according to new recent studies. This review provides additional aspects to facilitate the optimal decision-making process in the routine use of these drugs in clinical practice. PMID:26724872

  15. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the cellular membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Célia; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Ferreira, Helena; Lima, José L F C; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Reis, Salette

    2008-08-01

    In this work, fluorescence measurements were performed using the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) to evaluate the effects of the interaction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs--NSAIDs (meloxicam, lornoxicam, and nimesulide) with several membrane systems (liposomes with and without cholesterol, mouse splenocytes, mouse macrophages cell line--J774, human leukemia monocyte cell line--THP-1, and human granulocytes and mononuclear cells). DPH fluorescence quenching studies revealed that the NSAIDs studied were able to efficiently quench the probe located in membrane hydrocarbon region. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements were also made to investigate the effects on membrane fluidity resulting from the interaction between the drugs and membrane systems. All the anti-inflammatory drugs studied show an increase in the membrane fluidity in a concentration dependent manner. Results obtained provide an insight into NSAIDs capacity to be inserted in lipid bilayers and alter the lipid dynamics. The induced changes in lipid dynamics may modulate the activity of inflammatory enzymes or may be related with deleterious topical action of NSAIDs on gastric phospholipid fluidity. PMID:17990311

  16. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use and Endurance During Running in Male Long-Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Eduardo; Pinto, Ronei S.; Cadore, Eduardo L.; Kruel, Luiz F.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The effect of ibuprofen on pain tolerance during exercise is controversial, and its effects on endurance performance have been poorly investigated. Objective: To investigate the effect of prophylactic administration of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen on the time until the self-report of fatigue (tlim) in runners with exercise-induced muscle damage. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty healthy male long-distance runners (age = 18.8 ± 0.4 years, maximal oxygen consumption = 55.5 ± 5.9 mL·kg−1·min−1). Intervention(s): Participants were assigned to 2 groups (ibuprofen group = 10, placebo group = 10) to perform tlim trials (speed corresponded to their previously determined secondventilatory thresholds) 48 hours before and 48 hours after the induction of a lower limb muscle-damage protocol (isokinetic dynamometry). One hour before the second tlim trial, the ibuprofen group received 1.2 g ibuprofen, and the placebo group received lactose orally. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time until self-reported fatigue, heart rate, respiratory quotient, oxygen consumption, and perceived exertion were recorded during each tlim test. Results: Both groups reported increases in muscle pain in the knee extensors and flexors 48 hours after the muscle-damage protocol. We observed a reduction in the endurance performance of both groups (P < .01) but no difference between groups (P = .55). Conclusions: Ibuprofen did not reduce the effect of muscle damage and pain on performance. Prophylactic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not have an ergogenic effect on running performance after exercise-induced muscle damage in male long-distance runners. PMID:25622243

  17. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are rich source of gene modulators for prevention and treatment of cancer. In recent days, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a new target of diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural...

  18. Acute gastrointestinal permeability responses to different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Smecuol, E; Bai, J; Sugai, E; Vazquez, H; Niveloni, S; Pedreira, S; Maurino, E; Meddings, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal damage both in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. New anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed in an attempt to improve their gastrointestinal side effect profile. Our objective was to compare the effect on gastrointestinal permeability of acute equieffective doses of four different NSAIDs; three were designed to reduce gastrointestinal mucosal injury.
MATERIALS—Healthy volunteers underwent sugar tests in a randomised fashion, 15 days apart, at: (1) baseline; (2) after two days of 75 mg slow release (microspheres) indomethacin; (3) after two days of 7.5 mg oral meloxicam which preferentially inhibits cyclooxygenase 2; and (4) after two days of 750 mg naproxen. A subgroup of subjects was tested after two days of 200 mg celecoxib. In each test, subjects ingested a solution containing sucrose, lactulose, and mannitol and sucralose, to evaluate gastroduodenal, intestinal, and colonic permeability, respectively.
RESULTS—Gastric permeability was significantly affected by naproxen (p<0.05) but not by slow release indomethacin, meloxicam, or celecoxib. Intestinal permeability was significantly increased by the first three NSAIDs (p<0.05) but not by celecoxib. Abnormal lactulose/mannitol ratios were observed in 42% of meloxicam treatments, in 62% during indomethacin, and in 75% of subjects treated with naproxen. Finally, colonic permeability, as measured by sucralose, was not significantly increased by any of the four drugs.
CONCLUSION—Our study provides evidence that the newly developed NSAIDs reduce gastric mucosal permeability significantly. However, most produced significant alteration of small intestinal permeability. In contrast, our results suggest that celecoxib seems to exhibit the most desirable gastrointestinal side effect profile.


Keywords: permeability; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; celecoxib; meloxican; small intestine

  19. Assessment and prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E; Kim, Mi-Jeong

    2006-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and, in the case of aspirin, for anti-thrombotic actions. The serious gastrointestinal side-effects associated with these drugs are of concern and pose a significant obstacle to their use. This review discusses the pathogenic mechanisms by which the conventional acidic NSAIDs induce gastrointestinal toxicity, with particular emphasis on non-prostaglandin effects. Methods of assessment of NSAID-induced enteropathy are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the use of functional measurement of NSAID-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract. The advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these effects have resulted in the development of a range of novel NSAIDs. Where functional assessment of the effects of NSAIDs has been employed, it appears to be more useful as an indicator of early-stage changes rather than a predictor of the effects of long-term NSAID exposure. Successful pharmaceutical strategies now offer considerable promise for reducing the severity of NSAID damage to the gastrointestinal tract. The utility of intestinal permeability measurements for selection and assessment of these strategies is discussed. PMID:17034651

  20. Interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2008-03-01

    Chronic usage of Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) leads to gastrointestinal toxicity and clinical evidences point the cause to direct interactions between NSAIDs and phospholipid membranes. Also, NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipid vesicles are shown to be safer and therapeutically more effective than unmodified ones. Our initial experiments and simulations on the partitioning of Aspirin and Ibuprofen clearly indicate role played by the drug structure in drug-membrane interactions. Those results motivated systematic molecular dynamics simulations of membranes with NSAIDs of different size, structure and pKa values. Our results suggest high partition coefficients for these NSAIDs in the membrane compared to water and thinning effect on the bilayer. Our small angle neutron scattering and reflectivity studies on DMPC-Ibuprofen systems indicate that the drug affects both ˜5 nm thick bilayer and overall ˜100 nm diameter vesicle, indicating that NSAIDs affect vesicles on various length scales. We will discuss the structural perturbations to membranes due to NSAIDs at clinically relevant molar ratios and their implications on the use of vesicles as delivery vehicles for NSAIDs.

  1. Nicolau syndrome after intramuscular injection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID).

    PubMed

    Dadaci, Mehmet; Altuntas, Zeynep; Ince, Bilsev; Bilgen, Fatma; Tufekci, Osman; Poyraz, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection that leads to local ischemic necrosis of the skin and adipose tissue. In this paper, we discuss etiologies, risk factors, and treatment options for gluteal Nicolau syndrome referring to patients treated in our hospital. Our study includes 17 women who visited our clinic with symptoms of gluteal necrosis secondary to intramuscular injection. The following variables were taken into account: injection site, drug administered, frequency of injections, the person who administered the injections, needle size, and needle tip color. Magnetic resonance images obtained in the aftermath of intramuscular injection application were carefully analyzed for presence of necrosis, cyst formation and the thickness of the gluteal fat tissue layer. Drugs that had been received in intramuscular injection were exclusively non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Mean patient BMI was 41.8 (all patients were considered as obese), and mean gluteal fat thickness was 54 mm. Standard length of needles (3.8 cm) had been used in procedures. The wounds were treated with primary closure in 11 patients and with local flap therapy in 6 patients. The observed necrosis was a consequence of misplaced gluteal injection, where drugs were injected into the adipose tissue instead of the muscle due to the extreme thickness of the fat layer, on one hand, and the inappropriate length of standard needles, on the other hand. Intramuscular injection should be avoided in obese patients whenever possible: if it is necessary, proper injection technique should be used. PMID:25725145

  2. Clinical implications of prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in oral health care--a review.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Ravleen; Yashoda Devi, B K; Rakesh, N; Reddy, Sujatha S; Patil, Deepa Jatti

    2015-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including both the traditional nonselective NSAIDs and the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, are widely used for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. They are routinely prescribed in dental practice for the management of pain and swelling. Their use in treating acute dental pain and chronic orofacial pain, as adjuncts to the treatment of periodontal disease, and to minimize edema following surgical procedures is well documented. However, long-term utilization of nonselective NSAIDs could increase the risk of gastrointestinal symptoms, ranging from mild (e.g., dyspepsia, nausea, or vomiting) to serious gastric problems (e.g., gastric bleeding or perforation). Therefore, selective COX-2 inhibitors have been developed with fewer GI side effects but the recently identified cardiovascular adverse reactions limit their routine use in dental practice. Another major concern for oral physicians is NSAID-induced mucosal lesions and prolongation of bleeding time during invasive dental procedures. This article reviews therapeutic and analgesic uses of NSAIDs in dentistry. The various issues surrounding NSAID-induced adverse reactions and their implications in dentistry are also discussed. PMID:25617120

  3. Extractive spectrophotometric determination of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using methylene blue.

    PubMed

    El-Kommos, Michael E; Mohamed, Niveen A; Hakiem, Ahmed F Abdel

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, and accurate extractive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of seven nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)--namely diclofenac sodium, ibuprofen, indomethacin, ketoprofen, ketorolac tromethamine, mefenamic acid, and naproxen-in pure forms as well as their pharmaceutical dosage forms (tablets, capsules, effervescent granules, syrups, oral drops, ampules, eye drops, gels, and suppositories). The method depends on the formation of an intensely colored ion-pair complex between the acidic drug and methylene blue in alkaline medium. The complex is stable and extractable into methylene chloride. All parameters were optimized. Beer-Lambert's law was obeyed in concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 9 microg/mL. Statistical analysis of the calibration data was carried out, and correlation coefficients were in the range from 0.9996 to 0.9998. The developed method was fully validated according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines, and complied with U.S. Pharmacopeia guidelines. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of the investigated drugs in their pharmaceutical formulations, and good recoveries were obtained. The results obtained were compared with those of reported and official methods, and no significant differences were found with t- and F-tests. Interference effects of some compounds usually present in combination with NSAIDs were studied, and the tolerance limits of these compounds were determined. PMID:24000745

  4. Hypersensitivity to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Cross-Intolerance Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres-Jaén, M J; Canto, G; Padilla-España, L; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used worldwide and are responsible for several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. The 2 major groups of DHRs to NSAIDs are those induced by immunological mechanisms (selective reactions) and those where inflammatory mediators are released through activation of the prostaglandin-leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance). In the present review, we focus on cross-intolerance reactions, which are the most frequent DHRs and are becoming a topic of major interest in children and adolescents. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the drugs that most frequently cause DHRs in children; other NSAIDs are responsible for reactions in adolescents. In vivo and in vitro tests are of limited diagnostic value, with some exceptions for the less common selective reactions. In cross-intolerance, the clinical history and controlled administration are in many instances the only way to establish a diagnosis and look for alternatives. The clinical history is diagnostic when consistent symptoms occur repeatedly after exposure to NSAIDs with different chemical structures. Cutaneous and respiratory symptoms often co-occur in young children. The natural history of these reactions in children is unknown, and some patients can develop tolerance over time. Atopy remains a major risk factor for cross-intolerant reactions. The increasing interest in hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with improvements in patient phenotyping and the information provided by pharmacogenetics will improve our understanding and management of these reactions in the near future. PMID:26310040

  5. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Selective Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Pérez-Alzate, D; Pérez-Sánchez, N; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres, M J; Canto, G; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used throughout the world to treat pain and inflammation; however, they can trigger several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. Although most such reactions occur through activation of the leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance), a significant number of DHRs to NSAIDs are due to immunological mechanisms (selective reactions [SRs]). SRs are thought to be induced by specific IgE antibodies or by T cells. In this manuscript, we focus on SRs, which are of great concern in children and adolescents and comprise a heterogeneous set of clinical pictures ranging from mild entities such as urticaria/angioedema to potentially life-threatening conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the most frequent elicitors of IgE-mediated SRs, although pyrazolones have also been implicated. T cell-mediated reactions are infrequent in children but have been associated with ibuprofen, naproxen, and dipyrone. In this review, we analyze the available literature on SRs in children and adolescents, with emphasis on epidemiological data, mechanisms, and drugs involved, as well as on diagnostic procedures. PMID:26817135

  6. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Treatment of Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eduardo Büchele; Farah, Michel Eid; Bottós, Juliana Mantovani; Bom Aggio, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are an important class of drugs in medicine and ophthalmology. Several NSAIDs have been commercially available for many years: diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, ketorolac and suprofen. The purpose of this chapter is to review the clinical use of earlier and newer pharmacologic agents of the NSAID class. NSAIDs may have a modulating effect on ocular inflammation and pain through the prevention of prostaglandin synthesis via cyclooxygenase inhibition. Newer-generation NSAIDs have emerged in recent years for the treatment of ocular pain and inflammation. Nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% is a new topical NSAID prodrug that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of pain and inflammation after cataract surgery. Preliminary data suggest nepafenac may also provide unique efficacy in the posterior segment, since its corneal permeability characteristics are superior to those of other NSAIDs. Nevanac, diclofenac, ketorolac and bromfenac are some notable NSAID candidates which should be investigated intravitreally or topically for retinal pharmacotherapy. In addition, for intraocular surgery, NSAIDs can help to prevent intraoperative miosis, reduce ocular pain, decrease postoperative inflammation and prevent cystoid macular edema. Retinal, choroidal and vitreous diseases may be the target of future nepafenac studies, either as monotherapy or as combination treatments. PMID:26502088

  7. Mechanisms, prevention and clinical implications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, John L

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the latest developments in understanding the pathogenesis, detection and treatment of small intestinal damage and bleeding caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). With improvements in the detection of NSAID-induced damage in the small intestine, it is now clear that this injury and the associated bleeding occurs more frequently than that occurring in the stomach and duodenum, and can also be regarded as more dangerous. However, there are no proven-effective therapies for NSAID-enteropathy, and detection remains a challenge, particularly because of the poor correlation between tissue injury and symptoms. Moreover, recent studies suggest that commonly used drugs for protecting the upper gastrointestinal tract (i.e., proton pump inhibitors) can significantly worsen NSAID-induced damage in the small intestine. The pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy is complex, but studies in animal models are shedding light on the key factors that contribute to ulceration and bleeding, and are providing clues to the development of effective therapies and prevention strategies. Novel NSAIDs that do not cause small intestinal damage in animal models offer hope for a solution to this serious adverse effect of one of the most widely used classes of drugs. PMID:23569332

  8. Toxicity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. An overview of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Carson, J L; Willett, L R

    1993-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used throughout the world. This paper reviews the epidemiological data linking NSAID administration with gastrointestinal, hepatic, renal, haematological, and hypersensitivity reactions. Meta-analysis has demonstrated that NSAIDs are associated with serious upper gastrointestinal disorders, with a relative risk of 2.7 in patients receiving NSAIDs compared with subjects not receiving NSAIDs. An increase in the dose and duration of NSAIDs and age > 60 are associated with an increase in the risk of upper gastrointestinal toxicity. The current data strongly support a causal relationship between NSAIDs and gastrointestinal disorders. Case-control studies have demonstrated an association between some NSAIDs and neutropenia, with a relative risk of between 3 and 9 in patients treated with NSAIDs compared with nonusers of these drugs. NSAIDs have also been linked with hypersensitivity reactions, although the incidence of such reactions is very low. However, there are inconsistent data on the potential associations between NSAIDs and renal disease, and there are no epidemiological studies linking NSAIDs with acute liver disease. Overall, the incidence of serious adverse reactions associated with NSAIDs is low, and this class of drugs can be regarded as being reasonably safe. PMID:7506183

  9. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antihypertensives: how do they relate?

    PubMed

    Khatchadourian, Zovinar Der; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; de Leeuw, Reny

    2014-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely available as over-the-counter medications, despite their numerous side effects and drug interactions. The aim of this article is to increase awareness of the hypertensive potential of NSAIDs and their interference with antihypertensives. Patients with hypertension appear to be more susceptible than normotensive individuals to the blood pressure-increasing effect of NSAIDs. Most studies have found that short-term use of NSAIDs does not pose a major risk for hypertension or increase in cardiovascular disease in healthy individuals. The calcium channel blockers and β-blockers seem to be least affected by the concomitant use of NSAIDs. A dentist must weigh the benefits and disadvantages of using NSAIDs in patients taking antihypertensive drugs. For those who may be at greater risk, such as patients with hypertension and the elderly, careful selection of the class of NSAID and close monitoring are appropriate measures, especially if long-term use is anticipated. PMID:24755117

  10. Profile and mechanisms of gastrointestinal and other side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    PubMed

    Rainsford, K D

    1999-12-13

    The popular view that all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins has been challenged by the discovery that they also affect a wide variety of cellular processes that are important for their therapeutic actions and side effects. Although recognition of the differential activities of new and established NSAIDs on the activities of the cyclooxygenases (COXs) affecting production of inflammatory prostaglandins (from COX-2) and those that are physiologically important (from COX-1) may have significance for the prostaglandin components of the underlying inflammatory and physiologic processes, there are important features of their chemical structures that determine the various cellular and biochemical actions of these agents. Several established NSAIDs have low propensity to cause gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration and bleeding that may relate to these drugs having unique pharmacokinetic characteristics (pro-drugs, protein binding, etc). They also have weak effects on the production of GI mucosal prostaglandins and have specific physicochemical characteristics such that they cause minimal damage to mucosal membranes or effects on nonprostaglandin-related cellular mechanisms important in mucosal defenses. Some of the new COX-2-selective drugs with methyl or amino-sulfonyl moieties have relatively high pKa values and other properties that are similar to established NSAIDs with low GI ulcerogenicity. These physicochemical properties may contribute to the low irritancy of the new COX-2-selective drugs quite apart from their sparing of COX-1 in the GI mucosa. With concerns that some established NSAIDs may accelerate cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis (OA), interest is now focusing on whether the COX-2-selective drugs may have a lower potential for this adverse effect by avoiding the inhibitory effects on cartilage proteoglycan metabolism seen with such drugs as indomethacin and the salicylates. Meloxicam appears to

  11. [The mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Ishii, K; Seto, Y; Shimoda, A; Kadokawa, T

    1987-01-01

    In order to ascertain the mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate which is a diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, the in vitro test for the mechanism of the action were carried out. Etofenamate (3 microM) was hydrolysed to flufenamic acid at a rate of 39.5% and 57.0% of the dose during 30 and 60 min incubation, respectively, when incubated with rat peritoneal macrophages stimulated with starch and bacto peptone in phosphate-buffered saline. PGE2 generation by these cells in MEM medium was dose-relatedly inhibited with etofenamate as well as flufenamic acid at the dosage range of 1 to 30 microM. This suggests that unchanged etofenamate is active, since the highest conversion rate of etofenamate to flufenamic acid was 15% of the dose during the incubation. Etofenamate produced a dose-related inhibition against lipoxygenase prepared from peritoneal polymorphonuclear leucocytes of guinea pigs, and its activity (IC50 = 5.3 X 10(-5) M) was stronger than that of caffeic acid; flufenamic acid was inactive. Inhibitory activity of etofenamate was one-third or less that of flufenamic acid against the hypotonic-hyperthermic lysis of rat erythrocytes and heat-denaturation of bovine serum albumin. From these results, it was suggested that topically applied etofenamate produces its anti-inflammatory action through prostaglandin synthesis inhibition by flufenamic acid produced in the inflammatory tissue and inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by macrophages and lipoxygenase inhibition by unchanged etofenamate. PMID:2883093

  12. The impact of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the small intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Fukui, Akifumi; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine has been called as a dark continent of digestive tract and it had been very difficult to diagnose or treat the disease of small intestine. However recent technological development including video capsule endoscopy or balloon-assisted endoscopy has made us to aware the various diseases of small intestine. By using capsule endoscopy, many researchers reported that more than 70% of patients treated continuously with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) exhibit the mucosal damage of small intestine. In some cases, NSAID not only causes mucosal damage but also results in life threatening bleeding from small intestine, which had not been prevented or cured by gastro-protective drug or anti-gastric acid secretion drug administration. Therefore to investigate and identify the effective drug that protects small intestine from mucosal damage is urgently expected. In spite of extensive investigation in clinical field, only a few drugs such as misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue, has been reported as an effective one but is not satisfactory enough to fulfill the requirement of patients who suffer from NSAID-induced mucosal damage of small intestine. And now, extensive study is being performed using several gastro-mucoprotective drugs by many researchers. In this review, we introduce the current clinical situation in small intestinal injury of patients under NSAID treatment, and to summarize the molecular mechanism by which NSAID, including acetyl salicylic acid, cause small intestinal damage. In addition, we present results of clinical trials performed so far, and refer the possible preventive method or treatment in the near future. PMID:24426183

  13. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with adverse psychiatric reactions: five case reports.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H K; Chang, D M

    1999-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are quite prevalent, but there are few reports about possible adverse psychiatric reactions, which may be ignored or underestimated. We describe here five psychiatric outpatients, two with major depressive disorders, one bipolar disorder, one schizophrenic disorder and one anxiety disorder, who were treated with NSAIDs for pain due to rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis or other painful neuromuscular conditions. All five patients developed a moderate to severe depressive state, three patients became obviously paranoid, and four had either thoughts of suicide or an attempt while undergoing co-administration of NSAIDs. The psychiatric symptoms remitted when the NSAIDs were stopped. The depressive and paranoid symptoms returned on seven occasions of re-use or re-challenge with the same or a different type of NSAID in all five patients. When the NSAIDs were stopped again, the patients had another remission of the adverse psychiatric reactions, and eventually recovered to their baseline mental states in clear temporal relationships. The cases presented suggest that NSAIDs can induce or exacerbate idiosyncratic reproducible adverse psychiatric symptoms in certain vulnerable patients, including those with a variety of psychotic or neurotic disorders, and also in elderly persons, but these undesirable side-effects were generally transient and disappeared on withdrawal of the NSAIDs. PMID:10468178

  14. Use of a /sup 51/Cr technique to detect gastrointestinal microbleeding associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; Arsenault, A.; Varady, J.; de Medicis, R.; Lussier, Y.; LeBel, E.

    1987-02-01

    Of techniques used to evaluate gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, use of radiochromium (/sup 51/Cr)-tagged erythrocytes is the most quantitative and scientifically acceptable method. The value of this technique as well as systematic errors possible with its use are discussed. The medical literature concerning /sup 51/Cr evaluation of GI microbleeding with naproxen therapy is critically reviewed. We suggest that future studies using this technique be parallel, randomized, double-blind, and include a 1-week placebo baseline phase for all subjects. Treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should last 3 to 4 weeks. A parallel group of subjects should receive placebo throughout the study. For valid statistical analyses, randomization must achieve baseline comparability of weight, height, age, and sex in the treatment groups. Data transformations may be necessary to satisfy the assumptions of the statistical model. Following these guidelines will enable investigators to better evaluate GI microbleeding during treatment with naproxen or other NSAIDs, and, hopefully, to establish the safety profiles of these drugs.37 references.

  15. An Overview Of The Physiology And Pharmacology Of Aspirin And Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, I present an overview of the actions and effects of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although athletic trainers cannot prescribe or dispense prescription medications, they should be as aware of their effects as they are of other methods of injury treatment. To set the discussion in proper perspective, the inflammatory process and its mediators are reviewed briefly. The eicosanoids are a family of very active chemicals, which include: the prostaglandins, thromboxane, and the leukotrienes. They affect inflammation as well as numerous other body processes. Ingesting aspirin and NSAIDs blocks the production of prostaglandins and thromboxane, resulting in desired and undesired effects. The NSAIDs were developed to have the same action as aspirin, but with fewer adverse side effects. Many NSAIDs are currently available, and the decision as to which agent to use depends upon various factors. Surprisingly, recent studies suggest that some NSAIDs may hinder the healing process. Although not a NSAID, acetaminophen has many important clinical uses. Armed with an understanding of how these drugs act, and their potentially harmful aspects, the athletic trainer can assist the team physician in designing an aspirin- or NSAID-therapy regimen. PMID:16558240

  16. Molecular Basis for Cyclooxygenase Inhibition by the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Walters, Matthew J.; Musee, Joel; Harp, Joel M.; Kiefer, James R.; Oates, John A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-11-15

    Naproxen ((S)-6-methoxy-{alpha}-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid) is a powerful non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is extensively used as a prescription and over-the-counter medication. Naproxen exhibits gastrointestinal toxicity, but its cardiovascular toxicity may be reduced compared with other drugs in its class. Despite the fact that naproxen has been marketed for many years, the molecular basis of its interaction with cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is unknown. We performed a detailed study of naproxen-COX-2 interactions using site-directed mutagenesis, structure-activity analysis, and x-ray crystallography. The results indicate that each of the pendant groups of the naphthyl scaffold are essential for COX inhibition, and only minimal substitutions are tolerated. Mutation of Trp-387 to Phe significantly reduced inhibition by naproxen, a result that appears unique to this inhibitor. Substitution of S or CH2 for the O atom of the p-methoxy group yielded analogs that were not affected by the W387F substitution and that exhibited increased COX-2 selectivity relative to naproxen. Crystallization and x-ray analysis yielded structures of COX-2 complexed to naproxen and its methylthio analog at 1.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The combination of mutagenesis, structure analysis, and x-ray crystallography provided comprehensive information on the unique interactions responsible for naproxen binding to COX-2.

