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Sample records for normal breast epithelia

  1. Increased invasiveness and aggressiveness in breast epithelia with cytoplasmic p63 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Su, Yan A.; Tsai, Horng-Der; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Chou, Ming-Chih; Man, Yan-gao

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that pregnancy associated breast cancer (PABC) had significantly reduced nuclear p63 expression in myoepithelia, while intense cytoplasmic p63 expression in associated epithelia. Our current study assessed these epithelia using immunohistochemistry with a panel of aggressiveness and invasiveness related markers and comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) with over 30,000 DNA probes. These epithelia showed several unique alterations, including (1) immunohistochemical and morphological resemblance to invasive cancer, (2) significant gain in copy numbers of DNA coding genes for morphogenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis, and (3) significant loss in copy numbers of DNA coding genes for tumor suppressors, cell adhesion, and macromolecular complex assembly or intra-cellular trafficking. Detected array-CGH alterations correlated well with in vivo expression of a number of corresponding proteins tested. These findings suggest that aberrant sub-cellular localization of p63 expression in normal or hyperplastic appearing epithelial cells may significant contribute to increased invasiveness and aggressiveness of these cells. PMID:20714441

  2. Multicellular architecture of malignant breast epithelia influences mechanics.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Gautham; Camarillo, David B; Webster, Kevin D; Reber, Clay D; Sethian, James A; Weaver, Valerie M; Fletcher, Daniel A; El-Samad, Hana; Rycroft, Chris H

    2014-01-01

    Cell-matrix and cell-cell mechanosensing are important in many cellular processes, particularly for epithelial cells. A crucial question, which remains unexplored, is how the mechanical microenvironment is altered as a result of changes to multicellular tissue structure during cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the influence of the multicellular tissue architecture on mechanical properties of the epithelial component of the mammary acinus. Using creep compression tests on multicellular breast epithelial structures, we found that pre-malignant acini with no lumen (MCF10AT) were significantly stiffer than normal hollow acini (MCF10A) by 60%. This difference depended on structural changes in the pre-malignant acini, as neither single cells nor normal multicellular acini tested before lumen formation exhibited these differences. To understand these differences, we simulated the deformation of the acini with different multicellular architectures and calculated their mechanical properties; our results suggest that lumen filling alone can explain the experimentally observed stiffness increase. We also simulated a single contracting cell in different multicellular architectures and found that lumen filling led to a 20% increase in the "perceived stiffness" of a single contracting cell independent of any changes to matrix mechanics. Our results suggest that lumen filling in carcinogenesis alters the mechanical microenvironment in multicellular epithelial structures, a phenotype that may cause downstream disruptions to mechanosensing. PMID:25111489

  3. Multicellular Architecture of Malignant Breast Epithelia Influences Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Kevin D.; Reber, Clay D.; Sethian, James A.; Weaver, Valerie M.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; El-Samad, Hana; Rycroft, Chris H.

    2014-01-01

    Cell–matrix and cell–cell mechanosensing are important in many cellular processes, particularly for epithelial cells. A crucial question, which remains unexplored, is how the mechanical microenvironment is altered as a result of changes to multicellular tissue structure during cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the influence of the multicellular tissue architecture on mechanical properties of the epithelial component of the mammary acinus. Using creep compression tests on multicellular breast epithelial structures, we found that pre-malignant acini with no lumen (MCF10AT) were significantly stiffer than normal hollow acini (MCF10A) by 60%. This difference depended on structural changes in the pre-malignant acini, as neither single cells nor normal multicellular acini tested before lumen formation exhibited these differences. To understand these differences, we simulated the deformation of the acini with different multicellular architectures and calculated their mechanical properties; our results suggest that lumen filling alone can explain the experimentally observed stiffness increase. We also simulated a single contracting cell in different multicellular architectures and found that lumen filling led to a 20% increase in the “perceived stiffness” of a single contracting cell independent of any changes to matrix mechanics. Our results suggest that lumen filling in carcinogenesis alters the mechanical microenvironment in multicellular epithelial structures, a phenotype that may cause downstream disruptions to mechanosensing. PMID:25111489

  4. Immunohistochemical detection of Ca antigen in normal, dysplastic and neoplastic squamous epithelia of the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J M; O'Dowd, T; Driver, M; Tee, D E

    1984-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining was performed on biopsies and cytological samples from normal, dysplastic and neoplastic squamous epithelia using the monoclonal Ca 1 antibody. The results of staining 92 biopsies and 20 cytological samples are described and it is reported that positive staining with Ca 1 antibody was detected in normal, dysplastic and neoplastic epithelia. The role of the Ca 1 antibody in the study of cervical cancer is discussed. Images PMID:6368596

  5. Cellular microenvironment controls the nuclear architecture of breast epithelia through β1-integrin.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Bartek, Jiri; Jackson, Dean A; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-02-01

    Defects in nuclear architecture occur in a variety of diseases, however the fundamental mechanisms that control the internal structure of nuclei are poorly defined. Here we reveal that the cellular microenvironment has a profound influence on the global internal organization of nuclei in breast epithelia. A 3D microenvironment induces a prolonged but reversible form of cell cycle arrest that features many of the classical markers of cell senescence. This unique form of arrest is dependent on signaling from the external microenvironment through β1-integrins. It is concomitant with alterations in nuclear architecture that characterize the withdrawal from cell proliferation. Unexpectedly, following prolonged cell cycle arrest in 3D, the senescence-like state and associated reprogramming of nuclear architecture are freely reversible on altering the dimensionality of the cellular microenvironment. Breast epithelia can therefore maintain a proliferative plasticity that correlates with nuclear remodelling. However, the changes in nuclear architecture are cell lineage-specific and do not occur in fibroblasts, and moreover they are overcome in breast cancer cells. PMID:26818565

  6. In Vitro Analysis of Breast Cancer Cell Line Tumourspheres and Primary Human Breast Epithelia Mammospheres Demonstrates Inter- and Intrasphere Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Ana Cristina; Keith, Patricia; Reid, Lynne; Wockner, Leesa; Amiri, Marjan Askarian; Sarkar, Debina; Simpson, Peter T.; Clarke, Catherine; Schmidt, Chris W.; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammosphere and breast tumoursphere culture have gained popularity as in vitro assays for propagating and analysing normal and cancer stem cells. Whether the spheres derived from different sources or parent cultures themselves are indeed single entities enriched in stem/progenitor cells compared to other culture formats has not been fully determined. We surveyed sphere-forming capacity across 26 breast cell lines, immunophenotyped spheres from six luminal- and basal-like lines by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry and compared clonogenicity between sphere, adherent and matrigel culture formats using in vitro functional assays. Analyses revealed morphological and molecular intra- and inter-sphere heterogeneity, consistent with adherent parental cell line phenotypes. Flow cytometry showed sphere culture does not universally enrich for markers previously associated with stem cell phenotypes, although we found some cell-line specific changes between sphere and adherent formats. Sphere-forming efficiency was significantly lower than adherent or matrigel clonogenicity and constant over serial passage. Surprisingly, self-renewal capacity of sphere-derived cells was similar/lower than other culture formats. We observed significant correlation between long-term-proliferating-cell symmetric division rates in sphere and adherent cultures, suggesting functional overlap between the compartments sustaining them. Experiments with normal primary human mammary epithelia, including sorted luminal (MUC1+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+) cells revealed distinct luminal-like, basal-like and mesenchymal entities amongst primary mammospheres. Morphological and colony-forming-cell assay data suggested mammosphere culture may enrich for a luminal progenitor phenotype, or induce reversion/relaxation of the basal/mesenchymal in vitro selection occurring with adherent culture. Overall, cell line tumourspheres and primary mammospheres are not homogenous entities enriched for stem cells

  7. Electron-microscopic observations of the gravity receptor epithelia of normal and spinner juvenile Octopus maya.

    PubMed

    Fermin, C D; Colmers, W F; Igarashi, M

    1985-01-01

    Light and electron microscopy of the gravity receptor epithelia (maculae) of statocysts of normal and "spinner" juvenile Octopus maya showed differences between the structures of the hair cells, supporting cells, and afferent neurons of these cephalopods. The maculae of spinner animals were approximately 30% smaller in their surface area and had 40% fewer hair cells. Moreover, the average distance between randomly-chosen hair bundles in scanning electron micrographs of maculae of normal animals was significantly greater (4.33 +/- 6.47 microns) than those of maculae of spinner animals (3.38 +/- 4.90 microns; P less than 0.0001). The sectional area of the supporting cell's microvilli in spinner maculae was larger (0.16 +/- 0.18 microns) than those of normal (0.10 +/- 0.10 micron; P less than 0.0001) O. maya. The morphological differences observed between certain structural components of the maculae of normal and spinner O. maya may be related to the absence and/or malformation of the neuroepithelial suprastructures in spinners. This may have direct or indirect effects to their inability to orient to gravity with these organs. PMID:2861903

  8. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  9. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S H; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  10. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  11. Surface ultrastructure of the epithelia lining the normal human lower urinary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J.; Hicks, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The finding of cells with pleomorphic microvilli in urinary sediments has been proposed as an indicator for urothelial neoplasia. Recently, in addition to such cells, others with less bizarre, non-pleomorphic microvilli have also been found in urothelial cancers, and these cells are similar in appearance to others detected in the urinary sediments of healthy people. When using scanning electron microscopy as a diagnostic tool, these cells are a possible source of confusion. The entire lower urinary tracts from people free of urothelial neoplasia have therefore been examined to delineate the normal surface appearance of all cell types which could appear in the urine. There are 4 predominant cell types: the large, flat squamous cells of the urethral meatus which have abundant microridges; cells with mucus-coated, short, stubby microvilli lining the urethra and renal papilla; immature urothelial cells with chains and ridges of bleb-like processes in the ureters and bladder; and, also in the ureters and bladder, mature urothelial cells with microridges or ruffles. The lining epithelia of the normal urethra and renal papilla may thus contribute cells with non-pleomorphic stubby microvilli to urine sediments, which cannot be differentiated by scanning electron microscopy alone from similar cells derived from urothelial neoplasms. However, the normal complement of cells lining the adult lower urinary tract does not include any with prolific, long, pleomorphic microvilli such as characterize transitional-cell carcinomas of the urothelium. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 Fig. 27 Fig. 28 Fig. 29 Fig. 30 Fig. 31 Fig. 32 Fig. 33 Fig. 34 Fig. 35 Fig. 36 Fig. 37 Fig. 38 Fig. 39 Fig. 40 Fig. 41 Fig. 42 Fig. 43 Fig. 44 Fig. 45 PMID:7248168

  12. Epigenetic Regulation of GDF2 Suppresses Anoikis in Ovarian and Breast Epithelia1

    PubMed Central

    Varadaraj, Archana; Patel, Pratik; Serrao, Anne; Bandyopadhay, Tirthankar; Lee, Nam Y.; Jazaeri, Amir A.; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K.; Mythreye, Karthikeyan

    2015-01-01

    Anoikis, a cell death mechanism triggered upon cell-matrix detachment, is regarded as a physiological suppressor of metastasis that can be regulated by a diverse array of signals. The protein encoded by GDF2 is BMP9 and is a member of the bone morphogenetic protein family and the transforming growth factor (TGF) β superfamily with emerging yet controversial roles in carcinogenesis. In an attempt to identify the function of growth and differentiation factor 2 (GDF2) in epithelial systems, we examined the signaling machinery that is involved and cell fate decisions in response to GDF2 in ovarian and breast epithelia. We find that GDF2 can robustly activate the SMAD1/5 signaling axis by increasing complex formation between the type I receptor serine threonine kinases activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) 3 and ALK6 and the type II receptor serine threonine kinase BMPRII. This activation is independent of cross talk with the SMAD2-transforming growth factor β pathway. By activating SMAD1/5, epithelial cells regulate anchorage-independent growth by increasing anoikis sensitivity that is dependent on GDF2’s ability to sustain the activation of SMAD1/5 via ALK3 and ALK6. Consistent with a role for GDF2 in promoting anoikis susceptibility, the analysis of cell lines and patient data suggests epigenetic silencing of GDF2 in cancer cell lines and increased promoter methylation in patients. These findings collectively indicate an antimetastatic role for GDF2 in ovarian and breast cancer. The work also implicates loss of GDF2 via promoter methylation-mediated downregulation in promotion of carcinogenesis with significant relevance for the use of epigenetic drugs currently in clinical trials. PMID:26678910

  13. Immortalised breast epithelia survive prolonged DNA replication stress and return to cycle from a senescent-like state

    PubMed Central

    Maya-Mendoza, A; Merchut-Maya, J M; Bartkova, J; Bartek, J; Streuli, C H; Jackson, D A

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells have mechanisms to counteract the effects of metabolic and exogenous stresses, many of that would be mutagenic if ignored. Damage arising during DNA replication is a major source of mutagenesis. The extent of damage dictates whether cells undergo transient cell cycle arrest and damage repair, senescence or apoptosis. Existing dogma defines these alternative fates as distinct choices. Here we show that immortalised breast epithelial cells are able to survive prolonged S phase arrest and subsequently re-enter cycle after many days of being in an arrested, senescence-like state. Prolonged cell cycle inhibition in fibroblasts induced DNA damage response and cell death. However, in immortalised breast epithelia, efficient S phase arrest minimised chromosome damage and protected sufficient chromatin-bound replication licensing complexes to allow cell cycle re-entry. We propose that our observation could have implications for the design of drug therapies for breast cancer. PMID:25058425

  14. NHE-RF, a Merlin-Interacting Protein, Is Primarily Expressed in Luminal Epithelia, Proliferative Endometrium, and Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Wiederhold, Thorsten; Nielsen, G. Petur; James, Marianne; Pinney-Michalowski, Denise; Roy, Jennifer E.; Cohen, Wendy A.; Ramesh, Vijaya; Louis, David N.

    2001-01-01

    NHE-RF, a regulatory cofactor for NHE (Na+-H+ exchanger) type 3, interacts with ion transporters and receptors through its PDZ domains and with the MERM proteins (merlin, ezrin, radixin and moesin) via its carboxyl terminus. Thus, NHE-RF may act as a multifunctional adaptor protein and play a role in the assembly of signal transduction complexes, linking ion channels and receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. NHE-RF expression is up-regulated in response to estrogen in estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinoma cell lines, suggesting that it may be involved in estrogen signaling. To further understand NHE-RF function and its possible role in estrogen signaling, we analyzed NHE-RF expression in normal human tissues, including cycling endometrium, and in breast carcinomas, tissues in which estrogen plays an important role in regulating cell growth and proliferation. NHE-RF is expressed in many epithelia, especially in cells specialized in ion transport or absorption, and is often localized to apical (luminal) membranes. NHE-RF expression varies markedly in proliferative versus secretory endometrium, with high expression in proliferative (estrogen-stimulated) endometrium. Furthermore, estrogen receptor status and NHE-RF expression correlate closely in breast carcinoma specimens. These findings support a role for NHE-RF in estrogen signaling. PMID:11141479

  15. Lmx1a is required for segregation of sensory epithelia and normal ear histogenesis and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, David H.; Pauley, Sarah; Jahan, Israt; Beisel, Kirk W.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    At E8.5, the LIM-homeodomain factor Lmx1a is expressed throughout the otic placode but becomes developmentally restricted to non-sensory epithelia of the ear (endolymphatic duct, ductus reuniens, cochlea lateral wall). We confirm here that the ears of newborn dreher (Lmx1adr) mutants are dysmorphic. Hair cell markers such as Atoh1 and Myo7 reveal for the first time that newborn Lmx1a mutants have only three sensory epithelia: two enlarged canal cristae and one fused epithelium comprising an amalgamation of the cochlea, saccule and utricle, a “cochlear-gravistatic” endorgan. The enlarged anterior canal crista develops by fusion of horizontal and anterior crista whereas the posterior crista fuses with an enlarged papilla neglecta that may extend into the cochlear lateral wall. In the fused endorgan the cochlear region is distinguished from the vestibular region by markers such as Gata3, the presence of a tectorial membrane and cochlea-specific innervation. The cochlea-like apex displays minor disorganization of the hair and supporting cells. This contrasts with the basal half of the cochlear region which shows a vestibular epithelium-like organization of hair cells and supporting cells. The dismorphic features of the cochlea are also reflected in altered gene expression patterns. Fgf8 expression expands from inner hair cells in the apex to most hair cells in the base. Two supporting cell marker proteins, Sox2 and Prox1, also differ in their cellular distribution between the base and the apex. Sox2 expression expands in mutant canal cristae prior to their enlargement and fusion and displays a more diffuse and widespread expression in the base of the cochlear region whereas Prox1 is not detected in the base. These changes in Sox2 and Prox1 expression suggest that Lmx1a expression restricts and sharpens Sox2 expression thereby defining non-sensory and sensory epithelium. The adult Lmx1a mutant organ of Corti showed a loss of cochlear hair cells, suggesting that long

  16. Cell Budding from Normal Appearing Epithelia: A Predictor of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Mason, Jeffrey; Jewett, Anahid; Qian, Jun; Ding, Yijiang; Cho, William CS; Zhang, Xichen; Man, Yan-gao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Colorectal carcinogenesis is believed to be a multi-stage process that originates with a localized adenoma, which linearly progresses to an intra-mucosal carcinoma, to an invasive lesion, and finally to metastatic cancer. This progression model is supported by tissue culture and animal model studies, but it is difficult to reconcile with several well-established observations, principally among these are that up to 25% of early stage (Stage I/II), node-negative colorectal cancer (CRC) develop distant metastasis, and that circulating CRC cells are undetectable in peripheral blood samples of up to 50% of patients with confirmed metastasis, but more than 30% of patients with no detectable metastasis exhibit such cells. The mechanism responsible for this diverse behavior is unknown, and there are no effective means to identify patients with pending, or who are at high risk for, developing metastatic CRC. Novel findings: Our previous studies of human breast and prostate cancer have shown that cancer invasion arises from the convergence of a tissue injury, the innate immune response to that injury, and the presence of tumor stem cells within tumor capsules at the site of the injury. Focal degeneration of a capsule due to age or disease attracts lymphocyte infiltration that degrades the degenerating capsules resulting in the formation of a focal disruption in the capsule, which selectively favors proliferating or “budding” of the underlying tumor stem cells. Our recent studies suggest that lymphocyte infiltration also triggers metastasis by disrupting the intercellular junctions and surface adhesion molecules within the proliferating cell buds causing their dissociation. Then, lymphocytes and tumor cells are conjoined through membrane fusion to form tumor-lymphocyte chimeras (TLCs) that allows the tumor stem cell to avail itself of the lymphocyte's natural ability to migrate and breach cell barriers in order to intravasate and to travel to distant organs

  17. Regulation of Chloride Channels by Protein Kinase C in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; McCann, John D.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Clancy, John P.; Liedtke, Carole M.; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul; Welsh, Michael J.

    1989-06-01

    Apical membrane chloride channels control chloride secretion by airway epithelial cells. Defective regulation of these channels is a prominent characteristic of cystic fibrosis. In normal intact cells, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol ester either stimulated or inhibited chloride secretion, depending on the physiological status of the cell. In cell-free membrane patches, PKC also had a dual effect: at a high calcium concentration, PKC inactivated chloride channels; at a low calcium concentration, PKC activated chloride channels. In cystic fibrosis cells, PKC-dependent channel inactivation was normal, but activation was defective. Thus it appears that PKC phosphorylates and regulates two different sites on the channel or on an associated membrane protein, one of which is defective in cystic fibrosis.

  18. The expanding significance of keratin intermediate filaments in normal and diseased epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoou; Hobbs, Ryan P.; Coulombe, Pierre A.

    2012-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are assembled from a diverse group of evolutionary conserved proteins and are specified in a tissue-, cell type-, and context-dependent fashion in the body. Genetically-determined mutations in intermediate filament proteins account for a large number of diseases, ranging from skin fragility conditions to cardiomyopathies and premature aging. Keratins, the epithelial-specific intermediate filaments, are now recognized as multi-faceted effectors in their native context. In this review, we emphasize the recent progress made in defining the role of keratins towards the regulation of cytoarchitecture, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cell motility during embryonic development, in normal adult tissues, and in select diseases such as cancer. PMID:23270662

  19. Methylation of p16(INK4a) promoters occurs in vivo in histologically normal human mammary epithelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Charles R.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Esteller, Manel; Chew, Karen; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2003-01-01

    Cultures of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) contain a subpopulation of variant cells with the capacity to propagate beyond an in vitro proliferation barrier. These variant HMECs, which contain hypermethylated and silenced p16(INK4a) (p16) promoters, eventually accumulate multiple chromosomal changes, many of which are similar to those detected in premalignant and malignant lesions of breast cancer. To determine the origin of these variant HMECs in culture, we used Luria-Delbruck fluctuation analysis and found that variant HMECs exist within the population before the proliferation barrier, thereby raising the possibility that variant HMECs exist in vivo before cultivation. To test this hypothesis, we examined mammary tissue from normal women for evidence of p16 promoter hypermethylation. Here we show that epithelial cells with methylation of p16 promoter sequences occur in focal patches of histologically normal mammary tissue of a substantial fraction of healthy, cancer-free women.

  20. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women. PMID:27559297

  1. The Potential Role of Hedgehog Signaling in the Luminal/Basal Phenotype of Breast Epithelia and in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Flemban, Arwa; Qualtrough, David

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium of the lactiferous ducts in the breast is comprised of luminal epithelial cells and underlying basal myoepithelial cells. The regulation of cell fate and transit of cells between these two cell types remains poorly understood. This relationship becomes of greater importance when studying the subtypes of epithelial breast carcinoma, which are categorized according to their expression of luminal or basal markers. The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in tumor invasion. It is important to understand mechanisms that regulate this process, which bears relation to the normal dynamic of epithelial/basal phenotype regulation in the mammary gland. Understanding this process could provide answers for the regulation of EMT in breast cancer, and thereby identify potential targets for therapy. Evidence points towards a role for hedgehog signaling in breast tissue homeostasis and also in mammary neoplasia. This review examines our current understanding of role of the hedgehog-signaling (Hh) pathway in breast epithelial cells both during breast development and homeostasis and to assess the potential misappropriation of Hh signals in breast neoplasia, cancer stem cells and tumor metastasis via EMT. PMID:26389956

  2. [Tissue repair of uterine cervix--cell-biological properties of normal uterine cervical epithelia of transformation zone in vitro].

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, I; Sakuma, T; Nozawa, S

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this study is to culture the epithelia of the transformation zone of the uterine cervix for long term and evaluate their biological characteristics, such as morphology, growth behavior, alkaline phosphatase activity and heterotransplantability. The epithelia of transformation zone of 15 cases of myoma uteri were cut into 1 x 1 x 1 mm fragments and placed directly on the cover glass. The explants were cultured at 37 degrees C in 5% CO2 and 95% air. In vitro outgrowth of squamous cells (squamous cell outgrowth pattern) was observed in 44, that of columnar cells (columnar cell outgrowth pattern) was observed 49, a mixture of squamous and columnar cell outgrowth patterns was 52 out of 198 explants of transformation zone. The squamous cells were polygonal in shape and showed a pavement-like cell arrangement. The glandular cells grew in whorled fashion. Along the margins of the outgrowth of glandular cells, two types of cells were seen after 2 weeks of culture. One type contained secretory vacuoles of glandular cell, and the other type contained a large number of tonofilaments of squamous metaplastic cells. These phenomena suggested that biological characteristics of the cells in vivo can well be retained in vitro for a relative long term (about 6 weeks). PMID:1723625

  3. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  4. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  5. Intracellular pH and its relationship to regulation of ion transport in normal and cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Willumsen, N J; Boucher, R C

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) of cultured human airway epithelial cells from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects were measured with double-barrelled pH-sensitive liquid exchanger microelectrodes. The cells, which were grown to confluence on a permeable collagen matrix support, were mounted in a modified miniature Ussing chamber. All studies were conducted under open circuit conditions. Values are given as means +/- S.E.M. and n refers to the number of preparations. 2. Normal preparations (n = 15) were characterized by a transepithelial potential difference (Vt) of -18 +/- 2 mV, an apical membrane potential (Va) of -19 +/- 2 mV, a basolateral membrane potential (Vb) of -37 +/- 2 mV, a transepithelial resistance (Rt) of 253 +/- 15 omega cm2, a fractional apical membrane resistance (fRa) of 0.40 +/- 0.04 and an equivalent short circuit current (Ieq) of -73 +/- 7 microA cm-2. 3. CF preparations (n = 13) were characterized by a Vt of -46 +/- 7 mV, a Va of 3 +/- 5 mV, a Vb of -43 +/- 3 mV, Rt of 373 +/- 47 omega cm2, fRa of 0.44 +/- 0.04 and an Ieq of -130 +/- 16 microA cm-2. All parameters except Vb and fRa were significantly different (P < 0.025) from those of normal preparations. 4. Despite large differences in electrochemical driving force for proton flow across the apical cell membranes between normal and CF preparations (-4 +/- 3 mV and 20 +/- 7 mV, respectively), pHi was similar (7.15 +/- 0.02 and 7.11 +/- 0.05, respectively). The driving force across the basolateral membrane was similar in normal and CF preparations (22 +/- 3 and 26 +/- 3 mV, respectively). 5. Intracellular alkalinization achieved by removal of CO2 from the luminal Ringer solution or by luminal ammonium prepulse led to stimulation of Ieq in both normal (from -58 to -70 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.05) and CF (from -144 to -163 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.005) preparations. The increase in Ieq was associated with a reduction of Rt, increase in fRa, and hyperpolarization of Vb. All changes in

  6. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity. PMID:26449822

  7. RELATIONSHIP OF MAMMOGRAPHIC DENSITY AND GENE EXPRESSION: ANALYSIS OF NORMAL BREAST TISSUE SURROUNDING BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Williams, Tyisha; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Wesolowska, Ewa; Boyd, Norman F.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Sherman, Mark E.; Troester, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies of breast tissue gene expression have demonstrated that the extratumoral microenvironment has substantial variability across individuals, some of which can be attributed to epidemiologic factors. To evaluate how mammographic density (MD) and breast tissue composition relate to extratumoral microenvironment gene expression, we used data on 121 breast cancer patients from the population-based Polish Women's Breast Cancer Study. Design Breast cancer cases were classified based on a previously reported, biologically-defined extratumoral gene expression signature with two subtypes: an Active subtype, which is associated with high expression of genes related to fibrosis and wound response, and an Inactive subtype, which has high expression of cellular adhesion genes. MD of the contralateral breast was assessed using pre-treatment mammograms and a quantitative, reliable computer-assisted thresholding method. Breast tissue composition was evaluated based on digital image analysis of tissue sections. Results The Inactive extratumoral subtype was associated with significantly higher percentage mammographic density (PD) and dense area (DA) in univariate analysis (PD: p=0.001; DA: p=0.049) and in multivariable analyses adjusted for age and body mass index (PD: p=0.004; DA: p=0.049). Inactive/higher MD tissue was characterized by a significantly higher percentage of stroma and a significantly lower percentage of adipose tissue, with no significant change in epithelial content. Analysis of published gene expression signatures suggested that Inactive/higher MD tissue expressed increased estrogen response and decreased TGF-β signaling. Conclusions By linking novel molecular phenotypes with MD, our results indicate that MD reflects broad transcriptional changes, including changes in both epithelia- and stroma-derived signaling. PMID:23918601

  8. Visualization of basement membranes in normal breast and breast cancer tissues using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIUFENG; CHEN, GANG; QIU, JINGTING; LU, JIANPING; ZHU, WEIFENG; CHEN, JIANXIN; ZHUO, SHUANGMU; YAN, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Since basement membranes represent a critical barrier during breast cancer progression, timely imaging of these signposts is essential for early diagnosis of breast cancer. A label-free method using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence signals and second harmonic generation signals for analyzing the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues is likely to enable a better understanding of the pathophysiology of breast cancer and facilitate improved clinical management and treatment of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether MPM has the potential for label-free assessment of the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues. A total of 60 tissue section samples (comprising 30 fresh breast cancer specimens and 30 normal breast tissues) were first imaged (fresh, unfixed and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Comparisons were made between MPM imaging and gold standard sections for each specimen stained with H&E. Simply by visualizing morphological features appearing on multiphoton images, cancerous lesions may be readily identified by the loss of basement membrane and tumor cells characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. These results suggest that MPM has potential as a label-free method of imaging the morphology of basement membranes and cell features to effectively distinguish between normal and cancerous breast tissues. PMID:27313695

  9. Mechanical properties of normal versus cancerous breast cells.

    PubMed

    Smelser, Amanda M; Macosko, Jed C; O'Dell, Adam P; Smyre, Scott; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2015-11-01

    A cell's mechanical properties are important in determining its adhesion, migration, and response to the mechanical properties of its microenvironment and may help explain behavioral differences between normal and cancerous cells. Using fluorescently labeled peroxisomes as microrheological probes, the interior mechanical properties of normal breast cells were compared to a metastatic breast cell line, MDA-MB-231. To estimate the mechanical properties of cell cytoplasms from the motions of their peroxisomes, it was necessary to reduce the contribution of active cytoskeletal motions to peroxisome motion. This was done by treating the cells with blebbistatin, to inhibit myosin II, or with sodium azide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose, to reduce intracellular ATP. Using either treatment, the peroxisomes exhibited normal diffusion or subdiffusion, and their mean squared displacements (MSDs) showed that the MDA-MB-231 cells were significantly softer than normal cells. For these two cell types, peroxisome MSDs in treated and untreated cells converged at high frequencies, indicating that cytoskeletal structure was not altered by the drug treatment. The MSDs from ATP-depleted cells were analyzed by the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation to estimate the interior viscoelastic modulus G* and its components, the elastic shear modulus G' and viscous shear modulus G", at angular frequencies between 0.126 and 628 rad/s. These moduli are the material coefficients that enter into stress-strain relations and relaxation times in quantitative mechanical models such as the poroelastic model of the interior regions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. PMID:25929519

  10. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (p<0.05) and the redox ratio Fp/(NADH+Fp) was about 27% higher in the cancerous tissues than in the normal ones (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that the redox state could differentiate between cancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  11. Expression of K+ channels in normal and cancerous human breast.

    PubMed

    Brevet, Marie; Ahidouch, Ahmed; Sevestre, Henri; Merviel, Philippe; El Hiani, Yassine; Robbe, Micheline; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2008-08-01

    Potassium (K+) channels contribute to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis and are also involved in tumor generation and malignant growth. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we investigated the expression of four K+ channels GIRK1 (G-Protein Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel 1), Ca2+-activated K channel (K Ca 1.1), voltage activated K+ channels (KV 1.1 and KV 1.3) and of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 in normal and cancerous breast tissues and compared their expression with clinicopathological data. GIRK1 was overexpressed in carcinomatous tissues. In contrast, K V 1.1 and K V 1.3 were less expressed in cancerous tissue. The expression of Bcl-2 was similar in both tissues. As to the clinicopathological data, a correlation between K Ca 1.1 channel and estrogen receptor (ER) expression was observed. GIRK1 was overexpressed in breast carcinoma suggesting its involvement in proliferation and oncogenesis and its possible use as a putative pharmaceutical target. The correlation between K Ca 1.1 channel and ER suggests the involvement of this channel in proliferation. The loss of expression of the two channels K V 1.1 and K V 1.3 may correspond to their role in apoptosis. PMID:18498071

  12. Epithelia migration: A spatiotemporal interplay between contraction and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris; Pinto, Inês Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues represent 60% of the cells that form the human body and where more than 90% of all cancers derived. Epithelia transformation and migration involve altered cell contractile mechanics powered by an actomyosin-based cytoskeleton and influenced by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. A balance between contractile and adhesive forces regulates a large number of cellular and tissue properties crucial for epithelia migration and tumorigenesis. In this review, the forces driving normal epithelia transformation into highly motile and invasive cells and tissues will be discussed. PMID:26176587

  13. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferation in human breast epithelial cells and normal and malignant breast.

    PubMed

    Scaling, Allison L; Prossnitz, Eric R; Hathaway, Helen J

    2014-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized nontumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane-bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  14. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferations in human breast epithelial cells, and normal and malignant breast

    PubMed Central

    Scaling, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  15. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  16. Aspiration cytology of radiation-induced changes of normal breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Bondeson, L.

    1987-05-01

    From a case illustrated, it appears that irradiation may induce changes in normal breast epithelium indistinguishable from malignancy by means of aspiration cytology. This fact must be considered in the choice of diagnostic methods for the evaluation of lesions in irradiated breast tissue.

