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Sample records for nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated

  1. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Education Materials > Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Germs, like plants and animals, have been classified ... causes human tuberculosis. Click to open: Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Print Page Email Page Add Page I want ...

  2. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  3. Epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolations among central North Carolina residents, 2006-2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental mycobacteria associated with a range of infections. Reports of NTM epidemiology have primarily focused on pulmonary infections and isolations, however extrapulmonary infections of the skin, soft tissues and sterile s...

  4. Series of Case Patients with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation, Central North Carolina, 2006-2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection/colonization, associated with human morbidity/mortality, is linked to drinking water and drinking water distribution systems. To characterize rates and distribution of NTM isolation among residents living in three North Carolina countie...

  5. Nontuberculous mycobacteria isolations from residents of three counties in North Carolina, 2006 – 2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging infections among the elderly and immunocompromised but the epidemiology is poorly characterized. Reports of NTM isolation from clinical specimens is a readily available, if imperfect surrogate for disease prevalence. Meth...

  6. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Tuberculosis Suspects in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Cadmus, Simeon Idowu; Diarra, Bassirou; Traore, Brehima; Maiga, Mamoudou; Siddiqui, Sophia; Tounkara, Anatole; Falodun, Olutayo; Lawal, Wole; Adewole, Isaac Folurunso; Murphy, Rob; van Soolingen, Dick; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    In Nigeria, one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) burdened nations, sputum smear microscopy is routinely employed for TB diagnosis at Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) Centers. This diagnostic algorithm does not differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Between December 2008 and January 2009, consecutive patients diagnosed with TB were screened for inclusion at 10 DOTS centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. To verify Mycobacterium species in patients diagnosed, we cultured and identified mycobacterial isolates using PCR, line probe assay, and spoligotyping techniques. From 48 patients screened, 23 met the inclusion criteria for the study. All the 23 study patients had a positive culture. Overall, we identified 11/23 patients (48%) with MTC only, 9/23 (39%) with NTM only, and 3/23 (13%) with evidence of both MTC and NTM. Strains of MTC identified were Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) genotype (n = 12), M. africanum (n = 1), and the genotype family T (n = 1). Four M. avium-intracellulare-M. scrofulaceum complexes, one M. chelonae complex, one M. abscessus, and one M. intracellulare were identified. Our findings underscore the need to incorporate molecular techniques for more precise diagnosis of TB at DOTS centers to improve clinical outcomes and safe guard public health, particularly in TB endemic countries. PMID:27099795

  7. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Tuberculosis Suspects in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Cadmus, Simeon Idowu; Diarra, Bassirou; Traore, Brehima; Maiga, Mamoudou; Siddiqui, Sophia; Tounkara, Anatole; Falodun, Olutayo; Lawal, Wole; Adewole, Isaac Folurunso; Murphy, Rob; van Soolingen, Dick; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    In Nigeria, one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) burdened nations, sputum smear microscopy is routinely employed for TB diagnosis at Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) Centers. This diagnostic algorithm does not differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Between December 2008 and January 2009, consecutive patients diagnosed with TB were screened for inclusion at 10 DOTS centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. To verify Mycobacterium species in patients diagnosed, we cultured and identified mycobacterial isolates using PCR, line probe assay, and spoligotyping techniques. From 48 patients screened, 23 met the inclusion criteria for the study. All the 23 study patients had a positive culture. Overall, we identified 11/23 patients (48%) with MTC only, 9/23 (39%) with NTM only, and 3/23 (13%) with evidence of both MTC and NTM. Strains of MTC identified were Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) genotype (n = 12), M. africanum (n = 1), and the genotype family T (n = 1). Four M. avium-intracellulare-M. scrofulaceum complexes, one M. chelonae complex, one M. abscessus, and one M. intracellulare were identified. Our findings underscore the need to incorporate molecular techniques for more precise diagnosis of TB at DOTS centers to improve clinical outcomes and safe guard public health, particularly in TB endemic countries. PMID:27099795

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cândido, Pedro Henrique Campanini; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Folescu, Tânia Wrobel; Coelho, Fábrice Santana; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Gomes, Karen Machado; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Aguiar, Fábio Silva; Chitolina, Fernanda; Armstrong, Derek T.; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have become emergent pathogens of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 5 to 20%. This work investigated the presence of NTM in sputum samples of 129 CF patients (2 to 18 years old) submitted to longitudinal clinical supervision at a regional reference center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From June 2009 to March 2012, 36 NTM isolates recovered from 10 (7.75%) out of 129 children were obtained. Molecular identification of NTM was performed by using PCR restriction analysis targeting the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65) and sequencing of the rpoB gene, and susceptibility tests were performed that followed Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. For evaluating the genotypic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and/or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) was performed. The species identified were Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii (n = 24), M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (n = 6), Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium marseillense (n = 2), and Mycobacterium timonense (n = 1). Most of the isolates presented resistance to five or more of the antimicrobials tested. Typing profiles were mainly patient specific. The PFGE profiles indicated the presence of two clonal groups for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and five clonal groups for M. abscesssus subsp. bolletii, with just one clone detected in two patients. Given the observed multidrug resistance patterns and the possibility of transmission between patients, we suggest the implementation of continuous and routine investigation of NTM infection or colonization in CF patients, including countries with a high burden of tuberculosis disease. PMID:24920766

  9. Learn about Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are naturally-occurring organisms found in water and soil. NTM lung infection occurs when a person inhales ... Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are organisms naturally found in soil and water. NTM infections can become chronic and ...

  10. METHODS FOR ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA IN POTABLE WATER, CCL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunist pathogens that usually infect individuals with impaired immunity, such as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients, the elderly or those undergoing immunosuppressive drugs or chemotherapy. The sources of infection are ...

  11. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahruqi, Sara H.; Al-Busaidy, Suleiman; Boeree, Martin J.; Al-Zadjali, Samiya; Patel, Arti; Dekhuijzen, P.N. Richard; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Arabian Peninsula. We assessed the prevalence and studied a random sample of isolates at a reference laboratory in Muscat, Oman. NTM cause disease in this region, and their prevalence has increased. PMID:19193276

  12. The geographic diversity of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from pulmonary samples: an NTM-NET collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Hoefsloot, Wouter; van Ingen, Jakko; Andrejak, Claire; Angeby, Kristian; Bauriaud, Rosine; Bemer, Pascale; Beylis, Natalie; Boeree, Martin J; Cacho, Juana; Chihota, Violet; Chimara, Erica; Churchyard, Gavin; Cias, Raquel; Daza, Rosa; Daley, Charles L; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Domingo, Diego; Drobniewski, Francis; Esteban, Jaime; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse; Folkvardsen, Dorte Bek; Gibbons, Noel; Gómez-Mampaso, Enrique; Gonzalez, Rosa; Hoffmann, Harald; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Indra, Alexander; Jagielski, Tomasz; Jamieson, Frances; Jankovic, Mateja; Jong, Eefje; Keane, Joseph; Koh, Wo-Jung; Lange, Berit; Leao, Sylvia; Macedo, Rita; Mannsåker, Turid; Marras, Theodore K; Maugein, Jeannette; Milburn, Heather J; Mlinkó, Tamas; Morcillo, Nora; Morimoto, Kozo; Papaventsis, Dimitrios; Palenque, Elia; Paez-Peña, Mar; Piersimoni, Claudio; Polanová, Monika; Rastogi, Nalin; Richter, Elvira; Ruiz-Serrano, Maria Jesus; Silva, Anabela; da Silva, M Pedro; Simsek, Hulya; van Soolingen, Dick; Szabó, Nora; Thomson, Rachel; Tórtola Fernandez, Teresa; Tortoli, Enrico; Totten, Sarah E; Tyrrell, Greg; Vasankari, Tuula; Villar, Miguel; Walkiewicz, Renata; Winthrop, Kevin L; Wagner, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    A significant knowledge gap exists concerning the geographical distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolation worldwide. To provide a snapshot of NTM species distribution, global partners in the NTM-Network European Trials Group (NET) framework (www.ntm-net.org), a branch of the Tuberculosis Network European Trials Group (TB-NET), provided identification results of the total number of patients in 2008 in whom NTM were isolated from pulmonary samples. From these data, we visualised the relative distribution of the different NTM found per continent and per country. We received species identification data for 20 182 patients, from 62 laboratories in 30 countries across six continents. 91 different NTM species were isolated. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) bacteria predominated in most countries, followed by M. gordonae and M. xenopi. Important differences in geographical distribution of MAC species as well as M. xenopi, M. kansasii and rapid-growing mycobacteria were observed. This snapshot demonstrates that the species distribution among NTM isolates from pulmonary specimens in the year 2008 differed by continent and differed by country within these continents. These differences in species distribution may partly determine the frequency and manifestations of pulmonary NTM disease in each geographical location. PMID:23598956

  13. [Distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from clinical specimens and identified with DNA sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Özçolpan, O Olcay; Sürücüoğlu, Süheyla; Özkütük, Nuri; Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz

    2015-10-01

    The aims of the study were to perform the identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated from different clinical specimens in the Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Celal Bayar University, Manisa (located at Aegean region of Turkey), by DNA sequence analysis, and to discuss the epidemiological aspects of the data obtained. Out of 5122 clinical specimens sent to the laboratory with the initial diagnosis of tuberculosis in the period April 2007 to July 2011, M.tuberculosis complex and NTM were identified in 225 (4.39%) and 126 (2.46%) samples, respectively. DNA sequence analysis by targeting hsp65 and 16S rDNA gene regions was performed on 101 of the NTM strains in Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Ege University, Izmir. DNA sequence analysis data was evaluated using RIDOM and GenBLAST data bases. NTM strains were identified as 40 M.porcinum (39.60%), 36 M.lentiflavum (35.65%), six M.abscessus (5.64%), five M.peregrinum (4.95%), four M.gordonae (3.96%), three M.fortuitum (2.97%), two M.chelonae (1.98%), and one for each M.alvei (0.99%), M.scrofulaceum (0.99%), M.kansasii (0.99%) species. Two strains which were both 95-98% compatible with other mycobacteria in the data bases could not be identified with certainty. Seventy-two (94.73%) strains of M.lentiflavum and M.porcinum, which were the most frequent (75.24%) species in the study, were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. The remaining 99 strains examined could not be proven as the cause of the disease due to absence of patients' clinical data, whereas two M.abscessus strains isolated from the sputum were considered as the cause of the disease according to the ATS/IDSA criteria. The isolation rate of NTM in 2010 was found significantly higher (5.33%) than previous years. Review of the 2010 data showed that all strains of M.porcinum and M.lentiflavum, which were the most frequently identified strains were isolated from BAL specimens. This situation is in line with the start of using of an

  14. Drug susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Kuijper, Ed J

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria are emerging in many settings. With an increased number of patients needing treatment, the role of drug susceptibility testing is again in the spotlight. This articles covers the history and methodology of drug susceptibility tests for nontuberculous mycobacteria, but focuses on the correlations between in vitro drug susceptibility, pharmacokinetics and in vivo outcomes of treatment. Among slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria, clear correlations have been established for macrolides and amikacin (Mycobacterium avium complex) and for rifampicin (Mycobacterium kansasii). Among rapid-growing mycobacteria, correlations have been established in extrapulmonary disease for aminoglycosides, cefoxitin and co-trimoxazole. In pulmonary disease, correlations are less clear and outcomes of treatment are generally poor, especially for Mycobacterium abscessus. The clinical significance of inducible resistance to macrolides among rapid growers is an important topic. The true role of drug susceptibility testing for nontuberculous mycobacteria still needs to be addressed, preferably within clinical trials. PMID:25340838

  15. Natural Disasters and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Jon N.; Chan, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases acquired by survivors of large-scale natural disasters complicate the recovery process. During events such as tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornados and well into the recovery period, victims often are exposed to water-soil mixtures that have relocated with indigenous microbes. Because nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in water and soil, there is potential for increased exposure to these organisms during natural disasters. In this hypothesis-driven commentary, we discuss the rise in NTM lung disease and natural disasters and examine the geographic overlap of NTM infections and disaster frequencies in the United States. Moreover, we show an increased number of positive NTM cultures from Louisiana residents in the years following three of the relatively recent epic hurricanes and posit that such natural disasters may help to drive the increased number of NTM infections. Finally, we advocate for increased environmental studies and surveillance of NTM infections before and after natural disasters. PMID:25644904

  16. EXAMINATION OF BOTTLED WATER FOR NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to examine bottled water for the presence of nontuberculous mycobacteria as a potential source of infection in AIDS patients. Twenty brands of bottled water commonly used in the Los Angeles area were tested for the presence of nontuberculous mycoba...

  17. Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in French Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    Phelippeau, Michael; Aboubaker Osman, Djaltou; Musso, Didier

    2015-01-01

    As few data are available in the Pacific countries and territories of the Oceania region regarding nontuberculous mycobacteria, we retrospectively identified 87 such isolates from French Polynesia from 2008 to 2013 by hybridization using DNA-strip, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and partial rpoB gene sequencing. Partial rpoB gene sequencing classified 42/87 (48.3%) isolates in the Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, 28 (32.2%) in the Mycobacterium abscessus complex, 8 (9.2%) in the Mycobacterium mucogenicum complex, and 5 (5.7%) in the Mycobacterium avium complex. Two isolates were identified as Mycobacterium acapulcensis and Mycobacterium cosmeticum by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. One isolate, unidentified by MALDI-TOF MS and yielding less than 92% and 96% sequence similarity with rpoB and hsp65 reference sequences, respectively, was regarded as a potentially new species. Samples from three patients exhibiting ≥2 Mycobacterium porcinum isolates and from one patient with emphysema and a lung abscess exhibiting 2 Mycobacterium senegalense isolates fulfilled the American Thoracic Society microbiological criteria for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung infection. Remote geographic areas, such as French Polynesia, are potential sources for the discovery of new mycobacterial species. PMID:26400787

  18. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Bonaiti, Giulia; Pesci, Alberto; Marruchella, Almerico; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Gori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, a growing interest has been raised in evaluating nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in patients with noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE). This paper reviews several aspects of the correlations between NTM and NCFBE, including pathogenesis, radiological features, diagnosis, and management. Bronchiectasis and NTM lung disease are connected, but which one comes first is still an unresolved question. The rate of NTM lung disease in NCFBE varies through the studies, from 5% to 30%. The most frequent species isolated is MAC. NCFBE patients affected by NTM infection frequently present coinfections, including both other different NTM species and microorganisms, such as P. aeruginosa. Once a diagnosis of NTM disease has been reached, the initiation of therapy is not always mandatory. NTM species isolated, patients' conditions, and disease severity and its evolution should be considered. Risk factors for disease progression in NCFBE patients with NTM are low body mass index, cavitary disease, consolidations, and macrolide resistance at presentation. PMID:26106603

  19. Occurrence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Covert, Terry C.; Rodgers, Mark R.; Reyes, Antolin L.; Stelma, Gerard N.

    1999-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a major cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts. Because there is no evidence of person-to-person transmission and NTM have been found in drinking water, the environment is considered a likely source of infection. In this study the widespread occurrence of NTM was examined in drinking water, bottled water, and ice samples. A total of 139 samples were examined for NTM by a membrane filtration culture technique followed by PCR amplification and 16S rRNA sequence determination to identify the isolates. NTM were not detected in bottled water or cisterns but were detected in 54% of the ice samples and 35% of the public drinking-water samples from 21 states. The most frequently occurring isolate was M. mucogenicum (formerly referred to as an M. chelonae-like organism). PMID:10347032

  20. Isolation of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) from Household Water and Shower Aerosols in Patients with Pulmonary Disease Caused by NTM

    PubMed Central

    Tolson, Carla; Carter, Robyn; Coulter, Chris; Huygens, Flavia; Hargreaves, Megan

    2013-01-01

    It has been postulated that susceptible individuals may acquire infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from water and aerosol exposure. This study examined household water and shower aerosols of patients with NTM pulmonary disease. The mycobacteria isolated from clinical samples from 20 patients included M. avium (5 patients), M. intracellulare (12 patients), M. abscessus (7 patients), M. gordonae (1 patient), M. lentiflavum (1 patient), M. fortuitum (1 patient), M. peregrinum (1 patient), M. chelonae (1 patient), M. triplex (1 patient), and M. kansasii (1 patient). One-liter water samples and swabs were collected from all taps, and swimming pools or rainwater tanks. Shower aerosols were sampled using Andersen six-stage cascade impactors. For a subgroup of patients, real-time PCR was performed and high-resolution melt profiles were compared to those of ATCC control strains. Pathogenic mycobacteria were isolated from 19 homes. Species identified in the home matched that found in the patient in seven (35%) cases: M. abscessus (3 cases), M. avium (1 case), M. gordonae (1 case), M. lentiflavum (1 case), and M. kansasii (1 case). In an additional patient with M. abscessus infection, this species was isolated from potable water supplying her home. NTM grown from aerosols included M. abscessus (3 homes), M. gordonae (2 homes), M. kansasii (1 home), M. fortuitum complex (4 homes), M. mucogenicum (1 home), and M. wolinskyi (1 home). NTM causing human disease can be isolated from household water and aerosols. The evidence appears strongest for M. avium, M. kansasii, M. lentiflavum, and M. abscessus. Despite a predominance of disease due to M. intracellulare, we found no evidence for acquisition of infection from household water for this species. PMID:23843489

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources of a Metropolitan City

    PubMed Central

    Akbar Velayati, Ali; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Malekshahian, Donya; Seif, Shima; Rahideh, Snaz; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While NTM infection is mainly acquired from environmental exposure, monitoring of environmental niches for NTM is not a routine practice. This study aimed to find the prevalence of environmental NTM in soil and water in four highly populated suburbs of Tehran, Iran. Material and Methods A total of 4014 samples from soil and water resources were collected and studied. Sediments of each treated sample were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium and observed twice per week for growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation. Colonies were studied with phenotypic tests. Molecular analysis was performed on single colonies derived from subculture of original isolates. Environmental samples were compared with 34 NTM isolates from patients who were residents of the study locations. Results Out of 4014 samples, mycobacteria were isolated from 862 (21.4%) specimens; 536 (62.1%) belonged to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) and 326 (37.8%) were rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM). The five most frequent NTM were M. farcinogens (105/862; 12.1%), M. fortuitum (72/862; 8.3%), M. senegalense (58/862; 6.7%), M. kansasii (54/862; 6.2%), and M. simiae (46/862; 5.3%). In total, 62.5% (539/862) of mycobacterial positive samples were isolated from water and only 37.4% (323/862) of them were isolated from soil samples (P<0.05). Out of 5314 positive clinical samples for mycobacteria, 175 (3.2%) isolates were NTM. The trend of NTM isolates increased from 1.2% (13 out of 1078) in 2004 to 3.8% (39 out of 1005) in 2014 (P = 0.0001). The major clinical isolates were M. simiae (51; 29.1%), M. kansasii (26; 14.8%), M. chelonae (28; 16%), and M. fortuitum (13; 7.4%). Conclusions Comparing the distribution pattern of environmental NTM isolates with clinical isolates suggests a possible transmission link, but this does not apply to all environmental NTM species. Our study confirms an increasing trend of NTM isolation from clinical samples that needs further investigation. PMID:25485795

  2. Factors associated with the isolation of Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from a large municipal water system in Brisbane, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are normal inhabitants of a variety of environmental reservoirs including natural and municipal water. The aim of this study was to document the variety of species of NTM in potable water in Brisbane, QLD, with a specific interest in the main pathogens responsible for disease in this region and to explore factors associated with the isolation of NTM. One-litre water samples were collected from 189 routine collection sites in summer and 195 sites in winter. Samples were split, with half decontaminated with CPC 0.005%, then concentrated by filtration and cultured on 7H11 plates in MGIT tubes (winter only). Results Mycobacteria were grown from 40.21% sites in Summer (76/189) and 82.05% sites in winter (160/195). The winter samples yielded the greatest number and variety of mycobacteria as there was a high degree of subculture overgrowth and contamination in summer. Of those samples that did yield mycobacteria in summer, the variety of species differed from those isolated in winter. The inclusion of liquid media increased the yield for some species of NTM. Species that have been documented to cause disease in humans residing in Brisbane that were also found in water include M. gordonae, M. kansasii, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum complex, M. intracellulare, M. avium complex, M. flavescens, M. interjectum, M. lentiflavum, M. mucogenicum, M. simiae, M. szulgai, M. terrae. M. kansasii was frequently isolated, but M. avium and M. intracellulare (the main pathogens responsible for disease is QLD) were isolated infrequently. Distance of sampling site from treatment plant in summer was associated with isolation of NTM. Pathogenic NTM (defined as those known to cause disease in QLD) were more likely to be identified from sites with narrower diameter pipes, predominantly distribution sample points, and from sites with asbestos cement or modified PVC pipes. Conclusions NTM responsible for human disease can be found in large

  3. OCCURRENCE OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a major cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts. Because there is no evidence of person-to-person transmission and NTM have been found in drinking water, the environment is considered a likely source of infection. In this ...

  4. Identification of non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from clinical specimens at a tertiary care hospital: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens in immuno-compromised patients. They are also increasingly recognized as pathogens in immuno-competent individuals. Globally, an increase in NTM isolation is being reported with a varied geographic prevalence of different species around the world. There is lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Pakistan. Treatment options differ according to the species isolated and its susceptibility profile. Knowledge of local species variation would help targeted therapy. This study was performed to determine frequencies of different NTM species isolated from various clinical specimens submitted at a tertiary care hospital laboratory. Methods NTM isolated from 25955 clinical specimens over a period of two years (2010 to 2011) were included. All NTM were identified using conventional tests. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed by broth microdilution and interpreted according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute’s document M24-A2. Results A total of 104 NTM were included in the study. Of these, 76% (54/71) rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) and 57.6% (19/33) slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) could be further identified. Mycobacterium fortuitum (21/54) was the commonest NTM identified among RGM followed by M. mucogenicum (12/54) and M. smegmatis (11/54). Among SGM, M. avium complex (MAC) was the most frequent (14/19). Clinical significance could be assessed in a limited number (52/104) of NTM isolates and MAC appeared to be the commonest significant NTM. Three extra-pulmonary cases were found to be healthcare associated infections. DST results for RGM showed susceptibility to amikacin (100%), clarithromycin (100%, except M. fortuitum where it is not reportable), linezolid (90%) and moxifloxacin (75%). Whereas SGM were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), linezolid (58.8%) and moxifloxacin (64.7%). Conclusion This is the first study reporting NTM species and their

  5. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA FROM FOODS AS POSSIBLE EXPOSURE SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of foods collected from local supermarkets and produce stands were examined as possible sources of nontuberculous mycobacterial exposure. Food samples were combined with sterile ultrapure water and manually shaken. To remove large particles, the suspensions were filtere...

  6. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Sputum in a Gold Mining Workforce in South Africa: An Observational, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    van Halsema, Clare L.; Chihota, Violet N.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Lewis, James J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), detected by liquid more than solid culture in sputum specimens from a South African mining workforce, is uncertain. We aimed to describe the current spectrum and relevance of NTM in this population. Methods. An observational study including individuals with sputum NTM isolates, recruited at workforce tuberculosis screening and routine clinics. Symptom questionnaires were administered at the time of sputum collection and clinical records and chest radiographs reviewed retrospectively. Results. Of 232 individuals included (228 (98%) male, median age 44 years), M. gordonae (60 individuals), M. kansasii (50), and M. avium complex (MAC: 38) were the commonest species. Of 38 MAC isolates, only 2 (5.3%) were from smear-positive sputum specimens and 30/38 grew in liquid but not solid culture. MAC was especially prevalent among symptomatic, HIV-positive individuals. HIV prevalence was high: 57/74 (77%) among those tested. No differences were found in probability of death or medical separation by NTM species. Conclusions. M. gordonae, M. kansasii, and MAC were the commonest NTM among miners with suspected tuberculosis, with most MAC from smear-negative specimens in liquid culture only. HIV testing and identification of key pathogenic NTM in this setting are essential to ensure optimal treatment. PMID:26180817

  7. Epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria, an emerging environmental pathogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is an environmentally transmitted pathogen primarily associated with water and soil exposure. It is increasingly recognized in the developed world and may manifest as infection or colonization of multiple anatomic sites. Nontuberculous mycobacter...

  8. Isolation and identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria from hospitalized patients and drinking water samples--examination of their correlation by chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Dovriki, Eleni; Gerogianni, Irini; Petinaki, Efi; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Papaioannou, Agelos; Gourgoulianis, Kostas

    2016-04-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been found to be widely dispersed in the environment and are being considered potentially pathogenic for humans and animals, while reports of their human to human transmission are absent. Water and aerosols are potential transmission modes of NTM to humans. Hospitalized patients with NTM infections were studied together with drinking water samples from their respective residence areas during 2003-2013. Cluster analysis and factor analysis were used to analyze the data matrix. A total of 367 hospitalized patients living in 30 localities in the Prefecture of Larissa were tested positive for NTM. The most frequently isolated NTM species of the 383 NTM isolates from the clinical specimens were Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 118, 30.8 %), M. gordonae (n = 87, 22.7 %), M. peregrinum (n = 46, 12.0 %), M. chelonae (n = 11, 2.9 %), M. avium (n = 8, 2.1 %), and M. intracellulare (n = 7, 1.8 %), while 88 (23.0 %) of these isolates were not identified. It is noted that in 8 patients, M. tuberculosis was isolated simultaneously with one NTM, in 15 patients, together with two types of NTM, while in 1 patient, it was found at the same time as three different NTM. In addition, 3360 drinking water samples were collected from 30 localities and analyzed during 2010 to 2013; they were found 11.2 % NTM positive. Cluster analysis and factor analysis results confirm that NTM strains are correlated to each other in both isolated samples from patients and drinking water, while the strength of their correlation varied from weak to moderate (e.g., factor loadings ranged from 0.69 to 0.74 when all data are considered). These results provide indications that drinking water could be linked with NTM cases in humans. PMID:27021690

  9. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Respiratory Tract Infections, Eastern Asia

    PubMed Central

    van Ingen, Jakko; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Van Hung, Nguyen; Dekhuijzen, P.N. Richard; Boeree, Martin J.; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species isolated from pulmonary samples from persons in Asia and their association with pulmonary infections, we reviewed the literature. Mycobacterium avium complex bacteria were most frequently isolated (13%–81%) and were the most common cause of pulmonary NTM disease (43%–81%). Also pathogenic were rapidly growing mycobacteria (M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. abscessus). Among all NTM isolated from pulmonary samples, 31% (582/1,744) were considered clinically relevant according to American Thoracic Society diagnostic criteria. Most patients were male (79%) and had a history of tuberculosis (37%). In Asia, high prevalence of rapidly growing mycobacteria and a history of tuberculosis are distinct characteristics of pulmonary NTM disease. This geographic variation is not well reflected in the American Thoracic Society criteria for NTM infections and could be incorporated in future guidelines. PMID:21392422

  10. Pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Curtis H; Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    The propensity of various nontuberculous mycobacteria to cause lung disease varies widely and is conditioned by host factors; infection is believed to occur from environmental sources. Nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease (PNTM) is increasing worldwide and Mycobacterium avium complex is the most common cause. PNTM usually occurs in one of three prototypical forms: hypersensitivity pneumonitis, cavitary tuberculosis-like disease or nodular bronchiectasis. PNTM has been linked in some patients to genetic variants of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene and a distinct patient phenotype. Interactions between PNTM and other comorbidities are also increasingly appreciated. Guidelines for diagnosis, emphasizing chest imaging and microbiology, have been published; speciation using molecular techniques is critical for accuracy and for treatment decisions. Clinical trials are lacking to inform treatment for many species and experience with M. avium complex and several others species serves as a guide instead. Use of multiple drugs for a period of at least 12 months following sputum conversion is the norm for most species. In vitro drug susceptibility results for many drugs may not correlate with clinical outcomes and such testing should be done on a selective basis. PMID:23234447

  11. NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH POINT-OF-USE FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated potable water contains a variety of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) that are indigenous to aquatic environments and are not entirely eliminated by treatment. These opportunistic pathogens are potentially harmful to individuals whose body defenses are impaired. Reverse ...