  17. Delayed contact hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowska, B; Ruëff, F; Przybilla, B

    1999-02-01

    Several non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are available for topical treatment of acute soft tissue trauma or degenerative musculoskeletal disorders; the NSAID bufexamac is mainly used for therapy of chronic inflammatory skin diseases. In order to assess the occurrence of contact allergy to NSAIDs in 371 consecutive patients presenting for diagnosis of presumed contact allergy, patch tests were performed with a standard series and additionally with a series of NSAIDs, comprising acetylsalicylic acid, bufexamac, diclofenac, etofenamate, felbinac, flufenamic acid, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and piroxicam. 17 individuals (4.6%) exhibited delayed hypersensitivity to one of the NSAID preparations: 12 patients (3.2%) had patch test reactions to bufexamac, 2 (0.5%) to etofenamate, 2 (0.5%) to indomethacin, and 1 patient (0.3%) to flufenamic acid. These patch test results corresponded well to the individual history in 11 individuals (including 10 patients with reactions to bufexamac), and in 2 patients the clinical relevance of the reactions was probable. In view of the high frequency of allergic contact reactions to bufexamac, we propose to test this drug particularly in patients with atopic eczema or other chronic eczematous diseases. PMID:10048648

  18. Cobalt(II) complexes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and α-diimines.

    PubMed

    Tsiliou, Sofia; Kefala, Lida-Aikaterini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Perdih, Franc; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Turel, Iztok; Psomas, George

    2016-07-01

    Cobalt(II) complexes with a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diflunisal, flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid and niflumic acid) in the presence of nitrogen-(2,2'-bipyridylamine, 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline) and/or oxygen-donor ligands (methanol) have been synthesized and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The deprotonated NSAID ligands are coordinated to Co(II) ion through their carboxylato groups in diverse binding modes. The crystal structures of complexes [Co(diflunisal-O)2(methanol)4], [Co(niflumato-O)2(methanol)4], [Co(flufenamato-O,O')2(2,2'-bipyridylamine)], [Co(mefenamato-O,O')2(2,2'-bipyridylamine)] and [Co3(flufenamato-O,O')4(flufenamato-O,O,O')2(2,2'-bipyridine)2] have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complexes with serum albumins was studied by fluorescence emission spectroscopy and the albumin-binding constants were determined. The ability of the complexes to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and hydroxyl radicals was investigated and the complexes were more active than the corresponding free drugs. Spectroscopic (UV and fluorescence), electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) and physicochemical (viscosity measurements) techniques were employed in order to study the binding mode of the complexes to calf-thymus (CT) DNA and to calculate the corresponding binding constants; for all complexes, intercalation was suggested as the most possible DNA-binding mode. PMID:26775611

  19. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-12-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  20. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs cause apoptosis and induce cyclooxygenases in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, X; Xie, W; Reed, D; Bradshaw, W S; Simmons, D L

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an intrinsic part of organismal development and aging. Here we report that many nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause apoptosis when applied to v-src-transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). Cell death was characterized by morphological changes, the induction of tissue transglutaminase, and autodigestion of DNA. Dexamethasone, a repressor of cyclooxygenase (COX) 2, neither induced apoptosis nor altered the NSAID effect. Prostaglandin E2, the primary eicosanoid made by CEFs, also failed to inhibit apoptosis. Expression of the protooncogene bcl-2 is very low in CEFs and is not altered by NSAID treatment. In contrast, p20, a protein that may protect against apoptosis when fibroblasts enter G0 phase, was strongly repressed. The NSAID concentrations used here transiently inhibit COXs. Nevertheless, COX-1 and COX-2 mRNAs and COX-2 protein were induced. In some cell types, then, chronic NSAID treatment may lead to increased, rather than decreased, COX activity and, thus, exacerbate prostaglandin-mediated inflammatory effects. The COX-2 transcript is a partially spliced and nonfunctional form previously described. Thus, these findings suggest that COXs and their products play key roles in preventing apoptosis in CEFs and perhaps other cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:7644521

  1. Gastrointestinal blood loss induced by three different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, A; Hammermaier, A; Nagyiványi, P; Pabst, G; Waitzinger, J

    1995-04-01

    A clinical study was performed on 18 healthy volunteers to compare the gastrointestinal daily blood loss induced by oral intake of three different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, lysine clonixinate (CAS 55837-30-4), ibuprofen (CAS 15687-27-1) and acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2 ASA). For quantitative determination of gastrointestinal blood loss, autologous erythrocytes were radiolabelled in vitro with 51Cr and reinfused at study start. The amount of radioactivity excreted in faeces was measured during a placebo baseline phase of three days, a treatment phase of five days with thrice daily dosing of ASA, ibuprofen or lysine clonixinate and a subsequent wash-out phase of five days. The highest increase of mean daily blood loss over baseline was observed after treatment with ASA (+ 1.66 ml/d versus baseline). Treatment with ibuprofen led to an increase of mean daily blood loss by + 0.52 ml/d. During treatment with lysine clonixinate the mean increase of daily blood loss was +0.32 ml/d versus baseline. In the ibuprofen and lysine clonixinate treatment groups the values of mean daily blood loss decreased during the wash-out phase with respect to the verum phase, whereas the mean daily blood loss during the wash-out phase after treatment with ASA even increased in comparison to the verum phase (mean daily blood loss: +2.07 ml/d versus baseline. PMID:7779148

  2. Influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on Drosophila melanogaster longevity.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shevchenko, Oksana; Zemskaya, Nadezhda; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-08-14

    Most age-related diseases and aging itself are associated with chronic inflammation. Thus pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory processes may be effective antiaging strategy. In this study we demonstrated that treatment of Drosophila melanogaster with 10 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs: CAY10404, aspirin, APHS, SC-560, NS-398, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, licofelone) leads to extension of lifespan, delays age-dependent decline of locomotor activity and increases stress resistance. The effect of the lifespan increase was associated with decrease of fecundity. Depending on the concentration, NSAIDs demonstrated both anti- and pro-oxidant properties in Drosophila tissues. However, we failed to identify clear correlation between antioxidant properties of NSAIDs and their pro-longevity effects. The lifespan extending effects of APHS, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, and licofelone were more pronounced in males, valdecoxib and aspirin - in females. We demonstrated that lifespan extension effect of NSAIDs was abolished in flies with defective genes involved in Pkh2-ypk1-lem3-tat2 pathway. PMID:26305987

  3. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of osteoarthritis in long-term care patients

    PubMed Central

    Argoff, Charles E; Gloth, F Michael

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is common in patients ≥65 years of age. Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often prescribed for osteoarthritis pain, they pose age-related cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal risks. Two topical NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG) and diclofenac sodium 1.5% in 45.5% dimethylsulfoxide solution (D-DMSO), are approved in the US for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Topical NSAIDs have shown efficacy and safety in knee (DSG, D-DMSO) and hand (DSG) osteoarthritis. Analyses of data from randomized controlled trials of DSG in hand and knee osteoarthritis demonstrate significant improvement of pain and function in both younger patients (<65 years) and older patients (≥65 years) and suggest good safety and tolerability. However, long-term safety data in older patients are limited. Topical NSAIDs can ease medication administration and help address barriers to pain management in older patients, such as taking multiple medications and inability to swallow, and are a valuable option for long-term care providers. PMID:22076115

  4. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs stimulate secretion of non-amyloidogenic precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Avramovich, Yael; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2002-08-30

    Chronic inflammatory processes are associated with the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has been proposed that treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk for AD. Here we report that various NSAIDs, such as the cyclooxygenase inhibitors, nimesulide, ibuprofen and indomethacin, as well as thalidomide (Thal) and its non-teratogenic analogue, supidimide, significantly stimulated the secretion of the non-amyloidogenic alpha-secretase form of the soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP alpha) into the conditioned media of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and PC12 cells. These NSAIDs markedly reduced the levels of the cellular APP holoprotein, further accelerating non-amyloidogenic processes. sAPP alpha release, induced by nimesulide and Thal, was modulated by inhibitors of protein kinase C and Erk mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Furthermore, in results complementary to the inhibitor studies, we show for the first time that NSAIDs can activate the Erk MAP kinase signaling cascade, thus identifying a novel pharmacology mechanism of NSAIDs. Our findings suggest that NSAIDs and Thal might prove useful to favor non-amyloidogenic APP processing by enhancing alpha-secretase activity, thereby reducing the formation of amyloidogenic derivatives, and therefore are of potential therapeutic value in AD. PMID:12070143

  5. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug reduces neutrophil and macrophage accumulation but does not improve tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marsolais, David; Côté, Claude H; Frenette, Jérôme

    2003-07-01

    Whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a beneficial effect on tendon regeneration is still a matter of debate. Given that inflammatory cells are thought to induce nonspecific damage following an injury, we tested the hypothesis that a 3-day treatment with diclofenac would protect tendons from inflammatory cell injury and would promote healing. Neutrophil and ED1(+) macrophage concentrations were determined in the paratenon and the core of the rat Achilles tendon following collagenase-induced injury. Hydroxyproline content, edema, and mechanical properties were also evaluated at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post-trauma. Collagenase injections induced a 70% decrease in the ultimate rupture point at Day 3. Diclofenac treatments (1 mg/kg bid) selectively decreased the accumulation of neutrophils and ED1(+) macrophages by 59% and 35%, respectively, in the paratenon, where blood vessels are numerous, but did not reduce the accumulation of neutrophils and ED1(+) macrophages in the core of the tendon. Edema was significantly reduced on Day 3 but persisted during the remodeling phase in the diclofenac-treated group only. The inhibition of leukocyte accumulation by diclofenac did not translate into a reduction of tissue damage or a promotion of tissue healing, because the mechanical properties of injured Achilles tendons were identical in placebo and diclofenac-treated groups. These results indicate that diclofenac reduced both edema and the accumulation of inflammatory cells within the paratenon but provided no biochemical or functional benefits for the Achilles tendon. PMID:12861039

  6. Prediction of the efficacy of cutaneously applied nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from a lipophilic vehicle.

    PubMed

    Wenkers, B P; Lippold, B C

    2000-03-01

    The maximum cutaneous fluxes of 12 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), determined in a preceding study from the lipophilic vehicle light mineral oil in vivo on 24 healthy volunteers, were related to data concerning their intrinsic activities. From the multiplication of the relative intrinsic activities with the relative maximum fluxes, both related to indometacin (CAS 53-86-1) as standard, the percutaneous activities result as parameters for the prediction of the efficacy of cutaneous preparations with NSAIDs. According to the results of the calculations, the percutaneous activities of ibuprofen (CAS 15687-27-1) and nabumetone (CAS 42924-53-8) from lipophilic vehicles are remarkable because of their very high maximum fluxes. NSAIDs with still high percutaneous activities are ketoprofen (CAS 22071-15-4), naproxen (CAS 22204-53-1), piroxicam (CAS 36322-90-4) and diclofenac (CAS 15307-86-5). In contrast, the systemically highly effective NSAIDs indometacin and acemetacin (CAS 53164-05-9) show rather low percutaneous activities, when applied in lipophilic vehicles. Especially nabumeton and also tenoxicam (CAS 59804-37-4), both not yet commercially used cutaneously, can be recommended for lipophilic skin preparations. PMID:10758781

  7. Influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on Drosophila melanogaster longevity

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shevchenko, Oksana; Zemskaya, Nadezhda; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Most age-related diseases and aging itself are associated with chronic inflammation. Thus pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory processes may be effective antiaging strategy. In this study we demonstrated that treatment of Drosophila melanogaster with 10 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs: CAY10404, aspirin, APHS, SC-560, NS-398, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, licofelone) leads to extension of lifespan, delays age-dependent decline of locomotor activity and increases stress resistance. The effect of the lifespan increase was associated with decrease of fecundity. Depending on the concentration, NSAIDs demonstrated both anti- and pro-oxidant properties in Drosophila tissues. However, we failed to identify clear correlation between antioxidant properties of NSAIDs and their pro-longevity effects. The lifespan extending effects of APHS, SC-58125, valeroyl salicylate, trans-resveratrol, valdecoxib, and licofelone were more pronounced in males, valdecoxib and aspirin - in females. We demonstrated that lifespan extension effect of NSAIDs was abolished in flies with defective genes involved in Pkh2-ypk1-lem3-tat2 pathway. PMID:26305987

  8. Periconceptional Over-the-Counter Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Exposure and Risk for Spontaneous Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Aldridge, Tiara; Baird, Donna D.; Funk, Michele Jonsson; Savitz, David A.; Hartmann, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exposure during the early first-trimester and risk for spontaneous abortion (gestation prior to 20 weeks) in a prospective cohort. Methods Women were enrolled in the Right from the Start study (2004–2010). Exposure data regarding over-the-counter NSAID use from the last menstrual period through the 6th week of pregnancy were obtained from intake and first-trimester interviews. Pregnancy outcomes were self-reported and verified by medical records. Gestational age was determined from last menstrual period. Stage of development prior to loss was determined from study ultrasound. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the association between NSAID exposure and pregnancy outcome, taking into account candidate confounders. Results Among 2,780 pregnancies, 367 women (13%) experienced an spontaneous abortion. NSAID exposure was reported by 1,185 (43%) women. NSAID exposure was not associated with spontaneous abortion risk in unadjusted models (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82, 1.24) or models adjusted for maternal age (adjusted [aHR] = 1.00, 95% CI 0.81, 1.23). Conclusions Our findings suggest that use of non-prescription over-the-counter NSAIDs in early pregnancy does not put women at increased risk of spontaneous abortion. PMID:22914399

  9. Use of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Distal Large Bowel Cancer in Whites and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher; Galanko, Joseph; Woosley, John T.; Schroeder, Jane C.; Keku, Temitope O.; Satia, Jessie A.; Halabi, Susan; Sandler, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the belief that the etiology of and risk factors for rectal cancer might differ from those for colon cancer, relatively few studies have examined rectal cancer in relation to use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The authors evaluated the association between NSAIDs and distal large bowel cancer in African Americans and whites, using data from a population-based case-control study of 1,057 incident cases of adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid junction, and rectum and 1,019 controls from North Carolina (2001–2006). NSAID use was inversely associated with distal large bowel cancer in whites (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46, 0.79). The inverse association was evident for all types of NSAIDs but was slightly stronger with prescription NSAIDs, particularly selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.25, 0.56). Compared with whites, a relatively weak inverse association was found in African Americans (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.55, 1.40), although odds ratio heterogeneity by race could not be confirmed (P = 0.21). In addition, the strength of the association with NSAIDs varied by tumor location, suggesting more potent effects for rectal and rectosigmoid cancers than for sigmoid cancer. The chemopreventive potential of NSAIDs might differ by population and by tumor characteristics. PMID:18945689

  10. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indometacin enhances endogenous remyelination.

    PubMed

    Preisner, Anna; Albrecht, Stefanie; Cui, Qiao-Ling; Hucke, Stephanie; Ghelman, Julia; Hartmann, Christine; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Antel, Jack; Klotz, Luisa; Kuhlmann, Tanja

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most frequent demyelinating disease in the CNS that is characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions and axonal loss, the morphological correlate of permanent clinical disability. Remyelination does occur, but is limited especially in chronic disease stages. Despite effective immunomodulatory therapies that reduce the number of relapses the progressive disease phase cannot be prevented. Therefore, promotion of neuroprotective and repair mechanisms, such as remyelination, represents an attractive additional treatment strategy. A number of pathways have been identified that may contribute to impaired remyelination in MS lesions, among them the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here, we demonstrate that indometacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has been also shown to modulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer cells promotes differentiation of primary human and murine oligodendrocytes, myelination of cerebellar slice cultures and remyelination in cuprizone-induced demyelination. Our in vitro experiments using GSK3β inhibitors, luciferase reporter assays and oligodendrocytes expressing a mutant, dominant stable β-catenin indicate that the mechanism of action of indometacin depends on GSK3β activity and β-catenin phosphorylation. Indometacin might represent a promising treatment option to enhance endogenous remyelination in MS patients. PMID:25943886

  11. Innovative sampling and extraction methods for the determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Shivani; Di Carro, Marina; Magi, Emanuele

    2015-03-15

    Two different innovative approaches were used for the determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water: stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and passive sampling, followed by electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. SBSE was developed by comparing EG-Silicone and PDMS stir bars and optimizing main parameters to attain high preconcentration. Quantitative analysis was carried out by mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode and multiple reaction monitoring. The SBSE-LC-MS/MS method provided satisfactory figures of merit with LOD (7.5-71 ng L(-1)) and LOQ (22.5-213 ng L(-1)). The developed method was successfully applied to real samples collected from river water and wastewater effluents. The obtained results showed the presence of all analytes at trace levels, in a wide range of concentrations. The passive sampling approach was carried out by using Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS); samplers were deployed for 15 days in river and tap water, allowing to detect analytes at ultra-trace levels. Time-Weighted Average concentration of NSAIDs in river water was estimated in the range 0.33-0.46 ng L(-1), using the sampling rates previously obtained by means of a simple calibration system. PMID:25434009

  12. Adverse respiratory reactions to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ronald A

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset condition that manifests as asthma, rhinosinusitis/nasal polyps, and sensitivity to aspirin and other cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-inhibitor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). There is no cross-sensitivity to highly selective COX-2 inhibitors. AERD is chronic and does not improve with avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors. The diagnosis of AERD is made through provocative challenge testing. Following a positive aspirin challenge, patients can be desensitized to aspirin and NSAIDs. The desensitized state can be maintained indefinitely with continued daily administration. After desensitization, there is an approximately 48-hour refractory period to adverse effects from aspirin. The pathogenesis of AERD remains unknown, but these patients have been shown to have multiple abnormalities in arachidonic acid metabolism and in cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptors. AERD patients can take up to 650 mg of acetaminophen for analgesic or antipyretic relief. Patients can also use weak COX-1 inhibitors, such as sodium salicylate or choline magnesium trisalicylate. Treatment of AERD patients with antileukotriene medications has been helpful but not preferential when compared with non-AERD patients. An alternative treatment for many AERD patients is aspirin desensitization. This is particularly effective in reducing upper-airway mucosal congestion, nasal polyp formation, and systemic steroids. PMID:14680616

  13. In vitro interactions between anidulafungin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biofilms of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Carrieri, Antonio; Carone, Addolorata; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Franchini, Carlo; Corbo, Filomena; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for many biomaterial-related infections; they give rise to infective pathologies typically associated with biofilm formation. We recently reported that the echinocandin anidulafungin (ANF) showed a strong in vitro activity against both planktonic and biofilms cells. Herein, we report the antifungal activities of ANF alone and in association with some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against nine Candida strain biofilms: four Candida albicans, two Candida glabrata and three Candida guilliermondii. The activity of ANF was assessed using an in vitro microbiological model relevant for clinical practice. ANF proved oneself to be active against biofilms cells, and a clear-cut synergism was found against Candida species biofilms when ANF was used in combination with three NSAIDs: aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen. The positive synergism against Candida spp. of ANF in association with aspirin or the other NSAIDs proved to be a very effective antifungal treatment (FICI<0.5). These results may provide the starting point for new combination therapies of ANF with NSAIDs against Candida biofilm pathologies. PMID:26833243

  14. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy and the initiation of lactation.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Melanie; Paech, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, which are available as "over-the counter" medications in most countries, are widely used by both pregnant and lactating women. They are popular non-opioid analgesics for the treatment of pain after vaginal and operative delivery. In addition, NSAIDs are used for tocolysis in premature labor, and low-dose aspirin has a role in the prevention of preeclampsia and recurrent miscarriage in antiphospholipid syndrome. NSAIDs and aspirin may affect fertility and increase the risk of early pregnancy loss. In the second trimester their use is considered reasonably safe, but has been associated with fetal cryptorchism. In the third trimester, NSAIDs and aspirin are usually avoided because of significant fetal risks such as renal injury, oligohydramnios, constriction of the ductus arteriosus (with potential for persistent pulmonary hypertension in the newborn), necrotizing enterocolitis, and intracranial hemorrhage. Maternal administration or ingestion of most NSAIDs results in low infant exposure via breastmilk, such that both cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are generally considered safe, and preferable to aspirin, when breastfeeding. PMID:23558845

  15. Do non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase colonic permeability?

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, A P; Trew, D R; Crump, B J; Nukajam, W S; Foley, J A; Menzies, I S; Creamer, B

    1991-01-01

    Urinary excretion of orally administered lactulose and 51 chromium labelled ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (51Cr-EDTA) was measured in 12 healthy adult subjects and in six patients with ileostomies to assess intestinal permeability. In normal subjects, 24 hour urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA was significantly greater than that of lactulose (mean (SEM) 2.27 (0.15) v 0.50 (0.08)% oral dose; p less than 0.001), but in ileostomy patients recovery of the two markers was the same. In normal subjects, therefore, the difference between the two markers may arise from bacterial break-down of lactulose but not of 51Cr-EDTA in the distal bowel, urinary excretion of lactulose representing small intestinal permeation and that of 51Cr-EDTA representing both small and large intestinal permeation. The markers were then given simultaneously to nine patients receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The 24 hour urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA in the patients was significantly greater than normal (4.64 (1.20) v 2.27 (0.15)% oral dose; p less than 0.01), but that of lactulose was not significantly affected. Moreover, the increase in 51Cr-EDTA recovery was most noticeable in the later urine collections. Both of these findings suggest that NSAIDs may increase colonic permeability. PMID:1899408

  16. Do Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Affect Bone Healing? A Critical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pountos, Ippokratis; Georgouli, Theodora; Calori, Giorgio M.; Giannoudis, Peter V.

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play an essential part in our approach to control pain in the posttraumatic setting. Over the last decades, several studies suggested that NSAIDs interfere with bone healing while others contradict these findings. Although their analgesic potency is well proven, clinicians remain puzzled over the potential safety issues. We have systematically reviewed the available literature, analyzing and presenting the available in vitro animal and clinical studies on this field. Our comprehensive review reveals the great diversity of the presented data in all groups of studies. Animal and in vitro studies present so conflicting data that even studies with identical parameters have opposing results. Basic science research defining the exact mechanism with which NSAIDs could interfere with bone cells and also the conduction of well-randomized prospective clinical trials are warranted. In the absence of robust clinical or scientific evidence, clinicians should treat NSAIDs as a risk factor for bone healing impairment, and their administration should be avoided in high-risk patients. PMID:22272177

  17. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect bone healing? A critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pountos, Ippokratis; Georgouli, Theodora; Calori, Giorgio M; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play an essential part in our approach to control pain in the posttraumatic setting. Over the last decades, several studies suggested that NSAIDs interfere with bone healing while others contradict these findings. Although their analgesic potency is well proven, clinicians remain puzzled over the potential safety issues. We have systematically reviewed the available literature, analyzing and presenting the available in vitro animal and clinical studies on this field. Our comprehensive review reveals the great diversity of the presented data in all groups of studies. Animal and in vitro studies present so conflicting data that even studies with identical parameters have opposing results. Basic science research defining the exact mechanism with which NSAIDs could interfere with bone cells and also the conduction of well-randomized prospective clinical trials are warranted. In the absence of robust clinical or scientific evidence, clinicians should treat NSAIDs as a risk factor for bone healing impairment, and their administration should be avoided in high-risk patients. PMID:22272177

  18. Helicobacter pylori-negative, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug: negative idiopathic ulcers in Asia.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Katsunori; Kanno, Takeshi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-01-21

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the stomach, the bacteria infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use had been considered to be the 2 main causes of peptic ulcers. However, there have been recent reports of an increase in the proportion of peptic ulcers without these known risk factors; these are termed idiopathic peptic ulcers. Such trend was firstly indicated in 1990s from some reports in North America. In Asia, numerous studies reported that idiopathic ulcers accounted for a small percentage of all ulcers in the 1990s, but in the 2000s, multiple studies reported that the proportion of idiopathic ulcers had reached 10%-30%, indicating that the incidence of idiopathic ulcers in Asia has also been rising in recent years. While a decline in H. pylori infection rates of general population in Asia is seen as the main reason for the increased incidence of idiopathic ulcers, it is also possible that the absolute number of idiopathic ulcer cases has increased. Advanced age, serious systemic complication, and psychological stress are considered to be the potential risk factors for idiopathic ulcers. Management of idiopathic ulcers is challenging, at present, because there is no effective preventative measure against recurrence in contrast with cases of H. pylori-positive ulcers and NSAIDs-induced ulcers. As it is expected that H. pylori infection rates in Asia will decline further in the future, measures to treat idiopathic ulcers will also likely become more important. PMID:24574744

  19. Inhibition of islet amyloid polypeptide aggregation and associated cytotoxicity by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jessica S; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) constitute an important pharmacotherapeutic class that, over the past decade, have expanded in application to a panoply of medical conditions. They have been tested for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's to reduce inflammation and also in the attempt to abrogate amyloid deposition. However, the use of NSAIDs as aggregation inhibitors has not been extensively studied in pancreatic amyloid deposition. Pancreatic amyloidosis involves the misfolding of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) and contributes to the progression of type-2 diabetes in humans and felines. To ascertain their antiamyloidogenic activity, several NSAIDs were tested using fluorometric thioflavin-T assays, circular dichroism, photo-induced cross-linking assays, and cell culture. Celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, niflumic acid, nimesulide, phenylbutazone, piroxicam, sulindac, and tenoxicam reduced fibrillization at a molar ratio of 1:10. The circular dichroism spectra of diclofenac, piroxicam, and sulindac showed characteristic spectral signatures found in predominantly α-helical structures. The oligomerization of human IAPP was abrogated with diclofenac and sulindac at a molar ratio of 1:5. The cytotoxic effects of pre-incubated human IAPP on cultured INS-1 cells were noticeably reduced in the presence of diclofenac, meloxicam, phenylbutazone, sulindac, and tenoxicam at a molar ratio of 1:10. Our results demonstrate that NSAIDs can provide chemical scaffolds to generate new and promising antiamyloidogenic agents that can be used alone or as a coadjuvant therapy. PMID:26524404

  20. Mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ regulation by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Ana C.; Milton, Flora A.; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Campos, Jéssica C.L.; Bernardes, Amanda; Filgueira, Carly S.; Lindemann, Jan Lammel; Deng, Tuo; Neves, Francisco A.R.; Polikarpov, Igor; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) display anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties by inhibiting cyclooxygenases and blocking prostaglandin production. Previous studies, however, suggested that some NSAIDs also modulate peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs), raising the possibility that such off target effects contribute to the spectrum of clinically relevant NSAID actions. In this study, we set out to understand how peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ/PPARG) interacts with NSAIDs using X-ray crystallography and to relate ligand binding modes to effects on receptor activity. We find that several NSAIDs (sulindac sulfide, diclofenac, indomethacin and ibuprofen) bind PPARγ and modulate PPARγ activity at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Diclofenac acts as a partial agonist and binds to the PPARγ ligand binding pocket (LBP) in typical partial agonist mode, near the β-sheets and helix 3. By contrast, two copies of indomethacin and sulindac sulfide bind the LBP and, in aggregate, these ligands engage in LBP contacts that resemble agonists. Accordingly, both compounds, and ibuprofen, act as strong partial agonists. Assessment of NSAID activities in PPARγ-dependent 3T3-L1 cells reveals that NSAIDs display adipogenic activities and exclusively regulate PPARγ-dependent target genes in a manner that is consistent with their observed binding modes. Further, PPARγ knockdown eliminates indomethacin activities at selected endogenous genes, confirming receptor-dependence of observed effects. We propose that it is important to consider how individual NSAIDs interact with PPARγ to understand their activities, and that it will be interesting to determine whether high dose NSAID therapies result in PPAR activation. PMID:26445566

  1. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in species of veterinary interest.

    PubMed

    Lees, P; Landoni, M F; Giraudel, J; Toutain, P L

    2004-12-01

    This review summarises selected aspects of the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It is not intended to be comprehensive, in that it covers neither minor species nor several important aspects of NSAID PD. The limited objective of the review is to summarise those aspects of NSAID PK and PD, which are important to an understanding of PK-PD integration and PK-PD modelling (the subject of the next review in this issue). The general features of NSAID PK are: usually good bioavailability from oral, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration routes (but with delayed absorption in horses and ruminants after oral dosing), a high degree of binding to plasma protein, low volumes of distribution, limited excretion of administered dose as parent drug in urine, marked inter-species differences in clearance and elimination half-life and ready penetration into and slow clearance from acute inflammatory exudate. The therapeutic effects of NSAIDs are exerted both locally (at peripheral inflammatory sites) and centrally. There is widespread acceptance that the principal mechanism of action (both PD and toxicodynamics) of NSAIDs at the molecular level comprises inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme in the arachidonic acid cascade, which generates inflammatory mediators of the prostaglandin group. However, NSAIDs possess also many other actions at the molecular level. Two isoforms of COX have been identified. Inhibition of COX-1 is likely to account for most of the side-effects of NSAIDs (gastrointestinal irritation, renotoxicity and inhibition of blood clotting) but a minor contribution also to some of the therapeutic effects (analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions) cannot be excluded. Inhibition of COX-2 accounts for most and possibly all of the therapeutic effects of NSAIDs. Consequently, there has been an intensive search to identify and develop drugs with selectivity for inhibition of COX-2. Whole blood in

  2. Cyclooxygenase selectivity of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs in humans: ex vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, F; Ferraz, J G; Pereira, R; de Nucci, G; Warner, T D

    2001-08-24

    We have recently described a novel assay to assess ex vivo the activity and selectivity on cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (EC 1.14.99.1) of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) administered to rats [Br. J. Pharmacol. 126 (1999) 1824.]. Here, we have extended these studies to humans. Healthy male volunteers were given orally one of the following drugs (mg) for 5 days: etodolac (200 or 400 b.i.d.), meloxicam (7.5 or 15 q.d.), nimesulide (100 or 200 b.i.d.), nabumetone (500 or 1000 b.i.d.) or naproxen (500 b.i.d.). Blood samples were withdrawn from the volunteers before and up to 24 h after the last dose. Plasma obtained from the blood was tested for its ability to inhibit prostanoid formation in interleukin-1beta-treated A549 cells (cyclooxygenase-2 system) and human washed platelets (cyclooxygenase-1 system). Plasma from etodolac-treated subjects demonstrated a slight selectivity towards the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2. This effect was more prominent in plasma from subjects receiving meloxicam or nimesulide. Plasma from nabumetone-treated subjects showed no or little selectivity towards cyclooxygenase-1 depending on the dose of drug administered, while plasma taken from subjects receiving naproxen was more active at inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 than cyclooxygenase-2. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that this assay can be used to assess ex vivo the relative activity against cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 of NSAIDs consumed by human volunteers. It is to be hoped that data from such systems will aid in our understanding of the relationships between the differential inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 by NSAIDs and their reported efficacies and (gastrointestinal) toxicities. PMID:11525777

  3. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal distension-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Baskın, Veysel; Bilge, S. Sırrı; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Güzel, Hasan; İlkaya, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs effectiveness in colorectal distension (CRD)-induced visceral pain model. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague–Dawley (250–300 g) rats were anesthetized with ketamine (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) and chlorpromazine (25 mg/kg, i.p.). Two bipolar Teflon-coated Ni/Cr wire electrodes (80-M diameter) were placed in the abdominal external oblique muscle for the recording of electromyography. Jugular vein catheter was placed for the administration of drugs. CRD method was applied to evaluate of visceral pain. All drugs (paracetamol, meloxicam, metamizole, and dexketoprofen) administered intravenously. Results: Paracetamol 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg did not change the visceromotor response (VMR) when compare with the control group. Meloxicam 2 and 4 mg/kg showed no effect but at doses of 6 mg/kg meloxicam significantly ([51.9 ± 6.4%] [P < 0.001]) decreased VMR compared with the control group. Metamizole 200 mg/kg did not change responses but dose of 400 and 600 mg/kg metamizole reduced VMR. Dexketoprofen 2 and 4 mg/kg did not cause a change in VMR but 6 mg/kg dose significantly reduced response compared with the control group ([43.9 ± 3.9%, 36.8 ± 2.8%, 34.8 ± 2.5%, 42.1 ± 4.8%, 40.7 ± 3.5%, 36.4 ± 2.7%, and 26.1 ± 2.2%]; from 10 min to 70 min, respectively, [P < 0.05]). Conclusion: Metamizole, dexketoprofen and meloxicam show antinociceptive effect with different duration of action on CRD-induced visceral pain model. This condition can be explained due to different chemical structures and different mechanisms which play a role in modulation of pain. PMID:27114637

  4. [Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on colonic lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase activities from patients with colonic neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, G; Franchi, A; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Farina, M; Fernández de Gimeno, M A

    2001-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with good gastrointestinal tolerance. Treatment with LC at levels equivalent to those found in plasma following therapeutic doses resulted in significant inhibition of both cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and production of 5 hydroxy-eicosatetraeonic acid (5-HETE) and slightly affected levels of cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) in in vitro studies carried out on human tissues. This study deals with the in vivo effect of the drug on human colon segments. Experiment 1: Five patients about to undergo hemicholectomy due to colon neoplasia were treated preoperatively with a continuous infusion of LC, to achieve a steady-state concentration between 4 and 6 mg/ml. Human colon segments from the five patients and from another five control patients receiving no treatment with [14C]-arachidonic acid were incubated. Human colon segments treated with LC showed significant inhibition of PGE2, the only prostaglandin (PG) synthesised by the tissue, as well as of 5-HETE. Experiment 2: Fifteen patients received an i.v. bolus of LC 100 mg (n1 = 5); LC 200 mg (n2 = 5) or indomethacin (INDO) 50 mg (n3 = 5). Both doses of LC showed greater inhibition of PGE2 synthesis than the INDO bolus. Both NSAIDs studied proved to have different effects on the production of 5-HETE; while treatment with LC elicited significant inhibition, levels with INDO remained unchanged. Western blotting analysis showed expression of both COX isoforms in colon segments, COX-2 levels being 20% higher. Both types of in vivo studies conducted continuous infusion and i.v. bolus, revealed that LC exerted significant inhibition of basal synthesis of PGE2 and 5-HETE. PMID:11721323