  17. Mapping the cellular and molecular heterogeneity of normal and malignant breast tissues and cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Normal and neoplastic breast tissues are comprised of heterogeneous populations of epithelial cells exhibiting various degrees of maturation and differentiation. While cultured cell lines have been derived from both normal and malignant tissues, it remains unclear to what extent they retain similar levels of differentiation and heterogeneity as that found within breast tissues. Methods We used 12 reduction mammoplasty tissues, 15 primary breast cancer tissues, and 20 human breast epithelial cell lines (16 cancer lines, 4 normal lines) to perform flow cytometry for CD44, CD24, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), and CD49f expression, as well as immunohistochemistry, and in vivo tumor xenograft formation studies to extensively analyze the molecular and cellular characteristics of breast epithelial cell lineages. Results Human breast tissues contain four distinguishable epithelial differentiation states (two luminal phenotypes and two basal phenotypes) that differ on the basis of CD24, EpCAM and CD49f expression. Primary human breast cancer tissues also contain these four cellular states, but in altered proportions compared to normal tissues. In contrast, cultured cancer cell lines are enriched for rare basal and mesenchymal epithelial phenotypes, which are normally present in small numbers within human tissues. Similarly, cultured normal human mammary epithelial cell lines are enriched for rare basal and mesenchymal phenotypes that represent a minor fraction of cells within reduction mammoplasty tissues. Furthermore, although normal human mammary epithelial cell lines exhibit features of bi-potent progenitor cells they are unable to differentiate into mature luminal breast epithelial cells under standard culture conditions. Conclusions As a group breast cancer cell lines represent the heterogeneity of human breast tumors, but individually they exhibit increased lineage-restricted profiles that fall short of truly representing the intratumoral

  18. DNA methylation outliers in normal breast tissue identify field defects that are enriched in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gao, Yang; Jones, Allison; Ruebner, Matthias; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Wachter, David L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying molecular alterations in normal tissue adjacent to cancer is important for understanding cancer aetiology and designing preventive measures. Here we analyse the DNA methylome of 569 breast tissue samples, including 50 from cancer-free women and 84 from matched normal cancer pairs. We use statistical algorithms for dissecting intra- and inter-sample cellular heterogeneity and demonstrate that normal tissue adjacent to breast cancer is characterized by tens to thousands of epigenetic alterations. We show that their genomic distribution is non-random, being strongly enriched for binding sites of transcription factors specifying chromatin architecture. We validate the field defects in an independent cohort and demonstrate that over 30% of the alterations exhibit increased enrichment within matched cancer samples. Breast cancers highly enriched for epigenetic field defects, exhibit adverse clinical outcome. Our data support a model where clonal epigenetic reprogramming towards reduced differentiation in normal tissue is an important step in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26823093

  19. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast tissue in patients with triple-negative high-grade breast carcinomas: breast p53 signature?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Stolla, Moritz; Ring, Brian Z; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2016-09-01

    p53 alterations have been identified in approximately 23% of breast carcinomas, particularly in hormone receptor-negative high-grade carcinomas. It is considered to be an early event in breast carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, the putative precursor lesion of high-grade breast carcinoma remains elusive. Breast excision specimens from 93 triple-negative high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, 48 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/Her2-negative non-high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, and 50 mammoplasty breasts were selected. At least 2 tissue blocks with tumor and adjacent benign tissue were sectioned and subjected to immunohistochemistry staining for p53. TP53 gene sequencing was performed on select tumors. Further immunohistochemistry staining for ER and Ki-67 was performed on consecutive sections of tissue with p53-positive normal/benign cells. Of the 93 high-grade carcinomas, 51 (55%) were positive for p53 alteration, whereas only 3 (6.25%) of the 48 non-high-grade carcinomas were p53 altered. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign breast tissue was identified in 19 cases, and 18 of them also had p53 alteration in their carcinomas. Only 1 case had focal p53 staining in normal/benign tissue, but the tumor was negative for p53 alteration. No p53 staining positivity was identified in the mammoplasty specimens. The p53-stained normal/benign cells were ER negative and did not show an increase in the Ki-67 labeling index. These findings indicate that the p53 staining positivity in normal/benign breast tissue is not a random event. It could be considered as the "p53 signature" in breast and serve as an indicator for future potential risk of p53-positive high-grade breast carcinoma. PMID:27246177

  20. Trace elemental correlation study in malignant and normal breast tissue by PIXE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, G. J. Naga; Sarita, P.; Kumar, M. Ravi; Murty, G. A. V. Ramana; Reddy, B. Seetharami; Lakshminarayana, S.; Vijayan, V.; Lakshmi, P. V. B. Rama; Gavarasana, Satyanarayana; Reddy, S. Bhuloka

    2006-06-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission technique was used to study the variations in trace elemental concentrations between normal and malignant human breast tissue specimens and to understand the effects of altered homeostasis of these elements in the etiology of breast cancer. A 3 MeV proton beam was used to excite the biological samples of normal and malignant breast tissues. The elements Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr were identified and their relative concentrations were estimated. Almost all the elements were found to be elevated (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-ranks test) in the cancerous tissues when compared with normal tissues. The excess levels of trace elements observed in the cancerous breast tissues could either be a cause or a consequence of breast cancer. Regarding their role in the initiation or promotion of breast cancer, one possible interpretation is that the elevated levels of Cu, Fe and Cr could have led to the formation of free radicals or other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that adversely affect DNA thereby causing breast cancer, which is mainly attributed to genetic abnormalities. Moreover, since Cu and Fe are required for angiogenesis, elevated concentrations of these elements are likely to promote breast cancer by increasing the blood supply for tumor growth. On the other hand elevated concentrations of elements in breast cancer tissues might also be a consequence of the cancer. This can be understood in terms of the biochemical and histological differences between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Tumors, characterized by unregulated multiplication of cells, need an ever-increasing supply of essential nutrients including trace elements. This probably results in an increased vascularity of malignant tissues, which in turn leads to enhancement of elemental concentrations in tumors.

  1. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  2. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or

  3. Detection of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Malan-Shibley, L.B.; Janss, D.H.

    1980-01-28

    Studies were conducted to determine whether normal and/or neoplastic (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells contain the microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) which catalyses the conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to carcinogenic intermediates. Low constitutive levels of AHH activity were found in homogenates of both normal human breast epithelial and MCF-7 cells. The addition of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to the culture medium of either cell type significantly increased AHH activity. Peak induction of hydroxylase activity occurred following the in vitro addition of 10 ..mu..M DMBA. A time course of DMBA-induced AHH activity in both normal human breast epithelium and MCF-7 cells revealed maximal induction 16 hr after 10 ..mu..M DMBA was added to the culture medium. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and benz(a)anthracene (BA) also induced AHH activity in normal and MCF-7 cells. For example, the addition of 10 ..mu..M BP to the culture medium of either normal human breast epithelial or MCF-7 cells for 16 hr increased AHH activity 13.8 and 65.3-fold, respectively. For all PAH, the magnitude of AHH induction was substantially greater in MCF-7 than normal breast epithelial cells. Finally, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone inhibited BA-induced AHH activity in MCF-7 cells. The study demonstrates the presence of a PAH-inducible AHH enzyme(s) in normal human breast epithelial cells grown in primary culture and in the human breast tumor cell line, MCF-7.

  4. Estimation of stress relaxation time for normal and abnormal breast phantoms using optical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayakumar, K.; Sujatha, N.

    2015-03-01

    Many of the early occurring micro-anomalies in breast may transform into a deadliest cancer tumor in future. Probability of curing early occurring abnormalities in breast is more if rightly identified. Even in mammogram, considered as a golden standard technique for breast imaging, it is hard to pick up early occurring changes in the breast tissue due to the difference in mechanical behavior of the normal and abnormal tissue when subjected to compression prior to x-ray or laser exposure. In this paper, an attempt has been made to estimate the stress relaxation time of normal and abnormal breast mimicking phantom using laser speckle image correlation. Phantoms mimicking normal breast is prepared and subjected to precise mechanical compression. The phantom is illuminated by a Helium Neon laser and by using a CCD camera, a sequence of strained phantom speckle images are captured and correlated by the image mean intensity value at specific time intervals. From the relation between mean intensity versus time, tissue stress relaxation time is quantified. Experiments were repeated for phantoms with increased stiffness mimicking abnormal tissue for similar ranges of applied loading. Results shows that phantom with more stiffness representing abnormal tissue shows uniform relaxation for varying load of the selected range, whereas phantom with less stiffness representing normal tissue shows irregular behavior for varying loadings in the given range.

  5. Using the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the differentiation between normal and neoplastichuman breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hage, R; Galhanone, P R; Zângaro, R A; Rodrigues, K C; Pacheco, M T T; Martin, A A; Netto, M M; Soares, F A; da Cunha, I W

    2003-01-01

    This article reports results of the in vitro study for potential evaluation of the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the differentiation between normal and neoplastic human breast tissue. A coumarine dye laser pumped by nitrogen laser generated an excitation light centered at 458 nm. In order to collect the fluorescence signal was used an optical fiber catheter coupled to a spectrometer and CCD detector. Fluorescence spectra were recorded from normal and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissue, adding up 94 different areas. The discrimination between normal and neoplasm groups reach a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. PMID:14505202

  6. VIS-NIR spectrum analysis for distinguishing tumor and normal human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Yuan; Tuchin, Valery V.; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Xiang; Liu, Caihua; Wang, Jing; Xue, Xingbo; Zhu, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The high incidence and mortality of breast cancer require an effective method for early breast diagnosis. In order to investigate the optical differences among malignant tumor, benign tumor and normal human breast tissue, a commercial spectrophotometer combined with single integrating sphere was used to measure the optical properties of different types of breast tissue in the wavelength range of 400 nm to 2200 nm in vitro. The hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining) are used as the standard, and to find the find possible optical markers from the corresponding absorption or scattering spectra. This work is not only used for in vitro rapid optical diagnosis, but very helpful to develop innovative optical diagnosis of breast tumor in vivo.

  7. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  8. Control of sulfatase activity by nomegestrol acetate in normal and cancerous human breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Chetrite, Gérard Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Shields-Botella, Jaqueline; Cortes-Prieto, Joaquin; Philippe, Jean-Claude; Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2005-01-01

    Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a 17alpha-hydroxy-nor-progesterone derivative (17alpha-acetoxy-6-methyl-19-nor-4,6-pregnadiene-3,20-dione, the active substance in Lutenyl), is a potent and useful clinical synthetic progestin for the treatment of menopausal complaints and is under current development for oral contraception. Previous studies in this laboratory demonstrated that NOMAC can block sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and transformation of estradiol (E2) in hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T-47D breast cancer cells. In the present study, the effect of NOMAC on sulfatase activity using total breast cancer tissue, compared to the effect in normal breast tissue, was explored. Slices of tumoral or normal breast tissues (45-65 mg) were incubated in buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.2) with physiological concentrations of [3H]-estrone sulfate (5x10(-9) M), alone or in the presence of nomegestrol acetate (5x10(-5) - 5x10(-7) - 5x10(-9) M), for 4 h at 37 degrees C. Estrone sulfate (E1S), estrone (E1) and E2 were characterized by thin layer chromatography and quantified using the corresponding standard. It was observed that [3H]- E1S was only converted to [3H]- E1 and not to [3H]- E2, in normal or cancerous breast tissues, which suggests a low or no 17beta-HSD activity under these experimental conditions. The sulfatase activity was more intense with breast cancer tissue than normal tissue, since the concentrations of E1 were 42.5 +/- 3.4 and 27.2 +/- 2.5 pg/mg tissue, respectively. NOMAC, at the concentration of 5x10(-5) M, inhibited this conversion by 49.2% and 40.8% in cancerous and normal breast tissues, respectively. The sulfatase inhibition at low concentration (5x10(-7) M) was 32.5% and 22.8%, respectively. It is concluded that sulfatase activity is almost twice as potent in cancerous breast tissues than in normal tissues. Nomegestrol acetate is a strong anti-sulfatase agent, in particular with cancerous breast

  9. Discrimination of Breast Cancer from Normal Tissue with Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.-B.; Wang, W.; Liu, Ch.-H.; Zhang, G.-J.

    2015-07-01

    Conventional Raman spectra of normal and cancerous breast tissues were acquired at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm and subjected to a discrimination analysis. First the spectra were pretreated with wavelet transform and polynomial fitting; next, cancerous tissue was identified by applying an adaptive local hyperplane K-nearest neighbor (ALHK) method to the pretreated spectra. The best discrimination accuracy of the ALHK method was 93.2%. In summary, normal and cancerous breast tissue were accurately distinguished by a miniature laser Raman spectrometer and the chemometrics method (ALHK), which might prove to be a portable and accessible diagnostic system.

  10. Combined thermal and elastic modeling of the normal and tumorous breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray

    2008-03-01

    The abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of a high risk of breast cancer, but an open question is how to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques generally did not utilize the breast geometry determined by the gravity-induced elastic deformations arising from various body postures. In this paper, a 3-D finite-element method is developed for combined modeling of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast, including the mechanical nonlinearity associated with large deformations. The effects of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast tissues are investigated quantitatively. For the normal breast in a standing/sitting up posture, the gravity-induced deformation alone is found to be able to cause an asymmetric temperature distribution even though all the thermal/elastic properties are symmetrical, and this temperature asymmetry increases for softer and more compressible breast tissues. For a tumorous breast, we found that the surface-temperature alterations generally can be recognizable for superficial tumors at depths less than 20 mm. Tumor size plays a less important role than the tumor depth in determining the tumor-induced temperature difference. This result may imply that a higher thermal sensitivity is critical for a breast thermogram system when deeper tumors are present, even if the tumor is relatively large. We expect this new method to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis and treatment of breast tumors.

  11. Expression of microRNA-370 in human breast cancer compare with normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Mollainezhad, Halimeh; Eskandari, Nahid; Pourazar, Abbasali; Salehi, Mansoor; Andalib, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of deaths from cancer in the woman. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that are known critical player in carcinogenesis. The role of miR-370 in malignancies remains controversial because of its levels varying in different cancers according to its targets while the role of miR-370 in breast cancer has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study was to identify the expression pattern of miR-370 in human breast cancer tissue compared to adjacent healthy tissue. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two fresh frozen tissues (normal and malignant) from patients with breast cancer were examined for miR-370 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method at 2013. Results: We observed up-regulation (six-fold higher) of miR-370 in breast cancer tissue compared with normal adjacent tissue. Tumor samples in stage III, invasive ductal type, larger tumor size, human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2+, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor−, P53 − status showed significantly increased expression in miR-370. Conclusion: Together, miR-370 may acts as an onco-miRNA, and it may have a novel role in breast cancer. Detection of miR-370 and its targets could be helpful as a diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27563639

  12. Telomerase expression in noncancerous bronchial epithelia is a possible marker of early development of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyazu, Yuka Matsuoka; Miyazawa, Teruomi; Hiyama, Keiko; Kurimoto, Noriaki; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Matsuura, Hiroo; Kanoh, Koji; Kohno, Nobuoki; Nishiyama, Masahiko; Hiyama, Eiso

    2005-11-01

    Centrally located lung cancers in smokers frequently associated with subsequent primary tumors. We evaluated the telomerase expression chronologically in noncancerous epithelia as a risk factor of susceptibility to lung cancer development. Telomerase protein expression was examined in situ by immunohistochemistry in 26 noncancerous bronchial epithelia adjacent to centrally located early-stage lung cancers in sequential 23 patients treated by photodynamic therapy or surgery among 206 patients who underwent autofluorescence bronchoscopy from 1997 to 2003. Among the 15 lesions in 12 patients treated by photodynamic therapy alone, 11 lesions achieved complete remission after photodynamic therapy, and none of their noncancerous bronchial epithelia was telomerase positive. On the contrary, in the remaining four lesions, either recurrence or secondary lung cancer developed adjacent to the successfully treated primary cancer within 26 months, and the telomerase protein expression in noncancerous epithelia was detected before the secondary cancer development (P < 0.001). The overall relationship of human telomerase reverse transcriptase positivity in noncancerous epithelia and subsequent lung cancer development, including patients treated by radiation or surgery, showed higher significance (P < 0.0001). Histologically "normal" bronchial epithelia in smokers may unphysiologically express telomerase as a field, and such epithelia are likely susceptible to develop lung cancer. We propose that ectopic expression of telomerase in bronchial epithelia may precede transformation in human lung cancer development and that detection of telomerase protein in noncancerous bronchial epithelia will become a useful marker detecting high-risk patients for lung cancer development. PMID:16266979

  13. Precancerous esophageal epithelia are associated with significantly increased scattering coefficients.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing-Wei; Lin, Yang-Hsien; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsieh, Chao-Mao; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Yang, Pei-Wen; Wang, Chen-Ping; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Lee, Yi-Chia; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2015-10-01

    The progression of epithelial precancers into cancer is accompanied by changes of tissue and cellular structures in the epithelium. Correlations between the structural changes and scattering coefficients of esophageal epithelia were investigated using quantitative phase images and the scattering-phase theorem. An ex vivo study of 14 patients demonstrated that the average scattering coefficient of precancerous epithelia was 37.8% higher than that of normal epithelia from the same patient. The scattering coefficients were highly correlated with morphological features including the cell density and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. A high interpatient variability in scattering coefficients was observed and suggests identifying precancerous lesions based on the relative change in scattering coefficients. PMID:26504630

  14. Precancerous esophageal epithelia are associated with significantly increased scattering coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jing-Wei; Lin, Yang-Hsien; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsieh, Chao-Mao; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Yang, Pei-Wen; Wang, Chen-Ping; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Lee, Yi-Chia; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The progression of epithelial precancers into cancer is accompanied by changes of tissue and cellular structures in the epithelium. Correlations between the structural changes and scattering coefficients of esophageal epithelia were investigated using quantitative phase images and the scattering-phase theorem. An ex vivo study of 14 patients demonstrated that the average scattering coefficient of precancerous epithelia was 37.8% higher than that of normal epithelia from the same patient. The scattering coefficients were highly correlated with morphological features including the cell density and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. A high interpatient variability in scattering coefficients was observed and suggests identifying precancerous lesions based on the relative change in scattering coefficients. PMID:26504630

  15. Methylation profiling of 48 candidate genes in tumor and matched normal tissues from breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zibo; Guo, Xinwu; Wu, Yepeng; Li, Shengyun; Yan, Jinhua; Peng, Limin; Xiao, Zhi; Wang, Shouman; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Yi, Wenjun; Xia, Kun; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Gene-specific methylation alterations in breast cancer have been suggested to occur early in tumorigenesis and have the potential to be used for early detection and prevention. The continuous increase in worldwide breast cancer incidences emphasizes the urgent need for identification of methylation biomarkers for early cancer detection and patient stratification. Using microfluidic PCR-based target enrichment and next-generation bisulfite sequencing technology, we analyzed methylation status of 48 candidate genes in paired tumor and normal tissues from 180 Chinese breast cancer patients. Analysis of the sequencing results showed 37 genes differentially methylated between tumor and matched normal tissues. Breast cancer samples with different clinicopathologic characteristics demonstrated distinct profiles of gene methylation. The methylation levels were significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, with basal-like and luminal B tumors having the lowest and the highest methylation levels, respectively. Six genes (ACADL, ADAMTSL1, CAV1, NPY, PTGS2, and RUNX3) showed significant differential methylation among the 4 breast cancer subtypes and also between the ER +/ER- tumors. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we identified a panel of 13 hypermethylated genes as candidate biomarkers that performed a high level of efficiency for cancer prediction. These 13 genes included CST6, DBC1, EGFR, GREM1, GSTP1, IGFBP3, PDGFRB, PPM1E, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WRN. Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer prediction and patient stratification. The novel gene panel might be a valuable biomarker for early detection of breast cancer. PMID:25636590

  16. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  17. β class II tubulin predominates in normal and tumor breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, James H; Hiser, Laree; Davis, Jennifer A; Thomas, Nancy Stubbs; Tucci, Michelle A; Benghuzzi, Hamed A; Frankfurter, Anthony; Correia, John J; Lobert, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    Background Antimitotic chemotherapeutic agents target tubulin, the major protein in mitotic spindles. Tubulin isotype composition is thought to be both diagnostic of tumor progression and a determinant of the cellular response to chemotherapy. This implies that there is a difference in isotype composition between normal and tumor tissues. Methods To determine whether such a difference occurs in breast tissues, total tubulin was fractionated from lysates of paired normal and tumor breast tissues, and the amounts of β-tubulin classes I + IV, II, and III were measured by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only primary tumor tissues, before chemotherapy, were examined. Her2/neu protein amplification occurs in about 30% of breast tumors and is considered a marker for poor prognosis. To gain insight into whether tubulin isotype levels might be correlated with prognosis, ELISAs were used to quantify Her2/neu protein levels in these tissues. Results β-Tubulin isotype distributions in normal and tumor breast tissues were similar. The most abundant β-tubulin isotypes in these tissues were β-tubulin classes II and I + IV. Her2/neu levels in tumor tissues were 5–30-fold those in normal tissues, although there was no correlation between the Her2/neu biomarker and tubulin isotype levels. Conclusion These results suggest that tubulin isotype levels, alone or in combination with Her2/neu protein levels, might not be diagnostic of tumorigenesis in breast cancer. However, the presence of a broad distribution of these tubulin isotypes (for example, 40–75% β-tubulin class II) in breast tissue, in conjunction with other factors, might still be relevant to disease progression and cellular response to antimitotic drugs. PMID:12927047

  18. PKCλ/ι signaling—a common node for normal cellular development and breast oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arindam; Paul, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that PKCλ/ι signaling is an important contributor to breast cancer development. Strikingly, PKCλ/ι signaling is also important to balance self-renewal versus differentiation in pluripotent stem cells and is essential for embryonic development. This commentary highlights some key functions of PKCλ/ι signaling that are integral to both normal development and cancer progression. PMID:27308429

  19. Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-26

    The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

  20. Chromogranin-reactive endocrine cells in argyrophilic carcinomas ("carcinoids") and normal tissue of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, G.; Gugliotta, P.; Sapino, A.; Eusebi, V.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Breast carcinomas, either positive or negative with the Grimelius' silver procedure, benign fibroadenomas, duct papillomas, and areas of histologically normal breast tissue were tested immunocytochemically with the mouse monoclonal antibody LK2H10 directed against human chromogranin. This is regarded as a general stain for polypeptide-hormone-producing cells and tumors. In 3 of the 9 cases of argyrophilic carcinoma, but in none of 12 ductal infiltrating carcinomas, chromogranin-positive cells were found: the number of reactive cells was very low in 1 case, while in the other 2 carcinomas about 50% of the argyrophilic cells appeared stained. In areas of histologically normal breast tissue, rare argyrophilic chromogranin-positive cells were detected. This study is the first reported evidence concerning the presence of endocrinelike cells probably belonging to the diffuse neuroendocrine system in the normal mammary parenchyma. Our data are consistent with the endocrine nature of at least some of the breast argyrophilic carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 3 and 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:4025508

  1. Breast Cancer Heterogeneity Examined by High-Sensitivity Quantification of PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, and BRAF Mutations in Normal Breast and Ductal Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Myers, Meagan B; Banda, Malathi; McKim, Karen L; Wang, Yiying; Powell, Michael J; Parsons, Barbara L

    2016-04-01

    Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to derail durable patient responses to molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics, yet the prevalence and size of such subpopulations are largely unexplored. We employed the sensitive and quantitative Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR approach to characterize mutant cancer subpopulations in ductal carcinomas (DCs), examining five specific hotspot point mutations (PIK3CA H1047R, KRAS G12D, KRAS G12V, HRAS G12D, and BRAF V600E). As an approach to aid interpretation of the DC results, the mutations were also quantified in normal breast tissue. Overall, the mutations were prevalent in normal breast and DCs, with 9/9 DCs having measureable levels of at least three of the five mutations. HRAS G12D was significantly increased in DCs as compared to normal breast. The most frequent point mutation reported in DC by DNA sequencing, PIK3CA H1047R, was detected in all normal breast tissue and DC samples and was present at remarkably high levels (mutant fractions of 1.1 × 10(-3) to 4.6 × 10(-2)) in 4/10 normal breast samples. In normal breast tissue samples, PIK3CA mutation levels were positively correlated with age. However, the PIK3CA H1047R mutant fraction distributions for normal breast tissues and DCs were similar. The results suggest PIK3CA H1047R mutant cells have a selective advantage in breast, contribute to breast cancer susceptibility, and drive tumor progression during breast carcinogenesis, even when present as only a subpopulation of tumor cells. PMID:27108388

  2. Breast Cancer Heterogeneity Examined by High-Sensitivity Quantification of PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, and BRAF Mutations in Normal Breast and Ductal Carcinomas12

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Meagan B.; Banda, Malathi; McKim, Karen L.; Wang, Yiying; Powell, Michael J.; Parsons, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to derail durable patient responses to molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics, yet the prevalence and size of such subpopulations are largely unexplored. We employed the sensitive and quantitative Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR approach to characterize mutant cancer subpopulations in ductal carcinomas (DCs), examining five specific hotspot point mutations (PIK3CA H1047R, KRAS G12D, KRAS G12V, HRAS G12D, and BRAF V600E). As an approach to aid interpretation of the DC results, the mutations were also quantified in normal breast tissue. Overall, the mutations were prevalent in normal breast and DCs, with 9/9 DCs having measureable levels of at least three of the five mutations. HRAS G12D was significantly increased in DCs as compared to normal breast. The most frequent point mutation reported in DC by DNA sequencing, PIK3CA H1047R, was detected in all normal breast tissue and DC samples and was present at remarkably high levels (mutant fractions of 1.1 × 10− 3 to 4.6 × 10− 2) in 4/10 normal breast samples. In normal breast tissue samples, PIK3CA mutation levels were positively correlated with age. However, the PIK3CA H1047R mutant fraction distributions for normal breast tissues and DCs were similar. The results suggest PIK3CA H1047R mutant cells have a selective advantage in breast, contribute to breast cancer susceptibility, and drive tumor progression during breast carcinogenesis, even when present as only a subpopulation of tumor cells. PMID:27108388

  3. In vivo quantitative imaging of normal and cancerous breast tissue using broadband diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Li, Zhongze; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M.; Barth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A NIR tomography system that combines frequency domain (FD) and continuous wave (CW) measurements was used to image normal and malignant breast tissues. Methods: FD acquisitions were confined to wavelengths less than 850 nm because of detector limitations, whereas light from longer wavelengths (up to 948 nm) was measured in CW mode with CCD-coupled spectrometer detection. The two data sets were combined and processed in a single spectrally constrained reconstruction to map concentrations of hemoglobin, water, and lipid, as well as scattering parameters in the breast. Results: Chromophore concentrations were imaged in the breasts of nine asymptomatic volunteers to evaluate their intrasubject and intersubject variability. Normal subject data showed physiologically expected trends. Images from three cancer patients indicate that the added CW data is critical to recovering the expected increases in water and decreases in lipid content within malignancies. Contrasts of 1.5 to twofold in hemoglobin and water values were found in cancers. Conclusions:In vivo breast imaging with instrumentation that combines FD and CW NIR data acquisition in a single spectral reconstruction produces more accurate hemoglobin, water, and lipid results relative to FD data alone. PMID:20831079

  4. Ex vivo discrimination between normal and pathological tissues in human breast surgical biopsies using bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, N; Hamzaoui, L; Rochaix, P; Rigaud, B; Voigt, J J; Morucci, J P

    1999-04-20

    Ex vivo bioimpedance data measured on normal and cancerous female breast tissues are reported. They clearly show that the electrical properties of normal tissues, surrounding tissues, and carcinoma are different. These differences lie in the conductivity, in the characteristic frequency (frequency of the maximum of the imaginary part of the bioimpedance), and also in the shape of the Bode plots. Modeling using an R-S-Zcpe model is reported as well as indexes extracted from the real and imaginary parts of the bioimpedance. Even if a classification of the different types of tissues remains a difficult task and leads to much less precise diagnosis than microscopic examination, the electrical behavior of mammary tissue could be used to develop a noninvasive technique for early breast cancer detection. PMID:10372148

  5. Highly homologous hS100A15 and hS100A7 proteins are distinctly expressed in normal breast tissue and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald; Voscopoulos, Christopher; Winston, Jason; Dharamsi, Alif; Goldsmith, Paul; Gunsior, Michele; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Olson, Melanie; Watson, Peter H.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2009-01-01

    Human S100A7 (psoriasin) is considered a marker for specific stages of breast cancer. hS100A15 is almost identical to hS100A7 and difficult to discriminate. We developed specific probes to distinguish hS100A7 and hS100A15, and demonstrate their differential distribution in normal breast tissue. Further, hS100A7 and S100A15 transcripts are elevated in ER/PR negative breast cancers, but hS100A15 protein is detected in all cancer specimens while hS100A7 protein is sporadically expressed. The differential regulation, expression and distribution of hS100A7 and hS100A15 and their reported distinct functions are compelling reasons to discriminate among these proteins in normal breast and breast cancers. PMID:19136201

  6. Mammary fibroblasts regulate morphogenesis of normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells by mechanical and paracrine signals

    PubMed Central

    Lühr, Inke; Friedl, Andreas; Overath, Thorsten; Tholey, Andreas; Kunze, Thomas; Hilpert, Felix; Sebens, Susanne; Arnold, Norbert; Rösel, Frank; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Maass, Nicolai; Mundhenke, Christoph; Jonat, Walter; Bauer, Maret

    2013-01-01

    Stromal factors play a critical role in the development of the mammary gland. Using a three dimensional-coculture model we demonstrate a significant role for stromal fibroblasts in the regulation of normal mammary epithelial morphogenesis and the control of tumor growth. Both soluble factors secreted by fibroblasts and fibroblast-derived modifications of the matrix compliance contribute to the regulation of epithelial cell morphogenesis. Readjustment of matrix tension by fibroblasts can even induce a phenotypic reversion of breast carcinoma cells. These data offer a basis to develop new strategies for the normalization of the tumor stroma as an innovative target in cancer therapy. PMID:22776560

  7. Ultrasonic differentiation of normal versus malignant breast epithelial cells in monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Timothy E; Goodrich, Jeffrey B; Ambrose, Brady J; Patel, Hemang; Kwon, Soonjo; Pearson, Lee H

    2010-11-01

    Normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells were studied using laboratory measurements, wavelet analysis, and numerical simulations of monolayer cell cultures to determine whether microscopic breast cancer can be detected in vitro with high-frequency ultrasound. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired by immersing a broadband, unfocused 50-MHz transducer in the growth media of cell culture well plates and collecting the first reflection from the well bottoms. The simulations included a multilayer pulse-reflection model and a model of two-dimensional arrays of spherical cells and nuclei. The results show that normal and malignant cells produce time-domain signals and spectral features that are significantly different. PMID:21110531

  8. Comparison of hematologic and serologic profiles of broiler birds with normal and severe degrees of white striping in breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    “White Striping” (WS) is the abnormal white striation seen parallel to the direction of muscle fibers in broiler breast fillets and thighs with variable frequency at processing. Broiler breast fillets can be categorized as normal (NORM), moderate (MOD) and severe (SEV) based on thedegree of WS. Hist...

  9. Photoacoustic spectroscopy based investigatory approach to discriminate breast cancer from normal: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Chandra, Subhash; Ray, Satadru; Mathew, Stanley; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-02-01

    In spite of many efforts for early detection of breast cancer, there is still lack of technology for immediate implementation. In the present study, the potential photoacoustic spectroscopy was evaluated in discriminating breast cancer from normal, involving blood serum samples seeking early detection. Three photoacoustic spectra in time domain were recorded from each of 20 normal and 20 malignant samples at 281nm pulsed laser excitations and a total of 120 spectra were generated. The time domain spectra were then Fast Fourier Transformed into frequency domain and 116.5625 - 206.875 kHz region was selected for further analysis using a combinational approach of wavelet, PCA and logistic regression. Initially, wavelet analysis was performed on the FFT data and seven features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each were extracted. PCA was then performed on the feature matrix (7x120) for discriminating malignant samples from the normal by plotting a decision boundary using logistic regression analysis. The unsupervised mode of classification used in the present study yielded specificity and sensitivity values of 100% in each respectively with a ROC - AUC value of 1. The results obtained have clearly demonstrated the capability of photoacoustic spectroscopy in discriminating cancer from the normal, suggesting its possible clinical implications.

  10. miRNA expression patterns in normal breast tissue and invasive breast cancers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Shoko; Vesuna, Farhad; Raman, Venu; van Diest, Paul J.; van der Groep, Petra

    2015-01-01

    miRNA deregulation has been found to promote carcinogenesis. Little is known about miRNA deregulation in hereditary breast tumors as no miRNA expression profiling studies have been performed in normal breast tissue of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. miRNA profiles of 17 BRCA1- and 9 BRCA2-associated breast carcinomas were analyzed using microarrays. Normal breast tissues from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (both n = 5) and non-mutation carriers (n = 10) were also included. Candidate miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Breast carcinomas showed extensive miRNA alteration compared to normal breast tissues in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Moreover, normal breast tissue from BRCA1 mutation carriers already showed miRNA alterations compared to non-mutation carriers. Chromosomal distribution analysis showed several hotspots containing down- or up-regulated miRNAs. Pathway analysis yielded many similarities between the BRCA1 and BRCA2 axes with miRNAs involved in cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. Lesser known pathways were also affected, including cellular movement and protein trafficking. This study provides a comprehensive insight into the potential role of miRNA deregulation in BRCA1/2-associated breast carcinogenesis. The observed extensive miRNA deregulation is likely the result of genome-wide effects of chromosomal instability caused by impaired BRCA1 or BRCA2 function. This study's results also suggest the existence of common pathways driving breast carcinogenesis in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutation carriers. PMID:26378051

  11. Influence of menstrual cycle, parity and oral contraceptive use on steroid hormone receptors in normal breast.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, S.; Robertson, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.; King, R. J.; McPherson, K.