  12. Evaluation of MALDI Biotyper Mycobacteria Library v3.0 for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Belén; Ruiz-Serrano, M Jesús; Ruiz, Adrián; Timke, Markus; Kostrzewa, Markus; Bouza, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has demonstrated its ability to promptly identify nontuberculous mycobacteria using the Mycobacteria Library v2.0. However, some species are particularly difficult to identify reliably using this database, providing a low log(score). In this study, the identification power of an updated Mycobacteria Library (v3.0) has been evaluated. Overall, 109 NTM isolates were analyzed with both databases. The v3.0 database allowed a high-level confidence in the identification [log(score) value, ≥1.8] of 91.7% of the isolates versus 83.5% with the v2.0 version (P< 0.01). PMID:26842704

  13. Mycobacteria mobility shift assay: a method for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wildner, Letícia Muraro; Bazzo, Maria Luiza; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Segat, Gabriela; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Schlindwein, Aline Daiane; de Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano; Rovaris, Darcita B; Bonjardim, Claudio A; Kroon, Erna G; Ferreira, Paulo CP

    2014-01-01

    The identification of mycobacteria is essential because tuberculosis (TB) and mycobacteriosis are clinically indistinguishable and require different therapeutic regimens. The traditional phenotypic method is time consuming and may last up to 60 days. Indeed, rapid, affordable, specific and easy-to-perform identification methods are needed. We have previously described a polymerase chain reaction-based method called a mycobacteria mobility shift assay (MMSA) that was designed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species identification. The aim of this study was to assess the MMSA for the identification of MTC and NTM clinical isolates and to compare its performance with that of the PRA-hsp65 method. A total of 204 clinical isolates (102 NTM and 102 MTC) were identified by the MMSA and PRA-hsp65. For isolates for which these methods gave discordant results, definitive species identification was obtained by sequencing fragments of the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. Both methods correctly identified all MTC isolates. Among the NTM isolates, the MMSA alone assigned 94 (92.2%) to a complex or species, whereas the PRA-hsp65 method assigned 100% to a species. A 91.5% agreement was observed for the 94 NTM isolates identified by both methods. The MMSA provided correct identification for 96.8% of the NTM isolates compared with 94.7% for PRA-hsp65. The MMSA is a suitable auxiliary method for routine use for the rapid identification of mycobacteria. PMID:24821059

  14. In Vitro Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Iran.

    PubMed

    Heidarieh, Parvin; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Hashemzadeh, Mohamad; Feizabadi, Mohamad Mehdi; Bostanabad, Saeed Zaker; Nobar, Mostafa Ghalami; Hashemi Shahraki, Abodolrazagh

    2016-03-01

    Many species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have long been identified as important causes of human disease, the incidence of which is rising. Several reports have suggested increasing trend of both in vitro and in vivo resistance to available treatment regimes. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibiotic susceptibility of clinically relevant NTM isolates using standard microbroth dilution test. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed following National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards methods for NTM isolates, including 85 Mycobacterium fortuitum, 39 Mycobacterium chelonae, and 30 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus as rapidly growing mycobacteria and 48 Mycobacterium simiae and 40 Mycobacterium kansasii as slowly growing mycobacteria. All isolates were recovered from various types of clinical samples and identified by multilocus sequence analysis. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ), amikacin, tobramycin, clarithromycin, moxifloxacin, linezolid, and imipenem showed better activity against M. fortuitum rather than meropenem, ciprofloxacin, cefoxitin, and doxycycline. Amikacin was active against 93% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus. Linezolid, clarithromycin, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, moxifloxacin, tobramycin, TMP-SMZ, doxycycline, and meropenem showed some activities on M. abscessus subsp. abscessus as well. The majority of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. chelonae strains were multidrug resistant. Among the 40 isolates of M. kansasii, all were susceptible to ethambutol, isoniazid, clarithromycin, moxifloxacin, and linezolid. These isolates were also resistant to doxycycline and 50% were resistant to rifampicin and ciprofloxacin. M. simiae was resistant to clarithromycin, doxycycline, isoniazid, and TMP-SMZ, and the majority of isolates showed high levels of resistance to linezolid, ethambutol, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, and rifampicin. The majority of M. simiae isolates were multidrug resistant. Our data

  15. Analysis of DNA gyrA Gene Mutation in Clinical and Environmental Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Isolates of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Using Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Zarkesh Esfahani, Fatemeh Sadat; Bahador, Nima; Moghim, Sharareh; Radaei, Tooba; Rezaei Yazdi, Hadi; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajiyeh; Fazeli, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background During the past several years, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been reported as some of the most important agents of infection in immunocompromised patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of clinical and environmental NTM species isolated from Isfahan province, Iran, using the agar dilution method, and to perform an analysis of gyrA gene-related ciprofloxacin resistance. Materials and Methods A total of 41 clinical and environmental isolates of NTM were identified by conventional and multiplex PCR techniques. The isolates were separated out of water, blood, abscess, and bronchial samples. The susceptibility of the isolates to 1 µg/mL, 2 µg/mL and 4 µg/mL of ciprofloxacin concentrations was determined by the agar dilution method according to CLSI guidelines. A 120-bp area of the gyrA gene was amplified, and PCR-SSCP templates were defined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The 120-bp of gyrA amplicons with different PCR-SSCP patterns were sequenced. Results The frequency of the identified isolates was as follows: Mycobacterium fortuitum, 27 cases; M. gordonae, 10 cases; M. smegmatis, one case; M. conceptionense, one case; and M. abscessus, two cases. All isolates except for M. abscessus were sensitive to all three concentrations of ciprofloxacin. The PCR-SSCP pattern of the gyrA gene of resistant M. abscessus isolates showed four different bands. The gyrA sequencing of resistant M. abscessus isolates showed 12 alterations in nucleotides compared to the M. abscessus ATCC 19977 resistant strain; however, the amino acid sequences were similar. Conclusions This study demonstrated the specificity and sensitivity of the PCR-SSCP method for finding mutations in the gyrA gene. Due to the sensitivity of most isolates to ciprofloxacin, this antibiotic should be considered an appropriate drug for the treatment of related diseases. PMID:27217921

  16. Specific Proteins in Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: New Potential Tools

    PubMed Central

    Orduña, Patricia; Castillo-Rodal, Antonia I.; Mercado, Martha E.; Ponce de León, Samuel; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been isolated from water, soil, air, food, protozoa, plants, animals, and humans. Although most NTM are saprophytes, approximately one-third of NTM have been associated with human diseases. In this study, we did a comparative proteomic analysis among five NTM strains isolated from several sources. There were different numbers of protein spots from M. gordonae (1,264), M. nonchromogenicum type I (894), M. nonchromogenicum type II (935), M. peregrinum (806), and M. scrofulaceum/Mycobacterium mantenii (1,486) strains, respectively. We identified 141 proteins common to all strains and specific proteins to each NTM strain. A total of 23 proteins were selected for its identification. Two of the common proteins identified (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR and diguanylate cyclase) did not align with M. tuberculosis complex protein sequences, which suggest that these proteins are found only in the NTM strains. Some of the proteins identified as common to all strains can be used as markers of NTM exposure and for the development of new diagnostic tools. Additionally, the specific proteins to NTM strains identified may represent potential candidates for the diagnosis of diseases caused by these mycobacteria. PMID:26106621

  17. Specific Proteins in Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: New Potential Tools.

    PubMed

    Orduña, Patricia; Castillo-Rodal, Antonia I; Mercado, Martha E; Ponce de León, Samuel; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been isolated from water, soil, air, food, protozoa, plants, animals, and humans. Although most NTM are saprophytes, approximately one-third of NTM have been associated with human diseases. In this study, we did a comparative proteomic analysis among five NTM strains isolated from several sources. There were different numbers of protein spots from M. gordonae (1,264), M. nonchromogenicum type I (894), M. nonchromogenicum type II (935), M. peregrinum (806), and M. scrofulaceum/Mycobacterium mantenii (1,486) strains, respectively. We identified 141 proteins common to all strains and specific proteins to each NTM strain. A total of 23 proteins were selected for its identification. Two of the common proteins identified (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR and diguanylate cyclase) did not align with M. tuberculosis complex protein sequences, which suggest that these proteins are found only in the NTM strains. Some of the proteins identified as common to all strains can be used as markers of NTM exposure and for the development of new diagnostic tools. Additionally, the specific proteins to NTM strains identified may represent potential candidates for the diagnosis of diseases caused by these mycobacteria. PMID:26106621

  18. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria in patients with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Wickremasinghe, M; Ozerovitch, L; Davies, G; Wodehouse, T; Chadwick, M; Abdallah, S; Shah, P; Wilson, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms. Patients with pre-existing lung damage are susceptible to NTM, but their prevalence in bronchiectasis is unknown. Distinguishing between lung colonisation and disease can be difficult. Methods: A prospective study of 100 patients with bronchiectasis was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of NTM in sputum, and a retrospective analysis of clinical, microbiological, lung function and radiology data of our clinic patients with NTM sputum isolates over 11 years was performed. Results: The prevalence of NTM in this population of patients with bronchiectasis was 2%. Patients in the retrospective study were divided into three groups: bronchiectasis + multiple NTM isolates (n = 25), bronchiectasis + single isolates (n = 23), and non-bronchiectasis + multiple isolates (n = 22). Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) species predominated in patients with bronchiectasis compared with non-bronchiectasis lung disease (72% v 9%, p<0.0001). Single isolates were also frequently MAC (45.5%). Multiple isolates in bronchiectasis were more often smear positive on first sample than single isolates (p<0.0001). NTM were identified on routine screening samples or because of suggestive radiology. No particular bronchiectasis aetiology was associated with an NTM. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were frequently co-cultured. Six (25%) of multiple NTM patients had cavities of which five were due to MAC. Half the patients with multiple isolates were treated, mostly due to progressive radiology. Conclusions: NTM are uncommon in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Routine screening identifies otherwise unsuspected patients. MAC is the most frequent NTM isolated. PMID:16227333

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of standard strains of nontuberculous mycobacteria by microplate Alamar Blue assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilian; Lian, Lu-Lu; Wan, Li; Zhang, Jingrui; Zhao, Xiuqin; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Haican; Wan, Kanglin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 24 standard nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species strains including 12 slowly growing mycobacteria strains and 12 rapidly growing mycobacteria strains were subjected to drug susceptibility testing using microplate Alamar Blue assay-based 7H9 broth. The most active antimicrobial agents against the 24 NTM strains were streptomycin, amikacin, the fluoroquinolones, and the tetracyclines. Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium bolletii, and Mycobacterium simiae are resistant to most antimicrobial agents. The susceptibility results of this study from 24 NTM standard strains can be referenced by clinicians before susceptibility testing for clinical isolates is performed or when conditions do not allow for susceptibility testing. The application of broth-based methods is recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the documentation of the susceptibility patterns of standard strains of mycobacteria can improve the international standardization of susceptibility testing methods. PMID:24386332

  20. General Overview on Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Biofilms, and Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Sonia; Joao, Ines; Jordao, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emergent pathogens whose importance in human health has been growing. After being regarded mainly as etiological agents of opportunist infections in HIV patients, they have also been recognized as etiological agents of several infections on immune-competent individuals and healthcare-associated infections. The environmental nature of NTM and their ability to assemble biofilms on different surfaces play a key role in their pathogenesis. Here, we review the clinical manifestations attributed to NTM giving particular importance to the role played by biofilm assembly. PMID:26618006

  1. Biofilms of Pathogenic Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Targeted by New Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Aung, Thet Tun; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Lin, Shuimu; Salleh, Shuhaida Mohamed; Givskov, Michael; Liu, Shouping; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Yang, Liang; Beuerman, Roger W

    2016-01-01

    Microbial infections of the cornea are potentially devastating and can result in permanent visual loss or require vision-rescuing surgery. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports on nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of the cornea. Challenges to the management of nontuberculous mycobacterial keratitis include delayed laboratory detection, low index of clinical suspicion, poor drug penetration, slow response to therapy, and prolonged use of antibiotic combinations. The ability of nontuberculous mycobacteria to evade the host immune response and the ability to adhere and to form biofilms on biological and synthetic substrates contribute to the issue. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antimicrobial compounds that can overcome these problems. In this study, we evaluated the biofilm architectures for Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum in dynamic flow cell chamber and 8-well chamber slide models. Our results showed that mycobacterial biofilms were quite resistant to conventional antibiotics. However, DNase treatment could be used to overcome biofilm resistance. Moreover, we successfully evaluated a new antimicrobial compound (AM-228) that was effective not only for planktonic mycobacterial cells but also for biofilm treatment and was compared favorably with the most successful "fourth-generation" fluoroquinolone, gatifloxacin. Finally, a new treatment strategy emerged: a combination of DNase with an antibiotic was more effective than an antibiotic alone. PMID:26459903

  2. Biofilms of Pathogenic Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Targeted by New Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Thet Tun; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Lin, Shuimu; Salleh, Shuhaida Mohamed; Givskov, Michael; Liu, Shouping; Lwin, Nyein Chan

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections of the cornea are potentially devastating and can result in permanent visual loss or require vision-rescuing surgery. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports on nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of the cornea. Challenges to the management of nontuberculous mycobacterial keratitis include delayed laboratory detection, low index of clinical suspicion, poor drug penetration, slow response to therapy, and prolonged use of antibiotic combinations. The ability of nontuberculous mycobacteria to evade the host immune response and the ability to adhere and to form biofilms on biological and synthetic substrates contribute to the issue. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antimicrobial compounds that can overcome these problems. In this study, we evaluated the biofilm architectures for Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum in dynamic flow cell chamber and 8-well chamber slide models. Our results showed that mycobacterial biofilms were quite resistant to conventional antibiotics. However, DNase treatment could be used to overcome biofilm resistance. Moreover, we successfully evaluated a new antimicrobial compound (AM-228) that was effective not only for planktonic mycobacterial cells but also for biofilm treatment and was compared favorably with the most successful “fourth-generation” fluoroquinolone, gatifloxacin. Finally, a new treatment strategy emerged: a combination of DNase with an antibiotic was more effective than an antibiotic alone. PMID:26459903

  3. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Drug Resistance Mechanisms, and Therapy of Infections with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin A.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Within the past 10 years, treatment and diagnostic guidelines for nontuberculous mycobacteria have been recommended by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Moreover, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has published and recently (in 2011) updated recommendations including suggested antimicrobial and susceptibility breakpoints. The CLSI has also recommended the broth microdilution method as the gold standard for laboratories performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria. This article reviews the laboratory, diagnostic, and treatment guidelines together with established and probable drug resistance mechanisms of the nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:22763637

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, drug resistance mechanisms, and therapy of infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Nash, Kevin A; Wallace, Richard J

    2012-07-01

    Within the past 10 years, treatment and diagnostic guidelines for nontuberculous mycobacteria have been recommended by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Moreover, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has published and recently (in 2011) updated recommendations including suggested antimicrobial and susceptibility breakpoints. The CLSI has also recommended the broth microdilution method as the gold standard for laboratories performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria. This article reviews the laboratory, diagnostic, and treatment guidelines together with established and probable drug resistance mechanisms of the nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:22763637

  5. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems Jill Hoelle, Michael Coughlin, Elizabeth Sotkiewicz, Jingrang Lu, Stacy Pfaller, Mark Rodgers, and Hodon Ryu U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati...

  6. Newly described or emerging human species of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Griffith, David E; Wallace, Richard J

    2002-03-01

    The advent of molecular testing in the laboratory has brought about the recognition of multiple newly characterized mycobacterial species not previously recognizable with most standard techniques. Some of the species are nonpathogenic, but the majority may cause clinical disease. Each is likely to have its own biology, drug susceptibility pattern, and response to drug/surgical therapy. Thus, it is important to try to recognize these new species in the laboratory. A study of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of these new species also may help to elucidate the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these organisms. In addition, there are multiple emerging species of nontuberculous mycobacteria including M. ulcerans, M. haemophilum, M. xenopi, and M. malmoense. [table: see text] These species are being recognized increasingly as a cause of human disease and recovered within the laboratory. The clinician must learn about these new pathogens to recognize them clinically and assist the laboratory in their recovery. PMID:11917813

  7. Current Epidemiologic Trends of the Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM).

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2016-06-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are waterborne opportunistic pathogens of humans. They are normal inhabitants of premise plumbing, found, for example, in household and hospital shower heads, water taps, aerators, and hot tubs. The hydrophobic NTM are readily aerosolized, and pulmonary infections and hypersensitivity pneumonitis have been traced to the presence of NTM in shower heads. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in automotive workers was traced to the presence of NTM in metal recovery fluid used in grinding operations. Recently, NTM bacteremia in heart transplant patients has been traced to the presence of NTM in water reservoirs of instruments employed in operating rooms to heat and cool patient blood during periods of mechanical circulation. Although NTM are difficult to eradicate from premise plumbing as a consequence of their disinfectant-resistance and formation of biofilms, measures such as reduction of turbidity and reduction in carbon and nitrogen for growth and the installation of microbiological filters can reduce exposure of NTM to susceptible individuals. PMID:27020801

  8. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Serrano, María Jesús; Marín, Mercedes; López Roa, Paula; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) isolates was evaluated in this study. Overall, 125 NTM isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF and GenoType CM/AS. Identification by 16S rRNA/hsp65 sequencing was considered the gold standard. Agreements between MALDI-TOF and GenoType CM/AS with the reference method were, respectively, 94.4% and 84.0%. In 17 cases (13.6%), results provided by GenoType and MALDI-TOF were discordant; however, the reference method agreed with MALDI-TOF in 16/17 cases (94.1%; P = 0.002). PMID:26063855

  9. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: An Underestimated Cause of Bioprosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bouchiat, Coralie; Saison, Julien; Boisset, Sandrine; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Issartel, Bertrand; Dauwalder, Olivier; Benito, Yvonne; Jarraud, Sophie; Grando, Jacqueline; Boibieux, Andre; Dumitrescu, Oana; Delahaye, François; Farhat, Fadi; Thivolet-Bejui, Françoise; Frieh, Jean-Philippe; Vandenesch, François

    2015-04-01

    Background.  Atypical mycobacteria, or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), have been barely reported as infective endocarditis (IE) agents. Methods.  From January 2010 to December 2013, cardiac valve samples sent to our laboratory as cases of blood culture-negative suspected IE were analyzed by 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When positive for NTM, hsp PCR allowed species identification. Demographic, clinical, echocardiographic, histopathological, and Ziehl-Neelsen staining data were then collected. Results.  Over the study period, 6 of 370 cardiac valves (belonging to 5 patients in 3 hospitals) were positive for Mycobacterium chelonae (n = 5) and Mycobacterium lentiflavum (n = 1) exclusively on bioprosthetic material. The 5 patients presented to the hospital for heart failure without fever 7.1-18.9 months (median 13.1 months) after biological prosthetic valve implantation. Echocardiography revealed paravalvular regurgitation due to prosthesis dehiscence in all patients. Histopathological examination of the explanted material revealed inflammatory infiltrates in all specimens, 3 of which were associated with giant cells. Gram staining and conventional cultures remained negative, whereas Ziehl-Neelsen staining showed acid-fast bacilli in all patients. Allergic etiology was ruled out by antiporcine immunoglobulin E dosages. These 5 cases occurred exclusively on porcine bioprosthetic material, revealing a statistically significant association between bioprosthetic valves and NTM IE (P < .001). Conclusions.  The body of evidence confirmed the diagnosis of prosthetic IE. The statistically significant association between bioprosthetic valves and NTM IE encourages systematic Ziehl-Neelsen staining of explanted bioprosthetic valves in case of early bioprosthesis dysfunction, even without an obvious sign of IE. In addition, we strongly question the cardiac bioprosthesis conditioning process after animal sacrifice. PMID:26213691

  10. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: An Underestimated Cause of Bioprosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Bouchiat, Coralie; Saison, Julien; Boisset, Sandrine; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Issartel, Bertrand; Dauwalder, Olivier; Benito, Yvonne; Jarraud, Sophie; Grando, Jacqueline; Boibieux, Andre; Dumitrescu, Oana; Delahaye, François; Farhat, Fadi; Thivolet-Bejui, Françoise; Frieh, Jean-Philippe; Vandenesch, François

    2015-01-01

    Background. Atypical mycobacteria, or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), have been barely reported as infective endocarditis (IE) agents. Methods. From January 2010 to December 2013, cardiac valve samples sent to our laboratory as cases of blood culture-negative suspected IE were analyzed by 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When positive for NTM, hsp PCR allowed species identification. Demographic, clinical, echocardiographic, histopathological, and Ziehl-Neelsen staining data were then collected. Results. Over the study period, 6 of 370 cardiac valves (belonging to 5 patients in 3 hospitals) were positive for Mycobacterium chelonae (n = 5) and Mycobacterium lentiflavum (n = 1) exclusively on bioprosthetic material. The 5 patients presented to the hospital for heart failure without fever 7.1–18.9 months (median 13.1 months) after biological prosthetic valve implantation. Echocardiography revealed paravalvular regurgitation due to prosthesis dehiscence in all patients. Histopathological examination of the explanted material revealed inflammatory infiltrates in all specimens, 3 of which were associated with giant cells. Gram staining and conventional cultures remained negative, whereas Ziehl-Neelsen staining showed acid-fast bacilli in all patients. Allergic etiology was ruled out by antiporcine immunoglobulin E dosages. These 5 cases occurred exclusively on porcine bioprosthetic material, revealing a statistically significant association between bioprosthetic valves and NTM IE (P < .001). Conclusions. The body of evidence confirmed the diagnosis of prosthetic IE. The statistically significant association between bioprosthetic valves and NTM IE encourages systematic Ziehl-Neelsen staining of explanted bioprosthetic valves in case of early bioprosthesis dysfunction, even without an obvious sign of IE. In addition, we strongly question the cardiac bioprosthesis conditioning process after animal sacrifice. PMID:26213691

  11. Resistance mechanisms and drug susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Boeree, Martin J; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W

    2012-06-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized as causative agents of opportunistic infections in humans. For most NTM infections the therapy of choice is drug treatment, but treatment regimens differ by species, in particular between slow (e.g. Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium kansasii) and rapid growers (e.g. Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium fortuitum). In general, drug treatment is long, costly, and often associated with drug-related toxicities; outcome of drug treatment is poor and is likely related to the high levels of natural antibiotic resistance in NTM. The role of drug susceptibility testing (DST) in the choice of agents for antimicrobial treatment of NTM disease, mainly that by slow growers, remains subject of debate. There are important discrepancies between drug susceptibility measured in vitro and the activity of the drug observed in vivo. In part, these discrepancies derive from laboratory technical issues. There is still no consensus on a standardized method. With the increasing clinical importance of NTM disease, DST of NTM is again in the spotlight. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the mechanisms of drug resistance in NTM, phenotypic methods for testing susceptibility in past and current use for DST of NTM, as well as molecular approaches to assess drug resistance. PMID:22525524

  12. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: opportunistic environmental pathogens for predisposed hosts.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L

    2010-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections are caused by environmental mycobacteria. Patients with pulmonary NTM disease usually have predisposing lung abnormalities. Diagnostic methods are evolving. Treatment is largely empiric. Data were extracted from peer reviewed publications, guidelines, and case series. Progressive NTM lung disease should be treated. Multidrug regimens are mostly macrolide based and are occasionally complemented by lung resection. Disease persistence and relapse are not uncommon and are a greater problem with so-called rapid-grower NTM infections. Some of the issues considered in this review are: the role of antibiotic susceptibility testing in predicting treatment effectiveness, optimal drug combinations, daily vs. intermittent dosing intervals for different NTM infections and disease severity, when the goal of cure should be replaced with observation or palliation, and patient selection for surgery. Future needs for development and research include improved epidemiology, definition of genetic and other risk factors, definition of predictors of treatment outcome, multicenter treatment studies, new drug discovery and animal models of disease and treatment. PMID:20977990

  13. Update on pulmonary disease due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Stout, Jason E; Koh, Won-Jung; Yew, Wing Wai

    2016-04-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging worldwide as significant causes of chronic pulmonary infection, posing a number of challenges for both clinicians and researchers. While a number of studies worldwide have described an increasing prevalence of NTM pulmonary disease over time, population-based data are relatively sparse and subject to ascertainment bias. Furthermore, the disease is geographically heterogeneous. While some species are commonly implicated worldwide (Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium abscessus), others (e.g., Mycobacterium malmoense, Mycobacterium xenopi) are regionally important. Thoracic computed tomography, microbiological testing with identification to the species level, and local epidemiology must all be taken into account to accurately diagnose NTM pulmonary disease. A diagnosis of NTM pulmonary disease does not necessarily imply that treatment is required; a patient-centered approach is essential. When treatment is required, multidrug therapy based on appropriate susceptibility testing for the species in question should be used. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are needed to optimize the management of these complicated infections. PMID:26976549

  14. [Cutaneous and soft skin infections due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Esteban, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    The frequency of isolation as well as the number of species of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has increased in the last years. Nearly every pathogenic species of NTM may cause skin and soft tissue infections, but rapidly growing mycobacteria (Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus), Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium ulcerans are the most commonly involved. Many of these cutaneous mycobacteriosis, such as rapidly growing mycobacteria, M. marinum, Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium kansasii or Mycobacterium xenopi are world-wide distributed. In contrast, some others have a specific geographical distribution. This is the case of M. ulcerans, which causes a cutaneous diseases endemic of Central and West Africa (Buruli ulcer) and Australia (Bairnsdale ulcer), being the third mycobacterial infection after tuberculosis and leprosy. Cutaneous mycobacteriosis usually appear either after contact of traumatic or surgical wounds with water or other contaminated products, or, secondarily, as a consequence of a disseminated mycobacterial disease, especially among immunosuppressed patients. For an early diagnosis, it is necessary to maintain a high degree of suspicion in patients with chronic cutaneous diseases and a history of trauma, risk exposure and negative results of conventional microbiological studies. In general, individualized susceptibility testing is not recommended for most NTM infections, except for some species, and in case of therapeutic failure. Treatment includes a combination of different antimicrobial agents, but it must be taken into account that NTM are resistant to conventional antituberculous drugs. Severe cases or those with deep tissues involvement could also be tributary of surgical resection. PMID:20172423

  15. Ecology of nontuberculous mycobacteria--where do human infections come from?

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-02-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental, opportunistic human pathogens whose reservoirs include peat-rich potting soil and drinking water in buildings and households. In fact, humans are likely surrounded by NTM. NTM are ideally adapted for residence in drinking water distribution systems and household and building plumbing as they are disinfectant-resistant, surface adherent, and able to grow on low concentrations of organic matter. For individuals at risk for NTM infection, measures can be taken to reduce NTM exposure. These include avoiding inhalation of dusts from peat-rich potting soil and aerosols from showers, hot tubs, and humidifiers. A riskanalysis of the presence of NTM in drinking water has not been initiated because the virulence of independent isolates of even single NTM species (e.g., Mycobacterium avium) is quite broad, and virulence determinants have not been identified. PMID:23460009

  16. Simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sang Mee; Lim, Mi Suk; Hong, Yun Ji; Kim, Taek Soo; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Eui Chong

    2013-11-01

    Many nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species have clinical significance, and the rapid and reliable identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and NTM species is important. We evaluated the simultaneous detection of MTBC and NTM in respiratory specimens. MTBC and NTM were simultaneously detected and identified by laboratory-developed (LDT) real-time PCR, multiplex real-time PCR/melting curve analysis, rpoB PCR restriction fragment length polymorphisms and the AdvanSure Mycobacteria GenoBlot assay (LG Life Sciences). Eighty-five respiratory specimens from 69 patients showed simultaneous detection of MTBC and NTM. A line probe assay showed 70.6% concordance with LDT. Ten patients (14.5%) had a history of tuberculosis, and eight patients (11.6%) had been previously diagnosed with bronchiectasis. Mixed cultures were present one time in 57 patients (82.6%) and repeatedly in 12 patients (17.4%). MTBC was more frequent in 44 patients (63.8%), and NTM was isolated in seven patients (10.1%). The commonly detected NTM species in the mixed cultures were Mycobacterium intracellulare (29.0%) and Mycobacterium abscessus (29.0%). Co-isolation caused a failure of antitubercular drug susceptibility testing in 2 patients (2.9%). Molecular methods allow MTBC and NTM species to be simultaneously identified in respiratory specimens. NTM isolated with MTBC has clinical significance in some patients and should not be ignored. PMID:23988279

  17. HUMAN INFECTION WITH NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA SPP. IN KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON, 1999-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human infection with nontuberculous Mycobacteria spp. in King County, Washington, 1999 - 2002
    E Hilborn, T Covert, M Yakrus, G Stelma, M Schmitt
    1) US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory,...

  18. Modeling Human Exposure Risk to Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Central North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a broad group of soil-and water-borne bacteria. Some species are pathogenic and may cause serious infections in the lungs, soft tissues, bones and skin. Infections in humans are associated with environmental exposures to contaminated soil, ae...

  19. Utility of rpoB Gene Sequencing for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    de Zwaan, Rina; van Ingen, Jakko

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands, clinical isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has increased over the past decade. Proper identification of isolates is important, as NTM species differ strongly in clinical relevance. Most of the currently applied identification methods cannot distinguish between all different Mycobacterium species and complexes within species. rpoB gene sequencing exhibits a promising level of discrimination among rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria, including the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, we prospectively compared rpoB gene sequencing with our routine algorithm of reverse line blot identification combined with partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 455 NTM isolates. rpoB gene sequencing identified 403 isolates to species level as 45 different known species and identified 44 isolates to complex level, and eight isolates remained unidentifiable to species level. In contrast, our reference reverse line blot assay with adjunctive 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified 390 isolates to species level (30 distinct species) and identified 56 isolates to complex level, and nine isolates remained unidentified. The higher discriminatory power of rpoB gene sequencing results largely from the distinction of separate species within complexes and subspecies. Also, Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium interjectum were separated into multiple groupings with relatively low sequence similarity (98 to 94%), suggesting that these are complexes of closely related species. We conclude that rpoB gene sequencing is a more discriminative identification technique than the combination of reverse line blot and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and could introduce a major improvement in clinical care of NTM disease and the research on the epidemiology and clinical relevance of NTM. PMID:24808238

  20. Surveillance of Tuberculosis in Taipei: The Influence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Yu, Ming-Chih; Yang, Shiang-Lin; Yen, Muh-Yong; Bai, Kuan-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Background Notification of tuberculosis (TB) but not nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is mandatory in Taiwan. Partly due to the strict regulation on TB notification, several patients infected with NTM were notified as TB cases. Notification of patients infected with NTM as TB cases can trigger public health actions and impose additional burdens on the public health system. We conducted a study to assess the influence of NTM infection on surveillance of TB in Taipei. Methodology/Principal Findings The study population included all individuals with a positive culture for Mycobacterium who were citizens of Taipei City and notified as TB cases in the calendar years 2007–2010. Of the 4216 notified culture-positive tuberculosis (TB) cases, 894 (21.2%) were infected with NTM. The average annual reported case rate of infection with NTM was 8.6 (95% confidence interval 7.7–9.4) per 100,000 people. The reported case rate of NTM increased with age in both males and females. The proportion of reported TB cases infected with NTM was significantly higher in females than in males (27.6% vs 17.8%, adjusted OR (adjOR) 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.63–2.28); in smear-positive than in smear-negative (23.1% vs 19.2%, adjOR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08–1.47); and in previously treated cases than in new cases (35.7% vs 19.1%, adjOR 2.30, 95% CI 1.88–2.82). The most frequent species was M. avium complex (32.4%), followed by M. chelonae complex (17.6%), M. fortuitum complex (17.0%) and M. kansasii (9.8%). Of the 890 notified NTM cases assessed, 703 (79.0%) were treated with anti-TB drugs, and 730 (82.0%) were de-notified. Conclusions/Significance The influence of NTM on surveillance of TB in Taipei was substantial. Health authorities should take action to ensure that nucleic acid amplification tests are performed in all smear-positive cases in a timely manner to reduce the misdiagnosis of patients infected with NTM as TB cases. PMID:26544554

  1. Prevalence of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria in Hospital Waters of Major Cities of Khuzestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Hashemzadeh, Mohammad; Sheini Mehrabzadeh, Rasa; Teimoori, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are among the emerging pathogens in immunocompromised individuals including hospitalized patients. So, it is important to consider hospitals water supplies as a source for infection. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of NTM in the hospital aquatic systems of Khuzestan, South west of Iran. In total, 258 hospital water samples were collected and examined. After initial sample processing, sediment of each sample were inoculated into two Lowenstein-Jensen medium. The positive cultures were studied with phenotypic tests including growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation, with subsequent PCR- restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) and rpoB gene sequence analysis. Mycobacterial strains were isolated from 77 samples (29.8%), comprising 52 (70.1%) rapid growing, and 25 (32.4%) slow growing mycobacteria. Based on the overall results, M. fortuitum (44.1%) was the most common mycobacterial species in hospital water samples, followed by M. gordonae (n = 13, 16.8%) and M. senegalense (n = 5, 7.7%). In conclusion, current study demonstrated the NTM strains as one of the major parts of hospital water supplies with probable potential source for nosocomial infections. This finding also help to shed light on to the dynamics of the distribution and diversity of NTM in the water system of hospitals in the region of study. PMID:27148491

  2. NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACYERIA SPP ISOLATED FROM RESIDENTS OF KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON, 1999-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Pathogenic nontuberculous Mycobacteria spp. (NTM) are not known to be transmitted among persons, but may be acquired from exposure to contaminated media such as soil, food and water. We examined the spectrum of NTM isolated from human specimens in King County, WA.
    ...

  3. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria on Ready-to-Eat, Raw and Frozen Fruits and Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Dziedzinska, Radka; Makovcova, Jitka; Kaevska, Marija; Slany, Michal; Babak, Vladimir; Moravkova, Monika

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of fruits and vegetables is increasing worldwide because of the positive impact of these foods on human health. Ready-to-eat, raw whole, and frozen fruits and vegetables were purchased from markets and examined for the presence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) using culture, real-time PCR (qPCR), and sequencing. Using qPCR, Mycobacterium sp. at 10(0) to 10(4) ge/g (genome equivalents per gram) was found in almost all of the 178 samples; members of the M. avium complex were found only sporadically. Culture and sequencing revealed the presence of 22 viable NTM isolates in 17 samples. In addition to NTM commonly found in the environment, several rarely described isolates of viable NTM were recovered. The presence of Mycobacterium shigaense, which has been previously isolated only from human patients, was found in lettuce, the first time that this species has been found in an environmental sample. Mycobacterium parmense, Mycobacterium palustre, and Mycobacterium llatzerense, which have been previously isolated from human patients and occasionally from soil and water, were recovered from leafy green vegetables. Strawberries and cut salad mixes contained Mycobacterium algericum, Mycobacterium fallax, and Mycobacterium minnesotense. NTM are primarily nonpathogenic. However, consumption of fruits or vegetables contaminated with NTM could represent a health risk for immunocompromised people, children, and the elderly. PMID:27497136

  4. Multicenter Study of Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis in France ▿

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Anne-Laure; Catherinot, Emilie; Ripoll, Fabienne; Soismier, Nathalie; Macheras, Edouard; Ravilly, Sophie; Bellis, Gil; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Le Roux, Evelyne; Lemonnier, Lydie; Gutierrez, Cristina; Vincent, Véronique; Fauroux, Brigitte; Rottman, Martin; Guillemot, Didier; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    We performed a multicenter prevalence study of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) involving 1,582 patients (mean age, 18.9 years; male/female ratio, 1.06) with cystic fibrosis in France. The overall NTM prevalence (percentage of patients with at least one positive culture) was 6.6% (104/1,582 patients), with prevalences ranging from 3.7% (in the east of France) to 9.6% (in the greater Paris area). Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC; 50 patients) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC; 23 patients) species were the most common NTM, and the only ones associated with fulfillment of the American Thoracic Society bacteriological criteria for NTM lung disease. The “new” species, Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense, accounted for 40% of MABSC isolates. MABSC species were isolated at all ages, with a prevalence peak between 11 and 15 years of age (5.8%), while MAC species reached their highest prevalence value among patients over 25 years of age (2.2%). PMID:19846643

  5. Multicenter study of prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients with cystic fibrosis in france.

    PubMed

    Roux, Anne-Laure; Catherinot, Emilie; Ripoll, Fabienne; Soismier, Nathalie; Macheras, Edouard; Ravilly, Sophie; Bellis, Gil; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Le Roux, Evelyne; Lemonnier, Lydie; Gutierrez, Cristina; Vincent, Véronique; Fauroux, Brigitte; Rottman, Martin; Guillemot, Didier; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2009-12-01

    We performed a multicenter prevalence study of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) involving 1,582 patients (mean age, 18.9 years; male/female ratio, 1.06) with cystic fibrosis in France. The overall NTM prevalence (percentage of patients with at least one positive culture) was 6.6% (104/1,582 patients), with prevalences ranging from 3.7% (in the east of France) to 9.6% (in the greater Paris area). Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC; 50 patients) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC; 23 patients) species were the most common NTM, and the only ones associated with fulfillment of the American Thoracic Society bacteriological criteria for NTM lung disease. The "new" species, Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense, accounted for 40% of MABSC isolates. MABSC species were isolated at all ages, with a prevalence peak between 11 and 15 years of age (5.8%), while MAC species reached their highest prevalence value among patients over 25 years of age (2.2%). PMID:19846643

  6. Molecular Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Humans in Zimbabwe Using 16S Ribosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chin’ombe, Nyasha; Muzividzi, Boniface; Munemo, Ellen; Nziramasanga, Pasipanodya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) were previously isolated from diverse environments such as water, soil, sewage, food and animals. Some of these NTM are now known to be opportunistic pathogens of humans. Objective: The main purpose of the study was to identify NTM isolates stored at the National Microbiology Reference Laboratory (NMRL) and were previously isolated from humans during a national tuberculosis (TB) survey. Methods: Pure NTM cultures already isolated from human sputum samples during the national TB survey were retrieved from the NMRL and used for this study. DNA was extracted from the samples and 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The amplicons were sequenced and bioinformatics tools were used to identify the NTM species. Results: Out of total of 963 NTM isolates stored at the NMRL, 81 were retrieved for speciation. Forty isolates (49.4%) were found to belong to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) species. The other 41 isolates (50.6%) were identified as M. lentiflavum (6.2%), M. terrae complex (4.9%), M. paraense (4.9%), M. kansasii (3.7%), M. moriokaense (3.7%), M. asiaticum (2.5%), M. novocastrense (2.5%), M. brasiliensis (2.5%), M. elephantis (2.5%), M. paraffinicum (1.2%), M. bohemicum (1.2%), M. manitobense (1.2%), M. intermedium (1.2%), M. tuberculosis complex (1.2%), M. parakoreense (1.2%), M. florentinum (1.2%), M. litorale (1.2%), M. fluoranthenivorans (1.2%), M. sherrisii (1.2%), M. fortuitum (1.2%) and M septicum (1.2%). Two isolates (2.5%) could not be identified, but were closely related to M. montefiorense and M. phlei respectively. Interestingly, the MAC species were the commonest NTM during the survey. Conclusion: The study emphasizes the importance of identifying species of NTM in Zimbabwe. Future studies need to ascertain their true diversity and clinical relevance. PMID:27335623

  7. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory infections: advances in diagnosis and identification.