  5. Italian survey on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    PubMed Central

    Cardile, Sabrina; Martinelli, Massimo; Barabino, Arrigo; Gandullia, Paolo; Oliva, Salvatore; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Rea, Francesca; de' Angelis, Gian Luigi; Bizzarri, Barbara; Guariso, Graziella; Masci, Enzo; Staiano, Annamaria; Miele, Erasmo; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gastrointestinal complications associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) use in children. METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter study was conducted between January 2005 and January 2013, with the participation of 8 Italian pediatric gastroenterology centers. We collected all the cases of patients who refer to emergency room for suspected gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAIDs consumption, and underwent endoscopic evaluation. Previous medical history, associated risk factors, symptoms and signs at presentation, diagnostic procedures, severity of bleeding and management of gastrointestinal bleeding were collected. In addition, data regarding type of drug used, indication, dose, duration of treatment and prescriber (physician or self-medication) were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients, including 34 males, were enrolled (median age: 7.8 years). Ibuprofen was the most used NSAID [35/51 patients (68.6%)]. Pain was the most frequent indication for NSAIDs use [29/51 patients (56.9%)]. Seven patients had positive family history of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or peptic ulcer, and 12 had associated comorbidities. Twenty-four (47%) out of 51 patients used medication inappropriately. Hematemesis was the most frequent symptom (33.3%). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric lesions in 32/51 (62%) patients, duodenal lesions in 17 (33%) and esophageal lesions in 8 (15%). In 10/51 (19.6%) patients, a diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis was made. Forty-eight (94%) patients underwent medical therapy, with spontaneous bleeding resolution, while in 3/51 (6%) patients, an endoscopic hemostasis was needed. CONCLUSION: The data collected in this study confirms that adverse events with the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract secondary to NSAID use are also common in children PMID:26855547

  6. Fetal exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and spontaneous abortions

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Sharon; Koren, Gideon; Lunenfeld, Eitan; Bilenko, Natalya; Ratzon, Ronit; Levy, Amalia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous abortion is the most common complication of pregnancy. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used during pregnancy. Published data are inconsistent regarding the risk of spontaneous abortion following exposure to NSAIDs. Methods: We performed a historical cohort study involving all women who conceived between January 2003 and December 2009 and who were admitted for delivery or spontaneous abortion at Soroka Medical Center, Clalit Health Services, Israel. A computerized database of medication dispensation was linked with 2 computerized databases containing information on births and spontaneous abortions. We constructed time-varying Cox regression models and adjusted for maternal age, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, obesity, hypercoagulation or inflammatory conditions, recurrent miscarriage, in vitro fertilization of the current pregnancy, intrauterine contraceptive device, ethnic background, tobacco use and year of admission. Results: The cohort included 65 457 women who conceived during the study period; of these, 58 949 (90.1%) were admitted for a birth and 6508 (9.9%) for spontaneous abortion. A total of 4495 (6.9%) pregnant women were exposed to NSAIDs during the study period. Exposure to NSAIDs was not an independent risk factor for spontaneous abortion (nonselective cyclooxygenase [COX] inhibitors: adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99–1.22; selective COX-2 inhibitors: adjusted HR 1.43, 95% CI 0.79–2.59). There was no increased risk for specific NSAID drugs, except for a significantly increased risk with exposure to indomethacin (adjusted HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.70–4.69). We found no dose–response effect. Interpretation: We found no increased risk of spontaneous abortion following exposure to NSAIDs. Further research is needed to assess the risk following exposure to selective COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:24491470

  7. The influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M A M; Aronoff, D M

    2016-02-01

    The composition of the gut microbiome with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has not been fully characterized. Drug use within the past 30 days was ascertained in 155 adults, and stool specimens were submitted for analysis. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated in logit models to distinguish the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) by medication class. The type of medication had a greater influence on the gut microbiome than the number of medications. NSAIDs were particularly associated with distinct microbial populations. Four OTUs (Prevotella species, Bacteroides species, family Ruminococcaceae, and Barnesiella species) discriminated aspirin users from those using no medication (AUC = 0.96; 95% CI 0.84-1.00). The microbiome profile of celecoxib users was similar to that of ibuprofen users, with both showing enrichment of Acidaminococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae. Bacteria from families Propionibacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Puniceicoccaceae and Rikenellaceae were more abundant in ibuprofen users than in controls or naproxen users. Bacteroides species and Erysipelotrichaceae species discriminated individuals using NSAIDs plus proton-pump inhibitors from those using NSAIDs alone (AUC = 0.96; 95% CI 0.87-1.00). Bacteroides species and a bacterium of family Ruminococcaceae discriminated individuals using NSAIDs in combination with antidepressants and laxatives from those using NSAIDs alone (AUC = 0.98; 95% CI 0.93-1.00). In conclusion, bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract reflect the combinations of medications that people ingest. The bacterial composition of the gut varied with the type of NSAID ingested. PMID:26482265

  8. Opioid-sparing effects of perioperative paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in children

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan; St John-Green, Celia; Walker, Suellen M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Perioperative pain in children can be effectively managed with systemic opioids, but addition of paracetamol or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce opioid requirements and potentially improve analgesia and/or reduce adverse effects. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to identify trials evaluating postoperative opioid requirements in children and comparing NSAID and/or paracetamol with placebo. Studies were stratified according to design: continuous availability of intravenous opioid (PCA/NCA) vs intermittent ‘as needed’ bolus; and single vs multiple dose paracetamol/NSAIDs. Primary outcome data were extracted, and the percentage decrease in mean opioid consumption was calculated for statistically significant reductions compared with placebo. Secondary outcomes included differences in pain intensity, adverse effects (sedation, respiratory depression, postoperative nausea and vomiting, pruritus, urinary retention, bleeding), and patient/parent satisfaction. Results Thirty-one randomized controlled studies, with 48 active treatment arms compared with placebo, were included. Significant opioid sparing was reported in 38 of 48 active treatment arms, across 21 of the 31 studies. Benefit was most consistently reported when multiple doses of study drug were administered, and 24 h PCA or NCA opioid requirements were assessed. The proportion of positive studies was less with paracetamol, but was influenced by dose and route of administration. Despite availability of opioid for titration, a reduction in pain intensity by NSAIDs and/or paracetamol was reported in 16 of 29 studies. Evidence for clinically significant reductions in opioid-related adverse effects was less robust. Conclusion This systematic review supports addition of NSAIDs and/or paracetamol to systemic opioid for perioperative pain management in children. PMID:23570544

  9. Muscovite is protective against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Lu, Bin; Fan, Yi-Hong; Zhang, Lu; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Shuo; Meng, Li-Na

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of muscovite in preventing small bowel injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). METHODS: We recruited and screened thirty-two healthy volunteers who were randomly allocated equally into two groups: an NSAID control group, who received 75 mg slow-release diclofenac, twice daily for 14 d; and an NSAID-muscovite group, who received 3 g of muscovite in addition to the 75 mg of slow-release diclofenac, twice daily for 14 d. For gastroprotection, both groups were administered 20 mg/d of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. All eligible subjects underwent video capsule endoscopy (CE) prior to and 14 d after treatment. RESULTS: Thirty subjects (NSAID-muscovite group, n =16; NSAID control group, n =14) finally completed the whole trail. At the baseline CE examination, no statistically significant differences between the two groups have been observed. However, after 14 d of drug treatment, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of subjects with mucosal breaks when comparing the NSAID-muscovite group with the NSAID control group. While 71.4% (10/14) of subjects in the NSAID control group had at least one mucosal break, co-administration of muscovite in the NSAID-muscovite group reduced the rate to 31.3% (5/16) (P = 0.028). Moreover, higher number of mucosal breaks was found in the NSAID control group vs that in the NSAID-muscovite group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Muscovite co-therapy reduced the incidence of small intestinal injury after 14 d of diclofenac administration. PMID:25152605

  10. New insights into the use of currently available non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kay; Patrignani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which act via inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) isozymes, were discovered more than 100 years ago. They remain a key component of the pharmacological management of acute and chronic pain. The COX-1 and COX-2 isozymes have different biological functions; analgesic activity is primarily (although not exclusively) associated with inhibition of COX-2, while different side effects result from the inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. All available NSAIDs, including acetaminophen and aspirin, are associated with potential side effects, particularly gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects, related to their relative selectivity for COX-1 and COX-2. Since all NSAIDs exert their therapeutic activity through inhibition of the COX isozymes, strategies are needed to reduce the risks associated with NSAIDs while achieving sufficient pain relief. A better understanding of the inhibitory activity and COX-1/COX-2 selectivity of an NSAID at therapeutic doses, based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties (eg, inhibitory dose, absorption, plasma versus tissue distribution, and elimination), and the impact on drug tolerability and safety can guide the selection of appropriate NSAIDs for pain management. For example, many NSAIDs with moderate to high selectivity for COX-2 versus COX-1 can be administered at doses that maximize efficacy (~80% inhibition of COX-2) while minimizing COX-1 inhibition and associated side effects, such as gastrointestinal toxicity. Acidic NSAIDs with favorable tissue distribution and short plasma half-lives can additionally be dosed to provide near-constant analgesia while minimizing plasma concentrations to permit recovery of COX-mediated prostaglandin production in the vascular wall and other organs. Each patient's clinical background, including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risk factors, should be taken into account when selecting appropriate NSAIDs. New methods are emerging to assist

  11. Maximizing the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use for postoperative dental pain: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for postoperative dental pain. An evidence-based approach is used to evaluate the clinical studies to date on the safe use of these drugs in dental patients. No drugs are without adverse effects or are perfectly safe, but their safe use in clinical practice would entail maximizing the therapeutic efficacy and minimizing the adverse effects. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence for the safe use of NSAIDs in postoperative dental pain. PMID:12866802

  12. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alter vasa recta diameter via pericytes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Lydon, Teresa; Crawford, Carol; Wildman, Scott S; Peppiatt-Wildman, Claire M

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown that vasa recta pericytes are known to dilate vasa recta capillaries in the presence of PGE2 and contract vasa recta capillaries when endogenous production of PGE2 is inhibited by the nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin. In the present study, we used a live rat kidney slice model to build on these initial observations and provide novel data that demonstrate that nonselective, cyclooxygenase-1-selective, and cyclooxygenase -2-selective NSAIDs act via medullary pericytes to elicit a reduction of vasa recta diameter. Real-time images of in situ vasa recta were recorded, and vasa recta diameters at pericyte and nonpericyte sites were measured offline. PGE2 and epoprostenol (a prostacyclin analog) evoked dilation of vasa recta specifically at pericyte sites, and PGE2 significantly attenuated pericyte-mediated constriction of vasa recta evoked by both endothelin-1 and ANG II. NSAIDs (indomethacin > SC-560 > celecoxib > meloxicam) evoked significantly greater constriction of vasa recta capillaries at pericyte sites than at nonpericyte sites, and indomethacin significantly attenuated the pericyte-mediated vasodilation of vasa recta evoked by PGE2, epoprostenol, bradykinin, and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-penicillamine. Moreover, a reduction in PGE2 was measured using an enzyme immune assay after superfusion of kidney slices with indomethacin. In addition, immunohistochemical techniques were used to demonstrate the population of EP receptors in the medulla. Collectively, these data demonstrate that pericytes are sensitive to changes in PGE2 concentration and may serve as the primary mechanism underlying NSAID-associated renal injury and/or further compound-associated tubular damage. PMID:26202223

  13. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate the vascular responses in aging metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Diaz-Diaz, Eulises; Pavón, Natalia; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging are low-grade systemic inflammatory conditions, and inflammation is a key component of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon the vascular reactivity in aging MS rats. Methods: MS was induced in young male rats by adding 30% sucrose in drinking water over 6, 12, and 18 months. When the treatment was finished, the blood samples were collected, and aortas were dissected out. The expression of COX isoenzymes and PLA2 in the aortas was analyzed using Western blot analysis. The contractile responses of aortic rings to norepinephrine (1 μmol/L) were measured in the presence or absence of different NSAIDs (10 μmol/L for each). Results: Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) in control rats were remained stable during the aging process, whereas serum IL-6 in MS rats were significantly increased at 12 and 18 months. The levels of COX isoenzyme and PLA2 in aortas from control rats increased with the aging, whereas those in aortas from MS rats were irregularly increased with the highest levels at 6 months. Pretreatment with acetylsalicylic acid (a COX-1 preferential inhibitor), indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or meloxicam (a COX-2 preferential inhibitor) decreased NE-induced contractions of aortic rings from MS rats at all the ages, with meloxicam being the most potent. Acetylsalicylic acid also significantly reduced the maximum responses of ACh-induced vasorelaxation of aortic rings from MS rats, but indomethacin and meloxicam had no effect. Conclusion: NSAIDs can directly affect vascular responses in aging MS rats. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on blood vessels may improve the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and MS in the elders. PMID:25263337

  14. Intestinal toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with differential cyclooxygenase inhibition selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S; Saini, R Kishore; Sanyal, S Nath

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the gastrointestinal side effects of cycloxygenase (COX) inhibitor with varying selectivity, called the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) viz., non-selective COX-1 & 2 inhibitor--aspirin, prefentially selective COX-2 inhibitor--nimesulide and highly selective COX-2 inhibitor-celecoxib. Treatment with NSAIDs exhibited a decrease in the activity of rat intestinal brush border membrane associated enzymes such as sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase as compared to the control in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The uptake of D-glucose and L-histidine in the everted intestinal sac was found to be decreased. Also the decease of glucose and histidine uptake was found to be dependent on the substrate concentration, temperature and the time interval of incubation. The physical state and composition of brush border membrane was found to be altered as evident in the FTIR spectrum, by appearance of new peaks while disappearance of certain peaks occurred which were characteristics of the control membrane. The changes in wave number as well as peaks height were also noticed. Alterations in protein profile of the membrane were demonstrated using SDS-PAGE analysis where disappearance of few bands and change in the relative intensities of the bands were noticed and correlated with the alterations that have taken place at the molecular level. Histological studies have depicted a marked decrease in the absorption surface area such as the villi height of the intestinal segment. In addition, crypt number also deceased in the treated animals, an indication that such changes also correlate well with the changes in the transport of the end product nutrients. PMID:17970535

  15. The association of Helicobacter pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Gómez, Sergio; Montaño-Loza, Aldo; Vázquez-Ballesteros, Edgar; de Jesús Villalobos, José; Valdovinos-Andraca, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 10% of the world population. Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) are the principal factors associated with PUD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a cohort of patients with PUD and determine the association between H pylori infection and NSAID use. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The medical charts of patients with endoscopic diagnosis of PUD were retrospectively reviewed from September 2002 to August 2003. Patients were divided into three groups according to ulcer etiology: H pylori infection (group 1); NSAID use (group 2); and combined H pylori infection and NSAID use (group 3). RESULTS: One hundred two patients were evaluated: 36 men (35.3%) and 66 women (64.7%). Forty patients had H pylori infection, 43 had used NSAIDs and 15 had combined H pylori infection and NSAID use; four patients with ulcers secondary to malignancy were excluded. The frequency of women was significantly higher in group 2 (P=0.01). The mean age of patients in group 1 was significantly lower than in the other two groups (P=0.003). PUD developed earlier in group 3 than in group 2 (5.0±4.7 months versus 1.4±2.1 months, respectively, P=0.018). Thirty-two patients (32.7%) had bleeding peptic ulcer. Group 2 had a higher risk of bleeding peptic ulcer than the other two groups (P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The development of PUD was observed earlier in the combined H pylori and NSAID group than in patients with only NSAID use. This suggests a synergic effect between the two risks factors in the development of PUD. PMID:16609757

  16. Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug-Exacerbated Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Dennis K; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA)-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized by upper airway congestion due to eosinophilic inflammation of the nasal and sinus membranes and nasal polyposis, associated with increased leukotriene production that is further accentuated by ASA or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ingestion. It occurs in 5% to 10% of subjects with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and in 15% to 40% of those with nasal polyposis. Although AERD with CRS is usually associated with asthma, this is not always the case. The eosinophilic airway inflammation and symptoms precede clinical reactions to ASA or other NSAIDs, but ultimately affected subjects experience worsening of symptoms with ingestion of ASA/NSAIDs. The endotypic mechanism for this worsening is related to a chronic increase in leukotriene and a decrease in prostaglandin production, particularly prostaglandin E2, that is further aggravated by the inhibition of cycloxgenase I. IgE does not likely play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease although nasal and sinus staphylococcal infection increases local IgE level and may increase total IgE and specific IgE levels. Genetic studies suggest that multiple genes may be involved, but the genetic abnormalities may differ in affected subjects from different ethnicities and candidate genes have not been confirmed in multiple studies. Genome-wide association studies have not been revealing. The phenotype is recognized by the mucosal inflammation and worsening of symptoms acutely with ASA/NSAID. There is clinical improvement with ASA desensitization followed by regular ingestion of ASA or other NSAIDs. Further understanding of this unique phenotype and endotype of CRS will likely improve the understanding of other eosinophilic airway diseases. PMID:27393773

  17. Low-Dose Tramadol and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Combination Therapy Prevents the Transition to Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To determine whether low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy could prevent the transition of acute low back pain to chronic low back pain. Overview of Literature Inadequately treated early low back pain transitions to chronic low back pain occur in approximately 30% of affected individuals. The administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is effective for treatment of low back pain in the early stages. However, the treatment of low back pain that is resistant to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is challenging. Methods Patients who presented with acute low back pain at our hospital were considered for inclusion in this study. After the diagnosis of acute low back pain, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration was started. Forty patients with a visual analog scale score of >5 for low back pain 1 month after treatment were finally enrolled. The first 20 patients were included in a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group, and they continued non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy for 1 month. The next 20 patients were included in a combination group, and they received low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy for 1 month. The incidence of adverse events and the improvement in the visual analog scale score at 2 months after the start of treatment were analyzed. Results No adverse events were observed in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group. In the combination group, administration was discontinued in 2 patients (10%) due to adverse events immediately following the start of tramadol administration. At 2 months, the improvement in the visual analog scale score was greater in the combination group than in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group (p<0.001). Conclusions Low-dose tramadol plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combination therapy might decrease the incidence of adverse events and prevent

  18. Oxidation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with aqueous permanganate.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, Tania; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Triñanes, Sara; Cela, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    Potassium permanganate is a strong oxidant widely used in drinking water treatment, that can react with organic micropollutants. Thus, the oxidation kinetics and transformation route of seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon reaction with potassium permanganate was investigated. A liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) system was used to follow the time course of pharmaceuticals concentrations and for the identification of their by-products. Under strong oxidation conditions (2 mg L(-1) KMnO4, 24 h), only two NSAIDs were significantly degraded: indomethacine and diclofenac. The degradation kinetics of these two drugs was investigated at different concentrations of permanganate, chlorides, phosphates and sample pH by means of a full factorial experimental design. Depending on these factors, half-lives were in the range: 2-270 h for indomethacine and 3-558 h for diclofenac, equivalent to apparent second order constants between 0.65 and 9.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 0.27 and 7.4 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Permanganate concentration was the most significant factor on NSAIDs oxidation kinetics, but the pH also played a significant role in diclofenac reaction, being faster at acidic pH. In the case of indomethacine, the dose of permanganate seemed also to play an autocatalytic effect. The use of an accurate-mass high resolution LC-Q-TOF-MS system permitted the identification of a total of 13 by-products. The transformation path of these drugs consisted mainly of hydroxylations, decarboxylations and oxidation of aromatic double bonds, with ring opening. The software predicted toxicity of these products indicates that they are expected not to be more toxic than the NSAIDs, with the exception of two indomethacine by-products. Reaction in real samples was slower and/or incomplete for both pharmaceuticals, depending on the organic matter content of the sample. However, still all transformation products could be detected for

  19. Pharmacological Evaluation and Preparation of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Containing an N-Acyl Hydrazone Subunit

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Thais Regina Ferreira; Chelucci, Rafael Consolin; Pires, Maria Elisa Lopes; Dutra, Luiz Antonio; Barbieri, Karina Pereira; Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Trossini, Gustavo Henrique Goulart; Chung, Man Chin; dos Santos, Jean Leandro

    2014-01-01

    A series of anti-inflammatory derivatives containing an N-acyl hydrazone subunit (4a–e) were synthesized and characterized. Docking studies were performed that suggest that compounds 4a–e bind to cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 isoforms, but with higher affinity for COX-2. The compounds display similar anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, although compound 4c is the most effective compound for inhibiting rat paw edema, with a reduction in the extent of inflammation of 35.9% and 52.8% at 2 and 4 h, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity of N-acyl hydrazone derivatives was inferior to their respective parent drugs, except for compound 4c after 5 h. Ulcerogenic studies revealed that compounds 4a–e are less gastrotoxic than the respective parent drug. Compounds 4b–e demonstrated mucosal damage comparable to celecoxib. The in vivo analgesic activities of the compounds are higher than the respective parent drug for compounds 4a–b and 4d–e. Compound 4a was more active than dipyrone in reducing acetic-acid-induced abdominal constrictions. Our results indicate that compounds 4a–e are anti-inflammatory and analgesic compounds with reduced gastrotoxicity compared to their respective parent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24714090

  20. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and the Risk for Anastomotic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hakkarainen, Timo W.; Steele, Scott R.; Bastaworous, Amir; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Farrokhi, Ellen; Farjah, Farhood; Florence, Michael; Helton, Scott; Horton, Marc; Pietro, Michael; Varghese, Thomas K.; Flum, David R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have many physiologic effects and are being used more commonly to treat postoperative pain, but recent small studies have suggested that NSAIDs may impair anastomotic healing in the gastrointestinal tract. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the relationship between postoperative NSAID administration and anastomotic complications. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of 13 082 patients undergoing bariatric or colorectal surgery at 47 hospitals in Washington State from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2010, using data from the Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program linked to the Washington State Comprehensive Abstract Reporting System. EXPOSURE NSAID administration beginning within 24 hours after surgery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used multivariate logistic regression modeling to assess the risk for anastomotic complications (reoperation, rescue stoma, revision of an anastomosis, and percutaneous drainage of an abscess) through 90 days after bariatric and colorectal surgery involving anastomoses. RESULTS Of the 13 082 patients (mean [SD] age, 58.1 [15.8] years; 60.7% women), 3158 (24.1%) received NSAIDs. The overall 90-day rate of anastomotic leaks was 4.3% for all patients (151 patients [4.8%] in the NSAID group and 417 patients [4.2%] in the non-NSAID group; P = .16). After risk adjustment, NSAIDs were associated with a 24% increased risk for anastomotic leak (odds ratio, 1.24 [95% CI, 1.01–1.56]; P = .04). This association was isolated to nonelective colorectal surgery, for which the leak rate was 12.3% in the NSAID group and 8.3% in the non-NSAID group (odds ratio, 1.70 [95% CI, 1.11–2.68]; P = .01). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Postoperative NSAIDs were associated with a significantly increased risk for anastomotic complications among patients undergoing nonelective colorectal resection. To determine the role of NSAIDs in colorectal surgery, future evaluations should consider

  1. 2-Hydroxy Arachidonic Acid: A New Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Daniel H.; Fiol-deRoque, Maria A.; Noguera-Salvà, Maria A.; Terés, Silvia; Campana, Federica; Piotto, Stefano; Castro, José A.; Mohaibes, Raheem J.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Busquets, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a family of COX1 and COX2 inhibitors used to reduce the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators. In addition, inflammation often leads to a harmful generation of nitric oxide. Efforts are being done in discovering safer NSAIDs molecules capable of inhibiting the synthesis of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators and nitric oxide to reduce the side effects associated with long term therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings The analogue of arachidonic acid (AA), 2-hydroxy-arachidonic acid (2OAA), was designed to inhibit the activities of COX1 and COX2 and it was predicted to have similar binding energies as AA for the catalytic sites of COX1 and COX2. The interaction of AA and 2OAA with COX1 and COX2 was investigated calculating the free energy of binding and the Fukui function. Toxicity was determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. COX1 and COX2 (PGH2 production) activities were measured in vitro. COX1 and COX2 expression in human macrophage-like U937 cells were carried out by Western blot, immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis. NO production (Griess method) and iNOS (Western blot) were determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. The comparative efficacy of 2OAA, ibuprofen and cortisone in lowering TNF-α serum levels was determined in C57BL6/J mice challenged with LPS. We show that the presence of the –OH group reduces the likelihood of 2OAA being subjected to H* abstraction in COX, without altering significantly the free energy of binding. The 2OAA inhibited COX1 and COX2 activities and the expression of COX2 in human U937 derived macrophages challenged with LPS. In addition, 2OAA inhibited iNOS expression and the production of NO in BV-2 microglial cells. Finally, oral administration of 2OAA decreased the plasma TNF-α levels in vivo. Conclusion/Significance These findings demonstrate the potential of 2OAA as a NSAID. PMID:24015204

  2. Preventive Efficacy and Safety of Rebamipide in Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Mucosal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Soo-Heon; Cho, Chul-Soo; Lee, Soo Teik; Yoo, Wan-Hee; Kim, Sung Kook; Kang, Young Mo; Rew, Jong Sun; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Won; Lee, Don-Haeng

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The use of proton pump inhibitors or misoprostol is known to prevent the gastrointestinal complications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rebamipide is known to increase the mucosal generation of prostaglandins and to eliminate free oxygen radicals, thus enhancing the protective function of the gastric mucosa. However, it is unknown whether rebamipide plays a role in preventing NSAID-induced gastropathy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rebamipide compared to misoprostol in preventing NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications in patients requiring continuous NSAID treatment. Methods We studied 479 patients who required continuous NSAID treatment. The patients were randomly assigned to groups that received 100 mg of rebamipide three times per day or 200 μg of misoprostol three times per day for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint of the analysis was the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers, as determined by endoscopy after 12 weeks of therapy. Results Of the 479 patients in the study, 242 received rebamipide, and 237 received misoprostol. Ultimately, 44 patients (18.6%) withdrew from the misoprostol group and 25 patients (10.3%) withdrew from the rebamipide group. There was a significant difference in withdrawal rate between the two groups (p=0.0103). The per protocol analysis set was not valid because of the dropout rate of the misoprostol group; thus, the intention to treat (ITT) analysis set is the main set for the efficacy analysis in this study. After 12 weeks, the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (20.3% vs 21.9%, p=0.6497) according to ITT analysis. In addition, the therapeutic failure rate was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (13.6% vs 13.1%, p=0.8580). The total severity score of the gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly lower in the rebamipide group than in the misoprostol group (p=0.0002). The amount of antacid used was

  3. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and the Risk of Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Natalia; Nguyen, Theresa; Ramsey, David; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been suggested to protect against esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). This study examined the effect of NSAIDs on the risk of developing Barett’s esophagus (BE), the precursor lesion to EAC. Methods We conducted a case-control study among eligible patients scheduled for either elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or recruited from primary care clinics to undergo a study EGD. We compared 323 patients with BE (296 nondysplastic and 27 dysplastic) with 2 separate control groups: 1347 patients from the elective EGD group ("endoscopy controls") and 502 patients from the primary care group ("primary care controls") with no endoscopic or histopathologic BE. Use of aspirin products and 23 nonaspirin NSAIDs was ascertained from detailed, self-reported questionnaires. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multivariable logistic-regression models. Results There were no significant differences in self-reported NSAID use between all BE cases and all controls (58.2% vs. 54.6%, P=0.33); this was seen for aspirin products (43.0% vs. 37.4%, P=0.08) and nonaspirin NSAIDs (7.7% vs. 8.9%, P=0.46). These findings persisted in the multivariable model for any NSAIDs (adjusted OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.28), aspirin (adjusted OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.90–1.51), and nonaspirin NSAIDs (adjusted OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.55–1.39). Use of a combination of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs was reported in 7.4% cases and 8.3% controls, and a non-significant inverse association with BE was seen (adjusted OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.44–1.11). There was no significant association between BE and daily NSAID use (adjusted OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.78–1.37). Similar findings were observed for comparisons involving nondysplastic or dysplastic BE cases, and endoscopy or primary care control groups separately or combined. Conclusion The use of NSAIDs was not associated with a reduced risk of BE. It is likely that the protective

  4. Use of Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increases Risk for Diverticulitis and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Liu, Yan L.; Huang, Edward S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, have been implicated in diverticular complications. We examined the influence of aspirin and NSAID use on risk of diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding in a large prospective cohort. METHODS We studied 47,210 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohort who were 40–75 years old at baseline, in 1986. We assessed use of aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and other risk factors biennially. We identified men with diverticulitis or diverticular bleeding based on responses to biennial and supplemental questionnaires. RESULTS We documented 939 cases of diverticulitis and 256 cases of diverticular bleeding during a 22-year period of follow-up. After adjustment for risk factors, men who used aspirin regularly (≥2 times per week) had a multivariable relative risk (RR) of 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.47) for diverticulitis and RR of 1.70 (95% CI, 1.21–2.39) for diverticular bleeding, compared with non-users of aspirin and NSAIDs. Use of aspirin at intermediate doses (2–5.9 standard, 325 mg, tablets per week) and frequency (4–6 days per week) were associated with the highest risk of bleeding (multivariable RR=2.32; 95% CI, 1.34–4.02, and multivariable RR=3.13; 95% CI, 1.82–5.38, respectively). Regular users of non-aspirin NSAIDs also had an increased risk of diverticulitis (multivariable RR=1.72; 95% CI, 1.40–2.11) and diverticular bleeding (multivariable RR=1.74; 95% CI, 1.15–2.64), compared with men who denied use of these medications. CONCLUSIONS Regular use of aspirin or NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk for diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding. Patients at risk of diverticular complications should carefully consider the potential risks and benefits of using these medications. PMID:21320500

  5. Best evidence topic report. Rectal or intravenous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in acute renal colic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline; Gnanasegaram, Dhurga; Maloba, Margaret