    1992-01-01

    Steroid receptor was assessed immunohistochemically in 158 samples of normal breast for variation through the menstrual cycle. Patterns and intensity of reaction were used in a semi-quantitative scoring system to examine the influence of cycle phase, cycle type, parity and age. The changes in oestrogen receptor for natural cycle and oral contraceptive (OC) cycles indicated down-regulation by progestins. Progesterone receptor did not vary significantly in natural cycles, but increased steadily through OC cycles. This study provides strong evidence that both oestrogen and progesterone influence breast epithelium, but dissimilarities from the endometrium are apparent. The interval since pregnancy had a significant negative effect on frequency and score of oestrogen receptor and score of progesterone receptor. Multivariate analysis established the phase of cycle and OC use as independent significant influences on oestrogen receptor. The interval since pregnancy was an independent significant factor for both oestrogen and progesterone receptor presence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1562470

  12. Validation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging for normal and neoplastic breast tissues via surgical pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. E.; Albanese, K. E.; Lakshmanan, M. N.; McCall, S. J.; Greenberg, J. A.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    This study intends to validate the sensitivity and specificity of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging (CACSSI) by comparison to standard histological preparation and pathologic analysis methods used to differentiate normal and neoplastic breast tissues. A composite overlay of the CACSSI rendered image and pathologist interpreted stained sections validate the ability of CACSSI to differentiate normal and neoplastic breast structures ex-vivo. Via comparison to pathologist annotated slides, the CACSSI system may be further optimized to maximize sensitivity and specificity for differentiation of breast carcinomas.

  13. Optical properties of normal and diseased breast tissues: prognosis for optical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, Tamara L.; Page, David L.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    1996-07-01

    The use of near-infrared measurements of photon migration has been recently demonstrated for the detection of breast cancer in Europe. Yet the clinical success of this potential screening tool depends upon consistent detection of the disease at earlier stages than is currently possible with conventional x-ray mammography. In this paper, we present the optical property measurements of 115 histologically classified breast tissue specimens in order to determine whether consistent and significant optical contrast exists for detection of the disease. Our in vitro optical properties measured with a double integrating sphere technique show consistent changes in effective scattering coefficients, (mu) s', with tissue classification of infiltrating carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ, mucinous carcinoma, normal fatty, and normal fibrous tissues. However, there is little change in the in vitro tissue absorption coefficient, (mu) a, measured at 749, 789, and 836 nm. For normal and diseased tissue specimens extracted from the same patient, we found differences in optical properties, indicating optical contrast. Using a finite- element prediction of light propagation, we evaluated this optical contrast for photon migration detection of ductal carcinoma in situ tissues using these optical properties measured in vitro.

  14. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  15. CDDO-Me Protects Normal Lung and Breast Epithelial Cells but Not Cancer Cells from Radiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients. PMID:25536195

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 determines the differential response of breast cancer and normal cells to piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha-Na; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, BoRa; Kim, Wonki; Hong, Sung-Eun; Lee, Yun-Han; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Surh, Young-Joon; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-04-01

    Piperlongumine, a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, selectively increases reactive oxygen species production and apoptotic cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying piperlongumine-induced selective killing of cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we observed that human breast cancer MCF-7 cells are sensitive to piperlongumine-induced apoptosis relative to human MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Interestingly, this opposing effect of piperlongumine appears to be mediated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Piperlongumine upregulated HO-1 expression through the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling in both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. However, knockdown of HO-1 expression and pharmacological inhibition of its activity abolished the ability of piperlongumine to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, whereas those promoted apoptosis in MCF-10A cells, indicating that HO-1 has anti-tumor functions in cancer cells but cytoprotective functions in normal cells. Moreover, it was found that piperlongumine-induced Nrf2 activation, HO-1 expression and cancer cell apoptosis are not dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Instead, piperlongumine, which bears electrophilic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups, appears to inactivate Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1) through thiol modification, thereby activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and subsequently upregulating HO-1 expression, which accounts for piperlongumine-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that direct interaction of piperlongumine with Keap1 leads to the upregulation of Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression, and HO-1 determines the differential response of breast normal cells and cancer cells to piperlongumine. PMID:25813625

  17. Heme Oxygenase-1 Determines the Differential Response of Breast Cancer and Normal Cells to Piperlongumine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha-Na; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, BoRa; Kim, Wonki; Hong, Sung-Eun; Lee, Yun-Han; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Surh, Young-Joon; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Piperlongumine, a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, selectively increases reactive oxygen species production and apoptotic cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying piperlongumine-induced selective killing of cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we observed that human breast cancer MCF-7 cells are sensitive to piperlongumine-induced apoptosis relative to human MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Interestingly, this opposing effect of piperlongumine appears to be mediated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Piperlongumine upregulated HO-1 expression through the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling in both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. However, knockdown of HO-1 expression and pharmacological inhibition of its activity abolished the ability of piperlongumine to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, whereas those promoted apoptosis in MCF-10A cells, indicating that HO-1 has anti-tumor functions in cancer cells but cytoprotective functions in normal cells. Moreover, it was found that piperlongumine-induced Nrf2 activation, HO-1 expression and cancer cell apoptosis are not dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Instead, piperlongumine, which bears electrophilic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups, appears to inactivate Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1) through thiol modification, thereby activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and subsequently upregulating HO-1 expression, which accounts for piperlongumine-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that direct interaction of piperlongumine with Keap1 leads to the upregulation of Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression, and HO-1 determines the differential response of breast normal cells and cancer cells to piperlongumine. PMID:25813625

  18. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  19. Breast Cancer Stem Cells Transition between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Reflective of their Normal Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Cong, Yang; Wang, Dong; Sun, Yu; Deng, Lu; Liu, Yajing; Martin-Trevino, Rachel; Shang, Li; McDermott, Sean P.; Landis, Melissa D.; Hong, Suhyung; Adams, April; D’Angelo, Rosemarie; Ginestier, Christophe; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Birnbaum, Daniel; Wong, Stephen T.; Zhan, Ming; Chang, Jenny C.; Wicha, Max S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) mediate metastasis, are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and contribute to relapse. Although several BCSC markers have been described, it is unclear whether these markers identify the same or independent BCSCs. Here, we show that BCSCs exist in distinct mesenchymal-like (epithelial-mesenchymal transition [EMT]) and epithelial-like (mesenchymal-epithelial transition [MET]) states. Mesenchymal-like BCSCs characterized as CD24−CD44+ are primarily quiescent and localized at the tumor invasive front, whereas epithelial-like BCSCs express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are proliferative, and are located more centrally. The gene-expression profiles of mesenchymal-like and epithelial-like BCSCs are remarkably similar across different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, and resemble those of distinct basal and luminal stem cells found in the normal breast. We propose that the plasticity of BCSCs that allows them to transition between EMT- and MET-like states endows these cells with the capacity for tissue invasion, dissemination, and growth at metastatic sites. PMID:24511467

  20. Telomere length variation in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor: potential biomarker for breast cancer local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Meeker, Alan K.; Makambi, Kepher H.; Kosti, Ourania; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.S.; Sidawy, Mary K.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Zheng, Yun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the risk of local recurrence (LR) will facilitate therapeutic decision making in the management of early breast cancers. In the present study, we investigated whether telomere length in the normal breast epithelial cells surrounding the tumor is predictive of breast cancer LR; 152 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center were included in this nested case–control study. Cases (patients had LR) and controls (patients had no LR) were matched on year of surgery, age at diagnosis and type of surgery. Telomere fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to determine the telomere length using formalin fixed paraffin-embedded breast tissues. Small telomere length variation (TLV), defined as the coefficient variation of telomere lengths among examined cells, in normal epithelial cells adjacent to the tumor was significantly associated with a 5-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.2–22.2) increased risk of breast cancer LR. When the subjects were categorized into quartiles, a significant inverse dose–response relationship was observed with lowest versus highest quartile odds ratio of 15.3 (Ptrend = 0.012). Patients who had large TLV had significantly better 10 year recurrence free survival rate compared with patients who had small TLV (80 versus 33%). The present study revealed that TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor is a strong predictor of breast cancer LR. If confirmed by future studies, TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor has the potential to become a promising biomarker for predicting breast cancer LR after breast conserving surgery. PMID:22072619

  1. Theoretical versus Ex Vivo Assessment of Radiation Damage Repair: An Investigation in Normal Breast Tissue.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Martin A; Dhal, Bipina; Prunster, Janelle; McLaren, Sally; Zeps, Nikolajs; House, Michael; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; Corica, Tammy; Saunders, Christobel; Joseph, David J

    2016-04-01

    In vivo validation of models of DNA damage repair will enable their use for optimizing clinical radiotherapy. In this study, a theoretical assessment was made of DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction in normal breast tissue after intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), which is now an accepted form of adjuvant radiotherapy for selected patients with early breast cancer. DSB rates and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were calculated as a function of dose, radiation quality and dose rate, each varying based on the applicator size used during IORT. The spectra of primary electrons in breast tissue adjacent to each applicator were calculated using measured X-ray spectra and Monte Carlo methods, and were used to inform a Monte Carlo damage simulation code. In the absence of repair, asymptotic RBE values (relative to (60)Co) were approximately 1.5. Beam-quality changes led to only minor variations in RBE among applicators, though differences in dose rate and overall dose delivery time led to larger variations and a rapid decrease in RBE. An experimental assessment of DSB induction was performed ex vivo using pre- and postirradiation tissue samples from patients receiving breast intraoperative radiation therapy. Relative DSB rates were assessed via γ-H2AX immunohistochemistry using proportional staining. Maximum-likelihood parameter estimation yielded a DSB repair halftime of 25.9 min (95% CI, 21.5-30.4 min), although the resulting model was not statistically distinguishable from one where there was no change in DSB yield among patients. Although the model yielded an in vivo repair halftime of the order of previous estimates for in vitro repair halftimes, we cannot conclude that it is valid in this context. This study highlights some of the uncertainties inherent in population analysis of ex vivo samples, and of the quantitative limitations of immunohistochemistry for assessment of DSB repair. PMID:27023258

  2. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  3. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers.

  4. Ultrastructural observations on the basal lamina in the normal human breast.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, R J; Eyden, B P; Howell, A; Sellwood, R A

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the basal lamina of histologically normal human breast tissue was determined in 19 women undergoing operations for removal of a fibroadenoma or reduction mammoplasty. The day of the menstrual cycle was determined by hormone assay and direct questioning. Previously documented ultrastructural appearances were confirmed: in addition, three morphological variants were found. In all tissue examined, there was reduplication of basal lamina in some areas, which has been described previously as a pathological feature. Also, there was complex branching of the basal lamina into the periductular connective tissue. Some projections contained cytoplasmic processes and, in almost all, hemidesmosomes were seen. The third variant consisted of loops of basal lamina thrown up in folds into the collagenous stromal cuff. Reduplication of basal lamina was detected in breast tissue removed at all stages of the menstrual cycle, looping was not and could not be related to any particular phase of the menstrual cycle. However, complex branching was seen predominantly in the periovulatory and early luteal phase. We conclude that these appearances are normal variants of basal lamina. The appearance of branching basal lamina in the luteal phase suggests that this may be produced in response to endocrine stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3417540

  5. Measurement of pressure-displacement kinetics of hemoglobin in normal breast tissue with near-infrared spectral imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Laughney, Ashley M.; Kogel, Christine A.; Paulsen, Keith D

    2009-04-01

    Applying localized external displacement to the breast surface can change the interstitial fluid pressure such that regional transient microvascular changes occur in oxygenation and vascular volume. Imaging these dynamic responses over time, while different pressures are applied, could provide selective temporal contrast for cancer relative to the surrounding normal breast. In order to investigate this possibility in normal breast tissue, a near-infrared spectral tomography system was developed that can simultaneously acquire data at three wavelengths with a 15 s time resolution per scan. The system was tested first with heterogeneous blood phantoms. Changes in regional blood concentrations were found to be linearly related to recovered mean hemoglobin concentration (HbT) values (R{sup 2}=0.9). In a series of volunteer breast imaging exams, data from 17 asymptomatic subjects were acquired under increasing and decreasing breast compression. Calculations show that a 10 mm displacement applied to the breast results in surface pressures in the range of 0-55 kPa depending on breast density. The recovered human data indicate that HbT was reduced under compression and the normalized change was significantly correlated to the applied pressure with a p value of 0.005. The maximum HbT decreases in breast tissue were associated with body mass index (BMI), which is a surrogate indicator of breast density. No statistically valid correlations were found between the applied pressure and the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) or water percentage (H2O) across the range of BMI values studied.

  6. Functional Roles of Bestrophins in Ocular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Cross, Harold E.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2009-01-01

    There are four members of the bestrophin family of proteins in the human genome, of which two are known to be expressed in the eye. The gene BEST1 (formerly VMD2) which encodes the protein bestrophin-1 (Best1) was first identified in 1998. Mutations in this gene have now been associated with four clinically distinguishable human eye diseases, collectively referred to as “bestrophinopathies”. Over the last decade, laboratories have sought to understand how Best1 mutations could result in eye diseases that range in presentation from macular degeneration to nanophthalmos. The majority of our knowledge comes from studies that have sought to understand how Best1 mutations or dysfunction could induce the classical symptoms of the most common of these diseases: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD). BVMD is a dominant trait that is characterized electrophysiologically by a diminished electrooculogram light peak with a normal clinical electroretinogram. This together with the localization of Best1 to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) basolateral plasma membrane and data from heterologous expression studies, have led to the proposal that Best1 generates the light peak, and that bestrophins are a family of Ca2+ activated Cl- channels (CaCCs). However, data from Best1 knock-out and knock-in mice, coupled with the recent discovery of a recessive bestrophinopathy suggest that Best1 does not generate the light peak. Recently Best2 was found to be expressed in non-pigmented epithelia in the ciliary body. However, aqueous dynamics in Best2 knock-out mice do not support a role for Best2 as a Cl- channel. Thus, the purported CaCC function of the bestrophins and how loss of this function relates to clinical disease needs to be reassessed. In this article, we examine data obtained from tissue-type and animal models and discuss the current state of bestrophin research, what roles Best1 and Best2 may play in ocular epithelia and ocular electrophysiology, and how perturbation

  7. Basolateral chloride current in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Itani, Omar A; Lamb, Fred S; Melvin, James E; Welsh, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Electrolyte transport by airway epithelia regulates the quantity and composition of liquid covering the airways. Previous data indicate that airway epithelia can absorb NaCl. At the apical membrane, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) provides a pathway for Cl(-) absorption. However, the pathways for basolateral Cl(-) exit are not well understood. Earlier studies, predominantly in cell lines, have reported that the basolateral membrane contains a Cl(-) conductance. However, the properties have varied substantially in different epithelia. To better understand the basolateral Cl(-) conductance in airway epithelia, we studied primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia. The basolateral membrane contained a Cl(-) current that was inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). The current-voltage relationship was nearly linear, and the halide selectivity was Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-). Several signaling pathways increased the current, including elevation of cellular levels of cAMP, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and reduction of pH. In contrast, increasing cell Ca(2+) and inducing cell swelling had no effect. The basolateral Cl(-) current was present in both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF airway epithelia. Likewise, airway epithelia from wild-type mice and mice with disrupted genes for ClC-2 or ClC-3 all showed similar Cl(-) currents. These data suggest that the basolateral membrane of airway epithelia possesses a Cl(-) conductance that is not due to CFTR, ClC-2, or ClC-3. Its regulation by cAMP and PKC signaling pathways suggests that coordinated regulation of Cl(-) conductance in both apical and basolateral membranes may be important in controlling transepithelial Cl(-) movement. PMID:17660331

  8. Identification and behavior of label-retaining cells in epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Bickenbach, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    A subpopulation of stem cells has been demonstrated in several renewing tissues. Such cells have a slow cell cycle and provide differentiating cells during normal turnover and during regeneration of the tissue following damage. The presence of slowly-cycling cells in epithelia from regions of skin and oral mucosa was examined by labeling 10-day-old mice and 5-day-old hamsters with tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) and observing the rate at which label was diluted from the basal cells. Label was rapidly diluted by cell division in most cells but a small percentage of basal cells (label-retaining cells, LRCS) was found to retain label for up to ninety days. Electron microscopic autoradiography and ..beta..-glucuronidase histochemistry with autoradiography were used to distinguish slowly-cycling keratinocytes from Langerhans cells. Such findings of slowly-cycling keratinocytes in epithelia with the ability to proliferate in culture and with a direct relationship to patterns of tissue architecture suggest that LRCs in epithelia correspond to stem cells described in other continuously renewing tissues.

  9. Processes involved in the repair of injured airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered many aspects of the repair processes that follow airway epithelial injury. Although the repair process has common elements among various epithelia, such as the ones lining the airways, skin, and gut, there are differences based on their diverse functions. Whenever possible, similarities are pointed out that could help researchers further investigate their application to airway epithelia, although it would be beyond the scope of this review to cover the processes that may occur during the repair of all types of epithelia. In general, five major steps are involved in the recovery of airway epithelia from injury: 1) epithelial cells migrate to cover denuded areas within minutes, and certain proteins, such as the trefoil factor family proteins, are crucial to this process; 2) epithelial cells start to proliferate in order to replace injured cells and to differentiate to establish squamous or mucous cell metaplasia; 3) because more epithelial cells are present after proliferation, some of the cells must be discarded to restore the epithelium to the original condition; 4) once the cell numbers have been reduced to those found in unexposed individuals, the normal proportions of cell types are restored; 5) finally, studies from exposures of rats to ozone show that epithelial cells can adapt and develop a memory of the chronic exposure to which they were exposed. This adaptation allows the epithelium to respond quickly, thus minimizing further injury. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in these major steps of the recovery process are largely unknown, disruption of these steps clearly causes the permanent changes observed in diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and cancer; therefore, extensive research of these mechanisms may provide ideas for novel therapies. PMID:14626427

  10. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to ciliated airway epithelia requires prolonged incubation time.

    PubMed Central

    Zabner, J; Zeiher, B G; Friedman, E; Welsh, M J

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia will be an important factor in determining whether recombinant adenoviruses can be developed as vectors for transferring cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA to patients with cystic fibrosis. Current understanding of the biology of CF lung disease suggests that vectors should express transgene in mature, ciliated airway epithelia. We evaluated the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to primary cultures of normal and CF human airway epithelia. Our studies showed that the airway cells developed from an undifferentiated epithelium with markers characteristic of basal cells and a surface covered by short microvilli 3 days after seeding to a mature epithelium whose apical surface was covered with cilia by 10 to 14 days. The ability of adenovirus vectors to express a reporter gene and to correct defective cyclic AMP-stimulated Cl- transport in CF epithelia was correlated inversely with the state of differentiation. However, the inefficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer could be partially corrected when the contact time between vector and epithelium was prolonged. After prolonged contact, we observed complete correction of the CF Cl- transport defect in differentiated CF airway epithelia in culture and of the Cl- transport defect in the nasal epithelia of mice homozygous for the deltaF508 mutation. The fact that gene transfer to airway epithelia required prolonged incubation with vector contrasts with the rapid infection observed in cell models such as 293 and HeLa cells, which are commonly used to study adenovirus infection. Gene transfer observed after prolonged incubation may result from mechanisms different from those that mediate infection of 293 cells. These observations suggest that interventions that either increase the contact time or alter the epithelium or the vector may be required to facilitate gene transfer to ciliated respiratory epithelia

  11. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K. Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M.; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1–14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer. PMID:26430163

  12. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Lars A; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P

    2015-10-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1-14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer. PMID:26430163

  13. Comparative Study of Breast Normal and Cancer Cells Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microspectroscopy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Cho, Eun Hee; Shin, Sang-Mo; Oh, Myoung-kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2012-08-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy imaging system was developed using a femtosecond laser and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We separated resonant and non-resonant CARS signals in the time domain by the chirp of the PCF, and applied this system to compare live human breast normal and cancer cells. The CARS image and spectrum at C-H stretch vibration in lipid droplets could subsequently be used to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells, thereby confirming the potential of the CARS microspectroscopy imaging system as a diagnostic tool that allows the high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and fast detection of breast cancer.

  14. Pluripotency Genes and Their Functions in the Normal and Aberrant Breast and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Tracy; Twigger, Alecia-Jane; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) attracted considerable interest with the successful isolation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the inner cell mass of murine, primate and human embryos. Whilst it was initially thought that the only PSCs were ESCs, in more recent years cells with similar properties have been isolated from organs of the adult, including the breast and brain. Adult PSCs in these organs have been suggested to be remnants of embryonic development that facilitate normal tissue homeostasis during repair and regeneration. They share certain characteristics with ESCs, such as an inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells of the three germ layers, properties that are regulated by master pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4), SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), and homeobox protein NANOG. Aberrant expression of these TFs can be oncogenic resulting in heterogeneous tumours fueled by cancer stem cells (CSC), which are resistant to conventional treatments and are associated with tumour recurrence post-treatment. Further to enriching our understanding of the role of pluripotency TFs in normal tissue function, research now aims to develop optimized isolation and propagation methods for normal adult PSCs and CSCs for the purposes of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and disease modeling aimed at targeted personalised cancer therapies. PMID:26580604

  15. Pluripotency Genes and Their Functions in the Normal and Aberrant Breast and Brain.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Tracy; Twigger, Alecia-Jane; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) attracted considerable interest with the successful isolation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the inner cell mass of murine, primate and human embryos. Whilst it was initially thought that the only PSCs were ESCs, in more recent years cells with similar properties have been isolated from organs of the adult, including the breast and brain. Adult PSCs in these organs have been suggested to be remnants of embryonic development that facilitate normal tissue homeostasis during repair and regeneration. They share certain characteristics with ESCs, such as an inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells of the three germ layers, properties that are regulated by master pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4), SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), and homeobox protein NANOG. Aberrant expression of these TFs can be oncogenic resulting in heterogeneous tumours fueled by cancer stem cells (CSC), which are resistant to conventional treatments and are associated with tumour recurrence post-treatment. Further to enriching our understanding of the role of pluripotency TFs in normal tissue function, research now aims to develop optimized isolation and propagation methods for normal adult PSCs and CSCs for the purposes of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and disease modeling aimed at targeted personalised cancer therapies. PMID:26580604

  16. Discovery and verification of protein differences between Er positive/Her2/neu negative breast tumor tissue and matched adjacent normal breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Lindsay-Rae B; Byers, Tim; Allen, Jenna; Finlayson, Christina; Helmke, Steve M; Hokanson, John E; Hunsucker, Stephen W; Murphy, James R; Newell, Keri; Queensland, Kelly M; Singh, Meenakshi; Wischmeyer, Paul E; Duncan, Mark W; Elias, Anthony

    2010-11-01

    This study was designed to quantify and identify differences in protein levels between tumor and adjacent normal breast tissue from the same breast in 18 women with stage I/II ER positive/Her2/neu negative invasive breast cancer. Eighteen separate difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) gels were run (1 gel per patient). Relative quantification was based on DIGE analysis. After excision and tryptic digestion, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass mapping were used to identify protein spots. Two hundred and forty-three spots were differentially abundant between normal and cancer tissues. Fifty spots were identified: 41 were over abundant and nine were less abundant in cancers than in normal breast tissue. Western blotting provided independent confirmation for three of the most biologically and statistically interesting proteins. All 18 gels were replicated by another technician and 32% of the differentially abundant proteins were verified by the duplicate analysis. Follow-up studies are now examining these proteins as biomarkers in blood. PMID:20087651

  17. Loss of TGFβ Signaling Destabilizes Homeostasis and Promotes Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Stratified Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Géraldine; Schober, Markus; Pasolli, H. Amalia; Conn, Emily Belmont; Polak, Lisa; Fuchs, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Although TGFβ is a potent inhibitor of proliferation, epithelia lacking the essential receptor (TβRII) for TGFβ signaling display normal tissue homeostasis. By studying asymptomatic TβRII-deficient stratified epithelia, we show that tissue homeostasis is maintained by balancing hyperproliferation with elevated apoptosis. Moreover, rectal and genital epithelia, which are naturally proliferative, develop spontaneous squamous cell carcinomas with age when TβRII is absent. This progression is associated with a reduction in apoptosis and can be accelerated in phenotypically normal epidermis by oncogenic mutations in Ras. We show that TβRII deficiency leads to enhanced keratinocyte motility and integrin-FAK-Src signaling. Together, these mechanisms provide a molecular framework to account for many of the characteristics of TβRII-deficient invasive SQCCs. PMID:17936557

  18. Dynamic epithelia of the developing vertebrate face

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Chong Pyo; Crump, J. Gage

    2015-01-01

    A segmental series of endoderm-derived pouch and ectoderm-derived cleft epithelia act as signaling centers in the developing face. Their precise morphogenesis is therefore essential for proper patterning of the vertebrate head. Intercellular adhesion and polarity are highly dynamic within developing facial epithelial cells, with signaling from the adjacent mesenchyme controlling both epithelial character and directional migration. Endodermal and ectodermal epithelia fuse to form the primary mouth and gill slits, which involves basement membrane dissolution, cell intercalations, and apoptosis, as well as undergo further morphogenesis to generate the middle ear cavity and glands of the neck. Recent studies of facial epithelia are revealing both core programs of epithelial morphogenesis and insights into the coordinated assembly of the vertebrate head. PMID:25748249

  19. Distribution of monoclonal antibody-defined monosialoganglioside in normal and cancerous human tissues: an immunoperoxidase study.

    PubMed

    Arends, J W; Verstynen, C; Bosman, F T; Hilgers, J; Steplewski, Z

    1983-01-01

    The immunoreactivity of a monosialoganglioside antigen defined by monoclonal antibody 116NS19-9 (19-9) was studied in neoplastic and normal glandular and mucosal epithelia using an indirect immunoperoxidase method. In neoplastic mucosae, the antigen was detected in the majority of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas, predominantly in a focal staining pattern. A substantial proportion of gastric and pancreatic tumors and an occasional breast carcinoma also reacted with the monoclonal antibody. Expression of the monosialoganglioside in normal colonic mucosa appeared to be restricted to areas adjacent to tumor tissue. In gastric mucosa, the antigen was confined to some areas showing intestinal metaplasia. The antigen was also detected in the epithelium of normal mucosa of the gall bladder and endocervix, as well as in some ductal epithelia of the pancreas and salivary glands. Most other mucosae were negative for antigen expression. PMID:6381289

  20. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients

  1. Normal breast tissue implanted into athymic nude mice identifies biomarkers of the effects of human pregnancy levels of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Blance, Rognvald N; Sims, Andrew H; Anderson, Elizabeth; Howell, Anthony; Clarke, Robert B

    2009-03-01

    We have generated a novel model system for the study of estrogen intervention in normal breast tissue. Nulliparous human breast tissue was implanted into immunocompromised nude mice and treated with high-dose estrogen to simulate the effects of pregnancy. Treatment of mice with human mid-pregnancy levels of 17beta-estradiol for a period of 4 weeks was followed by 4 weeks of withdrawal to mimic involution. Gene expression in the xenograft tissue was then analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR to identify differences between treated and control tissues. Ten genes previously identified as altered by pregnancy in rodent models were found to be differentially expressed in human breast tissue with a > or =1.8-fold up-regulation of CDC42, TGFbeta3, DCN, KRT14, LTF, and AREG and a > or =0.7-fold down-regulation of STAT1, CTGF, IGF1, and VAMP1. Immunohistochemical analysis of archival paraffin-embedded adult premenopausal human breast tissue specimens identified a significantly lower level of expression of STAT1 (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) in parous compared with age-matched nulliparous tissue (median of 24% compared with 42% epithelial cells positive). We conclude that many of the pregnancy-induced breast cancer-protective changes observed in rodent models also occur in human breast tissue following intervention using human pregnancy levels of estrogen and that STAT1 expression is a potential biomarker of parity-induced breast cancer protection in the human breast. PMID:19258541

  2. Non-normal Screening Mammography Results, Lumpectomies, and Breast Cancer Reported by California Women, 2001–2009

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Veronica L.; Breen, Nancy; Meissner, Helen I.; Liu, Benmei; Kaplan, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although screening mammography may contribute to decreases in breast cancer mortality in a population, it may also increase the risk of false positives, anxiety, and unnecessary and costly medical procedures in individuals. We report trends in self-reported non-normal screening mammography results, lumpectomies, and breast cancer in a representative sample of California women. Methods Data were obtained from the 2001, 2005, and 2009 cross-sectional California Health Interview Surveys (CHIS) and weighted to the California population. CHIS employed a multistage sampling design to administer telephone surveys in 6 languages. Our study sample was restricted to women 40 years and older who reported a screening mammogram in the past 2 years. Sample sizes were 13,974 in 2001, 12,069 in 2005, and 15,552 in 2009. Women reporting non-normal results were asked whether they had an operation to remove the lump and, if so, whether the lump was confirmed as malignant. Findings Between 2001 and 2009, the percent of California women who reported having been diagnosed with breast cancer was relatively stable. For each of the three age groups studied, the percentage of non-normal mammography results increased and the percentages of lumpectomies decreased and, for every woman reporting a diagnosis of breast cancer, three women reported a lumpectomy that turned out not to be cancer. This ratio was greater for younger women and less for older women. Conclusions Despite relatively constant rates of breast cancer diagnosis from 2001 to 2009, the percentage of non-normal mammography results increased and lumpectomies declined. PMID:26070253

  3. Production of β-defensins by human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pradeep K.; Jia, Hong Peng; Wiles, Kerry; Hesselberth, Jay; Liu, Lide; Conway, Barbara-Ann D.; Greenberg, Everett P.; Valore, Erika V.; Welsh, Michael J.; Ganz, Tomas; Tack, Brian F.; McCray, Paul B.

    1998-01-01

    Human β-defensins (HBDs) are antimicrobial peptides that may play a role in mucosal defense. Diminished activity of these peptides has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We show that HBD-1 and HBD-2 mRNAs are expressed in excised surface and submucosal gland epithelia from non-CF and CF patients. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β stimulated the expression of HBD-2 but not HBD-1 mRNA and peptide in primary cultures of airway epithelia. HBD-1 was found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from normal volunteers, CF patients, and patients with inflammatory lung diseases, whereas HBD-2 was detected in BAL fluid from patients with CF or inflammatory lung diseases, but not in normal volunteers. Both HBD-1 and HBD-2 were found in BAL fluid in concentrations of several ng/ml, and both recombinant peptides showed salt-sensitive bactericidal activity. These data suggest that in the lung HBD-2 expression is induced by inflammation, whereas HBD-1 may serve as a defense in the absence of inflammation. PMID:9843998

  4. Developing Epithelia: What the Eye Cannot Grasp.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Sébastien; Milán, Marco

    2016-01-11

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Heller et al. (2016) introduce EpiTools, a new open-source image analysis toolkit that provides user-friendly graphical interfaces to perform automatic cell-based measurements from fluorescence microscopy time-lapse images of growing epithelia. PMID:26766439

  5. Isotonic water transport in secretory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Swanson, C H

    1977-01-01

    The model proposed by Diamond and Bossert [1] for isotonic water transport has received wide acceptance in recent years. It assumes that the local driving force for water transport is a standing osmotic gradient produced in the lateral intercellular spaces of the epithelial cell layer by active solute transport. While this model is based on work done in absorptive epithelia where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and the direction of net transport are the same, it has been proposed that the lateral spaces could also serve as the site of the local osmotic gradients for water transport in secretory epithelia, where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and net transport are opposed, by actively transporting solute out of the space rather than into it. Operation in the backward direction, however, requires a lower than ambient hydrostatic pressure within the lateral space which would seem more likely to cause the space to collapse with loss of function. On the other hand, most secretory epithelia are characterized by transport into a restricted ductal system which is similar to the lateral intercellular space in the absorptive epithelia in that its closed to open direction is the same as that of net transport. In vitro micropuncture studies on the exocrine pancreas of the rabbit indicate the presence of a small but statistically significant increase in juice osmolality, 6 mOsm/kg H(2)O, at the site of electrolyte and water secretion in the smallest extralobular ducts with secretin stimulation which suggests that the ductal system in the secretory epithelia rather than the lateral intercellular space is the site of the local osmotic gradients responsible for isotonic water transport. PMID:331693

  6. Associations between genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism and LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Adana A M; Marian, Catalin; Brasky, Theodore M; Dumitrescu, Ramona G; Liu, Zhenhua; Mason, Joel B; Makambi, Kepher H; Spear, Scott L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation is an early event in the carcinogenic process. Percent methylation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is a biomarker of genome-wide methylation and is a potential biomarker for breast cancer. Understanding factors associated with percent LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal tissues could provide insight into early stages of carcinogenesis. In a cross-sectional study of 121 healthy women with no prior history of cancer who underwent reduction mammoplasty, we examined associations between plasma and breast folate, genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism, and percent LINE-1 methylation using multivariable regression models (adjusting for race, oral contraceptive use, and alcohol use). Results are expressed as the ratio of LINE-1 methylation relative to that of the referent group, with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). We found no significant associations between plasma or breast folate and percent LINE-1 methylation. Variation in MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR were significantly associated with percent LINE-1 methylation. Variant allele carriers of MTHFR A1289C had 4% lower LINE-1 methylation (Ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.93–0.98), while variant allele carriers of MTR A2756G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) and MTRR A66G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) had 3% higher LINE-1 methylation, compared to those carrying the more common genotypes of these SNPs. DNA methylation of LINE-1 elements in histologically normal breast tissues is influenced by polymorphisms in genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Future studies are needed to investigate the sociodemographic, environmental and additional genetic determinants of DNA methylation in breast tissues and the impact on breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:26090795

  7. Platelet sensitivity to prostacyclin in normal subjects, and in patients with benign and malignant tumours of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, C.; Zonca, M.; Tavella, A. M.; Petitti, E.; Massobrio, M.; Nigam, S.; Slater, T. F.