    PubMed

    Somoskovi, Akos; Salfinger, Max

    2014-06-01

    An urgent question that needs to be addressed rapidly by the mycobacteriology laboratory is whether Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex or NTM is involved. NAA assays are excellent tools for the purpose, and can be used directly on the clinical specimens of patients suspected of having mycobacterial disease, allowing same-day reporting of results. The CDC recommends using both liquid and solid media for growth detection of mycobacteria to decrease the time to detection and to increase the yield of growth detection. DNA sequencing of variable genomic regions offers a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive method for the identification of mycobacteria. PMID:24856528

  8. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria: baseline data from three sites in Papua New Guinea, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Serej; Carter, Robyn; Millan, Korai; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Pandey, Sushil; Coulter, Christopher; Siba, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in samples of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) cases from Papua New Guinea who were diagnosed using acid-fast microscopy. Methods As part of a case detection study for TB, conducted in three provincial hospitals in Papua New Guinea, sputum samples of suspected tuberculous cases aged 15 years or older were collected from November 2010 to July 2012. Mycobacterial species isolated from sputum and grown in culture were examined to distinguish between NTM and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Results NTM were detected in 4% (9/225) of sputum samples grown in culture. Five (2.2%) of them were identified as NTM only and four (1.8%) were identified as mixed cultures containing both MTBC and NTM. Four different NTM species were identified; M. fortuitum, M. intracellulare, M. terrae and M. avium. Discussion This is the first report from Papua New Guinea identifying NTM in three different locations. As NTM cannot be distinguished from M. tuberculosis through smear microscopy, the presence of NTM can lead to a false-positive diagnosis of tuberculosis. The prevalence of NTM should be determined and a diagnostic algorithm developed to confirm acid-fast bacilli in a smear as M. tuberculosis. PMID:26798558

  9. Activities of clarithromycin against eight slowly growing species of nontuberculous mycobacteria, determined by using a broth microdilution MIC system.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B A; Wallace, R J; Onyi, G O

    1992-01-01

    MICs of clarithromycin against 324 clinical isolates belonging to eight species of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria were determined by using a broth microdilution system. Isolates were inoculated into twofold drug dilutions in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (pH corrected to 7.4) and then incubated at 30 degrees C for 7 days for Mycobacterium marinum and for 14 days for all other species. The MIC for 90% of the strains (MIC90) was less than or equal to 0.5 micrograms/ml for isolates of Mycobacterium gordonae (6 strains), Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (5 strains), Mycobacterium szulgai (6 strains), and Mycobacterium kansasii (35 strains). MICs for M. marinum (25 strains) and Mycobacterium avium complex (237 strains) were higher, but 100% and 89% of the strains, respectively, were susceptible to less than or equal to 4 micrograms/ml. In contrast, MICs for five of six M. simiae strains were greater than 8 micrograms/ml, and the range of MICs for Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum varied from less than or equal to 0.125 to 8 micrograms/ml. For the 237 isolates of M. avium complex, the MIC50 was 2 micrograms/ml and the MIC90 was 8 micrograms/ml. MICs for most isolates (77%) were in the 1- to 4-micrograms/ml range. For the 80 isolates in this group known to be from AIDS patients, the MIC50 was 4 micrograms/ml and the MIC90 was 8 micrograms/ml. These MIC studies combined with preliminary clinical trials suggest that clarithromycin may be useful for drug therapy of most species of the slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria except M. simiae. PMID:1416891

  10. Epidemiology of human pulmonary infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Marras, Theodore K; Daley, Charles L

    2002-09-01

    , advancing age, and male sex. Aside from HIV and CF, mining with associated high rates of pneumoconiosis and previous TB may be the most important historically, reported in studies worldwide [63]. A recurring observation is the increase in rates of infection and disease. The reason for this is unclear but may be caused by any of several contributing factors. The possibility exists that the apparent increase is either spurious or less significant than studies would suggest. Changes in clinician awareness leading to increased investigations, or laboratory methods leading to isolation and identification of previously unnoticed organisms, could play a role in this trend, and studies have been published that support [67] and refute [31] this argument. We believe such factors may contribute to but do not explain the significant increases that have been observed. A true increase could be related to the host, the pathogen, or some interaction between the two. Host changes leading to increased susceptibility could play an important role, with increased numbers of patients with inadequate defenses from diseases such as HIV infection, malignancy, or simply advanced age [31]. An increase in susceptibility could also relate to the decrease in infection with two other mycobacteria. It has been speculated that infection with TB [29,38] and Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) [19,68] may provide cross-immunity protecting against NTM infection. Many investigations have observed decreasing rates of TB concomitant with the increases in NTM. In addition, studies from Sweden [68] and the Czech Republic [19] have found that children who were not vaccinated with BCG had a far higher rate of extrapulmonary NTM infection. Potential changes in the pathogens include increases in NTM virulence, and it has been argued that this should be considered as a possible contributing factor [69]. Finally, an interaction between the host and pathogen could involve a major increase in pathogen exposure or potential

  11. Baby bottle steam sterilizers for disinfecting home nebulizers inoculated with non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Towle, D; Callan, D A; Lamprea, C; Murray, T S

    2016-03-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTMb), present in environmental water sources, can contribute to respiratory infection in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Contaminated nebulizers are a potential source of respiratory infection. Treatment with baby bottle steam sterilizers disinfects home nebulizers inoculated with bacterial pathogens but whether this method works for disinfection of NTMb is unclear. Baby bottle steam sterilization was compared with vigorous water washing for disinfecting home nebulizers inoculated with NTMb mixed with cystic fibrosis sputum. No NTMb was recovered from any nebulizers after steam treatment whereas viable NTMb grew after water washing, demonstrating that steam sterilization effectively disinfects NTMb-inoculated nebulizers. PMID:26810616

  12. Challenges facing the drug discovery pipeline for non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Soni, Isha; De Groote, Mary Ann; Dasgupta, Arunava; Chopra, Sidharth

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections are increasingly being reported worldwide. They are a major concern for healthcare professionals for multiple reasons, ranging from the intrinsic resistance of NTM to most conventionally utilized antimicrobials to inharmonious diagnostic criteria utilized for evaluation of NTM-infected patients, leading to high morbidity. In this review, we highlight the paucity of drugs having potent anti-NTM activity amongst the new antimicrobials currently under various stages of development for anti-tubercular activity and issue a call for the establishment of a concerted dedicated drug discovery pipeline targeting NTM. PMID:26515915

  13. Inventory study of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease is not notifiable in most European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) countries, the epidemiological situation of the >150 NTM species is largely unknown. We aimed to collect data on the frequency of NTM detection and NTM species types in EU/EEA countries. Methods Officially nominated national tuberculosis reference laboratories of all EU/EEA countries were asked to provide information on: laboratory routines for detection and identification of NTM, including drug sensitivity testing (DST) methods; data on the number and type of NTM species identified; coverage and completeness of the provided data on NTM; type and number of human specimens tested for NTM; and number of specimens tested for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and NTM. This information was summarized and the main results are described. Results In total, 99 different NTM species were identified with M. avium, M. gordonae, M. xenopi , M. intracellulare, and M. fortuitum identified most frequently. Seven percent of the NTM species could not be identified. NTM was cultured from between 0.4-2.0% of the specimens (data from four countries). The laboratories use culturing methods optimised for M. tuberculosis complex. Identification is mainly carried out by a commercial line probe assay supplemented with sequencing. Most laboratories carried out DST for rapid growers and only at the explicit clinical request for slow growers. Conclusion It is likely that the prevalence of NTM is underestimated because diagnostic procedures are not optimized specifically for NTM and isolates may not be referred to the national reference laboratory for identification. Due to the diagnostic challenges and the need to establish the clinical relevance of NTM, we recommend that countries should concentrate detection and identification in only few laboratories. PMID:24502462

  14. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Park, In Kwon; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers of cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis patients are affected by pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection worldwide. Two species of NTM account for up to 95% of the pulmonary NTM infections: Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Diagnosis of pulmonary NTM infection is based on criteria specified in the 2007 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Disease Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines. While many initial positive cultures do not progress to active NTM disease, even a single positive NTM sputum culture obtained from higher risk groups such as classic CF or older women with bronchiectasis and very low body mass index should be closely monitored for progressive disease. Macrolides remain the most effective agents available against MAC and MABSC. Infection with MABSC may be associated with worse clinical outcomes, as more than half of MABSC isolates have inducible macrolide resistance conferred by an active erm(41) gene. Of growing concern in CF is that MABSC is becoming more common than MAC, seems to target younger patients with classic CF, and is more difficult to manage, often requiring prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics. Recurrence rates of NTM after initial successful treatment remain high, likely due to nonmodifiable risk factors raising the question of whether secondary prophylaxis is feasible. More rapid and readily available methods for detecting inducible macrolide resistance and better in vitro susceptibility testing methods for other drugs that correlate with clinical responses are needed. This is crucial to identify more effective regimens of existing drugs and for development of novel drugs for NTM infection. PMID:25826589

  15. Infections Caused by Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma M.; Al-Anazi, Waleed Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are acid-fast bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and can colonize soil, dust particles, water sources, and food supplies. They are divided into rapidly growing mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium chelonae, and Mycobacterium abscessus as well as slowly growing species such as Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium marinum. About 160 different species, which can cause community acquired and health care-associated infections, have been identified. NTM are becoming increasingly recognized in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with incidence rates ranging between 0.4 and 10%. These infections are 50–600 times commoner in transplant recipients than in the general population and the time of onset ranges from day 31 to day 1055 post-transplant. They have been reported following various forms of HSCT. Several risk factors predispose to NTM infections in recipients of stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies as well as the transplant procedure and its complications. Clinically, NTM may present with: unexplained fever, lymphadenopathy, osteomyelitis, soft tissue and skin infections, central venous catheter infections, bacteremia, lung, and gastrointestinal tract involvement. However, disseminated infections are commonly encountered in severely immunocompromised individuals and bloodstream infections are almost always associated with catheter-related infections. It is usually difficult to differentiate colonization from true infection, thus, the threshold for starting therapy remains undetermined. Respiratory specimens such as sputum, pleural fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage in addition to cultures of blood, bone, skin, and soft tissues are essential diagnostically. Susceptibility testing of mycobacterial isolates is a basic component of optimal care

  16. Use of MALDI-TOF MS for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla-Gradolph, María Concepción; De Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; García-Martínez, María de los Ángeles; Ortega-Torres, María; Montiel Quezel-Guerraz, Natalia; Palop-Borrás, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained for identification by MALDI-TOF of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated in clinical samples with those obtained by GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (common mycobacteria/additional species). A total of 66 Mycobacterium isolates from various clinical specimens (mainly respiratory) were tested in this study. They were identified using MALDI-TOF Bruker from strains isolated in Lowenstein, following the recommended protocol of heat inactivation and extraction, and were simultaneously analyzed through hybridization by GenoType Mycobacterium from liquid culture MGIT. Our results showed that identification by MALDI-TOF was correct in 98.4% (65/66) of NTM isolated in our clinical practice (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. kansasii, and M. scrofulaceum). MALDI-TOF was found to be an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective system for identification of mycobacteria species. PMID:26106617

  17. THE EFFECT OF DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CHANGE ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND HUMAN EPIDEMIOLOGY OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species are bacteria that are found throughout the environment in soils and surface waters. Although most strains of NTM are not harmful, we know that sometimes susceptible people may become infected with NTM. We also know that sometimes the str...

  18. THE PERSISTENCE OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA INI A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AFTER THE ADDITION OF FILTRATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that drinking water may be a source of pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections in humans. One method by which NTM are believed to enter drinking water distribution systems is by their intracellular colonization of protozoa. Our goal was to determ...

  19. The Heater Cooler as a Source of Infection from Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Stammers, Alfred H; Riley, Jeffrey B

    2016-06-01

    Nosocomial infections acquired during the course of cardiac surgery and hospitalization can have devastating patient consequences. The source of these infections is often difficult to determine which complicates eradication efforts. Recently it has become apparent that the heater-cooler devices used in conjunction with cardiopulmonary bypass may become contaminated with bacteria that are normally found in hospital water sources. The culprit organisms are nontuberculous mycobacteria which coat the intrinsic surfaces found within the circuits of the heater-coolers. Aerosolization of the bacteria occurs during normal heater-cooler operation which can disperse the organisms throughout the operating room. The bacteria are slow-growing and may not present for months, or years, following exposure which makes epidemiological determination a challenge. The ensuing report summarizes a recent outbreak in these infections that have been reported both in Europe and the United States, along with efforts to reduce the risk for patient infection. PMID:27578894

  20. Antibiotic management of lung infections in cystic fibrosis. II. Nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Aksamit, Timothy R; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Dasenbrook, Elliott C; Elborn, J Stuart; LiPuma, John J; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Waters, Valerie J; Ratjen, Felix A

    2014-10-01

    Airway infections are a key component of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Whereas the approach to common pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa is guided by a significant body of evidence, other infections often pose a considerable challenge to treating physicians. In Part I of this series on the antibiotic management of difficult lung infections, we discussed bacterial organisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacterial infections, and treatment of multiple bacterial pathogens. Here, we summarize the approach to infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi. Nontuberculous mycobacteria can significantly impact the course of lung disease in patients with CF, but differentiation between colonization and infection is difficult clinically as coinfection with other micro-organisms is common. Treatment consists of different classes of antibiotics, varies in intensity, and is best guided by a team of specialized clinicians and microbiologists. The ability of anaerobic bacteria to contribute to CF lung disease is less clear, even though clinical relevance has been reported in individual patients. Anaerobes detected in CF sputum are often resistant to multiple drugs, and treatment has not yet been shown to positively affect patient outcome. Fungi have gained significant interest as potential CF pathogens. Although the role of Candida is largely unclear, there is mounting evidence that Scedosporium species and Aspergillus fumigatus, beyond the classical presentation of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, can be relevant in patients with CF and treatment should be considered. At present, however there remains limited information on how best to select patients who could benefit from antifungal therapy. PMID:25167882

  1. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tae-Im; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  2. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tae-Im; Ha, Seung-A; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-02-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  3. Synergistic activity of rifampicin and ethambutol against slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria is currently of questionable clinical significance.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Hoefsloot, Wouter; Mouton, Johan W; Boeree, Martin J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-07-01

    A key issue in the treatment of disease caused by slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria is the limited association between in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of rifampicin and ethambutol alone and the in vivo outcome of treatment with these drugs. Combined susceptibility testing to rifampicin and ethambutol could provide a more realistic view of the efficacy of these drugs. In this study, Mycobacterium avium (n = 5), Mycobacterium chimaera (n = 6), Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 4), Mycobacterium xenopi (n = 4), Mycobacterium malmoense (n = 3) and Mycobacterium simiae (n = 2) clinical isolates were selected and the MICs of rifampicin and ethambutol alone and in combination were measured using the Middlebrook 7H10 agar dilution method. Synergy was defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration index ≤ 0.5. Rifampicin and ethambutol showed synergistic activity against the majority of M. avium (4/5), M. chimaera (5/6) and M. intracellulare (3/4) isolates and 1 of 2 eligible M. malmoense isolates. No synergistic activity was measured against M. xenopi and M. simiae. Synergy was neither universal for all species nor for all isolates of one species; it thus needs to be tested for rather than assumed. Even if this synergy exists in vivo, it is questionable whether the MICs to the combined drugs can be overcome by the drug exposure attained by current regimens at the recommended dosages. New dosing strategies for rifampicin and ethambutol should be studied to increase the exposure to these drugs and thus maximise their impact. PMID:23664674

  4. Concurrent Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Infection and High-Grade Anterior Mediastinal Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma (ESOS): Is There a Connection?

    PubMed

    Faz, Gabriel T; Eltorky, Mahmoud; Karnath, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS) of the mediastinum are extremely rare and may present with concurrent nontuberculous mycobacteria infection. CASE REPORT We present the second documented case of high-grade anterior mediastinal extraskeletal osteosarcoma in a 59-year-old man with a history of treated, latent tuberculosis (TB). Sputum samples grew Mycoplasma avium complex and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Imaging showed a right-sided 7.6 cm mass with compression of the main bronchus. Subsequent biopsy with vimentin staining established the diagnosis of ESOS. Due to the patient's rapidly declining performance status, he was not deemed a candidate for surgery or chemotherapy. He subsequently expired within one month of presentation. CONCLUSIONS We present a unique case of high-grade anterior mediastinum ESOS and a review of the literature regarding all documented cases of ESOS to date. We suggest there is a possible link between mediastinal masses and nontuberculous mycobacteria infection. PMID:27539718

  5. The Epidemiology of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: Data from a General Hospital in Athens, Greece, 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Andriana I.; Paraskeua, Maria; Velentza, Ekaterini; Kanellopoulou, Maria; Filaditaki, Vasiliki; Karagiannidis, Napoleon

    2014-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in Greece is largely unknown. Objectives. To determine the incidence and the demographic, microbiological, and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary NTM infection and pulmonary NTM disease. Methods. A retrospective review of the demographic, microbiological, and clinical characteristics of patients with NTM culture-positive respiratory specimens from January 2007 to May 2013. Results. A total of 120 patients were identified with at least one respiratory NTM isolate and 56 patients (46%) fulfilled the microbiological ATS/IDSA criteria for NTM disease. Of patients with adequate data, 16% fulfilled the complete ATS/IDSA criteria for NTM disease. The incidence of pulmonary NTM infection and disease was 18.9 and 8.8 per 100.000 inpatients and outpatients, respectively. The spectrum of NTM species was high (13 species) and predominated by M. avium-intracellulare complex (M. avium (13%), M. intracellulare (10%)), M. gordonae (14%), and M. fortuitum (12%). The ratio of isolation of NTM to M. tuberculosis in all hospitalized patients was 0.59. Conclusions. The first data on the epidemiology of pulmonary NTM in Athens, Greece, are presented. NTM infection is common in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, only a significantly smaller proportion of patients fulfill the criteria for NTM disease. PMID:25132991

  6. Validation of Biomarkers for Distinguishing Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Using Gas Chromatography−Mass Spectrometry and Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Ngoc A.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Walters, Elisabetta; Claassens, Mareli; van Soolingen, Dick; Vivo-Truyols, Gabriel; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Kolk, Arend H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major international health problem. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) from non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is critical for decisions regarding patient management and choice of therapeutic regimen. Recently we developed a 20-compound model to distinguish between MTB and NTM. It is based on thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and partial least square discriminant analysis. Here we report the validation of this model with two independent sample sets, one consisting of 39 MTB and 17 NTM isolates from the Netherlands, the other comprising 103 isolates (91 MTB and 12 NTM) from Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa. All the MTB strains in the 56 Dutch samples were correctly identified and the model had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 94%. For the South African samples the model had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 100%. Based on our model, we have developed a new decision-tree that allows the differentiation of MTB from NTM with 100% accuracy. Encouraged by these findings we will proceed with the development of a simple, rapid, affordable, high-throughput test to identify MTB directly in sputum. PMID:24146846

  7. Structural analysis of biofilm formation by rapidly and slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) such as M. abscessus, M. mucogenicum, M. chelonae and M. fortuitum, implicated in healthcare-associated infections, are often isolated from potable water supplies as part of the microbial flora. To understa...

  8. Cooccurrence of Free-Living Amoebae and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Hospital Water Networks, and Preferential Growth of Mycobacterium avium in Acanthamoeba lenticulata

    PubMed Central

    Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Kartalija, Marinka; Bai, Xiyuan; Jackson, Mary; Gibbs, Sara; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Iseman, Michael D.; Reynolds, Paul R.; McDonnell, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung and other diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing. NTM sources include potable water, especially in households where NTM populate pipes, taps, and showerheads. NTM share habitats with free-living amoebae (FLA) and can grow in FLA as parasites or as endosymbionts. FLA containing NTM may form cysts that protect mycobacteria from disinfectants and antibiotics. We first assessed the presence of FLA and NTM in water and biofilm samples collected from a hospital, confirming the high prevalence of NTM and FLA in potable water systems, particularly in biofilms. Acanthamoeba spp. (genotype T4) were mainly recovered (8/17), followed by Hartmannella vermiformis (7/17) as well as one isolate closely related to the genus Flamella and one isolate only distantly related to previously described species. Concerning mycobacteria, Mycobacterium gordonae was the most frequently found isolate (9/17), followed by Mycobacterium peregrinum (4/17), Mycobacterium chelonae (2/17), Mycobacterium mucogenicum (1/17), and Mycobacterium avium (1/17). The propensity of Mycobacterium avium hospital isolate H87 and M. avium collection strain 104 to survive and replicate within various FLA was also evaluated, demonstrating survival of both strains in all amoebal species tested but high replication rates only in Acanthamoeba lenticulata. As A. lenticulata was frequently recovered from environmental samples, including drinking water samples, these results could have important consequences for the ecology of M. avium in drinking water networks and the epidemiology of disease due to this species. PMID:23475613

  9. Disinfectant effects of hot water, ultraviolet light, silver ions and chlorine on strains of Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Sasatsu, M

    2000-01-01

    The disinfectant effects on Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria of hot water, ultraviolet light, silver ions and chlorine, were evaluated. The bacterial strains Legionella pneumophila ATCC33152 and Mycobacterium avium ATCC25291 and strains of L. pneumophila and M. avium which had been isolated from a 24 h bath, were examined for their resistance to treatments. All strains were killed within 3 min on exposure to hot water at 70 degrees C and exposure to ultraviolet light at 90 mW.s/cm2. The strains of L. pneumophila tested were killed within 6 h on exposure to a solution of silver ions at 50 micrograms/l. The number of viable cells of strains of M. avium fell from 10(5) CFU/ml to 10(3) CFU/ml after exposure to an aqueous solution of silver ions at 100 micrograms/l for 24 h. Chlorine effectively killed strains of Legionella which were exposed to an aqueous solution of chlorine at 2 mg/l within 3 min, but strains of Mycobacterium survived exposure to chlorine at 4 mg/l for more than 60 min. PMID:10677839

  10. Culture-Independent Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Samples.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Carmody, Lisa A; Haig, Sarah-Jane; Kotlarz, Nadine; Kalikin, Linda M; Raskin, Lutgarde; LiPuma, John J

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasing in prevalence and are a significant cause of lung function decline in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). NTM have been detected in culture-independent analyses of CF airway microbiota at lower rates than would be expected based on published prevalence data, likely due to poor lysing of the NTM cell wall during DNA extraction. We compared a standard bacterial lysis protocol with a modified method by measuring NTM DNA extraction by qPCR and NTM detection with bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The modified method improved NTM DNA recovery from spiked CF sputum samples by a mean of 0.53 log10 copies/mL for M. abscessus complex and by a mean of 0.43 log10 copies/mL for M. avium complex as measured by qPCR targeting the atpE gene. The modified method also improved DNA sequence based NTM detection in NTM culture-positive CF sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples; however, both qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing remained less sensitive than culture for NTM detection. We highlight the limitations of culture-independent identification of NTM from CF respiratory samples, and illustrate how alterations in the bacterial lysis and DNA extraction process can be employed to improve NTM detection with both qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:27093603

  11. Profiling serum antibodies to Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in rhesus monkeys with nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Min, Fangui; Pan, Jinchun; Wu, Ruike; Chen, Meiling; Kuang, Huiwen; Zhao, Weibo

    2016-02-14

    Recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been increasing in both human and animals. In this study, antibody profiles of NTM in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were determined and compared with those of monkeys infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Antibodies against 10 M. tuberculosis proteins, purified protein derivative (PPD), and mammalian old tuberculin (MOT) were detected in 14 monkeys naturally infected with NTM by indirect ELISA. Sera from 10 monkeys infected with MTBC and 10 healthy monkeys were set as controls. All antigens showed high serological reactivities to MTBC infections and low reactivities in healthy monkeys. NTM infections showed strong antibody responses to MOT and PPD; moderate antibody responses to 16kDa, U1, MPT64L, 14kDa, and TB16.3; and low antibody responses to 38kDa, Ag85b, CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6. According to the criteria of MTBC, only CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6 showed negative antibody responses in all NTM infections. Taken together, these results suggest that positive results of a PPD/MOT-based ELISA in combination with results of antibodies to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens, such as CFP10 and ESAT-6, could discriminate NTM and MTBC infections. Two positive results indicate an MTBC infection, and a negative result for an M. tuberculosis-specific antigen may preliminarily predict an NTM infection. PMID:26437786

  12. Culture-Independent Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Samples

    PubMed Central

    Caverly, Lindsay J.; Carmody, Lisa A.; Haig, Sarah-Jane; Kotlarz, Nadine; Kalikin, Linda M.; Raskin, Lutgarde; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasing in prevalence and are a significant cause of lung function decline in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). NTM have been detected in culture-independent analyses of CF airway microbiota at lower rates than would be expected based on published prevalence data, likely due to poor lysing of the NTM cell wall during DNA extraction. We compared a standard bacterial lysis protocol with a modified method by measuring NTM DNA extraction by qPCR and NTM detection with bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The modified method improved NTM DNA recovery from spiked CF sputum samples by a mean of 0.53 log10 copies/mL for M. abscessus complex and by a mean of 0.43 log10 copies/mL for M. avium complex as measured by qPCR targeting the atpE gene. The modified method also improved DNA sequence based NTM detection in NTM culture-positive CF sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples; however, both qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing remained less sensitive than culture for NTM detection. We highlight the limitations of culture-independent identification of NTM from CF respiratory samples, and illustrate how alterations in the bacterial lysis and DNA extraction process can be employed to improve NTM detection with both qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:27093603

  13. Epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria among patients with cystic fibrosis in Scandinavia

    PubMed Central

    Qvist, Tavs; Gilljam, Marita; Jönsson, Bodil; Taylor-Robinson, David; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Wang, Mikala; Svahn, Anita; Kötz, Karsten; Hansson, Lennart; Hollsing, Annika; Hansen, Christine R.; Finstad, Pål L.; Pressler, Tania; Høiby, Niels; Katzenstein, Terese L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an emerging threat to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients but their epidemiology is not well described. Methods In this retrospective observational study we identified all Scandinavian CF patients with a positive NTM culture from airway secretions from 2000 to the end of 2012 and used national CF databases to describe microbiological and clinical characteristics. Results During the 13-year period 157 (11%) CF patients were culture positive for NTM at least once. Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC) (45%) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) (32%) were the predominant species with geographical differences in distribution. Younger patients were more prone to MABSC (p < 0.01). Despite treatment, less than one-third of MABSC patients with repeated positive cultures cleared their infection and a quarter had a lung transplant or died. Conclusion NTM are significant CF pathogens and are becoming more prevalent in Scandinavia. MABSC and MAC appear to target distinct patient groups. Having multiple positive cultures despite treatment conveys a poor outcome. PMID:25178871

  14. Chronic suppurative otitis media due to nontuberculous mycobacteria: A case of successful treatment with topical boric acid.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Marie-Astrid; Quach, Caroline; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasingly recognized cause of chronic suppurative otitis media in children with tympanostomy tubes. Treatment of this condition is difficult and typically requires a combination of systemic antibiotics and surgical debridement. We present the first case of a 2-year-old male with chronic suppurative otitis media due to NTM who failed systemic antibiotic therapy and was successfully managed with topical boric acid powder. This report highlights the challenges involved in treating this infection, and introduces boric acid as a potentially valuable component of therapy. PMID:26026892

  15. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria in children: muddying the waters of tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    López-Varela, Elisa; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Santiago, Begoña; Wagner, Dirk; van Ingen, Jakko; Kampmann, Beate

    2015-03-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a large family of acid-fast bacteria, widespread in the environment. In children, NTM cause lymphadenitis, skin and soft tissue infections, and occasionally also lung disease and disseminated infections. These manifestations can be indistinguishable from tuberculosis on the basis of clinical and radiological findings and tuberculin skin testing. A diagnostic and therapeutic problem for respiratory physicians and other clinicians is therefore evident, particularly in settings where childhood tuberculosis is common, and bacteriological confirmation of any mycobacterial disease is difficult because of low availability of laboratory services in low-resource settings and the inherent paucibacillary nature of mycobacterial disease in childhood. The epidemiology of NTM varies by world region, and attempts to understand the burden of NTM disease and to identify risk factors in the paediatric population are hampered by inadequate mandatory NTM reporting and the overlap of clinical presentation with tuberculosis. The immune response to both NTM and Mycobacterium tuberculosis is based on cellular immunity and relies on the type-1 cytokine pathway. The disruption of this immune response by genetic or acquired mechanisms, such as mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease or HIV, might result in predisposition to mycobacterial infections. Published diagnostic and management guidelines do not provide specific advice for diagnosis of NTM in children, from whom the quantity and quality of diagnostic samples are often suboptimum. Treatment of NTM infections is very different from the treatment of tuberculosis, depends on the strain and anatomical site of infection, and often involves antibiotic combinations, surgery, or both. In this Review, we summarise the epidemiological and clinical features of NTM infection in children, with a specific focus on the implications for public health in settings with a high endemic burden of childhood

  16. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Fungi, and Opportunistic Pathogens in Unchlorinated Drinking Water in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooij, Dick

    2013-01-01

    The multiplication of opportunistic pathogens in drinking water supplies might pose a threat to public health. In this study, distributed unchlorinated drinking water from eight treatment plants in the Netherlands was sampled and analyzed for fungi, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and several opportunistic pathogens by using selective quantitative PCR methods. Fungi and NTM were detected in all drinking water samples, whereas Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Aspergillus fumigatus were sporadically observed. Mycobacterium avium complex and Acanthamoeba spp. were not detected. Season had no influence on the occurrence of these organisms, except for NTM and S. maltophilia, which were present in higher numbers in the summer. Opportunistic pathogens were more often observed in premise plumbing water samples than in samples from the distribution system. The lowest number of these organisms was observed in the finished water at the plant. Thus, fungi, NTM, and some of the studied opportunistic pathogens can multiply in the distribution and premise plumbing systems. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and/or total organic carbon (TOC) had no clear effects on fungal and NTM numbers or on P. aeruginosa- and S. maltophilia-positive samples. However, L. pneumophila was detected more often in water with AOC concentrations above 10 μg C liter−1 than in water with AOC levels below 5 μg C liter−1. Finally, samples that contained L. pneumophila, P. aeruginosa, or S. maltophilia were more frequently positive for a second opportunistic pathogen, which shows that certain drinking water types and/or sampling locations promote the growth of multiple opportunistic pathogens. PMID:23160134

  17. Concurrent Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Infection and High-Grade Anterior Mediastinal Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma (ESOS): Is There a Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Faz, Gabriel T.; Eltorky, Mahmoud; Karnath, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 59 Final Diagnosis: High-grade anterior mediastinal extraskeletal osteosarcoma Symptoms: Dyspnea • hemoptysis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Biopsy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS) of the mediastinum are extremely rare and may present with concurrent nontuberculous mycobacteria infection. Case Report: We present the second documented case of high-grade anterior mediastinal extraskeletal osteosarcoma in a 59-year-old man with a history of treated, latent tuberculosis (TB). Sputum samples grew Mycoplasma avium complex and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Imaging showed a right-sided 7.6 cm mass with compression of the main bronchus. Subsequent biopsy with vimentin staining established the diagnosis of ESOS. Due to the patient’s rapidly declining performance status, he was not deemed a candidate for surgery or chemotherapy. He subsequently expired within one month of presentation. Conclusions: We present a unique case of high-grade anterior mediastinum ESOS and a review of the literature regarding all documented cases of ESOS to date. We suggest there is a possible link between mediastinal masses and nontuberculous mycobacteria infection. PMID:27539718