    2005-09-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are as effective as IV NSAIDs in the management of acute renal colic. Altogether 179 papers were found using the reported search, of which two represent the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. Rectal NSAIDs are an effective form of analgesia for patients with acute renal colic and have fewer side effects compared with intravenous NSAIDs. PMID:16113190

  6. Open access gastroscopy findings are unrelated to the use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J C; Greenaway, J R; Contractor, B R; Idle, N; Bramble, M G

    1997-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether priority should be given to patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or aspirin when selecting which dyspeptic patients to refer for open access gastroscopy. A total of 8156 patients underwent gastroscopy, all of whom had upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients taking NSAIDs or aspirin showed no significant differences in the frequency of ulcer disease when age-matched groups were compared. Although NSAIDs and aspirin are frequently implicated in gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly, patients referred for investigation of dyspepsia show no increase in major endoscopic pathology. PMID:9463986

  7. Induction of cytochrome P-450 BM-3 (CYP 102) by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    English, N; Hughes, V; Wolf, C R

    1996-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium contains a cytochrome P-450 fatty acid mono-oxygenase which is inducible with barbiturate drugs. We have demonstrated that this enzyme system is inducible with peroxisome proliferators. In mammals, peroxisome proliferators also induce mono-oxygenases in the CYP4A gene family. In this paper we demonstrate that the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen, ketoprofen and indomethacin are potent inducers of fatty acid mono-oxygenase activity as well as of P-450BM-3 protein in B. megaterium. The levels of induction of P-450 protein were 11.8-, 3.9- and 3.0-fold respectively. In addition, we demonstrate that these inducing agents interact with a transcriptional repressor, Bm3R1, which leads to its dissociation from its operator sequence. This provides a rational mechanism for the induction process. This is the first report which demonstrates that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can interact directly with a transcription factor to initiate gene expression, and further substantiates the structure-activity relationships that identify inducers of cytochrome P-450BM-3 and compounds that have the potential to act as peroxisome proliferators and induce CYP4A expression in mammals. PMID:8645218

  8. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the increasing the incidence of colonic anastomosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chengdong; Xiong, Yuanchang; Pan, Xin; Guo, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Qian, Shuwen; Xu, Chang; Yu, De-Hua; Liao, Wan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anastomotic leakage is one of serious complications of colorectal surgery. Research is inconsistent about whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs influence the healing of colorectal anastomoses and increase the incidence of anastomotic leakage. Objective: To study the influence of NSAIDs on the healing of rat colonic anastomoses. Design: This was an animal randomized-control trial. This study was approved by the ethical committee of Yangpu Hospital, Tongji University. Intervention: 90 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 15 rats/group. Trail was performed in C (cotrol group) with no drugs, group M with morphine for analgesia, group F with flurbiprofen axeil, group L with lornoxicam, and group P with parecoxib sodium. Main outcome measures: The main outcomes measures were serological indexes including vascular endothelial growth factor, prostaglandin E2, hydroxyproline, and C reactive protein; histological specimens from the anastomotic stoma tissue including the collagen proportion, and hydroxyproline, cycloxygenase-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor content; physical indicators, including stoma fracture pressure, fracture strength and anastomotic leakage. Results: No significant difference was observed among the indices of each group (P > 0.05). A significant difference occurred after operation (P < 0.05), with the data for groups K and M being dramatically higher than those for group F. Limitation: The study was nonblinded. Conclusion: The postoperative usages of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can decrease the strength of anastomotic tissue, and increase the incidence of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26261490

  9. Inhibitory effect of quinolone antimicrobial and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on a medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, F; Hiasa, M; Kawai, Y; Igarashi, K; Fukui, M

    2001-08-01

    The inhibitory effects of quinolone antimicrobial agents and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on purified mouse liver mitochondrial medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase catalyzing the first reaction of glycine conjugation were examined, using hexanoic acid as a substrate. Enoxacin, ofloxacin, nalidixic acid, diflunisal, salicylic acid, 2-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and 2-hydroxydodecanoic acid, which do not act as substrates, were potent inhibitors. Diflunisal, nalidixic acid, salicylic acid, 2-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and 2-hydroxydodecanoic acid inhibited competitively this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase with K(i) values of 0.6, 12.4, 19.6, 13.4, and 15.0 microM, respectively. Enoxacin and ofloxacin inhibited this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase in a mixed-type manner with K(i) values of 23.7 and 38.2 microM, respectively. Felbinac, which is a substrate, inhibited the activity of this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase for hexanoic acid (IC50 = 25 microM). The concomitant presence of enoxacin and felbinac strongly inhibited this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase. These findings indicate that medium chain acyl-CoA synthetases may be influenced by quinolone antimicrobial and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:11434910

  10. Expression of pleiotrophin, an important regulator of cell migration, is inhibited in intestinal epithelial cells by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used drugs for the suppression of inflammation and pain. However, the analgesic properties of NSAIDs are also associated with significant negative side effects, most notably in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Increasingly, evi...

  11. Discovery of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and anticancer drug enhancing reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem cell generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Shun; Lopez, Claudia G; Rana, Tariq M

    2011-10-01

    Recent breakthroughs in creating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide alternative means to obtain embryonic stem-like cells without destroying embryos by introducing four reprogramming factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, and Klf4/c-Myc or Nanog/Lin28) into somatic cells. iPSCs are versatile tools for investigating early developmental processes and could become sources of tissues or cells for regenerative therapies. Here, for the first time, we describe a strategy to analyze genomics datasets of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and embryonic stem cells to identify genes constituting barriers to iPSC reprogramming. We further show that computational chemical biology combined with genomics analysis can be used to identify small molecules regulating reprogramming. Specific downregulation by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of several key MEF-specific genes encoding proteins with catalytic or regulatory functions, including WISP1, PRRX1, HMGA2, NFIX, PRKG2, COX2, and TGFβ3, greatly increased reprogramming efficiency. Based on this rationale, we screened only 17 small molecules in reprogramming assays and discovered that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Nabumetone and the anticancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen can generate iPSCs without Sox2. Nabumetone could also produce iPSCs in the absence of c-Myc or Sox2 without compromising self-renewal and pluripotency of derived iPSCs. In summary, we report a new concept of combining genomics and computational chemical biology to identify new drugs useful for iPSC generation. This hypothesis-driven approach provides an alternative to shot-gun screening and accelerates understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying iPSC induction. PMID:21898684

  12. Enhanced Loading and Release of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs from Silica-Based Nanoparticle Carriers.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Mostafa; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Sadegh; Khodaverdi, Elham; Hadizadeh, Farzin; Omid Malayeri, Sina

    2016-09-01

    Silica nanoparticles can be potentially considered the carriers of controlled drug systems. In this research, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were used. Diclofenac sodium and piroxicam were loaded on the considered nanosilica using solvent evaporation method. To prove drug encapsulation on the nanosilica and its rate, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and BET were used, and after proving the existence of the drug in the nanosilica matrix and determining the amount of loading, dissolution test was performed in an environment similar to that of stomach and intestine in terms of pH. Drug loading percentage showed that over 90% of drugs were loaded on nanosilica. Dissolution tests in stomach pH environment showed the control samples (drug without SBA-15) released considerable amount of drugs (about 90%) within first 15 min, when it was about 10-20% for the matrixes. Furthermore, release rate of drugs from matrixes has shown slower rate in comparison with control samples. It was indicated nanosilica has the ability of retaining the drugs in acidic pH and prevented their release. Furthermore, the drugs were released in a controlled manner in small intestine, which is the main absorption site. PMID:27062095

  13. Supramolecular interactions of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in nanochannels of molecular containers: a spectroscopic, thermogravimetric and microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Maity, Banibrata; Chatterjee, Aninda; Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Seth, Debabrata

    2014-11-10

    Supramolecular host-guest complexation between the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (IMC) and molecular containers were investigated. The weakly fluorescent drug molecule becomes highly fluorescent on complexation with different molecular containers, and time-resolved fluorescence emission spectroscopy reveals that the lifetime components of IMC significantly increase in the presence of molecular containers, compared with the lifetimes in neat water. The respective solid host-guest complexes were synthesised and characterised by Fourier transform infrared and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. Microscopy techniques were used to analyse modifications of the surface morphology, owing to the formation of supramolecular complexes. The effect of the molecular container on the optical properties of IMC has also been investigated to determine the effect of nanochannels of different size and structure. PMID:25146319

  14. β-Amino acid and amino-alcohol conjugation of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) imparts hydrogelation displaying remarkable biostability, biocompatibility, and anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Joydeb; Das, Mahua Rani; Deb, Jolly; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2013-08-13

    A well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely, naproxen (Np), was conjugated with β-alanine and various combinations of amino alcohols and l-alanine. Quite a few bioconjugates, thus synthesized, were capable of gelling pure water, NaCl solution (0.9 wt %), and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.4). The hydrogels were characterized by rheology and electron microscopy. Hydrogelation was probed by FT-IR and temperature-variable (1)H NMR studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) of a nonhydrogelator and a hydrogelator in the series established a useful structure-property (gelation) correlation. MTT assay of the hydrogelators in the mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line showed excellent biocompatibility. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) assay of the hydrogelators revealed their anti-inflammatory response, which was comparable to that of the parent NSAID naproxen sodium (Ns). PMID:23859562

  15. Coordination Polymers Derived from Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Cell Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mithun; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2016-01-18

    A new series of Mn(II) coordination polymers, namely, [{Mn(L)(H2 O)2 }⋅2 Nap]∞ (CP1), [{Mn(L)(Ibu)2 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP2), [{Mn(L)(Flr)2 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP3), [{Mn(L)(Ind)2 (H2 O)2 }⋅H2 O]∞ (CP4), [{Mn2 (L)2 (μ-Flu)4 (H2 O)}⋅L]∞ (CP5), [{Mn2 (L)2 (μ-Tol)4 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP6) and [{Mn2 (L)2 (μ-Mef)4 (H2 O)2 }]∞ (CP7) (Nap=naproxen, Ibu=ibuprofen, Flr=flurbiprofen, Ind=indometacin, Flu=flufenamic acid, Tol=tolfenamic acid and Mef=mefenamic acid) derived from various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the organic linker 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (L) have been synthesized with the aim of being used for cell imaging and drug delivery. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) studies revealed that the NSAID molecules were part of the coordination polymeric network either through coordination to the metal center (in the majority of the cases) or through hydrogen bonding. Remarkably, all the Mn(II) coordination polymers were found to be soluble in DMSO, thereby making them particularly suitable for the desired biological applications. Two of the coordination polymers (namely, CP1 and CP3) reported herein, were found to be photoluminescent both in the solid as well as in the solution state. Subsequent experiments (namely, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2 ) assays) established their biocompatibility and anti-inflammatory response. In vitro studies by using a macrophage cell line (i.e., RAW 264.7) revealed that both CP1 and CP3 were excellent cell imaging agents. Finally, biodegradability studies under simulated physiological conditions in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.6 showed that slow and sustained release of the corresponding NSAID was indeed possible from both CP1 and CP3. PMID:26660274

  16. [Cardiovascular side effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the light of recent recommendations. Diclofenac is not more dangerous].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Viktor József; Tabák, Gy Ádám; Szabó, Gergely; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Koós, Csaba Géza; Lakatos, Péter

    2015-03-29

    Among their beneficial effects, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may also exert several side effects which depend on the dosage and the type of these medications. The most frequent gastrointestinal side effects usually develop shortly after the beginning of their administration, but others such as cardiovascular interactions (which are present much less frequently than gastrointestinal side effects) can also occur after the beginning of drug administration without a latency period. For a long-term treatment, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are most frequently used in the elderly population where patients typically have high cardiovascular risk and take other medicines, e.g. low dose acetylsalicylic acid that can interact with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; in this aspect diclofenac may cause less side effects. In this review, the authors briefly review cardiovascular side effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the processes which potentially influence them, therapeutic consequences and their interaction with acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:25796279

  17. Postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal anastomotic leakage. NSAIDs and anastomotic leakage.

    PubMed

    Klein, Mads

    2012-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most important and one of the most serious complications after colorectal resections with primary anastomosis. Any factors that contribute to increase the risk of AL should be identified and--if possible--eliminated. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used for treating pain after surgical procedures, among these also colorectal resections. The objective of this Ph.d. thesis was to investigate whether the use of NSAIDs in the postoperative period increases the risk of AL, and investigate the effect on pathophysiological mechanisms. In order to achieve this, the following studies were performed. Study I was a retrospective, case-control study in 75 patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection for colorectal cancer. 33 of these patients received the NSAID diclofenac in the postoperative period; the remaining 42 did not receive any NSAID. There were significantly more ALs among the patients receiving diclofenac (7/33 vs. 1/42, p=0.018). In uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses, diclofenac was the only factor associated with increased AL rate. This study functioned as a hypothesis generating study and laid the ground for the subsequent studies. Study II was an experimental, randomized, case-control study in 32 Wistar rats. The rats had a colonic anastomosis performed and were randomized to diclofenac or placebo treatment. After three days, the rats were sacrificed and the anastomoses were harvested. First, the anastomotic strengths were tested by longitudinal; subsequently, the levels of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the anastomotic tissues were measured. There was no difference among the groups with regard to anastomotic strength, but the animals treated with diclofenac had significantly lower COX-2 levels (median (range) 1.30 (0.42-3.31) ng/mg vs. 2.44 (0.88 - 18.94) ng/mg, p<0.001). This study showed that the used dose of diclofenac was sufficient and relevant, but did not show a

  18. Fatal necrotising fasciitis associated with intramuscular injection of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after uncomplicated endoscopic polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Orlando, A; Marrone, C; Nicoli, N; Tamburello, G; Rizzo, A; Pagliaro, L; Cottone, M; D'Amico, G

    2007-03-01

    Necrotising fasciitis is a life-threatening infection of the superficial muscle fascia and the adjacent deep layer of subcutaneous tissue that is often fatal. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) three days after an uncomplicated endoscopic polypectomy because of necrotising fasciitis of left tight, buttock and retroperitoneal space and septic shock. Six hours after the polypectomy she was given an intramuscular injection of ketorolac in the left tight because of moderate low abdominal pain. Twelve and 24h later she was treated with another two intramuscular injection of diclofenac in the left tight for severe pains in the left hip joint region. The shock was unresponsive to any treatment and the fasciitis extended to the whole body even after surgical specific treatment and the patient died in four days. This is the first report of a necrotising fasciitis following intramuscular administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after an endoscopic procedure. PMID:17052758

  19. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and admission to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation: a record linkage case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. M.; McMahon, A. D.; McGilchrist, M. M.; White, G.; Murray, F. E.; McDevitt, D. G.; MacDonald, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the relation between topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. DESIGN--A case-control study with 1103 patients admitted to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation between January 1990 and December 1992 (cases). Two different control groups were used, with six community controls and with two hospital controls for each case. Previous exposure to topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ulcer healing drugs was assessed. STUDY POPULATION--The population of 319,465 people who were resident in Tayside and were registered with a Tayside general practitioner between January 1989 and October 1994. A record linkage database containing all data on hospital events and dispensed drugs between 1989 and 1992 was used for this population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios of exposure in those admitted to hospital compared with controls. RESULTS--Significant unadjusted associations were detected between all three classes of drug and upper gastrointestinal complications. The significant association detected for topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was no longer evident in analyses which adjusted for the confounding effect of concomitant exposure to oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs (odds ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 2.50 with community controls; 1.06; 0.60 to 1.88 with hospital controls). CONCLUSION--In this study topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were not significantly associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation after adjustment for the confounding effects of concomitant use of oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs. PMID:7613317

  20. Does administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug determine morphological changes in adrenal cortex: ultrastructural studies

    PubMed Central

    Matysiak, Włodzimierz

    2010-01-01

    Rofecoxib (Vioxx© made by Merck Sharp & Dohme, the USA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which belongs to the group of selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenasis-2, i.e., coxibs. Rofecoxib was first registered in the USA, in May 1999. Since then the drug was received by millions of patients. Drugs of this group were expected to exhibit increased therapeutic action. Additionally, there were expectations concerning possibilities of their application, at least as auxiliary drugs, in neoplastic therpy due to intensifying of apoptosis. In connection with the withdrawal of Vioxx© (rofecoxib) from pharmaceutical market, attempts were made to conduct electron-microscopic evaluation of cortical part of the adrenal gland in preparations obtained from animals under influence of the drug. Every morning animals from the experimental group (15 rats) received rofecoxib (suspension in physiological saline)—non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Vioxx©, Merck Sharp and Dohme, the USA), through an intragastric tube in the dose of 1.25 mg during 8 weeks. In the evaluated material, there was found a greater number of secretory vacuoles and large, containing cholesterol and other lipids as well as generated glucocorticoids, lipid drops in cytoplasm containing prominent endoplasmic reticulum. There were also found cells with cytoplasm of smaller density—especially in apical and basal parts of cells. Mitochondria occasionally demonstrated features of delicate swelling. The observed changes, which occurred on cellular level with application of large doses of the drug, result from mobilization of adaptation mechanisms of the organism. PMID:20721677

  1. Pharmacology and potential therapeutic applications of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and related nitric oxide-donating drugs

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, J E; Moore, P K

    2002-01-01

    This review examines the biological significance, therapeutic potential and mechanism(s) of action of a range of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAID) and related nitric oxide-releasing donating drugs (NODD). The slow release of nitric oxide (NO) from these compounds leads to subtle changes in the profile of pharmacological activity of the parent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). For example, compared with NSAID, NO-NSAID cause markedly diminished gastrointestinal toxicity and improved anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy. In addition, nitroparacetamol exhibits hepatoprotection as opposed to the hepatotoxic activity of paracetamol. The possibility that NO-NSAID or NODD may be of therapeutic benefit in a wide variety of disease states including pain and inflammation, thrombosis and restenosis, neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, colitis, cancer, urinary incontinence, liver disease, impotence, bronchial asthma and osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:12237248

  2. [Differential action of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs on human gallbladder cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase].

    PubMed

    Franchi, A; Di Girolamo, G; Farina, M; de los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Gimeno, M A

    2000-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is a non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent (NSAID) with only few adverse effects. This characteristic has prompted us to suggest that its administration, at levels equivalent to those found in human plasma following therapeutic doses, slightly inhibits cyclooxygenase I (COX I). Three experiments were performed. Experiment 1: to study the in vitro effect of LC at concentrations of 4 and 6 micrograms/ml, comparable with those found in plasma following an oral therapeutic dose of 125 mg. Gallbladder tissue segments were incubated with 0.25 microCi of 14C-arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto PGF1 alpha) was measured. LC did not affect basal production of any of the 3 prostaglandins (PGs) but at 6 micrograms/ml slightly reduced the levels of 5-hidroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE). Experiment 2: LC was administered preoperatively to 6 patients by continuous perfusion, to achieve a steady-state concentration between 4 and 6 micrograms/ml. Gallbladder segments from the 6 treated and another 6 control patients were incubated in 14C-arachidonic acid. Gallbladder segments treated with LC did not show a decreased production of any of the three PGs whereas 5-HETE released to the medium was significantly lower. Experiment 3: 18 patients received an i.v. bolus of LC 100 mg (n1 = 6) or LC 200 mg (n2 = 6) or indomethacin (INDO) 50 mg (n3 = 6). Unlike the administration of INDO bolus, LC in the above doses did not inhibit PG synthesis. Both NSAIDs showed different effects when the production of 5-HETE synthesis was assessed. Treatment with INDO did not alter the production of 5-HETE while LC elicited significant inhibition. The three studies conducted, namely in vitro and in vivo continuous perfusion and i.v. bolus, revealed that LC had no effect on prostaglandin synthesis while reducing significantly the levels of 5-HETE. PMID:11188896

  3. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sensitizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis to endogenous and exogenous antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Pingle, Maneesh; Brickner, Steven J.; Shah, Nilesh; Roberts, Julia; Rundell, Mark; Bracken, W. Clay; Warrier, Thulasi; Somersan, Selin; Venugopal, Aditya; Darby, Crystal; Jiang, Xiuju; Warren, J. David; Fernandez, Joseph; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Cunningham-Bussel, Amy; Rath, Poonam; Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Deng, Haiteng; Realubit, Ronald; Glickman, J. Fraser; Nathan, Carl F.

    2012-01-01

    Existing drugs are slow to eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients and have failed to control tuberculosis globally. One reason may be that host conditions impair Mtb’s replication, reducing its sensitivity to most antiinfectives. We devised a high-throughput screen for compounds that kill Mtb when its replication has been halted by reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs), acid, hypoxia, and a fatty acid carbon source. At concentrations routinely achieved in human blood, oxyphenbutazone (OPB), an inexpensive anti-inflammatory drug, was selectively mycobactericidal to nonreplicating (NR) Mtb. Its cidal activity depended on mild acid and was augmented by RNIs and fatty acid. Acid and RNIs fostered OPB’s 4-hydroxylation. The resultant 4-butyl-4-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione (4-OH-OPB) killed both replicating and NR Mtb, including Mtb resistant to standard drugs. 4-OH-OPB depleted flavins and formed covalent adducts with N-acetyl-cysteine and mycothiol. 4-OH-OPB killed Mtb synergistically with oxidants and several antituberculosis drugs. Thus, conditions that block Mtb’s replication modify OPB and enhance its cidal action. Modified OPB kills both replicating and NR Mtb and sensitizes both to host-derived and medicinal antimycobacterial agents. PMID:23012453

  4. [Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and risk of cardiovascular events. Literature review and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Zito, Giovanni Battista; Pedretti, Roberto Franco; Belisarii, Franceso Iachini; Putortí, Giuseppe; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2014-09-01

    Non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are largely used for treatment of acute and chronic pain, even for long periods of time (months or years). While it is known that their use is frequently associated with gastrointestinal damage, including major bleedings from peptic ulcer, the risk of cardiovascular events related to NSAID has received much less attention. However, there is a large body of evidence showing that NSAIDs (both "traditional", such as diclofenac or indobufen, and selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, COX-2) are associated with a significant increase of risk of cardiovascular events, both fatal and nonfatal. Consequently, several options have been proposed for the treatment of pain, including the use of analgesic drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as the opiates. Of interest, the Italian Drug Agency (AIFA) published a few years ago a warning (Nota 66) on the careful prescription of NSAIDs in patients with overt heart disease, such as coronary artery disease and heart failure. Aim of this paper is to present the current status of knowledge on the proper use of NSAIDs and other analgesic drugs in the management of acute and chronic pain. PMID:26058269

  5. Sunlight-driven photocatalytic degradation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug based on TiO₂ quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Umar, Ahmad; Kansal, Sushil Kumar

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the facile synthesis, characterization and solar-light driven photocatalytic degradation of TiO2 quantum dots (QDs). The TiO2 QDs were synthesized by a facile ultrasonic-assisted hydrothermal process and characterized in terms of their structural, morphological, optical and photocatalytic properties. The detailed studies confirmed that the prepared QDs are well-crystalline, grown in high density and exhibiting good optical properties. Further, the prepared QDs were efficiently used as effective photocatalyst for the sun-light driven photocatalytic degradation of ketorolac tromethamine, a well-known non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). To optimize the photocatalytic degradation conditions, various dose-dependent, pH-dependent, and initial drug-concentration dependent experiments were performed. The detailed solar-light driven photocatalytic experiments revealed that ∼99% photodegradation of ketorolac tromethamine drug solution (10 mg L(-1)) was observed with optimized amount of TiO2 QDs and pH (0.5 g L(-1) and 4.4, respectively) under solar-light irradiations. The observed results demonstrate that simply synthesized TiO2 QDs can efficiently be used for the solar-light driven photocatalytic degradation of harmful drugs and chemicals. PMID:26301837

  6. Traumeel – an emerging option to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of acute musculoskeletal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are on the rise. First-line management of such injuries usually employs the RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) approach to limit excessive inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also commonly used to limit inflammation and to control pain. Traumeel®, a preparation with bioregulatory effects is also used to treat the symptoms associated with acute musculoskeletal injuries, including pain and swelling. Traumeel is a fixed combination of biological and mineral extracts, which aims to apply stimuli to multiple targets to restore normal functioning of regulatory mechanisms. This paper presents the accumulating evidence of Traumeel’s action on the inflammatory process, and of its efficacy and tolerability in randomized trials, as well as observational and surveillance studies for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Traumeel has shown comparable effectiveness to NSAIDs in terms of reducing symptoms of inflammation, accelerating recovery, and improving mobility, with a favorable safety profile. While continued research and development is ongoing to broaden the clinical evidence of Traumeel in acute musculoskeletal injury and to further establish its benefits, current information suggests that Traumeel may be considered as an anti-inflammatory agent that is at least as effective and appears to be better tolerated than NSAIDs. PMID:21556350

  7. Chemopreventive action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the inflammatory pathways in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghanghas, Preety; Jain, Shelly; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, S N

    2016-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are emerging as novel chemopreventive agents against a variety of cancers owing to their capability in blocking the tumor development by cellular proliferation and by promoting apoptosis. Inflammation is principal cause of colon carcinogenesis. A missing link between inflammation and cancer could be the activation of NF-κB, which is a hallmark of inflammatory response, and is commonly detected in malignant tumors. Therefore, targeting pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase enzymes and transcription factors will be profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor growth. In the present study, we have studied the role of various pro-inflammatory enzymes and transcription factors in the development of the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced colorectal cancer and also observed the role of three NSAIDs, viz., Celecoxib, Etoricoxib and Diclofenac. Carcinogenic changes were observed in morphological and histopathological studies, whereas protein regulations of various biomolecules were identified by immunofluorescence analysis. Apoptotic studies was done by TUNEL assay and Hoechst/PI co-staining of the isolated colonocytes. It was found that DMH-treated animals were having an over-expression of pro-inflammatory enzymes, aberrant nuclear localization of activated cell survival transcription factor, NF-κB and suppression of anti-inflammatory transcription factor PPAR-γ, thereby suggesting a marked role of inflammation in the tumor progression. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has significantly reduced the inflammatory potential of the growing neoplasm. PMID:26898448

  8. The Evolving Role of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Colon Cancer Prevention: A Cause for Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Tsioulias, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a serious yet preventable disease. The low acceptance and cost of colonoscopy as a screening method for CRC make chemoprevention an important option. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), not currently recommended for CRC prevention, have the potential to evolve into the agents of choice for this indication. Here, we discuss the promise and challenge of NSAIDs for this chemopreventive application. Multiple epidemiologic studies, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of sporadic colorectal polyp recurrence, RCTs in patients with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, and pooled analyses of cardiovascular-prevention RCTs linked to cancer outcomes have firmly established the ability of conventional NSAIDs to prevent CRC. NSAIDs, however, are seriously limited by their toxicity, which can become cumulative with their long-term administration for chemoprevention, whereas drug interactions in vulnerable elderly patients compound their safety. Newer, chemically modified NSAIDs offer the hope of enhanced efficacy and safety. Recent work also indicates that targeting earlier stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, such as the lower complexity aberrant crypt foci, is a promising approach that may only require relatively short use of chemopreventive agents. Drug combination approaches exemplified by sulindac plus difluoromethylornithine appear very efficacious. Identification of those at risk or most likely to benefit from a given intervention using predictive biomarkers may usher in personalized chemoprevention. Agents that offer simultaneous chemoprevention of diseases in addition to CRC, e.g., cardiovascular and/or neurodegenerative diseases, may have a much greater potential for a broad clinical application. PMID:25589413

  9. An in vitro biomarker approach for the evaluation of the ecotoxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea; Cogni, Daniele; Riva, Consuelo; Provini, Alfredo

    2009-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently detected pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments. They are the sixth most sold drugs worldwide and are usually found in significant quantities in municipal effluents. The aim of this study was to assess a first screening evaluation of the cytogenotoxicity of three common NSAIDs (diclofenac, ibuprofen and paracetamol) using an in vitro biomarker approach on the haemocytes of the freshwater bivalve zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Genotoxicity was evaluated by SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis) and DNA diffusion assay while cytotoxicity was evaluated by neutral red retention assay (NRRA). The exposure of the haemocytes to increasing concentrations of the three drugs, chosen based on the results of a viability test, revealed high cytogenotoxic potential and allowed the creation of the first toxicity scale for zebra mussel haemocytes (paracetamol

  10. Gaultherin, a natural salicylate derivative from Gaultheria yunnanensis: towards a better non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; He, Xiao-Li; Ding, Yi; Du, Guan-Hua

    2006-01-13

    One of the major factors limiting the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is gastrointestinal toxicity. Gaultherin, 2-[(6-O-beta-D-Xylopyranosyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy] benzoic acid methyl ester, a natural salicylate derivative extracted from Gaultheria yunnanensis, has been shown to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and lack gastric ulcerogenic effect compared to aspirin in our primary study. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of gaultherin, which may rely on its active metabolite, and the mechanism responsible for the non-ulcerogenic property. The results showed that gaultherin (200 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the abdominal contractions in the acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of gaultherin was demonstrated in the croton oil-induced ear edema model in mice. The results showed that gaultherin and equimolar dose of aspirin produced comparable inhibitory effects. The study of the metabolism characters of gaultherin in mice and rats indicated that gaultherin could be metabolically converted to salicylate, which produced the pharmacological effects, and provided effective concentrations for an extended period. In vitro metabolism experiment showed that gaultherin was metabolized by beta-glycosidase produced by human intestinal bacteria and esterases in intestine, blood and liver successively to release salicylate finally. The study suggested gaultherin did not cause gastric ulcer for the reason that it released salicylate in intestine slowly, not in stomach and it left the cyclooxygenase-1 unaffected, which was the source of cytoprotective prostaglandins in gastric epithelium. PMID:16375889

  11. Reduction of Breast Cancer Relapses with Perioperative Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: New Findings and a Review

    PubMed Central

    Retsky, Michael; Demicheli, Romano; Hrushesky, William J.M; Forget, Patrice; Kock, Marc De; Gukas, Isaac; Rogers, Rick A; Baum, Michael; Sukhatme, Vikas; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2013-01-01

    To explain a bimodal pattern of hazard of relapse among early stage breast cancer patients identified in multiple databases, we proposed that late relapses result from steady stochastic progressions from single dormant malignant cells to avascular micrometastases and then on to growing deposits. However in order to explain early relapses, we had to postulate that something happens at about the time of surgery to provoke sudden exits from dormant phases to active growth and then to detection. Most relapses in breast cancer are in the early category. Recent data from Forget et al. suggest an unexpected mechanism. They retrospectively studied results from 327 consecutive breast cancer patients comparing various perioperative analgesics and anesthetics in one Belgian hospital and one surgeon. Patients were treated with mastectomy and conventional adjuvant therapy. Relapse hazard updated Sept 2011 are presented. A common Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) analgesic used in surgery produced far superior disease-free survival in the first 5 years after surgery. The expected prominent early relapse events in months 9-18 are reduced 5-fold. If this observation holds up to further scrutiny, it could mean that the simple use of this safe, inexpensive and effective anti-inflammatory agent at surgery might eliminate early relapses. Transient systemic inflammation accompanying surgery could facilitate angiogenesis of dormant micrometastases, proliferation of dormant single cells, and seeding of circulating cancer stem cells (perhaps in part released from bone marrow) resulting in early relapse and could have been effectively blocked by the perioperative anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23992307

  12. Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced ulcer: looking to the future.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano

    2009-06-01

    The great challenge for those attempting to develop safer NSAIDs is shifting from a focus on GI toxicity to the increasingly more appreciated cardiovascular toxicity. At present, coxib shows an unmatched GI safety and appears to be a rational choice for patients at a low cardiovascular risk who have had serious GI events. In these patients, however, a cost-effective alternative is the use of tNSAIDs associated with comedication with a low-cost PPI or PN400. Because it seems prudent to avoid coxibs in patients who have cardiovascular disease or who are at risk for it, naproxcinod will be an appealing alternative to coxibs and tNSAIDs. However, because naproxcinod carries a significant risk of GI bleeding, a comedication therapy with a PPI inhibitor will be required if these patients also present risk factors for GI events. Although the development of H2S-releasing anti-inflammatory drugs is in its infancy, the preclinical data available thus far provide cause for optimism. The quest for the development of NSAIDs devoid of cardiovascular toxicity and that spare the gastric mucosa to the same extent as that of a coxib, however, is still open. PMID:19446261

  13. Effects of nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) on melanoma cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Huiwen; Mollica, Molly Y.; Lee, Shin Hee; Wang, Lei; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-10-15

    A new class of nitric oxide (NO•)-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) were developed in recent years and have shown promising potential as NSAID substitutes due to their gentle nature on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Since nitric oxide plays a role in regulation of cell adhesion, we assessed the potential use of NONO-NSAIDs as anti-metastasis drugs. In this regard, we compared the effects of NONO-aspirin and a novel NONO-naproxen to those exerted by their respective parent NSAIDs on avidities of human melanoma M624 cells. Both NONO-NSAIDs, but not the corresponding parent NSAIDs, reduced M624 adhesion on vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by 20–30% and fibronectin by 25–44% under fluid flow conditions and static conditions, respectively. Only NONO-naproxen reduced (∼ 56%) the activity of β1 integrin, which binds to α4 integrin to form very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), the ligand of VCAM-1. These results indicate that the diazeniumdiolate (NO•)-donor moiety is critical for reducing the adhesion between VLA-4 and its ligands, while the NSAID moiety can impact the regulation mechanism of melanoma cell adhesion. -- Highlights: ► NONO-naproxen, a novel nitric oxide-releasing NSAID, was synthesized. ► NONO-NSAIDs, but not their parent NSAIDs, reduced melanoma adhesion. ► NONO-naproxen, but not NONO-aspirin and NSAIDs, reduced activity of β1 integrin.