    1985-01-01

    Platelet sensitivity to prostacyclin (PG12) was determined in normal male and female subjects, and in patients with benign and malignant tumours of the breast. The IC50 overall mean values for PG12 on ADP-induced platelet aggregation were similar for normal men and women, being 0.97 +/- 0.05 ng ml-1 and 0.83 +/- 0.07 ng ml-1 respectively. However, there were significant differences in the IC50 values for women in the 1st (0.81 +/- 0.06 ng ml-1) vs. 2nd (1.37 +/- 0.13 ng ml-1) phase of the menstrual cycle; post-menopausal women gave similar values to normal males and to pre-menopausal women in the 1st phase of the cycle. No significant differences were found between normal subjects and patients with benign or malignant tumours of the breast when account was taken of the status of the patient in relation to the phase of the menstrual cycle and the menopause. The importance of the hormonal status in evaluating changes in platelet sensitivity in patients with breast cancer is strongly emphasised. PMID:3881119

  8. Sensitivity of proliferating human breast epithelial cells to hypotonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstone, S.E.; Stanyon, R.; Lan, S.

    1982-12-01

    An assay for colony-forming cells of breast epithelia derived from normal and malignant surgical specimens is described using an IMR 90 fibroblast feeder layer. Their radiosensitivity (DO: 120-172) is consistent with the proliferative origin of the colonies. Distilled water inhibits proliferation of a proportion of the colony-forming cells after a 1-minute exposure. Continued detection of colonies after 10 minutes of exposure indicates that it is an inefficient way of completely eradicating proliferating epithelial cells of normal and malignant origin.

  9. A comparison study of different excitation wavelengths to determine the relative content of key biomolecules in breast cancer and breast normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence profiles from breast cancer and breast normal tissue samples with excitation wavelengths at 280 nm and 340 nm were obtained using the conventional LS-50 Perkin-Elmer spectrometer. Fluorescence ratios from these tissue samples, demonstrated by emission peaks at 340 nm, 440 nm and 460 nm and likely representing tryptophan and NADH, show increased relative content of tryptophan in malignant samples. Double ratio (DR) techniques were used to measure the severity of disease. The single excitation double ratio (Single-DR) method utilizes the emission intensity peaks from the spectrum acquired using a single excitation of 280 nm; while the dual excitation double ratio (dual-DR) method utilizes the emission intensity peaks from the spectra acquired using an excitation of 280 nm and 340 nm. Single-DR and dual-DR from 13 patients with breast carcinoma were compared in terms of their efficiency to distinguish high from low/intermediate tumors. Similar results were found with both methods. Results suggest that dual excitation wavelengths may be as effective as single excitation wavelength in calculating the relative content of biomolecules in breast cancer tissue, as well as for the assessment of the malignant potential of these tumors.

  10. Human breast cancer cells and normal mammary epithelial cells: retinol metabolism and growth inhibition by the retinol metabolite 4-oxoretinol.

    PubMed

    Chen, A C; Guo, X; Derguini, F; Gudas, L J

    1997-10-15

    To understand the signaling and growth-inhibitory effects of retinoids, we have examined the metabolism of [3H]retinol in a number of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) human breast cancer cell lines. We have also assayed the metabolism of [3H]retinol in normal human mammary epithelial cells. The ER+ breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D produce [3H]4-oxoretinol from [3H]retinol; the production of [3H]4-oxoretinol is increased by initial culture in the presence of nonradiolabeled retinoic acid (RA) or N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide, indicating that these drugs enhance [3H]retinol metabolism to [3H]4-oxoretinol. No metabolism of [3H]retinol to [3H]RA in these ER+ tumor lines was detected. ER- breast cancer lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and BT20 do not metabolize [3H]retinol to [3H]4-oxoretinol. In the ER- tumor lines, most of the [3H]retinol remains unmetabolized during the 24-h culture period; MDA-MB-468 and BT20 metabolize some [3H]retinol to [3H]RA. Unlike the majority of the tumor lines, the normal human breast epithelial cell strains AD074 and MCF10A rapidly metabolize [3H]retinol to [3H]retinyl esters. No detectable [3H]RA is produced from [3H]retinol in AD074 and MCF10A cells. Thus, the normal breast epithelial strains, the ER+ tumor lines and the ER- tumor lines differ greatly in their pathways of [3H]retinol metabolism. The levels of cellular retinol binding protein-I mRNA expression are not correlated with the levels or types of various retinol metabolites. Whereas the normal breast epithelial cells and the ER+ tumor lines are growth inhibited by RA, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide, and 4-oxoretinol, only the 4-oxoretinol is growth inhibitory in the ER- tumor lines. The cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II mRNA levels are not correlated with the growth inhibition by RA or 4-oxoretinol in the normal and tumor lines. PMID:9377581

  11. Morphometric studies of age related changes in normal human breast and their significance for evolution of mammary cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, S W; Cowen, P N; Bird, C C

    1985-01-01

    Ageing changes in the normal human female breast were studied to determine their significance for the evolution of mammary cancer. Employing the morphometric techniques of point counting and planimetry, objective quantitative measurements were made of the structure of the normal female breast in 58 subjects from the prepubertal to late postreproductive period. The relative amounts of epithelial and connective tissue varied with age, and the epithelial elements (combined lobular and extralobular) were unevenly distributed within the gland, with lower containing more than upper quadrants. The upper outer quadrant, however, usually contained the largest proportion of lobular units, which may relate to the higher incidence of lobular carcinoma found in this quadrant. Involution was shown to be a premenopausal rather than postmenopausal phenomenon. Mammary dysplastic changes were uncommon in all age groups. Images PMID:3973052

  12. Effects of pale, normal, and dark chicken breast meat on microstructure, extractable proteins, and cooking of marinated fillets.

    PubMed

    Barbut, S; Zhang, L; Marcone, M

    2005-05-01

    The effects of chicken breast meat lightness value (L*) on microstructure, protein extraction, and marinating and tumbling was investigated. Pale soft, and exudative (PSE) meat (L* = 57.7, pH 5.72) showed significantly lower salt soluble protein extraction with less heavy myosin chains compared with dark, firm, and dry (DFD) meat (L* = 44.8, pH 6.27). The PSE meat showed larger intercellular spaces among muscle fibers and bundles compared with normal and DFD meat. Marinated and tumbled PSE breast fillets had higher unbound brine compared with the other meats. Further cooking resulted in lower yield and higher shear force values for the PSE meat compared with normal and DFD fillets. PMID:15913193

  13. Mechanical Forces Mediate Localized Topological Change in Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X.; Liang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and proliferation has a fundamental role in tissue development, organogenesis, and disease progression. Conserved distribution of the number of sides of cells with a mean value of six was found in a variety of proliferating epithelia. Previous studies have shown that clones of proliferating cells bounded by quiescent cells have fewer sides than normal epithelia. However, the mechanisms for mediating such localized topological change remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a two-dimensional vertex model with consideration of mechanical forces to investigate how differential proliferation and forces can influence cell shape and tissue morphogenesis, and how they may lead to distorted topological change. We find that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to affect the topology of boundary proliferating cells. Rather, increased surface tension on the boundary, in addition to differential proliferation, can significantly decrease the average number of cell sides. Our results are consistent with experimental observations. We conclude that mechanical forces in addition to localized differential proliferation are required to produce the distorted topological change which significantly impacts the overall cell shape and tissue morphogenesis. PMID:22254279

  14. Seasonal variation in the secretion of mammotrophic hormones in normal women and women with previous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, I M; Mason, B H; Gibbs, E E; Rajasoorya, C; Lethaby, A; Hopkins, K D; Evans, M C; Lim, T; Schooler, B

    1997-01-01

    Hormones such as melatonin whose serum concentrations vary seasonally have been previously implicated in the growth of breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to identify possible seasonal variation in a range of mammotrophic hormones which could exert a chronobiologic influence in women with breast tumours. Fifteen premenopausal women with a history of previous breast cancer (BC subjects) and 10 control women underwent 2-hourly serum sampling for 24 h at both summer and winter solstice for measurement of melatonin, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), cortisol, prolactin and thyrotrophin (TSH). Hormone secretion at the different seasons was compared by measuring the area under the 24 h serum hormone concentration x time curves and by time series analysis of summer-to-winter differences in hormone concentration. Control women had significantly higher GH and IGF-I levels in summer compared to winter and significantly higher cortisol secretion in winter than summer. In contrast, BC women had no significant seasonal difference in IGF-I concentrations and had a reversal of the normal seasonal pattern of melatonin secretion, although seasonal changes in GH production were similar to controls. Prolactin and TSH showed no significant summer/winter variation in either group. Thus, seasonal variations in hormone secretion seen in normal women were, with exception of GH, absent or reversed in women with a previous history of breast cancer. As a result these individuals may be exposed to an asynchronous hormonal stimulus which could influence tumour growth. These changes could reflect a constitutional abnormality in BC women or may have been induced by the previous breast tumour. PMID:9116314

  15. Use of high-throughput protein array for profiling of differentially expressed proteins in normal and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hudelist, Gernot; Pacher-Zavisin, Margit; Singer, Christian F; Holper, Tina; Kubista, Ernst; Schreiber, Martin; Manavi, Mahmood; Bilban, Martin; Czerwenka, Klaus

    2004-08-01

    cDNA arrays provide a powerful tool to identify gene expression pattern that are potentially associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. However, genes work at the protein level and, since the transcriptional activity of a gene does not necessarily reflect cellular protein expression, the identification and quantification of proteins is essential for the understanding of molecular events leading to malignant transformation. We have therefore employed a high-throughput protein microarray system which contains 378 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies in order to compare the gene expression pattern of malignant and adjacent normal breast tissue in a patient with primary breast cancer. Using this technique, we have identified a number of proteins that show increased expression levels in malignant breast tissues such as casein kinase Ie, p53, annexin XI, CDC25C, eIF-4E and MAP kinase 7. The expression of other proteins, such as the multifunctional regulator 14-3-3e was found to be decreased in malignant breast tissue, whereas the majority of proteins remained unchanged when compared to the corresponding non-malignant samples. The protein expression pattern was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, in which antibodies against 8 representative proteins known to be involved in carcinogenesis were employed in paraffin-embedded normal and malignant tissue sections deriving from the same patient. In each case, the results obtained by IHC matched the data obtained by antibody microarray system. Taken together, we have described for the first time a tumor cell specificity protein expression pattern by use of a novel commercially available antibody microarray system. We have thus demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput protein arrays in the proteomic analysis of human breast tissue. We hypothesize that the use of protein arrays will not only increase our understanding of the molecular events, but could prove useful in evaluating prognosis and in determining optimal

  16. Long Non-Coding RNAs Differentially Expressed between Normal versus Primary Breast Tumor Tissues Disclose Converse Changes to Breast Cancer-Related Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reiche, Kristin; Kasack, Katharina; Schreiber, Stephan; Lüders, Torben; Due, Eldri U.; Naume, Bjørn; Riis, Margit; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Horn, Friedemann; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hackermüller, Jörg; Baumbusch, Lars O.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in women, is a highly heterogeneous disease, characterized by distinct genomic and transcriptomic profiles. Transcriptome analyses prevalently assessed protein-coding genes; however, the majority of the mammalian genome is expressed in numerous non-coding transcripts. Emerging evidence supports that many of these non-coding RNAs are specifically expressed during development, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. The focus of this study was to investigate the expression features and molecular characteristics of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in breast cancer. We investigated 26 breast tumor and 5 normal tissue samples utilizing a custom expression microarray enclosing probes for mRNAs as well as novel and previously identified lncRNAs. We identified more than 19,000 unique regions significantly differentially expressed between normal versus breast tumor tissue, half of these regions were non-coding without any evidence for functional open reading frames or sequence similarity to known proteins. The identified non-coding regions were primarily located in introns (53%) or in the intergenic space (33%), frequently orientated in antisense-direction of protein-coding genes (14%), and commonly distributed at promoter-, transcription factor binding-, or enhancer-sites. Analyzing the most diverse mRNA breast cancer subtypes Basal-like versus Luminal A and B resulted in 3,025 significantly differentially expressed unique loci, including 682 (23%) for non-coding transcripts. A notable number of differentially expressed protein-coding genes displayed non-synonymous expression changes compared to their nearest differentially expressed lncRNA, including an antisense lncRNA strongly anticorrelated to the mRNA coding for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), which was investigated in more detail. Previously identified chromatin-associated lncRNAs (CARs) were predominantly downregulated in breast tumor samples, including CARs located in the

  17. Breast lump

    MedlinePlus

    Breast mass ... males and females of all ages have normal breast tissue. This tissue responds to hormone changes. Because of this, lumps can come and go. Breast lumps may appear at any age: Both male ...

  18. Comparison of hematologic and serologic profiles of broiler birds with normal (NORM) and severe (SEV) degrees of white striping in breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White striping is the white striation seen parallel to the direction of muscle fibers in broiler breast fillets and thighs. Broiler breast fillets can be categorized as normal (NORM), moderate (MOD) and severe (SEV) based on the degree of white striping. Histologically, the SEV fillets are character...

  19. Discrimination between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Chizuru; Ihori, Akiko; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Kato, Misa; Nakajima, Ai; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) series photon-counting detector, having high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In a previous study, we showed that the use of high X-ray energy in digital mammography is useful from the viewpoint of exposure dose and image quality. In addition, the CdTe series detector can acquire X-ray spectrum information following transmission through a subject. This study focused on the tissue composition identified using spectral information obtained by a new photon-counting detector. Normal breast tissue consists entirely of adipose and glandular tissues. However, it is very difficult to find tumor tissue in the region of glandular tissue via a conventional mammogram, especially in dense breast because the attenuation coefficients of glandular tissue and tumor tissue are very close. As a fundamental examination, we considered a simulation phantom and showed the difference between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue of various thicknesses in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot. We were able to discriminate between both types of tissues. In addition, there was a tendency for the distribution to depend on the thickness of the tumor tissue. Thinner tumor tissues were shown to be closer in appearance to normal breast tissue. This study also demonstrated that the difference between these tissues could be made obvious by using a CdTe series detector. We believe that this differentiation is important, and therefore, expect this technology to be applied to new tumor detection systems in the future.

  20. Effects of BRCA2 cis-regulation in normal breast and cancer risk amongst BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cis-acting regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at specific loci may modulate penetrance of germline mutations at the same loci by introducing different levels of expression of the wild-type allele. We have previously reported that BRCA2 shows differential allelic expression and we hypothesize that the known variable penetrance of BRCA2 mutations might be associated with this mechanism. Methods We combined haplotype analysis and differential allelic expression of BRCA2 in breast tissue to identify expression haplotypes and candidate cis-regulatory variants. These candidate variants underwent selection based on in silico predictions for regulatory potential and disruption of transcription factor binding, and were functionally analyzed in vitro and in vivo in normal and breast cancer cell lines. SNPs tagging the expression haplotypes were correlated with the total expression of several genes in breast tissue measured by Taqman and microarray technologies. The effect of the expression haplotypes on breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers was investigated in 2,754 carriers. Results We identified common haplotypes associated with differences in the levels of BRCA2 expression in human breast cells. We characterized three cis-regulatory SNPs located at the promoter and two intronic regulatory elements which affect the binding of the transcription factors C/EBPα, HMGA1, D-binding protein (DBP) and ZF5. We showed that the expression haplotypes also correlated with changes in the expression of other genes in normal breast. Furthermore, there was suggestive evidence that the minor allele of SNP rs4942440, which is associated with higher BRCA2 expression, is also associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.72 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.048). Conclusions Our work provides further insights into the role of cis-regulatory variation in the penetrance of disease-causing mutations

  1. Correction of electrode polarization contributions to the dielectric properties of normal and cancerous breast tissues at audio/radiofrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, M. R.; Kosempa, M.; Gregory, W. D.; Gregory, C. W.; Marx, J. J.; Mikkelson, W.; Tjoe, J.; Raicu, V.

    2007-11-01

    Spurious contributions from electrode polarization (EP) are a major nuisance in dielectric measurements of biological tissues and hamper accurate determination of tissue properties in the audio/radiofrequencies. Various electrode geometries and/or treatments have been employed traditionally to reduce EP contributions, although none succeeded to completely remove EP from measurements on tissues for all practical frequency ranges. A method of correction for contributions of EP to the dielectric properties of tissues is proposed. The method is based on modeling the electrode impedance with suitable functions and on the observation that certain parameters are only dependent on electrodes properties and can thus be determined separately. The method is tested on various samples with known properties, and its usefulness is demonstrated with samples of normal and cancerous human female breast tissue. It is observed that the dielectric properties of the tissues over the frequency range 40 Hz-100 MHz are significantly different among different types of breast tissue. This observation is used further to demonstrate that, by scanning the tip of the measuring dielectric probe (with modest spatial resolution) across a sample of excised breast tissue, significant variations in the electrical properties are detected at a position where a tumor is located. This study shows that dielectric spectroscopy has the potential to offer a viable alternative to the current methods for detection of breast cancer in vivo.

  2. Use of cultured epithelia to study transport and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Handler, J S

    1983-09-01

    Epithelial cells from a variety of species and organs form polarized epithelia in culture. When epithelia are grown on a porous surface, such as a millipore filter, transport can be studied using adaptations of standard techniques. In the few years in which cultured epithelia have been studied by transport physiologists, most work has been focused on identification and description of the differentiated transport exhibited by cultured epithelia. Epithelia formed by a continuous line of cells derived from pig kidney (LLC-PK1) exhibit sodium-coupled glucose transport similar to that of the proximal tubule and have vasopressin-sensitive adenylate cyclase that has been studied in great detail. Also of interest are epithelia formed by continuous lines of cells derived from amphibian kidney (A6) and from amphibian urinary bladder (TBM). Each line forms epithelia that have high electrical resistance and amiloride-sensitive sodium transport. Transport is stimulated by aldosterone and by cAMP or hormones that raise cell cAMP levels. In LLC-PK1 and in A6 epithelia, transport and the response to hormones can be manipulated by manipulating the culture conditions. Cultured epithelia have also been used to explore the cell biology of epithelia. Most interesting in this regard are studies of the development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. This approach should be especially valuable. PMID:6317789

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of MUC5B apomucin expression in breast cancer and non-malignant breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Sóñora, Cecilia; Mazal, Daniel; Berois, Nora; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Ubillos, Luis; Varangot, Mario; Barrios, Enrique; Carzoglio, Julio; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2006-03-01

    A deregulation of several MUC genes (MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, MUC5AC, and MUC6) was previously demonstrated in breast carcinomas. Considering that recently we found the "non-mammary" MUC5B mRNA in primary breast tumors (Berois et al. 2003), we undertook the present study to evaluate the expression profile of MUC5B protein product in breast tissues, using LUM5B-2 antisera raised against sequences within the non-glycosylated regions of this apomucin. Expression of MUC5B by breast cancer cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, and Western blot on MCF-7 cancer cells. Using an immunohistochemical procedure, MUC5B apomucin was detected in 34/42 (81%) primary breast tumors, in 13/14 (92.8%) samples of non-malignant breast diseases, in 8/19 (42.1%) samples of normal-appearing breast epithelia adjacent to cancer, and in 0/5 normal control breast samples. The staining pattern of MUC5B was very different when comparing breast cancer cells (cytoplasmic) and non-malignant breast cells (predominantly apical and in the secretory material). We analyzed MUC5B mRNA expression using RT-PCR in bone marrow aspirates from 22/42 patients with breast cancer to compare with MUC5B protein expression in the primary tumors. Good correlation was observed because the six MUC5B-positive bone marrow samples also displayed MUC5B expression in the tumor. Our results show, for the first time at the protein level, that MUC5B apomucin is upregulated in breast cancer. Its characterization could provide new insights about the glycobiology of breast cancer cells. PMID:16148312

  4. Isotropic 3D Nuclear Morphometry of Normal, Fibrocystic and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Reveals New Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Hernandez, Kathryn F.; Lintecum, Kelly M.; Senechal, Patti; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Grading schemes for breast cancer diagnosis are predominantly based on pathologists' qualitative assessment of altered nuclear structure from 2D brightfield microscopy images. However, cells are three-dimensional (3D) objects with features that are inherently 3D and thus poorly characterized in 2D. Our goal is to quantitatively characterize nuclear structure in 3D, assess its variation with malignancy, and investigate whether such variation correlates with standard nuclear grading criteria. Methodology We applied micro-optical computed tomographic imaging and automated 3D nuclear morphometry to quantify and compare morphological variations between human cell lines derived from normal, benign fibrocystic or malignant breast epithelium. To reproduce the appearance and contrast in clinical cytopathology images, we stained cells with hematoxylin and eosin and obtained 3D images of 150 individual stained cells of each cell type at sub-micron, isotropic resolution. Applying volumetric image analyses, we computed 42 3D morphological and textural descriptors of cellular and nuclear structure. Principal Findings We observed four distinct nuclear shape categories, the predominant being a mushroom cap shape. Cell and nuclear volumes increased from normal to fibrocystic to metastatic type, but there was little difference in the volume ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (N/C ratio) between the lines. Abnormal cell nuclei had more nucleoli, markedly higher density and clumpier chromatin organization compared to normal. Nuclei of non-tumorigenic, fibrocystic cells exhibited larger textural variations than metastatic cell nuclei. At p<0.0025 by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests, 90% of our computed descriptors statistically differentiated control from abnormal cell populations, but only 69% of these features statistically differentiated the fibrocystic from the metastatic cell populations. Conclusions Our results provide a new perspective on nuclear structure variations

  5. Growth Hormone Is Secreted by Normal Breast Epithelium upon Progesterone Stimulation and Increases Proliferation of Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Sara; Honeth, Gabriella; Ginestier, Christophe; Shinomiya, Ireneusz; Marlow, Rebecca; Buchupalli, Bharath; Gazinska, Patrycja; Brown, John; Catchpole, Steven; Liu, Suling; Barkan, Ariel; Wicha, Max; Purushotham, Anand; Burchell, Joy; Pinder, Sarah; Dontu, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Summary Using in vitro and in vivo experimental systems and in situ analysis, we show that growth hormone (GH) is secreted locally by normal human mammary epithelial cells upon progesterone stimulation. GH increases proliferation of a subset of cells that express growth hormone receptor (GHR) and have functional properties of stem and early progenitor cells. In 72% of ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, an expansion of the cell population that expresses GHR was observed, suggesting that GH signaling may contribute to breast cancer development. PMID:24936466

  6. Use of Finite Difference Time Domain Simulations and Debye Theory for Modelling the Terahertz Reflection Response of Normal and Tumour Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Anthony J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the capabilities of Debye theory combined with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods to simulate the terahertz (THz) response of breast tissues. Being able to accurately model breast tissues in the THz regime would facilitate the understanding of image contrast parameters used in THz imaging of breast cancer. As a test case, the model was first validated using liquid water and simulated reflection pulses were compared to experimental measured pulses with very good agreement (p = 1.00). The responses of normal and cancerous breast tissues were simulated with Debye properties and the correlation with measured data was still high for tumour (p = 0.98) and less so for normal breast (p = 0.82). Sections of the time domain pulses showed clear differences that were also evident in the comparison of pulse parameter values. These deviations may arise from the presence of adipose and other inhomogeneities in the breast tissue that are not accounted for when using the Debye model. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the power of the model for simulating THz reflection imaging; however, for biological tissues extra Debye terms or a more detailed theory may be required to link THz image contrast to physiological composition and structural changes of breast tissue associated with differences between normal and tumour tissues. PMID:25010734

  7. Mechanics and Patterning in Metazoan Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Kevin K.

    In this dissertation we consider the effect of mechanical interactions on cell biology and how this translates into tissue-level properties in metazoan epithelia. We delineate three model-based approaches with different phenomenological aims and compare applicable results to experimental data. We first consider cellular vertex model simulations, which are used to represent the mechanics of two-dimensional epithelial cell arrays. We outline the assumptions, parameters, and outputs. Then we review a number of systems in which these simulations have been used. The second approach is the Mechanical Inverse, which is a vertex model-based approach to inferring mechanical stresses from cell boundary labeled images of epithelial tissue. We develop this inference method from the assumption of mechanical equilibrium and dominant stresses in the tissue. We then apply this computational method to experimental images and validate the performance. In the final part we consider avian cochlea development in epithelia where lateral inhibition plays a role in cell differentiation—a process which involves cell division, differentiation, and rearrangement in a two-dimensional epithelial layer. We develop a mean-field mathematical description of this process. The results provide a description of the observed hair cell patterns in the cochlea.

  8. Biocompatibility of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using normal, glia and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ankamwar, B; Lai, T C; Huang, J H; Liu, R S; Hsiao, M; Chen, C H; Hwu, Y K

    2010-02-19

    In order to reveal the biocompatibility of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles and bipolar surfactant tetramethylammonium 11-aminoundecanoate cytotoxicity tests were performed as a function of concentration from low (0.1 microg ml(-1)) to higher concentration (100 microg ml(-1)) using various human glia, human breast cancer and normal cell lines. Cytotoxicity tests for human glia (D54MG, G9T, SF126, U87, U251, U373), human breast cancer (MB157, SKBR3, T47D) and normal (H184B5F5/M10, WI-38, SVGp12) cell lines exhibited almost nontoxicity and reveal biocompatibility of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles in the concentration range of 0.1-10 microg ml(-1), while accountable cytotoxicity can be seen at 100 microg ml(-1). The results of our studies suggest that Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles coated with bipolar surfactant tetramethylammonium 11-aminoundecanoate are biocompatible and promising for bio-applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:20090199

  9. miRNA-218 contributes to the regulation of D-glucuronyl C5-epimerase expression in normal and tumor breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    Prudnikova, Tatiana Y.; Mostovich, Luydmila A.; Kashuba, Vladimir I.; Ernberg, Ingemar; Zabarovsky, Eugene R.; Grigorieva, Elvira V.

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. In the present study, regulation of tumor-suppressor gene D-glucuronyl C5-epimerase (GLCE) by miRNA-218 was investigated. Significant downregulation of miRNA-218 expression was shown in primary breast tumors. Exogenous miRNA-218/anti-miRNA-218 did not affect GLCE mRNA but regulated GLCE protein level in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells in vitro. Comparative analysis showed a positive correlation between miRNA-218 and GLCE mRNA, and negative correlation between miRNA-218 and GLCE protein levels in breast tissues and primary tumors in vivo, supporting a direct involvement of miRNA-218 in posttranscriptional regulation of GLCE in human breast tissue. A common scheme for the regulation of GLCE expression in normal and tumor breast tissues is suggested. PMID:22968430

  10. Activation of an apical Cl- conductance by Ca2+ ionophores in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Willumsen, N J; Boucher, R C

    1989-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia express a defect in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent regulation of apical membrane Cl- channels. Recent patch-clamp studies have raised the possibility that Ca2+ -dependent mechanisms for the activation of Cl- secretion may be preserved in CF airway epithelia. To determine 1) whether intact normal (N1) and CF airway epithelia exhibit a Ca2+ -dependent mechanism for activation of Cl- secretion and 2) whether Ca2+ -dependent mechanism for activation of Cl- secretion and 2) whether Ca2+ -dependent mechanisms initiate Cl- secretion via activation of an apical membrane Cl- conductance (GCl-), nasal epithelia from N1 and CF subjects were cultured on collagen membranes, and responses to isoproterenol or Ca2- ionophores [A23187 10(-6) M; ionomycin (10(-5)M)] were measured with transepithelial and intracellular techniques. Isoproterenol induced activation of an apical membrane GCl- in N1 cultures but was ineffective in CF. In contrast, in both N1 and CF amiloride-pretreated cultures, A23187 induced an increase in the equivalent short-circuit current that was associated with an activation of an apical membrane Gc1- and was bumetanide inhibitable. A23187 addition during superfusion of the lumen with a low Cl- (3 mM) solution reduced intracellular Cl- activity of CF cells. A Ca2+ ionophore of different selectivity properties, ionomycin, was also an effective Cl- secretagogue in both N1 and CF cultures. We conclude that 1) the A23187 induced Cl- secretion via activation of an apical GCl- in N1 human nasal epithelium, and 2) in contrast to an isoproterenol-dependent path, a Ca2+ -dependent path for GCl- activation is preserved in CF epithelia. PMID:2465689

  11. Renal epithelia in long term gradient culture for biomaterial testing and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Minuth, Will W; Schumacher, Karl; Strehl, Raimund

    2005-01-01

    In the organism epithelia perform perfect barrier functions. Strong rheological and mechanical influences constitute the normal environment of this tissue throughout life. Most epithelia are exposed to different fluids at the luminal and basal sides. To obtain realistic information about tissue development in modern biomaterial testing and tissue engineering it is necessary to mimick the natural environment of epithelia. Cultured cells are brought in contact with an artificial extracellular matrix to determine whether proper development into a functional epithelium occurs. As under natural conditions the cultures have to withstand mechanical and fluid stress over a prolonged period of time in close contact to a selected biomaterial. However, development of tissue-specific features such as polarization, tightness and transport under in vitro conditions will only occur, if the biomaterial and the culture conditions support tissue development. Leakage, edge damage and pressure differences during culture have to be avoided so that the natural functions of the growing epithelium can develop. Our aim is to generate functional epithelia derived from renal explants containing stem cells, which are microsurgically isolated and placed into specific O-ring carriers for optimal handling. The cells develop in combination with a collagenous matrix from an embryonic into a functional collecting duct (rCD) epithelium. To achieve optimal culture conditions the tissue is placed in a gradient culture container. A typical environment can be simulated by superfusing different culture media at the luminal and basal sides. Within days epithelia growing inside the gradient container build up a physiological barrier, which is maintained during the whole culture period. The described method allows to investigate the influence of new biomaterials over prolonged periods of time. PMID:15623930

  12. Apparent diffusion coefficient of breast cancer and normal fibroglandular tissue in diffusion-weighted imaging: the effects of menstrual cycle and menopausal status.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin You; Suh, Hie Bum; Kang, Hyun Jung; Shin, Jong Ki; Choo, Ki Seok; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lee, Seok Won; Jung, Young Lae; Bae, Young Tae

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate prospectively whether the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of both breast cancer and normal fibroglandular tissue vary with the menstrual cycle and menopausal status. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was obtained from each participant. Fifty-seven women (29 premenopausal, 28 postmenopausal) with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent diffusion-weighted imaging twice (interval 12-20 days) before surgery. Two radiologists independently measured ADC of breast cancer and normal contralateral breast tissue, and we quantified the differences according to the phases of menstrual cycle and menopausal status. With normal fibroglandular tissue, ADC was significantly lower in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women (P = 0.035). In premenopausal women, ADC did not differ significantly between proliferative and secretory phases in either breast cancer or normal fibroglandular tissue (P = 0.969 and P = 0.519, respectively). In postmenopausal women, no significant differences were found between ADCs measured at different time intervals in either breast cancer or normal fibroglandular tissue (P = 0.948 and P = 0.961, respectively). The within-subject variability of the ADC measurements was quantified using the coefficient of variation (CV) and was small: the mean CVs of tumor ADC were 2.90 % (premenopausal) and 3.43 % (postmenopausal), and those of fibroglandular tissue ADC were 4.37 % (premenopausal) and 2.55 % (postmenopausal). Both intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent for ADC measurements, with intraclass correlation coefficients in the range of 0.834-0.974. In conclusion, the measured ADCs of breast cancer and normal fibroglandular tissue were not affected significantly by menstrual cycle, and the measurements were highly reproducible both within and between observers. PMID:27091644

  13. Quantification of growth asymmetries in developing epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittig, T.; Wartlick, O.; González-Gaitán, M.; Jülicher, F.