  18. Occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sgarioni, Sônia Aparecida; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Prince, Karina Andrade; de Andrade Leite, Sergio Roberto; Filho, Dirceu Vedovello; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany Rizzieri; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    Milk is widely consumed in Brazil and can be the vehicle of agent transmission. In this study, was evaluated the occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk consumed in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil. Fifty-two milk samples (20 pasteurized and 32 raw) from dairy farms near the municipality of Maringa, Parana State, Brazil were collected. Milk samples were decontaminated using 5% oxalic acid method and cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media at 35 °C and 30 °C, with and without 5–10% CO2. Mycobacteria isolates were identified by morphological features, PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis (PCR-PRA) and Mycolic acids analysis. Thirteen (25%) raw and 2 (4%) pasteurized milk samples were positive for acid fast bacilli growth. Nine different species of NTM were isolated (M. nonchromogenicum, M. peregrinum, M. smegmatis, M. neoaurum, M. fortuitum, M. chelonae, M. flavescens, M. kansasii and M. scrofulaceum). M. bovis was not detected. Raw and pasteurized milk may be considered one source for NTM human infection. The paper reinforces the need for intensification of measures in order to avoid the milk contamination and consequently prevent diseases in the south of Brazil. PMID:25242962

  19. Occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sgarioni, Sônia Aparecida; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Prince, Karina Andrade; de Andrade Leite, Sergio Roberto; Filho, Dirceu Vedovello; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany Rizzieri; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    Milk is widely consumed in Brazil and can be the vehicle of agent transmission. In this study, was evaluated the occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk consumed in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil. Fifty-two milk samples (20 pasteurized and 32 raw) from dairy farms near the municipality of Maringa, Parana State, Brazil were collected. Milk samples were decontaminated using 5% oxalic acid method and cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media at 35 °C and 30 °C, with and without 5-10% CO2. Mycobacteria isolates were identified by morphological features, PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis (PCR-PRA) and Mycolic acids analysis. Thirteen (25%) raw and 2 (4%) pasteurized milk samples were positive for acid fast bacilli growth. Nine different species of NTM were isolated (M. nonchromogenicum, M. peregrinum, M. smegmatis, M. neoaurum, M. fortuitum, M. chelonae, M. flavescens, M. kansasii and M. scrofulaceum). M. bovis was not detected. Raw and pasteurized milk may be considered one source for NTM human infection. The paper reinforces the need for intensification of measures in order to avoid the milk contamination and consequently prevent diseases in the south of Brazil. PMID:25242962

  20. An unusual outbreak of nontuberculous mycobacteria in hospital respiratory wards: Association with nontuberculous mycobacterial colonization of hospital water supply network.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Salvatore; Rogliani, Paola; Paone, Gregorino; Altieri, Alfonso; Alma, Mario Giuseppe; Cazzola, Mario; Puxeddu, Ermanno

    2016-06-01

    The incidence and prevalence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is increasing worldwide arousing concerns that NTM infection may become a serious health challenge. We recently observed a significant increase of NTM-positive sputa samples from patients referred to respiratory disease wards of a large tertiary hospital in Rome. A survey to identify possible NTM contamination revealed a massive presence of NTM in the hospital water supply network. After decontamination procedures, NTM presence dropped both in water pipelines and sputa samples. We believe that this observation should encourage water network surveys for NTM contamination and prompt decontamination procedures should be considered to reduce this potential source of infection. PMID:27242241

  1. Structural analysis of biofilm formation by rapidly and slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Williams, Margaret M; Yakrus, Mitchell A; Arduino, Matthew J; Cooksey, Robert C; Crane, Christina B; Banerjee, Shailen N; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Donlan, Rodney M

    2009-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) such as M. abscessus, M. mucogenicum, M. chelonae, and M. fortuitum, implicated in health care-associated infections, are often isolated from potable water supplies as part of the microbial flora. To understand factors that influence growth in their environmental source, clinical RGM and slowly growing MAC isolates were grown as biofilm in a laboratory batch system. High and low nutrient levels were compared, as well as stainless steel and polycarbonate surfaces. Biofilm growth was measured after 72 h of incubation by enumeration of bacteria from disrupted biofilms and by direct quantitative image analysis of biofilm microcolony structure. RGM biofilm development was influenced more by nutrient level than by substrate material, though both affected biofilm growth for most of the isolates tested. Microcolony structure revealed that RGM develop several different biofilm structures under high-nutrient growth conditions, including pillars of various shapes (M. abscessus and M. fortuitum) and extensive cording (M. abscessus and M. chelonae). Although it is a slowly growing species in the laboratory, a clinical isolate of M. avium developed more culturable biofilm in potable water in 72 h than any of the 10 RGM examined. This indicates that M. avium is better adapted for growth in potable water systems than in laboratory incubation conditions and suggests some advantage that MAC has over RGM in low-nutrient environments. PMID:19201956

  2. Identification of immunological biomarkers which may differentiate latent tuberculosis from exposure to environmental nontuberculous mycobacteria in children.

    PubMed

    Hur, Yun-Gyoung; Crampin, Amelia C; Chisambo, Christina; Kanyika, James; Houben, Rein; Ndhlovu, Richard; Mzembe, Themba; Lalor, Maeve K; Saul, Jacky; Branson, Keith; Stanley, Carolynne; Ngwira, Bagrey; French, Neil; Ottenhoff, Tom H; Dockrell, Hazel M; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    A positive gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6)/culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) has been taken to indicate latent tuberculosis (TB) infection, but it may also be due to exposure to environmental nontuberculous mycobacteria in which ESAT-6 homologues are present. We assessed the immune responses to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 and cross-reactive responses to ESAT-6 homologues of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium kansasii. Archived culture supernatant samples from children at 3 years post-BCG vaccination were tested for cytokine/chemokine responses to M. tuberculosis antigens. Furthermore, the IFN-γ responses to M. tuberculosis antigens were followed up for 40 children at 8 years post-BCG vaccination, and 15 TB patients were recruited as a control group for the M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 response in Malawi. IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) on supernatants from diluted whole-blood assays, IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays, QuantiFERON TB Gold-In Tube tests, and multiplex bead assays were performed. More than 45% of the responders to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 showed IFN-γ responses to M. avium and M. kansasii ESAT-6. In response to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6/CFP-10, interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-9, IL-13, and IL-17 differentiated the stronger IFN-γ responders to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 from those who preferentially responded to M. kansasii and M. avium ESAT-6. A cytokine/chemokine signature of IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, and IL-17 was identified as a putative immunological biosignature to differentiate latent TB infection from exposure to M. avium and M. kansasii in Malawian children, indicating that this signature might be particularly informative in areas where both TB and exposure to environmental nontuberculous mycobacteria are endemic. PMID:24285818

  3. Identification of Immunological Biomarkers Which May Differentiate Latent Tuberculosis from Exposure to Environmental Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Crampin, Amelia C.; Chisambo, Christina; Kanyika, James; Houben, Rein; Ndhlovu, Richard; Mzembe, Themba; Lalor, Maeve K.; Saul, Jacky; Branson, Keith; Stanley, Carolynne; Ngwira, Bagrey; French, Neil; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    A positive gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6)/culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) has been taken to indicate latent tuberculosis (TB) infection, but it may also be due to exposure to environmental nontuberculous mycobacteria in which ESAT-6 homologues are present. We assessed the immune responses to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 and cross-reactive responses to ESAT-6 homologues of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium kansasii. Archived culture supernatant samples from children at 3 years post-BCG vaccination were tested for cytokine/chemokine responses to M. tuberculosis antigens. Furthermore, the IFN-γ responses to M. tuberculosis antigens were followed up for 40 children at 8 years post-BCG vaccination, and 15 TB patients were recruited as a control group for the M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 response in Malawi. IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) on supernatants from diluted whole-blood assays, IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays, QuantiFERON TB Gold-In Tube tests, and multiplex bead assays were performed. More than 45% of the responders to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 showed IFN-γ responses to M. avium and M. kansasii ESAT-6. In response to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6/CFP-10, interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-9, IL-13, and IL-17 differentiated the stronger IFN-γ responders to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 from those who preferentially responded to M. kansasii and M. avium ESAT-6. A cytokine/chemokine signature of IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, and IL-17 was identified as a putative immunological biosignature to differentiate latent TB infection from exposure to M. avium and M. kansasii in Malawian children, indicating that this signature might be particularly informative in areas where both TB and exposure to environmental nontuberculous mycobacteria are endemic. PMID:24285818

  4. Mycobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay fish.

    PubMed

    Stine, C B; Kane, A S; Baya, A M

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in fish can result in ulcers, emaciation, and in some cases death. Mycobacteria have been previously isolated from a variety of Chesapeake Bay fish species, and the current study was designed to identify potential host specificity and location fidelity of mycobacterial isolates. Mycobacteria were isolated from wild fish of the Chesapeake Bay collected from the Upper Bay, the Choptank River, Herring Bay, the Chicamacomico River, the Pocomoke River and the Potomac River in 2003-2006. Mycobacterial isolates were recovered from striped bass, Morone saxatilis, Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, white perch, Morone americana, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, common carp, Cyprinus carpio carpio, spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus, killifish, Fundulus sp., blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, American gizzard shad, Dorosoma cepedianum and American silver perch, Bairdiella chrysoura. Twenty-nine well-defined mycobacterial groups resulted from gas chromatography dendrogram clustering of isolates. The majority of groups included more than one host species and more than one site of collection. However, four groups contained only striped bass isolates, three of which were similar to M. shottsii. Therefore, multiple Chesapeake Bay fish species are colonized with multiple mycobacterial isolates, of which few appear to be host or location specific. PMID:19909394

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium wolinskyi, a Rapid-Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perry, K. Allison; Lawsin, Adrian; Coulliette, Angela D.; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Limbago, Brandi M.; Noble-Wang, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium wolinskyi is a nonpigmented, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium species that is associated with bacteremia, peritonitis, infections associated with implants/prostheses, and skin and soft tissue infections often following surgical procedures in humans. Here, we report the first functionally annotated draft genome sequence of M. wolinskyi CDC_01. PMID:26988052

  6. Evaluation of three real-time PCR assays for differential identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria species in liquid culture media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Jung; Kim, Ji-Youn; Song, Dong Joon; Koh, Won-Jung; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC)/nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) PCR assays for differential identification of MTBC and NTM using culture-positive liquid media. Eighty-five type strains and 100 consecutive mycobacterial liquid media cultures (MGIT 960 system) were analyzed by a conventional PCR assay (MTB-ID(®) V3) and three real-time PCR assays (AdvanSure™ TB/NTM real-time PCR, AdvanSure; GENEDIA(®) MTB/NTM Detection Kit, Genedia; Real-Q MTB & NTM kit, Real-Q). The accuracy rates for reference strains were 89.4%, 100%, 98.8%, and 98.8% for the MTB-ID V3, AdvanSure, Genedia, and Real-Q assays, respectively. Cross-reactivity in the MTB-ID V3 assay was mainly attributable to non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species. The diagnostic performance was determined using clinical isolates grown in liquid media, and the overall sensitivities for all PCR assays were higher than 95%. In conclusion, the three real-time PCR assays showed better performance in discriminating mycobacterium species and non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species than the conventional PCR assay. PMID:27105774

  7. Comparison of methods for the isolation of mycobacteria from water treatment plant sludge.

    PubMed

    Makovcova, Jitka; Babak, Vladimir; Slany, Michal; Slana, Iva

    2015-05-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms in all natural ecosystems, including water environments. Several of these species are potential pathogens which affect human health. NTM most commonly cause pulmonary, skin or soft tissue infections. Primary sludge obtained from the water treatment plants of four drinking water reservoirs were subjected to analysis for mycobacteria. Five decontamination methods (5% oxalic acid, modified Petroff, HCl-NaOH, N-acetyl-L-cysteine-sodium hydroxide and 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride), three growth media (Herrold's egg yolk medium with and without the antibiotic cocktail PANTA and Löwenstein-Jensen medium with sodium pyruvate) and three incubation temperatures (25, 30 and 37 °C) for isolation of mycobacteria were compared in the analysis of 18 sludge samples. To evaluate examined methods, the overall positive, negative, and contamination rate, and these rates in respect to localities are taken into account. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the best combination for the recovery of mycobacteria with the minimum number of contaminating microorganisms is 5% oxalic acid decontamination cultured on Herrold's egg yolk medium with the antibiotic cocktail PANTA at 25 °C. The least suitable is N-acetyl-L-cysteine-sodium hydroxide decontamination cultured on Löwenstein-Jensen medium with sodium pyruvate at 25 °C. From 18 sludge samples we isolated 27 mycobacterial species or groups; Mycobacterium algericum, M. arabiense, M. heraklionense, M. minnesotense, M. moriokaense, M. salmoniphilum and M. vulneris were isolated from the natural water environment for the first time. Because the natural water environment is the main source of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria for humans, it is important to direct particular focus to newly described mycobacterial species. PMID:25724128

  8. Medical Management for the Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Infection of the Parotid Gland: Avoiding Surgery May Be Possible

    PubMed Central

    Bouhabel, Sarah; Oughton, Matthew Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is uncommon in the head and neck; therefore there is no clear consensus on treating these infections. Our objective was to report our experience with a unique case of NTM infection of the parotid in an immunocompetent patient, in order to determine appropriate management through our experience with this pathology. A 57-year-old man, known for numerous comorbid diseases, presented to our institution complaining of right parotid swelling and pain. A computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed a multiloculated collection in the inferior portion of the right parotid gland, compatible with abscess formation. This abscess was drained by interventional radiology (IR) but required repeat drainage twice due to lack of initial improvement. He was treated with several antibiotics as culture results initially indicated Gram-positive bacilli and then Mycobacterium species, with final identification by a reference laboratory as Mycobacterium abscessus. Imipenem was initiated with amikacin and clarithromycin. His infection clinically and radiologically resolved after 5 months of antibiotherapy. In our case, the patient improved following intravenous antibiotic therapy. Our experience demonstrates that appropriate antibiotherapy can lead to resolution of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in the parotid without the risks associated with surgical intervention. PMID:27340407

  9. Performance of Vitek MS in identifying nontuberculous mycobacteria from MGIT liquid medium and Lowenstein-Jensen solid medium.

    PubMed

    Kehrmann, Jan; Schoerding, Ann-Kathrin; Murali, Roshni; Wessel, Sarah; Koehling, Hedda Luise; Mosel, Frank; Buer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a fast and inexpensive method for bacterial identification. The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of Vitek MS in identifying 160 nontuberculous mycobacterial isolates of 24 species from Lowenstein-Jensen solid medium and BACTEC MGIT 960 liquid medium using a bead-based method. The system correctly identified 76.9% of the isolates (123 of 160) cultivated on solid medium and 76.9% (123 of 160) of positive liquid cultures. None of the isolates included in the study was misidentified. Although the overall performance of Vitek MS with the SARAMIS 4.12 database was comparable in identifying mycobacterial species grown on solid medium and in liquid medium, the identification rate varied notably between the various species analyzed, which currently limits the utility for identification in routine diagnostics for some species. PMID:26527059

  10. Patient-Centered Research Priorities for Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Infection. An NTM Research Consortium Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Henkle, Emily; Aksamit, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Daley, Charles L; Griffith, David; Leitman, Philip; Leitman, Amy; Malanga, Elisha; Marras, Theodore K; Olivier, Kenneth N; Prevots, D Rebecca; Prieto, Delia; Quittner, Alexandra L; Skach, William; Walsh, John W; Winthrop, Kevin L

    2016-09-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause an increasingly important chronic and debilitating lung disease in older adults. Diagnosis is often delayed, although awareness among clinicians and patients is increasing. When necessary, treatment often lasts 18-24 months and consists of three or four antibiotics that can have serious side effects. Relapses are common and commonly require resumption of prolonged therapy. Given the need for improved diagnostic techniques and clinical trials to identify new therapies or to improve existing therapies, a group of North American clinicians and researchers formed the NTM Research Consortium (NTMRC) in 2014. The NTMRC recognized the importance of including the patient voice in determining research priorities for NTM. In November 2015, patients, caregivers, patient advocates, clinical experts, and researchers gathered for a 1-day meeting in Portland, Oregon funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. The meeting goal was to define patient-centered research priorities for NTM lung infections. Patients expressed frustration with the number of people who have endured years of missed diagnoses or inadequate treatment of NTM. Participants identified as top research priorities the prevention of NTM infection; approval of more effective treatments with fewer side effects and easier administration; understanding the best chest physiotherapy methods; validating and using tools to measure quality of life; and developing a disease-specific activity and severity assessment tool. Workshop participants agreed that two complementary objectives are critical to ensure the best achievable outcomes for patients: (1) additional clinician education to improve screening and diagnosis of NTM infections; and (2) development of a geographically distributed network of experts in NTM disease to offer consultation or direct therapy after a diagnosis is made. PMID:27627485

  11. Pneumothorax associated with nontuberculous mycobacteria: A retrospective study of 69 patients.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, M; Asakura, Takanori; Morimoto, Kozo; Namkoong, Ho; Matsuda, Shuichi; Osawa, Takeshi; Ishii, Makoto; Hasegawa, Naoki; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Goto, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) is increasing worldwide. Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax occurs as a complication of underlying lung disease and is associated with higher morbidity, mortality, and recurrence than primary spontaneous pneumothorax. We here investigated the clinical features and long-term outcomes of pneumothorax associated with NTMPD.We conducted a retrospective study on consecutive adult patients with pneumothorax associated with NTMPD at Fukujuji Hospital and Keio University Hospital from January 1992 to December 2013. We reviewed the medical records of 69 such patients to obtain clinical characteristics, radiological findings, and long-term outcomes, including pneumothorax recurrence and mortality.The median age of the patients was 68 years; 34 patients were women. The median body mass index was 16.8 kg/m. Underlying pulmonary diseases mainly included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. On computed tomography, nodules and bronchiectasis were observed in 46 (98%) and 45 (96%) patients, respectively. Consolidation, pleural thickening, interlobular septal thickening, and cavities were most common, and observed in 40 (85%), 40 (85%), 37 (79%), and 36 (77%) patients, respectively. Regarding pneumothorax treatment outcomes, complete and incomplete lung expansion were observed in 49 patients (71%) and 15 patients (22%), respectively. The survival rate after pneumothorax was 48% at 5 years. By the end of the follow-up, 33 patients had died, and the median survival was 4.4 years with a median follow-up period of 1.7 years. The rate of absence of recurrence after the first pneumothorax was 59% at 3 years. By the end of the follow-up, 18 patients had experienced pneumothorax recurrence. Furthermore, 12/18 patients (66%) with recurrent pneumothorax died during the study period. Twenty-three patients (70%) died because of NTMPD progression. Low body mass index (BMI) was a negative

  12. A cluster of central line-associated bloodstream infections due to rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients with hematologic disorders at a Japanese tertiary care center: an outbreak investigation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, Yasuaki; Kozai, Yasuji; Yamasa, Hitomi; Sakurada, Masako; Kashiyama, Tetsuya; Honda, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (RGM) are considered rare pathogens, causing central line-associated bloodstream infection. We identified an outbreak of central line-associated bloodstream infection due to RGM at a hematology-oncology ward during a 5-month period. DESIGN Outbreak investigation and literature review. SETTING A Japanese tertiary care center. PATIENTS Adults who were hospitalized at the hematology-oncology ward from October 15, 2011, through February 17, 2012. RESULTS A total of 5 patients with a bloodstream infection due to RGM (4 cases of Mycobacterium mucogenicum and 1 case of Mycobacterium canariasense infection) were identified; of these, 3 patients had acute myeloid leukemia, 1 had acute lymphocytic leukemia, and 1 had aplastic anemia. Four of the 5 patients received cord blood transplantation prior to developing the bloodstream infection. All central venous catheters in patients with a bloodstream infection were removed. These patients promptly defervesced after catheter removal and their care was successfully managed without antimicrobial therapy. Surveillance cultures from the environment and water detected M. mucogenicum and M. canariasense in the water supply of the hematology-oncology ward. The isolates from the bloodstream infection and water sources were identical on the basis of 16S-rRNA gene sequencing. CONCLUSIONS The source of RGM in the outbreak of bloodstream infections likely was the ward tap water supply. Awareness of catheter-related bloodstream infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria should be emphasized, especially where immunocompromised patients are at risk. Also, using antimicrobials after catheter removal to treat central line-associated bloodstream infection due to RGM may not be necessary. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;36(1): 76-80. PMID:25627764

  13. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain CCUG 47445, a Rapidly Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Seguí, Carolina; Busquets, Antonio; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruíz, Mikel; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae strains are ubiquitous rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections, cellulitis, abscesses, osteomyelitis, catheter infections, disseminated diseases, and postsurgical infections after implants with prostheses, transplants, and even hemodialysis procedures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. chelonae type strain CCUG 47445. PMID:27284158

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain CCUG 47445, a Rapidly Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Seguí, Carolina; Busquets, Antonio; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruíz, Mikel; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar-Figueras, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae strains are ubiquitous rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections, cellulitis, abscesses, osteomyelitis, catheter infections, disseminated diseases, and postsurgical infections after implants with prostheses, transplants, and even hemodialysis procedures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. chelonae type strain CCUG 47445. PMID:27284158

  16. Chemical and biological properties of mycobactins isolated from various mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Snow, G. A.; White, A. J.

    1969-01-01

    Nine different strains of mycobacteria grown on media deficient in iron all produced mycobactins. Most strains produced one mycobactin in great preponderance. Mycobacteria from clearly distinct taxonomic groups gave mycobactins differing in the structure of their nuclei. One group of taxonomically related mycobacteria produced mycobactins having the same nucleus but with different distributions of side chains within the homologous mixtures. Simple methods are described for identifying mycobactins on a small scale; these may be of value in classifying mycobacteria. Structures are proposed for mycobactin A from Mycobacterium aurum, mycobactin R from M. terrae, mycobactin F, produced together with mycobactin H by M. fortuitum, and mycobactins M and N from M. marinum. The first three of these differ from known mycobactins in details of substitution and configuration of asymmetric centres in the nucleus. Mycobactins M and N are substantially different, having only small acyl groups (acetyl and propionyl respectively) at the hydroxamic acid centre of the mycobactic acid moiety. Both are homologous mixtures having long-chain saturated 3-hydroxy-2-methyl acid fragments in the cobactin moiety. All mycobactins so far isolated promote almost maximal growth of M. johnei at 30ng./ml. in liquid medium. The activity of some mycobactins extends to much lower concentrations, mycobactin S showing significant growth promotion at 0·3ng./ml. Mycobactin M or N in combination with mycobactins having a long side chain in the mycobactic acid moiety exerts a mutually antagonistic effect on the growth of M. johnei, the mixture giving less growth than either mycobactin separately. Mycobactin M also decreases the growth of M. kansasii and M. tuberculosis on liquid media. These antagonistic effects are probably caused by a lengthening of the lag phase. PMID:5360674

  17. Delivery of aerosolized liposomal amikacin as a novel approach for the treatment of nontuberculous mycobacteria in an experimental model of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sasha J; Neville, Mary E; Gupta, Renu; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasing problem in individuals with chronic lung conditions and current therapies are lacking. We investigated the activity of liposomal amikacin for inhalation (LAI) against NTM in vitro as well as in a murine model of respiratory infection. Macrophage monolayers were infected with three strains of Mycobacterium avium, two strains of Mycobacterium abscessus, and exposed to LAI or free amikacin for 4 days before enumerating bacterial survival. Respiratory infection was established in mice by intranasal inoculation with M. avium and allowing three weeks for the infection to progress. Three different regimens of inhaled LAI were compared to inhaled saline and parenterally administered free amikacin over a 28 day period. Bacteria recovered from the mice were analyzed for acquired resistance to amikacin. In vitro, liposomal amikacin for inhalation was more effective than free amikacin in eliminating both intracellular M. avium and M. abscessus. In vivo, inhaled LAI demonstrated similar effectiveness to a ∼25% higher total dose of parenterally administered amikacin at reducing M. avium in the lungs when compared to inhaled saline. Additionally, there was no acquired resistance to amikacin observed after the treatment regimen. The data suggest that LAI has the potential to be an effective therapy against NTM respiratory infections in humans. PMID:25264757

  18. Microbiological Quality of Ready-to-Eat Vegetables Collected in Mexico City: Occurrence of Aerobic-Mesophilic Bacteria, Fecal Coliforms, and Potentially Pathogenic Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cerna-Cortes, Jorge Francisco; Leon-Montes, Nancy; Cortes-Cueto, Ana Laura; Salas-Rangel, Laura P.; Helguera-Repetto, Addy Cecilia; Lopez-Hernandez, Daniel; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Fernandez-Rendon, Elizabeth; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological quality and the occurrence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in a variety of salads and sprouts from supermarkets and street vendors in Mexico City. Aerobic-mesophilic bacteria (AMB) were present in 100% of RTE-salads samples; 59% of samples were outside guidelines range (>5.17 log10 CFU per g). Although fecal coliforms (FC) were present in 32% of samples, only 8% of them exceeded the permissible limit (100 MPN/g). Regarding the 100 RTE-sprouts, all samples were also positive for AMB and total coliforms (TC) and 69% for FC. Seven NTM species were recovered from 7 salad samples; they included three M. fortuitum, two M. chelonae, one M. mucogenicum, and one M. sp. Twelve RTE-sprouts samples harbored NTM, which were identified as M. porcinum (five), M. abscessus (two), M. gordonae (two), M. mucogenicum (two), and M. avium complex (one). Most RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts had unsatisfactory microbiological quality and some harbored NTM associated with illness. No correlation between the presence of coliforms and NTM was found. Overall, these results suggest that RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts might function as vehicles for NTM transmission in humans; hence, proper handling and treatment before consumption of such products might be recommendable. PMID:25918721

  19. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  20. Delivery of Aerosolized Liposomal Amikacin as a Novel Approach for the Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in an Experimental Model of Pulmonary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Sasha J.; Neville, Mary E.; Gupta, Renu; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasing problem in individuals with chronic lung conditions and current therapies are lacking. We investigated the activity of liposomal amikacin for inhalation (LAI) against NTM in vitro as well as in a murine model of respiratory infection. Macrophage monolayers were infected with three strains of Mycobacterium avium, two strains of Mycobacterium abscessus, and exposed to LAI or free amikacin for 4 days before enumerating bacterial survival. Respiratory infection was established in mice by intranasal inoculation with M. avium and allowing three weeks for the infection to progress. Three different regimens of inhaled LAI were compared to inhaled saline and parenterally administered free amikacin over a 28 day period. Bacteria recovered from the mice were analyzed for acquired resistance to amikacin. In vitro, liposomal amikacin for inhalation was more effective than free amikacin in eliminating both intracellular M. avium and M. abscessus. In vivo, inhaled LAI demonstrated similar effectiveness to a ∼25% higher total dose of parenterally administered amikacin at reducing M. avium in the lungs when compared to inhaled saline. Additionally, there was no acquired resistance to amikacin observed after the treatment regimen. The data suggest that LAI has the potential to be an effective therapy against NTM respiratory infections in humans. PMID:25264757

  1. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered ‘good’ agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  2. Rapid susceptibility testing for slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria using a colorimetric microbial viability assay based on the reduction of water-soluble tetrazolium WST-1.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, T; Suenaga, H; Shiga, M; Ikegami, T; Ishiyama, M; Ezoe, T; Matsumoto, K

    2015-10-01

    Rapid susceptibility testing for slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) using a colorimetric microbial viability assay based on the reduction of the water-soluble tetrazolium salt {2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, monosodium salt (WST-1)} using 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone as an electron mediator was developed. Using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) method, a long-term incubation time (7-14 days) was required to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the slowly growing NTM. The MICs for a variety of different antibiotics against the slowly growing NTM were determined by the WST-1 colorimetric method and compared with those obtained using the broth microdilution methods approved by the CLSI. Good agreement was found between the MICs determined after 3-4 days using the WST-1 colorimetric method and those obtained after 10-14 days using the broth microdilution method. The results suggest that the WST-1 colorimetric assay is a useful method for the rapid determination of the MICs for the slowly growing NTM. PMID:26173690

  3. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Miller, Becky A.; Miller, Melissa B.; MacKuen, Courteney; Groben, Pamela; White, Becky; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are increasingly associated with cutaneous infections after cosmetic procedures. Fractionated CO2 resurfacing, a widely used technique for photorejuvenation, has been associated with a more favorable side effect profile than alternative procedures. We describe 2 cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after treatment with a fractionated CO2 laser at a private clinic. Densely distributed erythematous papules and pustules developed within the treated area within 2 weeks of the laser procedure. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic analysis and culture. Both infections responded to a 4-month course of a multidrug regimen. An environmental investigation of the clinic was performed, but no source of infection was found. The case isolates differed from each other and from isolates obtained from the clinic, suggesting that the infection was acquired by postprocedure exposure. Papules and pustules after fractionated CO2 resurfacing should raise the suspicion of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. PMID:23628077

  4. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria: Predisposing conditions and clinical characteristics of six cases and a review of 63 cases in the literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung-Jong; Kim, Uh-Jin; Kim, Hong Bin; Park, Sang Won; Oh, Myoung-Don; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Nam Joong

    2016-07-01

    Background Several case series have reported on clinical and radiographic characteristics of patients with vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). However, only a few patients were included, and systematic reviews are still lacking. The aim of this study was to update and summarise the pre-disposing conditions, clinical and radiographic characteristics of such cases due to NTM. Methods In this study, a systematic review was conducted of the English-language literature from 1961-2014 to investigate the pre-disposing conditions and characteristics of cases of VO due to NTM. Also, six additional cases diagnosed in the study hospitals were described; these cases are included in an analysis of a total of 69 cases of NTM VO. Results The most common species, regardless of the presence of HIV co-infection, was M. avium Complex followed by M. xenopi. Ten cases with HIV infection had a median CD4 lymphocyte count of 320/mm(3) (range = 41-465/mm(3)) at the time of diagnosis of NTM VO. The VO in the cases with HIV infections occurred at an earlier age and more often involved the thoracic spine than in the cases without HIV infection. Pre-disposing trauma or surgery was reported in 14.5% (10/69) of the cases. A variety of immunosuppressive diseases were observed in 49.3% of the patients, including the 10 with HIV infections and corticosteroids were used in 27.5% of the cases. Surgery was performed in 67.6% and improvement was reported in 80.6%. Conclusion NTM should be considered in immunocompromised patients with indolent VO without confirmation of tuberculosis. PMID:27002256

  5. Spheroplastic phase of mycobacteria isolated from patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, R J; Van Kruiningen, H J; Thayer, W R; Coutu, J A

    1986-01-01

    Two strains of an unclassified Mycobacterium species were isolated after 18 and 30 months of incubation of media inoculated with resected intestinal tissues from patients with Crohn's disease. These strains represented the third and fourth isolates of this organism from Crohn's disease patients. Ultrastructural examination of this strain and two previously isolated strains revealed the presence of spheroplasts which eventually transformed into the bacillary form of a previously unrecognized Mycobacterium species. These cell wall-deficient forms did not stain with conventional dyes and failed to grow on hypertonic media. Restriction polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA genes was used to determine the relationship between the cell wall-deficient and bacillary forms. Identical restriction patterns of the ribosomal DNA genes were found between the spheroplasts and Mycobacterium sp. isolates with EcoRI, BamHI, and XhoI restriction endonucleases, thus providing definitive evidence of their origin. Unidentified spheroplasts were isolated from an additional 12 patients with Crohn's disease, of which 7 of 10 seroagglutinated with antiserum prepared against the Mycobacterium sp. Spheroplasts were isolated from 16 of 26 (61%) patients with Crohn's disease but not from tissues of 13 patients with ulcerative colitis or 13 patients with other diseases of the bowel. These findings support the role of mycobacteria as etiologic agents in some cases of Crohn's disease. Images PMID:3760132

  6. Uveitis with occult choroiditis due to Mycobacterium kansasii: limitations of interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) tests (case report and mini-review on ocular non-tuberculous mycobacteria and IGRA cross-reactivity).