  14. Apparent tolerance of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Whitehead, M.A.; Gasper, G.; Meteyer, C.U.; Link, W.A.; Taggart, M.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is extremely toxic to Old World Gyps vultures (median lethal dose 0.1?0.2 mg/kg), evoking visceral gout, renal necrosis, and mortality within a few days of exposure. Unintentional secondary poisoning of vultures that fed upon carcasses of diclofenac-treated livestock decimated populations in the Indian subcontinent. Because of the widespread use of diclofenac and other cyclooxygenase-2 inhibiting drugs, a toxicological study was undertaken in turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) as an initial step in examining sensitivity of New World scavenging birds. Two trials were conducted entailing oral gavage of diclofenac at doses ranging from 0.08 to 25 mg/kg body weight. Birds were observed for 7 d, blood samples were collected for plasma chemistry (predose and 12, 24, and 48 h and 7 d postdose), and select individuals were necropsied. Diclofenac failed to evoke overt signs of toxicity, visceral gout, renal necrosis, or elevate plasma uric acid at concentrations greater than 100 times the estimated median lethal dose reported for Gyps vultures. For turkey vultures receiving 8 or 25 mg/kg, the plasma half-life of diclofenac was estimated to be 6 h, and it was apparently cleared after several days as no residues were detectable in liver or kidney at necropsy. Differential sensitivity among avian species is a hallmark of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and despite the tolerance of turkey vultures to diclofenac, additional studies in related scavenging species seem warranted.

  15. Effects of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) on Melanoma Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huiwen; Mollica, Molly Y.; Lee, Shinhee; Wang, Lei; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-01-01

    A new class of nitric oxide (NO•)-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) were developed in recent years and have shown promising potential as NSAID substitutes due to their gentle nature on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Since nitric oxide plays a role in regulation of cell adhesion, we assessed the potential use of NONO-NSAIDs as anti-metastasis drugs. In this regard, we compared the effects of NONO-aspirin and a novel NONO-naproxen, to those exerted by their respective parent NSAIDs on avidities of human melanoma M624 cells. Both NONO-NSAIDs, but not the corresponding parent NSAIDs, reduced M624 adhesion on vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by 20-30% and fibronectin by 25-44% under fluid flow conditions and static conditions, respectively. Only NONO-naproxen reduced (~56%) the activity of β1 integrin, which binds to α4 integrin to form very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), the ligand of VCAM-1. These results indicate that the diazeniumdiolate (NO•)-donor moiety is critical for reducing the adhesion between VLA-4 and its ligands, while the NSAID moiety can impact the regulation mechanism of melanoma cell adhesion. PMID:22889880

  16. Provocation tests with the offending nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with urticaria/angioedema reactions.

    PubMed

    Zisa, Giuliana; Riccobono, Francesca; Bommarito, Luisa; D'Antonio, Cristian; Calamari, Ambra Marianna; Poppa, Mariangela; Moschella, Maria Adele; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The provocation test (PT) with the suspected drug represents the gold standard in the diagnosis of non-IgE hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Nevertheless, there is no consensus regarding the clinical management of suspected NSAID-sensitive patients. This study assessed if a PT with the suspected drug is a reliable and safe proceeding to confirm NSAID hypersensitivity in patients with a clinical history of urticaria/angioedema (Urt/AE). It also analyzed different patient characteristics (such as gender, age, atopy, dermographism, time interval between the last drug reaction, and number of previous NSAID reactions) in relation to PT positivity. One hundred fifty-nine patients with Urt/AE apparently related to assumption of one or more NSAIDs underwent PT with the suspected drugs. Moreover, to distinguish single/multiple NSAID reactivity in patients who did not tolerate the offending NSAID, another strong cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor PT was performed. PT was negative in 142/159 patients (89.31%), ruling out a diagnosis of NSAIDs hypersensitivity; 17/159 patients (10.69%) experienced a reaction of Urt/AE during the PT: 8 patients were diagnosed as single reactors to NSAIDs and 4 as multiple reactors to NSAIDs. Those with a history of multiple NSAID reactions and male patients were both more likely to have a positive PT. Our results suggest that in all patients with history of NSAID cutaneous reactions, the NSAID hypersensitivity should be confirmed by an oral PT and that the diagnostic proceeding can safely start with the offending NSAID. PMID:23026184

  17. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Siril, Prem Felix; Javid, Farideh

    2016-12-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. PMID:27612834

  18. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: The Role of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Usta, M; Urganci, N

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori infection in the aetiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in children. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight patients (82 girls, 106 boys; mean age 8.43 ± 5.24 years), admitted to the paediatric gastroenterology unit because of UGIB and who underwent endoscopic examination, were studied from their medical records, retrospectively. Results: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding was observed in 188 (8.29%) of 2266 patients. The mucosal causes related to the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum were found at the rate of 37%, 58% and 24.5%, respectively with endoscopic examination. The location of bleeding could not be determined in 14.4% of the patients. History of drug intake before admitting to hospital was present in 40 patients (21.3%). When we examined these forty patients, 35% were on acetylsalicylic acid, 47.5% were on ibuprofen and 17.5% were on NSAIDs. Ibuprofen versus acetylsalicylic acid usage was found to be highly significant (p < 0.05) for UGIB. Helicobacter pylori was found in 20.7% of the patients. The relationship between H pylori and UGIB was not found statistically significant (p > 0.05). The relationship between drug intake and presence of H pylori infection was not found significant in our patients (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Ibuprofen and acetylsalicyclic acid intake were found significant in the aetiology of UGIB in children. There was no significant connection with Helicobacter pylori infection in children with UGIB. We did not find a significant relationship with drug intake and H pylori infection. PMID:26360683

  19. Site-specific effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug lysine clonixinate on rat brain opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ortí, E; Coirini, H; Pico, J C

    1999-04-01

    In addition to effects in the periphery through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, several lines of evidence suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act in the central nervous system. The possibility that the central action of NSAIDs involves regulation of opioid receptors was investigated by quantitative autoradiography of mu, delta, and kappa sites in rat brain slices. Increased (p < 0.05) labeling of mu receptors was observed in thalamic nuclei, gyrus dentate, and layers of the parietal cortex of rats treated for 10 days with lysine clonixinate. Labeling of delta receptors was lower in the lateral septum, and kappa sites decreased in thalamic nuclei. These effects were not mediated through direct interaction with opioid-binding sites, since receptor-binding assays using rat brain membranes confirmed that clonixinate up to 1 x 10(-4) mol/l does not inhibit mu, delta, and kappa receptor specific binding. Central effects of NSAIDs might, therefore, involve interaction with the opioid receptor system through indirect mechanisms. PMID:10077738

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of imidazole-based polymers for the enrichment of selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Schemeth, Dieter; Kappacher, Christoph; Rainer, Matthias; Thalinger, Ramona; Bonn, Günther K

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the comparison of four manufactured imidazole-based copolymers and two commercially available hydrophilic sorbents for the solid phase extraction (SPE) of selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Different hydrophilic copolymers were obtained by a suspension polymerization using a styrene-based and a methacrylate-based cross-linker and by single step modifications for enhancing the ion-exchange character. SPE protocols were optimized for both non-modified and modified sorbents and applied for the enrichment of selected NSAID using all six copolymers. Comparison and evaluation were carried out by determining recovery rates of standard mixtures at different concentration levels ranging from 0.5mgL(-1) to 10mgL(-1) and by the enrichment of spiked human urine at two concentration levels. In order to gain insight into the complexity of the biological sample and its reduction after solid phase extraction, UHPLC-MS analysis and following database comparison was performed for the three mixed-mode strong anion-exchange sorbents. In order to prove the applicability of the modified imidazole-based polymers for the enrichment of NSAID in surface water, river water or groundwater, solid phase extraction was performed with 10ppb of NSAID which resulted into enhanced enrichment by a hundredfold. PMID:27130106

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of head and neck cancer: A case-control analysis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Claudia; Wilson, Jessica Claire; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2015-11-15

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) have been associated with a reduced risk for certain cancers. We explored the association between use of NSAIDs and the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC). We conducted a case-control analysis in the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) among people below the age of 90 years with incident HNC between 1995 and 2013. Six controls per case were matched on age, sex, calendar time, general practice, and number of years of active history in the CPRD prior to the HNC diagnosis. Other potential confounders including comorbidities and comedication were also evaluated, and we adjusted our final analyses for BMI, smoking and alcohol consumption. Our analyses included 2,745 HNC cases and 16,470 controls. Aspirin or NSAID use overall did not significantly change the HNC risk. However, patients with six or more prescriptions for ibuprofen were at a statistically significantly reduced risk for HNC (adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.37-0.94). The HNC risk tended to decrease with increasing cumulative exposure to ibuprofen, and to be more pronounced for cancer of the larynx. To conclude, in this large population-based observational study we found a decreased risk for HNC associated with regular use of ibuprofen. PMID:25974157

  2. Economic evaluation of gastric ulcer prophylaxis in patients with arthritis receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Knill-Jones, R.; Drummond, M.; Kohli, H.; Davies, L.

    1990-01-01

    This study assesses the economic benefits of misoprostol in the prophylaxis of gastric ulcers larger than 0.3 cm in patients with osteoarthritis receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Independent epidemiological data were obtained for patients in Scotland and the West Midlands. Co-diagnosis of arthritis with gastric ulcer recorded in the routine data was substantially less (4% Scotland, 10% West Midlands) than the 21% found at case review. These data were combined with cost and patient management data in a decision analysis model to explore whether prophylactic use of misoprostol altered substantially the average cost of managing gastric ulcer. Using conservative assumptions and a daily dose of 400 micrograms, cost savings per patient to the National Health Service of 5-8 pounds over a 3-month period are expected in the groups of patients studied, while at the 800 micrograms dose there would be a net cost of 23-25 pounds. Sensitivity analysis showed that under many assumptions misoprostol is expected to be cost saving or cost neutral. PMID:2120690

  3. Metronidazole reduces intestinal inflammation and blood loss in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Hayllar, J; Smethurst, P; Price, A; Gumpel, M J

    1992-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of metronidazole on the gastroduodenal mucosa, intestinal permeability, blood loss, and inflammation in patients on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Thirteen patients were studied before and after 2-12 weeks' treatment with metronidazole 800 mg/day, while maintaining an unchanged NSAID intake. Intestinal inflammation, as assessed by the faecal excretion of indium-111 labelled neutrophils, and blood loss, assessed with chromium-51 labelled red cells, were significantly reduced after treatment (mean (SD) 111In excretion 4.7 (4.7)% v 1.5 (1.3)% (N < 1.0%), p < 0.001, 51Cr red cells loss 2.6 (1.6) ml/day v 0.9 (0.5) ml/day (N < 1.0 ml/day), p < 0.01). Intestinal permeability assessed as the 5 hour urinary excretion ratio of 51CrEDTA/L-rhamnose did not change significantly (0.133 (0.046) v 0.154 (0.064), p > 0.1) and there were no significant changes in the endoscopic or microscopic appearances of the gastroduodenal mucosa. These results suggest that the neutrophil is the main damaging effector cell in NSAID induced enteropathy. The main neutrophil chemo-attractant in this enteropathy may be a metronidazole sensitive microbe. PMID:1427372

  4. Treatment of acute soft tissue trauma with a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (biphenylacetic acid 3% gel).

    PubMed

    Lee, E H; Lee, P Y; Ngai, A T; Chiu, E H

    1991-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be effective in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries. However, taken orally, NSAIDs have a definite incidence of gastro-intestinal toxicity. Since acute soft tissue trauma is normally localised, use of a topical NSAID may eliminate this undesirable side-effect. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a topical NSAID, biphenylacetic acid 3% gel (Traxam) in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Thirty-two patients (22 males and 10 females) with acute soft tissue trauma were enrolled at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, National University Hospital, Singapore from 7 June 1988 to 28 March 1989. Each patient was treated for a period of one week with bipenylacetic acid 3% gel (Traxam), 60 mg three times a day. Statistically significant improvement was found in pain, swelling and functional impairment in all patients assessed at day 3 and day 7 after the injury. The speed of recovery was enhanced. The medication was found to be well tolerated and safe. PMID:1776001

  5. Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Treatment Strategies of Gastrointestinal Diaphragm Disease Associated with Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Zhi; Sun, Gang; Cai, Feng-Chun; Yang, Yun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. To demonstrate the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug- (NSAID-) induced diaphragm disease (DD). Methods. A literature search between January 1973 and August 2015 was undertaken. The clinical data of patients with NSAID-induced DD were recorded and analyzed. Results. 159 patients were included. The ratio of male to female was 1 : 2.3; the mean age was 65 ± 11 years. The most common clinical manifestations were gastrointestinal bleeding and obstruction. 121 (84%) patients took traditional NSAIDs. The durations of NSAIDs use ranged from 2 to 300 months. A majority (59.7%) of DD were seen in the small bowel, were seen secondly in the colon (30.2%), and were mainly located in the ileum (57.9%) and right colon (91.7%), respectively. 80% of patients had multiple diaphragms. 41.5% of small bowel DD were diagnosed preoperatively by capsule endoscopy and/or double-balloon enteroscopy, 52.1% at laparotomy. Nearly 75% of patients underwent surgery, endoscopic balloon dilation was performed in 22 patients, and NSAIDs were withdrawn in 53 patients. Conclusions. NSAID-induced DD is relatively rare. The small bowel is most commonly involved. Preoperative diagnosis of small bowel DD is relatively difficult. Discontinuation of the NSAIDs is recommended, surgical resection is the main treatment presently, and endoscopic balloon dilation should be considered as an alternative therapy. PMID:27118967

  6. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, prevents indometacin-induced gastric damage via inhibition of neutrophil functions.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Yoshiro; Okamoto, Masayuki; Yokochi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyachi, Atsushi; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2003-02-01

    Nabumetone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works as a prodrug and is extensively metabolized to an active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA). It is well known that neutrophil infiltration and activation are critical in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric injury, and nabumetone shows less incidence of gastrointestinal irritancy. We examined the effects of nabumetone on neutrophil activation and on indometacin-induced gastric damage. In the indometacin-induced gastric mucosal injury, rats were treated with indometacin and then nabumetone or 6MNA was orally administered. Nabumetone prevented gastric damage accompanied by the reduction of neutrophil infiltration into gastric mucosa, but such an effect was not observed with 6MNA. Nabumetone reduced the formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils to 30% of the control level in-vitro, but 6MNA did not. In addition, nabumetone prevented the fMLP-induced migration of neutrophils. Nabumetone did not inhibit O2- generation in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. These results suggest that nabumetone prevents gastric damage induced by the active metabolite, 6MNA, via the suppression of neutrophil activation in gastric mucosa. PMID:12635655

  7. Counter-flow electrokinetic supercharging for the determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water samples.

    PubMed

    Dawod, Mohamed; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Haddad, Paul R

    2009-04-10

    Electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) has been used in the last few years as a powerful tool for separation and on-line preconcentration of different types of analytes. We have developed a valuable modification for EKS system, namely counter-flow EKS (CF-EKS) and applied it for the separation and on-line preconcentration of seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water samples. In CF-EKS, a hydrodynamic counter-flow is applied during electrokinetic injection of the analytes within the EKS system. This counter-flow minimises the introduction of the sample matrix into the capillary, allowing longer injections to be performed. Careful choice of the optimum counter-flow as well as the optimum injection voltage allowed the sensitivity to be enhanced by 11,800-fold, giving limits of detection (LODs) of 10.7-47.0 ng/L for the selected NSAIDs. The developed method was validated and then applied for the determination of the studied NSAIDs in drinking water as well as wastewater samples from Hobart city. PMID:19251261

  8. Exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy and risk of miscarriage: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Kun; Liu, Liyan; Odouli, Roxana

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether prenatal use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with increased risk of miscarriage. Design Population based cohort study. Prenatal use of NSAIDs, aspirin, and paracetamol (acetaminophen) ascertained by in-person interview. Setting Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, a healthcare delivery system, in the San Francisco area of the United States. Participants 1055 pregnant women recruited and interviewed immediately after their positive pregnancy test. Median gestational age at entry to the study was 40 days. Main outcome measures Pregnancy outcomes up to 20 weeks of gestation. Results 53 women (5%) reported prenatal NSAID use around conception or during pregnancy. After adjustment for potential confounders, prenatal NSAID use was associated with an 80% increased risk of miscarriage (adjusted hazard ratio 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.0 to 3.2)). The association was stronger if the initial NSAID use was around the time of conception or if NSAID use lasted more than a week. Prenatal aspirin use was similarly associated with an increased risk of miscarriage. However, prenatal use of paracetamol, pharmacologically different from NSAIDs and aspirin, was not associated with increased risk of miscarriage regardless of timing and duration of use. Conclusion Prenatal use of NSAIDs and aspirin increased the risk of miscarriage. These findings need confirmation in studies designed specifically to examine the apparent association. PMID:12919986

  9. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe–Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe–Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic–aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  10. Induction of Apoptosis and Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug-Activated Gene 1 in Pancreatic Cancer Cells By A Glycyrrhetinic Acid Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Papineni, Sabitha; Safe, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18β-olean-1,12-dien-30-oate (CDODA-Me) is a synthetic triterpenoid derived from glycyrrhetinic acid, a bioactive phytochemical in licorice, CDODA-Me inhibits growth of Panc1 and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cell lines and activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-dependent transactivation in these cells. CDODA-Me also induced p21 and p27 protein expression and downregulates cyclin D1; however, these responses were receptor-independent. CDODA-Me induced apoptosis in Panc1 and Panc28 cells, and this was accompanied by receptor-independent induction of the proapoptotic proteins early growth response-1 (Egr-1), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene-1 (NAG-1), and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3). Induction of NAG-1 and Egr-1 by CDODA-Me was dependent on activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3-K) and/or p42 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways but there were differences between Panc28 and Panc1 cells. Induction of NAG-1 in Panc28 cells was p38-MAPK- and PI3-K-dependent but Egr-1-independent, whereas induction in Panc1 cells was associated with activation of p38-MAPK, PI3-K and p42-MAPK and was only partially Egr-1-dependent. This is the first report of the induction of the proapoptotic protein NAG-1 in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:19125423

  11. Removal of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and ketoprofen from water by emulsion liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Dâas, Attef; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the removal of the worldwide non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen (IBP) and ketoprofen (KTP) by emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was carried out. An ELM system is made up of hexane as diluent, Span 80 as the surfactant and sodium carbonate as the inner aqueous solution. Effect of experimental conditions that affect the extraction of IBP such as surfactant concentration, emulsification time, sulfuric acid concentration in external phase, acid type in external phase, internal phase concentration, type of internal phase, stirring speed, volume ratio of internal phase to membrane phase, treatment ratio, IBP initial concentration, diluent type and salt was investigated. The obtained results showed that by appropriate selection of the operational parameters, it was possible to extract nearly all of IBP molecules from the feed solution even in the presence of high concentration of salt. Under optimum operating conditions, the efficiencies of IBP removal from distilled water (99.3 %), natural mineral water (97.3 %) and sea water (94.0 %) were comparable, which shows that the ELM treatment process represents a very interesting advanced separation process for the removal of IBP from complex matrices such as natural and sea waters. Under the optimized experimental conditions, approximately 97.4 % KTP was removed in less than 20 min of contact time. PMID:24037298

  12. Biophysical study of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac with phosphatidylserine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Heinbockel, Lena; Suwalsky, Mario; Garidel, Patrick; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) represent an effective pain treatment option and therefore one of the most sold therapeutic agents worldwide. The study of the molecular interactions responsible for their physiological activity, but also for their side effects, is therefore important. This report presents data on the interaction of the most consumed NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac) with one main phospholipid in eukaryotic cells, dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS). The applied techniques are Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), with which in transmission the gel to liquid crystalline phase transition of the acyl chains in the absence and presence of the NSAID are monitored, supplemented by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data on the phase transition. FTIR in reflection (ATR, attenuated total reflectance) is applied to record the dependence of the interactions of the NSAID with particular functional groups observed in the DMPS spectrum such as the ester carbonyl and phosphate vibrational bands. With Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) a possible intercalation of the NSAID into the DMPS liposomes and with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) the thermodynamics of the interaction are monitored. The data show that the NSAID react in a particular way with this lipid, but in some parameters the three NSAID clearly differ, with which now a clear picture of the interaction processes is possible. PMID:27316371

  13. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on bone turnover: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos-George; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2013-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used for acute and chronic pain control and treatment of inflammation, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. NSAIDs have been shown to inhibit bone healing in animal studies due to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. However, little evidence exists regarding the effect of NSAID exposure on human bone metabolism. This systematic review summarizes the current literature of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating NSAIDs with bone remodeling-related outcomes in humans. After performing computerized searches in the most widely indexed databases, study selection, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment were conducted in duplicate. The results were controversial regarding the association of NSAID with bone formation or resorption. Increased bone mineral density following NSAID exposure was reported by some studies. Based on the levels of biochemical markers, no effect was seen on bone formation, while some evidence was found for a decreased rate of bone resorption in NSAID patients. Trials investigating the effects of NSAID treatment on bone metabolism outcomes of human patients are limited. Further research is required to confirm or refute the findings of this systematic review. PMID:23016823

  14. Treatment of persistent mating-induced endometritis in mares with the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug vedaprofen.

    PubMed

    Rojer, H; Aurich, C

    2010-12-01

    Recently, successful treatment of mares with a history of persistent mating-induced endometritis (PMIE) with dexamethasone has been reported. As systemic treatment of horses with glucocorticoids should be handled with caution, we tested the hypothesis that treatment with the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) vedaprofen, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, may have comparative, positive effects on fertility. Barren mares with a history of repeated PMIE were treated with vedaprofen (n = 8; initially 2 mg/kg bodyweight followed by 1 mg/kg orally twice daily) from 1 day before the first insemination to 1 day after ovulation or left untreated (n = 9). All mares received oxytocin (20 I.E. s.c.) thrice daily. Uterine swabs were collected for bacteriology and cytology. The day after ovulation, fluid accumulation was detected in three control mares and four treated mares (n.s.). The percentage of neutrophils in uterine cytology was significantly increased in comparison to the day before ovulation irrespective of treatment. Pregnancy was confirmed in two of nine mares in the control group and seven of eight mares in the treatment group (p < 0.05). NSAIDs may positively affect fertility in mares with a history of PMIE. PMID:20074320

  15. [Induction of NAG-1 gene expression in colon cancer cells by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhui; Ouyang, Qin; Tang, Chengwei; Liu, Rui; Huang, Minghui

    2007-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and NAG-1 gene expression effected by Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) on colon cancer cell lines in vitro. The proliferation of colon cancer cells were determined by MTT assay and COX-2 protein expression were detected by Western blot. Total RNA was isolated from three kinds of colon cancer cell lines; the expressions of NAG-1 mRNA in the cells treated with or without NSAIDs were assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Celecoxib, meloxicam and aspirin were able to inhibit the growth of HT-29, SW480 and LS174-T cells in dose-dependent manner. COX-2 protein expressed in HT-29 and LS174-T, but not in SW480 cells. All of colon cancer cells expressed NAG-1 gene and the level of LS174-T was lower than that of the other two cell lines. NAG-1 expression was increased by treatment with some NSAIDs in all three kinds of colon cancer cells. NSAIDs were able to potentially inhibit the growth of colon cell lines. Induction of NAG-1 gene expression by NSAID was not consistent with COX-2 expression. PMID:17899765

  16. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe-Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe-Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic-aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  17. Effect of N-Phenylanthranilic Acid Scaffold Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs on the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition.