    2009-09-01

    Many developmental processes of multicellular organisms involve the patterning and growth of two-dimensional tissues, so called epithelia. We have quantified the growth of the wing imaginal disk, which is the precursor of the adult wing, of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. We find that growth follows a simple rule with exponentially decreasing area growth rate. Anisotropies of growth can be precisely determined by comparing experimental results to a continuum theory. Growth anisotropies are to good approximation constant in space and time. They are weak in wild-type wing disks but threefold increased in GFP-Dpp disks in which the morphogen Dpp is overexpressed. Our findings indicate that morphogens such as Dpp control tissue shape via oriented cell divisions that generate anisotropic growth. in here

  14. Crossroads of integrins and cadherins in epithelia and stroma remodeling.

    PubMed

    Epifano, Carolina; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion events mediated by cadherin and integrin adhesion receptors have fundamental roles in the maintenance of the physiological balance of epithelial tissues, and it is well established that perturbations in their normal functional activity and/or changes in their expression are associated with tumorigenesis. Over the last decades, increasing evidence of a dynamic collaborative interaction between these complexes through their shared interactions with cytoskeletal proteins and common signaling pathways has emerged not only as an important regulator of several aspects of epithelial cell behavior, but also as a coordinated adhesion module that senses and transmits signals from and to the epithelia surrounding microenvironment. The tight regulation of their crosstalk is particularly important during epithelial remodeling events that normally take place during morphogenesis and tissue repair, and when defective it leads to cell transformation and aggravated responses of the tumor microenvironment that contribute to tumorigenesis. In this review we highlight some of the interactions that regulate their crosstalk and how this could be implicated in regulating signals across epithelial tissues to sustain homeostasis. PMID:22568988

  15. Simulation study of diffuse photon density waves traveling through normal and abnormal breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoyuan; Xing, Da

    1999-09-01

    Diffuse Photon Density Waves (DPDW) is new concept and principle, which takes advantage of the difference of absorption and scattering coefficients of different tissues to study the law of photon density fluctuation during a modulated light traveling through the tissues, thus to explore the structure and function of tissues. With the combination of image reconstruction technology, we can directly `visualize' the tissues. As a non- invasive exam, it has highly extensive applied prospect in medical field and brain cognition study. In this paper, the behavior of DPDW traveling through simulated breast tissue is tentatively examined. Under various conditions, we observed the characteristics of DPDW. We observed the reasonability of the distribution of sources and detectors, the factors that influence the distortion of DPDW. Simulation results could be used as a good theoretical guideline for experiments.

  16. Three-dimensional heart dose reconstruction to estimate normal tissue complication probability after breast irradiation using portal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Louwe, R. J. W.; Wendling, M.; Herk, M. B. van; Mijnheer, B. J.

    2007-04-15

    Irradiation of the heart is one of the major concerns during radiotherapy of breast cancer. Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning would therefore be useful but cannot always be performed for left-sided breast treatments, because CT data may not be available. However, even if 3D dose calculations are available and an estimate of the normal tissue damage can be made, uncertainties in patient positioning may significantly influence the heart dose during treatment. Therefore, 3D reconstruction of the actual heart dose during breast cancer treatment using electronic imaging portal device (EPID) dosimetry has been investigated. A previously described method to reconstruct the dose in the patient from treatment portal images at the radiological midsurface was used in combination with a simple geometrical model of the irradiated heart volume to enable calculation of dose-volume histograms (DVHs), to independently verify this aspect of the treatment without using 3D data from a planning CT scan. To investigate the accuracy of our method, the DVHs obtained with full 3D treatment planning system (TPS) calculations and those obtained after resampling the TPS dose in the radiological midsurface were compared for fifteen breast cancer patients for whom CT data were available. In addition, EPID dosimetry as well as 3D dose calculations using our TPS, film dosimetry, and ionization chamber measurements were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom. It was found that the dose reconstructed using EPID dosimetry and the dose calculated with the TPS agreed within 1.5% in the lung/heart region. The dose-volume histograms obtained with EPID dosimetry were used to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for late excess cardiac mortality. Although the accuracy of these NTCP calculations might be limited due to the uncertainty in the NTCP model, in combination with our portal dosimetry approach it allows incorporation of the actual heart dose. For the anthropomorphic

  17. Fatty Acids Inhibit Apical Membrane Chloride Channels in Airway Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew P.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    Apical membrane Cl^- channels control the rate of transepithelial Cl^- secretion in airway epithelia. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C regulate Cl^- channels by phosphorylation; in cystic fibrosis cells, phosphorylation-dependent activation of Cl^- channels is defective. Another important signaling system involves arachidonic acid, which is released from cell membranes during receptor-mediated stimulation. Here we report that arachidonic acid reversibly inhibited apical membrane Cl^- channels in cell-free patches of membrane. Arachidonic acid itself inhibited the channel and not a cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase metabolite because (i) inhibitors of these enzymes did not block the response, (ii) fatty acids that are not substrates for the enzymes had the same effect as arachidonic acid, and (iii) metabolites of arachidonic acid did not inhibit the channel. Inhibition occurred only when fatty acids were added to the cytosolic surface of the membrane patch. Unsaturated fatty acids were more potent than saturated fatty acids. Arachidonic acid inhibited Cl^- channels from both normal and cystic fibrosis cells. These results suggest that fatty acids directly inhibit apical membrane Cl^- channels in airway epithelial cells.

  18. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sukseree, Supawadee; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Mildner, Michael; Pammer, Johannes; Buchberger, Maria; Gruber, Florian; Watanapokasin, Ramida; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  19. Human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sang Won; Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Anguo; Guang, Wei; Nguyen, Chinh; Sun, Wenji; Luzina, Irina G.; Webb, Tonya J.; Atamas, Sergei P.; Passaniti, Antonino; Twaddell, William S.; Puché, Adam C.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Cross, Alan S.; Goldblum, Simeon E.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids on glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in many biological processes. In the airways, sialylated glycoproteins and glycolipids are strategically positioned on the plasma membranes of epithelia to regulate receptor-ligand, cell-cell, and host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. We now demonstrate, for the first time, sialidase activity for ganglioside substrates in human airway epithelia. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU3 has a substrate preference for gangliosides and is expressed at mRNA and protein levels at comparable abundance in epithelia derived from human trachea, bronchi, small airways, and alveoli. In small airway and alveolar epithelia, NEU3 protein was immunolocalized to the plasma membrane, cytosolic, and nuclear subcellular fractions. Small interfering RNA-induced silencing of NEU3 expression diminished sialidase activity for a ganglioside substrate by >70%. NEU3 immunostaining of intact human lung tissue could be localized to the superficial epithelia, including the ciliated brush border, as well as to nuclei. However, NEU3 was reduced in subepithelial tissues. These results indicate that human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase. PMID:24658138

  20. Ultrastructural aspects of otoliths and sensory epithelia of fish inner ear exposed to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibsch, M.; Nindl, G.; Anken, R. H.; Körtje, K. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The present electron microscopical investigations were directed to the question, whether alterations in the gravitational force might induce structural changes in the morphology of otoliths or/and inner ear sensory epithelia of developing and adult swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) that had been kept either under long-term moderate hypergravity (8 days; 3g) or under short-time extreme hypergravity (10 minutes up to 9g). The otoliths of adult and neonate swordtail fish were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Macular epithelia of adult fish were examined both by SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The saccular otoliths (sagittae) of normally hatched adult fish revealed an enormous inter- (and even intra-; i.e. left vs. right) individual diversity in shape and size, whereas the otoliths of utricles (lapilli) and lagenae (asterisci) seemed to be more constant regarding morphological parameters. The structural diversity of juvenile otoliths was found to be less prominent as compared to the adults, differing from the latter regarding their peculiar crystalline morphology. Qualitative differences in the fine structure (SEM) of otoliths taken from adult and larval animals kept under 3g in comparison to 1g controls could not be observed. The SEM and TEM investigations of sensory epithelia also did not reveal any effects due to 3g stimulation. Even extreme hypergravity (more than 7g) for 10 minutes did not result in distinct pathological changes.

  1. Ultrastructural aspects of otoliths and sensory epithelia of fish inner ear exposed to hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Ibsch, M; Nindl, G; Anken, R H; Kortje, K H; Rahmann, H

    1998-01-01

    The present electron microscopical investigations were directed to the question, whether alterations in the gravitational force might induce structural changes in the morphology of otoliths or/and inner ear sensory epithelia of developing and adult swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) that had been kept either under long-term moderate hypergravity (8 days; 3g) or under short-time extreme hypergravity (10 minutes up to 9g). The otoliths of adult and neonate swordtail fish were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Macular epithelia of adult fish were examined both by SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The saccular otoliths (sagittae) of normally hatched adult fish revealed an enormous inter- (and even intra-; i.e. left vs. right) individual diversity in shape and size, whereas the otoliths of utricles (lapilli) and lagenae (asterisci) seemed to be more constant regarding morphological parameters. The structural diversity of juvenile otoliths was found to be less prominent as compared to the adults, differing from the latter regarding their peculiar crystalline morphology. Qualitative differences in the fine structure (SEM) of otoliths taken from adult and larval animals kept under 3g in comparison to 1g controls could not be observed. The SEM and TEM investigations of sensory epithelia also did not reveal any effects due to 3g stimulation. Even extreme hypergravity (more than 7g) for 10 minutes did not result in distinct pathological changes. PMID:11541408

  2. Computational model for the regulation of extracellular ATP and adenosine in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Picher, Maryse; Zuo, Peiying; Okada, Seiko F; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Tim C

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are key components of the signaling network regulating airway clearance. They are released by the epithelium into the airway surface liquid (ASL) to stimulate cilia beating activity, mucus secretion and airway hydration. Understanding the factors affecting their availability for purinoceptor activation is an important step toward the development of new therapies for obstructive lung diseases. This chapter presents a mathematical model developed to gain predictive insights into the regulation of ASL nucleotide concentrations on human airway epithelia. The parameters were estimated from experimental data collected on polarized primary cultures of human nasal and bronchial epithelial cells. This model reproduces major experimental observations: (1) the independence of steady-state nucleotide concentrations on ASL height, (2) the impact of selective ectonucleotidase inhibitors on their steady-state ASL concentrations, (3) the changes in ASL composition caused by mechanical stress mimicking normal breathing, (4) and the differences in steady-state concentrations existing between nasal and bronchial epithelia. In addition, this model launched the study of nucleotide release into uncharted territories, which led to the discovery that airway epithelia release, not only ATP, but also ADP and AMP. This study shows that computational modeling, coupled to experimental validation, provides a powerful approach for the identification of key therapeutic targets for the improvement of airway clearance in obstructive respiratory diseases. PMID:21560044

  3. Kefir extracts suppress in vitro proliferation of estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cells but not normal mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chujian; Chan, Hing Man; Kubow, Stan

    2007-09-01

    Anti-tumorigenic effects have been demonstrated in animal studies from the intake of kefir, a traditional fermented milk product believed to originate from the Caucasian mountains of Russia. In the present study, the antiproliferative effects of extracts of kefir, yogurt, and pasteurized cow's milk on human mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) and normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) was investigated at doses of 0.31%, 0.63%, 1.25%, 2.5%, 5%, and 10% (vol/vol). After 6 days of culture, extracts of kefir-fermented milk depressed MCF-7 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, showing 29% inhibition of proliferation at a concentration as low as 0.63%, whereas yogurt extracts began to show dose-dependent antiproliferative effects only at the 2.5% dose. Moreover, at the 2.5% dose, kefir extracts decreased the MCF-7 cell numbers by 56%, while yogurt extracts decreased MCF-7 cell proliferation by only 14%. No antiproliferative effects of kefir extracts were observed in the HMECs, while the yogurt extracts exerted antiproliferative effects on HMECs at the 5% and 10% doses. Unfermented milk extracts stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 cells and HMECs at concentrations above 0.31%. Peptide content and capillary electrophoresis analyses showed that kefir-mediated milk fermentation led to an increase in peptide concentrations and a change in peptide profiles relative to milk or yogurt. The present findings suggest that kefir extracts contain constituents that specifically inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells, which might eventually be useful in the prevention or treatment of breast cancer. PMID:17887934

  4. Role of vascular density and normalization in response to neoadjuvant bevacizumab and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tolaney, Sara M; Boucher, Yves; Duda, Dan G; Martin, John D; Seano, Giorgio; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Barry, William T; Goel, Shom; Lahdenrata, Johanna; Isakoff, Steven J; Yeh, Eren D; Jain, Saloni R; Golshan, Mehra; Brock, Jane; Snuderl, Matija; Winer, Eric P; Krop, Ian E; Jain, Rakesh K

    2015-11-17

    Preoperative bevacizumab and chemotherapy may benefit a subset of breast cancer (BC) patients. To explore potential mechanisms of this benefit, we conducted a phase II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab (single dose) followed by combined bevacizumab and adriamycin/cyclophosphamide/paclitaxel chemotherapy in HER2-negative BC. The regimen was well-tolerated and showed a higher rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) in triple-negative (TN)BC (11/21 patients or 52%, [95% confidence interval (CI): 30,74]) than in hormone receptor-positive (HR)BC [5/78 patients or 6% (95%CI: 2,14)]. Within the HRBCs, basal-like subtype was significantly associated with pCR (P = 0.007; Fisher exact test). We assessed interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and tissue biopsies before and after bevacizumab monotherapy and circulating plasma biomarkers at baseline and before and after combination therapy. Bevacizumab alone lowered IFP, but to a smaller extent than previously observed in other tumor types. Pathologic response to therapy correlated with sVEGFR1 postbevacizumab alone in TNBC (Spearman correlation 0.610, P = 0.0033) and pretreatment microvascular density (MVD) in all patients (Spearman correlation 0.465, P = 0.0005). Moreover, increased pericyte-covered MVD, a marker of extent of vascular normalization, after bevacizumab monotherapy was associated with improved pathologic response to treatment, especially in patients with a high pretreatment MVD. These data suggest that bevacizumab prunes vessels while normalizing those remaining, and thus is beneficial only when sufficient numbers of vessels are initially present. This study implicates pretreatment MVD as a potential predictive biomarker of response to bevacizumab in BC and suggests that new therapies are needed to normalize vessels without pruning. PMID:26578779

  5. Role of vascular density and normalization in response to neoadjuvant bevacizumab and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tolaney, Sara M.; Boucher, Yves; Duda, Dan G.; Martin, John D.; Seano, Giorgio; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Barry, William T.; Goel, Shom; Lahdenrata, Johanna; Isakoff, Steven J.; Yeh, Eren D.; Jain, Saloni R.; Golshan, Mehra; Brock, Jane; Snuderl, Matija; Winer, Eric P.; Krop, Ian E.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative bevacizumab and chemotherapy may benefit a subset of breast cancer (BC) patients. To explore potential mechanisms of this benefit, we conducted a phase II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab (single dose) followed by combined bevacizumab and adriamycin/cyclophosphamide/paclitaxel chemotherapy in HER2-negative BC. The regimen was well-tolerated and showed a higher rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) in triple-negative (TN)BC (11/21 patients or 52%, [95% confidence interval (CI): 30,74]) than in hormone receptor-positive (HR)BC [5/78 patients or 6% (95%CI: 2,14)]. Within the HRBCs, basal-like subtype was significantly associated with pCR (P = 0.007; Fisher exact test). We assessed interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and tissue biopsies before and after bevacizumab monotherapy and circulating plasma biomarkers at baseline and before and after combination therapy. Bevacizumab alone lowered IFP, but to a smaller extent than previously observed in other tumor types. Pathologic response to therapy correlated with sVEGFR1 postbevacizumab alone in TNBC (Spearman correlation 0.610, P = 0.0033) and pretreatment microvascular density (MVD) in all patients (Spearman correlation 0.465, P = 0.0005). Moreover, increased pericyte-covered MVD, a marker of extent of vascular normalization, after bevacizumab monotherapy was associated with improved pathologic response to treatment, especially in patients with a high pretreatment MVD. These data suggest that bevacizumab prunes vessels while normalizing those remaining, and thus is beneficial only when sufficient numbers of vessels are initially present. This study implicates pretreatment MVD as a potential predictive biomarker of response to bevacizumab in BC and suggests that new therapies are needed to normalize vessels without pruning. PMID:26578779

  6. Down-regulation of the desmosomal cadherin desmocollin 3 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klus, G T; Rokaeus, N; Bittner, M L; Chen, Y; Korz, D M; Sukumar, S; Schick, A; Szallasi, Z

    2001-07-01

    In previous studies using cDNA microarray analysis, we have identified an expressed sequence tag which is consistently down-regulated in six human breast tumor cell lines. In the current study, we have determined this tag to be part of the mRNA sequence of human desmocollin 3, a member of the cadherin superfamily of proteins and an integral component of desmosomes. Desmosomes are sites of adhesion between adjacent cells in layers of epithelia, as well as in some non-epithelial tissues, and play an important role in the maintenance of tissue structure. Northern analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot analysis showed that desmocollin 3 is present in normal and immortalized human mammary epithelial cells, but consistently exhibits a significant, and often complete, down-regulation in breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors, both at the mRNA and protein levels. PMID:11408939

  7. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  8. The organizing principle: microenvironmental influences in the normal and malignant breast

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina; Radisky, Derek C.; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Petersen, Ole W.

    2002-08-20

    The current paradigm for cancer initiation and progression rests on the groundbreaking discoveries of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. This framework has revealed much about the role of genetic alterations in the underlying signaling pathways central to normal cellular function and to tumor progression. However, it is clear that single gene theories or even sequential acquisition of mutations underestimate the nature of the genetic and epigenetic changes in tumors, and do not account for the observation that many cancer susceptibility genes (e.g. BRCA1, APC) show a high degree of tissue specificity in their association with neoplastic transformation. Therefore, the cellular and tissue context itself must confer additional and crucial information necessary for mutated genes to exert their influence. A considerable body of evidence now shows that cell - cell and cell - extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential organizing principles that help define the nature of the tissue context, and play a crucial role in regulating homeostasis and tissue specificity. How this context determines functional integrity, and how its loss can lead to malignancy, appears to have much to do with tissue structure and polarity.

  9. Histological and immunohistochemical study of estrogen and progesterone receptors in normal human breast tissue in adult age groups vulnerable to malignancy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, R; Gupta, T; Gupta, R; Aggarwal, A; Sahni, D; Singh, G

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of receptor status has become standard procedure for assessing breast cancer patients. Estrogen causes epithelial proliferation in breast tissue via the estrogen receptor (ER). The progesterone receptor (PR) is also regulated by the estrogen gene. Analyzing ER and PR together gives information regarding the likely response of carcinoma patients to hormonal therapy. The aim of the present study was to record the expression patterns of ER and PR in normal mammary tissue in different age groups to provide reference data to facilitate histological diagnosis. Breast tissues from the upper outer quadrant of each side of 27 adult female cadavers were examined after H & E staining. ER and PR were identified and examined by immunohistochemistry. The percentage area occupied by parenchyma relative to stromal tissue was calculated in different age groups and was about 4:6, 3.5:6.5, 3:7, 2:8, and 1.5:8.5 in the 3rd, 4th and 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th, and 10th decades of life, respectively. Both ER and PR were present in all age groups and the numbers of both receptors were maximal during the 4th decade. The distribution and staining patterns for both ER and PR were recorded in different age groups. The contiguous pattern of ER, which is considered pathognomonic of breast carcinoma, was not seen except in one case in the 6th decade. Moderately stained ER and PR receptor sites predominated throughout. The study of normal breast tissue of similar age might provide comparisons that will help histopathologists to make clinical diagnoses from breast biopsies. Clin. Anat. 29:729-737, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038435

  10. Glucose transport by epithelia prepared from harvested enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuhiro; van der Merwe, Marie; Bering, Stine B; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Conoley, Veronica G; Sangild, Per T; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Buddington, Randal K

    2015-01-01

    Transformed and cultured cell lines have significant shortcomings for investigating the characteristics and responses of native villus enterocytes in situ. Interpretations of results from intact tissues are complicated by the presence of underlying tissues and the crypt compartment. We describe a simple, novel, and reproducible method for preparing functional epithelia using differentiated enterocytes harvested from the small intestine upper villus of adult mice and preterm pigs with and without necrotizing enterocolitis. Concentrative, rheogenic glucose uptake was used as an indicator of epithelial function and was demonstrated by cellular accumulation of tracer (14)C D-glucose and Ussing chamber based short-circuit currents. Assessment of the epithelia by light and immunofluorescent microscopy revealed the harvested enterocytes remain differentiated and establish cell-cell connections to form polarized epithelia with distinct apical and basolateral domains. As with intact tissues, the epithelia exhibit glucose induced short-circuit currents that are increased by exposure to adenosine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and decreased by phloridzin to inhibit the apical glucose transporter SGLT-1. Similarly, accumulation of (14)C D-glucose by the epithelia was inhibited by phloridzin, but not phloretin, and was stimulated by pre-exposure to AMP and adenosine, apparently by a microtubule-based mechanism that is disrupted by nocodazole, with the magnitudes of responses to adenosine, forskolin, and health status exceeding those we have measured using intact tissues. Our findings indicate that epithelia prepared from harvested enterocytes provide an alternative approach for comparative studies of the characteristics of nutrient transport by the upper villus epithelium and the responses to different conditions and stimuli. PMID:24166597

  11. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  12. Human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia have reduced Cl- conductance but not increased Na+ conductance.

    PubMed

    Itani, Omar A; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah; Keshavjee, Shaf; Parekh, Kalpaj; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2011-06-21

    Loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel function causes cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. CFTR is expressed in airway epithelia, but how CF alters electrolyte transport across airway epithelia has remained uncertain. Recent studies of a porcine model showed that in vivo, excised, and cultured CFTR(-/-) and CFTR(ΔF508/ΔF508) airway epithelia lacked anion conductance, and they did not hyperabsorb Na(+). Therefore, we asked whether Cl(-) and Na(+) conductances were altered in human CF airway epithelia. We studied differentiated primary cultures of tracheal/bronchial epithelia and found that transepithelial conductance (Gt) under basal conditions and the cAMP-stimulated increase in Gt were markedly attenuated in CF epithelia compared with non-CF epithelia. These data reflect loss of the CFTR anion conductance. In CF and non-CF epithelia, the Na(+) channel inhibitor amiloride produced similar reductions in Gt and Na(+) absorption, indicating that Na(+) conductance in CF epithelia did not exceed that in non-CF epithelia. Consistent with previous reports, adding amiloride caused greater reductions in transepithelial voltage and short-circuit current in CF epithelia than in non-CF epithelia; these changes are attributed to loss of a Cl(-) conductance. These results indicate that Na(+) conductance was not increased in these cultured CF tracheal/bronchial epithelia and point to loss of anion transport as key to airway epithelial dysfunction in CF. PMID:21646513

  13. Human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia have reduced Cl− conductance but not increased Na+ conductance

    PubMed Central

    Itani, Omar A.; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Karp, Philip H.; Ernst, Sarah; Keshavjee, Shaf; Parekh, Kalpaj; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel function causes cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. CFTR is expressed in airway epithelia, but how CF alters electrolyte transport across airway epithelia has remained uncertain. Recent studies of a porcine model showed that in vivo, excised, and cultured CFTR−/− and CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 airway epithelia lacked anion conductance, and they did not hyperabsorb Na+. Therefore, we asked whether Cl− and Na+ conductances were altered in human CF airway epithelia. We studied differentiated primary cultures of tracheal/bronchial epithelia and found that transepithelial conductance (Gt) under basal conditions and the cAMP-stimulated increase in Gt were markedly attenuated in CF epithelia compared with non-CF epithelia. These data reflect loss of the CFTR anion conductance. In CF and non-CF epithelia, the Na+ channel inhibitor amiloride produced similar reductions in Gt and Na+ absorption, indicating that Na+ conductance in CF epithelia did not exceed that in non-CF epithelia. Consistent with previous reports, adding amiloride caused greater reductions in transepithelial voltage and short-circuit current in CF epithelia than in non-CF epithelia; these changes are attributed to loss of a Cl− conductance. These results indicate that Na+ conductance was not increased in these cultured CF tracheal/bronchial epithelia and point to loss of anion transport as key to airway epithelial dysfunction in CF. PMID:21646513

  14. Comparison of normal tissue pharmacokinetics with {sup 111}In/{sup 9}Y monoclonal antibody m170 for breast and prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; O'Donnell, Robert T.; Richman, Carol M. . E-mail: sjdenardo@ucdavis.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Radioactivity deposition in normal tissues limits the dose deliverable by radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study investigated the absorbed radiation dose in normal tissues for prostate cancer patients in comparison to breast cancer patients for 2 RPs using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) m170. Methods and Materials: {sup 111}In-DOTA-glycylglycylglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanatophenylalanine amide (GGGF)-m170 and {sup 111}In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) 2-iminothiolane (2IT)-m170, representing the same MAb and chelate with and without a cleavable linkage, were studied in 13 breast cancer and 26 prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for {sup 9}Y was calculated using {sup 111}In MAb pharmacokinetics from the initial imaging study for each patient, using reference man- and patient-specific masses. Results: The reference man-specific radiation doses (cGy/MBq) were not significantly different for the breast and the prostate cancer patients for both RPs in all but one tissue-RP combination (liver, DOTA-2IT). The patient-specific doses had differences between the groups most of which can be related to weight differences. Conclusions: Similar normal tissue doses were calculated for two groups of patients having different cancers and genders. This similarity combined with continued careful analysis of the imaging data might allow the use of higher starting doses in early phase RIT studies.

  15. SMAD4 expression in breast ductal carcinoma correlates with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, NANNAN; YU, CHUNYAN; SHI, YANFEN; JIANG, JING; LIU, YUHE

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined SMAD4 expression in fine-needle aspiration cell blocks from patients with breast ductal carcinoma, in order to assess its viability as a prognostic marker. Using immunohistochemistry, the SMAD4 protein status of 86 breast ductal carcinoma fine-needle biopsies, from patients who underwent tumor resection at Beihua University Affiliated Hospital (Jilin, China) between 2002 and 2008, was characterized. The association between SMAD4 expression and clinicopathological parameters, as well as prognosis was assessed using the Mantel-Haenszel method and Cox proportional hazards regression. SMAD4 staining was observed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and its expression was found to be decreased in ductal breast carcinoma as compared with adjacent normal breast epithelia. Patients with reduced SMAD4 expression levels tended to exhibit more poorly differentiated tumors, a higher risk of recurrence and shorter overall survival. These results demonstrated that the evaluation of SMAD4 protein status in fine-needle biopsy specimens of breast ductal carcinoma may provide additional prognostic information. PMID:26622737

  16. Loss of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors From Bile Duct Epithelia Is a Common Event in Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    SHIBAO, KAZUNORI; HIRATA, KEIJI; ROBERT, MARIE E.; NATHANSON, MICHAEL H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims: Cholestasis is one of the principal manifestations of liver disease and often results from disorders involving bile duct epithelia rather than hepatocytes. A range of disorders affects biliary epithelia, and no unifying pathophysiologic event in these cells has been identified as the cause of cholestasis. Here we examined the role of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R)/Ca2+ release channel in Ca2+ signaling and ductular secretion in animal models of cholestasis and in patients with cholestatic disorders. Methods: The expression and distribution of the InsP3R and related proteins were examined in rat cholangiocytes before and after bile duct ligation or treatment with endotoxin. Ca2+ signaling was examined in isolated bile ducts from these animals, whereas ductular bicarbonate secretion was examined in isolated perfused livers. Confocal immunofluorescence was used to examine cholangiocyte InsP3R expression in human liver biopsy specimens. Results: Expression of the InsP3R was selectively lost from biliary epithelia after bile duct ligation or endotoxin treatment. As a result, Ca2+ signaling and Ca2+-mediated bicarbonate secretion were lost as well, although other components of the Ca2+ signaling pathway and adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated bicarbonate secretion both were preserved. Examination of human liver biopsy specimens showed that InsP3Rs also were lost from bile duct epithelia in a range of human cholestatic disorders, although InsP3R expression was intact in noncholestatic liver disease. Conclusions: InsP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling in bile duct epithelia appears to be important for normal bile secretion in the liver, and loss of InsP3Rs may be a final common pathway for cholestasis. PMID:14517800

  17. Evidence of inherent spontaneous polarization in the metazoan integument epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Athenstaedt, H; Claussen, H

    1983-01-01

    The live integument epithelia of the metazoa have an inherent spontaneous polarization (an inherent permanent electric dipole moment) of corresponding direction perpendicular to the integument surface. The existence of the inherent polarization was proved by their temperature dependence, i.e., by the pyroelectric (PE) effect. Quantitative PE measurements were carried out on a number of integument epithelia of vertebrates (a) in vivo, (b) on fresh epidermis preparations, and (c) on dead, air-dried epidermis specimens of the same species. The demonstrated spontaneous polarization is not dependent on the living state and not caused by a potential difference between the outer and inner integument surface. Dead, dry epidermis samples (potential difference less than 0.01 mV) as well as dead, dry integument appendages (bristles, hairs), and dead cuticles (of arthropoda, annelida, nematoda) showed an inherent dipole moment of the same orientation as the live epidermis. The findings reveal a relationship between the direction (vector) of inherent spontaneous polarization and that of growth (morphogenesis) in the animal epidermis, their appendages, and cuticles. We conclude (a) that the inherent spontaneous polarization is present in live individual epithelial cells of the metazoan integument, and (b) that this physical property is related to the structural and functional cell polarity of integument epithelia and possibly of other epithelia. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:6838974

  18. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy: An RTOG Multi-Institutional and Multiobserver Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. Allen Tai, An; Arthur, Douglas W.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Macdonald, Shannon; Marks, Lawrence B.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Taghian, Alphonse; Vicini, Frank; Woodward, Wendy; White, Julia R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the multi-institutional and multiobserver variability of target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation for breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and its dosimetric impact as the first step of a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group effort to establish a breast cancer atlas. Methods and Materials: Nine radiation oncologists specializing in breast RT from eight institutions independently delineated targets (e.g., lumpectomy cavity, boost planning target volume, breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary nodes, chest wall) and OARs (e.g., heart, lung) on the same CT images of three representative breast cancer patients. Interobserver differences in structure delineation were quantified regarding volume, distance between centers of mass, percent overlap, and average surface distance. Mean, median, and standard deviation for these quantities were calculated for all possible combinations. To assess the impact of these variations on treatment planning, representative dosimetric plans based on observer-specific contours were generated. Results: Variability in contouring the targets and OARs between the institutions and observers was substantial. Structure overlaps were as low as 10%, and volume variations had standard deviations up to 60%. The large variability was related both to differences in opinion regarding target and OAR boundaries and approach to incorporation of setup uncertainty and dosimetric limitations in target delineation. These interobserver differences result in substantial variations in dosimetric planning for breast RT. Conclusions: Differences in target and OAR delineation for breast irradiation between institutions/observers appear to be clinically and dosimetrically significant. A systematic consensus is highly desirable, particularly in the era of intensity-modulated and image-guided RT.

  19. Quantitative measurement of optical parameters in normal breasts using time-resolved spectroscopy: in vivo results of 30 Japanese women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yutaka; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Kaneko, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Chance, Britton

    1996-07-01

    Previous investigation has proved time-resolved spectroscopy to be applicable to measurement of optical parameters in the human breast. To increase knowledge of these properties in vivo, the optical parameters of healthy breasts were measured using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy. A time-correlated single-photon counting method was used to obtain time-response curves for the breasts of 30 Japanese women. Values of (mu) a and (mu) s$' were analyzed by fitting the curves to the diffusion equation. The relationships of optical parameters to age, body mass index, thickness of the breast, number of pregnancies, and menstrual status were examined. The (mu) a and (mu) s' ranged from 0.0024 to 0.0078/mm and from 0.63 to 1.08/mm, respectively. The values of (mu) a and (mu) s' showed a high correlation with properties may be strongly influenced by changes in tissue components related to aging, menstrual status, and so on. This optical information will contribute to the investigation of photon migration in the human breast.