    PubMed

    Kuznetcova, Tatiana I; Sauty, Alain; Herbort, Carl P

    2012-10-01

    Ocular tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose but should be suspected when uveitis fails to respond to inflammation suppressive therapy. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) represent a substantial help to diagnose suspected ocular tuberculosis especially in non-endemic areas. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) is able to detect clinically silent choroiditis that, when associated with a positive IGRA test, should lead the clinician to suspect ocular tuberculosis, warranting specific therapy. The fact that IGRA tests can also react with some atypical strains of mycobacteria is not always known. We report here a case with resistant post-operative inflammation that presented with occult ICGA-detected choroiditis and a positive IGRA test that was most probably due to the non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) Mycobacterium kansasii. A 66 year-old man presented with a resistant cystoid macular oedema (CMO) in his left eye after combined cataract and epiretinal membrane surgery. At entry, his best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.5 for far and near OS. Intraocular inflammation measured by laser flare photometry was elevated in the left eye (54.4 ph/ms) and also in the right eye (50.9 ph/ms). Four subTenon's injections of 40 mg of triamcinolone did not produce any substantial improvement. Therefore a complete uveitis work-up was performed. Fluorescein angiography showed CMO OS and ICGA showed numerous hypofluorescent dots and fuzziness of choroidal vessels in both eyes. Among performed laboratory tests, the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold test was positive. After a pulmonological examination disclosing a right upper lobe infiltrate, the patient was started on a triple anti-tuberculous therapy. Bronchial aspirate, obtained during bronchoscopy, was Ziehl-positive and culture grew M. kansasii. Nine months later, BCVA OS increased to 1.0 and flare decreased to 40.2 ph/ms. The CMO OS resolved angiographically and did not recur with a macula still slightly thickened on OCT

  7. Evaluation of the MB/BacT system and comparison to the BACTEC 460 system and solid media for isolation of mycobacteria from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Rohner, P; Ninet, B; Metral, C; Emler, S; Auckenthaler, R

    1997-01-01

    The MB/BacT automated system is designed for the isolation of mycobacteria from clinical specimens. It utilizes a colorimetric sensor and reflected light to continuously monitor the CO2 concentration in the culture medium. We compared its performance to that of the BACTEC 12B media for the radiometric BACTEC 460 instrument and that of solid culture media. Respiratory specimens and urine samples were decontaminated with 4% NaOH. The vials of the two instruments were inoculated with 500 microl of sample and two solid egg-based media at 200 microl each. All vials were incubated at 37 degrees C for 6 weeks. A total of 1,078 specimens (633 respiratory specimens, 78 cerebrospinal fluid specimens, 177 other body fluid specimens, 87 urine specimens, and 103 other types of specimens) were cultured in parallel. Mycobacteria could be identified from 73 (6.8%) specimens: 67 M. tuberculosis, 3 M. kansasii, 1 M. xenopi, 1 M. terrae, and 1 mixed M. avium with M. scrofulaceum. Of these, 63 (86.3%) specimens were positive with the MB/BacT system, 67 (91.8%) were positive with the BACTEC 460 instrument, and 58 (79.5%) were positive with the two egg-based media. MB/BacT cultures were positive on average after 17.5 (+/-6.4) days, BACTEC cultures with a growth index of >20 (mean, 200) were positive after 14.3 (+/-8.2) days, and egg-based media were positive after 24.2 (+/-7.5) days. Microorganisms other than mycobacteria contaminated 46 (4.3%) MB/BacT cultures and 31 (2.9%) BACTEC cultures, which had to be discarded. The MB/BacT system is a well-automated system for the detection of M. tuberculosis in clinical specimens without using radioactive reagents. Further trials are required to determine whether it is suitable for the culture of nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:9399507

  8. Simultaneous identification of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analysis of the RNA polymerase gene (rpoB).

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum-Joon; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Yun, Yeo-Jun; Park, Eun-Mi; Park, Young-Gil; Bai, Gil-Han; Cha, Chang-Yong; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2004-07-01

    Interspecies variations and mutations associated with rifampin resistance in rpoB of Mycobacterium allow for the simultaneous identification of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria by PCR-SSCP analysis and PCR- sequencing. One hundred and ten strains of rifampin-susceptible M. tuberculosis, 14 strains of rifampin-resistant M. tuberculosis, and four strains of the M. avium complex were easily identified by PCR-SSCP. Of another seven strains, which showed unique SSCP patterns, three were identified as rifampin-resistant M. tuberculosis and four as M. terrae complex by subsequent sequence analysis of their rpoB DNAs (306 bp). These results were concordant with those obtained by susceptibility testing, biochemical identification, and 16S rDNA sequencing. PMID:15177909

  9. Spectrum of activity of levofloxacin against nontuberculous mycobacteria and its activity against the Mycobacterium avium complex in combination with ethambutol, rifampin, roxithromycin, amikacin, and clofazimine.

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, N; Goh, K S; Bryskier, A; Devallois, A

    1996-01-01

    The spectrum of activity of levofloxacin was initially determined against 29 strains belonging to 16 species of atypical mycobacteria by measuring radiometric MICs. Levofloxacin MICs were 1 to 2 dilutions lower compared with those obtained for ofloxacin and 8 to 64 dilutions lower compared with those obtained for its D-isomer. Levofloxacin MICs were below its peak level in serum (5.5 micrograms/ml following administration of a single oral dose of 350 mg) for 25 of 29 isolates tested. It possessed MICs below its peak level in serum for M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai, M. malmoense, M. xenopi, M. marinum, M. kansasii, M. chelonei, M. abcessus, M. fortuitum, and M. peregrinum. Regarding the M. avium complex, the MICs of levofloxacin for 11 clinical isolates (7 from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients and 4 from human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients) were 1 to 2 dilutions lower than those of ofloxacin. Among 20 isolates belonging to 12 pathogenic mycobacterial species, the MBC/MIC ratios varied from 1 to 4 for levofloxacin and 2 to 4 for ofloxacin. When drug combinations were screened by using the radiometric x/y quotient methodology against five M. avium complex isolates, levofloxacin activity against all five isolates was enhanced by ethambutol and activity against three isolates was enhanced by clofazimine. Screening of three-drug combinations showed that the combination levofloxacin-ethambutol with a third potential anti-M. avium drug (rifampin, roxithromycin, amikacin, or clofazimine) resulted in enhanced activity for all 20 drug combinations screened. PMID:8913450

  10. [Isolation of environmental mycobacteria from soils of Córdoba city Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ballarino, Guillermo J; Eseverri, M Verónica; Salas, Andrea V; Giayetto, Víctor O; González, Silvia; Wolff, Lidia; Pessah, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    The interest for the research on enviromental mycobacteria has risen over the last decades, in part, due to a significant incidence rate rise. Reports from all over the world address the soil as the major source for human contamination. In Argentina two documents report the prevalence of atypical mycobacteriosis at Córdoba (1997), and the isolation of enviromental mycobacteria from soils of the Province of La Pampa (1999) respectively. The aim of our study was to confirm the presence of enviromental mycobacteria in soil of the city of Córdoba. The map of the city was divided in 9 regions according to avenues and major streets distribution. A total of 120 soil samples were recollected with spatula from a 10 x 10 cm square up to 1 cm deep. Samples were kept at 4 degrees C no more than 7 days. Soil samples were homogenized with destilled water in a 1:1 proportion, and decontaminated according to Petroff's method. The cultures were made in Lowestein-Jehnsen media and incubated at 37 degrees C controlling development every 7 days for 2 months. An acid-fast-bacilli smear was made from colonies obtained. Twenty three cultures (19%) were discarded due to contamination. Twenty cultures (17%) developed acid fast bacilli (AFB). Colonies obtained were sent to the Mycobacteria Service of the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán, in the city of Buenos Aires, for identification. A single isolation was identified as Mycobacterium triviale. A positive correlation was observed between the frequency of positive AFB isolation and the number of samples taken from park areas. The presence of enviromental mycobacteria in soils of Córdoba was confirmed. Results suggest higher odds of isolation in parklands and soils where animals live. Extensive works are needed to asset the features that allow and contribute the proliferation of mycobacteria in soils. PMID:12934243

  11. MICOBACTERIUM PARATUBERCULOSIS AND NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIAL IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) include Mycobacterium species that are not members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex. Members of the NTM group are important causes of disease in birds and mammals. Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium parat...

  12. Characterisation of mycobacteria isolated from slaughter cattle in pastoral regions of Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Oloya, J; Kazwala, R; Lund, A; Opuda-Asibo, J; Demelash, B; Skjerve, E; Johansen, TB; Djønne, B

    2007-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis is a zoonotic problem in pastoral cattle and communities in Uganda. Tuberculin tests in pastoral cattle had shown a high herd but low animal prevalence, with a high proportion of avian reactors. No work had been done to identify the mycobacterial species involved. The objective of the study was to isolate and characterise Mycobacterial species causing tuberculous lesions in slaughtered animals. Lesioned organs compatible with bovine tuberculosis in slaughtered cattle from pastoral areas in Uganda were collected and cultured to isolate mycobacteria. AccuProbe culture identification kits for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium complex and M. avium were used to identify the isolates. Spoligotyping and Insertion Sequence (IS) 1311 and IS1245 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis (RFLP) were used to further characterise the isolates. Results Of the 61 lesioned organs and tissues cultured, 19 isolates were identified as M. bovis, 3 as M. avium subsp.hominissuis, 1 as M. intracellulare, 1 as a mixed culture of M. bovis and M. avium sp. and 1 as M. avium sp. and unidentified mycobacteria. Eleven other mycobacteria outside the tuberculosis and avium complex groups were also isolated. Ten new spoligopatterns grouped into three clusters were identified from M. bovis isolates. Two of the three M. avium subsp.hominissuis isolates showed similar patterns on the IS1311 RFLP but all were different on the IS1245 RFLP. Conclusion The isolation of M. bovis confirms the ongoing infection with spoligotypes unique to Uganda. Isolation of environmental mycobacteria could explain the high avian or non specific tuberculin reactor patterns commonly observed in pastoral cattle and suggests their pathogenic or opportunistic role in the infection of cattle with disseminated bovine tuberculous lesions. PMID:17961243

  13. Isolation and characterization of mycobacteria from striped bass Morone saxatilis from the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kaattari, I.; Gauthier, D.; Vogelbein, W.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis of Chesapeake Bay, USA, was first diagnosed in 1997 based on the presence of granulomatous inflammation and acid-fast bacteria in skin and spleen. To confirm histopathology, bacteriological detection and identification of mycobacteria were begun using splenic tissue from fish with and without skin ulcerations. On the basis of initial studies using a variety of selective and nonselective media, decontamination, homogenization and incubation conditions, a simple and quantitative recovery method using aseptic necropsy of splenic tissue was developed. Optimal recovery was obtained by spread-plating homogenates on Middlebrook 7H10 agar with incubation for 3 mo at 23??C. Mycobacteria were recovered from 76% (n = 149/196) of fish examined. Mycobacterial densities exceeded 104 colony forming units??g tissue-1 in 38% of samples (n = 63/168) that were examined using a quantitative approach. The most frequently recovered mycobacterium, present in 57% (n = 109/192) of characterized samples, was the recently named new species Mycobacterium shottsii. Polyinfections of M. shottsii and other mycobacteria were observed in 25% of samples (n = 47/192) with densities of M. shottsii usually 1 or more orders of magnitude higher than co-isolate(s). Other mycobacteria recovered included isolates that, based on phenotypic traits, resembled M. interjectum, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai and M. triplex. M. marinum, commonly associated with fish mycobacteriosis and human disease, was recovered infrequently (3%, n = 6/192). The presence of multiple mycobacterial types occurring at high densities suggests that a variety of mycobacteria could be causative agents of mycobacteriosis in striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. Striped bass is the major recreational fish species in the Chesapeake Bay, and the significance of the current epizootic to human health and the potential adverse effects on fish stocks are not known.

  14. First Detection of Mycobacteria in African Rodents and Insectivores, Using Stratified Pool Screening▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Durnez, Lies; Eddyani, Miriam; Mgode, Georgies F.; Katakweba, Abdul; Katholi, Charles R.; Machang'u, Robert R.; Kazwala, Rudovik R.; Portaels, Françoise; Leirs, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    With the rising number of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in developing countries, the control of mycobacteria is of growing importance. Previous studies have shown that rodents and insectivores are carriers of mycobacteria. However, it is not clear how widespread mycobacteria are in these animals and what their role is in spreading them. Therefore, the prevalence of mycobacteria in rodents and insectivores was studied in and around Morogoro, Tanzania. Live rodents were trapped, with three types of live traps, in three habitats. Pieces of organs were pooled per habitat, species, and organ type (stratified pooling); these sample pools were examined for the presence of mycobacteria by PCR, microscopy, and culture methods. The mycobacterial isolates were identified using phenotypic techniques and sequencing. In total, 708 small mammals were collected, 31 of which were shrews. By pool prevalence estimation, 2.65% of the animals were carriers of mycobacteria, with a higher prevalence in the urban areas and in Cricetomys gambianus and the insectivore Crocidura hirta. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (Mycobacterium chimaera, M. intracellulare, M. arupense, M. parascrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium spp.) were isolated from C. gambianus, Mastomys natalensis, and C. hirta. This study is the first to report findings of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores and the first in mycobacterial ecology to estimate the prevalence of mycobacteria after stratified pool screening. The fact that small mammals in urban areas carry more mycobacteria than those in the fields and that potentially pathogenic mycobacteria were isolated identifies a risk for other animals and humans, especially HIV/AIDS patients, that have a weakened immune system. PMID:18065608

  15. First detection of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores, using stratified pool screening.

    PubMed

    Durnez, Lies; Eddyani, Miriam; Mgode, Georgies F; Katakweba, Abdul; Katholi, Charles R; Machang'u, Robert R; Kazwala, Rudovik R; Portaels, Françoise; Leirs, Herwig

    2008-02-01

    With the rising number of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in developing countries, the control of mycobacteria is of growing importance. Previous studies have shown that rodents and insectivores are carriers of mycobacteria. However, it is not clear how widespread mycobacteria are in these animals and what their role is in spreading them. Therefore, the prevalence of mycobacteria in rodents and insectivores was studied in and around Morogoro, Tanzania. Live rodents were trapped, with three types of live traps, in three habitats. Pieces of organs were pooled per habitat, species, and organ type (stratified pooling); these sample pools were examined for the presence of mycobacteria by PCR, microscopy, and culture methods. The mycobacterial isolates were identified using phenotypic techniques and sequencing. In total, 708 small mammals were collected, 31 of which were shrews. By pool prevalence estimation, 2.65% of the animals were carriers of mycobacteria, with a higher prevalence in the urban areas and in Cricetomys gambianus and the insectivore Crocidura hirta. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (Mycobacterium chimaera, M. intracellulare, M. arupense, M. parascrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium spp.) were isolated from C. gambianus, Mastomys natalensis, and C. hirta. This study is the first to report findings of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores and the first in mycobacterial ecology to estimate the prevalence of mycobacteria after stratified pool screening. The fact that small mammals in urban areas carry more mycobacteria than those in the fields and that potentially pathogenic mycobacteria were isolated identifies a risk for other animals and humans, especially HIV/AIDS patients, that have a weakened immune system. PMID:18065608

  16. A study of mycobacteria isolated from cervical lymph glands of African patients in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Šula, Ladislav; Stott, H.; Kubín, M.; Kiaer, J.

    1960-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the cervical lymph glands is common among Africans, but little is known at present about the causal type of mycobacterium. A study was therefore made in 1958, jointly by WHO and the Kenya Medical Department, to isolate and type mycobacteria from specimens of cervical lymph glands from African patients. From 57 such specimens, collected throughout Kenya and sent to the Tuberculosis Research Institute in Prague for bacteriological and histological examination, 41 strains—all typed as Myco. tuberculosis var. hominis—were isolated, studied in subculture, and tested for drug sensitivity and animal pathogenicity. The cultural, pathogenic, biochemical, and other characteristics of these strains show that mycobacteria isolated from tuberculous cervical lymph glands of Africans essentially resemble those similarly isolated from Europeans, but that all of them were of the human type. No bovine or atypical strains were isolated. The importance of investigating the chest condition of Africans suspected of having tuberculous cervical lymph glands is demonstrated by the high incidence of chest lesions revealed on radiological examination of such persons. This report describes in detail the various methods employed in the study for making cultures, drug sensitivity tests, and histological examinations; the characteristics of the mycobacterial strains isolated; and the results of the bacteriological, clinical, histological, and radiological examinations performed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12 PMID:20604079

  17. Isolation and identification of mycobacteria from captive reptiles.

    PubMed

    Ebani, Valentina V; Fratini, Filippo; Bertelloni, Fabrizio; Cerri, Domenico; Tortoli, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of Mycobacterium species in clinically healthy pet reptiles was studied in Italy during the period 2004-2006. The feces samples of 223 animals were examined bacteriologically. Thirty-seven strains were isolated, in particular from 13/18 (72.2%) ophidians, 13/134 (9.7%) saurians and 11/71 (15.5%) chelonians. The isolates were classified, after HPLC analysis of bromophenacyl esters of cell wall mycolic acids, as Mycobacterium fortuitum (14 strains, 37.8%), Mycobacterium fortuitum-like (17, 45.9%), Mycobacterium peregrinum (4, 10.8%), and Mycobacterium chelonae (1, 2.7%). M. fortuitum was isolated from seven pythons, five saurians and two turtles; M. fortuitum-like from six saurians, six pythons and five turtles; M. peregrinum from four turtles; M. chelonae from one lizard. One isolate from an Iguana iguana could not be identified by HPLC analysis showing a previously unreported profile. Comparative 16S rDNA sequencing showed a low similarity with Mycobacterium triviale (97.2%) and Mycobacterium confluentis (97.1%). On the basis of such data the unidentified bacterium turned out to belong to a not yet described Mycobacterium species. PMID:22657144

  18. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Odell, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized worldwide. Although over 150 different species of NTM have been described, pulmonary infections are most commonly due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium abscessus. The identification of these organisms in pulmonary specimens does not always equate with active infection; supportive radiographic and clinical findings are needed to establish the diagnosis. It is difficult to eradicate NTM infections. A prolonged course of therapy with a combination of drugs is required. Unfortunately, recurrent infection with new strains of mycobacteria or a relapse of infection caused by the original organism is not uncommon. Surgical resection is appropriate in selected cases of localized disease or in cases in which the infecting organism is resistant to medical therapy. Additionally, surgery may be required for infections complicated by hemoptysis or abscess formation. This review will summarize the practical aspects of the diagnosis and management of NTM thoracic infections, with emphasis on the indications for surgery and the results of surgical intervention. The management of NTM disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections is beyond the scope of this article and, unless otherwise noted, comments apply to hosts without HIV infection PMID:24624285

  19. [Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of the lung].

    PubMed

    Latshang, Tsogyal D; Lo Cascio, Christian M; Russi, Erich W

    2011-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) species are mycobacterial species other than those belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and M. leprae. NTM are generally free-living organisms that are ubiquitous in the environment. Pulmonary disease, especially in older persons with and without underlying lung disease, is caused primarily by M. avium complex (MAC) and M. kansasii. The symptoms and signs of MAC lung disease are variable and not specific, but include cough, malaise, weakness, dyspnoea, chest discomfort and occasionally hemoptoe. Two major clinical presentations include disease in those with underlying lung disease, primarily white, middle-aged or elderly men - often alcoholics and/or smokers with underlying chronic obstructive lung disease, patients in whom MAC develops in areas of prior bronchiectasis, and patients with cystic fibrosis; and those without known underlying lung disease, including non-smoking women over age 50 who have interstitial patterns on chest radiography. M. kansasii infections are endemic in cities with infected tap water. Symptoms of the M. kansasii lung disease resemble to tuberculosis. M. abszessus is the most pathogenic rapid growing Mycobacterium which causes pulmonary infection. The American Thoracic Society and Infectious Disease Society of America's diagnostic criteria for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections include both imaging studies consistent with pulmonary disease and recurrent isolation of mycobacteria from sputum or isolated from at least one bronchial wash in a symptomatic patient. For treatment of MAC lung disease we recommend depending on severity and susceptibility testing a three to four drug treatment with a macrolide, rifampicin and ethambutol and for M. kansasii a treatment with Isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol. Surgical management only plays a role in rare and special cases. Treatment should be continued until sputum cultures are consecutively negative for at least one year. PMID

  20. The water environment as a source of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Makovcova, Jitka; Slany, Michal; Babak, Vladimir; Slana, Iva; Kralik, Petr

    2014-06-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms of a wide variety of environmental reservoirs, including natural and municipal water, soil, aerosols, protozoans, animals and humans. Several of these species are potential pathogens which affect human health. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of NTM in the water environment. Samples were taken from 13 water-related facilities including fish ponds, storage ponds, drinking water reservoirs and an experimental recirculation system. Altogether, 396 samples of water, sediment and aquatic plants were collected and analysed. All samples were examined using conventional culture methods. Suspected microbial isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis and identified using partial sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA gene. The culture revealed 94/396 samples (23.7%) that contained mycobacteria. Among known NTM we identified potentially pathogenic mycobacteria isolated from the fresh water environment for the first time: Mycobacterium asiaticum, M. chimaera, M. interjectum, M. kumamotonense, M. lentiflavum, M. montefiorense, M. nebraskense, M. paraffinicum and M. simiae. Epidemiologic studies suggest that the natural water environment is the principal source of human exposure. Our results indicate that besides the well-known potentially pathogenic mycobacteria it is important to observe occurrence, proliferation and persistence of newly discovered mycobacterial species. PMID:24937219

  1. Development of simple and efficient protocol for isolation of plasmids from mycobacteria using zirconia beads.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, M V; Qin, M H; Rajagopalan, M

    2000-01-01

    A two-step protocol has been developed for isolation of plasmids from recombinant mycobacteria via Escherichia coli. First either mycobacterial primary transformants or propagated cultures were lysed in a mini-bead beater using zirconia beads and the lysate thus obtained was used to transform E. coli recA mutant cells. Secondly, plasmid DNA was isolated from recombinant E. coli cells and analysed. Bead beating times of 2 min for Mycobacterium smegmatis, a rapid grower, and 4 min for M. bovis BCG, a slow grower, were found to be optimal for recovery of plasmid DNA. This protocol was also amenable to other mycobacterial species such as M. avium, M. fortuitum and M. tuberculosis H37Ra. Plasmid recovery from the recombinant M. bovis BCG using this protocol is approximately 300-fold higher than that reported for the electroduction method. PMID:10728558

  2. THE EFFECT OF DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CHANGE ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND HUMAN EPIDEMIOLOGY OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA SPECIES (NERL COMPONENT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium species are classified as rod-shaped acid-fast, bacteria in the family Mycobacteriaceae. They are ubiquitous throughout the environment, and are commonly found in environmental samples of soil, and ambient surface waters. NTM have been isolated from drinking wate...

  3. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium). PMID:12060893

  4. Drug Susceptibility Testing of 31 Antimicrobial Agents on Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria Isolates from China

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hui; Li, Guilian; Zhao, Xiuqin; Liu, Haican; Wan, Kanglin; Yu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Several species of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are now recognized as human pathogens. However, limited data on effective drug treatments against these organisms exists. Here, we describe the species distribution and drug susceptibility profiles of RGM clinical isolates collected from four southern Chinese provinces from January 2005 to December 2012. Methods. Clinical isolates (73) were subjected to in vitro testing with 31 antimicrobial agents using the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth microdilution method. The isolates included 55 M. abscessus, 11 M. fortuitum, 3 M. chelonae, 2 M. neoaurum, and 2 M. septicum isolates. Results. M. abscessus (75.34%) and M. fortuitum (15.07%), the most common species, exhibited greater antibiotic resistance than the other three species. The isolates had low resistance to amikacin, linezolid, and tigecycline, and high resistance to first-line antituberculous agents, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, rifapentine, dapsone, thioacetazone, and pasiniazid. M. abscessus and M. fortuitum were highly resistant to ofloxacin and rifabutin, respectively. The isolates showed moderate resistance to the other antimicrobial agents. Conclusions. Our results suggest that tigecycline, linezolid, clofazimine, and cefmetazole are appropriate choices for M. abscessus infections. Capreomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tigecycline, clofazimine, and cefmetazole are potentially good choices for M. fortuitum infections. Our drug susceptibility data should be useful to clinicians. PMID:26351633

  5. Evaluation of Various Culture Media for Detection of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Preece, Clair L; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; Perry, Audrey; Jones, Amanda L; Cummings, Stephen P; Perry, John D; Hogardt, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is challenging due to overgrowth by rapidly growing species that colonize the lungs of patients with CF. Extended incubation on Burkholderia cepacia selective agar (BCSA) has been recommended as an expedient culture method for the isolation of rapidly growing NTM in this setting. The aim of this study was to assess five selective media designed for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia complex, along with two media designed for the isolation of mycobacteria (rapidly growing mycobacteria [RGM] medium and Middlebrook 7H11 agar), for their abilities to isolate NTM. All seven media were challenged with 147 isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria and 185 isolates belonging to other species. RGM medium was then compared with the most selective brand of BCSA for the isolation of NTM from 224 sputum samples from patients with CF. Different agars designed for the isolation of B. cepacia complex varied considerably in their inhibition of other bacteria and fungi. RGM medium supported the growth of all isolates of mycobacteria and was more selective than any other medium. NTM were recovered from 17 of 224 sputum samples using RGM medium, compared with only 7 samples using the most selective brand of BCSA (P = 0.023). RGM medium offers a superior option, compared to other selective agars, for the isolation of rapidly growing mycobacteria from the sputum of patients with CF. Furthermore, the convenience of using RGM medium enables routine screening for rapidly growing NTM in all submitted sputum samples from patients with CF. PMID:27098962

  6. The therapeutic approach to non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection of the lung.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Emmet E; Anderson, Paul B

    2010-10-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of alcohol fast, aerobic, nonmotile bacteria that are found in the environment. Recent reports indicate that their incidence and prevalence is increasing and guidelines have been developed laying down criteria for diagnosis. The treatment of these mycobacteria may be difficult, in many cases involving complex regimens containing multiple drugs. While traditional anti-tuberculosis medications are frequently used, specific therapeutic regimens depend on the organism isolated, in vitro susceptibility testing, drug tolerance and toxicity and concomitant medical disorders. In this review, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of the more important lung pathogens, describing complexities and controversies surrounding treatment with traditional, adjunctive and the newer and more experimental agents. PMID:20542128

  7. Fine-tuning the space, time, and host distribution of mycobacteria in wildlife

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We describe the diversity of two kinds of mycobacteria isolates, environmental mycobacteria and Mycobacterium bovis collected from wild boar, fallow deer, red deer and cattle in Doñana National Park (DNP, Spain), analyzing their association with temporal, spatial and environmental factors. Results High diversity of environmental mycobacteria species and M. bovis typing patterns (TPs) were found. When assessing the factors underlying the presence of the most common types of both environmental mycobacteria and M. bovis TPs in DNP, we evidenced (i) host species differences in the occurrence, (ii) spatial structuration and (iii) differences in the degree of spatial association of specific types between host species. Co-infection of a single host by two M. bovis TPs occurred in all three wild ungulate species. In wild boar and red deer, isolation of one group of mycobacteria occurred more frequently in individuals not infected by the other group. While only three TPs were detected in wildlife between 1998 and 2003, up to 8 different ones were found during 2006-2007. The opposite was observed in cattle. Belonging to an M. bovis-infected social group was a significant risk factor for mycobacterial infection in red deer and wild boar, but not for fallow deer. M. bovis TPs were usually found closer to water marshland than MOTT. Conclusions The diversity of mycobacteria described herein is indicative of multiple introduction events and a complex multi-host and multi-pathogen epidemiology in DNP. Significant changes in the mycobacterial isolate community may have taken place, even in a short time period (1998 to 2007). Aspects of host social organization should be taken into account in wildlife epidemiology. Wildlife in DNP is frequently exposed to different species of non-tuberculous, environmental mycobacteria, which could interact with the immune response to pathogenic mycobacteria, although the effects are unknown. This research highlights the suitability of

  8. Species Identification and Clarithromycin Susceptibility Testing of 278 Clinical Nontuberculosis Mycobacteria Isolates.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenjuan; Duan, Hongfei; Huang, Hairong; Lu, Yu; Chu, Naihui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to analyze different species' proportion of nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) and susceptibility to clarithromycin of different species. 278 clinical NTM isolates were identified into species by using 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp65. Then clarithromycin susceptibility testing against different species was done separately, using microplate Alamar Blue assay. Finally, resistance isolates' erm(41) of M. abscessus were sequenced in order to analyze mechanisms for clarithromycin resistant. In this test, 131 isolates (47%) belonged to M. avium complex (MAC), and 70 isolates (25%) belonged to M. abscessus. Nearly all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus resistant to clarithromycin had T28 in erm(41). However, all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus susceptible to clarithromycin had C28 in erm(41). In this study, we find that MAC was the most common pathogens of NTM, and the second one was M. abscessus. However, M. chelonei, M. fuerth, and M. gordon were rare. Clarithromycin had a good inhibition activity against all the NTM species except M. abscessus subsp. abscessus. The erm(41) genotype is of high relevance to clarithromycin resistance. PMID:26146620

  9. Species Identification and Clarithromycin Susceptibility Testing of 278 Clinical Nontuberculosis Mycobacteria Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wenjuan; Duan, Hongfei; Huang, Hairong; Lu, Yu; Chu, Naihui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to analyze different species' proportion of nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) and susceptibility to clarithromycin of different species. 278 clinical NTM isolates were identified into species by using 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp65. Then clarithromycin susceptibility testing against different species was done separately, using microplate Alamar Blue assay. Finally, resistance isolates' erm(41) of M. abscessus were sequenced in order to analyze mechanisms for clarithromycin resistant. In this test, 131 isolates (47%) belonged to M. avium complex (MAC), and 70 isolates (25%) belonged to M. abscessus. Nearly all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus resistant to clarithromycin had T28 in erm(41). However, all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus susceptible to clarithromycin had C28 in erm(41). In this study, we find that MAC was the most common pathogens of NTM, and the second one was M. abscessus. However, M. chelonei, M. fuerth, and M. gordon were rare. Clarithromycin had a good inhibition activity against all the NTM species except M. abscessus subsp. abscessus. The erm(41) genotype is of high relevance to clarithromycin resistance. PMID:26146620

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium kansasii Strains 1010001454, 1010001458, 1010001468, 1010001493, 1010001495, and 1010001469, Isolated from Environmental Sources.

    PubMed

    Strapagiel, Dominik; Borówka, Paulina; Marciniak, Błażej; Bakuła, Zofia; van Ingen, Jakko; Safianowska, Aleksandra; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław; Jagielski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii belongs to the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and causes opportunistic infections with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six environmental M. kansasii strains, designated 1010001495 (type I), 1010001469 (type II), 1010001468 (type III), 1010001458 (type IV), 1010001454 (type V), and 1010001493 (type V), originally isolated in five different European countries. PMID:27257194

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium kansasii Strains 1010001454, 1010001458, 1010001468, 1010001493, 1010001495, and 1010001469, Isolated from Environmental Sources

    PubMed Central

    Strapagiel, Dominik; Borówka, Paulina; Marciniak, Błażej; Bakuła, Zofia; Safianowska, Aleksandra; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii belongs to the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and causes opportunistic infections with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six environmental M. kansasii strains, designated 1010001495 (type I), 1010001469 (type II), 1010001468 (type III), 1010001458 (type IV), 1010001454 (type V), and 1010001493 (type V), originally isolated in five different European countries. PMID:27257194

  12. Isolation of Mycobacteria from clinical samples collected in the United States from 2004 to 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Mycobacteria other than M. bovis (i.e. atypical mycobacteria) may interfere with current bovine tuberculosis diagnostic tests resulting in false positive test results. In populations with low prevalence of M. bovis (i.e., as detected within the United States), interference from atypical ...