    PubMed

    Tatematsu, Yohei; Hayashi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Ryo; Fujita, Haruhi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ohkura, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a known side effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In the present study, the effects of N-phenylanthranilic acid (NPA) scaffold NSAIDs on rat liver mitochondria were examined. Mefenamic acid (MEF, 200 µM) induced mitochondrial swelling, which was inorganic phosphate (Pi)-dependent and suppressed by cyclosporin A (CsA, 2.5 µM), similar to calcium-induced swelling. Mitochondrial swelling was also observed following the addition of 200 µM flufenamic acid (FLU), meclofenamic acid (MCL), and tolfenamic acid (TOL). Less swelling was observed with the addition of 200 µM diclofenac (DIC) or NPA. Diphenylamine (DPA)-induced swelling occurred in a Pi-independent manner and was not sensitive to CsA. The mechanism by which DPA interacted with the mitochondrial inner membrane differed from those of the other NPA scaffold NSAIDs. The addition of 50 µM MEF, MCL, TOL, and FLU had uncoupling effects in mitochondrial inner membrane. These NSAIDs dose-dependently obstructed electron transport in the respiratory chain. NSAIDs are known to have various dynamic structures, and the solvation free energies (dGWs: an index of stereo-hydrophobicity) of the conformers obtained were determined using a molecular orbital analysis. The relationship between the dynamic structures and swelling induced by NPA scaffold NSAIDs was also examined. PMID:26830486

  18. Impact of discontinuing non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs on long-term recurrence in colonic diverticular bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Aoki, Tomonori; Shimbo, Takuro; Sekine, Katsunori; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Akiyama, Junichi; Yanase, Mikio; Mizokami, Masashi; Uemura, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of discontinuing non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on recurrence in long-term follow-up patients with colonic diverticular bleeding (CDB). METHODS: A cohort of 132 patients hospitalized for CDB examined by colonoscopy was prospectively enrolled. Comorbidities, lifestyle, and medications (NSAIDs, low-dose aspirin, antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, acetaminophen, and corticosteroids) were assessed. After discharge, patients were requested to visit the hospital on scheduled days during the follow-up period. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate recurrence. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 15 mo. The probability of recurrence at 1, 6, 12, and 24 mo was 3.1%, 19%, 27%, and 38%, respectively. Of the 41 NSAID users on admission, 26 (63%) discontinued NSAID use at discharge. Many of the patients who could discontinue NSAIDs were intermittent users, and could be switched to alternative therapies, such as acetaminophen or an antiinflammatory analgesic plaster. The probability of recurrence at 12 mo was 9.4% in discontinuing NSAID users compared with 77% in continuing users (P < 0.01, log-rank test). The hazard ratio for recurrence in the discontinuing NSAIDs users was 0.06 after adjusting for age > 70 years, right-sided diverticula, history of hypertension, and hemodialysis. No patients developed cerebrocardiovascular events during follow-up. CONCLUSION: There is a substantial recurrence rate after discharge among patients hospitalized for diverticular bleeding. Discontinuation of NSAIDs is an effective preventive measure against recurrence. This study provides new information on risk reduction strategies for diverticular bleeding. PMID:25632204

  19. Effects of intrathecal or intracerebroventricular administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on a C-fiber reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, D; Paeile, C; Willer, J C; Le Bars, D

    1997-06-01

    A C-fiber reflex elicited by electrical stimulation within the territory of the sural nerve was recorded from the ipsilateral biceps femoris muscle in anesthetized rats. The temporal evolution of the response was studied using a constant stimulus intensity (3 times threshold), and recruitment curves were built by varying the stimulus intensity from 0 to 7 times threshold. The intrathecal (i.t.) but not i.c.v. administration of aspirin, indomethacin, ketoprofen and lysine clonixinate resulted in dose-dependent depressions of the C-fiber reflex. In contrast, saline was ineffective. Regardless of the route of administration, the drugs never produced disturbances in heart rate and/or acid-base equilibrium. When a constant level of stimulation was used, 500 microg of aspirin i.t. induced a blockade of the reflex immediately after the injection, followed by a partial recovery. Indomethacin produced a stable depression, which reached 80 to 90% with an i.t. dose of 500 microg. Ketoprofen and lysine clonixinate produced a more stable effect; the highest doses (500 microg) produced a steady-state depression of approximately 50% for approximately 30 min. When the recruitment curves were built with a range of nociceptive stimulus intensities, all of the drugs except for indomethacin produced a dose-dependent decrease in the slopes and the areas under the recruitment curves without major modifications in the thresholds; indomethacin also induced a significant dose-related increase in the threshold. The orders of potency for both stimulation paradigms with the i.t. route were the same, namely aspirin > indomethacin > lysine clonixinate > or = ketoprofen. It is concluded that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs elicit significant antinociceptive effects at a spinal level, which do not depend on the existence of a hyperalgesic or inflammatory state. Such effects were not seen after injections within the lateral ventricle. PMID:9190874

  20. The Diamine Oxidase Gene Is Associated with Hypersensitivity Response to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Ayuso, Pedro; Cornejo-García, José A.; Blanca, Miguel; Torres, María J.; Doña, Inmaculada; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Canto, Gabriela; Rondon, Carmen; Campo, Paloma; Laguna, José J.; Fernández, Javier; Martínez, Carmen; García-Martín, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the drugs most frequently involved in hypersensitivity drug reactions. Histamine is released in the allergic response to NSAIDs and is responsible for some of the clinical symptoms. The aim of this study is to analyze clinical association of functional polymorphisms in the genes coding for enzymes involved in histamine homeostasis with hypersensitivity response to NSAIDs. We studied a cohort of 442 unrelated Caucasian patients with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs. Patients who experienced three or more episodes with two or more different NSAIDs were included. If this requirement was not met diagnosis was established by challenge. A total of 414 healthy unrelated controls ethnically matched with patients and from the same geographic area were recruited. Analyses of the SNPs rs17740607, rs2073440, rs1801105, rs2052129, rs10156191, rs1049742 and rs1049793 in the HDC, HNMT and DAO genes were carried out by means of TaqMan assays. The detrimental DAO 16 Met allele (rs10156191), which causes decreased metabolic capacity, is overrepresented among patients with crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with an OR  = 1.7 (95% CI  = 1.3–2.1; Pc  = 0.0003) with a gene-dose effect (P = 0.0001). The association was replicated in two populations from different geographic areas (Pc  = 0.008 and Pc  = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions and implications The DAO polymorphism rs10156191 which causes impaired metabolism of circulating histamine is associated with the clinical response in crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs and could be used as a biomarker of response. PMID:23152756

  1. The Prescription Pattern of Acetaminophen and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Tae; Heo, Jeong; Woo, Hyun Young; Lim, Won; An, Dae Seong; Han, Jun Hee; Cho, Mong

    2016-10-01

    Analgesics, known to be hepatotoxic drugs, are frequently prescribed to patients with liver cirrhosis who are prone to drug-induced liver injury. No guidelines are available regarding the prescription of analgesics in these patients. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the prescription pattern of most frequently used analgesics in patients with cirrhosis. We assessed the prescription pattern of acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with liver cirrhosis registered in Health Insurance Review Assessment Service database between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. A total of 125,505 patients with liver cirrhosis were registered from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Of that group, 50,798 (40.5%) patients claimed reimbursement for at least one prescription for acetaminophen or NSAIDs during the one year follow-up period. Overall, NSAIDs (82.7%) were more prescribed than acetaminophen (64.5%). NSAIDs were more prescribed than acetaminophen even in decompensated cirrhosis compared with compensated cirrhosis (71.5% vs. 68.8%, P value < 0.001). There was a marked difference in prescription preference between acetaminophen and NSAIDs among physicians. Internists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen than NSAIDs compared to other physicians (50.9% vs. 76.2%, P < 0.001). Gastroenterologists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen over NSAIDs compared to other internists (80.9% vs. 51.2%, P < 0.001). Analgesics were prescribed in 40.5% of patients with cirrhosis. NSAIDs were more frequently prescribed although they should be avoided. The prescription pattern of analgesics were different significantly among physicians in patients with liver cirrhosis. The harmful effects of NSAIDs in patients with cirrhosis should be reminded to all physicians prescribing analgesics. PMID:27550489

  2. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cancer Death in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Veitonmäki, Thea; Murtola, Teemu J.; Talala, Kirsi; Taari, Kimmo; Tammela, Teuvo; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially aspirin, have been associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality. We examined overall cancer mortality and mortality from specific cancer sites among the 80,144 men in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial. Information on prescription drug use was acquired from the national drug reimbursement database. Over-the-counter use information was gathered by a questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by prescription and over-the-counter NSAID use for overall and specific cancer deaths were calculated using Cox regression. During the median follow-up time of 15 years, 7,008 men died from cancer. Men with prescription NSAID use had elevated cancer mortality (HR 2.02 95% CI 1.91–2.15) compared to non-users. The mortality risk was increased for lung, colorectal and pancreas cancer mortality (HR 2.68, 95%CI 2.40–2.99, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.57–2.32 and HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.58–2.37, respectively). The increased risk remained in competing risks regression (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05–1.18). When the usage during the last three years of follow-up was excluded, the effect was reversed (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65–0.73). Cancer mortality was not decreased for prescription or over-the-counter aspirin use. However, in the competing risk regression analysis combined prescription and over-the-counter aspirin use was associated with decreased overall cancer mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70–0.82). Cancer mortality was increased for NSAID users. However, the risk disappeared when the last 3 years were excluded. PMID:27100876

  3. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cancer Death in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Veitonmäki, Thea; Murtola, Teemu J; Talala, Kirsi; Taari, Kimmo; Tammela, Teuvo; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially aspirin, have been associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality. We examined overall cancer mortality and mortality from specific cancer sites among the 80,144 men in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial. Information on prescription drug use was acquired from the national drug reimbursement database. Over-the-counter use information was gathered by a questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by prescription and over-the-counter NSAID use for overall and specific cancer deaths were calculated using Cox regression. During the median follow-up time of 15 years, 7,008 men died from cancer. Men with prescription NSAID use had elevated cancer mortality (HR 2.02 95% CI 1.91-2.15) compared to non-users. The mortality risk was increased for lung, colorectal and pancreas cancer mortality (HR 2.68, 95%CI 2.40-2.99, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.57-2.32 and HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.58-2.37, respectively). The increased risk remained in competing risks regression (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18). When the usage during the last three years of follow-up was excluded, the effect was reversed (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.73). Cancer mortality was not decreased for prescription or over-the-counter aspirin use. However, in the competing risk regression analysis combined prescription and over-the-counter aspirin use was associated with decreased overall cancer mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70-0.82). Cancer mortality was increased for NSAID users. However, the risk disappeared when the last 3 years were excluded. PMID:27100876

  4. [Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate, in experimental animals].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Imazu, C; Ishii, K; Yokoyama, Y; Seto, Y; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities of orally administered etofenamate, the diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, were investigated in experimental animals. Against acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice and ultra-violet light-induced erythema in guinea pigs, etofenamate produced a dose related inhibition at doses of 40--320 mg/kg and 5--20 mg/kg, respectively. In rats, felt-pellet-induced granuloma formation and adjuvant-induced arthritis were significantly inhibited by repeated administration of etofenamate at doses of 20 mg/kg/day for 5 days and 40 mg/kg/day for 21 days, respectively. Etofenamate showed an inhibitory activity on the squeak response caused by flexing and extending the silver nitrate-induced arthritic joint in rats; and it produced a dose related anti-writhing activity at doses of 50--300 mg/kg and 10--80 mg/kg in mice and rats, respectively, in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Etofenamate showed a significant anti-pyretic activity at doses of 0.2 mg/kg or more. These potencies of etofenamate were 0.5 to 1.6 times those of flufenamic acid. In particular, the anti-erythema, anti-arthritis, and anti-pyretic activities of etofenamate were approximately equivalent to or superior to those of flufenamic acid. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate given orally, like other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities in experimental animals. PMID:6983482

  5. Drug interactions between antihypertensive drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents: a descriptive study using the French Pharmacovigilance database.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jean-Pascal; Sommet, Agnès; Durrieu, Geneviève; Poutrain, Jean-Christophe; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between antihypertensive drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can lead to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Guidelines are available to help prescribers deal with these drug associations, but their implementation is not well evaluated. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of NSAIDs exposure in patients treated with antihypertensive drugs, using the French Pharmacovigilance database, and explore the ADRs related to DDIs between antihypertensive drugs and NSAIDs. Over the 11, 442 notifications of ADRs recorded in this database in patients treated with oral antihypertensive drugs between 2008 and 2010, 517 (4.5 and 95% CI: 4.1-4.9) also included exposure to NSAIDs. These subjects were more frequently women, took more drugs in general, and were younger and less frequently treated with antiplatelet drugs. In 24.2% of them (125 patients), a DDI between NSAIDs and antihypertensive drugs was potentially the cause of the reported ADR. Acute renal failure caused by DDIs between NSAIDs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), or diuretics was the most frequently reported ADR (20.7%). Finally, in the French Pharmacovigilance database, around one-fourth of associations NSAIDs  +  antihypertensive drugs are associated with a 'serious' ADR (mainly acute renal failure), suggesting that this well-known DDI is not enough taken into account by prescribers. PMID:23190210

  6. Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors use in Australia and Nova Scotia (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Sketris, Ingrid; Cooke, Charmaine; Tett, Susan

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors were marketed aggressively and their rapid uptake caused safety concerns and budgetary challenges in Canada and Australia. The objectives of this study were to compare and contrast COX-2 inhibitors and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ns-NSAID) use in Nova Scotia (Canada) and Australia and to identify lessons learned from the two jurisdictions. METHODS Ns-NSAID and COX-2 inhibitor Australian prescription data (concession beneficiaries) were downloaded from the Medicare Australia website (2001–2006). Similar Pharmacare data were obtained for Nova Scotia (seniors and those receiving Community services). Defined daily doses per 1000 beneficiaries day−1 were calculated. COX-2 inhibitors/all NSAIDs ratios were calculated for Australia and Nova Scotia. Ns-NSAIDs were divided into low, moderate and high risk for gastrointestinal side-effects and the proportions of use in each group were determined. Which drugs accounted for 90% of use was also calculated. RESULTS Overall NSAID use was different in Australia and Nova Scotia. However, ns-NSAID use was similar. COX-2 inhibitor dispensing was higher in Australia. The percentage of COX-2 inhibitor prescriptions over the total NSAID use was different in the two countries. High-risk NSAID use was much higher in Australia. Low-risk NSAID prescribing increased in Nova Scotia over time. The low-risk/high-risk ratio was constant throughout over the period in Australia and increased in Nova Scotia. CONCLUSIONS There are significant differences in Australia and Nova Scotia in use of NSAIDs, mainly due to COX-2 prescribing. Nova Scotia has a higher proportion of low-risk NSAID use. Interventions to provide physicians with information on relative benefits and risks of prescribing specific NSAIDs are needed, including determining their impact. PMID:19660008

  7. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of pain due to soft tissue injury: diclofenac epolamine topical patch

    PubMed Central

    Lionberger, David R; Brennan, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review published clinical data on diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP) in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries, such as strains, sprains, and contusions. Review of published literature on topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac, and DETP in patients with acute soft tissue injuries was included. Relevant literature was identified on MEDLINE using the search terms topical NSAIDs, diclofenac, diclofenac epolamine, acute pain, sports injury, soft tissue injury, strain, sprain, and contusion, and from citations in retrieved articles covering the years 1978–2008. Review of published, randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses shows that topical NSAIDs are significantly more effective than placebo in relieving acute pain; the pooled average relative benefit was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.5–1.9). In a limited number of comparisons, topical and oral NSAIDs provided comparable pain relief, but the use of topical agents produced lower plasma drug concentrations and fewer systemic adverse events (AEs). The physical–chemical properties of diclofenac epolamine make it well suited for topical use. In patients with acute soft tissue injuries treated with DETP, clinical data report an analgesic benefit within hours of the first application, and significant pain relief relative to placebo within 3 days. Moreover, DETP displayed tolerability comparable with placebo; the most common AEs were pruritus and other application site reactions. Review of published literature suggests that DETP is generally safe and well tolerated, clinically efficacious, and a rational treatment option for patients experiencing acute pain associated with strains, sprains, and contusions, and other localized painful conditions. PMID:21197326

  8. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician’s understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  9. Effect of different antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the growth of Lactobacillus casei Shirota.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Serna, Alaíde; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) could cause inhibition of the growth of Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) or whether this microorganism is able to use some of them as the sole carbon source, considering that the simultaneous consumption of NSAIDs and a dairy drink fermented with LcS could help to prevent the appearance or improve the healing of gastric ulcers. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), sodium acetylsalicylate (SAS), acetaminophen, sodium naproxen, and sodium ibuprofen were added as the sole carbon source to a basal medium and tested for biodegradation by LcS. The same NSAIDs were added in different concentrations to disks and plated on MRS Agar to test the possible inhibitory effect of these compounds on LcS. Also, the resistance of LcS to 12 different antibiotics was studied on MRS agar. None of the NSAIDs tested could be used by LcS as the sole carbon source at the assayed concentrations. In the case of the disk diffusion method, sodium naproxen showed inhibition zones for the 500-μg disks and sodium ibuprofen was inhibitory for the 250- and 500-μg disks. However, when the macrobroth dilution method was used, the growth of LcS was inhibited by ASA, SAS, acetaminophen, and sodium ibuprofen. This strain showed resistance to the antibiotics sulfamethoxazole with trimethoprim, pefloxacin, and gentamicin. This is the first study on the effect of NSAIDs on probiotic bacteria. The results of the biodegradation test indicate that the simultaneous consumption of NSAIDs and a dairy beverage with LcS is not likely to change the bioavailability of the drugs. PMID:21104082

  10. Usage patterns of ‘over-the-counter’ vs. prescription-strength nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in France

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Mai; Salvo, Francesco; Pariente, Antoine; Abouelfath, Abdelilah; Lassalle, Regis; Droz, Cecile; Blin, Patrick; Moore, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Aims Most risks of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are pharmacological, dose and duration dependent. Usage patterns of prescription-only (POM) or ‘over-the-counter (OTC)’ NSAIDs may influence risks, but are not commonly described. Methods The Echantillon Généraliste de Bénéficiaires database, the permanent 1/97 representative sample from the French national healthcare insurance systems, was queried over 2009–2010 to identify usage patterns, concomitant chronic diseases and cardiovascular medication in OTC and POM NSAID users. Results Over 2 years, 229 477 of 526 108 patients had at least one NSAID dispensation; 44 484 patients (19%) were dispensed only OTC NSAIDs (93% ibuprofen) and 121 208 (53%) only POM NSAIDs. The OTC users were younger (39.9 vs. 47.4 years old) and more often female (57 vs. 53%); 69% of OTC users and 49% of POM users had only one dispensation. A mean of 14.6 defined daily doses (DDD) were dispensed over 2 years for OTC vs. 53 for POM; 93% OTC vs. 60% POM patients bought ≤ 30 DDD over 2 years, and 1.5 vs. 12% bought ≥ 90 DDD. Chronic comorbidities were found in 19% of OTC users vs. 28% of POM users; 24 vs. 37% had at least one dispensation of a cardiovascular drug over the 2 years. Conclusions Most of the use of NSAIDs appears to be short term, especially for OTC-type NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen. The validity of risk estimates for NSAIDs extrapolated from clinical trials or from observational studies not including OTC-type usage may need to be revised. PMID:24102791

  11. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician's understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  12. Are altered pharmacokinetics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, H A; Long, A; Nicholson, E; Ward, A; Keir, D

    1998-01-01

    Aims We hypothesised that pharmacokinetic factors might go some way to explaining the risk of major gastrointestinal haemorrhage with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with bleeders exhibiting a reduced clearance of NSAIDs compared with non-bleeders and set out to investigate this. Methods Fifty patients presenting to hospital with acute gastrointestinal bleeding while taking piroxicam, indomethacin, diclofenac or naproxen and age, sex, musculoskeletal disease and drug matched community dwelling controls, up to two for each index case, who had not bled were recruited. Clinical details including duration of therapy were recorded. Bleeders discontinued the implicated NSAID at presentation, controls at least five half-lives before the study. Bleeders were contacted by letter 1 month after discharge and invited to take part and were studied after a median delay of 5 months. Subjects received an oral dose of their respective NSAID and venous blood was sampled, over a period determined by the half-life of the NSAID. Plasma concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results The median length of treatment for the index patients was 1 year (range 2 weeks—28 years) and for the control patients 2 years (1 month—25 years), P<0.0005. There were no significant differences in peak plasma concentration, time to peak plasma concentration or area under the plasma concentration-time curve between bleeders or controls for any of the NSAIDs studied, apart from piroxicam Cmax being lower in bleeders at 2.07 mg l−1 than in controls at 3.21 mg l−1, mean difference (95% CI) −1.14 (−1.83–−0.48), P<0.005. Conclusions The data failed to support the hypothesis that reduced clearance of NSAIDs, which results in higher plasma concentrations, is a risk factor for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. PMID:9578191

  13. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for exercise-induced muscle damage: implications for skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2012-12-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is a common condition resulting from a bout of vigorous exercise, particularly if the individual is unaccustomed to performance of the given movement. Symptoms of EIMD include delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and a loss of physical function. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed post-exercise to alleviate these symptoms and restore normal physical function. Of potential concern for those who use NSAIDs to treat EIMD is the possibility that they may impair the adaptive response to exercise. Specifically, there is emerging evidence that the action of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes, and COX-2 in particular, are important and even necessary to achieve maximal skeletal muscle hypertrophy in response to functional overload. Given that NSAIDs exert their actions by blocking COX and thus suppressing prostaglandin production, a theoretical rationale exists whereby these drugs may have detrimental effects on muscle regeneration and supercompensation. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to extensively review the literature and evaluate the effects of NSAIDs on muscle growth and development. Based on current evidence, there is little reason to believe that the occasional use of NSAIDs will negatively affect muscle growth, although the efficacy for their use in alleviating inflammatory symptoms remains questionable. Evidence on the hypertrophic effects of the chronic use of NSAIDs is less clear. In those who are untrained, it does not appear that regular NSAID use will impede growth in the short term, and at least one study indicates that it may in fact have a positive impact. Given their reported impairment of satellite cell activity, however, longer-term NSAID use may well be detrimental, particularly in those who possess greater growth potential. PMID:23013520

  14. [Effect of protracted therapy with chondroprotectors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the quality of life in patients with osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Maĭko, O Iu; Bagirova, G G

    2009-01-01

    Dynamics of clinical parameters and quality of life (QL) was evaluated in 281 patients with knee and hip osteoarthrosis (OA) during long-term treatment of different duration. The group was dominated by women (71%) aged 41-65 yr with grade I-III OA according to Kellgren. Patients of groups I and II received only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, nize), those of groups III-IV the same drugs in combination with structum, chondrolon, and zeel T respectively. Clinical parameters were assessed based on VAS at rest and in motion, Leken's indices, and WOMAC, QL from SF-36 questionnaire. Variable clinical course was recorded in patients treated with non-steroidal drugs alone that caused rapid improvement after the very first treatment sessions followed by deterioration of the patients' condition. Addition of structum resulted in marked optimization of clinical and QL parameters within 3 months after the onset of combined therapy. Similar effect was obtained using chondrolon and zeel T, but 2-3 clinical parameters and 3 QL parameters were not significantly different from the initial ones after 12 and 24 months of therapy. It is concluded that structum produced the best therapeutic effect followed by chondrolon and zeel T. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs had no beneficial action whatever in patients with OA. PMID:19514322

  15. Pharmacological treatment of spondyloarthritis: exploring the effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological therapies

    PubMed Central

    Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Del Puente, Antonio; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Lupoli, Gelsy; Scarpa, Raffaele; Peluso, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis represents a heterogeneous group of articular inflammatory diseases that share common genetic, clinical and radiological features. The therapy target of spondyloarthritis relies mainly in improving patients’ quality of life, controlling articular inflammation, preventing the structural joints damage and preserving the functional abilities, autonomy and social participation of patients. Among these, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have been demonstrated to be effective in the management of peripheral arthritis; moreover, in the last decade, biological therapies have improved the approach to spondyloarthritis. In patients with axial spondyloarthritis, tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors are currently the only effective therapy in patients for whom conventional therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has failed. The aim of this review is to summarize the current experience and evidence about the pharmacological approach in spondyloarthritis patients. PMID:26568809

  16. Deep Tissue Massage and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Low Back Pain: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kocur, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether chronic low back pain therapy with deep tissue massage (DTM) gives similar results to combined therapy consisting of DTM and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Design. Prospective controlled randomized single blinded trial. Settings. Ambulatory care of rehabilitation. Participants. 59 patients, age 51.8 ± 9.0 years, with chronic low back pain. Interventions. 2 weeks of DTM in the treatment group (TG) versus 2 weeks of DTM combined with NSAID in the control group (CG). Main Outcome Measures. Visual analogue scale, Oswestry disability index (ODI), and Roland-Morris questionnaire (RM). Results. In both the TG and the CG, a significant pain reduction and function improvement were observed. VAS decreased from 58.3 ± 18.2 to 42.2 ± 21.1 (TG) and from 51.8 ± 18.8 to 30.6 ± 21.9 (CG). RM value decreased from 9.8 ± 5.1 to 6.4 ± 4.4 (TG), and from 9.3 ± 5.5 to 6.1 ± 4.6 (CG). ODI value decreased from 29.2 ± 17.3 to 21.4 ± 15.1 (TG) and from 21.4 ± 9.4 to 16.6 ± 9.4 (CG). All pre-post-treatment differences were significant; however, there was no significant difference between the TG and the CG. Conclusion. DTM had a positive effect on reducing pain in patients with chronic low back pain. Concurrent use of DTM and NSAID contributed to low back pain reduction in a similar degree that the DTM did. PMID:24707200

  17. Distal bowel selectivity in the chemoprevention of experimental colon carcinogenesis by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Roy, H K; Karolski, W J; Ratashak, A

    2001-05-15

    Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chemoprevention of colon cancer has been hindered by their potential gastro-intestinal toxicity. Nabumetone, which is approximately 10 to 36 times safer than conventional NSAIDs, was evaluated in 2 models of experimental colon carcinogenesis. In azoxymethane (AOM)-treated Fisher 344 rats, nabumetone caused dose-dependent inhibition of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), with 750 and 1,500 ppm resulting in 15% and 37% reductions, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, complex ACF were reduced by 48% in the latter group. MIN mice studies confirmed the chemopreventive efficacy of nabumetone, with 900 ppm suppressing approximately half of the intestinal tumors. Interestingly, inhibition of intermediate biomarkers in both models was markedly greater in the distal than the proximal bowel. To mechanistically evaluate this regional selectivity, we assessed cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the uninvolved mucosa and demonstrated a 3- to 4-fold excess in the distal relative to the proximal bowel in both MIN mice and AOM-treated rats. We then investigated another putative NSAID target, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta) and demonstrated up-regulation during AOM-induced colonic tumorigenesis. Furthermore, in pre-neoplastic mucosa, there was a 3-fold excess of PPAR-delta in the distal colon. We demonstrate that nabumetone is an effective protective agent in both experimental models of colon carcinogenesis. The striking distal predilection of nabumetone may be, at least partially, explained by distal bowel over-expression of COX-2 and PPAR-delta. PMID:11304699

  18. Cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: investigation using human peripheral monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Nishida, S; Kitasato, H; Sakata, N; Kawai, S

    2001-12-01

    Since the pharmacological profiles of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might depend on their differing selectivity for cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and 2 (COX-2), we developed a new screening method using human peripheral monocytes. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were separated, and the cells were incubated with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Monocytes without LPS stimulation exclusively expressed COX-1 on Western blotting analysis, whereas LPS stimulation induced COX-2 expression. Unstimulated monocytes (COX-1) and LPS-stimulated monocytes (COX-2) were then used to determinethe COX selectivity of various NSAIDs. The respective mean IC50 values for COX-1 and COX-2 IC50 (microM), and the COX-1/COX-2 ratio of each NSAID were as follows: celecoxib, 82, 6.8, 12; diclofenac, 0.076, 0.026, 2.9; etodolac, > 100, 53, > 1.9; ibuprofen, 12, 80, 0.15; indometacin, 0.0090, 0.31, 0.029; meloxicam, 37, 6.1, 6.1; 6-MNA (the active metabolite of nabumetone), 149, 230, 0.65; NS-398, 125, 5.6, 22; piroxicam, 47, 25, 1.9; rofecoxib, > 100, 25, > 4.0; S-2474, > 100, 8.9, > 11; SC-560, 0.0048, 1.4, 0.0034. The percentage inhibition of COX-1 activity at the IC50 of COX-2 also showed a wide variation among these NSAIDs. The bioassay system using human monocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of various NSAIDs on COX-1 and COX-2 may become a clinically useful screening method. PMID:11804398

  19. Safe full-dose one-step nabumetone challenge in patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Goldberg, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    Aspirin and all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a chemically heterogeneous group of compounds that share the ability to inhibit the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). This inhibitory effect, especially of COX-1, is suggested as the mechanism underlying NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reactions. In this study, we evaluated the safety and convenience of a single full-dose challenge with nabumetone, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in patients with hypersensitivity to nonselective NSAIDs (ns-NSAIDs). Twenty-four subjects with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to at least two different ns-NSAIDs on two different occasions were enrolled in the study. The patients were otherwise healthy and did not suffer from NSAID- or aspirin-induced asthma or urticaria. All subjects were orally challenged by a single full dose (1000 mg) of nabumetone, monitored closely in the hospital for the next 4 hours and contacted by telephone the next morning and 3-12 months afterward. Twenty-two patients tolerated nabumetone without any reaction during and after the challenge. One patient had a single urticarial lesion and one patient reported mild pruritus without objective signs, both of which resolved spontaneously. Thirteen patients, including the patient who responded with pruritus to the challenge, used nabumetone on several occasions during the follow-up period without any adverse reaction. Our study shows that in patients with a history of aspirin- and ns-NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reaction, a rapid one-step challenge with nabumetone was well tolerated. These initial data support the possibility that a single full dose of nabumetone can be tried as a safe alternative in most patients with a hypersensitivity reaction to ns-NSAIDs. PMID:12974196

  20. Electrokinetic supercharging for on-line preconcentration of seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water samples.