  20. Rapid Discrimination of Malignant Breast Lesions from Normal Tissues Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongyuan; Wei, Zhigong; Xiao, Yue; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Raman spectroscopy system in the detection of malignant breast lesions through a systemic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Embase from 2000 to June 2015. Published studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of Raman spectroscopy in distinguishing malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and normal tissues were included in our study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was derived. A Revised Tool for the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines was used to assess the quality of included studies. Results The initial search produced a total of 157 articles after removing duplicates. Nine studies (8 in vitro and 1 in vivo) were eligible in this meta-analysis. We analyzed the eight in vitro studies with 1756 lesions, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy system for the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions were 0.92 (95% CI 0.86–0.96) and 0.97 (97% CI 0.93–0.98), respectively. Diagnostic odds ratio was 266.70 (95% CI 89.38–795.79), and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was 0.98 (95% CI 0.97–0.99). Significant heterogeneity was found between studies. There was no evidence of considerable publication bias. Conclusions Raman spectroscopy system is an optical diagnostic technology with great value for detecting malignant breast lesions. At the same time, it has advantages of being non-invasive, real-time, and easy to use. Thus it deserves to be further explored for intra-operatory breast tumor margin detection. PMID:27459193

  1. Comparative regulation of gene expression by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in cells derived from normal mammary tissue and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Sarah G; Robilotto, Samantha; Welsh, JoEllen

    2016-01-01

    Previous genomic profiling of immortalized, non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells identified a set of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated genes with potential relevance to breast cancer prevention. In this report, we characterized the effect of 1,25D on a subset of these genes in six cell lines derived from mammary tissue and breast cancers. Non-tumorigenic cell lines included hTERT-HME1, HME and MCF10A cells which are often used to model normal breast epithelial cells. Breast cancer cell lines included MCF7 cells (a model of early stage, estrogen-dependent disease), DCIS.com cells (a derivative of MCF10A cells that models in situ breast cancer) and Hs578T cells (a model of metastatic disease). All of these cell lines express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and exhibit anti-cancer responses to 1,25D such as changes in proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, or invasion. Our comparative data demonstrate highly variable responses to 1,25D (100nM, 24h) between the cell lines. In both hTERT-HME1 and HME cell lines, CYP24A1, SLC1A1 and ITGB3 were up-regulated whereas KDR, GLUL and BIRC3 were down-regulated in response to 1,25D. In contrast, no changes in SLC1A1, ITGB3 or GLUL expression were detected in 1,25D treated MCF10A cells although KDR and BIRC3 were down-regulated by 1,25D. The effects of 1,25D on these genes in the breast cancer cell lines were blunted, with the DCIS.com cells exhibiting the most similar responses to the immortalized hTERT-HME1 and HME cells. The differences in cellular responses were not due to general impairment in VDR function as robust CYP24A1 induction was observed in all cell lines. Thus, our data indicate that the genomic changes induced by 1,25D are highly cell-type specific even in model cell lines derived from the same tissue. The implication of these findings is that genomic responses to changes in vitamin D status in vivo are likely to be distinct from individual to individual, particularly in neoplastic tissue. PMID

  2. Comparative regulation of gene expression by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in cells derived from normal mammary tissue and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Beaudin, Sarah G; Robilotto, Samantha; Welsh, JoEllen

    2015-04-01

    Previous genomic profiling of immortalized, non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells identified a set of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated genes with potential relevance to breast cancer prevention. In this report, we characterized the effect of 1,25D on a subset of these genes in six cell lines derived from mammary tissue and breast cancers. Non-tumorigenic cell lines included hTERT-HME1, HME and MCF10A cells which are often used to model normal breast epithelial cells. Breast cancer cell lines included MCF7 cells (a model of early stage, estrogen-dependent disease), DCIS.com cells (a derivative of MCF10A cells that models in situ breast cancer) and Hs578T cells (a model of metastatic disease). All of these cell lines express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and exhibit anti-cancer responses to 1,25D such as changes in proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, or invasion. Our comparative data demonstrate highly variable responses to 1,25D (100nM, 24h) between the cell lines. In both hTERT-HME1 and HME cell lines, CYP24A1, SLC1A1 and ITGB3 were up-regulated whereas KDR, GLUL and BIRC3 were down-regulated in response to 1,25D. In contrast, no changes in SLC1A1, ITGB3 or GLUL expression were detected in 1,25D treated MCF10A cells although KDR and BIRC3 were down-regulated by 1,25D. The effects of 1,25D on these genes in the breast cancer cell lines were blunted, with the DCIS.com cells exhibiting the most similar responses to the immortalized hTERT-HME1 and HME cells. The differences in cellular responses were not due to general impairment in VDR function as robust CYP24A1 induction was observed in all cell lines. Thus, our data indicate that the genomic changes induced by 1,25D are highly cell-type specific even in model cell lines derived from the same tissue. The implication of these findings is that genomic responses to changes in vitamin D status in vivo are likely to be distinct from individual to individual, particularly in neoplastic tissue. This

  3. Amount of stroma is associated with mammographic density and stromal expression of oestrogen receptor in normal breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Marike; Chiesa, Flaminia; Paulsson, Janna; Strell, Carina; Behmer, Catharina; Rönnow, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Östman, Arne; Hall, Per

    2016-07-01

    Following female sex and age, mammographic density is considered one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Despite the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk, little is known about the underlying histology and biological basis of breast density. To better understand the mechanisms behind mammographic density we assessed morphology, proliferation and hormone receptor status in relation to mammographic density in breast tissues from healthy women. Tissues were obtained from 2012-2013 by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from 160 women as part of the Karma (Karolinska mammography project for risk prediction for breast cancer) project. Mammograms were collected through routine mammography screening and mammographic density was calculated using STRATUS. The histological composition, epithelial and stromal proliferation status and hormone receptor status were assessed through immunohistochemical staining. Higher mammographic density was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stromal and epithelial tissue and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial expression levels of Ki-67, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were not associated with mammographic density. Epithelial Ki-67 was associated with a greater proportion of epithelial tissue, and epithelial PR was associated with a greater proportion of stromal and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial ER was not associated with any tissues. In contrast, expression of ER in the stroma was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stroma, and negatively associated with the amount of adipose tissue. High mammographic density is associated with higher amount of stroma and epithelium and less amount of fat, but is not associated with a change in epithelial proliferation or receptor status. Increased expressions of both epithelial PR and stromal ER are associated with a greater proportion of stroma, suggesting hormonal involvement

  4. Distinct expression patterns of the E3 ligase SIAH-1 and its partner Kid/KIF22 in normal tissues and in the breast tumoral processes.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto; Fernandez, Plinio; Veiga, Lucía; Podgorniak, Marie-Pierre; Powell, Darren J; Candeias, Marco M; Mourah, Samia; Calvo, Fabien; Marín, Mónica

    2010-01-01

    SIAH proteins are the human members of an highly conserved family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Several data suggest that SIAH proteins may have a role in tumor suppression and apoptosis. Previously, we reported that SIAH-1 induces the degradation of Kid (KIF22), a chromokinesin protein implicated in the normal progression of mitosis and meiosis, by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In human breast cancer cells stably transfected with SIAH-1, Kid/KIF22 protein level was markedly reduced whereas, the Kid/KIF22 mRNA level was increased. This interaction has been further elucidated through analyzing SIAH and Kid/KIF22 expression in both paired normal and tumor tissues and cell lines. It was observed that SIAH-1 protein is widely expressed in different normal tissues, and in cells lines but showing some differences in western blotting profiles. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that the intracellular distribution of SIAH-1 and Kid/KIF22 appears to be modified in human tumor tissues compared to normal controls. When mRNA expression of SIAH-1 and Kid/KIF22 was analyzed by real-time PCR in normal and cancer breast tissues from the same patient, a large variation in the number of mRNA copies was detected between the different samples. In most cases, SIAH-1 mRNA is decreased in tumor tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Interestingly, in all breast tumor tissues analyzed, variations in the Kid/KIF22 mRNA levels mirrored those seen with SIAH-1 mRNAs. This concerted variation of SIAH-1 and Kid/KIF22 messengers suggests the existence of an additional level of control than the previously described protein-protein interaction and protein stability regulation. Our observations also underline the need to re-evaluate the results of gene expression obtained by qRT-PCR and relate it to the protein expression and cellular localization when matched normal and tumoral tissues are analyzed. PMID:20144232

  5. Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1)-deficient embryos develop normally but are more susceptible to ethanol-initiated DNA damage and embryopathies☆

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Aaron M.; Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The breast cancer 1 (brca1) gene is associated with breast and ovarian cancers, and heterozygous (+/−) brca1 knockout progeny develop normally, suggesting a negligible developmental impact. However, our results show BRCA1 plays a broader biological role in protecting the embryo from oxidative stress. Sox2-promoted Cre-expressing hemizygous males were mated with floxed brca1 females, and gestational day 8 +/− brca1 conditional knockout embryos with a 28% reduction in protein expression were exposed in culture to the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-initiating drug ethanol (EtOH). Untreated +/− brca1-deficient embryos developed normally, but when exposed to EtOH exhibited increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, γH2AX, which is a marker of DNA double strand breaks that can result from 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, formation, and embryopathies at EtOH concentrations that did not affect their brca1-normal littermates. These results reveal that even modest BRCA1 deficiencies render the embryo more susceptible to drug-enhanced ROS formation, and corroborate a role for DNA oxidation in the mechanism of EtOH teratogenesis. PMID:26629949

  6. In vitro and in silico evaluation of NF-κB targeted costunolide action on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells--a comparison with normal breast cells.

    PubMed

    Pitchai, Daisy; Roy, Anita; Banu, Sakhila

    2014-10-01

    Costunolide, a sesquiterpene lactone is a plant-derived secondary metabolite found to be present in most of the pharmacologically active herbs, being the cause for their medicinal values. The present study aims to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of costunolide isolated from Costus speciosus rhizome extract on MDA-MB-231 cells and explore its targeted action in comparison with its action on the normal breast cells (MCF 10A). The effect of costunolide on cell viability of the cells was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide viability assay. The targeted action of the compound was analyzed comparing the effectiveness of the compound to alter the protein expression levels of NF-κB subunits in the normal and the cancer cells using western blotting analysis. In silico studies were performed to predict the targeted interaction of costunolide with the NF-κB subunit proteins. Costunolide inhibited the cell viability of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner leaving no significant change in the viability of the normal breast cells. The over expressed NF-κB subunits - p65, 52 and 100 in the cancer cells were found to be downregulated when treated with costunolide at an effective dose of 20 and 40 μM costunolide. In silico results provided stable interactions between costunolide and the target proteins, supporting the in vitro results in addition. Thus, costunolide derived from C. speciosus plant source elevates a fresh conviction for its use in breast cancer therapy for its cytotoxic efficacy and non-toxic nature. PMID:24733523

  7. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  8. Long-term exposure of MCF-12A normal human breast epithelial cells to ethanol induces epithelial mesenchymal transition and oncogenic features

    PubMed Central

    GELFAND, ROBERT; VERNET, DOLORES; BRUHN, KEVIN; VADGAMA, JAYDUTT; GONZALEZ-CADAVID, NESTOR F.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is associated with breast cancer incidence and progression, and moderate chronic consumption of ethanol is a risk factor. The mechanisms involved in alcohol's oncogenic effects are unknown, but it has been speculated that they may be mediated by acetaldehyde. We used the immortalized normal human epithelial breast cell line MCF-12A to determine whether short- or long-term exposure to ethanol or to acetaldehyde, using in vivo compatible ethanol concentrations, induces their oncogenic transformation and/or the acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cultures of MCF-12A cells were incubated with 25 mM ethanol or 2.5 mM acetaldehyde for 1 week, or with lower concentrations (1.0–2.5 mM for ethanol, 1.0 mM for acetaldehyde) for 4 weeks. In the 4-week incubation, cells were also tested for anchorage-independence, including isolation of soft agar selected cells (SASC) from the 2.5 mM ethanol incubations. Cells were analyzed by immunocytofluorescence, flow cytometry, western blotting, DNA microarrays, RT/PCR, and assays for miRs. We found that short-term exposure to ethanol, but not, in general, to acetaldehyde, was associated with transcriptional upregulation of the metallothionein family genes, alcohol metabolism genes, and genes suggesting the initiation of EMT, but without related phenotypic changes. Long-term exposure to the lower concentrations of ethanol or acetaldehyde induced frank EMT changes in the monolayer cultures and in SASC as demonstrated by changes in cellular phenotype, mRNA expression, and microRNA expression. This suggests that low concentrations of ethanol, with little or no mediation by acetaldehyde, induce EMT and some traits of oncogenic transformation such as anchorage-independence in normal breast epithelial cells. PMID:27035792

  9. Long-term exposure of MCF-12A normal human breast epithelial cells to ethanol induces epithelial mesenchymal transition and oncogenic features.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Robert; Vernet, Dolores; Bruhn, Kevin; Vadgama, Jaydutt; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F

    2016-06-01

    Alcoholism is associated with breast cancer incidence and progression, and moderate chronic consumption of ethanol is a risk factor. The mechanisms involved in alcohol's oncogenic effects are unknown, but it has been speculated that they may be mediated by acetaldehyde. We used the immortalized normal human epithelial breast cell line MCF-12A to determine whether short- or long-term exposure to ethanol or to acetaldehyde, using in vivo compatible ethanol concentrations, induces their oncogenic transformation and/or the acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cultures of MCF-12A cells were incubated with 25 mM ethanol or 2.5 mM acetaldehyde for 1 week, or with lower concentrations (1.0-2.5 mM for ethanol, 1.0 mM for acetaldehyde) for 4 weeks. In the 4-week incubation, cells were also tested for anchorage-independence, including isolation of soft agar selected cells (SASC) from the 2.5 mM ethanol incubations. Cells were analyzed by immunocytofluorescence, flow cytometry, western blotting, DNA microarrays, RT/PCR, and assays for miRs. We found that short-term exposure to ethanol, but not, in general, to acetaldehyde, was associated with transcriptional upregulation of the metallothionein family genes, alcohol metabolism genes, and genes suggesting the initiation of EMT, but without related phenotypic changes. Long-term exposure to the lower concentrations of ethanol or acetaldehyde induced frank EMT changes in the monolayer cultures and in SASC as demonstrated by changes in cellular phenotype, mRNA expression, and microRNA expression. This suggests that low concentrations of ethanol, with little or no mediation by acetaldehyde, induce EMT and some traits of oncogenic transformation such as anchorage-independence in normal breast epithelial cells. PMID:27035792

  10. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  11. Possession of ATM Sequence Variants as Predictor for Late Normal Tissue Responses in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Fan, Grace; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Iyengar, Preetha B.A.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The ATM gene product is a central component of cell cycle regulation and genomic surveillance. We hypothesized that DNA sequence alterations in ATM predict for adverse effects after external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 patients with a minimum of 2 years follow-up who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were screened for sequence alterations in ATM using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Genetic variants were identified using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring schemes for skin and subcutaneous tissues were applied to quantify the radiation-induced effects. Results: Of the 131 patients, 51 possessed ATM sequence alterations located within exons or in short intron regions flanking each exon that encompass putative splice site regions. Of these 51 patients, 21 (41%) exhibited a minimum of a Grade 2 late radiation response. In contrast, of the 80 patients without an ATM sequence variation, only 18 (23%) had radiation-induced adverse responses, for an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2). Fifteen patients were heterozygous for the G{yields}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which causes substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein. Of these 15 patients, 8 (53%) exhibited a Grade 2-4 late response compared with 31 (27%) of the 116 patients without this alteration, for an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). Conclusion: Sequence variants located in the ATM gene, in particular the 5557 G{yields}A polymorphism, may predict for late adverse radiation responses in breast cancer patients.

  12. Effect of L-ascorbate on Chloride Transport in Freshly Excised Sinonasal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Hwang, Peter H.; Illek, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) occurs at high frequency in patients with cystic fibrosis, suggesting that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride (Cl) ion channel might be involved in the development of chronic sinusitis in the general population. CFTR Cl ion transport controls the hydration of mucosal surfaces and promotes effective mucociliary clearance. Altered ion transport, and hence disrupted mucociliary function, could play a role in the pathogenesis of sinus disease. L-ascorbate is a metabolically active component of the nasal and tracheobronchial airway lining fluids and appears to serve as an important biological effector of CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of L-ascorbate on Cl ion transport in freshly excised sinonasal epithelia from normal controls and patients with CRS. Methods Four different types of sinonasal tissue (normal sinus mucosa, sinus mucosa from CRS, normal nasal mucosa, nasal mucosa from CRS) were obtained during endoscopic sinus surgery and mounted on sliders with open areas of 0.03 to 0.71cm2 between Ussing hemichambers. Short-circuit current (Isc) was continuously recorded, and a serosa-to-mucosa-directed Cl gradient was applied to increase the electrochemical driving force. Results L-ascorbate (500µM) stimulated Cl currents (ΔICl, µA/cm2) across sinonasal epithelia from normal and CRS patients. The Cl secretory response to L-ascorbate was effectively blocked by the Cl ion transport inhibitors glibenclamide and bumetanide. A maximal dose of L-ascorbate (at 1 mM) stimulated 53–70% of Cl currents elicited by the cAMP agonist forskolin. CRS sinonasal tissue was characterized by impaired Cl secretory responses to L-ascorbate that were reduced by 33% in sinus epithelial tissue and by 70% in nasal epithelial tissue when compared to normal subjects. In nasal epithelial tissue from normal subjects, Cl secretion was approximately 2-fold

  13. iSERS microscopy guided by wide field immunofluorescence: analysis of HER2 expression on normal and breast cancer FFPE tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Yuying; König, Matthias; Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Walkenfort, Bernd; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2016-08-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy is an emerging imaging technique for tissue-based cancer diagnostics. Specifically, immuno-SERS (iSERS) microscopy employs antibodies labelled by molecularly functionalized noble metal colloids for antigen localization on tissue specimen. Spectrally resolved iSERS acquisition schemes are typically rather time-consuming when large tissue areas must be scanned. Here, we demonstrate the application of iSERS imaging guided by wide field immunofluorescence (IF) for localization of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on breast tissue sections. The addition of unlabelled anti-HER2 primary antibodies to the tissue is followed by the incubation with secondary antibodies labelled with both Alexa-647 (for IF) and hydrophilically stabilized gold nanostars coated with aromatic thiols (for iSERS). False-color iSERS images clearly reveal the different HER2 expression levels on normal and breast cancer tissue, respectively. A series of negative controls confirms that the binding specificity of the secondary antibody is maintained after conjugation to the SERS nanoparticles. PMID:27302205

  14. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Composition in the Malaria Mosquito's Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tchioffo, Majoline T.; Boissière, Anne; Abate, Luc; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Bayibéki, Albert N.; Awono-Ambéné, Parfait H.; Christen, Richard; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Morlais, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The Anopheles midgut hosts diverse bacterial communities and represents a complex ecosystem. Several evidences indicate that mosquito midgut microbiota interferes with malaria parasite transmission. However, the bacterial composition of salivary glands and ovaries, two other biologically important tissues, has not been described so far. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the bacterial communities in the mosquito tissues from emerging mosquitoes until 8 days after a blood meal containing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and described the temporal colonization of the mosquito epithelia. Bacterial communities were identified in the midgut, ovaries, and salivary glands of individual mosquitoes using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that the mosquito epithelia share a core microbiota, but some bacteria taxa were more associated with one or another tissue at a particular time point. The bacterial composition in the tissues of emerging mosquitoes varied according to the breeding site, indicating that some bacteria are acquired from the environment. Our results revealed temporal variations in the bacterial community structure, possibly as a result of the mosquito physiological changes. The abundance of Serratia significantly correlated with P. falciparum infection both in the midgut and salivary glands of malaria challenged mosquitoes, which suggests that interactions occur between microbes and parasites. These bacteria may represent promising targets for vector control strategies. Overall, this study points out the importance of characterizing bacterial communities in malaria mosquito vectors. PMID:26779155

  15. CFTR–SLC26 transporter interactions in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Transport mechanisms that mediate the movements of anions must be coordinated tightly in order to respond appropriately to physiological stimuli. This process is of paramount importance in the function of diverse epithelial tissues of the body, such as, for example, the exocrine pancreatic duct and the airway epithelia. Disruption of any of the finely tuned components underlying the transport of anions such as Cl−, HCO3−, SCN−, and I− may contribute to a plethora of disease conditions. In many anion-secreting epithelia, the interactions between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and solute carrier family 26 (SLC26) transporters determine the final exit of anions across the apical membrane and into the luminal compartment. The molecular identification of CFTR and many SLC26 members has enabled the acquisition of progressively more detailed structural information about these transport molecules. Studies employing a vast array of increasingly sophisticated approaches have culminated in a current working model which places these key players within an interactive complex, thereby setting the stage for future work. PMID:22685498

  16. In vitro synthesis of primary specific anti-breast cancer antibodies by normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Norkina, Oxana; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a unique in vitro model to mimic the endogenous tumor microenvironment to understand the effect of immunotherapy with activated T-cells (ATC) armed with anti-CD3 × anti-Her2 bispecific antibody (aATC) on antibody response by naive immune cells. This model contained a co-culture of naïve peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3), ATC or aATC and CpG ODNs. Culture supernatants were tested at various time points for anti-SK-BR-3 antibodies by ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry. PBMC cocultured with non-irradiated aATC or irradiated (*) aATC showed significant increases in anti-tumor antibody production at day 14 (P < 0.0001) in the presence of CpG-ODN compared to unstimulated PBMC cultures (n = 9). Antibody specificity was confirmed by ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry. Co-cultures containing *aATC and CpG showed significantly enhanced levels of IgG2 (P < 0.001) and cytokines that promote IgG2 synthesis including IL-13 (P < 0.02), IFNγ (P < 0.01) and GM-CSF (P < 0.05) compared to unstimulated PBMC control (n = 3). We show that aATC targeting and lysis of tumor cells induces an anti-tumor antibody response in our in vitro model. This model provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the interactions of T-cells, B-cells, and antigen-presenting cells leading to specific anti-tumor antibody responses. PMID:21713642

  17. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  18. 17β-Estradiol inhibits Ca2+-dependent homeostasis of airway surface liquid volume in human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, Ray D.; Sun, Hengrui; Clunes, Lucy A.; Rasmussen, Julia E.; Stackhouse, James R.; Okada, Seiko F.; Fricks, Ingrid; Young, Steven L.; Tarran, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Normal airways homeostatically regulate the volume of airway surface liquid (ASL) through both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of ion and water transport. In cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect causes a lack of cAMP-regulated CFTR activity, leading to diminished Cl– and water secretion from airway epithelial cells and subsequent mucus plugging, which serves as the focus for infections. Females with CF exhibit reduced survival compared with males with CF, although the mechanisms underlying this sex-related disadvantage are unknown. Despite the lack of CFTR, CF airways retain a limited capability to regulate ASL volume, as breathing-induced ATP release activates salvage purinergic pathways that raise intracellular Ca2+ concentration to stimulate an alternate pathway to Cl– secretion. We hypothesized that estrogen might affect this pathway by reducing the ability of airway epithelia to respond appropriately to nucleotides. We found that uridine triphosphate–mediated (UTP-mediated) Cl– secretion was reduced during the periovulatory estrogen maxima in both women with CF and normal, healthy women. Estrogen also inhibited Ca2+ signaling and ASL volume homeostasis in non-CF and CF airway epithelia by attenuating Ca2+ influx. This inhibition of Ca2+ signaling was prevented and even potentiated by estrogen antagonists such as tamoxifen, suggesting that antiestrogens may be beneficial in the treatment of CF lung disease because they increase Cl– secretion in the airways. PMID:19033671

  19. The beetle amnion and serosa functionally interact as apposed epithelia.

    PubMed

    Hilbrant, Maarten; Horn, Thorsten; Koelzer, Stefan; Panfilio, Kristen A

    2016-01-01

    Unlike passive rupture of the human chorioamnion at birth, the insect extraembryonic (EE) tissues - the amnion and serosa - actively rupture and withdraw in late embryogenesis. Withdrawal is essential for development and has been a morphogenetic puzzle. Here, we use new fluorescent transgenic lines in the beetle Tribolium castaneum to show that the EE tissues dynamically form a basal-basal epithelial bilayer, contradicting the previous hypothesis of EE intercalation. We find that the EE tissues repeatedly detach and reattach throughout development and have distinct roles. Quantitative live imaging analyses show that the amnion initiates EE rupture in a specialized anterior-ventral cap. RNAi phenotypes demonstrate that the serosa contracts autonomously. Thus, apposition in a bilayer enables the amnion as 'initiator' to coordinate with the serosa as 'driver' to achieve withdrawal. This EE strategy may reflect evolutionary changes within the holometabolous insects and serves as a model to study interactions between developing epithelia. PMID:26824390

  20. Collectins and Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides of the Respiratory Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, B.; Meyerholz, D. K.; Ackermann, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a primary site for the deposition of microorganisms that are acquired during inspiration. The innate immune system of the respiratory tract eliminates many of these potentially harmful agents preventing their colonization. Collectins and cationic antimicrobial peptides are antimicrobial components of the pulmonary innate immune system produced by respiratory epithelia, which have integral roles in host defense and inflammation in the lung. Synthesis and secretion of these molecules are regulated by the developmental stage, hormones, as well as many growth and immunoregulatory factors. The purpose of this review is to discuss antimicrobial innate immune elements within the respiratory tract of healthy and pneumonic lung with emphasis on hydrophilic surfactant proteins and β-defensins. PMID:16966437

  1. Mechanisms controlling arrangements and movements of nuclei in pseudostratified epithelia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun O; Norden, Caren

    2013-03-01

    During development, cells undergo complex rearrangements that contribute to the final tissue architecture. A characteristic arrangement found in rapidly expanding, highly proliferative tissues is pseudostratified epithelium, which features notably elongated cells with varied nuclear positions along the cell axis. Although anomalies in its structure are implicated in diseases like microcephaly, how pseudostratification is formed and maintained remains elusive. In this review, we focus on a typical feature of pseudostratified epithelia called interkinetic nuclear migration (INM), which describes dynamic movements of nuclei within the elongated cell bodies. We provide an overview of cytoskeletal components underlying INM in different systems, discuss current understanding of its kinetics and timing, and evaluate how conflicting results could be explained through developmental and evolutionary considerations. PMID:23266143

  2. Calcium signaling and the secretory activity of bile duct epithelia.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Maria Jimena; Nathanson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    Cytosolic calcium (Cai(2+)) is a second messenger that is important for the regulation of secretion in many types of tissues. Bile duct epithelial cells, or cholangiocytes, are polarized epithelia that line the biliary tree in liver and are responsible for secretion of bicarbonate and other solutes into bile. Cai(2+) signaling plays an important role in the regulation of secretion by cholangiocytes, and this review discusses the machinery involved in the formation of Ca(2+) signals in cholangiocytes, along with the evidence that these signals regulate ductular secretion. Finally, this review discusses the evidence that impairments in cholangiocyte Ca(2+) signaling play a primary role in the pathogenesis of cholestatic disorders, in which hepatic bile secretion is impaired. PMID:24612866

  3. Motile Cilia of Human Airway Epithelia Are Chemosensory

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Alok S; Ben-Shahar, Yehuda; Moninger, Thomas O; Kline, Joel N; Welsh, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Cilia are microscopic projections that extend from eukaryotic cells. There are two general types of cilia; primary cilia serve as sensory organelles, whereas motile cilia exert mechanical force. The motile cilia emerging from human airway epithelial cells propel harmful inhaled material out of the lung. We found that these cells express sensory bitter taste receptors, which localized on motile cilia. Bitter compounds increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and stimulated ciliary beat frequency. Thus, airway epithelia contain a cell-autonomous system in which motile cilia both sense noxious substances entering airways and initiate a defensive mechanical mechanism to eliminate the offending compound. Hence, like primary cilia, classical motile cilia also contain sensors to detect the external environment. PMID:19628819

  4. Changes in Normal Liver and Spleen Volume after Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-Resin Microspheres in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Findings and Clinical Significance

    SciTech Connect

    Paprottka, Philipp M. Schmidt, G. P.; Trumm, C. G.; Hoffmann, R. T.; Reiser, M. F.; Jakobs, T. F.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: In clinical trials with yttrium-90-resin-microspheres for the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases, it was observed that radioembolization might result in splenomegaly and an increase in portal vein size. Subclinical hepatitis in normal liver tissue as well as the effects of radioembolization and prior chemotherapy are suspected to be responsible for this phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter after radioembolization. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with liver-dominant metastatic disease from breast cancer who had not responded to chemotherapy or had to abandon chemotherapy because of its toxic effects were evaluated. Changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter as well as liver tumor volume and diameter were quantified using computed tomography scans. Results: Radioembolization was associated with a significant mean decrease in the whole liver volume of 10.2% (median 16.7%; P = 0.0024), mainly caused by a reduction in the right lobe volume (mean 16.0%; P < 0.0001). These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in the diameter of the main portal vein (mean 6.8%; P < 0.0001) as well as splenic volume (mean 50.4%; P < 0.0001). Liver-tumor volume and diameter decreased by a median of 24 and 39.7%. Conclusions: Radioembolization is an effective treatment for tumor size reduction in patients with breast cancer liver metastases. Treatment is associated with changes of hepatic parenchymal volume, splenic volume, and portal vein size that appear not to represent clinically important sequelae in this patient cohort.

  5. Differential effects of cyclic and constant stress on ATP release and mucociliary transport by human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Button, Brian; Picher, Maryse; Boucher, Richard C

    2007-04-15

    In the lungs, the first line of defence against bacterial infection is the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) lining the airway surface. The superficial airway epithelium exhibits complex regulatory pathways that blend ion transport to adjust ASL volume to maintain proper mucociliary clearance (MCC). We hypothesized that stresses generated by airflow and transmural pressures during breathing govern ASL volume by regulating the rate of epithelial ATP release. Luminal ATP, via interactions with apical membrane P2-purinoceptors, regulates the balance of active ion secretion versus absorption to maintain ASL volume at optimal levels for MCC. In this study we tested the hypothesis that cyclic compressive stress (CCS), mimicking normal tidal breathing, regulates ASL volume in airway epithelia. Polarized tracheobronchial epithelial cultures from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects responded to a range of CCS by increasing the rate of ATP release. In normal airway epithelia, the CCS-induced increase in ASL ATP concentration was sufficient to induce purinoceptor-mediated increases in ASL height and MCC, via inhibition of epithelial Na(+)-channel-mediated Na(+) absorption and stimulation of Cl(-) secretion through CFTR and the Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels. In contrast, static, non-oscillatory stress did not stimulate ATP release, ion transport or MCC, emphasizing the importance of rhythmic mechanical stress for airway defence. In CF airway cultures, which exhibit basal ASL depletion, CCS was partially effective, producing less ASL volume secretion than in normal cultures, but a level sufficient to restore MCC. The present data suggest that CCS may (1) regulate ASL volume in the normal lung and (2) improve clearance in the lungs of CF patients, potentially explaining the beneficial role of exercise in lung defence. PMID:17317749

  6. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  7. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Methods Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. Results The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D105% and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Conclusion Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT. PMID:26451240

  8. Multispectral reflectance enhancement for breast cancer visualization in the operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Barreras, Gaspar; Real, Eusebio; Laughney, Ashley M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Paulsen, Keith D.; López-Higuera, José M.; Pogue, Brian W.; Conde, Olga M.

    2015-03-01

    A color enhancement method to optimize the visualization of breast tumors in cancer pathology is proposed. Light scattering measurements are minimally invasive, and allow the estimation of tissue morphology and composition to guide the surgeon in resection surgeries. The usability of scatter and absorption signatures acquired with a microsampling reflectance spectral imaging system was improved employing an empirical approximation to the Mie theory to estimate the scattering power on a per-pixel basis. The proposed methodology generates a new image with blended color and diagnostic purposes coming from the emphasis or highlighting of specific wavelengths or features. These features can be the specific absorbent tissue components (oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, etc.), additional parameters as scattering power or amplitude or even the combination of both. The goal is to obtain an improved and inherent tissue contrast working only with the local reflectance of tissue. To this aim, it is provided a visual interpretation of what is considered non-malignant (normal epithelia and stroma, benign epithelia and stroma, inflammation), malignant (DCIS, IDC, ILC) and adipose tissue. Consequently, a fast visualization map of the intracavity area can be offered to the surgeon providing relevant diagnostic information. No labeling or extrinsic indicators are required for proposed methodology and therefore the possibility of transferring absorption and scattering features simultaneously into visualization, fusing their effects into a single image, can guide surgeons efficiently.