  13. Susceptibility of rapidly growing mycobacteria and Nocardia isolates from cats and dogs to pradofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Govendir, M; Norris, J M; Hansen, T; Wigney, D I; Muscatello, G; Trott, D J; Malik, R

    2011-12-15

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) and Nocardiae can cause severe or refractory infections in cats and dogs. Prolonged antibacterial therapy is required to cure these infections. As fluoroquinolones have been used in combination therapy for treating RGM infections, isolates from the Mycobacterium smegmatis cluster (n=64), Mycobacterium fortuitum cluster (n=17), and M. mageritense cluster (n=2), collected from feline and canine patients, underwent susceptibility testing to pradofloxacin. The MIC(50), MIC(90) and tentative epidemiological cut-off (ECOFF) values as determined by microbroth dilution susceptibility testing that inhibited growth of the M. smegmatis and M. fortuitum clusters were 0.063, 0.125 and ≤ 0.25; and 0.125, 0.250 and ≤ 1.0 μg/mL, respectively. E-Test results showed similar trends but MICs were lower than those for microbroth dilution. In summary, pradofloxacin demonstrated effective in vitro activity against RGM isolates. Additionally, veterinary isolates of Nocardia nova (n=18), Nocardia farcinica (n=3) and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n=1) underwent microbroth dilution testing to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and pradofloxacin. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) of pradofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin that inhibited growth of Nocardia nova isolates were 2 (4), 8 (16), 16 (32) μg/mL, respectively. The tentative ECOFF values for pradofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were 32 μg/mL and for enrofloxacin 64 μg/mL. The MIC or MIC range for the three N. farcinica isolates of pradofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin were 0.25-0.5, 2 and 2 μg/mL and for the single N. cyriacigeorgica isolate were 1, 4 and 4 μg/mL, respectively. On the basis on these results, fluoroquinolones appear to have limited therapeutic potential for most Nocardia infections. PMID:21726965

  14. [Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Ringshausen, F C; Rademacher, J

    2016-02-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of biologically diverse, ubiquitous and naturally multi-drug resistant bacteria with facultative pathogenicity. Recent data suggest that their clinical significance is increasing worldwide and that susceptible individuals may be at risk for infection via contaminated surfaces and aerosols. These individuals often have a predisposition for chronic respiratory diseases, e. g. bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis and these conditions frequently share the same unspecific signs and symptoms with NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD). As a consequence, the diagnosis of NTM-PD, which is established based on clinical, radiological and microbiological criteria, is often delayed. Treating NTM-PD is more demanding than treating pulmonary tuberculosis as therapy is generally more tedious, toxic and expensive as well as being prone to failure. Patient and pathogen-specific factors guide the choice of an appropriate antimicrobial combination regimen, which should comply with national and international recommendations. Adverse events are common, should be anticipated and closely monitored. If infections with infrequently encountered mycobacterial species and severe or refractory disease occur, an interdisciplinary approach should be used, involving infectious disease specialists, experienced thoracic surgeons and referral to an NTM specialist center. PMID:26810111

  15. Nontuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Hu, Fei-Shu; Yu, Hai-Ying; Xu, Kai-Jin; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Ji, Zhong-Kang; Li, Jun-Jie; Deng, Mei; Hu, Hai-Yang; Sheng, Ji-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can have severe consequences and a poor prognosis. Physicians therefore need to be alert to this condition, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although the pathogenesis of NTM osteomyelitis is still unclear, studies in immunodeficient individuals have revealed close relationships between NTM osteomyelitis and defects associated with the interleukin-12–interferon-γ–tumor necrosis factor-α axis, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infection, various immunosuppressive conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Culture and species identification from tissue biopsies or surgical debridement tissue play crucial roles in diagnosing NTM osteomyelitis. Suitable imaging examinations are also important. Adequate surgical debridement and the choice of appropriate, combined antibiotics for long-term anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy, based on in vitro drug susceptibility tests, are the main therapies for these bone infections. Bacillus Calmette–Guerin vaccination might have limited prophylactic value. The use of multiple drugs and long duration of treatment mean that the therapeutic process needs to be monitored closely to detect potential side effects. Adequate duration of anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy together with regular monitoring with blood and imaging tests are key factors determining the recovery outcome in patients with NTM osteomyelitis. PMID:25915177

  16. Susceptibility of rapidly growing mycobacteria isolated from cats and dogs, to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Govendir, M; Hansen, T; Kimble, B; Norris, J M; Baral, R M; Wigney, D I; Gottlieb, S; Malik, R

    2011-01-10

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) cause infections in cats and dogs which require prolonged antibacterial medication for resolution. In Australia, pathogens from the Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium smegmatis clusters are responsible for most of the RGM infections in cats and dogs. As fluoroquinolones are often recommended for treating such infections, 14 M. fortuitum isolates, 51 isolates from the M. smegmatis cluster and 2 M. mageritense isolates, collected from feline and canine patients, underwent susceptibility testing to the second generation fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin and the newer generation fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. Using microbroth dilution, the MIC(90) of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and moxifloxacin that inhibited growth of M. fortuitum isolates were 0.500, 0.250 and 0.063 μg/mL respectively. For the M. smegmatis cluster isolates the corresponding MIC(90) was 0.500, 0.250 and 0.125 μg/mL respectively. E-test results showed similar trends but MICs were lower than those determined by microbroth dilution. Additionally, moxifloxacin was administered to 10 clinically normal cats (50mg per cat, once daily for 4 days). The plasma moxifloxacin concentration 2h after the last dose was determined by liquid chromatography as 2.2 ± 0.6 μg/mL. The plasma concentration at 2h:MIC(90) ratios for moxifloxacin for M. fortuitum and M. smegmatis cluster was 34.9 and 17.6 respectively which exceeded the recommended threshold of 10, indicating that moxifloxacin has good theoretical efficacy for treatment of those M. fortuitum and M. smegmatis infections in cats and dogs that have become refractory to other antibacterial drug classes. PMID:20619975

  17. [Isolation frequency of the Mycobacterium genus in urine samples].

    PubMed

    Mederos, Lilian M; Sardiñas, Misleidis; García, Grechen; Martínez, María Rosarys; Reyes, Angélica; Díaz, Raúl

    2015-10-01

    Kidney infections caused by Mycobacterium genus are torpid and chronic evolution. In this study were analyzed 177 urine samples (included 110 from HIV patients) received between January 2006 and July 2014 in the National Reference Laboratory of Tuberculosis at Tropical Medicine Institute "Pedro Kourí" (IPK). The results were 17 isolates Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 30 isolates of nontuberculous mycobacteria were detected. This study confirms the diagnostic importance of these infections especially in HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:26633121

  18. Multi-centre evaluation of the speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay for differentiation of Mycobacterium spp. in clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A new DNA line probe assay (Speed-oligo Mycobacteria, Vircell) has been launched for rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium spp. from cultures. Compared to other line-probe assays, Speed-oligo Mycobacteria covers a relatively limited spectrum of species but uses a simpler and faster dip-stick technique. The present multi-centre, multi-country study aimed at evaluating the utility and usability of Speed-oligo Mycobacteria in routine mycobacteriology diagnostics. Results from Speed-oligo Myobacteria were compared to those from Genotype CM (HAIN lifescience, Nehren, Germany), another line-probe assay. Methods Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay was performed in three main steps: 1) DNA extraction from cultured material 2) PCR amplification of the target gene and an internal control and 3) hybridization of the PCR products to specific probes by means of a dip-stick. Results Two hundred forty-two clinical isolates were recovered from consecutive positive mycobacterial cultures at two German (IML Gauting, Bioscientia Ingelheim), one Czech (KLINLAB Prague), and at a Sudanese (Khartoum) laboratory. All Mycobacterium species covered by the assay were reliably recognized. The rate of false positive results was 1.2% and concerned only the species M. marinum and M. peregrinum. The identification rate, i.e. the proportion of isolates which was correctly differentiated to the level of species or complex by the assay, differed significantly among laboratories being 94.9%, 90.7%, and 75.0% at the study sites IML Gauting, KLINLAB Prague and Bioscientia Ingelheim, respectively. This difference was caused by different spectra of NTM species encountered by the laboratory centres in daily routine diagnostics. Conclusions Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay was proved a rapid and easy-to-perform alternative to conventional line-probe assays. The assay showed excellent sensitivity with regard to identification of genus Mycobacterium and species/complexes covered by the test. However

  19. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Possible Novel Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Species with High Pathogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Dutta, Avirup; Wong, Guat Jah; Wee, Wei Yee; Ang, Mia Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been reported to cause a wide range of human diseases. We present the first whole-genome study of a Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium, Mycobacterium sp. UM_CSW (referred to hereafter as UM_CSW), isolated from a patient diagnosed with bronchiectasis. Our data suggest that this clinical isolate is likely a novel mycobacterial species, supported by clear evidence from molecular phylogenetic, comparative genomic, ANI and AAI analyses. UM_CSW is closely related to the Mycobacterium avium complex. While it has characteristic features of an environmental bacterium, it also shows a high pathogenic potential with the presence of a wide variety of putative genes related to bacterial virulence and shares very similar pathogenomic profiles with the known pathogenic mycobacterial species. Thus, we conclude that this possible novel Mycobacterium species should be tightly monitored for its possible causative role in human infections. PMID:27035710

  20. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martiniano, Stacey L; Nick, Jerry A; Daley, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are important emerging cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens, with estimates of prevalence ranging from 6% to 13%. Diagnosis of NTM disease in patients with CF is challenging, as the infection may remain indolent in some, without evidence of clinical consequence, whereas other patients suffer significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment requires prolonged periods of multiple drugs and varies depending on NTM species, resistance pattern, and extent of disease. The development of a disease-specific approach to the diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in CF patients is a research priority, as a lifelong strategy is needed for this high-risk population. PMID:26857770

  1. Molecular typing of Iranian mycobacteria isolates by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 360-bp rpoB gene

    PubMed Central

    Hadifar, Shima; Moghim, Sharareh; Fazeli, Hossein; GhasemianSafaei, Hajieh; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Farid, Fariba; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis and typing of Mycobacterium genus provides basic tools for investigating the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this group of bacteria. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PRA) is an accurate method providing diagnosis and typing of species of mycobacteria. The present study is conducted by the purpose of determining restriction fragment profiles of common types of mycobacteria by PRA method of rpoB gene in this geographical region. Materials and Methods: Totally 60 clinical and environmental isolates from February to October, 2013 were collected and subcultured and identified by phenotypic methods. A 360 bp fragment of the rpoB gene amplified by PCR and products were digested by MspI and HaeIII enzymes. Results: In the present study, of all mycobacteria isolates identified by PRA method, 13 isolates (21.66%) were Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 34 isolates (56.66%) were rapidly growing Nontuberculosis Mycobacteria (NTM) that including 26 clinical isolates (43.33%) and 8 environmental isolates (13.33%), 11 isolates (18.33%) were clinical slowly growing NTM. among the clinical NTM isolates, Mycobacterium fortuitum Type I with the frequency of 57.77% was the most prevalent type isolates. Furthermore, an unrecorded of the PRA pattern of Mycobacterium conceptionense (HeaIII: 120/90/80, MspI: 120/105/80) was found. This study demonstrated that the PRA method was high discriminatory power for identification and typing of mycobacteria species and was able to identify 96.6% of all isolates. Conclusion: Based on the result of this study, rpoB gene could be a potentially useful tool for identification and investigation of molecular epidemiology of mycobacterial species. PMID:26380237

  2. [Current microbiological methods in the investigation of mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Richter, E; Andres, S; Hillemann, D

    2015-05-01

    The rapid and reliable detection of tuberculosis is the main goal of microbiological analyses. This is not only of great value for an early diagnosis and early start of an adequate therapy, but also helps to stop transmission and spread of the disease. Prerequisites for successful detection of mycobacteria are careful selection of patient specimens, proper sampling and appropriate shipping. In addition to the classical microbiological methods such as staining for acid-fast bacteria and culture procedures, newer molecular methods are gaining greater importance (PCR; NAT). TB bacteria and resistance-associated mutations can be detected from the specimens directly, providing an early hint about resistant strains. In positive cultures, M. tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria must be discriminated from each other. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) of all first-line drugs has to be performed from one isolate of each patient and repeated if TB bacteria are still isolated after 2 months of therapy. DST of second-line drugs should follow in case of drug resistance or drug intolerance. PMID:25970121

  3. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection with concurrent IgG4-related lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Weng, Shao-Wen; Wang, Ming-Chung; Huang, Wan-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection with concurrent IgG4-related lymphadenopathy has not been reported. We described a patient with neutralizing autoantibodies to interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and elevated levels of serum IgG4 presenting with generalized lymphadenopathy and reactive dermatosis. Histologically, lymph nodes (LNs) showed effaced nodal architecture with polymorphic infiltrates, mimicking angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. Both the absolute number and the ratio of IgG4+ plasma cells to IgG+ plasma cells were increased. Mycobacterium abscessus was isolated from cultures of LNs, and demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The skin biopsy showed neutrophilic dermatosis, consistent with Sweet syndrome. The patient met the criteria of both adult-onset immunodeficiency syndrome and IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. This case provides evidence of disseminated NTM infection with concurrent type III IgG4-related lymphadenopathy in the patient with anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies. PMID:26660641

  4. Nontuberculous mycobacterial otomastoiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Tai; Wang, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Chia-Der; Tsai, Ming-Hsui

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial otomastoiditis is rare and can be easily confused with various different forms of otitis media. We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with left-sided chronic otitis media that had persisted for more than 1 year. It was not eradicated by standard antimicrobial therapy and surgical debridement. After appropriate antibiotic therapy for nontuberculous mycobacteria was added to the therapeutic regimen, the patient improved significantly and the lesion had healed by 6 months. Based on our experience with this case, we conclude that early bacterial culture and staining for acid-fast bacilli in ear drainage material or granulation tissue should be performed when standard antimicrobial therapy fails to eradicate chronic otitis media of an undetermined origin that is accompanied by granulation tissue over the external auditory canal or middle ear. Polymerase chain reaction testing is also effective for rapid diagnosis. Surgical debridement and removal of the foreign body can successfully treat nontuberculous mycobacterial otomastoiditis only when effective antimicrobial therapy is also administered. PMID:23354889

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms; their isolation from clinical specimens does not always indicate clinical disease. The incidence of NTM lung diseases has been increasing worldwide. Although the geographic diversity of NTM species is well known, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus complex (MABC), and M. kansasii are the most commonly encountered and important etiologic organisms. Two distinct types of NTM lung diseases have been reported, namely fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic forms. For laboratory diagnosis of NTM lung diseases, both liquid and solid media cultures and species-level identification are strongly recommended to enhance growth detection and determine the clinical relevance of isolates. Treatment for NTM lung diseases consists of a multidrug regimen and a long course of therapy, lasting more than 12 months after negative sputum conversion. For MAC lung disease, several new macrolide-based regimens are now recommended. For nodular bronchiectatic forms of MAC lung diseases, an intermittent three-time-weekly regimen produces outcomes similar to those of daily therapy. Treatment of MABC lung disease is very difficult, requiring long-term use of parenteral agents in combination with new macrolides. Treatment outcomes are much better for M. massiliense lung disease than for M. abscessus lung disease. Thus, precise identification of species in MABC infection is needed for the prediction of antibiotic response. Likewise, increased efforts to improve treatment outcomes and develop new agents for NTM lung disease are needed. PMID:27134484

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Soo; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-05-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms; their isolation from clinical specimens does not always indicate clinical disease. The incidence of NTM lung diseases has been increasing worldwide. Although the geographic diversity of NTM species is well known, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus complex (MABC), and M. kansasii are the most commonly encountered and important etiologic organisms. Two distinct types of NTM lung diseases have been reported, namely fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic forms. For laboratory diagnosis of NTM lung diseases, both liquid and solid media cultures and species-level identification are strongly recommended to enhance growth detection and determine the clinical relevance of isolates. Treatment for NTM lung diseases consists of a multidrug regimen and a long course of therapy, lasting more than 12 months after negative sputum conversion. For MAC lung disease, several new macrolide-based regimens are now recommended. For nodular bronchiectatic forms of MAC lung diseases, an intermittent three-time-weekly regimen produces outcomes similar to those of daily therapy. Treatment of MABC lung disease is very difficult, requiring long-term use of parenteral agents in combination with new macrolides. Treatment outcomes are much better for M. massiliense lung disease than for M. abscessus lung disease. Thus, precise identification of species in MABC infection is needed for the prediction of antibiotic response. Likewise, increased efforts to improve treatment outcomes and develop new agents for NTM lung disease are needed. PMID:27134484

  7. [Atypical mycobacteria and pulmonary involvement in infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Camarena Miñana, Juan J; Pellicer, Rosa González

    2011-12-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly associated with infectious pulmonary disease. NTM are ubiquitous environmental pathogens with high isolation rates worldwide. The greater frequency of NTM associated with pulmonary diseases is probably due to a combination of increased exposure, improved diagnostic methods and an increase in the prevalence of risk factors predisposing individuals to infection. Difficulty may arise in determining whether an isolate from a respiratory sample is in fact a contaminant or a pathogenic organism. The ATS/IDSA guidelines highlight the importance of following microbiological and clinical criteria in making a diagnosis of NTM lung infection. These criteria may not be useful for all NTM and species-level identification is strongly recommended. Mycobacteria identification by conventional methods has been the standard in most clinical microbiology laboratories. However, conventional testing alone does not allow identification of many NTM. Newer, rapid molecular methods such as commercially available nucleic acid probes, genomic amplification and DNA sequence analysis should be used. Communication between the clinician and the laboratorian is essential to decide whether an isolate could be sent to a reference laboratory to determine the best method for species identification. Although the CLSI has recently published an approved standard for NTM susceptibility testing, there is ongoing debate about the role of in vitro susceptibility for managing patients with NTM disease. The goal of this review is to describe the mycobacteria involved in lung disease, the factors that predispose to this infection, its diagnosis with alternative procedures and the correlation between in vitro and in vivo treatment response. PMID:22305672

  8. Mycobacteria and Fungi in Moisture-Damaged Building Materials

    PubMed Central

    Torvinen, Eila; Meklin, Teija; Torkko, Pirjo; Suomalainen, Sini; Reiman, Marjut; Katila, Marja-Leena; Paulin, Lars; Nevalainen, Aino

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to the growth of fungi, the growth of mycobacteria in moisture-damaged building materials has rarely been studied. Environmental mycobacteria were isolated from 23% of samples of moisture-damaged materials (n = 88). The occurrence of mycobacteria increased with increasing concentrations of fungi. Mycobacteria may contribute to indoor exposure and associated adverse health effects. PMID:17021236

  9. Evaluation of practical chromatographic procedures for identification of clinical isolates of mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Luquin, M; Ausina, V; López Calahorra, F; Belda, F; García Barceló, M; Celma, C; Prats, G

    1991-01-01

    After experimental conditions were established, 366 strains of mycobacteria belonging to 23 different species were studied for fatty acids, secondary alcohols, and mycolic acid cleavage products by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Additionally, the mycolic acid pattern was studied by thin-layer chromatography. Capillary gas-liquid chromatography allowed direct identification of the following Mycobacterium spp.: M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. szulgai, M. xenopi, M. malmoense, and M. gordonae. The patterns of mycolic acid methyl esters recorded for the test strains of M. chelonae and M. agri may be of value in the identification of these species. Moreover, the combined use of the two chromatographic techniques provided precise identification of the M. tuberculosis complex, M. simiae, M. fallax, M. triviale, and M. chelonae-like organisms. A minimal set of biochemical tests is usually required to obtain identification to the species level when chromatographic procedures alone are not sufficient. Under the reported experimental conditions, thin-layer chromatography and capillary gas-liquid chromatography are rapid and very useful techniques for the identification of mycobacteria. Images PMID:1993746

  10. Isolation and characterization of a unique group of slowly growing mycobacteria: description of Mycobacterium lentiflavum sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, B; Wu, W K; Bodmer, T; Haase, G; Pfyffer, G E; Kroppenstedt, R M; Schröder, K H; Emler, S; Kilburn, J O; Kirschner, P; Telenti, A; Coyle, M B; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    A distinct group of slowly growing mycobacteria was identified on the basis of growth characteristics, biochemical and lipid profiles, and nucleic acid analyses. The isolates showed growth at 22 to 37 degrees C, yellow pigmentation, and negative tests for Tween 80 hydrolysis, nicotinic acid, nitrate reductase, and urease; tests for arylsulfatase, pyrazinamidase, and heat-stable catalase were variable. Analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography and mycolic acids by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography indicated a distinctive pattern which was unlike those of other species. Determination of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed a unique sequence closely related to Mycobacterium simiae and M. genavense. On the basis of DNA homology studies, we suggest that these organisms are representatives of a novel species, for which the name M. lentiflavum sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:8727884

  11. Laboratory aspects of clinically significant rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Set, R; Shastri, J

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenic potential of the rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) has started being recognized. This is due to more sensitive and specific techniques in the laboratory. The RGM are generally defined as nontuberculous species of mycobacteria that show visible growth on agar media within 7 days. RGM are widely distributed in nature and have been isolated from natural water, tap water, and soil. Several biochemical tests, high performance liquid chromatography, and molecular techniques have been developed for rapid identification of these species. The American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Disease Society of America recommend that RGM should be identified to the species level using a recognized acceptable methodology such as polymerase chain reaction restriction enzyme analysis or biochemical testing and routine susceptibility testing of RGM should include amikacin, imipenem, doxycycline, the fluorinated quinolones, a sulphonamide or trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, cefoxitin, clarithromycin, linezolid, and tobramycin. The diseases caused by these organisms have varied manifestations. They have been responsible for a number of healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks. For recognition of outbreaks, it is important to be familiar with the causative organisms like RGM which are most frequently involved in healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo outbreaks. It is essential to intervene as soon as possible to interrupt this transmission. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge of RGM. Unquestionably more studies are required. Through this review, we wish to emphasize that reporting of RGM from clinical settings along with their sensitivity patterns is an absolute need of the hour. PMID:22120792

  12. Comparative evaluation of polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis: two amplified targets, hsp65 and rpoB, for identification of cultured mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cheunoy, Wattana; Prammananan, Therdsak; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Foongladda, Suporn

    2005-03-01

    The increasing incidence of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections due to AIDS epidemic resulted in the need of rapid and accurate identification of isolated mycobacteria. The correct identification result leads to the selection of an appropriate therapeutic regimen. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis (PCR-REA) has been developed since 1992 and used as the rapid method for identifying mycobacteria. Several genes or sequences have been used as an amplified target for PCR-REA. The present study aims to evaluate the potential use of PCR-REA of gene-encoding heat shock protein 65 kDa (hsp65) and beta-subunit RNA polymerase (rpoB) for the identification of mycobacteria compared with conventional biochemical identification. Two hundreds clinical isolates, consisting of 50 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 150 isolates of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), were submitted for identification using PCR-REA and biochemical method. The results demonstrated that PCR-REA identified 188 isolates of both M. tuberculosis and NTM concordantly with biochemical identification. Discordant identification results obtained from 12 isolates, comprised of 8 M. scrofulaceum, 1 M. avium complex, 1 M. malmoense, 1 M. terrae complex, and 1 M. chelonae/abscessus. Overall, the concordant percentage of results obtained from PCR-REA compared with biochemical method was 100%, 98.8%, and 83.3% for M. tuberculosis complex, rapidly growing, and slowly growing mycobacteria, respectively, and the results of hsp65 PCR-REA was in agreement with those obtained from rpoB PCR-REA. From this study, PCR-REA appears to be a simple, rapid, and reliable method for identifying mycobacteria in a routine microbiology laboratory. PMID:15766601

  13. [Molecular diagnosis of mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Kessler, Harald H

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading infectious diseases in the world. Using conventional methods, the isolation, identification, and drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other clinically important mycobacteria can take several weeks. During the past several years, molecular methods have been developed for direct detection, species identification, and drug susceptibility testing of mycobacteria. These methods can potentially reduce the diagnostic time from weeks to hours. For direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical specimens, several molecular assays are commercially available today. They have been shown useful for the routine diagnostic laboratory. DNA probes and polymerase chain reaction-based sequencing have been widely used to identify mycobacterial species. Molecular methods have also been applied for the detection of mutations that confer drug resistance in mycobacteria. All in all, the future of clinical mycobacteriology appears to be heading toward direct detection, species identification and drug resistance determination using molecular methods. PMID:13677254

  14. [Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections related to esthetic care in France, 2001-2010].

    PubMed

    Couderc, C; Carbonne, A; Thiolet, J M; Brossier, F; Savey, A; Bernet, C; Ortmans, C; Lecadet-Morin, C; Coudière, I; Aggoune, M; Astagneau, P; Coignard, B; Cambau, E

    2011-07-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections usually occur in immunocompromised patients but also in immunocompetent patients following invasive procedures, especially for esthetic purposes. Since 2001, 20 episodes (57 cases) of NTM infections, seven of which (43 cases) were related to esthetic care, have been reported to the regional infection control coordinating centers (RICCC), the local health authorities (LHA), and the national institute for public health surveillance. Four notifications (40 cases) were related to non-surgical procedures performed by general practitioners in private settings: mesotherapy, carboxytherapy, and sclerosis of microvaricosities. The three other notifications (three cases) concerned surgical procedures-lifting and mammary prosthesis. Practice evaluations performed by the RICCC and LHA for five notifications showed deficiency of standard hygiene precautions and tap water misuse for injection equipment cleaning, or skin disinfection. Microbiological investigations (national reference center for mycobacteria) demonstrated the similarity of patient and environmental strains: in one episode (16 cases after mesotherapy), M. chelonae isolated from tap water was similar to those isolated from 11 cases. Healthcare-associated NTM infections are rare but have a potentially severe outcome. These cases stress the need of healthcare-associated infection notifications in outpatient settings. PMID:21440389

  15. Comparison of the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube with MB Redox, Löwenstein-Jensen, and Middlebrook 7H11 Media for Recovery of Mycobacteria in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Somoskövi, Ákos; Magyar, Pál

    1999-01-01

    The rate of recovery and the mean time to detection of mycobacteria in clinical specimens were evaluated with two nonradiometric broth-based systems, the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) and MB Redox systems. The data obtained for each system were compared with each other and with those obtained with the Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and Middlebrook 7H11 reference media. A total of 117 mycobacterial isolates (Mycobacterium tuberculosis, n = 112; nontuberculous mycobacteria, n = 5) were detected in 486 clinical specimens. The recovery rates for M. tuberculosis were 91 of 112 (81.3%) isolates with MGIT and 81 of 112 (72.3%) isolates with MB Redox. The combination of MGIT plus MB Redox recovered 104 of the 112 (92.9%) M. tuberculosis isolates. MGIT plus LJ plus Middlebrook 7H11 recovered 106 of the 112 (94.6%) isolates, MB Redox plus LJ plus Middlebrook 7H11 recovered 99 of the 112 (88.4%) isolates, and LJ plus Middlebrook 7H11 recovered 84 of the 112 (75.0%) isolates. The mean time to detection of M. tuberculosis in smear-positive specimens was 7.2 days with MGIT, 6.9 days with MB Redox, 20.4 days with LJ, and 17.6 days with Middlebrook 7H11. The mean time to detection of M. tuberculosis in smear-negative specimens was 19.1 days with MGIT, 15.5 days with MB Redox, 25.8 days with LJ, and 21.6 days with Middlebrook 7H11. The contamination rates were 4.4, 3.8, 2.1, and 2.7% for MGIT, MB Redox, LJ, and Middlebrook 7H11, respectively. In conclusion, MGIT and MB Redox can be viable tools in the routine mycobacteriology laboratory. PMID:10203488

  16. Comparison of Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube with Culture on RGM Selective Agar for Detection of Mycobacteria in Sputum Samples from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Eltringham, Ian; Pickering, Julie; Gough, Helen; Preece, Clair L; Perry, John D

    2016-08-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an important cause of pulmonary disease in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A new culture medium (RGM medium) for the isolation of rapidly growing mycobacteria from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients has recently been reported. The aim of this study was to compare culture of sputum samples on RGM medium with culture using a standard automated liquid culture method. Sputum samples were obtained from 187 distinct patients with CF attending King's College Hospital, London, United Kingdom. Each sample was decontaminated with 3% oxalic acid and inoculated into a mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) that was monitored for 42 days using the Bactec MGIT 960 instrument. Each sample was also cultured, without decontamination, onto RGM medium, which was incubated for 10 days at 30°C. Mycobacteria were isolated from 28 patients (prevalence, 15%). Mycobacteria were detected in 24 samples (86%) using the MGIT and in 23 samples (82%) using RGM medium (P = 1.00). In this setting, RGM medium showed sensitivity equivalent to that of the MGIT for isolation of NTM from the sputum of patients with CF. RGM medium offers a simple, convenient tool that can be embedded into routine culture methods, allowing the culture of all sputum samples that are submitted from patients with CF. PMID:27225412

  17. Natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Populaire, F; Buriánková, K; Weiser, J; Pernodet, J-L

    2002-12-01

    The genus Mycobacterium contains two of the most important human pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the etiologic agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, respectively. Other mycobacteria are mostly saprophytic organisms, living in soil and water, but some of them can cause opportunistic infections. The increasing incidence of tuberculosis as well as infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in AIDS patients has renewed interest in molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in these pathogens. Mycobacteria show a high degree of intrinsic resistance to most common antibiotics. For instance, species from the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) are intrinsically resistant to macrolides. Nevertheless, some semi-synthetic macrolides as the erythromycin derivatives clarithromycin, azithromycin and most recently the ketolides, are active against NTM, particularly Mycobacterium avium, and some of them are widely used for infection treatment. However, shortly after the introduction of these new drugs, resistant strains appeared due to mutations in the macrolide target, the ribosome. The mycobacterial cell wall with its specific composition and structure is considered to be a major factor in promoting the natural resistance of mycobacteria to various antibiotics. However, to explain the difference in macrolide sensitivity between the MTC and NTM, the synergistic contribution of a specific resistance mechanism might be required, in addition to possible differences in cell wall permeability. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria, gives an overview of potential mechanisms implicated in the intrinsic resistance and brings recent data concerning a macrolide resistance determinant in the MTC. PMID:12570741

  18. Trehalose Polyphleates Are Produced by a Glycolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Conserved across Phylogenetically Distant Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Burbaud, Sophie; Laval, Françoise; Lemassu, Anne; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe; Chalut, Christian

    2016-02-18

    Mycobacteria synthesize a variety of structurally related glycolipids with major biological functions. Common themes have emerged for the biosynthesis of these glycolipids, including several families of proteins. Genes encoding these proteins are usually clustered on bacterial chromosomal islets dedicated to the synthesis of one glycolipid family. Here, we investigated the function of a cluster of five genes widely distributed across non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Using defined mutant analysis and in-depth structural characterization of glycolipids from wild-type or mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium abscessus, we established that they are involved in the formation of trehalose polyphleates (TPP), a family of compounds originally described in Mycobacterium phlei. Comparative genomics and lipid analysis of strains distributed along the mycobacterial phylogenetic tree revealed that TPP is synthesized by a large number of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. This work unravels a novel glycolipid biosynthetic pathway in mycobacteria and extends the spectrum of bacteria that produce TPP. PMID:27028886

  19. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) and Environmental isolates associated with a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system. After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The distribution system ...

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) and Environmental Isolates Associated with a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification - poster #2168

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system. After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The distribution system wa...

  1. Highlight on Advances in Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease in North America

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Farshidpour, Maham; Allen, Mary Beth; Ebrahimi, Golnaz; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2014-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in the environment and exist as an important cause of pulmonary infections in humans. Pulmonary involvement is the most common disease manifestation of NTM and the incidence of NTM is growing in North America. Susceptibility to NTM infection is incompletely understood; therefore preventative tools are not well defined. Treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is difficult and entails multiple antibiotics and an extended treatment course. Also, there is a considerable variation in treatment management that should be considered before initiating treatment. We highlight the new findings in the epidemiology diagnosis and treatment of mycobacterial infections. We debate new advances regarding NTM infection in cystic fibrosis patients and solid organ transplant recipients. Finally, we introduce a new epidemiologic model for NTM disease based on virulence-exposure-host factors. PMID:25574470

  2. Host Response to Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections of Current Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences. PMID:24914222

  3. Direct identification of mycobacteria from liquid media using a triplex real-time PCR coupled with pyrosequencing method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Uk; Cha, Choong-Hwan; Park, Seon-Hee

    2015-12-01

    Culture in enriched broth, as well as on a solid medium, is recommended for primary isolation of mycobacteria. With the introduction of liquid mycobacterial culture methods, a substantial workload regarding the identification of culture-recovered mycobacterial species, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), has been imposed on our laboratory. We thus developed a triplex, real-time PCR coupled with pyrosequencing assay that can directly identify mycobacterial species from liquid media, which can reduce the workload. In this assay, real-time PCR simultaneously detects MTC and Mycobacterium xenopi, and amplifies the region of 16S rRNA gene containing hypervariable region A for pyrosequencing analysis; subsequent, pyrosequencing identifies many other nontuberculous mycobacteria. The assay was evaluated using 333 DNA samples directly prepared from liquid media, including 24 reference strains and 309 clinical isolates. Three hundred and twenty-eight (98.5%) of the 333 samples were correctly identified. The remaining five were determined as indeterminate. In conclusion, this coupled assay would be an alternative method for rapid identification of mycobacteria directly from liquid media in a clinical laboratory with a high workload in regions where tuberculosis is endemic. PMID:26471200

  4. [Molecular identification of mycobacteria and detection of antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Cattoir, V

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacteria are responsible for many human infections, especially species of tuberculosis complex, causative agents of tuberculosis. With nine millions new cases every year, this disease is responsible for more than two millions of deaths. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (e.g. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Mycobacterium kansasii, Mycobacterium xenopi or Mycobacterium ulcerans) can cause infections too, usually in particular clinical settings. Standard diagnosis of mycobacterial infections relies on direct examination and culture. Although culture in liquid media allows the detection of mycobacterial growth at an earlier stage, isolation and phenotypic identification requires several weeks, as does antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Nowadays, molecular tools are available, allowing quicker accurate diagnosis. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by amplification-based tests can be performed directly from clinical samples, although most identifications are successfully after isolation. Several commercial techniques are now available but identification is limited to selected species, at a high cost. Sequencing of genomic targets (such as rrs, rpoB, gyrB, 16S-23S intergenic spacer or hsp65) allows accurate and quick identifications but requires access to a sequencer. Eventually, our better knowledge of the action mechanisms of the different drugs allows genotypic detection of most antibiotic resistances. Indeed, characterization of mutations in specific target genes (such as rpoB, katG, embB, pncA, gyrA or rrl) should be an effective tool for rapid detection of resistance, although this method has only been used so far for rifampin resistance detection. Nevertheless, this approach, limited to reference laboratories, should always be performed in conjunction with antibiogram. PMID:15297234

  5. Multiple nontuberculous scrofulodermas showing dramatic response to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Parimalam, Kumar; Senthil, G; Vinnarasan, M; Arumugakani, V; Amutha, B M; Lalitha, S; Swarna, S

    2015-01-01

    Atypical mycobacteria are distinct from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium chelonae, a non-pigment producing rapid grower, can be found in many cutaneous sites; infection occurs most commonly after skin trauma from surgery, injections, or minor injuries. In immune competent patients, the infection is more frequently localized as a cellulitis or a nodule, whereas, in the immunocompromised patient, dissemination (more than five lesions) can occur. Because the organism is resistant to antituberculous therapy, abscess can develop and follow a chronic, indolent course. We report a case of multiple scrofuloderma due to nontuberculous infection caused by M. chelonae showing dramatic response to clarithromycin. PMID:25657914

  6. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  7. MYCOBACTERIA IN PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES: COMPARATIVE RESISTANCE TO CHLORINE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The isolation of mycobacteria from municipal and hospital water supplies prompted an investigation of the susceptibility of environmental and clinical isolates of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis to free chlorine. Experiments revealed tha...