    PubMed

    Dawod, Mohamed; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Haddad, Paul R

    2008-05-01

    The development of new sensitive methods for the analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water samples is of great importance. In this work, seven NSAIDs were separated within 9 min using 15 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 9.2) containing 0.1% (w/v) hexadimethrine bromide (HDMB) and 10% (v/v) methanol. Field-amplified sample injection (FASI) was examined and found to improve the detection limits by 200-fold providing detection limits of 0.6-2.0 microg/L, but these are insufficient for the determination of NSAIDs as environmental pollutants in water samples. To improve the sensitivity further, electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) was examined. The optimum EKS method involved hydrodynamic injection leading electrolyte (100 mM NaCl, 30 s, 50 mbar), electrokinetic injection of the sample (200 s, -10 kV) and finally injection of the terminating electrolyte (100 mM 2-(cyclohexylamino) ethanesulphonic acid, CHES, 40s, 50 mbar). With this method, the sensitivity was improved by 2400-fold giving detection limits of 50-180 ng/L. The developed method was validated and then applied to the analysis of wastewater samples from a local sewage treatment plant. The detection limits were found to increase by approximately 10-fold, however, this is still lower than levels previously found in wastewater samples from European and Mediterranean cities. The proposed method has the advantage of simplicity and achieving sensitivity through high-preconcentration power without the use of off-line chromatographic sample cleanup. PMID:18206157

  1. Toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to Gyps vultures: a new threat from ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Vinny; Wolter, Kerri; Cromarty, Duncan; Diekmann, Maria; Duncan, Neil; Meharg, Andrew A; Taggart, Mark A; Venter, Leon; Cuthbert, Richard

    2010-06-23

    Three Gyps vulture species are on the brink of extinction in South Asia owing to the veterinary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac. Carcasses of domesticated ungulates are the main food source for Asia's vultures and birds die from kidney failure after consuming diclofenac-contaminated tissues. Here, we report on the safety testing of the NSAID ketoprofen, which was not reported to cause mortality in clinical treatment of scavenging birds and is rapidly eliminated from livestock tissues. Safety testing was undertaken using captive non-releasable Cape griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres) and wild-caught African white-backed vultures (G. africanus), both previously identified as susceptible to diclofenac and suitable surrogates. Ketoprofen doses ranged from 0.5 to 5 mg kg(-1) vulture body weight, based upon recommended veterinary guidelines and maximum levels of exposure for wild vultures (estimated as 1.54 mg kg(-1)). Doses were administered by oral gavage or through feeding tissues from cattle dosed with ketoprofen at 6 mg kg(-1) cattle body weight, before slaughter. Mortalities occurred at dose levels of 1.5 and 5 mg kg(-1) vulture body weight (within the range recommended for clinical treatment) with the same clinical signs as observed for diclofenac. Surveys of livestock carcasses in India indicate that toxic levels of residual ketoprofen are already present in vulture food supplies. Consequently, we strongly recommend that ketoprofen is not used for veterinary treatment of livestock in Asia and in other regions of the world where vultures access livestock carcasses. The only alternative to diclofenac that should be promoted as safe for vultures is the NSAID meloxicam. PMID:20007163

  2. Toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to Gyps vultures: a new threat from ketoprofen

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Vinny; Wolter, Kerri; Cromarty, Duncan; Diekmann, Maria; Duncan, Neil; Meharg, Andrew A.; Taggart, Mark A.; Venter, Leon; Cuthbert, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Three Gyps vulture species are on the brink of extinction in South Asia owing to the veterinary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac. Carcasses of domesticated ungulates are the main food source for Asia's vultures and birds die from kidney failure after consuming diclofenac-contaminated tissues. Here, we report on the safety testing of the NSAID ketoprofen, which was not reported to cause mortality in clinical treatment of scavenging birds and is rapidly eliminated from livestock tissues. Safety testing was undertaken using captive non-releasable Cape griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres) and wild-caught African white-backed vultures (G. africanus), both previously identified as susceptible to diclofenac and suitable surrogates. Ketoprofen doses ranged from 0.5 to 5 mg kg−1 vulture body weight, based upon recommended veterinary guidelines and maximum levels of exposure for wild vultures (estimated as 1.54 mg kg−1). Doses were administered by oral gavage or through feeding tissues from cattle dosed with ketoprofen at 6 mg kg−1 cattle body weight, before slaughter. Mortalities occurred at dose levels of 1.5 and 5 mg kg−1 vulture body weight (within the range recommended for clinical treatment) with the same clinical signs as observed for diclofenac. Surveys of livestock carcasses in India indicate that toxic levels of residual ketoprofen are already present in vulture food supplies. Consequently, we strongly recommend that ketoprofen is not used for veterinary treatment of livestock in Asia and in other regions of the world where vultures access livestock carcasses. The only alternative to diclofenac that should be promoted as safe for vultures is the NSAID meloxicam. PMID:20007163

  3. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to <18 years with rheumatoid-factor–positive or –negative polyarthritis, persistent or extended oligoarthritis, or systemic arthritis were enrolled into this prospective, observational, multicenter standard-of-care registry. Eligible patients were newly or recently prescribed (≤6 months) an nsNSAID or celecoxib. Enrolled patients were followed to the end of the study, whether they remained on the original NSAID, switched, or discontinued therapy altogether. All adverse events (AEs) regardless of severity were captured in the database. Results A total of 274 patients (nsNSAID, n = 219; celecoxib, n = 55) were observed for 410 patient-years of observation. Naproxen, meloxicam, and nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  4. Incidence of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shigenao; Inaba, Tomoki; Mizuno, Motowo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kuzume, Toshiaki; Yokota, Hitomi; Fukuda, Yasuyo; Takeda, Kou; Nagano, Hiroshi; Wato, Masaki; Kawai, Kozo

    2008-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a major adverse event of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and co-administration of proton pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists has been established as a means of preventing such an effect. However, the incidence of bleeding associated with NSAID-induced ulcers under conditions where such strong anti-acid agents are used for prevention has yet to be clarified. We aimed to determine the annual incidence of serious upper gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding among Japanese patients in whom NSAIDs were used in our hospital. Before commencing the study, we recommended to all the physicians in our hospital the best method for caring for NSAID users, focusing on the concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors or H2 receptor antagonists. We conducted a cohort study involving 17,270 patients for whom NSAIDs had been newly prescribed. Bleeding from gastric ulcers was observed in 8 of the 17,270 patients using NSAIDs (0.05%). The pooled incidence rate for bleeding was calculated as 2.65 (95% confidence interval, 2.56-2.74) and 1.29 (1.27-1.31) per 1,000 patient years for low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID users, respectively. None of the bleeding ulcer patients required blood transfusion or were in serious condition. In conclusion, gastric ulcer bleeding occurred in low-dose aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID users, but its incidence was low and outcomes were not serious when adequate preventive measures were taken. PMID:18323869

  5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase insulin release from beta cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Zhang, N; Ye, B; Ju, W; Orser, B; Fox, J E M; Wheeler, M B; Wang, Q; Lu, W-Y

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) incidentally induce hypoglycemia, which is often seen in diabetic patients receiving sulphonylureas. NSAIDs influence various ion channel activities, thus they may cause hypoglycemia by affecting ion channel functions in insulin secreting beta cells. This study investigated the effects of the NSAID meclofenamic acid (MFA) on the electrical excitability and the secretion of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. Experimental approach: Using patch clamp techniques and insulin secretion assays, the effects of MFA on the membrane potential and transmembrane current of INS-1 cells, and insulin secretion were studied. Key results: Under perforated patch recordings, MFA induced a rapid depolarization in INS-1 cells bathed in low (2.8mM), but not high (28mM) glucose solutions. MFA, as well as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and flufenamic acid (FFA), excited the cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP). In whole cell recordings, KATP conductance consistently appeared when intracellular ATP was diluted. Intracellular glibenclamide prevented the development of KATP activity, whereas intracellular MFA had no effect. At low glibenclamide concentrations, MFA induced additional inhibition of the KATP current. Live cell Ca2+ imaging displayed that MFA elevated intracellular Ca2+ at low glucose concentrations. Furthermore, MFA dose-dependently increased insulin release under low, but not high, glucose conditions. Conclusions and Implications: MFA blocked KATP through an extracellular mechanism and thus increased insulin secretion. As some NSAIDs synergistically inhibit KATP activity together with sulphonylureas, the risk of NSAID-induced hypoglycemia should be considered when glucose-lowering compounds are administered. PMID:17435793

  6. Characteristics and clinical outcome of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ya-Li; Tian, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen-Ge; Cheng, Dan-Ying; Yang, Yan-Fang; Gao, Hong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinicopathological characteristics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code for acute kidney injury (AKI) (584.5 or 584.9) and for acute liver injury (ALI) (570.0 or 573.3) from January 2004 to December 2013. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of AKI and ALI and to quantify NSAID administration. RESULTS: Seven of 59 patients (11.8%) were identified with acute hepato-nephrotoxicity induced by NSAIDs. Five patients (71.4%) received over the recommended NSAIDs dose. Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere AKI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), a high prevalence of alcohol use (71.4%) and positive hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers (85.7%). Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere ALI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), increased extracellular volume depletion (71.4%), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor combined use (57.1%). Acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubulointerstitial disease were apparent in three out of six (42.9%) kidney biopsy patients, respectively. Acute hepatitis was found in four out of six (66.7%) liver biopsy patients. Overall complete recovery occurred in four patients within a mean of 118.25 ± 55.42 d. CONCLUSION: The injury typically occurred after an overdose of NSAIDs. The risk factors include age older than 60 years, alcohol use, positive HBV markers, extracellular volume depletion and RAAS inhibitor combined use. PMID:25320533

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protect against chondrocyte apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, P; Rachita, C; Aisen, P S; Pasinetti, G M

    2001-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the degradation of cartilage in osteoarthritis is characterized by chondrocyte apoptosis, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved or potential protective measures. In the present study, we used an immortalized chondrocyte cell line to explore the mechanisms of apoptotic chondrocyte cell death. We found that staurosporine-mediated chondrocyte death depended on the concentration and time of incubation, and coincided with increased Bax:Bcl-X mRNA expression, cytochrome C release, and activation of caspase-3. Pre-treatment of the cultures with nimesulide, a preferential cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, or with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, protected the chondrocytes against the staurosporine-mediated nuclear damage and cell death in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-12) to 10(-6) M). Cell protection coincided with inhibition of the staurosporine-mediated induction of caspase-3 activation. Notably, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 (10(-6) M, 24 hr pre-treatment) did not protect the cells against staurosporine-mediated apoptotic death. The data suggest that nimesulide and ibuprofen, in addition to their anti-inflammatory and analgesic benefits, may also have a protective effect in osteoarthritis through the inhibition of apoptosis in chondrocytes. PMID:11296547

  8. Selection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and treatment regimen for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Plahovinsak, Jennifer L; Buccellato, Matthew A; Reid, Frances M; Graham, John S

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in sulfur mustard (HD) injury and HD pathogenesis, suggesting that anti-inflammatory treatments applied as soon as possible following HD injury may reduce tissue damage and accelerate healing. This study used the HD dermal weanling swine model to investigate the efficacy of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin and diclofenac, when applied in combination with the steroid, clobetasol. The therapeutic regimen was also investigated with respect to initiation of treatment post-exposure, frequency and duration. Yorkshire-cross pigs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, corresponding to all combinations of treatment (capsaicin with clobetasol or diclofenac with clobetasol), onset time (1, 2 or 4 h post-exposure), treatment duration (1, 3 or 5 days) and frequency of applications (2, 3 or 4 per day). For each animal, two sites on the ventral abdomen were exposed to 400 μL of neat HD for 8 min to achieve superficial dermal (SD) lesions and two sites were exposed to 400 μL neat HD for 30 min to achieve deep dermal (DD) lesions. Each treatment regimen was tested against a SD and a DD injury. Untreated SD and DD lesion sites served as within-animal controls. Assessments, up to one week post-challenge, included digital photographs, clinical assessments (lesion size measurements and modified Draize scoring), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), reflectance colorimetry and histopathologic evaluations that included an estimate for depth of injury and wound healing parameters. Diclofenac plus clobetasol treatment resulted in significant reductions in lesion contracture and modified Draize scores, increased barrier function (decreased TEWL), and increased healing as determined by histopathology for both SD and DD injury when compared with untreated sites and sites treated with capsaicin plus clobetasol. An increased duration of treatment from 1 to 5 days was most commonly associated with decreased

  9. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen. PMID:27312831

  10. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and upper and lower gastrointestinal mucosal damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    NSAIDs are among the most commonly used drugs worldwide and their beneficial therapeutic properties are thoroughly accepted. However, they are also associated with gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events. NSAIDs can damage the whole GI tract including a wide spectrum of lesions. About 1 to 2% of NSAID users experienced a serious GI complication during treatment. The relative risk of upper GI complications among NSAID users depends on the presence of different risk factors, including older age (>65 years), history of complicated peptic ulcer, and concomitant aspirin or anticoagulant use, in addition to the type and dose of NSAID. Some authors recently reported a decreasing trend in hospitalizations due to upper GI complications and a significant increase in those from the lower GI tract, causing the rates of these two types of GI complications to converge. NSAID-induced enteropathy has gained much attention in the last few years and an increasing number of reports have been published on this issue. Current evidence suggests that NSAIDs increase the risk of lower GI bleeding and perforation to a similar extent as that seen in the upper GI tract. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors have the same beneficial effects as nonselective NSAIDs but with less GI toxicity in the upper GI tract and probably in the lower GI tract. Overall, mortality due to these complications has also decreased, but the in-hospital case fatality for upper and lower GI complication events has remained constant despite the new therapeutic and prevention strategies. PMID:24267289

  11. Efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Koes, B.; Scholten, R.; Mens, J.; Bouter, L.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE—To assess the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for low back pain.
DATA SOURCES—Computer aided search of published randomised clinical trials and assessment of the methods of the studies.
STUDY SELECTION—26 randomised clinical trials evaluating NSAIDs for low back pain were identified.
DATA EXTRACTION—Score for quality (maximum = 100 points) of the methods based on four categories: study population; interventions; effect measurement; data presentation and analysis. Determination of success rate per study group and evaluation of different contrasts. Statistical pooling of placebo controlled trials in similar patient groups and using similar outcome measures.
RESULTS—The methods scores of the trials ranged from 27 to 83 points. NSAIDs were compared with placebo treatment in 10 studies. The pooled odds ratio in four trials comparing NSAIDs with placebo after one week was 0.53 (95% confidence intervals 0.32 to 0.89) using the fixed effect model, indicating a significant effect in favour of NSAIDs compared with placebo. In nine studies NSAIDs were compared with other (drug) therapies. Of these, only two studies reported better results of NSAIDs compared with paracetamol with and without dextropropoxyphene. In the other trials NSAIDs were not better than the reference treatment. In 11 studies different NSAIDs were compared, of which seven studies reported no differences in effect.
CONCLUSIONS—There are flaws in the design of most studies. The pooled odds ratio must be interpreted with caution because the trials at issue, including the high quality trials, did not use identical outcome measures. The results of the 26 randomised trials that have been carried out to date, suggest that NSAIDs might be effective for short-term symptomatic relief in patients with uncomplicated low back pain, but are less effective or ineffective in patients with low back pain with sciatica and patients with sciatica with nerve

  12. Gastrointestinally distributed UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A10, which metabolizes estrogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, depends upon phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Nikhil K; Kubota, Shigeki; Meselhy, Meselhy R; Ciotti, Marco; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Hartori, Masao; Owens, Ida S

    2004-07-01

    Among gastrointestinal distributed isozymes encoded at the UGT1 locus, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A10 (UGT1A10) metabolizes a number of important chemicals. Similar to broad conversion of phytoestrogens (Basu, N. K., Ciotti, M., Hwang, M. S., Kole, L., Mitra, P. S., Cho, J. W., and Owens, I. S. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 1429-1441), UGT1A10 metabolized estrogens and their derivatives, whereas UGT1A1, -1A3, -1A7, and -1A8 differentially exhibited reduced activity toward the same. UGT1A10 compared with UGT1A7, -1A8, and -1A3 generally exhibited high activity toward acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and natural benzaldehyde derivatives, while UGT1A3 metabolized most efficiently aromatic transcinnamic acids known to be generated from flavonoid glycosides by microflora in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Finally UGT1A10, -1A7, -1A8, and -1A3 converted plant-based salicylic acids; methylsalicylic acid was transformed at high levels, and acetylsalicylic (aspirin) and salicylic acid were transformed at moderate to low levels. Atypically UGT1A10 transformed estrogens between pH 6 and 8 but acidic structures preferentially at pH 6.4. Furthermore evidence indicates UGT1A10 expressed in COS-1 cells depends upon phosphorylation; UGT1A10 versus its single, double, and triple mutants at three predicted protein kinase C phosphorylation sites incorporated [(33)P]-orthophosphate and showed a progressive decrease with no detectable label or activity for the triple T73A/T202A/S432G-1A10 mutant. Single and double mutants revealed either null/full activity or null/additive activity, respectively. Additionally UGT1A10-expressing cultures glucuronidated 17beta-[(14)C]estradiol, whereas cultures containing null mutants at protein kinase C sites showed no estrogen conversion. Importantly UGT1A10 in cells supported 10-fold higher glucuronidation of 17beta-estradiol than UGT1A1. In summary, our results suggest gastrointestinally distributed UGT1A10 is important for detoxifying

  13. Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Are Better than Acetaminophen on Fever Control at Acute Stage of Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Wu, Wen-Tien; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chen, Ing-Ho; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In addition to adequate surgical fixation and an aggressive rehabilitation program, pain relief is one of the most critical factors in the acute stage of fracture treatment. The most common analgesics are nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and Acetaminophen, both of which relieve pain and reduce body temperature. In clinical experiences, they exhibit effective pain control; however, their influence on body temperature remains controversial. This study is aimed at determining the effects of analgesics at the acute stage of traumatic fracture by performing a clinical retrospective study of patients with fractures and a fracture animal model. The retrospective study revealed that, in the acetaminophen group, the mean value of postmedication body temperature (BT) was significantly higher than that of the premedication BT. The change in BT was highly related with the medication rather than other risk factors. Forty eight 12-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, fracture group, fracture-Acetaminophen group, Acetaminophen group, fracture-Arcoxia group, and Arcoxia group. Fracture rats were prepared by breaking their unilateral tibia and fibula. Their inflammation conditions were evaluated by measuring their serum cytokine level and their physiological status was evaluated by estimating their central temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The hepatic adverse effects were assessed by measuring the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (sGOT) and alanine aminotransferase (sGPT). The central temperature in the fracture-Acetaminophen group exceeded that in the groups fed normal saline water or Arcoxia. Accumulated hepatic injury was presented as steadily ascending curves of sGOT and sGPT. Inflammation-related cytokine levels were not higher in the Acetaminophen fracture group and were significantly lower in the fracture-Arcoxia group. Fever appeared to be aggravated by acetaminophen and more related to the elevation of hepatic

  14. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Women: Results from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bavry, Anthony A.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Allison, Matthew; Johnson, Karen C.; Howard, Barbara V.; Hlatky, Mark; Manson, JoAnn E.; Limacher, Marian C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Conclusive data regarding cardiovascular (CV) toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are sparse. We hypothesized that regular NSAID use is associated with increased risk for CV events in post-menopausal women, and that this association is stronger with greater cyclooxygenase (cox)-2 compared with cox-1 inhibition. Methods and Results Post-menopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) were classified as regular users or non-users of non-aspirin NSAIDs. Cox regression examined NSAID use as a time-varying covariate and its association with the primary outcome of total CV disease defined as CV death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Secondary analyses considered the association of selective cox-2 inhibitors (e.g., celecoxib), non-selective agents with cox-2>cox-1 inhibition (e.g., naproxen), and non-selective agents with cox-1>cox-2 inhibition (e.g., ibuprofen) with the primary outcome. Overall, 160,801 participants were available for analysis (mean follow-up 11.2 years). Regular NSAID use at some point in time was reported by 53,142 participants. Regular NSAID use was associated with an increased hazard for CV events versus no NSAID use (HR=1.10[95% CI 1.06–1.15], Pitalic>0.001). Selective cox-2 inhibitors were associated with a modest increased hazard for CV events (HR=1.13[1.04–1.23], P=0.004; celecoxib only HR=1.13[1.01–1.27], P=0.031). Among aspirin users, concomitant selective cox-2 inhibitor use was no longer associated with increased hazard for CV events. There was an increased risk for agents with cox-2>cox-1 inhibition (HR=1.17[1.10–1.24], Pbold>0.001; naproxen only HR=1.22[1.12–1.34], P<0.001). This harmful association remained among concomitant aspirin users. We did not observe a risk elevation for agents with cox-1>cox-2 inhibition (HR=1.01[0.95–1.07], P=0.884; ibuprofen only HR=1.00[0.93–1.07], P=0.996). Conclusions Regular use of selective cox-2 inhibitors and non

  15. Copper(II) complexes with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolfenamic acid: Structure and biological features.

    PubMed

    Tarushi, Alketa; Perontsis, Spyros; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Psomas, George

    2015-08-01

    Copper(II) complexes with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolfenamic acid (Htolf) with the oxygen-donor ligands methanol (MeOH) or N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and/or the nitrogen-donor heterocyclic ligands 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 2,2'-bipyridylamine (bipyam), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or pyridine (py) were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of five novel complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography where tolfenamic acid is deprotonated being in different binding modes. Equimolar quantities of CuCl2, tolf(-1) and bipy led to the formation of [Cu(tolf-O,O')(bipy)Cl] (1), while with a 1:2 Cu(II):tolf ratio, complexes [Cu(tolf-O,O')2(bipy)] (2), [Cu(tolf-O,O')2(bipyam)] · 0.5MeOH (3 0.5MeOH), [Cu(tolf-O,O')(tolf-O)(phen)(MeOH)] (4) and [Cu(tolf-O)2(py)2(MeOH)2] (5) were isolated. The interaction of the complexes with serum albumin proteins was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy with the determined binding constant bearing relative high values. The scavenging ability of the complexes towards 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and hydroxyl radicals was investigated and the in vitro inhibitory activity against soybean lipoxygenase was evaluated and complexes 4 and 5 were the more active compounds among those tested. Spectroscopic (UV), electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) and physicochemical (viscosity measurements) techniques were employed in order to study the binding mode and strength of the complexes to calf-thymus (CT) DNA suggesting intercalation as the most possible mode of binding. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) revealed the ability of the complexes to displace the DNA-bound EB. The biological properties of complexes 1-5 were evaluated in regard to previously reported complex [Cu2(tolf-O,O')4(DMF)2] (6). PMID:25824465

  16. Hot topic: Early postpartum treatment of commercial dairy cows with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs increases whole-lactation milk yield.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, A J; Ylioja, C M; Vargas, C F; Mamedova, L K; Mendonça, L G; Coetzee, J F; Hollis, L C; Gehring, R; Bradford, B J

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that postpartum administration of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) sodium salicylate can increase 305-d milk yield in older dairy cattle (parity 3 and greater). However, in this prior work, sodium salicylate was delivered to cows via the drinking water, a method that does not align well with current grouping strategies on commercial dairy farms. The objective of the current study was to replicate these results on a commercial dairy farm with a simplified treatment protocol and to compare sodium salicylate with another NSAID, meloxicam. Dairy cattle in their second lactation and greater (n=51/treatment) were alternately assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at parturition, with treatments lasting for 3d. Experimental treatments began 12 to 36 h after parturition and were (1) 1 placebo bolus on the first day and 3 consecutive daily drenches of sodium salicylate (125 g/cow per day; SAL); (2) 1 bolus of meloxicam (675 mg/cow) and 3 drenches of an equal volume of water (MEL); or (3) 1 placebo bolus and 3 drenches of water (CON). Blood samples were collected on the first day of treatment, immediately following the last day of treatment, and 7d after the last day of treatment; plasma was analyzed for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), free fatty acids, haptoglobin, and paraoxonase. Milk production, body condition score, reproductive status, and retention in the herd were monitored for 365 d posttreatment, and effects of treatment, parity, days in milk, and interactions were evaluated in mixed effects models. Significance was declared at P<0.05. Whole-lactation milk and protein yields were greater in NSAID-treated cows, although 305-d fat production was not affected. There was a significant interaction of treatment and parity for plasma glucose concentration; MEL increased plasma glucose concentrations compared with CON and SAL in older cows. Sodium salicylate decreased plasma BHB concentration compared with MEL at 7d posttreatment

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: overall risks and management. Complementary roles for COX-2 inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, C J; Langman, M J S

    2003-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are well recognised as causing peptic ulceration and ulcer complications. However, several critical issues, including the amount of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal disease affected by NSAIDs, their interaction with ancillary risk factors, and how to optimise management in subgroups, remain poorly understood. In this article, strategies for subgroups that take account of non-specific gastrointestinal risks, minimisation of residual risk, and the importance of non-gastrointestinal toxicity are suggested, and areas for research identified. PMID:12631678

  18. The Effects of Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Factors Influencing Drug Adherence in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of knee osteoarthritis patients according to drug adherence; and to find out the factors the affecting those outcomes. We analyzed the drug adherence and clinical outcomes in 1,334 primary knee osteoarthritis patients who took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes of Pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EQ-5D were compared at baseline and 3 weeks’ follow-up between the two groups of adherent group and non-adherent group (1,167 vs. 167 patients). Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors affecting the adherence, and the reasons for the non-adherence were asked. The follow-up clinical outcomes of NRS and KOOS symptom, pain and activity of daily life were significantly higher in the adherence group (P = 0.003, P = 0.048, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003, respectively). The adherence was better in the elderly and in the male group (P = 0.042 and P = 0.034, respectively) and the top reason for no strict adherence was “symptom improved” (21.5%) followed by side effects. In this study, the patients with better adherence to NSAIDs showed better outcomes compared to those with poor adherence. This study can contribute to the patient education for the pharmacological treatment in knee OA patients. PMID:27134504

  19. Variability in risk of gastrointestinal complications with individual non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: results of a collaborative meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D.; Lim, L. L.; Garcia Rodriguez, L. A.; Perez Gutthann, S.; Carson, J. L.; Griffin, M.; Savage, R.; Logan, R.; Moride, Y.; Hawkey, C.; Hill, S.; Fries, J. T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the relative risks of serious gastrointestinal complications reported with individual non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. DESIGN--Systematic review of controlled epidemiological studies that found a relation between use of the drugs and admission to hospital for haemorrhage or perforation. SETTING--Hospital and community based case-control and cohort studies. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--(a) Estimated relative risks of gastrointestinal complications with use of individual drugs, exposure to ibuprofen being used as reference; (b) a ranking that best summarised the sequence of relative risks observed in the studies. RESULTS--12 studies met the inclusion criteria. 11 provided comparative data on ibuprofen and other drugs. Ibuprofen ranked lowest or equal lowest for risk in 10 of the 11 studies. Pooled relative risks calculated with exposure to ibuprofen used as reference were all significantly greater than 1.0 (interval of point estimates 1.6 to 9.2). Overall, ibuprofen was associated with the lowest relative risk, followed by diclofenac. Azapropazone, tolmetin, ketoprofen, and piroxicam ranked highest for risk and indomethacin, naproxen, sulindac, and aspirin occupied intermediate positions. Higher doses of ibuprofen were associated with relative risks similar to those with naproxen and indomethacin. CONCLUSIONS--The low risk of serious gastrointestinal complications with ibuprofen seems to be attributable mainly to the low doses of the drug used in clinical practice. In higher doses ibuprofen is associated with a similar risk to other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Use of low risk drugs in low dosage as first line treatment would substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality due to serious gastrointestinal toxicity from these drugs. PMID:8664664

  20. Suppression of postoperative pain by the combination of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flurbiprofen, and a long-acting local anesthetic, etidocaine.

    PubMed

    Dionne, R A; Wirdzek, P R; Fox, P C; Dubner, R

    1984-04-01

    The analgesic efficacy of the combination of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flurbiprofen, and a long-acting local anesthetic, etidocaine, was evaluated for the suppression of acute postoperative pain. Subjects having two impacted third molars removed at two appointments received either the experimental combination or standard treatment in a randomized, crossover design. The experimental treatment consisted of 100 mg flurbiprofen 30 minutes before surgery, 1.5% etidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine five minutes before surgery, and 100 mg flurbiprofen three hours after surgery. Standard treatment consisted of 10 mg oxycodone plus 650 mg acetaminophen 30 minutes before surgery, 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine five minutes before surgery, and a second dose of the oxycodone-acetaminophen combination three hours after surgery. Pain intensity was rated hourly from one to seven hours after surgery, using a variety of ordinal and analog scales. The flurbiprofen-etidocaine combination resulted in significantly less postoperative pain than the oxycodone plus acetaminophen-lidocaine combination on all four analgesic scales used and was preferred by the majority of the patients. This study shows that pretreatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flurbiprofen, in combination with a long-acting local analgesic, etidocaine, suppresses pain to a greater extent than a potent opiate mild/analgesic combination and lidocaine without an increase in side-effect liability. PMID:6586802

  1. [Helicobacter pylori, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and gastroduodenal changes].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A V

    1995-09-01

    The author discusses the possible interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) which may play an important role in the unleashing of gastroduodenal lesions. To our knowledge, AINEs have no influence on the prevalence of infection by Hp and the latter does not seem to influence the development and intensity of the lesions caused by NSAIDs. PMID:7484272

  2. Pharmacology in rehabilitation: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Ross E

    2005-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are the most commonly encountered over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications in physical therapy practice. Worldwide, over 73000000 prescriptions for nonsteroidal agents are written yearly. NSAIDs produce a wide range of beneficial effects to the physical therapy patient, enhancing the outcome of treatment. Helpful effects of NSAIDs include analgesia, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic properties. However, NSAIDs are also associated with frequent and significant side effects that are deleterious to treatment outcome, including delay in soft tissue and bone healing, renal and liver toxicity, hemorrhagic events, gastric irritation and ulceration, and central nervous system effects. Understanding of the pharmacological properties of these drugs, exemplified by aspirin, and the individual pharmacokinetics of specific preparations will help the therapist to screen patients for potential side effects, develop more effective plans of care, and, where allowed, effectively and safely prescribe NSAIDs. PMID:16001907

  3. Meta-analysis of short term low dose prednisolone versus placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether short term, oral low dose prednisolone (⩽15 mg daily) is superior to placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Design: Meta-analysis of randomised trials of oral corticosteroids compared with placebo or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Setting: Trials conducted anywhere in the world. Subjects: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Main outcome measures: Joint tenderness, pain, and grip strength. Outcomes measured on different scales were combined by using the standardised effect size (difference in effect divided by SD of the measurements). Results: Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. Prednisolone had a marked effect over placebo on joint tenderness (standardised effect size 1.31; 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.83), pain (1.75; 0.87 to 2.64), and grip strength (0.41; 0.13 to 0.69). Measured in the original units the differences were 12 (6 to 18) tender joints and 22 mm Hg (5 mm Hg to 40 mm Hg) for grip strength. Prednisolone also had a greater effect than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on joint tenderness (0.63; 0.11 to 1.16) and pain (1.25; 0.26 to 2.24), whereas the difference in grip strength was not significant (0.31; −0.02 to 0.64). Measured in the original units the differences were 9 (5 to 12) tender joints and 12 mm Hg (−6 mm Hg to 31 mm Hg). The risk of adverse effects during moderate and long term use seemed acceptable. Conclusion: Prednisolone in low doses (⩽15 mg daily) may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if the disease cannot be controlled by other means. Key messages Prednisolone in low doses—that is, no more than 15 mg daily—is highly effective in patients with rheumatoid arthritis The risk of adverse effects is acceptable in short, moderate, or long term use Oral low dose prednisolone may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if

  4. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib on the hematological parameters and enzymes of colon and kidney.