  9. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Drapkin, Paola T.; O’Riordan, Catherine R.; Yi, Su Min; Chiorini, John A.; Cardella, Jonathan; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  10. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, P T; O'Riordan, C R; Yi, S M; Chiorini, J A; Cardella, J; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    2000-03-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  11. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure on Carcinogenic Properties of Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Shinsaku; Kim, Young Hak; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. The inflammation increases the permeability of blood vessels and consequently elevates pressure in the interstitial tissues. However, there have been only a few reports on the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cultured cells, and the relationship between elevated hydrostatic pressure and cell properties related to malignant tumors is less well understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the cultured epithelial cells seeded on permeable filters. Surprisingly, hydrostatic pressure from basal to apical side induced epithelial stratification in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) I and Caco-2 cells, and cavities with microvilli and tight junctions around their surfaces were formed within the multi-layered epithelia. The hydrostatic pressure gradient also promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis, and increased transepithelial ion permeability. The inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) promoted epithelial stratification by the hydrostatic pressure whereas the activation of PKA led to suppressed epithelial stratification. These results indicate the role of the hydrostatic pressure gradient in the regulation of various epithelial cell functions. The findings in this study may provide clues for the development of a novel strategy for the treatment of the carcinoma. PMID:26716691

  12. The beetle amnion and serosa functionally interact as apposed epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Hilbrant, Maarten; Horn, Thorsten; Koelzer, Stefan; Panfilio, Kristen A

    2016-01-01

    Unlike passive rupture of the human chorioamnion at birth, the insect extraembryonic (EE) tissues – the amnion and serosa – actively rupture and withdraw in late embryogenesis. Withdrawal is essential for development and has been a morphogenetic puzzle. Here, we use new fluorescent transgenic lines in the beetle Tribolium castaneum to show that the EE tissues dynamically form a basal-basal epithelial bilayer, contradicting the previous hypothesis of EE intercalation. We find that the EE tissues repeatedly detach and reattach throughout development and have distinct roles. Quantitative live imaging analyses show that the amnion initiates EE rupture in a specialized anterior-ventral cap. RNAi phenotypes demonstrate that the serosa contracts autonomously. Thus, apposition in a bilayer enables the amnion as 'initiator' to coordinate with the serosa as 'driver' to achieve withdrawal. This EE strategy may reflect evolutionary changes within the holometabolous insects and serves as a model to study interactions between developing epithelia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13834.001 PMID:26824390

  13. Structure and functions of keratin proteins in simple, stratified, keratinized and cornified epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bragulla, Hermann H; Homberger, Dominique G

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the term ‘keratin’ stood for all of the proteins extracted from skin modifications, such as horns, claws and hooves. Subsequently, it was realized that this keratin is actually a mixture of keratins, keratin filament-associated proteins and other proteins, such as enzymes. Keratins were then defined as certain filament-forming proteins with specific physicochemical properties and extracted from the cornified layer of the epidermis, whereas those filament-forming proteins that were extracted from the living layers of the epidermis were grouped as ‘prekeratins’ or ‘cytokeratins’. Currently, the term ‘keratin’ covers all intermediate filament-forming proteins with specific physicochemical properties and produced in any vertebrate epithelia. Similarly, the nomenclature of epithelia as cornified, keratinized or non-keratinized is based historically on the notion that only the epidermis of skin modifications such as horns, claws and hooves is cornified, that the non-modified epidermis is a keratinized stratified epithelium, and that all other stratified and non-stratified epithelia are non-keratinized epithelia. At this point in time, the concepts of keratins and of keratinized or cornified epithelia need clarification and revision concerning the structure and function of keratin and keratin filaments in various epithelia of different species, as well as of keratin genes and their modifications, in view of recent research, such as the sequencing of keratin proteins and their genes, cell culture, transfection of epithelial cells, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Recently, new functions of keratins and keratin filaments in cell signaling and intracellular vesicle transport have been discovered. It is currently understood that all stratified epithelia are keratinized and that some of these keratinized stratified epithelia cornify by forming a Stratum corneum. The processes of keratinization and cornification in skin modifications are

  14. CFTR with a partially deleted R domain corrects the cystic fibrosis chloride transport defect in human airway epithelia in vitro and in mouse nasal mucosa in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Zabner, Joseph; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H.; Stecenko, Arlene A.; Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    In developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) airways disease, a transgene encoding a partially deleted CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel could be of value for vectors such as adeno-associated virus that have a limited packaging capacity. Earlier studies in heterologous cells indicated that the CFTR R (regulatory) domain is predominantly random coil and that parts of the R domain can be deleted without abolishing channel function. Therefore, we designed a series of CFTR variants with shortened R domains (between residues 708 and 835) and expressed them in well-differentiated cultures of CF airway epithelia. All of the variants showed normal targeting to the apical membrane, and for the constructs we tested, biosynthesis was like wild type. Moreover, all constructs generated transepithelial Cl− current in CF epithelia. Comparison of the Cl− transport suggested that the length of the R domain, the presence of phosphorylation sites, and other factors contribute to channel activity. A variant deleting residues 708–759 complemented CF airway epithelia to the same extent as wild-type CFTR and showed no current in the absence of cAMP stimulation. In addition, expression in nasal mucosa of CF mice corrected the Cl− transport defect. These data provide insight into the structure and function of the R domain and identify regions that can be deleted with retention of function. Thus they suggest a strategy for shortening the transgene used in CF gene therapy. PMID:11854474

  15. CFTR with a partially deleted R domain corrects the cystic fibrosis chloride transport defect in human airway epithelia in vitro and in mouse nasal mucosa in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Zabner, Joseph; Vermeer, Daniel W; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H; Stecenko, Arlene A; Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-03-01

    In developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) airways disease, a transgene encoding a partially deleted CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel could be of value for vectors such as adeno-associated virus that have a limited packaging capacity. Earlier studies in heterologous cells indicated that the CFTR R (regulatory) domain is predominantly random coil and that parts of the R domain can be deleted without abolishing channel function. Therefore, we designed a series of CFTR variants with shortened R domains (between residues 708 and 835) and expressed them in well-differentiated cultures of CF airway epithelia. All of the variants showed normal targeting to the apical membrane, and for the constructs we tested, biosynthesis was like wild type. Moreover, all constructs generated transepithelial Cl- current in CF epithelia. Comparison of the Cl- transport suggested that the length of the R domain, the presence of phosphorylation sites, and other factors contribute to channel activity. A variant deleting residues 708-759 complemented CF airway epithelia to the same extent as wild-type CFTR and showed no current in the absence of cAMP stimulation. In addition, expression in nasal mucosa of CF mice corrected the Cl- transport defect. These data provide insight into the structure and function of the R domain and identify regions that can be deleted with retention of function. Thus they suggest a strategy for shortening the transgene used in CF gene therapy. PMID:11854474

  16. Immunohistological distribution of 5T4 antigen in normal and malignant tissues.

    PubMed

    Southall, P J; Boxer, G M; Bagshawe, K D; Hole, N; Bromley, M; Stern, P L

    1990-01-01

    A trophoblast cell surface antigen has been characterised by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 5T4, raised following immunisation with solubilised wheat germ agglutinin binding glycoproteins from human syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane (StMPM). The expression of the 72 kDa glycoprotein was assessed on cryostat sections of a range of neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues, using an avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase technique. In products of conception, intense reactions were noted with villous syncytiotrophoblast membrane in normal early and term placenta, with weaker positivity of placental site trophoblast. Most normal or non-neoplastic tissues were negative, including liver, kidney, spleen, small intestine, ovary and testis. Faint or moderate positive reactions were present in some specialised epithelia. Of 115 neoplasms examined, 76 showed reactions with tumour cells including carcinomas of the bladder, breast, cervix, endometrium, lung, oesophagus, ovary, pancreas, stomach and testicular non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. Choriocarcinomas and placental site trophoblastic tumours were also positive. Most adenocarcinomas of colon and seminomas were negative as were all malignant melanomas and malignant lymphomas. A radioimmunoassay did not detect the antigen in either normal or pregnancy serum. The relatively low level of expression in normal tissues and reactivity with a wide range of carcinomas suggested that the antibody may be useful in diagnostic or targeting studies. PMID:2404511

  17. Bioelectric characterization of epithelia from neonatal CFTR knockout ferrets.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John T; Tyler, Scott R; Zhang, Yulong; Lee, Ben J; Liu, Xiaoming; Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Liang, Bo; Luo, Meihui; Xie, Weiliang; Yi, Yaling; Zhou, Weihong; Song, Yi; Keiser, Nicholas; Wang, Kai; de Jonge, Hugo R; Engelhardt, John F

    2013-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to understanding pathophysiology in CF and developing therapies. CFTR knockout ferrets manifest many of the phenotypes observed in the human disease, including lung infections, pancreatic disease and diabetes, liver disease, malnutrition, and meconium ileus. In the present study, we have characterized abnormalities in the bioelectric properties of the trachea, stomach, intestine, and gallbladder of newborn CF ferrets. Short-circuit current (ISC) analysis of CF and wild-type (WT) tracheas revealed the following similarities and differences: (1) amiloride-sensitive sodium currents were similar between genotypes; (2) responses to 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulphonic acid were 3.3-fold greater in CF animals, suggesting elevated baseline chloride transport through non-CFTR channels in a subset of CF animals; and (3) a lack of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)/forskolin-stimulated and N-(2-Naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101)-inhibited currents in CF animals due to the lack of CFTR. CFTR mRNA was present throughout all levels of the WT ferret and IBMX/forskolin-inducible ISC was only observed in WT animals. However, despite the lack of CFTR function in the knockout ferret, the luminal pH of the CF ferret gallbladder, stomach, and intestines was not significantly changed relative to WT. The WT stomach and gallbladder exhibited significantly enhanced IBMX/forskolin ISC responses and inhibition by GlyH-101 relative to CF samples. These findings demonstrate that multiple organs affected by disease in the CF ferret have bioelectric abnormalities consistent with the lack of cAMP-mediated chloride transport. PMID:23782101

  18. Bioelectric Characterization of Epithelia from Neonatal CFTR Knockout Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John T.; Tyler, Scott R.; Zhang, Yulong; Lee, Ben J.; Liu, Xiaoming; Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Liang, Bo; Luo, Meihui; Xie, Weiliang; Yi, Yaling; Zhou, Weihong; Song, Yi; Keiser, Nicholas; Wang, Kai; de Jonge, Hugo R.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to understanding pathophysiology in CF and developing therapies. CFTR knockout ferrets manifest many of the phenotypes observed in the human disease, including lung infections, pancreatic disease and diabetes, liver disease, malnutrition, and meconium ileus. In the present study, we have characterized abnormalities in the bioelectric properties of the trachea, stomach, intestine, and gallbladder of newborn CF ferrets. Short-circuit current (ISC) analysis of CF and wild-type (WT) tracheas revealed the following similarities and differences: (1) amiloride-sensitive sodium currents were similar between genotypes; (2) responses to 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulphonic acid were 3.3-fold greater in CF animals, suggesting elevated baseline chloride transport through non-CFTR channels in a subset of CF animals; and (3) a lack of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)/forskolin–stimulated and N-(2-Naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101)–inhibited currents in CF animals due to the lack of CFTR. CFTR mRNA was present throughout all levels of the WT ferret and IBMX/forskolin–inducible ISC was only observed in WT animals. However, despite the lack of CFTR function in the knockout ferret, the luminal pH of the CF ferret gallbladder, stomach, and intestines was not significantly changed relative to WT. The WT stomach and gallbladder exhibited significantly enhanced IBMX/forskolin ISC responses and inhibition by GlyH-101 relative to CF samples. These findings demonstrate that multiple organs affected by disease in the CF ferret have bioelectric abnormalities consistent with the lack of cAMP-mediated chloride transport. PMID:23782101

  19. Emergence and Dynamics of Polar Order in Developing Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is a conserved process in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, and is fundamental for the coordination of cell behavior and patterning. A well-studied example is the orientational pattern of hairs in the wing of the adult fruit fly Drosophila, which is an important model organism in biology. The Drosophila wing is an epithelium, i.e., a two-dimensional sheet of cells, which grows from a few cells to thousands of cells during the course of development. In the wing epithelium, planar polarity is established by an anisotropic distribution of PCP proteins within cells. The distribution of these proteins in a given cell affects the polarity of neighboring cells, such that at the end of wing development a large-scale PCP orientational order emerges. Here we present a theoretical study of planar polarity in developing epithelia based on a vertex model, which takes into account cell mechanics, cell adhesion, and cell division, combined with experimental results obtained from time-lapse imaging of the wing development. We show that in experiment, polarity order does not develop de novo at the end of wing development, but rather cells are initially polarized at an angle with respect to their final polarity axis. During wing development, the polarity axes of cells reorient towards their final direction. We identify a basic mechanism to generate such a large-scale initial polarization, based on the growth of a small number of cells with an initially random PCP distribution. Finally, we study the effect of shear and oriented cell division on dynamics of PCP order, showing that these two processes can robustly reorient the polarity axes of cells.

  20. Abnormal expression of CCND1 and RB1 in resection margin epithelia of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Betticher, D. C.; Heighway, J.; Thatcher, N.; Hasleton, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    Tumours develop through the accumulation of genetic alterations associated with a progressive increase of the malignant phenotype. In lung cancer, chronic exposure of bronchial epithelium to carcinogens in cigarette smoke may lead to multiple dysplastic and hyperplastic lesions scattered throughout the tracheobronchial tree. Little is known about the genetic alterations in such lesions. This study was carried out to examine cyclin D1 (CCND1) and retinoblastoma (RB1) gene expression in the bronchial epithelium of patients with lung cancer. Lung tumours and their corresponding tumour-free resection margins from 33 patients who underwent resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were examined by immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies against cyclin D1 (DCS-6; Novocastra) and pRb (NCL Rb-1; Novocastra). Examination of the resection margins revealed four carcinomas in situ, 19 hyperplasias and ten sections showing apparently normal bronchial epithelium. A control group of patients, without lung tumours and who had never smoked, revealed no or weak cyclin D1 and positive pRb staining within bronchial epithelia. Increased cyclin D1 and diminished pRb expression were found in 76% (n = 25) and 27% (n = 9) of the resection margins respectively, and in 12% (n = 4) both cyclin D1 and pRb expression were altered. In the corresponding tumours, 48% (n = 16) were normal, while altered expression was found for cyclin D1 in 33% (n = 11), pRb in 27% (n = 9) and both in 9% (n = 3) of cases. It appears that altered expression of cyclin D1 and pRb is an early event in NSCLC development in almost half of cases analysed. Further investigations are needed to determine the significance of immunostaining of bronchial specimens in individuals at risk of lung cancer, with the possibility that the observations are of importance in the early diagnosis of NSCLC. Images Figure 1 PMID:9192978

  1. CFTR is required for maximal transepithelial liquid transport in pig alveolar epithelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Comellas, Alejandro P; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah E; Moninger, Thomas O; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Taft, Peter J; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Rector, Michael V; Rossen, Nathan; Stoltz, David A; McCray, Paul B; Welsh, Michael J; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    A balance between alveolar liquid absorption and secretion is critical for maintaining optimal alveolar subphase liquid height and facilitating gas exchange in the alveolar space. However, the role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) in this homeostatic process has remained elusive. Using a newly developed porcine model of cystic fibrosis, in which CFTR is absent, we investigated ion transport properties and alveolar liquid transport in isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells (T2AECs) cultured at the air-liquid interface. CFTR was distributed exclusively to the apical surface of cultured T2AECs. Alveolar epithelia from CFTR(-/-) pigs failed to increase liquid absorption in response to agents that increase cAMP, whereas cAMP-stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR(+/-) epithelia was similar to that in CFTR(+/+) epithelia. Expression of recombinant CFTR restored stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR(-/-) T2AECs but had no effect on CFTR(+/+) epithelia. In ex vivo studies of nonperfused lungs, stimulated liquid absorption was defective in CFTR(-/-) alveolar epithelia but similar between CFTR(+/+) and CFTR(+/-) epithelia. When epithelia were studied at the air-liquid interface, elevating cAMP levels increased subphase liquid height in CFTR(+/+) but not in CFTR(-/-) T2AECs. Our findings demonstrate that CFTR is required for maximal liquid absorption under cAMP stimulation, but it is not the rate-limiting factor. Furthermore, our data define a role for CFTR in liquid secretion by T2AECs. These insights may help to develop new treatment strategies for pulmonary edema and respiratory distress syndrome, diseases in which lung liquid transport is disrupted. PMID:22637155

  2. CFTR is required for maximal transepithelial liquid transport in pig alveolar epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Comellas, Alejandro P.; Karp, Philip H.; Ernst, Sarah E.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Rector, Michael V.; Rossen, Nathan; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A balance between alveolar liquid absorption and secretion is critical for maintaining optimal alveolar subphase liquid height and facilitating gas exchange in the alveolar space. However, the role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) in this homeostatic process has remained elusive. Using a newly developed porcine model of cystic fibrosis, in which CFTR is absent, we investigated ion transport properties and alveolar liquid transport in isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells (T2AECs) cultured at the air-liquid interface. CFTR was distributed exclusively to the apical surface of cultured T2AECs. Alveolar epithelia from CFTR−/− pigs failed to increase liquid absorption in response to agents that increase cAMP, whereas cAMP-stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR+/− epithelia was similar to that in CFTR+/+ epithelia. Expression of recombinant CFTR restored stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR−/− T2AECs but had no effect on CFTR+/+ epithelia. In ex vivo studies of nonperfused lungs, stimulated liquid absorption was defective in CFTR−/− alveolar epithelia but similar between CFTR+/+ and CFTR+/− epithelia. When epithelia were studied at the air-liquid interface, elevating cAMP levels increased subphase liquid height in CFTR+/+ but not in CFTR−/− T2AECs. Our findings demonstrate that CFTR is required for maximal liquid absorption under cAMP stimulation, but it is not the rate-limiting factor. Furthermore, our data define a role for CFTR in liquid secretion by T2AECs. These insights may help to develop new treatment strategies for pulmonary edema and respiratory distress syndrome, diseases in which lung liquid transport is disrupted. PMID:22637155

  3. Accumulation of multipotent progenitors with a basal differentiation bias during aging of human mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, James C; Pepin, Francois; Pelissier, Fanny; Sputova, Klara; Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Guo, Diana E; Villadsen, Rene; Park, Morag; Petersen, Ole W; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Stampfer, Martha R; LaBarge, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Women over 50 years of age account for 75% of new breast cancer diagnoses, and the majority of these tumors are of a luminal subtype. Although age-associated changes, including endocrine profiles and alterations within the breast microenvironment, increase cancer risk, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie these observations is lacking. In this study, we generated a large collection of normal human mammary epithelial cell strains from women aged 16 to 91 years, derived from primary tissues, to investigate the molecular changes that occur in aging breast cells. We found that in finite-lifespan cultured and uncultured epithelial cells, aging is associated with a reduction of myoepithelial cells and an increase in luminal cells that express keratin 14 and integrin α6, a phenotype that is usually expressed exclusively in myoepithelial cells in women under 30. Changes to the luminal lineage resulted from age-dependent expansion of defective multipotent progenitors that gave rise to incompletely differentiated luminal or myoepithelial cells. The aging process therefore results in both a shift in the balance of luminal/myoepithelial lineages and to changes in the functional spectrum of multipotent progenitors, which together increase the potential for malignant transformation. Together, our findings provide a cellular basis to explain the observed vulnerability to breast cancer that increases with age. PMID:22552289

  4. Development and Evolution of Inner Ear Sensory Epithelia and Their Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.; Jones, K.; Fariñas, I.; Maklad, A.; Lee, J.; Reichardt, L. F.

    2013-01-01

    The development and evolution of the inner ear sensory patches and their innervation is reviewed. Recent molecular developmental data suggest that development of these sensory patches is a developmental recapitulation of the evolutionary history. These data suggest that the ear generates multiple, functionally diverse sensory epithelia by dividing a single sensory primordium. Those epithelia will establish distinct identities through the overlapping expression of genes of which only a few are currently known. One of these distinctions is the unique pattern of hair cell polarity. A hypothesis is presented on how the hair cell polarity may relate to the progressive segregation of the six sensory epithelia. Besides being markers for sensory epithelia development, neurotrophins are also expressed in delaminating cells that migrate toward the developing vestibular and cochlear ganglia. These delaminating cells originate from multiple sites at or near the developing sensory epithelia and some also express neuronal markers such as NeuroD. The differential origin of precursors raises the possibility that some sensory neurons acquire positional information before they delaminate the ear. Such an identity of these delaminating sensory neurons may be used both to navigate their dendrites to the area they delaminated from, as well as to help them navigate to their central target. The navigational properties of sensory neurons as well as the acquisition of discrete sensory patch phenotypes implies a much more sophisticated subdivision of the developing otocyst than the few available gene expression studies suggest. PMID:12382272

  5. KGF alters gene expression in human airway epithelia: potential regulation of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Prince, L S; Karp, P H; Moninger, T O; Welsh, M J

    2001-07-17

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) regulates several functions in adult and developing lung epithelia; it causes proliferation, stimulates secretion of fluid and electrolytes, enhances repair, and may minimize injury. To gain insight into the molecular processes influenced by KGF, we applied KGF to primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia and used microarray hybridization to assess the abundance of gene transcripts. Of 7,069 genes tested, KGF changed expression levels of 910. Earlier studies showed that KGF causes epithelial proliferation, and as expected, treatment altered expression of numerous genes involved in cell proliferation. We found that KGF stimulated transepithelial Cl(-) transport, but the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) transcripts fell. Although transcripts for ClC-1 and ClC-7 Cl(-) channels increased, KGF failed to augment transepithelial Cl(-) transport in CF epithelia, suggesting that KGF-stimulated Cl(-) transport in differentiated airway epithelia depends on the CFTR Cl(-) channel. Interestingly, KGF decreased transcripts for many interferon (IFN)-induced genes. IFN causes trafficking of Stat dimers to the nucleus, where they activate transcription of IFN-induced genes. We found that KGF prevented the IFN-stimulated trafficking of Stat1 from the cytosol to the nucleus, suggesting a molecular mechanism for KGF-mediated suppression of the IFN-signaling pathway. These results suggest that in addition to stimulating proliferation and repair of damaged airway epithelia, KGF stimulates Cl(-) transport and may dampen the response of epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators. PMID:11459923

  6. FAK Acts as a Suppressor of RTK-MAP Kinase Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster Epithelia and Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Macagno, Juan Pablo; Diaz Vera, Jesica; Yu, Yachuan; MacPherson, Iain; Sandilands, Emma; Palmer, Ruth; Norman, Jim C.; Frame, Margaret; Vidal, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) regulate multiple signalling pathways, including mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. FAK interacts with several RTKs but little is known about how FAK regulates their downstream signalling. Here we investigated how FAK regulates signalling resulting from the overexpression of the RTKs RET and EGFR. FAK suppressed RTKs signalling in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia by impairing MAPK pathway. This regulation was also observed in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, suggesting it is a conserved phenomenon in humans. Mechanistically, FAK reduced receptor recycling into the plasma membrane, which resulted in lower MAPK activation. Conversely, increasing the membrane pool of the receptor increased MAPK pathway signalling. FAK is widely considered as a therapeutic target in cancer biology; however, it also has tumour suppressor properties in some contexts. Therefore, the FAK-mediated negative regulation of RTK/MAPK signalling described here may have potential implications in the designing of therapy strategies for RTK-driven tumours. PMID:24676055

  7. Ablation of Coactivator Med1 Switches the Cell Fate of Dental Epithelia to That Generating Hair

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thai; Sakai, Kiyoshi; He, Bing; Fong, Chak; Oda, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Cell fates are determined by specific transcriptional programs. Here we provide evidence that the transcriptional coactivator, Mediator 1 (Med1), is essential for the cell fate determination of ectodermal epithelia. Conditional deletion of Med1 in vivo converted dental epithelia into epidermal epithelia, causing defects in enamel organ development while promoting hair formation in the incisors. We identified multiple processes by which hairs are generated in Med1 deficient incisors: 1) dental epithelial stem cells lacking Med 1 fail to commit to the dental lineage, 2) Sox2-expressing stem cells extend into the differentiation zone and remain multi-potent due to reduced Notch1 signaling, and 3) epidermal fate is induced by calcium as demonstrated in dental epithelial cell cultures. These results demonstrate that Med1 is a master regulator in adult stem cells to govern epithelial cell fate. PMID:24949995

  8. Cellular targets of estrogen signaling in regeneration of inner ear sensory epithelia

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen signaling in auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia is a newly emerging focus propelled by the role of estrogen signaling in many other proliferative systems. Understanding the pathways with which estrogen interacts can provide a means to identify how estrogen may modulate proliferative signaling in inner ear sensory epithelia. Reviewed herein are two signaling families, EGF and TGFβ. Both pathways are involved in regulating proliferation of supporting cells in mature vestibular sensory epithelia and have well characterized interactions with estrogen signaling in other systems. It is becoming increasingly clear that elucidating the complexity of signaling in regeneration will be necessary for development of therapeutics that can initiate regeneration and prevent progression to a pathogenic state. PMID:19450430

  9. Loss of anion transport without increased sodium absorption characterizes newborn porcine cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeng-Haur; Stoltz, David A; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah E; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Moninger, Thomas O; Rector, Michael V; Reznikov, Leah R; Launspach, Janice L; Chaloner, Kathryn; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2010-12-10

    Defective transepithelial electrolyte transport is thought to initiate cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Yet, how loss of CFTR affects electrolyte transport remains uncertain. CFTR⁻(/)⁻ pigs spontaneously develop lung disease resembling human CF. At birth, their airways exhibit a bacterial host defense defect, but are not inflamed. Therefore, we studied ion transport in newborn nasal and tracheal/bronchial epithelia in tissues, cultures, and in vivo. CFTR⁻(/)⁻ epithelia showed markedly reduced Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ transport. However, in contrast to a widely held view, lack of CFTR did not increase transepithelial Na(+) or liquid absorption or reduce periciliary liquid depth. Like human CF, CFTR⁻(/)⁻ pigs showed increased amiloride-sensitive voltage and current, but lack of apical Cl⁻ conductance caused the change, not increased Na(+) transport. These results indicate that CFTR provides the predominant transcellular pathway for Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ in porcine airway epithelia, and reduced anion permeability may initiate CF airway disease. PMID:21145458

  10. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  11. Accelerated geroncogenesis in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Folguera-Blasco, Núria; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The geroncogenesis hypothesis postulates that the decline in metabolic cellular health that occurs naturally with aging drives a “field effect” predisposing normal tissues for cancer development. We propose that mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 might trigger “accelerated geroncogenesis” in breast and ovarian epithelia. By speeding up the rate at which the metabolic threshold becomes “permissive” with survival and expansion of genomically unstable pre-tumoral epithelial cells, BRCA haploinsufficiency-driven metabolic reprogramming would operate as a bona fide oncogenic event enabling malignant transformation and tumor formation in BRCA carriers. The metabolic facet of BRCA1 one-hit might involve tissue-specific alterations in acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, NAD+, FAD, or S-adenosylmethionine, critical factors for de/methylation or de/acetylation dynamics in the nuclear epigenome. This in turn might induce faulty epigenetic reprogramming at the “install phase” that directs cell-specific differentiation of breast/ovarian epithelial cells, which can ultimately determine the penetrance of BRCA defects during developmental windows of susceptibility. This model offers a framework to study whether metabolic drugs that prevent or revert metabolic reprogramming induced by BRCA haploinsufficiency might displace the “geroncogenic risk” of BRCA carriers to the age typical for those without the mutation. The identification of the key nodes that directly communicate changes in cellular metabolism to the chromatin in BRCA haploinsufficient cells may allow the epigenetic targeting of genomic instability using exclusively metabolic means. The validation of accelerated geroncogenesis as an inherited “one-hit” metabolic “field effect” might offer new strategies to therapeutically revisit the apparently irreversible genetic-hereditary fate of women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. PMID:26943589

  12. Accelerated geroncogenesis in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Folguera-Blasco, Núria; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-03-15

    The geroncogenesis hypothesis postulates that the decline in metabolic cellular health that occurs naturally with aging drives a "field effect" predisposing normal tissues for cancer development. We propose that mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 might trigger "accelerated geroncogenesis" in breast and ovarian epithelia. By speeding up the rate at which the metabolic threshold becomes "permissive" with survival and expansion of genomically unstable pre-tumoral epithelial cells, BRCA haploinsufficiency-driven metabolic reprogramming would operate as a bona fide oncogenic event enabling malignant transformation and tumor formation in BRCA carriers. The metabolic facet of BRCA1 one-hit might involve tissue-specific alterations in acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, NAD+, FAD, or S-adenosylmethionine, critical factors for de/methylation or de/acetylation dynamics in the nuclear epigenome. This in turn might induce faulty epigenetic reprogramming at the "install phase" that directs cell-specific differentiation of breast/ovarian epithelial cells, which can ultimately determine the penetrance of BRCA defects during developmental windows of susceptibility. This model offers a framework to study whether metabolic drugs that prevent or revert metabolic reprogramming induced by BRCA haploinsufficiency might displace the "geroncogenic risk" of BRCA carriers to the age typical for those without the mutation. The identification of the key nodes that directly communicate changes in cellular metabolism to the chromatin in BRCA haploinsufficient cells may allow the epigenetic targeting of genomic instability using exclusively metabolic means. The validation of accelerated geroncogenesis as an inherited "one-hit" metabolic "field effect" might offer new strategies to therapeutically revisit the apparently irreversible genetic-hereditary fate of women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. PMID:26943589

  13. Characterization of wild-type and deltaF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator in human respiratory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Kreda, Silvia M; Mall, Marcus; Mengos, April; Rochelle, Lori; Yankaskas, James; Riordan, John R; Boucher, Richard C

    2005-05-01

    Previous studies in native tissues have produced conflicting data on the localization and metabolic fate of WT and deltaF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) in the lung. Combining immunocytochemical and biochemical studies utilizing new high-affinity CFTR mAbs with ion transport assays, we examined both 1) the cell type and region specific expression of CFTR in normal airways and 2) the metabolic fate of deltaF508 CFTR and associated ERM proteins in the cystic fibrosis lung. Studies of lungs from a large number of normal subjects revealed that WT CFTR protein localized to the apical membrane of ciliated cells within the superficial epithelium and gland ducts. In contrast, other cell types in the superficial, gland acinar, and alveolar epithelia expressed little WT CFTR protein. No deltaF508 CFTR mature protein or function could be detected in airway specimens freshly excised from a large number of deltaF508 homozygous subjects, despite an intact ERM complex. In sum, our data demonstrate that WT CFTR is predominantly expressed in ciliated cells, and deltaF508 CFTR pathogenesis in native tissues, like heterologous cells, reflects loss of normal protein processing. PMID:15716351

  14. Characterization of Wild-Type and ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator in Human Respiratory Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Mall, Marcus; Mengos, April; Rochelle, Lori; Yankaskas, James; Riordan, John R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in native tissues have produced conflicting data on the localization and metabolic fate of WT and ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) in the lung. Combining immunocytochemical and biochemical studies utilizing new high-affinity CFTR mAbs with ion transport assays, we examined both 1) the cell type and region specific expression of CFTR in normal airways and 2) the metabolic fate of ΔF508 CFTR and associated ERM proteins in the cystic fibrosis lung. Studies of lungs from a large number of normal subjects revealed that WT CFTR protein localized to the apical membrane of ciliated cells within the superficial epithelium and gland ducts. In contrast, other cell types in the superficial, gland acinar, and alveolar epithelia expressed little WT CFTR protein. No ΔF508 CFTR mature protein or function could be detected in airway specimens freshly excised from a large number of ΔF508 homozygous subjects, despite an intact ERM complex. In sum, our data demonstrate that WT CFTR is predominantly expressed in ciliated cells, and ΔF508 CFTR pathogenesis in native tissues, like heterologous cells, reflects loss of normal protein processing. PMID:15716351

  15. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 prevents luminal cell commitment in normal mammary glands and tumors by inhibiting p53/Notch1 and breast cancer gene 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferle, Adam D.; Perou, Charles M.; Van Den Berg, Carla Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with several subtypes carrying unique prognoses. Patients with differentiated luminal tumors experience better outcomes, while effective treatments are unavailable for poorly differentiated tumors, including the basal-like subtype. Mechanisms governing mammary tumor subtype generation could prove critical to developing better treatments. C-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is important in mammary tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Using a variety of mouse models, human breast cancer cell lines and tumor expression data, studies herein support that JNK2 inhibits cell differentiation in normal and cancer-derived mammary cells. JNK2 prevents precocious pubertal mammary development and inhibits Notch-dependent expansion of luminal cell populations. Likewise, JNK2 suppresses luminal populations in a p53-competent Polyoma Middle T-antigen tumor model where jnk2 knockout causes p53-dependent upregulation of Notch1 transcription. In a p53 knockout model, JNK2 restricts luminal populations independently of Notch1, by suppressing Brca1 expression and promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transition. JNK2 also inhibits estrogen receptor (ER) expression and confers resistance to fulvestrant, an ER inhibitor, while stimulating tumor progression. These data suggest that therapies inhibiting JNK2 in breast cancer may promote tumor differentiation, improve endocrine therapy response, and inhibit metastasis. PMID:25970777

  16. Striatins as plaque molecules of zonulae adhaerentes in simple epithelia, of tessellate junctions in stratified epithelia, of cardiac composite junctions and of various size classes of lateral adherens junctions in cultures of epithelia- and carcinoma-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Frey, Norbert; Heid, Hans; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2015-03-01

    Proteins of the striatin family (striatins 1-4; sizes ranging from 90 to 110 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) are highly homologous in their amino acid sequences but can differ in their cell-type-specific gene expression patterns and biological functions. In various cell types, we have found one, two or three polypeptides of this evolutionarily old and nearly ubiquitous family of proteins known to serve as scaffold proteins for diverse protein complexes. Light and electron microscopic immunolocalization methods have revealed striatins in mammalian cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs). In simple epithelia, we have localized striatins as constitutive components of the plaques of the subapical zonulae adhaerentes of cells, including intestinal, glandular, ductal and urothelial cells and hepatocytes. Striatins colocalize with E-cadherin or E-N-cadherin heterodimers and with the plaque proteins α- and β-catenin, p120 and p0071. In some epithelia and carcinomas and in cultured cells derived therefrom, striatins are also seen in lateral AJs. In stratified epithelia and in corresponding squamous cell carcinomas, striatins can be found in plaques of some forms of tessellate junctions. Moreover, striatins are major plaque proteins of composite junctions (CJs; areae compositae) in the intercalated disks connecting cardiomyocytes, colocalizing with other CJ molecules, including plectin and ankyrin-G. We discuss the "multimodulator" scaffold roles of striatins in the initiation and regulation of the formation of various complex particles and structures. We propose that striatins are included in the diagnostic candidate list of proteins that, in the CJs of human hearts, can occur in mutated forms in the pathogeneses of hereditary cardiomyopathies, as seen in some types of genetically determined heart damage in boxer dogs. PMID:25501894

  17. Lypd8 promotes the segregation of flagellated microbiota and colonic epithelia.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Ryu; Kurakawa, Takashi; Nakano, Takashi; Kayama, Hisako; Kinoshita, Makoto; Motooka, Daisuke; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Taishi; Kamiyama, Naganori; Kusu, Takashi; Ueda, Yoshiyasu; Wu, Hong; Iijima, Hideki; Barman, Soumik; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Junichi; Ohba, Yusuke; Nakamura, Shota; Iida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Umemoto, Eiji; Sano, Koichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Colonic epithelial cells are covered by thick inner and outer mucus layers. The inner mucus layer is free of commensal microbiota, which contributes to the maintenance of gut homeostasis. In the small intestine, molecules critical for prevention of bacterial invasion into epithelia such as Paneth-cell-derived anti-microbial peptides and regenerating islet-derived 3 (RegIII) family proteins have been identified. Although there are mucus layers providing physical barriers against the large number of microbiota present in the large intestine, the mechanisms that separate bacteria and colonic epithelia are not fully elucidated. Here we show that Ly6/PLAUR domain containing 8 (Lypd8) protein prevents flagellated microbiota invading the colonic epithelia in mice. Lypd8, selectively expressed in epithelial cells at the uppermost layer of the large intestinal gland, was secreted into the lumen and bound flagellated bacteria including Proteus mirabilis. In the absence of Lypd8, bacteria were present in the inner mucus layer and many flagellated bacteria invaded epithelia. Lypd8(-/-) mice were highly sensitive to intestinal inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Antibiotic elimination of Gram-negative flagellated bacteria restored the bacterial-free state of the inner mucus layer and ameliorated DSS-induced intestinal inflammation in Lypd8(-/-) mice. Lypd8 bound to flagella and suppressed motility of flagellated bacteria. Thus, Lypd8 mediates segregation of intestinal bacteria and epithelial cells in the colon to preserve intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27027293

  18. EFFECTS OF INGESTED ARSENIC ON DNA AND CHROMOSOME IN HUMAN EXFOLIATED EPITHELIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Ingested Arsenic on DNA and Chromosome in Human Exfoliated Epithelia

    Judy L. Mumford, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    Arsenic...