  8. WATERBORNE MYCOBACTERIA: AN INCREASING THREAT TO HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years there have been increasing numbers of reports on the emergence of disseminated disease due to mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Isolation of these organisms from normally sterile sites including blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid have le...

  9. Evaluation of the broth microdilution method using 2,3-diphenyl-5-thienyl-(2)-tetrazolium chloride for rapidly growing mycobacteria susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Min; Kim, Jeong man; Jeong, Joseph; Park, Young Kil; Bai, Gill-Han; Lee, Eun Yup; Lee, Min Ki; Chang, Chulhun L

    2007-10-01

    As the incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection has been increasing recently in Korea, the importance of drug susceptibility test for clinical isolates of mycobacteria has become larger. In this study we determined the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates of M. fortuitum and M. abscessus in Korea, and evaluated the efficacy of a modified broth microdilution method using 2,3-diphenyl-5-thienyl-(2)-tetrazolium chloride (STC), in terms of its ability to provide accurate and easy-to-read minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) endpoints for the susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria. Most isolates of M. fortuitum and M. abscessus in Korea are susceptible or intermediately susceptible to amikacin, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, and clarithromycin. Many isolates of M. fortuitum are susceptible to doxycycline, sulfamethoxazole, and imipenem, while many M. abscessus isolates are resistant to these drugs. In the present study, the modified broth microdilution method using STC was found to be reliable, easy to read, and inexpensive for M. fortuitum and M. abscessus susceptibility testing. The modified colorimetric MIC testing method using STC was proven to be a useful surrogate for RGM antibiotic susceptibility testing. PMID:17982223

  10. Management of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in The Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Farshidpour, Maham; Ebrahimi, Golnaz; Aliberti, Stefano; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has increased over the last decades. Elderly people are more susceptible to NTM and experience increased morbidities. NTM incidence is expected to rise due to an increasing elderly population at least up to 2050. Given the importance of NTM infection in the elderly, an increasing interest exists in studying NTM characteristics in aged population. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of NTM infection among elderly patients. We focus on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment options of NTM in this age group. We highlight the differences in the diagnosis and treatment between rapid and slow growing mycobacterial infections. The current recommendation for treatment of NTM is discussed. We debate if in vitro susceptibility testing has a role in treatment of NTM. Drug-drug interaction between antibiotics used to treat NTM and other medications, particularly warfarin, is another important issue that we discuss. Finally, we review the prognosis of NTM disease in elderly patients. PMID:24685313

  11. Tetracycline Resistance and Presence of Tetracycline Resistance Determinants tet(V) and tap in Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria from Agricultural Soils and Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kyselková, Martina; Chron̂áková, Alica; Volná, Lucie; Nêmec, Jan; Ulmann, Vít; Scharfen, Josef; Elhottová, Dana

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) inhabit soil and water but certain strains represent a health risk for human and animals. Both clinical and soil RGM may be under selection pressure for resistance to tetracycline (TET) antibiotics, since tetracyclines are administrated to humans and farm animals, and TET residues enter soil through manuring; however, resistance to TET and the presence of TET-resistance genes have been assessed only in clinical isolates. We were therefore interested in comparing soil and clinical RGM in terms of TET resistance and the presence of TET-resistance genes. We used 44 RGM from grasslands with different exposure to animal manure, and 38 clinical RGM from Czech hospitals. There was no difference between the clinical and soil isolates in TET resistance, with >50% resistant isolates in both groups. otr(A), otr(B), tet(K), tet(L) or tet(M) were not detected in any soil or clinical isolate. In contrast, most isolates harbored tet(V) and tap, both encoding mycobacterial efflux pumps, including species where these genes have never been evidenced before. The phylogeny of tet(V) correlated with isolates’ BOX-PCR profiles, suggesting that this gene evolved along with mycobacterial genomes as a part of the intrinsic resistome. In certain cases, tet(V) and/or tap were found in TET-sensitive isolates, or inversely, were not found in resistant strains. Concluding, intrinsic efflux pumps may be more important for TET resistance than horizontally transferred genes in both soil and clinical RGM. Their simple presence, however, does not attest to resistance, and therefore their diversity, function and expression merit further research. PMID:22673307

  12. ANIMAL STUDIES FOR USE IN DETERMINING VIRULENCE IN BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The heterotrophic bacteria that are indigenous to potable water are normally not a threat to the healthy population. However, some strains of Aeromonas hydrophila, Legionella pneumophila and the nontuberculous mycobacteria are opportunistic pathogens that can cause illness and ...

  13. Inhaled Amikacin for Treatment of Refractory Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Pamela A.; Glaser, Tanya S.; Bhattacharyya, Darshana; Fleshner, Michelle; Brewer, Carmen C.; Zalewski, Christopher K.; Folio, Les R.; Siegelman, Jenifer R.; Shallom, Shamira; Park, In Kwon; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Zelazny, Adrian M.; Holland, Steven M.; Prevots, D. Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, requires prolonged, multidrug regimens with high toxicity and suboptimal efficacy. Options for refractory disease are limited. Objectives: We reviewed the efficacy and toxicity of inhaled amikacin in patients with treatment-refractory nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease. Methods: Records were queried to identify patients who had inhaled amikacin added to failing regimens. Lower airway microbiology, symptoms, and computed tomography scan changes were assessed together with reported toxicity. Measurements and Main Results: The majority (80%) of the 20 patients who met entry criteria were women; all had bronchiectasis, two had cystic fibrosis and one had primary ciliary dyskinesia. At initiation of inhaled amikacin, 15 were culture positive for M. abscessus and 5 for Mycobacterium avium complex and had received a median (range) of 60 (6, 190) months of mycobacterial treatment. Patients were followed for a median of 19 (1, 50) months. Eight (40%) patients had at least one negative culture and 5 (25%) had persistently negative cultures. A decrease in smear quantity was noted in 9 of 20 (45%) and in mycobacterial culture growth for 10 of 19 (53%). Symptom scores improved in nine (45%), were unchanged in seven (35%), and worsened in four (20%). Improvement on computed tomography scans was noted in 6 (30%), unchanged in 3 (15%), and worsened in 11 (55%). Seven (35%) stopped amikacin due to: ototoxicity in two (10%), hemoptysis in two (10%), and nephrotoxicity, persistent dysphonia, and vertigo in one each. Conclusions: In some patients with treatment-refractory pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, the addition of inhaled amikacin was associated with microbiologic and/or symptomatic improvement; however, toxicity was common. Prospective evaluation of inhaled amikacin for mycobacterial disease is warranted. PMID:24460437

  14. Two liquid medium systems, mycobacteria growth indicator tube and MB redox tube, for Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolation from sputum specimens.

    PubMed

    Heifets, L; Linder, T; Sanchez, T; Spencer, D; Brennan, J

    2000-03-01

    Two manual liquid medium systems, the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) and MB Redox tube systems, were evaluated in comparison to the radiometric BACTEC-460 semiautomated system for recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from sputum specimens. The highest level of recovery, from a total of 77 culture-positive specimens, occurred with the BACTEC-460 system (92.2%), followed by the MB Redox tube (80.5%) and the MGIT (63.6%) systems. The shortest time to detection was observed also among the cultures in BACTEC-460: a mean of 12 days to a growth index (GI) of 10 and 15 days to a GI of 500. The mean times for the other systems were 16 days for the MB Redox tube system and 17.4 days for the MGIT system. The proportion of cultures grown after more than 3 weeks of incubation was only 2.8 or 8.4% in BACTEC-460 (for a GI of 10 or 500) but 17.7% in MB Redox and 22.5% in MGIT. Despite these differences in comparison to the BACTEC-460 system and some differences between the MGIT and MB Redox tube systems, either of the two manual liquid medium systems presents a reasonable alternative to the BACTEC-460 system, especially for laboratories with a limited workload, and a valuable element in the laboratory protocol, in conjunction with solid media, for obtaining rapid detection of growth from about 80% of culture-positive specimens and for better overall recovery of M. tuberculosis. PMID:10699027

  15. Mycobacteria in Finnish cooling tower waters.

    PubMed

    Torvinen, Eila; Suomalainen, Sini; Paulin, Lars; Kusnetsov, Jaana

    2014-04-01

    Evaporative cooling towers are water systems used in, e.g., industry and telecommunication to remove excess heat by evaporation of water. Temperatures of cooling waters are usually optimal for mesophilic microbial growth and cooling towers may liberate massive amounts of bacterial aerosols. Outbreaks of legionellosis associated with cooling towers have been known since the 1980's, but occurrences of other potentially pathogenic bacteria in cooling waters are mostly unknown. We examined the occurrence of mycobacteria, which are common bacteria in different water systems and may cause pulmonary and other soft tissue infections, in cooling waters containing different numbers of legionellae. Mycobacteria were isolated from all twelve cooling systems and from 92% of the 24 samples studied. Their numbers in the positive samples varied from 10 to 7.3 × 10(4) cfu/L. The isolated species included M. chelonae/abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. peregrinum, M. intracellulare, M. lentiflavum, M. avium/nebraskense/scrofulaceum and many non-pathogenic species. The numbers of mycobacteria correlated negatively with the numbers of legionellae and the concentration of copper. The results show that cooling towers are suitable environments for potentially pathogenic mycobacteria. Further transmission of mycobacteria from the towers to the environment needs examination. PMID:23937212

  16. Mutation of environmental mycobacteria to resist silver nanoparticles also confers resistance to a common antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Curtis; Islam, Mohammad Shyful; Ojha, Anil; Nettleship, Ian

    2014-08-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are a threat to human health, gaining entry to the body through contaminated water systems, where they form persistent biofilms despite extensive attempts at disinfection. Silver is a natural antibacterial agent and in nanoparticle form activity is increased by a high surface area. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as alternative disinfectants in circulating water systems, washing machines and even clothing. However, nanoparticles, like any other antibiotic that has a pervasive durable presence, carry the risk of creating a resistant population. In this study Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 was cultured in AgNP enriched agar such that only a small population survived. Surviving cultures were isolated and re-exposed to AgNPs and AgNO3 and resistance to silver was compared to a negative control. After only a single exposure, mutant M. smegmatis populations were resistant to AgNPs and AgNO3. Further, the silver resistant mutants were exposed to antibiotics to determine if general resistance had been conferred. The minimum inhibitory concentration of isoniazid was four times higher for silver resistant mutants than for strain mc(2)155. However, core resistance was not conferred to other toxic metal ions. The mutants had lower resistance to CuSO4 and ZnSO4 than the mc(2)155 strain. PMID:24989695

  17. Therapy of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Jogi, Reena; Tyring, Stephen K

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections are increasing in incidence worldwide, partly as a result of the increase in immunocompromised individuals. They cause a large number of cutaneous infections with a broad array of manifestations. Because of their diverse manifestations and sometimes fastidious nature, infections with mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, leading to delay in and sometimes failure of therapy. In addition, many mycobacteria display both in vitro and in vivo drug resistance to antimicrobial agents. Early recognition of affected patients, initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy based on current guidelines, and tailoring of therapy after susceptibility testing is available are therefore essential to the successful treatment of mycobacterial infections. PMID:15571497

  18. Detection of Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex by a Novel Tetraplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses. PMID:25588660

  19. Comparison of Large Restriction Fragments of Mycobacterium avium Isolates Recovered from AIDS and Non-AIDS Patients with Those of Isolates from Potable Water

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, T.; Holtzman, A.; Glover, N.; Boian, M.; Froman, S.; Berlin, O. G. W.; Hill, H.; Stelma, G.

    1999-01-01

    We examined potable water in Los Angeles, California, as a possible source of infection in AIDS and non-AIDS patients. Nontuberculous mycobacteria were recovered from 12 (92%) of 13 reservoirs, 45 (82%) of 55 homes, 31 (100%) of 31 commercial buildings, and 15 (100%) of 15 hospitals. Large-restriction-fragment (LRF) pattern analyses were done with AseI. The LRF patterns of Mycobacterium avium isolates recovered from potable water in three homes, two commercial buildings, one reservoir, and eight hospitals had varying degrees of relatedness to 19 clinical isolates recovered from 17 patients. The high number of M. avium isolates recovered from hospital water and their close relationship with clinical isolates suggests the potential threat of nosocomial spread. This study supports the possibility that potable water is a source for the acquisition of M. avium infections. PMID:10074518

  20. Physiology of Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gregory M.; Berney, Michael; Gebhard, Susanne; Heinemann, Matthias; Cox, Robert A.; Danilchanka, Olga; Niederweis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    mycobacteria of course stems from the diseases they cause and, lest it be imagined that tuberculosis is a disease which has now been largely conquered and that leprosy is of relatively rare occurrence, current estimates for the number of case of tuberculosis and leprosy in the world today are 20,000,000 and 11,000,000, respectively (Bechelli and Dominguez, 1972). The annual estimated mortality rate is equally dramatic, namely 3,000,000 (World Health Organization, 1974). Also causing unease is the continuing isolation from tubercular patients of strains already resistant to one or more chemotherapeutic agent”. C. Ratledge (1976). PMID:19573696

  1. Distribution and Respiratory Activity of Mycobacteria in Household Water System of Healthy Volunteers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. PMID:25350137

  2. [Isolation of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare from a hepatic biopsy].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Aroldo; Mederos, Lilian; Capó, Virginia

    2002-01-01

    A 64 years-old patient, who was a farmer suffering from chronic fever for two years, loss of weight and acute asthenia, was studied. He was admitted to "Pedro Kourí" Tropical Medicine Institute where the studies were conducted and revealed a globular sedimentation rate of 116 mm in 2 hours, and anemia of 9,8g% hemoglobin. The laparoscopic study indicated hepatic granulomatosis that was confirmed by hepatic biopsy in which a sample was taken from the liver to be microbiologically and cytologically examined. By microbiological methods, a non-pigmented slowly-growing strain was isolated, which was classified by conventional diagnostic techniques for the non-tuberculous mycobacteria classification and the alternative diagnosing technique known as bidimensional thin layer chromatography to confirm the previous classification and set the mycolic acid patterns. The isolated strain belonged to group III of Rynyon and was identified as Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. PMID:15849945

  3. [Recommendations from the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases on the diagnosis and treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis].

    PubMed

    Núñez Cuadros, E; Baquero Artigao, F

    2012-09-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been increasingly isolated over the last 20 years in Spain. However, as NTM disease is not a notifiable condition, there is no national registry, thus the true prevalence and incidence of these infections in children are difficult to estimate. Cervical adenitis is the most common clinical manifestation of NTM infection in immunocompetent children. The clinical course can be sub-acute or chronic, and is often associated with fluctuation, fistulisation, and scarring at a later stage. Although much less common, it is important to consider Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis, as the management and the epidemiological implications of tuberculous lymphadenitis are completely different. Diagnosis of NTM cervical lymphadenitis is based on a high level of clinical suspicion, supported by results of the tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA). Fine needle aspiration or excisional biopsy is usually required for histological and microbiological confirmation. Complete surgical excision of the affected nodes is the treatment of choice. Incision and drainage is not recommended, due to the high risk of chronic fistulisation and recurrence rate. Antibiotic treatment or conservative wait-and-see therapy may be indicated in certain circumstances. PMID:22522153

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease: Clinicians' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yon Ju; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging pathogens that affect both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The incidence and prevalence of NTM lung disease are increasing worldwide and rapidly becoming a major public health problem. For the diagnosis of NTM lung disease, patients suspected to have NTM lung disease are required to meet all clinical and microbiologic criteria. The development of molecular methods allows the characterization of new species and NTM identification at a subspecies level. Even after the identification of NTM species from respiratory specimens, clinicians should consider the clinical significance of such findings. Besides the limited options, treatment is lengthy and varies by species, and therefore a challenge. Treatment may be complicated by potential toxicity with discouraging outcomes. The decision to start treatment for NTM lung disease is not easy and requires careful individualized analysis of risks and benefits. Clinicians should be alert to those unique aspects of NTM lung disease concerning diagnosis with advanced molecular methods and treatment with limited options. Current recommendations and recent advances for diagnosis and treatment of NTM lung disease are summarized in this article. PMID:27066084

  5. Management of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Farshidpour, Maham; Ebrahimi, Golnaz; Aliberti, Stefano; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has increased over the last decades. Elderly people are more susceptible to NTM and experience increased morbidities. NTM incidence is expected to rise due to an increasing elderly population at least up to 2050. Given the importance of NTM infection in the elderly, an increasing interest exists in studying NTM characteristics in the aged population. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of NTM infection among elderly patients. We focus on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment options of NTM in this age group. We highlight the differences in the diagnosis and treatment between rapid and slow growing mycobacterial infections. The current recommendation for treatment of NTM is discussed. We debate if in vitro susceptibility testing has a role in the treatment of NTM. Drug-drug interaction between antibiotics used to treat NTM and other medications, particularly warfarin, is another important issue that we discuss. Finally, we review the prognosis of NTM disease in elderly patients. PMID:24685313

  6. Disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Emily A; Sharma, Mukta; Jackson, Mary Anne; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Woods, Gerald M

    2006-10-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in nature and have been implicated in skin/soft-tissue, pulmonary, middle ear, bone, and surgical/traumatic wound infections. Disseminated disease occurs infrequently and almost exclusively in the immunocompromised. We describe the first 2 reported cases of disseminated Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in teenagers with sickle hemoglobinopathy. Both had central venous catheters (CVCs), frequent admissions for vaso-occlusive painful episode and received hydroxyurea. Diagnosis was confirmed by multiple positive blood cultures and pulmonary dissemination occurred in both. Both had successful treatment after CVC removal and combination drug therapy. Positive cultures persisted in 1 patient due to drug resistance emphasizing the need for accurate susceptibility data. NTM infection should be added to the list of pathogens in sickle cell patients with CVCs and fever. Investigation for disseminated disease should be undertaken based on clinical signs and symptoms. Although some routine blood culture systems can identify NTM, specific mycobacterial blood culture is optimal. Removal of involved CVCs is essential and treatment of NTM must be guided by susceptibilities. As dissemination almost always occurs in those with impaired cellular immunity, human immunodeficiency virus testing should be performed. Hydroxyurea may be a risk factor for dissemination and needs further evaluation. PMID:17023829

  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease: Clinicians' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yon Ju; Koh, Won-Jung; Daley, Charles L

    2016-04-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging pathogens that affect both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The incidence and prevalence of NTM lung disease are increasing worldwide and rapidly becoming a major public health problem. For the diagnosis of NTM lung disease, patients suspected to have NTM lung disease are required to meet all clinical and microbiologic criteria. The development of molecular methods allows the characterization of new species and NTM identification at a subspecies level. Even after the identification of NTM species from respiratory specimens, clinicians should consider the clinical significance of such findings. Besides the limited options, treatment is lengthy and varies by species, and therefore a challenge. Treatment may be complicated by potential toxicity with discouraging outcomes. The decision to start treatment for NTM lung disease is not easy and requires careful individualized analysis of risks and benefits. Clinicians should be alert to those unique aspects of NTM lung disease concerning diagnosis with advanced molecular methods and treatment with limited options. Current recommendations and recent advances for diagnosis and treatment of NTM lung disease are summarized in this article. PMID:27066084

  8. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Semi; Lim, Nara; Kwon, Seungjik; Shim, Taesun; Park, Misun; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seonghan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods. Methods Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), and VNTR assay targeting 44 M. intracellulare isolates obtained from patients with pulmonary infections were performed. Results All the antibiotic susceptibility patterns had no association with the molecular and sequence types tested in this study; however, the molecular and sequence types were related with each other. PFGE gave best results for discriminatory capacity, followed by VNTR, MLST, and MIRU-VNTR. Conclusion The high discriminatory power of PFGE, VNTR, and MLST is enough for differentiating between reinfection and relapse, as well as for other molecular epidemiological usages. The MLST could be regarded as a representative classification method, because it showed the clearest relation with the sequence types. PMID:25180144

  9. Bacteriological and virulence study of a Mycobacterium chimaera isolate from a patient in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guan; Chen, Su-Ting; Yu, Xia; Li, Yu-Xun; Ling, Ying; Dong, Ling-Ling; Zheng, Su-Hua; Huang, Hai-Rong

    2015-04-01

    A clinical isolate from a patient was identified as Mycobacterium chimaera, a recently identified species of nontuberculous Mycobacteria. The biochemical and molecular identity, drug sensitivity and virulence of this isolated strain were investigated. 16S rRNA, the 16S-23S ITS, hsp65 and rpoB were amplified, and their sequence similarities with other mycobacteria were analyzed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of 22 anti-microbial agents against this isolate were established, and the virulence of the isolate was evaluated by intravenous injection into C57BL/6 mice using Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv as a control strain. Growth and morphological characteristics and mycolic acid profile analysis revealed that this isolated strain was a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex. BLAST analysis of the amplified sequences showed that the isolated strain was closely related to M. chimaera. Susceptibility testing showed that the isolate was sensitive to rifabutin, rifapentine, clarithromycin, azithromycin, imipenem and cefoxitin. Bacterial load determination and tissue histopathology of the infected mice indicated that the isolate was highly virulent. The first case of M. chimaera infection in China was evaluated. The information derived from this case may offer valuable guidance for clinical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25763937

  10. Clinical manifestations, course, and outcome of patients with neutralizing anti-interferon-γ autoantibodies and disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chih-Yu; Lin, Chia-Hao; Ho, Mao-Wang; Ding, Jing-Ya; Huang, Wen-Chi; Shih, Han-Po; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Fung, Chang-Phone; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Huang, Ching-Tai; Wu, Ting-Shu; Chang, Chih-Yen; Liu, Yuag-Meng; Feng, Jia-Yih; Wu, Wei-Kai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Tsai, Chung-Hao; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Lin, Huang-Shen; Chen, Hung-Jen; Lin, Po-Chang; Liao, Wei-Chin; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lo, Chia-Chi; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Chen-Yen; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Ku, Cheng-Lung

    2016-06-01

    Neutralizing anti-interferon-γ autoantibody (nAIGA)-associated immunodeficiency is an emerging medical issue worldwide. In the present study, we describe and discuss the clinical features and outcomes of patients with nAIGAs and disseminated infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (dNTM).We thoroughly reviewed the medical records of all patients. Microorganisms and nAIGAs were identified using previously described methods with modifications. All data were calculated and analyzed using SPSS software.Among 46 adult patients with dNTM infections, we identified 45 cases (97.8%) with nAIGAs. The average patient age was 58.6 years, and there was no sex predominance. Cervical lymphadenitis (81.8%) was the most common clinical manifestation. Endocrine disorder was the leading comorbidity (7 cases). Malignancies were found in 4 patients, and all of the malignancies originated from the T-cell/macrophage lineage. More than half of the identifiable isolates were slow-growing NTMs. Twenty-eight (62.2%) and 18 (40.0%) patients had a history of zoster and salmonellosis, respectively. A high proportion of patients with recurrent episodes of NTM infection or a history of zoster and dNTM infection had initial nAIGA titers ≥10 dilution (P < 0.05). Twenty-seven patients (60.0%) required long-term antimycobacterial therapy and had at least 1 episode of recurrent NTM disease. No mortality was related to dNTM infection.In Taiwan, nAIGAs are a recently recognized mechanism of dNTM infection. Long term of antibiotic treatment and adherence to medical advice are necessary to improve the clinical outcome of patients with nAIGAs. PMID:27336882

  11. Clinical manifestations, course, and outcome of patients with neutralizing anti-interferon-γ autoantibodies and disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chih-Yu; Lin, Chia-Hao; Ho, Mao-Wang; Ding, Jing-Ya; Huang, Wen-Chi; Shih, Han-Po; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Fung, Chang-Phone; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Huang, Ching-Tai; Wu, Ting-Shu; Chang, Chih-Yen; Liu, Yuag-Meng; Feng, Jia-Yih; Wu, Wei-Kai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Tsai, Chung-Hao; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Lin, Huang-Shen; Chen, Hung-Jen; Lin, Po-Chang; Liao, Wei-Chin; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lo, Chia-Chi; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Chen-Yen; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Ku, Cheng-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neutralizing anti-interferon-γ autoantibody (nAIGA)-associated immunodeficiency is an emerging medical issue worldwide. In the present study, we describe and discuss the clinical features and outcomes of patients with nAIGAs and disseminated infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (dNTM). We thoroughly reviewed the medical records of all patients. Microorganisms and nAIGAs were identified using previously described methods with modifications. All data were calculated and analyzed using SPSS software. Among 46 adult patients with dNTM infections, we identified 45 cases (97.8%) with nAIGAs. The average patient age was 58.6 years, and there was no sex predominance. Cervical lymphadenitis (81.8%) was the most common clinical manifestation. Endocrine disorder was the leading comorbidity (7 cases). Malignancies were found in 4 patients, and all of the malignancies originated from the T-cell/macrophage lineage. More than half of the identifiable isolates were slow-growing NTMs. Twenty-eight (62.2%) and 18 (40.0%) patients had a history of zoster and salmonellosis, respectively. A high proportion of patients with recurrent episodes of NTM infection or a history of zoster and dNTM infection had initial nAIGA titers ≥10–5 dilution (P < 0.05). Twenty-seven patients (60.0%) required long-term antimycobacterial therapy and had at least 1 episode of recurrent NTM disease. No mortality was related to dNTM infection. In Taiwan, nAIGAs are a recently recognized mechanism of dNTM infection. Long term of antibiotic treatment and adherence to medical advice are necessary to improve the clinical outcome of patients with nAIGAs. PMID:27336882

  12. Evaluation of a new biphasic culture system for the recovery of mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Giger, T; Burkardt, H J

    1990-06-01

    A newly developed biphasic culture system (MB-Check) for recovery of mycobacteria was evaluated. The biphasic system consists of a bottle containing selective modified Middlebrook 7H9 broth and a mounted dip slide with chocolate agar and modified Middlebrook 7H11 agar with and without NAP. The system was compared with culture on two egg-based media, Lowenstein medium and a selective Gottsacker medium, using 995 routine specimens and 90 artificially seeded sputa. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in 17 of the 995 routine specimens by the biphasic system and in 14 specimens by the egg-based media together. In the artificially seeded sputa the biphasic system showed higher sensitivity in detection of both tuberculosis complex and non-tuberculous mycobacteria than the egg-based media. The recovery times of the new system were comparable to those of the two conventional culture methods. PMID:2387296

  13. LOC-SERS: A Promising Closed System for the Identification of Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mühlig, Anna; Bocklitz, Thomas; Labugger, Ines; Dees, Stefan; Henk, Sandra; Richter, Elvira; Andres, Sönke; Merker, Matthias; Stöckel, Stephan; Weber, Karina; Cialla-May, Dana; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-08-16

    A closed droplet based lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been developed for the differentiation of six species of mycobacteria, i.e., both Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The combination of a fast and simple bead-beating module for the disruption of the bacterial cell with the LOC-SERS device enables the application of an easy and reliable system for bacteria discrimination. Without extraction or further treatment of the sample, the obtained SERS spectra are dominated by the cell-wall component mycolic acid. For the differentiation, a robust data set was recorded using a droplet based LOC-SERS device. Thus, more than 2100 individual SERS spectra of the bacteria suspension were obtained in 1 h. The differentiation of bacteria using LOC-SERS provides helpful information for physicians to define the conditions for the treatment of individual patients. PMID:27441738

  14. Evaluation of Performance of the Real-Q NTM-ID Kit for Rapid Identification of Eight Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Hee Jae; Park, Kyung Sun; Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Ji-Youn; Kwon, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis assay (Real-Q NTM-ID kit; Biosewoom, Seoul, South Korea) for the identification of eight common nontuberculous mycobacterial species, using 30 type strains and 230 consecutive clinical isolates. The concordance rate of this assay with multigene sequence-based typing was 97.0% (223/230 isolates). PMID:25165078

  15. Two Episodes of Cutaneous Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in a Patient with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai Sze Agnes; Tee, Shang-Ian; Chandran, Nisha Su Yien; Pan, Jiun Yit

    2015-05-21

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of environmental pathogens, which cause a broad spectrum of disease. The incidence of NTM infection is increasing, especially in immunocompromized patients. The past three decades also saw a rapid increase in the incidence of NTM infection involving otherwise healthy subjects. We report a case of cutaneous NTM infection in a 79-year-old Chinese woman, who was receiving methotrexate for psoriasis. Mycobacterial culture grew Mycobacterium abscessus, and the lesions cleared with a combination of oral clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin and doxycycline. Interestingly, she then developed a second episode of cutaneous NTM infection with Mycobacterium haemophilum over the same body region, five years after stoppage of methotrexate. Both episodes were separated in time and involved different species, indicating that they were independent from each other. We further discuss the risk factors for cutaneous NTM infection, treatment, and highlight the need for diagnostic vigilance. PMID:26236445

  16. The looming tide of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in Portugal and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Alarico, Susana; Dalcolmo, Margareth Pretti; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are widely disseminated in the environment and an emerging cause of infectious diseases worldwide. Their remarkable natural resistance to disinfectants and antibiotics and an ability to survive under low-nutrient conditions allows NTM to colonize and persist in man-made environments such as household and hospital water distribution systems. This overlap between human and NTM environments afforded new opportunities for human exposure, and for expression of their often neglected and underestimated pathogenic potential. Some risk factors predisposing to NTM disease have been identified and are mainly associated with immune fragilities of the human host. However, infections in apparently immunocompetent persons are also increasingly reported. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to this emerging health problem in Portugal and Brazil and to emphasize the urgent need for increased surveillance and more comprehensive epidemiological data in both countries, where such information is scarce and seriously thwarts the adoption of proper preventive strategies and therapeutic options. PMID:26560840

  17. Leveraging Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment to Address Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanlin; Rubin, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), defined as any mycobacterial pathogen other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium leprae, are a diverse group of pathogens that collectively cause a substantive but often unappreciated worldwide burden of illness. Although NTMs may cause illness similar to M. tuberculosis, these pathogens generally do not respond to classic tuberculosis (TB) drug regimens, resulting in misdiagnosis and poor treatment, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although a few high-quality epidemiologic surveys have been made on the topic, existing evidence suggests that NTM-associated disease is much more common than previously thought: more common than TB in the industrialized world and likely increasing in prevalence globally. Despite this evidence, these organisms remain markedly understudied, and few international grants support basic science and clinical research. Here we suggest that the considerable efforts in developing new treatments and diagnostics for TB can be harnessed in the fight against NTM-associated illnesses. PMID:26886068

  18. Two Episodes of Cutaneous Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in a Patient with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Sze Agnes; Tee, Shang-Ian; Chandran, Nisha Su Yien; Pan, Jiun Yit

    2015-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of environmental pathogens, which cause a broad spectrum of disease. The incidence of NTM infection is increasing, especially in immunocompromized patients. The past three decades also saw a rapid increase in the incidence of NTM infection involving otherwise healthy subjects. We report a case of cutaneous NTM infection in a 79-year-old Chinese woman, who was receiving methotrexate for psoriasis. Mycobacterial culture grew Mycobacterium abscessus, and the lesions cleared with a combination of oral clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin and doxycycline. Interestingly, she then developed a second episode of cutaneous NTM infection with Mycobacterium haemophilum over the same body region, five years after stoppage of methotrexate. Both episodes were separated in time and involved different species, indicating that they were independent from each other. We further discuss the risk factors for cutaneous NTM infection, treatment, and highlight the need for diagnostic vigilance. PMID:26236445

  19. Leveraging Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment to Address Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Raju, Ravikiran M; Raju, Sagar M; Zhao, Yanlin; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), defined as any mycobacterial pathogen other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium leprae, are a diverse group of pathogens that collectively cause a substantive but often unappreciated worldwide burden of illness. Although NTMs may cause illness similar to M. tuberculosis, these pathogens generally do not respond to classic tuberculosis (TB) drug regimens, resulting in misdiagnosis and poor treatment, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although a few high-quality epidemiologic surveys have been made on the topic, existing evidence suggests that NTM-associated disease is much more common than previously thought: more common than TB in the industrialized world and likely increasing in prevalence globally. Despite this evidence, these organisms remain markedly understudied, and few international grants support basic science and clinical research. Here we suggest that the considerable efforts in developing new treatments and diagnostics for TB can be harnessed in the fight against NTM-associated illnesses. PMID:26886068

  20. Sulfate metabolism in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Schelle, Michael W; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2006-10-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed numerous mechanisms to survive inside a hostile host environment. The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is thought to control the human immune response with diverse biomolecules, including a variety of exotic lipids. One prevalent M. tb-specific sulfated metabolite, termed sulfolipid-1 (SL-1), has been correlated with virulence though its specific biological function is not known. Recent advances in our understanding of SL-1 biosynthesis will help elucidate the role of this curious metabolite in M. tb infection. Furthermore, the study of SL-1 has led to questions regarding the significance of sulfation in mycobacteria. Examples of sulfated metabolites as mediators of interactions between bacteria and plants suggest that sulfation is a key modulator of extracellular signaling between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The discovery of novel sulfated metabolites in M. tb and related mycobacteria strengthens this hypothesis. Finally, mechanistic and structural data from sulfate-assimilation enzymes have revealed how M. tb controls the flux of sulfate in the cell. Mutants with defects in sulfate assimilation indicate that the fate of sulfur in M. tb is a critical survival determinant for the bacteria during infection and suggest novel targets for tuberculosis drug therapy. PMID:16933356

  1. Update in tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial disease 2012.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Dick; Nahid, Payam

    2013-10-15

    In 2012, new publications in the Journal described both the predictive value of the new IFN-γ release assays for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis (TB), but also provided evidence that these new tests cannot be interpreted simply as positive or negative, as initially hoped. Surgical masks can reduce transmission of TB infection, but other measures such as state-wide implementation of targeted testing and treatment of latent TB or active case finding require substantial and sustained effort to successfully reduce TB morbidity and mortality. A quasiexperimental study revealed that a package of social interventions could substantially reduce risk of TB disease in heavily exposed (and infected) children in the preantibiotic era. A study in a high-TB burden setting suggested that a new rapid drug-susceptibility test for TB may be more practical for implementation than traditional culture-based phenotypic tests. And two studies of TB vaccines revealed that currently used bacillus Calmette-Guérin strains vary in their ability to affect correlates of immunogenicity, whereas a new candidate vaccine, MVA85A, was safe and immunogenic in adults. Studies of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) described a rapid rise in the prevalence and spatial clustering of NTM in the United States over the past decade. Although risk factors for pulmonary NTM such as advanced age and low BMI are known, the mechanisms underlying infection and disease remain mysterious. Four studies of therapy of NTM disease highlighted the pressing need for well-designed international randomized controlled trials to improve our management of NTM disease. PMID:24127799

  2. [Non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis. What has been coming out].