    PubMed

    Behal, N; Singh Kanwar, S; Sharma, P; Sanyal, S N

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of a selective COX-2 inhibitor, etoricoxib in rats on the hematological and toxicity parameters in colon and kidney at two different doses of the drug, one within the therapeutic anti-inflammatory range as based on the reported ED50 value (Eto-1) while the other at ten times higher (Eto-2), relative to the toxicity studies which have not been reported so far. The results showed that the control and the drug treated animals achieved similar linear growth rate and also showed no major alterations in the histological parameters in the liver and kidney tissue. The animals treated with lower dose of etoricoxib showed an overall decrease in total leukocytes counts as well as in the number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and eosinophills while the higher dose of the drug produced a highly significant increase in all the cell counts. However, the drug treatment at both the dose level produced significant fall in the activities of alkaline phosphatase, sucrase, lactase and maltase in the kidney but increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase in colon. The treatment of etoricoxib did not produce any change in the nitric oxide and citrulline levels in kidney while an increase was noted in the colonic tissue. It was concluded that etoricoxib is a relatively safe drug at its anti-inflammatory ED50 dose in rats when the hematological parameters and the structural and functional characteristics of kidney and colonic tissues were studied. PMID:19721906

  5. Impact and mechanism of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs combined with chemotherapeutic drugs on human lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, WEIYI; CHEN, GANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of indomethacin treatment combined with oxaliplatin treatment on the expression of cluster of differentiation 44 variant 6 (CD44v6), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and survivin in human lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors. The human lung adenocarcinoma (A549)-nude mouse transplanted tumor model was established, and the mice were divided into a control group, an indomethacin treatment group, an oxaliplatin treatment group and an indomethacin-oxaliplatin combination treatment group. The tumor inhibition rate was calculated following sacrificing of the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and fluorescence reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were utilized to detect the protein and messenger (m)RNA expression of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin. The tumor inhibition rates of the indomethacin group, the oxaliplatin group and the combination group were 26.67, 47.70 and 68.88%, respectively. The protein and mRNA expression levels of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin in the transplanted tumors of each treatment group were reduced compared with the control group (P<0.05), and those of the combination group were lower compared with the single-drug treatment groups (P<0.05). Survivin and MMP-2, MMP-2 and CD44v6, and MMP-2 and CD44v6 all exhibited linear positive correlation. The present study provides evidence that the administration of indomethacin alone, or in combination with oxaliplatin, may significantly inhibit the growth of lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors and the expression of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin inside the tumor. The combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with chemotherapeutic drugs may improve the antitumor effects. PMID:27313765

  6. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cyanobacteria and algae in laboratory strains and in natural algal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Bácsi, István; B-Béres, Viktória; Kókai, Zsuzsanna; Gonda, Sándor; Novák, Zoltán; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Vasas, Gábor

    2016-05-01

    In recent years measurable concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown in the aquatic environment as a result of increasing human consumption. Effects of five frequently used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, diflunisal, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and piroxicam in 0.1 mg ml(-1) concentration) in batch cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus, Microcystis aeruginosa, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii), and eukaryotic algae (Desmodesmus communis, Haematococcus pluvialis, Cryptomonas ovata) were studied. Furthermore, the effects of the same concentrations of NSAIDs were investigated in natural algal assemblages in microcosms. According to the changes of chlorophyll-a content, unicellular cyanobacteria seemed to be more tolerant to NSAIDs than eukaryotic algae in laboratory experiments. Growth of eukaryotic algae was reduced by all drugs, the cryptomonad C. ovata was the most sensitive to NSAIDs, while the flagellated green alga H. pluvialis was more sensitive than the non-motile green alga D. communis. NSAID treatments had weaker impact in the natural assemblages dominated by cyanobacteria than in the ones dominated by eukaryotic algae, confirming the results of laboratory experiments. Diversity and number of functional groups did not change notably in cyanobacteria dominated assemblages, while they decreased significantly in eukaryotic algae dominated ones compared to controls. The results highlight that cyanobacteria (especially unicellular ones) are less sensitive to the studied, mostly hardly degradable NSAIDs, which suggest that their accumulation in water bodies may contribute to the expansion of cyanobacterial mass productions in appropriate environmental circumstances by pushing back eukaryotic algae. Thus, these contaminants require special attention during wastewater treatment and monitoring of surface waters. PMID:26967537

  7. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Oscar; Migliore, Marco; Habrant, Damien; Armirotti, Andrea; Albani, Clara; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to inhibit cyclooxygenase (Cox)-1 and Cox-2 underlies the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs, as well as their propensity to damage the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium. This toxic action greatly limits the use of NSAIDs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic pathologies. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades the endocannabinoid anandamide, which attenuates inflammation and promotes GI healing. Here, we describe the first class of systemically active agents that simultaneously inhibit FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 with high potency and selectivity. The class prototype 4 (ARN2508) is potent at inhibiting FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 (median inhibitory concentration: FAAH, 0.031 ± 0.002 µM; Cox-1, 0.012 ± 0.002 µM; and Cox-2, 0.43 ± 0.025 µM) but does not significantly interact with a panel of >100 off targets. After oral administration in mice, ARN2508 engages its intended targets and exerts profound therapeutic effects in models of intestinal inflammation. Unlike NSAIDs, ARN2508 causes no gastric damage and indeed protects the GI from NSAID-induced damage through a mechanism that requires FAAH inhibition. Multitarget FAAH/Cox blockade may provide a transformative approach to IBD and other pathologies in which FAAH and Cox are overactive.—Sasso, O., Migliore, M., Habrant, D., Armirotti, A., Albani, C., Summa, M., Moreno-Sanz, G., Scarpelli, R., Piomelli, D. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage. PMID:25757568

  8. Interaction between use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selected genetic polymorphisms in ovarian cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Simone P; Gates, Margaret A; DeVivo, Immaculata; Rosner, Bernard A; Tworoger, Shelley S; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Hankinson, Susan E; Cramer, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) may play important role in ovarian cancer. However, epidemiologic data are inconsistent, possibly reflecting inter-individual genetic differences affecting the metabolism of NSAIDs. We examined whether common polymorphisms affecting the metabolism of NSAIDs modify the association between NSAIDs and ovarian cancer risk. We genotyped 1,353 DNA samples from women who developed ovarian cancer and 1,823 samples from matched controls participating in the New England Case-Control study and the Nurses' Health Studies. Conditional logistic regression estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with regular use of NSAIDs and with relevant polymorphisms on ovarian cancer risk. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression estimated the association of NSAID use across stratum of each genotype. Regular use of NSAIDs was not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Multivariable OR (95% CI) associated with use NSAIDs was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.71-1.02). Associations between NSAID use and ovarian cancer risk did not differ significantly across strata of genotypes. None of the studied polymorphisms was associated with ovarian cancer risk. The multivariable ORs (95% CI) associated with CYP2C9 and UGT1A6 variant genotypes were 0.99 (0.90-1.08) and 0.93 (0.82-1.05), respectively. The multivariable ORs (95% CI) associated with PPAR-γ, COX-2 -765G>C, and COX-2 Ex10+837T>C polymorphisms were 1.02 (0.87-1.20), 0.87 (0.75-1.00), and 0.97 (0.87-1.09), respectively. In this relatively large study, we found no convincing evidence supporting an association between NSAIDs use and ovarian cancer risk. Furthermore, data did not suggest interaction between selected polymorphisms and use of NSAIDs in relation to ovarian cancer risk. PMID:21532843

  9. The Inhibitory Effect of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) on the Monophenolase and Diphenolase Activities of Mushroom Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuomi; Toriyama, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the monophenolase and diphenolase activity of mushroom tyrosinase. The results showed that diflunisal and indomethacin inhibited both monophenolase and diphenolase activity. For monophenolase activity, the lag time was extended in the presence of diflunisal. In the presence of indomethacin, the lag time did not change. IC50 values of monophenolase activity were estimated to be 0.112 mM (diflunisal) and 1.78 mM (indomethacin). Kinetic studies of monophenolase activity revealed that both diflunisal and indomethacin were non-competitive inhibitors. For diphenolase activity, IC50 values were estimated to be 0.197 mM (diflunisal) and 0.509 mM (indomethacin). Diflunisal and indomethacin were also found to be non-competitive diphenolase inhibitors. PMID:21747720

  10. pH-sensitive interpenetrating polymer network microspheres of poly(vinyl alcohol) and carboxymethyl cellulose for controlled release of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac tromethamine.

    PubMed

    Kondolot Solak, Ebru; Er, Akın

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to produce pH-sensitive microspheres for the controlled release of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, ketorolac tromethamine (KT). For this purpose, an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) of microspheres of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) were prepared, based on different formulations using glutaraldehyde (GA) (0.66 M) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) (3%, v/v). The preparation conditions of the microspheres were optimized by considering the percentage of entrapment efficiency and swelling capacity of the microspheres, and their release data. The effects of PVA and NaCMC ratio on the release of KT for over a period of 6 h, at three pH values (1.2, 6.8, and 7.4), have been discussed. PMID:25619756

  11. D-Amino Acids Boost the Selectivity and Confer Supramolecular Hydrogels of a Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Du, Xuewen; Shi, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    As systemically used therapeutics for treatmenting acute or chronic pains or inflammations, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) also associate with the adverse gastrointestinal and renal effects and cardiovascular risks. Thus, it is beneficial to develop topical gels that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for the management of local inflammation. In this work, we demonstrate that the covalent conjugation of D-amino acids to naproxen (i.e., an NSAID) not only affords supramolecular hydrogelators for the topical gels, but also unexpectedly and significantly elevates the selectivity towards COX-2 about 20 times at little expense of the activity of naproxen. This work illustrates a previously unexplored approach that employs D-amino acids for the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and exceptional biostability, which offers a new class of molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents. PMID:23136972

  12. Concentration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Pelvic Floor Muscles: An Experimental Comparative Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. Materials and Methods We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Results Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Conclusion Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle. PMID:24954342

  13. Esters of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with cinnamyl alcohol are potent lipoxygenase inhibitors with enhanced anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Theodosis-Nobelos, Panagiotis; Kourti, Malamati; Tziona, Paraskevi; Kourounakis, Panos N; Rekka, Eleni A

    2015-11-15

    Novel esters of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, α-lipoic acid and indol-3-acetic acid with cinnamyl alcohol were synthesised by a straightforward method and at high yields (60-98%). They reduced acute inflammation more than the parent acids and are potent inhibitors of soybean lipoxygenase. Selected structures decreased plasma lipidemic indices in Triton-induced hyperlipidemia to rats. Therefore, the synthesised compounds may add to the current knowledge about agents acting against various inflammatory disorders. PMID:26494261

  14. A supramolecular topical gel derived from a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, fenoprofen, is capable of treating skin inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Joydeb; Yedoti, Pavani; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2015-02-28

    A new series of bioconjugates derived from a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely fenoprofen, has been synthesised by amidation with various biogenic molecules such as β-alanine, aminocaproic acid and tyramine with the aim of converting the NSAID into a supramolecular gelator for plausible biomedical applications. One such bioconjugate (2) showed gelation ability with methylsalicylate (MS) and 1% menthol in methyl salicylate (MMS) solvents. These gels were characterized by table top rheology, high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and dynamic rheology. Gelator 2 was found to be biostable both in proteolytic enzymes and in blood serum of BALB/c mouse under physiological conditions. It was also found to be biocompatible, as revealed by the methyl thiazolyldiphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 and mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. The anti-inflammatory response (prostaglandin E2 assay, denoted PGE2 assay) of 2 was comparable to that of the parent drug fenoprofen calcium salt. Finally, a topical gel formulation of 2 displayed in vivo self-delivery application in treating imiquimod (IMQ) induced skin inflammation in BALB/c mice. PMID:25554116

  15. Amides of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with thiomorpholine can yield hypolipidemic agents with improved anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Theodosis-Nobelos, Panagiotis; Kourti, Malamati; Gavalas, Antonios; Rekka, Eleni A

    2016-02-01

    Novel amides of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), α-lipoic acid and indole-3-acetic acid with thiomorpholine were synthesised by a simple method and at high yields (60-92%). All the NSAID derivatives highly decreased lipidemic indices in the plasma of Triton treated hyperlipidemic rats. The most potent compound was the indomethacin derivative, which decreased total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol by 73%, 80% and 83%, respectively. They reduced acute inflammation equally or more than most parent acids. Hence, it could be concluded that amides of common NSAIDs with thiomorpholine acquire considerable hypolipidemic potency, while they preserve or augment their anti-inflammatory activity, thus addressing significant risk factors for atherogenesis. PMID:26750253

  16. Intra-Articular Tibiofemoral Injection of a Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug has no Detrimental Effects on Joint Mechanics in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Riggin, Corinne N.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Kuntz, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Administration of intra-articular medications, including corticosteroids and analgesics, is common clinical practice for knee pathology and dysfunction. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are another category of medication commonly prescribed for their analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of injectable NSAIDs in the treatment of intra-articular pathology and postoperative analgesia.1–3 However, little data exist regarding the safety of intra-articular injection, despite the increase in its application.4 Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intra-articular NSAID injection on articular cartilage, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and joint function in the rat. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into either saline (SAL) or ketorolac (NSAID) tibiofemoral single injection treatment groups. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 7, 28, and 84 days post-injection for histological and mechanical analyses. Additionally, a subset of animals underwent longitudinal ambulatory evaluation to determine joint functional properties. We hypothesized that intra-articular ketorolac injection would result in no detrimental mechanical, histological, or functional changes. No differences were reported between the NSAID and SAL groups in any of the parameters measured at any time point, demonstrating the potential safety of intra-articular NSAID administration. Therefore, NSAID injection could be further considered for clinical application in humans. PMID:24981310

  17. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  18. The thermodynamic dissociation constants of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by the least-squares nonlinear regression of multiwavelength spectrophotometric pH-titration data.

    PubMed

    Meloun, Milan; Bordovská, Sylva; Galla, Lubomír

    2007-11-30

    The mixed dissociation constants of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, diclofenac sodium, flurbiprofen and ketoprofen at various ionic strengths I of range 0.003-0.155, and at temperatures of 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C, were determined with the use of two different multiwavelength and multivariate treatments of spectral data, SPECFIT/32 and SQUAD(84) nonlinear regression analyses and INDICES factor analysis. The factor analysis in the INDICES program predicts the correct number of components, and even the presence of minor ones, when the data quality is high and the instrumental error is known. The thermodynamic dissociation constant pK(a)(T) was estimated by nonlinear regression of (pK(a), I) data at 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Goodness-of-fit tests for various regression diagnostics enabled the reliability of the parameter estimates found to be proven. PALLAS, MARVIN, SPARC, ACD/pK(a) and Pharma Algorithms predict pK(a) being based on the structural formulae of drug compounds in agreement with the experimental value. The best agreement seems to be between the ACD/pK(a) program and experimentally found values and with SPARC. PALLAS and MARVIN predicted pK(a,pred) values with larger bias errors in comparison with the experimental value for all four drugs. PMID:17825517

  19. In Vitro Interactions between Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Antifungal Agents against Planktonic and Biofilm Forms of Trichosporon asahii

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Lin; Lu, Xuelian

    2016-01-01

    Increasing drug resistance has brought enormous challenges to the management of Trichosporon spp. infections. The in vitro antifungal activities of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. were recently discovered. In the present study, the in vitro interactions between three NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium) and commonly used antifungal agents (fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and amphotericin B) against planktonic and biofilm cells of T. asahii were evaluated using the checkerboard microdilution method. The spectrophotometric method and the XTT reduction assay were used to generate data on biofilm cells. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and the ΔE model were compared to interpret drug interactions. Using the FICI, the highest percentages of synergistic effects against planktonic cells (86.67%) and biofilm cells (73.33%) were found for amphotericin B/ibuprofen, and caspofungin/ibuprofen showed appreciable percentages (73.33% for planktonic form and 60.00% for biofilm) as well. We did not observe antagonism. The ΔE model gave consistent results with FICI (86.67%). Our findings suggest that amphotericin B/ibuprofen and caspofungin/ibuprofen combinations have potential effects against T. asahii. Further in vivo and animal studies to investigate associated mechanisms need to be conducted. PMID:27275608

  20. In Vivo and In Vitro Toxicodynamic Analyses of New Quinolone-and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Effects on the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Hideki; Matsuo, Hirotami; Takanaga, Hitomi; Kawakami, Junichi; Yamamoto, Koujirou; Iga, Tatsuji; Naito, Mikihiko; Tsuruo, Takashi; Asanuma, Atsushi; Yanagisawa, Keiji; Sawada, Yasufumi

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between an in vivo isobologram based on the concentrations of new quinolones (NQs) in brain tissue and the administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the occurrence of convulsions in mice and an in vitro isobologram based on the concentrations of both drugs for changes in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current response in Xenopus oocytes injected with mRNA from mouse brains in the presence of NQs and/or NSAIDs. After the administration of enoxacin (ENX) in the presence or absence of felbinac (FLB), ketoprofen (KTP), or flurbiprofen (FRP), a synergistic effect was observed in the isobologram based on the threshold concentration in brain tissue between mice with convulsions and those without convulsions. The three NSAIDs did not affect the pharmacokinetic behavior of ENX in the brain. However, the ENX-induced inhibition of the GABA response in the GABAA receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes was enhanced in the presence of the three NSAIDs. The inhibition ratio profiles of the GABA responses for both drugs were analyzed with a newly developed toxicodynamic model. The inhibitory profiles for ENX in the presence of NSAIDs followed the order KTP (1.2 μM) > FRP (0.3 μM) > FLB (0.2 μM). These were 50- to 280-fold smaller than those observed in the absence of NSAIDs. The inhibition ratio (0.01 to 0.02) of the GABAA receptor in the presence of both drugs was well-fitted to the isobologram based on threshold concentrations of both drugs in brain tissue between mice with convulsions and those without convulsions, despite the presence of NSAIDs. In mice with convulsions, the inhibitory profiles of the threshold concentrations of both drugs in brain tissue of mice with convulsions and those without convulsions can be predicted quantitatively by using in vitro GABA response data and toxicodynamic model. PMID:10223919

  1. In vivo and in vitro toxicodynamic analyses of new quinolone-and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kita, H; Matsuo, H; Takanaga, H; Kawakami, J; Yamamoto, K; Iga, T; Naito, M; Tsuruo, T; Asanuma, A; Yanagisawa, K; Sawada, Y

    1999-05-01

    We investigated the correlation between an in vivo isobologram based on the concentrations of new quinolones (NQs) in brain tissue and the administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the occurrence of convulsions in mice and an in vitro isobologram based on the concentrations of both drugs for changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current response in Xenopus oocytes injected with mRNA from mouse brains in the presence of NQs and/or NSAIDs. After the administration of enoxacin (ENX) in the presence or absence of felbinac (FLB), ketoprofen (KTP), or flurbiprofen (FRP), a synergistic effect was observed in the isobologram based on the threshold concentration in brain tissue between mice with convulsions and those without convulsions. The three NSAIDs did not affect the pharmacokinetic behavior of ENX in the brain. However, the ENX-induced inhibition of the GABA response in the GABAA receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes was enhanced in the presence of the three NSAIDs. The inhibition ratio profiles of the GABA responses for both drugs were analyzed with a newly developed toxicodynamic model. The inhibitory profiles for ENX in the presence of NSAIDs followed the order KTP (1.2 microM) > FRP (0. 3 microM) > FLB (0.2 microM). These were 50- to 280-fold smaller than those observed in the absence of NSAIDs. The inhibition ratio (0.01 to 0.02) of the GABAA receptor in the presence of both drugs was well-fitted to the isobologram based on threshold concentrations of both drugs in brain tissue between mice with convulsions and those without convulsions, despite the presence of NSAIDs. In mice with convulsions, the inhibitory profiles of the threshold concentrations of both drugs in brain tissue of mice with convulsions and those without convulsions can be predicted quantitatively by using in vitro GABA response data and toxicodynamic model. PMID:10223919

  2. An in vitro spectrometric method for determining the partition coefficients of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs into human erythrocyte ghost membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omran, Ahmed A.

    2013-03-01

    Usefulness of second derivative spectrophotometry for determining the partition coefficients (Kps) of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) between human erythrocyte ghost (HEG) membranes and buffer at simulated physiological conditions (pH = 7.4, 37 °C) has been adequately emphasized. In the absorption spectra for each of the investigated NSAIDs, λmax was red-shifted in presence of HEG membranes, indicating that NSAIDs have the nature of metachromasy between lipid bilayer and water. Further quantitative spectral data for calculating Kps could not be obtained from the absorption spectra because of the presence of background signal impacts of HEG lipid bilayers. Second derivative spectra were calculated from absorption spectra and fortunately showed three isosbestic derivative points for each NSAID, indicating without doubt that the background signals were entirely eliminated. From the relation between the derivative intensity change (ΔD) induced by addition of HEG membranes, Kps were calculated and obtained with RSD of below 6%. Fractions of partitioned NSAIDs are in well-harmony with that derived from the experimental values. Moreover, validity of the proposed method was confirmed. Conclusively, the second derivative spectrometry has proven to be a facile, reliable and more expeditious method to obtain in vitro Kps of drugs to HEG without previous separation.

  3. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Lakhundi, Sahreena; Iqbal, Junaid; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, Diclofenac, targeting COX have shown promise in the treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Using various NSAIDs, Diclofenac sodium, Indomethacin, and Acetaminophen, here we determined the effects of NSAIDs on the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype. Using amoebicidal assays, the results revealed that Diclofenac sodium, and Indomethacin affected growth of A. castellanii. In contrast, none of the compounds tested had any effect on the viability of A. castellanii. Importantly, all NSAIDs tested abolished A. castellanii encystation. This is a significant finding as the ability of amoebae to transform into the dormant cyst form presents a significant challenge in the successful treatment of infection. The NSAIDs inhibit production of cyclo-oxegenase, which regulates the synthesis of prostaglandins suggesting that cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and prostaglandins play significant role(s) in Acanthamoeba biology. As NSAIDs are routinely used in the clinical practice, these findings may help design improved preventative strategies and/or of therapeutic value to improve prognosis, when used in combination with other anti-amoebic drugs. PMID:27381503

  4. Effects of systemic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nociception during tail ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gelgor, L.; Butkow, N.; Mitchell, D.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of five non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on nociception during ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats. 2. We induced tail ischaemia in conscious rats by applying a tourniquet at the base of the tail until the rats exhibited co-ordinated escape behaviour when we released the tourniquet. 3. We assessed hyperalgesia by measuring the tail flick latency following tail immersion in water at 49 degrees C, before applying and immediately after releasing the tourniquet, and then at 30 min intervals for 2 h. 4. Intraperitoneal injection of NSAIDs prior to applying the tourniquet had no effect on the co-ordinated escape behaviour during ischaemia, nor on tail flick latency in the absence of prior ischaemia. However all the drugs attenuated reperfusion hyperalgesia in a log dose-dependent manner. Doses required to abolish hyperalgesia, were indomethacin 5 mg kg-1, diclofenac sodium 42 mg kg-1, ibuprofen 54 mg kg-1, dipyrone 168 mg kg-1 and paracetamol 170 mg kg-1. 5. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying nociception during ischaemia are not the same as those underlying reperfusion hyperalgesia. Moreover our procedure provides a rapid and more humane method for measuring the antinociceptive potency of NSAIDs. PMID:1559131

  5. Effect of indomethacin on bile acid-phospholipid interactions: implication for small intestinal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Dial, Elizabeth J; Doyen, Rand; Lichtenberger, Lenard M

    2010-05-01

    The injurious effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the small intestine was not appreciated until the widespread use of capsule endoscopy. Animal studies found that NSAID-induced small intestinal injury depends on the ability of these drugs to be secreted into the bile. Because the individual toxicity of amphiphilic bile acids and NSAIDs directly correlates with their interactions with phospholipid membranes, we propose that the presence of both NSAIDs and bile acids alters their individual physicochemical properties and enhances the disruptive effect on cell membranes and overall cytotoxicity. We utilized in vitro gastric AGS and intestinal IEC-6 cells and found that combinations of bile acid, deoxycholic acid (DC), taurodeoxycholic acid, glycodeoxycholic acid, and the NSAID indomethacin (Indo) significantly increased cell plasma membrane permeability and became more cytotoxic than these agents alone. We confirmed this finding by measuring liposome permeability and intramembrane packing in synthetic model membranes exposed to DC, Indo, or combinations of both agents. By measuring physicochemical parameters, such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer and membrane surface charge, we found that Indo associated with phosphatidylcholine and promoted the molecular aggregation of DC and potential formation of larger and isolated bile acid complexes within either biomembranes or bile acid-lipid mixed micelles, which leads to membrane disruption. In this study, we demonstrated increased cytotoxicity of combinations of bile acid and NSAID and provided a molecular mechanism for the observed toxicity. This mechanism potentially contributes to the NSAID-induced injury in the small bowel. PMID:20203063

  6. Enantioselective analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in freshwater fish based on microextraction with a supramolecular liquid and chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Carmen; Sicilia, Maria Dolores; Rubio, Soledad

    2015-06-01

    Toxicity of pharmaceuticals to aquatic biota is still largely unknown, and no research on the stereoselective toxicity of chiral drugs to these organisms has been undertaken to date. Because of the lack of analytical methods available for this purpose, this manuscript deals, for the first time, with the enantioselective analysis of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, naproxen and ketoprofen in freshwater fish. The method was based on the microextraction of NSAIDs from fish muscle with a supramolecular liquid made up of inverted hexagonal aggregates of decanoic acid, their enantiomeric separation by liquid chromatography onto a (R)-1-naphthylglycine and 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid stationary phase and quantification by tandem mass spectrometry. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for NSAID enantiomers were in the range 1.7-3.3 ng g(-1). Absolute recoveries were from 97 to 104 %, which indicated the high extraction efficiency of the supramolecular solvent. Extraction equilibrium conditions were reached after 10 min which permitted fast sample treatment. Relative standard deviations for enantiomers in fish muscle were always below 6 %. Isotopically labelled internal standards were used to compensate for matrix interferences. The method in-house validation was carried out with the Oncorhynchus mykiss species, and it was applied to the determination of NSAID enantiomers in different fortified freshwater fish species (Alburnus alburnus, Lepomis gibbosus, Micropterus salmoides, O. mykiss and Cyprinus carpio). PMID:25869485

  7. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced adverse effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2016-09-10

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are globally prescribed, exhibit mainly anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects but also can cause adverse effects including gastrointestinal erosions, ulceration, bleeding, and perforation. The purpose of this study was to investigate surrogate biomarkers associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) damage caused by NSAID treatment using pattern recognition analysis of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra of rat urine. Urine was collected for 5h after oral administration of the following NSAIDs at low or high doses: acetylsalicylic acid (10 or 200mgkg(-1)), diclofenac (0.5 or 15mgkg(-1)), piroxicam (1 or 10mgkg(-1)), indomethacin (1 or 25mgkg(-1)), or ibuprofen (10, or 150mgkg(-1)) as nonselective COX inhibitors and celecoxib (10 or 100mgkg(-1)) as a COX-2 selective inhibitor. The urine was analyzed using 500MHz (1)H NMR for spectral binning and targeted profiling and the level of gastric damage was examined. The nonselective COX inhibitors caused severe gastric damage while no lesions were observed in the celecoxib-treated rats. The (1)H NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04ppm) for global profiling, and a total of 44 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. Multivariate data analyses were performed to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to NSAIDs using partial least square-discrimination analysis (PLS-DA). The (1)H NMR spectra clustered differently according to gastric damage score in global profiling. In targeted profiling, the endogenous metabolites of citrate, allantoin, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, benzoate, glycine, and trimethylamine N-oxide were selected as putative biomarkers for gastric damage caused by NSAIDs. These putative biomarkers might be useful for predicting the risk of adverse effects caused by NSAIDs in the early stage of drug development process. PMID:27497650

  8. Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (-COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic -OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities with

  9. Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (–COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic –OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities

  10. P-glycoprotein Modulates Morphine Uptake into the CNS: A Role for the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Slosky, Lauren M.; Thompson, Brandon J.; Zhang, Yifeng; Laracuente, Mei-Li; DeMarco, Kristin M.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that peripheral inflammatory pain (PIP), induced by subcutaneous plantar injection of λ-carrageenan, results in increased expression and activity of the ATP-dependent efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that is endogenously expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The result of increased P-gp functional expression was a significant reduction in CNS uptake of morphine and, subsequently, reduced morphine analgesic efficacy. A major concern in the treatment of acute pain/inflammation is the potential for drug-drug interactions resulting from P-gp induction by therapeutic agents co-administered with opioids. Such effects on P-gp activity can profoundly modulate CNS distribution of opioid analgesics and alter analgesic efficacy. In this study, we examined the ability of diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly administered in conjunction with the opioids during pain therapy, to alter BBB transport of morphine via P-gp and whether such changes in P-gp morphine transport could alter morphine analgesic efficacy. Administration of diclofenac reduced paw edema and thermal hyperalgesia in rats subjected to PIP, which is consistent with the known mechanism of action of this NSAID. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in P-gp expression in rat brain microvessels not only following PIP induction but also after diclofenac treatment alone. Additionally, in situ brain perfusion studies showed that both PIP and diclofenac treatment alone increased P-gp efflux activity resulting in decreased morphine brain uptake. Critically, morphine analgesia was significantly reduced in animals pretreated with diclofenac (3 h), as compared to animals administered diclofenac and morphine concurrently. These novel findings suggest that administration of diclofenac and P-gp substrate opioids during pain pharmacotherapy may result in a clinically significant drug-drug interaction. PMID:24520393