  19. Serotonin Localization in the Turkey Vaginal but not Sperm Storage Tubule Epithelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our knowledge regarding the mechanism of sperm selection and transport in the hen’s vagina is meager. Preliminary observations indicate the presence of non-neuron endocrine cells in the epithelia lining the lumina of the turkey hen vagina and uterovaginal junction. While no cells in the vagina or U...

  20. Glucocorticoids Regulate Tight Junction Permeability of Lung Epithelia by Modulating Claudin 8.

    PubMed

    Kielgast, Felix; Schmidt, Hanna; Braubach, Peter; Winkelmann, Veronika E; Thompson, Kristin E; Frick, Manfred; Dietl, Paul; Wittekindt, Oliver H

    2016-05-01

    The lung epithelium constitutes a selective barrier that separates the airways from the aqueous interstitial compartment. Regulated barrier function controls water and ion transport across the epithelium and is essential for maintaining lung function. Tight junctions (TJs) seal the epithelial barrier and determine the paracellular transport. The properties of TJs depend especially on their claudin composition. Steroids are potent drugs used to treat a variety of airway diseases. Therefore, we addressed whether steroid hormones directly act on TJ properties in lung epithelia. Primary human tracheal epithelial cells and NCI-H441 cells, both cultivated under air-liquid interface conditions, were used as epithelial cell models. Our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids, but not mineralocorticoids, decreased paracellular permeability and shifted the ion permselectivity of TJs toward Cl(-). Glucocorticoids up-regulated claudin 8 (cldn8) expression via glucocorticoid receptors. Silencing experiments revealed that cldn8 is necessary to recruit occludin at the TJs. Immunohistochemistry on human lung tissue showed that cldn8 is specifically expressed in resorptive epithelia of the conducting and respiratory airways but not in the alveolar epithelium. We conclude that glucocorticoids enhance lung epithelia barrier function and increase paracellular Cl(-) selectivity via modulation of cldn8-dependent recruitment of occludin at the TJs. This mode of glucocorticoid action on lung epithelia might be beneficial to patients who suffer from impaired lung barrier function in various diseased conditions. PMID:26473470

  1. Acute regulation of tight junction ion selectivity in human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Andrea N.; Itani, Omar A.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Electrolyte transport through and between airway epithelial cells controls the quantity and composition of the overlying liquid. Many studies have shown acute regulation of transcellular ion transport in airway epithelia. However, whether ion transport through tight junctions can also be acutely regulated is poorly understood both in airway and other epithelia. To investigate the paracellular pathway, we used primary cultures of differentiated human airway epithelia and assessed expression of claudins, the primary determinants of paracellular permeability, and measured transepithelial electrical properties, ion fluxes, and La3+ movement. Like many other tissues, airway epithelia expressed multiple claudins. Moreover, different cell types in the epithelium expressed the same pattern of claudins. To evaluate tight junction regulation, we examined the response to histamine, an acute regulator of airway function. Histamine stimulated a rapid and transient increase in the paracellular Na+ conductance, with a smaller increase in Cl− conductance. The increase was mediated by histamine H1 receptors and depended on an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These results suggest that ion flow through the paracellular pathway can be acutely regulated. Such regulation could facilitate coupling of the passive flow of counter ions to active transcellular transport, thereby controlling net transepithelial salt and water transport. PMID:19208806

  2. cAMP stimulation of HCO3- secretion across airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Welsh, M J; Smith, J J

    2001-07-01

    To test for the presence of HCO(3)(-) transport across airway epithelia, we measured short-circuit current in primary cultures of canine and human airway epithelia bathed in a Cl(-)-free, HCO(3)(-)/CO(2)-buffered solution. cAMP agonists stimulated a secretory current that was likely carried by HCO(3)(-) because it was absent in HCO(3)(-)-free solutions. In addition, the cAMP-stimulated current was inhibited by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, and by the apical addition of a blocker of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), diphenylamine-2-carboxylate. The current was dependent on Na(+) because it was inhibited by removing Na(+) from the submucosal solution and by inhibition of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase with ouabain. The cAMP-stimulated current was absent in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia. These data suggest that cAMP agonists can stimulate HCO(3)(-) secretion across airway epithelia and that CFTR may provide a conductive pathway for HCO(3)(-) movement across the apical membrane. PMID:11875274

  3. Persistent Gene Expression in Mouse Nasal Epithelia following Feline Immunodeficiency Virus-Based Vector Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L.; Burnight, Erin R.; Hickey, Melissa A.; Blissard, Gary W.; McCray, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 106 transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 107 to 109 TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (∼109 TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for ∼1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity. PMID:16188984

  4. Bioimpedance analysis for the characterization of breast cancer cells in suspension.

    PubMed

    Guofeng Qiao; Wei Wang; Wei Duan; Fan Zheng; Sinclair, A J; Chatwin, C R

    2012-08-01

    The bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) technique is potentially a useful tool to differentiate malignancy based on the variation of electrical properties presented by different tissues and cells. The different tissues and cells present variant electrical resistance and reactance when excited at different frequencies. The main purpose of this area of research is to use impedance measurements over a low-frequency bandwidth ranging from 1 kHz to 3 MHz to 1) differentiate the pathological stages of cancer cells under laboratory conditions and 2) permit the extraction of electrical parameters related to cellular information for further analysis. This provides evidence to form the basis of bioimpedance measurement at the cellular level and aids the potential future development of rapid diagnostics from biopsy materials. Three cell lines, representing normal breast epithelia and different pathological stages of breast cancer, have been measured using a standard impedance analyzer driving a four-electrode chamber filled with different cell suspensions. We identify the specific BIS profile for each cell type and determine whether these can be differentiated. In addition, the electrical parameters, e.g., the intracellular conductivity, membrane capacitance/capacity, characteristic frequency, are extracted by the use of equivalent circuit models and physical models to provide details of the cell electric signatures for further analysis of cancer cell pathology. PMID:22692870

  5. Small Activating RNA Restores the Activity of the Tumor Suppressor HIC-1 on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Guo, Shanyu; Dai, Qiancheng; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    HIC-1 is a gene that is hypermethylated in cancer, and commonly downregulated in human breast cancer. However, the precise mechanisms and molecular pathways regulated by HIC-1 remain unclear. We assessed HIC-1 expression on a tissue microarray containing 80 cases of breast cancer. We also analyzed its biological function by restoring HIC-1 expression using 5-aza-2′ deoxycytidine (5-CdR) and small-activating RNAs for the reversal of HIC-1 tumor suppressive effects on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. An Agilent Q44h global expressing microarray was probed after restoring the expression of HIC-1. Data demonstrated that HIC-1 expression was reduced significantly in breast cancer tissues. HIC-1 immunohistochemistry resulted in mean staining scores in cancer tissue and normal ductal epithelia of 3.54 and 8.2, respectively (p<0.01). 5-CdR partially reversed HIC-1 expression, and modulated cell growth and apoptosis. dsHIC1-2998, an saRNA, showed activating efficacy in breast cancer cells. A group of differentially expressed genes were characterized by cDNA microarray. Upon saRNA treatment, genes upregulated included those involved in immune activation, cell cycle interference, the induction of apoptosis, anti-metastasis, and cell differentiation. Downregulated genes included oncogenes and those that play roles in cell invasion, cell growth, and cell division. Our findings may provide valuable resources not only for gene functional studies, but also for potential clinical applications to develop novel drug targets. PMID:24489730

  6. Experimental Autoimmune Breast Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kesaraju, Pavani; Jaini, Ritika; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Gruden, Jessica J.; Sakalar, Cagri; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis is a substantial clinical problem in lactating women that may result in severe pain and abrupt termination of breastfeeding, thereby predisposing infants to long-term health risks. Many cases of mastitis involve no known infectious agent and may fundamentally be due to autoimmune-mediated inflammation of the breast. Herein, we develop a murine model of autoimmune mastitis and provide a detailed characterization of its resulting phenotype of breast failure and lactation insufficiency. To generate breast-specific autoimmunity, we immunized SWXJ mice with recombinant mouse α-lactalbumin, a lactation-dependent, breast-specific differentiation protein critical for production of lactose. Mice immunized with α-lactalbumin showed extensive T-cell–mediated inflammation in lactating normal breast parenchyma but none in nonlactating normal breast parenchyma. This targeted autoimmune attack resulted in breast failure characterized by lactation insufficiency and decreased ability to nurture offspring. Although immunization with α-lactalbumin had no effect on fertility and birth numbers, pups nursed by α-lactalbumin–immunized mice showed significantly disrupted growth often accompanied by kwashiorkor-like nutritional abnormalities, including alopecia, liver toxicity, and runting. This experimental model of autoimmune breast failure has useful applications for prophylactic breast cancer vaccination and for addressing inflammatory complications during breastfeeding. In addition, this model is suited for investigating nutritionally based “failure-to-thrive” issues, particularly regarding the long-term implications of postnatal nutritional deprivation. PMID:22901749

  7. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  8. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  9. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. A breast lift, or mastopexy, is cosmetic breast surgery to lift the breasts. The surgery ... the position of the areola and nipple. Description Cosmetic breast surgery can be done at an outpatient ...

  10. Multifunctional T Lymphocytes Generated After Therapy With an Antitumor Gallotanin-Rich Normalized Fraction Are Related to Primary Tumor Size Reduction in a Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Urueña, Claudia; Gomez, Alejandra; Sandoval, Tito; Hernandez, John; Li, Shaoping; Barreto, Alfonso; Fiorentino, Susana

    2015-09-01

    Natural compounds are promising sources for anticancer therapies because of their multifunctional activity and low toxicity. Although the host immune response (IR) is clearly implicated in tumor control, the relationship between natural therapies and IR has not yet been elucidated. The present work evaluates IR induction after treatment with a gallotannin-rich fraction from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). Breast tumor 4T1 cells were used to evaluate antitumor properties and IR activation. Apoptosis and expression of immunogenic cell death (ICD) markers were assessed in vitro, whereas IR and postvaccination tumor evolution were assessed in vivo. P2Et fraction induced apoptotic cell death, displaying phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. ICD markers such as calreticulin, high-mobility group box 1 translocation from nuclei to cytoplasm, and ATP secretion were observed. Primary tumor control was improved by vaccination with P2Et-pretreated 4T1 cells (t-P2Et), yielding long-lasting ex vivo multifunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes (interleukin [IL]-2(+), tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α(+), interferon [IFN]-γ(+)) that secrete IL-2, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ after specific 4T1 cell stimulation. The present study constitutes the first demonstration of a long-lasting antitumor IR induction and primary tumor reduction induced by a complex natural fraction. These data reveal the potential use of this fraction as an adjuvant in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26220604

  11. pRb Inactivation in Mammary Cells Reveals Common Mechanisms for Tumor Initiation and Progression in Divergent Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Retinoblastoma 1 (pRb) and the related pocket proteins, retinoblastoma-like 1 (p107) and retinoblastoma-like 2 (p130) (pRbf, collectively), play a pivotal role in regulating eukaryotic cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and terminal differentiation. While aberrations in the pRb-signaling pathway are common in human cancers, the consequence of pRbf loss in the mammary gland has not been directly assayed in vivo. We reported previously that inactivating these critical cell cycle regulators in divergent cell types, either brain epithelium or astrocytes, abrogates the cell cycle restriction point, leading to increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and predisposing to cancer. Here we report that mouse mammary epithelium is similar in its requirements for pRbf function; Rbf inactivation by T121, a fragment of SV40 T antigen that binds to and inactivates pRbf proteins, increases proliferation and apoptosis. Mammary adenocarcinomas form within 16 mo. Most apoptosis is regulated by p53, which has no impact on proliferation, and heterozygosity for a p53 null allele significantly shortens tumor latency. Most tumors in p53 heterozygous mice undergo loss of the wild-type p53 allele. We show that the mechanism of p53 loss of heterozygosity is not simply the consequence of Chromosome 11 aneuploidy and further that chromosomal instability subsequent to p53 loss is minimal. The mechanisms for pRb and p53 tumor suppression in the epithelia of two distinct tissues, mammary gland and brain, are indistinguishable. Further, this study has produced a highly penetrant breast cancer model based on aberrations commonly observed in the human disease. PMID:14966529

  12. Linear classifier and textural analysis of optical scattering images for tumor classification during breast cancer extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguizabal, Alma; Laughney, Ashley M.; Garcia Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-02-01

    Texture analysis of light scattering in tissue is proposed to obtain diagnostic information from breast cancer specimens. Light scattering measurements are minimally invasive, and allow the estimation of tissue morphology to guide the surgeon in resection surgeries. The usability of scatter signatures acquired with a micro-sampling reflectance spectral imaging system was improved utilizing an empirical approximation to the Mie theory to estimate the scattering power on a per-pixel basis. Co-occurrence analysis is then applied to the scattering power images to extract the textural features. A statistical analysis of the features demonstrated the suitability of the autocorrelation for the classification of notmalignant (normal epithelia and stroma, benign epithelia and stroma, inflammation), malignant (DCIS, IDC, ILC) and adipose tissue, since it reveals morphological information of tissue. Non-malignant tissue shows higher autocorrelation values while adipose tissue presents a very low autocorrelation on its scatter texture, being malignant the middle ground. Consequently, a fast linear classifier based on the consideration of just one straightforward feature is enough for providing relevant diagnostic information. A leave-one-out validation of the linear classifier on 29 samples with 48 regions of interest showed classification accuracies of 98.74% on adipose tissue, 82.67% on non-malignant tissue and 72.37% on malignant tissue, in comparison with the biopsy H and E gold standard. This demonstrates that autocorrelation analysis of scatter signatures is a very computationally efficient and automated approach to provide pathological information in real-time to guide surgeon during tissue resection.

  13. Why Are My Breasts Different Sizes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... breasts is perfectly normal. It's quite common for girls to have different-sized breasts or nipples, especially ... its partner — is quite common in humans. When girls begin puberty, usually between the ages of 8 ...

  14. In vitro preparation of newt inner ear sensory epithelia as a model for repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth R

    2015-01-01

    The sensory "hair" cells of the inner ear transform sound energy into electrical signals, but are readily lost through aging, excessive noise, and ototoxic agents. The newt provides an excellent model in which to explore regeneration and whilst loss of hair cells from inner ear epithelia does not require whole organ regeneration, new hair cells are generated from differentiated supporting cells that transdifferentiate without an intervening mitotic event. Here we describe the methods for maintaining the sensory epithelia in long term culture; for the use of the aminoglycoside, gentamicin, to kill the hair cells; and for the examination of the tissue by electron microscopy or fluorescence microscopy. Demembranation of the epithelium reveals the underlying ultrastructure of the tissue for examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and is a technique that can be utilized with immunogold labelling. PMID:25740492

  15. Cellular Barriers after Extravasation: Leukocyte Interactions with Polarized Epithelia in the Inflamed Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; García-Weber, Diego; Millán, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    During the inflammatory response, immune cells egress from the circulation and follow a chemotactic and haptotactic gradient within the tissue, interacting with matrix components in the stroma and with parenchymal cells, which guide them towards the sites of inflammation. Polarized epithelial cells compartmentalize tissue cavities and are often exposed to inflammatory challenges such as toxics or infections in non-lymphoid tissues. Apicobasal polarity is critical to the specialized functions of these epithelia. Indeed, a common feature of epithelial dysfunction is the loss of polarity. Here we review evidence showing that apicobasal polarity regulates the inflammatory response: various polarized epithelia asymmetrically secrete chemotactic mediators and polarize adhesion receptors that dictate the route of leukocyte migration within the parenchyma. We also discuss recent findings showing that the loss of apicobasal polarity increases leukocyte adhesion to epithelial cells and the consequences that this could have for the inflammatory response towards damaged, infected or transformed epithelial cells. PMID:26941485

  16. ID4 controls luminal lineage commitment in normal mammary epithelium and inhibits BRCA1 function in basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura A; Holliday, Holly; Swarbrick, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation (ID) proteins are key regulators of development and tumorigenesis. One member of this family, ID4, controls lineage commitment during mammary gland development by acting upstream of key developmental pathways. Recent evidence suggests an emerging role for ID4 as a lineage-dependent proto-oncogene that is overexpressed and amplified in a subset of basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs), conferring poor prognosis. Several lines of evidence suggest ID4 may suppress BRCA1 function in BLBC and in doing so, define a subset of BLBC patients who may respond to therapies traditionally used in BRCA1-mutant cancers. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the requirement for ID4 in mammary lineage commitment and the role for ID4 in BLBC. We address current shortfalls in this field and identify important areas of future research. PMID:27412917

  17. Scintigraphic, spirometric, and roentgenologic effects of radiotherapy on normal lung tissue. Short-term observations in 14 consecutive patients with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Botterman, J.; Tasson, J.; Schelstraete, K.; Pauwels, R.; Van der Straeten, M.; De Schryver, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of radiotherapy on lung function, ventilation/perfusion scans, and chest radiography were studied prospectively in 15 patients who underwent either modified radical mastectomy or tumorectomy, followed by radiotherapy for breast cancer. In all patients, pulmonary function studies, chest x-ray films, and lung scintigraphic studies were performed prior to and at the end of radiotherapy as well as three months later. No consistent or significant alteration in either parameter was detected. No patient developed clinical symptoms suggestive of radiation-induced lung changes, although in one of them, major radiologic features were found that were consistent with radiation pneumonitis; those changes disappeared completely in the course of the subsequent months. It is concluded that the tangential beam technique for postoperative irradiation as used in these patients is largely safe as regards pulmonary function, perfusion, and ventilation.

  18. Luminal acetylcholine does not affect the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Nikolaus P; Kummer, Wolfgang; Clauss, Wolfgang G; Fronius, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Fluid homeostasis mediated by the airway epithelium is required for proper lung function, and the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) Cl(-) channel is crucial for these processes. Luminal acetylcholine (ACh) acts as an auto-/paracrine mediator to activate Cl(-) channels in airway epithelia and evidence exists showing that nicotinic ACh receptors activate CFTR in murine airway epithelia. The present study investigated whether or not luminal ACh regulates CFTR activity in airway epithelia of pigs, an emerging model for investigations of human airway disease and cystic fibrosis (CF) in particular. Transepithelial ion currents of freshly dissected pig tracheal preparations were measured with Ussing chambers. Application of luminal ACh (100 μM) induced an increase of the short-circuit current (I(SC)). The ACh effect was mimicked by muscarine and pilocarpine (100 μM each) and was sensitive to muscarinic receptor antagonists (atropine, 4-DAMP, pirenzepine). No changes of the I(SC) were observed by nicotine (100 μM) and ACh responses were not affected by nicotine or mecamylamine (25 μM). Luminal application of IBMX (I, 100 μM) and forskolin (F, 10 μM), increase the I(SC) and the I/F-induced current were decreased by the CFTR inhibitor GlyH-101 (GlyH, 50 μM) indicating increased CFTR activity by I/F. In contrast, GlyH did not affect the ACh-induced current, indicating that the ACh response does not involve the activation of the CFTR. Results from this study suggest that luminal ACh does not regulate the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs which opposes observation from studies using mice airway epithelium. PMID:26286842

  19. Identification of differentially expressed genes from multipotent epithelia at the onset of an asexual development

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Chaurasia, Ankita; Lapébie, Pascal; Dru, Philippe; Helm, Rebecca R.; Copley, Richard R.; Tiozzo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Organisms that have evolved alternative modes of reproduction, complementary to the sexual mode, are found across metazoans. The chordate Botryllus schlosseri is an emerging model for asexual development studies. Botryllus can rebuild its entire body from a portion of adult epithelia in a continuous and stereotyped process called blastogenesis. Anatomy and ontogenies of blastogenesis are well described, however molecular signatures triggering this developmental process are entirely unknown. We isolated tissues at the site of blastogenesis onset and from the same epithelia where this process is never triggered. We linearly amplified an ultra-low amount of mRNA (<10ng) and generated three transcriptome datasets. To provide a conservative landscape of transcripts differentially expressed between blastogenic vs. non-blastogenic epithelia we compared three different mapping and analysis strategies with a de novo assembled transcriptome and partially assembled genome as references, additionally a self-mapping strategy on the dataset. A subset of differentially expressed genes were analyzed and validated by in situ hybridization. The comparison of different analyses allowed us to isolate stringent sets of target genes, including transcripts with potential involvement in the onset of a non-embryonic developmental pathway. The results provide a good entry point to approach regenerative event in a basal chordate. PMID:27264734

  20. Morphological impact of zinc oxide particles on the antibacterial activity and human epithelia toxicity.

    PubMed

    Čepin, Marjeta; Hribar, Gorazd; Caserman, Simon; Orel, Zorica Crnjak

    2015-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles are utilized in an ever growing number of products and can, therefore, be readily encountered in our everyday life. Human beings' outermost tissues consist of different epithelia and are, therefore, the most exposed to materials from the environment. In this paper, Caco-2 and Calu-3 cell lines were used, having been previously broadly applied for in vitro modelling of intestinal and respiratory epithelia, respectively. The toxicity of synthesized micro-, submicro- and nanoparticulate ZnO on these epithelia was measured and compared to the efficacy of the same ZnO particles as antibacterial agents. An approximately four-fold excess in antibacterial activity of ZnO nanoparticles over ZnO granulate was observed. The results of this paper reveal a sharp distinction between toxic nanoparticulate ZnO and safe ZnO particles of larger sizes in intestinal and airway in vitro epithelial models. In contrast, ZnO of larger particle sizes had only modestly lower antibacterial activity, which can be compensated for with higher dosing. These results show that nanoparticulate ZnO requires critical in vivo assessment before application. PMID:25953559

  1. Identification of differentially expressed genes from multipotent epithelia at the onset of an asexual development.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Chaurasia, Ankita; Lapébie, Pascal; Dru, Philippe; Helm, Rebecca R; Copley, Richard R; Tiozzo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Organisms that have evolved alternative modes of reproduction, complementary to the sexual mode, are found across metazoans. The chordate Botryllus schlosseri is an emerging model for asexual development studies. Botryllus can rebuild its entire body from a portion of adult epithelia in a continuous and stereotyped process called blastogenesis. Anatomy and ontogenies of blastogenesis are well described, however molecular signatures triggering this developmental process are entirely unknown. We isolated tissues at the site of blastogenesis onset and from the same epithelia where this process is never triggered. We linearly amplified an ultra-low amount of mRNA (<10ng) and generated three transcriptome datasets. To provide a conservative landscape of transcripts differentially expressed between blastogenic vs. non-blastogenic epithelia we compared three different mapping and analysis strategies with a de novo assembled transcriptome and partially assembled genome as references, additionally a self-mapping strategy on the dataset. A subset of differentially expressed genes were analyzed and validated by in situ hybridization. The comparison of different analyses allowed us to isolate stringent sets of target genes, including transcripts with potential involvement in the onset of a non-embryonic developmental pathway. The results provide a good entry point to approach regenerative event in a basal chordate. PMID:27264734

  2. Cortisol differentially alters claudin isoforms in cultured puffer fish gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Kelly, Scott P

    2010-04-12

    A primary cultured gill epithelium from the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis was developed to examine the corticosteroid regulation of claudin isoform mRNA abundance in fish gills. Preparations were composed of polygonal epithelial cells exhibiting concentric apical microridges and zonula occludens-1 immunoreactivity along cell margins. No evidence was found to indicate the presence of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive or mitochondria-rich cells in cultured preparations. Therefore, epithelia appear to be composed of gill pavement cells (PVCs) only. An RT-PCR profile of 12 salinity responsive gill claudin tight junction (TJ) proteins (Tncldn3a, -3c, -6, -8d, -10d, -10e, -11a, -23b, -27a, -27c, -32a, and -33b) revealed the absence of Tncldn6, -10d and -10e in cultured epithelia, suggesting that these isoforms are not associated with gill PVCs. Cortisol treatment of cultured epithelia dose-dependently increased or decreased mRNA abundance of select claudin isoforms. Transcript abundance of several claudin isoforms was unaffected by cortisol treatment. These data provide evidence for the cell specific distribution of claudins in fish gills and suggest that heterogeneous alterations in the abundance of select claudin isoforms contribute to the corticosteroid regulation of gill permeability. PMID:19969041

  3. Influence of exercise on airway epithelia in cystic fibrosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Jason Michael; Paolone, Vincent J

    2012-07-01

    Regular exercise is recommended as part of cystic fibrosis (CF) physiotherapy. Exercise delays the development of pulmonary disease in CF patients; however, the cellular mechanisms responsible for these improvements are unclear. This review expands on the hypothesis that exercise improves CF pathophysiological ion dysregulation via purinergic and adrenergic pathways by describing the effects of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) on CF airway epithelia. Activation of AMPK decreases Na(+) absorption, increases airway surface liquid, and reduces oxidative stress and inflammation. Plasma ANP inhibits the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and may therefore reduce epithelial water absorption. Airway epithelia respond to plasma AVP and secrete AVP in response to elevated bradykinin. AVP stimulates the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) exchanger, thereby increasing Cl(-) secretion, reducing Na(+) absorption, and promoting basolateral to luminal water flux. In addition, AVP may increase cilia beat frequency in airway epithelia via a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. This review will describe the effects of exercise on AMPK activation, ANP release, and AVP secretion; we hypothesize that the mechanical and metabolic perturbations that occur with exercise may be beneficial in preventing CF lung pathogenesis by improving airway hydration, mucociliary clearance, and reducing markers of inflammation. PMID:22297805

  4. Loss of anion transport without increased sodium absorption characterizes newborn porcine cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeng-Haur; Stoltz, David A.; Karp, Philip H.; Ernst, Sarah E.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Rector, Michael V.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Launspach, Janice L.; Chaloner, Kathryn; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Defective transepithelial electrolyte transport is thought to initiate cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Yet, how loss of CFTR affects electrolyte transport remains uncertain. CFTR−/− pigs spontaneously develop lung disease resembling human CF. At birth, their airways exhibit a bacterial host defense defect, but are not inflamed. Therefore, we studied ion transport in newborn nasal and tracheal/bronchial epithelia in tissue, cultures, and in vivo. CFTR−/− epithelia showed markedly reduced Cl− and HCO3− transport. However, in contrast to a widely held view, lack of CFTR did not increase transepithelial Na+ or liquid absorption or reduce periciliary liquid depth. Like human CF, CFTR−/− pigs showed increased amiloride-sensitive voltage and current, but lack of apical Cl− conductance caused the change, not increased Na+ transport. These results indicate that CFTR provides the predominant transcellular pathway for Cl− and HCO3− in porcine airway epithelia, and reduced anion permeability may initiate CF airway disease. PMID:21145458

  5. Basolateral localization of fiber receptors limits adenovirus infection from the apical surface of airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Walters, R W; Grunst, T; Bergelson, J M; Finberg, R W; Welsh, M J; Zabner, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent identification of two receptors for the adenovirus fiber protein, coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR), and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I alpha-2 domain allows the molecular basis of adenoviral infection to be investigated. Earlier work has shown that human airway epithelia are resistant to infection by adenovirus. Therefore, we examined the expression and localization of CAR and MHC Class I in an in vitro model of well differentiated, ciliated human airway epithelia. We found that airway epithelia express CAR and MHC Class I. However, neither receptor was present in the apical membrane; instead, both were polarized to the basolateral membrane. These findings explain the relative resistance to adenovirus infection from the apical surface. In contrast, when the virus was applied to the basolateral surface, gene transfer was much more efficient because of an interaction of adenovirus fiber with its receptors. In addition, when the integrity of the tight junctions was transiently disrupted, apically applied adenovirus gained access to the basolateral surface and enhanced gene transfer. These data suggest that the receptors required for efficient infection are not available on the apical surface, and interventions that allow access to the basolateral space where fiber receptors are located increase gene transfer efficiency. PMID:10187807

  6. Large-scale gene discovery in human airway epithelia reveals novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scheetz, Todd E; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J; Coco, Justin; Eyestone, Mari de Fatima; Bonaldo, Maria; Kucaba, Tamara; Casavant, Thomas L; Soares, M Bento; McCray, Paul B

    2004-03-12

    The airway epithelium represents an important barrier between the host and the environment. It is a first site of contact with pathogens, particulates, and other stimuli, and has evolved the means to dynamically respond to these challenges. In an effort to define the transcript profile of airway epithelia, we created and sequenced cDNA libraries from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF epithelia and from human lung tissue. Sequencing of these libraries produced approximately 53,000 3'-expressed sequence tags (3'-ESTs). From these, a nonredundant UniGene set of more than 19,000 sequences was generated. Despite the relatively small contribution of airway epithelia to the total mass of the lung, focused gene discovery in this tissue yielded novel results. The ESTs included several thousand transcripts (6,416) not previously identified from cDNA sequences as expressed in the lung. Among the abundant transcripts were several genes involved in host defense. Most importantly, the set also included 879 3'-ESTs that appear to be novel sequences not previously represented in the National Center for Biotechnology Information UniGene collection. This UniGene set should be useful for studies of pulmonary diseases involving the airway epithelium including cystic fibrosis, respiratory infections and asthma. It also provides a reagent for large-scale expression profiling. PMID:14701920

  7. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  8. The Non-Proliferative Nature of Ascidian Folliculogenesis as a Model of Highly Ordered Cellular Topology Distinct from Proliferative Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Azzag, Karim; Chelin, Yoann; Rousset, François; Le Goff, Emilie; Martinand-Mari, Camille; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Maurin, Bernard; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Godefroy, Nelly; Averseng, Julien; Mangeat, Paul; Baghdiguian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have addressed why and how mono‐stratified epithelia adopt a polygonal topology. One major additional, and yet unanswered question is how the frequency of different cell shapes is achieved and whether the same distribution applies between non-proliferative and proliferative epithelia. We compared different proliferative and non-proliferative epithelia from a range of organisms as well as Drosophila melanogaster mutants, deficient for apoptosis or hyperproliferative. We show that the distribution of cell shapes in non‐proliferative epithelia (follicular cells of five species of tunicates) is distinctly, and more stringently organized than proliferative ones (cultured epithelial cells and Drosophila melanogaster imaginal discs). The discrepancy is not supported by geometrical constraints (spherical versus flat monolayers), number of cells, or apoptosis events. We have developed a theoretical model of epithelial morphogenesis, based on the physics of divided media, that takes into account biological parameters such as cell‐cell contact adhesions and tensions, cell and tissue growth, and which reproduces the effects of proliferation by increasing the topological heterogeneity observed experimentally. We therefore present a model for the morphogenesis of epithelia where, in a proliferative context, an extended distribution of cell shapes (range of 4 to 10 neighbors per cell) contrasts with the narrower range of 5-7 neighbors per cell that characterizes non proliferative epithelia. PMID:26000769

  9. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  10. Normal faults, normal friction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Sibson, Richard H.

    2001-10-01

    Debate continues as to whether normal faults may be seismically active at very low dips (δ < 30°) in the upper continental crust. An updated compilation of dip estimates (n = 25) has been prepared from focal mechanisms of shallow, intracontinental, normal-slip earthquakes (M > 5.5; slip vector raking 90° ± 30° in the fault plane) where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. The dip distribution for these moderate-to-large normal fault ruptures extends from 65° > δ > 30°, corresponding to a range, 25° < θr < 60°, for the reactivation angle between the fault and inferred vertical σ1. In a comparable data set previously obtained for reverse fault ruptures (n = 33), the active dip distribution is 10° < δ = θr < 60°. For vertical and horizontal σ1 trajectories within extensional and compressional tectonic regimes, respectively, dip-slip reactivation is thus restricted to faults oriented at θr ≤ 60° to inferred σ1. Apparent lockup at θr ≈ 60° in each dip distribution and a dominant 30° ± 5° peak in the reverse fault dip distribution, are both consistent with a friction coefficient μs ≈ 0.6, toward the bottom of Byerlee's experimental range, though localized fluid overpressuring may be needed for reactivation of less favorably oriented faults.