    PubMed

    Kajiki, Akira

    2011-02-01

    (VNTR) analysis of MAC is available. So, we studied the MAC-VNTR of clinical isolates from 29 patients with pulmonary MAC, refractory to the therapy. Compared the clinical isolates before with after each therapy, clinical isolates derived from the all except one patient showed the same VNTR patterns, before and after. According to MAC-VNTR analysis of the clinical isolates we studied, frequency of polyclonal infection was low (1/29). We concluded that the highly resistance to antibiotics or the repeated same VNTR type infection from environment made refractory pulmonary MAC. (3) An approach to identify susceptibility genes in patients with non-HIV-related pulmonary Mycobaterium avium complex (MAC) infection: Naoto KEICHO (Department of Respiratory Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine) Mycobacterium avium complex causes human pulmonary disease. Th1 T cells play a role in protective immunity from mycobacterial infection. Genetic defect of Interferon-gamma/ Interleukin-12 axis is known to cause familial non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection. On the other hand, non-mendelian type of genetic abnormalities such as polymorphisms of HLA, CFTR and SLC11A1 (NRAMP1) genes has also been investigated as disease susceptibility genes. Recently our group has reported disease association with MHC-class I related chain-A molecule (MICA), comparing 300 sporadic cases with 300 healthy controls. (4) Genetic feature of Mycobacterium avium complex: Taku NAKAGAWA, Kenji OGAWA (Department of Pulmonary Medicine, National Hospital Organization Higashinagoya National Hospital) The bacterial factors contributing to the pathogenesis of M. avium complex infection and diversity of disease progression remain unclear. MATR-VNTR typing is inexpensive and easy to perform and has an excellent discriminatory power compared with MIRU-VNTR and IS1245-RFLP typing. MATR-VNTR typing revealed that M. avium isolates from HIV-positive patients are analogous to the isolates

  3. The envelope of mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Brennan, P J; Nikaido, H

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacteria, members of which cause tuberculosis and leprosy, produce cell walls of unusually low permeability, which contribute to their resistance to therapeutic agents. Their cell walls contain large amounts of C60-C90 fatty acids, mycolic acids, that are covalently linked to arabinogalactan. Recent studies clarified the unusual structures of arabinogalactan as well as of extractable cell wall lipids, such as trehalose-based lipooligosaccharides, phenolic glycolipids, and glycopeptidolipids. Most of the hydrocarbon chains of these lipids assemble to produce an asymmetric bilayer of exceptional thickness. Structural considerations suggest that the fluidity is exceptionally low in the innermost part of bilayer, gradually increasing toward the outer surface. Differences in mycolic acid structure may affect the fluidity and permeability of the bilayer, and may explain the different sensitivity levels of various mycobacterial species to lipophilic inhibitors. Hydrophilic nutrients and inhibitors, in contrast, traverse the cell wall presumably through channels of recently discovered porins. PMID:7574484

  4. Animal Models of Mycobacteria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Diane J.; Orme, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the infection of mice and guinea pigs with mycobacteria via various routes, as well as necropsy methods for the determination of mycobacterial loads within target organs. Additionally, methods for cultivating mycobacteria and preparing stocks are described. The protocols outlined are primarily used for M. tuberculosis, but can also be used for the study of other non-tuberculosis mycobacterial species. PMID:18432756

  5. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Case-Control study in a TB Endemic Area.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tsai-Ling; Lin, Chin-Fu; Chen, Yi-Ming; Liu, Hung-Jen; Chen, Der-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the risk of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease is elevated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the risk factors and outcomes for NTM disease among RA patients remain unclear. We conducted a case-control study and estimated odds ratios (ORs) for RA patients with NTM disease according to comorbidities and anti-rheumatic medications by using conditional logistic regression. Prior tuberculosis history (adjusted OR (aOR) =5.58, p < 0.001), hypertension (aOR = 2.55, p = 0.013), diabetes mellitus (aOR = 3.31, p = 0.005), interstitial lung disease (aOR = 8.22, p < 0.001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (aOR = 8.59, p < 0.001) and exposure to oral corticosteroids in a dose-dependent manner (5- < 10 mg/day aOR = 2.51, Ptrend = 0.007) were associated with a significantly increased risk of NTM disease in RA patients. The predominant species causing NTM disease in RA patients was Mycobacterium intracellulare (46.0%). Most NTM isolates were resistant to the majority of the antibiotics that are currently available, which maybe caused treatment failure; hospitalization and mortality are increased. To prevent and treat NTM disease efficiently, we suggested that it is important to monitor the development of NTM disease in RA patients receiving therapy with corticosteroids, particularly in those with predisposing factors. PMID:27404002

  6. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Case-Control study in a TB Endemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tsai-Ling; Lin, Chin-Fu; Chen, Yi-Ming; Liu, Hung-Jen; Chen, Der-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the risk of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease is elevated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the risk factors and outcomes for NTM disease among RA patients remain unclear. We conducted a case-control study and estimated odds ratios (ORs) for RA patients with NTM disease according to comorbidities and anti-rheumatic medications by using conditional logistic regression. Prior tuberculosis history (adjusted OR (aOR) =5.58, p < 0.001), hypertension (aOR = 2.55, p = 0.013), diabetes mellitus (aOR = 3.31, p = 0.005), interstitial lung disease (aOR = 8.22, p < 0.001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (aOR = 8.59, p < 0.001) and exposure to oral corticosteroids in a dose-dependent manner (5− < 10 mg/day aOR = 2.51, Ptrend = 0.007) were associated with a significantly increased risk of NTM disease in RA patients. The predominant species causing NTM disease in RA patients was Mycobacterium intracellulare (46.0%). Most NTM isolates were resistant to the majority of the antibiotics that are currently available, which maybe caused treatment failure; hospitalization and mortality are increased. To prevent and treat NTM disease efficiently, we suggested that it is important to monitor the development of NTM disease in RA patients receiving therapy with corticosteroids, particularly in those with predisposing factors. PMID:27404002

  7. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella Pneumophilaand Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria in Hospital Plumbing Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) such as Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are frequently detected in the plumbing systems of large buildings. The ability of these organisms to form biofilms and to grow in phagocytic amoeba ar...

  8. Developing whole mycobacteria cell vaccines for tuberculosis: Workshop proceedings, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany, July 9, 2014.

    PubMed

    2015-06-12

    On July 9, 2014, Aeras and the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology convened a workshop entitled "Whole Mycobacteria Cell Vaccines for Tuberculosis" at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology on the grounds of the Charité Hospital in Berlin, Germany, close to the laboratory where, in 1882, Robert Koch first identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) as the pathogen responsible for tuberculosis (TB). The purpose of the meeting was to discuss progress in the development of TB vaccines based on whole mycobacteria cells. Live whole cell TB vaccines discussed at this meeting were derived from Mtb itself, from Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against TB, which was genetically modified to reduce pathogenicity and increase immunogenicity, or from commensal non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Inactivated whole cell TB and non-tuberculous mycobacterial vaccines, intended as immunotherapy or as safer immunization alternatives for HIV+ individuals, also were discussed. Workshop participants agreed that TB vaccine development is significantly hampered by imperfect animal models, unknown immune correlates of protection and the absence of a human challenge model. Although a more effective TB vaccine is needed to replace or enhance the limited effectiveness of BCG in all age groups, members of the workshop concurred that an effective vaccine would have the greatest impact on TB control when administered to adolescents and adults, and that use of whole mycobacteria cells as TB vaccine candidates merits greater support, particularly given the limited understanding of the specific Mtb antigens necessary to generate an immune response capable of preventing Mtb infection and/or disease. PMID:25882170

  9. COMPARISON OF LARGE RESTRICTION FRAGMENTS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM AIDS AND NON-AIDS PATIENTS WITH THOSE OF ISOLATES FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined potable water in Los Angeles, California, as a possible source of infection in AIDS and non-AIDS patients. Nontuberculous mycobacteria were recovered from 12 (92%) of 13 reservoirs, 45 (82%) of 55 homes, 31 (100%) of 31 commercial buildings, and 15 (100%) of 15 hospit...

  10. COMPARISON OF LARGE RESTRICTION FRAGMENTS OF MYCOBACATERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM AIDS AND NON-AIDS PATIENTS WITH THOSE OF ISOLATES FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined potable water in Los Angeles, California, as a possible source of infection in AIDS and non-AIDS patients. Nontuberculous mycobacteria were recovered from 12 (92%) of 13 reservoirs, 45 (82%) of 55 homes, 31 (100%) of 31 commercial buildings, and 15 (100%) of 15 hospi...

  11. Non-tuberculous mycobacterium skin infections after tattooing in healthy individuals: A systematic review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Mudedla, Sreenuvasu; Avendano, Esther E; Raman, Gowri

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, several case reports and outbreaks reported occurrence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections within 6 months after receiving a tattoo in healthy individuals. NTM species (e.g., Chelonae, Fortuitum, Hemophillum, and Abscessus) are widespread in the environment and it is often suspected that contamination may occur through unsterile instrumentation or unsterile water used for diluting tattoo ink to dilute color. In reported cases, lesions were mainly restricted to a single color 'gray' part of the tattoo. Mycobacterium Chelonae was the most common cause of tattoo associated NTM infections. Less than 50% of the case reports tested tattoo ink for acid fast bacilli stains and cultures. Subjects required treatment with either clarithromycin alone or in combination with quinolones for 6 to 9 months. An increase in NTM skin infections in healthy individuals after tattooing indicates the need for sterile standards during tattooing and improved local and regional regulatory oversight. PMID:26158355

  12. Increased Incidence of Cutaneous Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection, 1980 to 2009: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wentworth, Ashley B.; Drage, Lisa A.; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Wilson, John W.; Lohse, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the incidence and clinical characteristics of cutaneous nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection during the past 30 years and whether the predominant species have changed. Patients and Methods Using Rochester Epidemiology Project data, we identified Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents with cutaneous NTM infections between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 2009, examining the incidence of infection, patient demographic and clinical features, the mycobacterium species, and therapy. Results Forty patients (median age, 47 years; 58% female [23 of 40]) had positive NTM cultures plus 1 or more clinical signs. The overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence of cutaneous NTM infection was 1.3 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 0.9–1.7 per 100,000 person-years). The incidence increased with age at diagnosis (P = .003) and was higher in 2000 to 2009 (2.0 per 100,000 person-years; 95% CI, 1.3–2.8 per 100,000 person-years) than in 1980 to 1999 (0.7 per 100,000 person-years; 95% CI, 0.3–1.1 per 100,000 person-years) (P = .002). The distal extremities were the most common sites of infection (27 of 39 patients [69%]). No patient had human immunodeficiency virus infection, but 23% (9 of 39) were immunosuppressed. Of the identifiable causes, traumatic injuries were the most frequent (22 of 29 patients [76%]). The most common species were Mycobacterium marinum (17 of 38 patients [45%]) and Mycobacterium chelonae/Mycobacterium abscessus (12 of 38 patients [32%]). In the past decade (2000–2009), 15 of 24 species (63%) were rapidly growing mycobacteria compared with only 4 of 14 species (29%) earlier (1980–1999) (P = .04). Conclusion The incidence of cutaneous NTM infection increased nearly 3-fold during the study period. Rapidly growing mycobacteria were predominant during the past decade. PMID:23218797

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis].

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Atsuyuki

    2002-12-01

    Pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis in Japan occurs more than about 5,000 cases annually. Among them, about 70% are occupied by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. Considering the frequency and the difficulty of treatment, we discuss mainly on pulmonary MAC infection on this report. At National Tokyo hospital, secondary MAC infection after tuberculosis sequelae were 46.5% out of 170 pulmonary MAC cases since 1969 to 1985, but it decreased to 19.4% out of 268 cases since 1986 to 2000. In this same period, a type of MAC infection like middle lobe syndrome without recognizing preceding pulmonary disease, increased to 69.8% out of all pulmonary MAC cases (Fig. 1). Recently, this type of pulmonary MAC infection, which consists with scattered nodular lesion and local bronchiectasis in middle lobe or lingula, attracts attention. Why is there much frequency in women? Why does it originate from middle lobe or lingula? Although, it shows a characteristic X-ray pattern, ant it is still an interesting problem, the origin of the disease cannot be clarified. First diagnostic standard of nontuberculous mycobacteriosis in Japan was submitted in 1967, and the current diagnostic standard was made in 1985, through several times improvements. These contents are almost similar to that of American diagnostic standard in 1997, but the new revision that reflected chest CT findings and bronchoscopic sampling etc, is pressed now. In the treatment, INH or PZA, which is a key drug in tuberculous chemotherapy, is not a key drug in MAC chemotherapy. MAC chemotherapy is multidrugs combination chemotherapy including EB, CAM, RFP, and aminoglycosides. However, it is difficult to achieve complete regression with current drugs combinations, and an early surgical resection is the most effective in case of localized MAC lesion. We propose a guidance of treatment selection with age and disease severity (Table). Fig. 2 shows survival curves of 104 cases pulmonary MAC infection at National

  14. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria–associated Lung Disease in Hospitalized Persons, United States, 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Billinger, Megan E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Viboud, Cecile; Montes de Oca, Ruben; Steiner, Claudia; Holland, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and trends of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)–associated hospitalizations in the United States were estimated using national hospital discharge data. Records were extracted for all persons with a pulmonary NTM International Classification of Diseases code (031.0) hospitalized in the 11 states with continuous data available from 1998 through 2005. Prevalence was calculated using US census data. Pulmonary NTM hospitalizations (031.0) increased significantly with age among both sexes: relative prevalence for persons 70–79 years of age compared with those 40–49 years of age was 15/100,000 for women (9.4 vs. 0.6) and 9/100,000 for men (7.6 vs. 0.83). Annual prevalence increased significantly among men and women in Florida (3.2%/year and 6.5%/year, respectively) and among women in New York (4.6%/year) with no significant changes in California. The prevalence of pulmonary NTM–associated hospitalizations is increasing in selected geographic areas of the United States. PMID:19861046

  15. Investigation and diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteriosis in a captive herd of aoudad (Ammotragus lervia).

    PubMed

    Portas, Timothy J; Bryant, Benn R; Jones, Stephen L; Humphreys, Kaye; Gilpin, Christopher M; Rose, Karrie A

    2009-06-01

    An epizootic of nontuberculous mycobacteriosis occurred in a captive herd of aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) over a period of 18 mo. Each of the affected animals was subject to a thorough postmortem examination that included histopathology, tissue concentration and acid-fast staining, aerobic and anaerobic bacterial culture, mycobacterial culture, and real-time polymerase chain reaction specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. Histopathologic lesions consistent with pulmonary mycobacteriosis, including the presence of acid-fast bacteria, were identified in two captive adult male aoudad. M. avium was isolated in culture from the pulmonary parenchyma, and M. parafortuitum was isolated from a mesenteric lymph node of a third animal, an adult female, euthanized subsequent to an illness characterized by progressive dyspnea and tachypnea. M. intracellulare was isolated within the bronchial lymph node of a fourth aoudad, an adult female that was euthanized due to chronic weight loss. Diagnostic testing of the 34 individuals in the herd included collection of blood for an interferon-gamma assay, intradermal tuberculin testing, and radiometric fecal culture for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. On the basis of this investigation, mycobacteriosis associated with M. bovis, M. tuberculosis, and/or M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was ruled out and nontuberculous mycobacteriosis was confirmed in this herd. PMID:19569478

  16. Methodological and Clinical Aspects of the Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Minias, Alina; van Ingen, Jakko; Rastogi, Nalin; Brzostek, Anna; Żaczek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    Molecular typing has revolutionized epidemiological studies of infectious diseases, including those of a mycobacterial etiology. With the advent of fingerprinting techniques, many traditional concepts regarding transmission, infectivity, or pathogenicity of mycobacterial bacilli have been revisited, and their conventional interpretations have been challenged. Since the mid-1990s, when the first typing methods were introduced, a plethora of other modalities have been proposed. So-called molecular epidemiology has become an essential subdiscipline of modern mycobacteriology. It serves as a resource for understanding the key issues in the epidemiology of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases. Among these issues are disclosing sources of infection, quantifying recent transmission, identifying transmission links, discerning reinfection from relapse, tracking the geographic distribution and clonal expansion of specific strains, and exploring the genetic mechanisms underlying specific phenotypic traits, including virulence, organ tropism, transmissibility, or drug resistance. Since genotyping continues to unravel the biology of mycobacteria, it offers enormous promise in the fight against and prevention of the diseases caused by these pathogens. In this review, molecular typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria elaborated over the last 2 decades are summarized. The relevance of these methods to the epidemiological investigation, diagnosis, evolution, and control of mycobacterial diseases is discussed. PMID:26912567

  17. Characterization of non-tuberculosis mycobacteria by neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jaqueline M; Crispim, Verginia Reis; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Furtado, Vanessa Rodrigues; Duarte, Rafael Da Silva

    2013-07-01

    The genus Mycobacterium shares many characteristics with Corynebacterium and Actinomyces genera, among which the genomic guanine plus cytosine content and the production of long branched-chain fatty acids, known as mycolic acids are enhanced. Growth rate and optimal temperature of mycobacteria are variable. The genus comprises more than 140 known species; however Mycobacterium fortuitum, a fast growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, is clinically significant, because it has been associated to several lesions following surgery procedures such as liposuction, silicone breast and pacemaker implants, exposure to prosthetic materials besides sporadic lesions in the skin, soft tissues and rarely lungs. The objective of the present study is to reduce the time necessary for M. fortuitum characterization based on its morphology and the use of the neutron radiography technique substituting the classical biochemical assays. We also aim to confirm the utility of dendrimers as boron carriers. The samples were sterilized through conventional protocols using 10% formaldehyde. In the incubation process, two solutions with different molar ratios (10:1 and 20:1) of sodium borate and PAMAM G4 dendrimer and also pure sodium borate were used. After doping and sterilization procedures, the samples were deposited on CR-39 sheets, irradiated with a 4.6×10(5) n/cm(2)s thermal neutron flux for 30 min, from the J-9 irradiation channel of the Argonauta IEN/CNEN reactor. The images registered in the CR-39 were visualized in a Nikon E400 optical transmission microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix 995 digital camera. Developing the nuclear tracks registered in the CR-39 allowed a 1000× enlargement of mycobacterium images, facilitating their characterization, the use of more sophisticated equipment not being necessary. The use of neutron radiography technique reduced the time necessary for characterization. Doping with PAMAM dendrimer improved the visualization of NTM in neutron radiography

  18. Potential cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies against clinically relevant mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Moreno, K; Celis-Meneses, J S; Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Castillo-Rodal, A I; Orduña, P; Montiel, B A; López-Vidal, Y

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTb). In 2011, global mortality due to tuberculosis was 1·4 million individuals. The only available vaccine is the attenuated M. bovis [bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG)] strain, which confers variable protection against pulmonary tuberculosis. Some widely distributed non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), such as M. avium and M. arupense, are also potential pathogens for humans. This work aimed to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies against the M. bovis BCG Mexico strain of the MTb, M. avium subs. hominissuis and the M. arupense strain from NTM. Hybridomas were produced from splenocytes of BALB/c female mice immunized with radiation-inactivated mycobacteria, and the immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibody-producing clones with the highest antigenic recognition were selected. The selected clones, Mbv 2A10 for M. bovis BCG Mexico, Mav 3H1 for M. avium and Mar 2D10 for M. arupense, were used in further studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immune proteomics analyses characterized the clones as having the highest cross-reactivity with mycobacteria. Using mass spectrometry, a number of proteins recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) clones were identified. These proteins had roles in metabolic processes, hypoxia, cell cycle and dormancy. In addition, a Clustal W and Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) in-silico analysis was performed in protein sequences that result in the conserved regions within probability epitopes that could be recognized for Mbv2A10 and Mav3H1 clones. PMID:24580144

  19. 'Emerging' mycobacteria in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Helden, P D; Parsons, S D C; Gey van Pittius, N C

    2009-12-01

    Disease can be caused by various species of the genus Mycobacterium. A number of reports, both published and unpublished, of rarely reported mycobacteria have surfaced in South Africa in the last few years. Some unusual hosts have also been involved, causing concern in some quarters.These include reports on Mycobacterium goodii in a spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta), M. xenopi in a ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata), M. intracellulare in wild-caught chacma baboons (Papio ursinus), the 'dassie bacillus' in free ranging rock hyrax (dassies; Procavia capensis) the 'oryx bacillus' from free-ranging buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and M. tuberculosis in suricates (Suricata suricatta), a domestic dog and in baboons. In this article it has been attempted to put these in context and show how improved surveillance and technologies have allowed mycobacteria to be identified to species level more easily. Most of the unusual mycobacterial species have most likely been present in the region for many years and have probably caused disease episodes before, but have been misdiagnosed. Each case must be evaluated carefully with respect to the animal species involved, the environment in which the host is found and the mycobacterial species, and operational decisions made accordingly. PMID:20458859

  20. Comparative evaluation of Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Enzyme Analysis (PRA) and sequencing of heat shock protein 65 (hsp65) gene for identification of aquatic mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Pourahmad, F; Thompson, K D; Adams, A; Richards, R H

    2009-02-01

    Traditional identification of mycobacteria based on cultural and biochemical tests can take several weeks and may fail to provide a precise identification. Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Enzyme Analysis (PRA) of the gene encoding heat shock protein 65 kDa (hsp65) gene has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive alternative approach. Despite being widely used for differentiation of mammalian mycobacteria, this method has only been applied in the identification of a small number of aquatic mycobacteria. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential use of PRA of hsp65 for the identification of aquatic mycobacteria compared with sequence analysis. Seventy one mycobacterial isolates including, 10 type/reference strains and the remainder field isolates, were subjected to PRA of a 441 bp fragment of this gene. For 68 representative isolates, sequence analysis was performed. All rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria had best matches with 99.3% to 100% similarity with their corresponding species in the databanks. PRA proved to be a simple and rapid method for identifying aquatic mycobacteria. However, the incidence of similar or identical restriction patterns for some species of mycobacteria, and in particular, identification of new species of mycobacteria is a major problem using such a method. In contrast, the nucleic acid sequencing of the hsp65 gene yielded unambiguous results. PMID:18950664

  1. Disinfective process of strongly acidic electrolyzed product of sodium chloride solution against Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoyo Matsushita; Nakano, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Shimizu, Mitsuhide; Wu, Hong; Aoki, Hiroaki; Ota, Rie; Kobayashi, Toyohide; Sano, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    Electrolyzed acid water (EAW) has been studied for its disinfective potential against pathogenic microbes; however, the bactericidal process against Mycobacteria has not been clearly presented. In this study, to clarify the disinfective process against Mycobacteria, EAW-treated bacteria were examined against laboratory strains of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and Mycobacterium terrae (M. terrae) by recovery culture and observation of morphology, enzymatic assay, and the detection of DNA. All experiments were performed with the use of EAW containing 30 ppm free chlorine that kills Mycobacteria, including three pathogenic clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and six isolates of other Mycobacteria, within 5 min. In morphology, the bacterial surface became rough, and a longitudinal concavity-like structure appeared. The intrabacterial enzyme of EAW-contacted bacteria was inactivated, but chromosomal DNA was not totally denatured. These results suggest that the bactericidal effect of EAW against Mycobacteria occurs by degradation of the cell wall, followed by denaturation of cytoplasmic proteins, but degeneration of the nucleic acid is not always necessary. PMID:23224598

  2. Mycobacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . ​ Related Links Tuberculosis Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ... coats that can be found throughout the world. Tuberculosis and leprosy (Hansen’s disease) are the best known ...

  3. Mycobacteria causing human cervical lymphadenitis in pastoral communities in the Karamoja region of Uganda

    PubMed Central

    OLOYA, J.; OPUDA-ASIBO, J.; KAZWALA, R.; DEMELASH, A. B.; SKJERVE, E.; LUND, A.; JOHANSEN, T. B.; DJONNE, B.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Mycobacteria from lymph node biopsies of patients with cervical lymphadenitis reporting for tuberculosis treatment in Matany and Moroto Hospitals in the transhumant areas of Karamoja, Uganda were isolated and characterized. The AccuProbe® culture identification kits for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), M. avium complex (MAC) and M. avium were used to identify the isolates. Spoligotyping, IS901 PCR and IS1311 and IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to characterize the isolates. Of the 43 biopsies, ten M. avium, seven M. tuberculosis, three M. bovis, and two M. intracellulare were isolated. Two isolates could not be identified with AccuProbe® and from 19 samples no mycobacteria could be isolated. Three isolates with the Beijing spoligotype were identified from the seven M. tuberculosis isolates. The spoligopatterns of the M. bovis isolates had previously been detected in cattle in Uganda. Isolation of members of the MAC group reflects the complex interaction between the transhumant communities, water sources and their cattle. None of the M. avium isolates harboured IS901, and all showed several bands on IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP, in accordance with M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Composite dendrograms of IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP showed that the isolates were similar and identical patterns were found. The isolation of M. bovis confirms the human infection with zoonotic mycobacteria in areas where consumption of raw milk and meat is routine. Isolation of environmental mycobacteria also confirms their increasing role in human disease and the occupational risk of infection in the transhumant ecosystem in the absence of safe drinking water and environmental contamination. PMID:17599779

  4. Selective Killing of Nonreplicating Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bryk, Ruslana; Gold, Benjamin; Venugopal, Aditya; Singh, Jasbir; Samy, Raghu; Pupek, Krzysztof; Cao, Hua; Popescu, Carmen; Gurney, Mark; Hotha, Srinivas; Cherian, Joseph; Rhee, Kyu; Ly, Lan; Converse, Paul J.; Ehrt, Sabine; Vandal, Omar; Jiang, Xiuju; Schneider, Jean; Lin, Gang; Nathan, Carl

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Antibiotics are typically more effective against replicating rather than nonreplicating bacteria. However, a major need in global health is to eradicate persistent or nonreplicating subpopulations of bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Hence, identifying chemical inhibitors that selectively kill bacteria that are not replicating is of practical importance. To address this, we screened for inhibitors of dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), an enzyme required by Mtb to cause tuberculosis in guinea pigs and used by the bacterium to resist nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates, a stress encountered in the host. Chemical screening for inhibitors of Mtb DlaT identified select rhodanines as compounds that almost exclusively kill nonreplicating mycobacteria in synergy with products of host immunity, such as nitric oxide and hypoxia, and are effective on bacteria within macrophages, a cellular reservoir for latent Mtb. Compounds that kill nonreplicating pathogens in cooperation with host immunity could complement the conventional chemotherapy of infectious disease. PMID:18329613

  5. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  6. [The presence of mycobacteria in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from an immunocompetent patient does not necessarily imply tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, Frédéric; Marcq, Laurent; Novellas, Sébastien; Chyderiotis, Georges; Haudebourg, Juliette; Benchetrit, Maxime; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the most frequently identified mycobacterium in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of immunocompetent patients. Lung infections due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rare in such patients and then often occur in the context of pre-existing chronic lung disease. We report the case of an immunocompetent 85-year-old woman without pre-existing lung disease in whom M. abscessus was recovered from BALF. Cytological examination of the BALF revealed an increased number of neutrophils and some acid-fast bacilli, all located within neutrophil cytoplasm. This case report contributes a cytological description of BALF in the context of M. abscessus infection, which is poorly detailed in the literature. PMID:20005441

  7. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Disease, Germany, 2009–2014

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Dirk; de Roux, Andrés; Diel, Roland; Hohmann, David; Hickstein, Lennart; Welte, Tobias; Rademacher, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed routine statutory health insurance claim data to determine prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in Germany. Documented prevalence rates of this nonnotifiable disease increased from 2.3 to 3.3 cases/100,000 population from 2009 to 2014. Prevalence showed a strong association with advanced age and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27191473

  8. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Disease, Germany, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Ringshausen, Felix C; Wagner, Dirk; de Roux, Andrés; Diel, Roland; Hohmann, David; Hickstein, Lennart; Welte, Tobias; Rademacher, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed routine statutory health insurance claim data to determine prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in Germany. Documented prevalence rates of this nonnotifiable disease increased from 2.3 to 3.3 cases/100,000 population from 2009 to 2014. Prevalence showed a strong association with advanced age and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27191473

  9. Pulmonary infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria in a singer with achalasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cramer, J P; Sudeck, H; Burchard, G D

    2007-04-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old male patient with prolonged pneumonia and achalasia. Culture and molecular genetic typing identified Mycobacterium abscessus as causative agent. Treatment with clarithromycin and minocycline over 8 months gradually resolved the infection. Rapidly growing, non-obligate pathogenic mycobacteria are widespread in the environment. Several cases of pulmonary infections with these mycobacteria in patients with achalasia have been reported, suggesting a causative association. This is the first report of a case with isolation of M. abscessus in this context. PMID:17316814

  10. Increased Vancomycin Susceptibility in Mycobacteria: a New Approach To Identify Synergistic Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Soetaert, Karine; Rens, Céline; Wang, Xiao-Ming; De Bruyn, Jacqueline; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Laval, Françoise; Lemassu, Anne; Daffé, Mamadou; Bifani, Pablo; Fontaine, Véronique; Lefèvre, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is wrapped in complex waxes, impermeable to most antibiotics. Comparing Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis mutants that lack phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIM) and/or phenolic glycolipids with wild-type strains, we observed that glycopeptides strongly inhibited PDIM-deprived mycobacteria. Vancomycin together with a drug targeting lipid synthesis inhibited multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) clinical isolates. Our study puts glycopeptides in the pipeline of potential antituberculosis (TB) agents and might provide a new antimycobacterial drug-screening strategy. PMID:26033733